Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Staff Quits; Oracle Future Uncertain

By STEVE STRANG
Assistant Assignments Editor
After Tuesday The Oracle, the
University of South Florida
(USF) student newspaper may
not be published unless
problems following a staff
walkout last week can be
resolved, according to Dr.
Arthur Sanderson, USF director
of publication, and de facto
publisher.
Sanderson said an issue of The
Oracle will be published Tuesday
because of responsibilities to the
advertisers to put out a paper.
He and Col. Walter Griscti
worked alone Saturday to meet
the Saturday deadline for copy.
Sunday they were joined by one
or two staff members who
returned and members of the
advertising staff who didnt quit.
SANDERSON DENIED
REPORTS printed Sunday in
The St. Petersburg Times saying
for sure that a paper will not be
published after Tuesday.

Student Demands
To Follow Rally

By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
A list of demands will be
presented to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell by
students of dismissed instructor
Robert Canney following
Tuesdays scheduled
counter-culture ripped off
rally at the Plaza of the
Americas.
DR. JAMES Millikan of the
philosophy department, who has
backed Canney, said the
demands would be as follows:
Rehire Bob Canney to
teach in the winter quarter.
Pay Canney for the fall
quarter (his salary will be
terminated Nov. 15).
HIRING AND firing be
done by faculty members and
students of each department
instead of by the administration.
Open files and
administrative facilities to
faculty and student inspection.
More open admissions,
including no discrimination for
pwpMjpMMi
LOCAL EMPLOYERS
tell how much
hair they allow
their employes. f .. page 11
Campus Crier 10
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies 12
Sports. 14
Whats Happening 5

CONTROVERSY OVER CENSORSHIP

We may have said some
things we didnt mean,
Sanderson said. Were not sure
after Tuesday if a paper will
come out or not. Well just have
to wait and see what happens
this week. Some of the kids may
drift back in. There is a
possibility the paper will come
out Friday.
However, Sanderson said they
may decide to publish a paper
only once a week, instead of
twice a week. The Oracle
currently comes out on
Tuesdays and Fridays.
WE JUST DONT know for
sure what we will do, he said.
But if we publish only once a
week, it would be a lot easier.
Oracle staff members walked
out last week, contending they
had been subjected to undue
censorship concerning an
editorial cartoon removed from
Tuesdays paper and an editorial
removed from Fridays paper.
Oracle Editor Jane Daugherty
and Editorial Page Editor Steve

AsSMI
wdftk i
DR. JAMES MILLIKAN
... presents demands Tuesday
participating in disruptive
activities. (Presently a clause in
administration procedure
requires graduate assistants to
sign a statement saying they
havent participated in
disruptive activities since
1967. The definition of
disruptive is very vague,
according to Millikan).
NO UNDER cover agents on
campus.
No city police on campus.
No police cameras on
campus.
NO GUNS on campus
police.
Canneys students will picket
Tigert Hall following the noon
rally and will be joined by
members of the Florida Student
Movement and other students
interested in the caus& for
Canney.
Millikan as well as members of
the r lack Student Union are
scheduled at the rally.

Snow resigned Wednesday. Most
of the rest of the staff resigned
following a staff meeting with
Sanderson on Friday. Only
Managing Editor Mary Ellen
Moore, who was attending a
convention in Minnesota, and a
staff writer hired Wednesday
stayed on the staff.
THE CARTOON IN question
depicted a policeman in riot gear
pointing a rifle with a bayonet at
a rabbit and asking Wheres
your 1.D., boy? The cartoon
referred to police dressed in riot
gear who arrested 53 persons at
a peace rally Oct. 31 after they
stayed beyond a 2 a.m. curfew.
The editorial referred to the
suspended USF professor and
contained blatant factual errors,
Sanderson said. Details
concerning what the editorial
said, including the professors
name, had not been disclosed.
Miss Sanderson said the fact
the editorial was pulled had little
to do with the decision to quit.
She' and Snow resigned

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 63, No. 36

ACCENT AWARENESS

Abernathy To Speak

By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Staff Writer
The Rev. Dr. Ralph David
Abernathy, who rose to national
prominence when he and other
black leaders led the
Montgomery, Ala. bus boycott
of 1955-56, will speak at UF
Thursday, at 8 p.m. in the
University Auditorium.
ABERNATHY succeeded the
late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
as president of the Southern
Christian Leadership Conference
(SCLC).
As president, Abernathy is the
chief administrative officer of
the SCLC, its various executive
staff members and over 100 field
staff members scattered across
the country.
During the Montgomery
campaign, Abernathy helped
found the Montgomery
Improvement Association
(MIA), which was the forerunner
of the SCLC. He still serves as
president emeritus of the MIA.
Abernathy is an
internationally known civil
rights leader and leading
spokesman for the Freedom
Movement and many black
people. As a result of his
non-violent protest activities,
Abernathy has been jailed many
times.

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USF STUDENT NEWSPAPER
... publication's future is in doubt

Wednesday before the decision
to pull file editorial had been
made.
MISS DAUGHERTY SAID
she was not as upset with the
fact the cartoon was censored as

University of Florida, Gainesville

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9 -V> |i:sH
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K.
REV. RALPH ABERNATHY
... comes to UF for Accent 71

SINCE 1961, Abernathy has
been pastor of West Hunter
Street Baptist Church in Atlanta.
Abernathy is appearing as part
of Accent 7l which will be
centered around the theme,
Challenge of Our Dilemma. It
will focus on the conflicts that
arise as our society is being
re-evaluated in the light of our
changing times, according to

with the manner in which it was
done.
She said a similar situation
had arisen Oct. 30 when the
(SEE 'ORACLE/ PAGE 3)

Monday, November 9, 1970

Accent General Chairman Ed
Boze.
Accent strives to bring
awareness to the center of every
persons life, Boze said. We
want to present as fairly as
possible both sides of the
issues.
Abernathy is the first
exposure of Accent to the
students this year, Bob Berrin,
a committee member, said.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 9, 1970

CLEP Offers Legal Aid, Casework

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
Relevance in education?
The UF Law Schools Clinical
Legal Education Program
(CLEP) is in its third year of
operation this fall with an
expanded program of practical
experience for students and an
expanded caseload of applicants
from Gainesvilles indigent
citizens.
PARTICULARLY
RELEVANT to the poorer
citizens of Gainesville is one part
of the CLEP program, the UF
Legal Aid Clinic (LAC). LAC is
the only local agency to which
low-income residents can appeal
for free legal aid and casework
with respect to disputes in civil
law.
Since its beginning in the fall
of 1968, the UF LAC has
provided UF law students for
legal aid in about 500 cases on
behalf of Alachua County
citizens who qualify for clinic
aid, according to CLEP Director
Jim Pierce, UF professor of law.

30 Arrested In Outbreak

DAYTONA BEACH (UPI)
Police arrested 30 persons
Saturday night during an
outbreak of racial violence in
which police were reportedly
fired upon 150 times and 10
businesses were damaged by
firebombs.
SUNDAY, POLICE Chief
A. O. Folsom ordered his
officers to return any more
sniper fire and said his men were
prepared to deal with any
situation.
Two persons A policeman
and a girl were slightly injured
by flying rocks Saturday after

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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August Its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

The UF LAC is local evidence
of the increasing national
concern in recent years of
lawyers, law students, and
government, for provision of
legal services to the poor. The
US government began offering
the Legal Services program in
1964 through the Office of
Economic Opportunity (OEO),
by which lawyers paid by the
national government offer legal
aid to the poorer citizens of
many communities throughout
the nation.
BUT PIERCE described the
establishment of the UF LAC as
a response to an OEO rejection
of a local request to establish a
Legal Services program in
Gainesville. The local application
was not cleared until 1968, after
the U.S. government had cut
back on the establishment of
new Legal Services programs.
Although favorable
judgements for LAC clients are
reached in at least 90 per cent
of the cases, a major drawback
of the LAC is that it has neither
the funds nor the personnel to
handle many requests for legal

violence erupted at the end of a
protest march through the
downtown business district of
this seaside resort.
The protest march was
organized by students at
Bethune-Cookman College and
members of the Militant Citizens
Coordinating Committee after a
Negro youth was shot and
slightly wounded at a gas station
that had been the target of rock
throwers.
A 200-MAN police task force
arrested 19 marchers when they
left their scheduled parade route
Saturday evening and staged a

aid from local indigent citizens,
according to Pierce.
Certainly a federal program
would have been moi%
efficient, he said, it would
have been better funded and
better staffed.
BUT IF the LAC is less
effective than a federal program
might have been, it is certainly
more effective than the local
bar associations legal aid
committee, which existed before
the establishment of LAC,
according to LAC Director and
UF Professor Michael Bryant.
The committee was really
just a legal referral service,
Bryant said. It would refer
cases of indigent persons to
lawyers who might handle their
cases without fee but usually
no one wanted them.
But the local bar associations
legal aid committee helped to set
up the LAC and is now
responsible for setting the policy
of the clinic. The local bar also
grants an annual sum to help pay
for the operation of the clinic,
most of which is paid for by UF.
BRYANT DESCRIBED cases

sit-down in the middle of busy
U.S. Highway One.
Several hours after the
marchers were arrested, police
reported growing incidents of
sniping, firebombing and rock
throwing.
Sheriffs Lt. James Jones said
at least 150 shots were fired at
police during the night. No one
was hit by the fire, but several
patrol cars were damaged,
Jones said.
FOLSOM SAID officers did
not return the sniper fire
Saturday night.

Three million all-aluminum
cans were produced in the
United States in 1969. That
means over six million by the
end of 1970. So what?
Aluminum doesn't rust, that's
what. It just hangs around
forever. As in litter. Trash.
Soon you'll be lucky to walk
a city block without tripping

(Q) ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION GROUP

in which debts are claimed
against clients, cases involving
the settlement of property
claims, some divorce cases, and
cases in which mortgage
companies have threatened to
evict a tenant for non-payment,
as among those most often
handled by LAC.
Although Bryant described
LAC as the heart of the
CLEP, the program offers two
other projects involving law
students.
Twelve law students work in
the Public Defender Intern
Clinic with Public Defender
Robert A. Green, Jr. and his
staff defending persons accused
in criminal cases who cannot
provide for their own defense
counsel. These students may
appear in court, when the public
defender is also present, to argue
on behalf of the client.
TWELVE STUDENTS are
also enrolled in a preparatory
course for a new program, the
Prosecution Intern Clinic, which
will begin next quarter. These
students will work in the office
of the State Attorney Ted
Duncan. This program was
begun with the aid of a grant
from the Council on Legal
Education for Professional
Responsibility (CLEPR), a
private foundation.
Students in the LAC program
- there are currently 28 work
under the supervision of Bryant
and of Steven A. Lewallen, also
a local private attorney.
Bryant and Lewallen often

abort getting a part-time job? I
Alligator 'HELP WANTED ad help I

over some of it.
The Environmental Action
Group is doing something about
this problem. It's an aluminum
can drive. With collection points
by most vending machines. And
the EAG office, 3rd floor, Reitz
Union. Cooperate now.
A city block without litter?
How about a country mile.

appear in court with their
clients. The students interview
the client, investigate the case,
research the law and make
recommendations, Bryant said.
STUDENTS IN any of the
three CLEP projects receive
academic credit.
Pierce is hopeful that the
operations of the clinic may be
expanded next year. He has
applied to CLEPR for a grant
which would provide for an
additional staff member for the
clinic. Additional students and
an increased number of cases
could then be included in the
program, Pierce said.
The CLEPR grant would also
pay for court costs which must
now sometimes be paid by LAC
clients.
THE UF College of Law has
also asked more funds for the
CLEP program from the UF
budget.
That the clinic now has more
work than it can handle is shown
by the fact that after Thursday
the clinic will accept no more
requests to handle cases this
quarter.
This happens every quarter,
Pierce said.
But even while LAC waits and
hopes for additional funding,
which would enable it to handle
all legitimate requests for legal
aid, it remains a very relevant
part of the university curriculum
to many low-income area
residents whose appeal for legal
aid in civil disputes can be
directed to no other agency.



Campus Problems Being Realized

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Matthew Byrne, executive
director of the Presidents
Commission on Campus Unrest,
said Sunday college
administrators are taking a
more realistic stand about the
necessity of dealing firmly with
camp us violence.
HE ALSO said the underlying
causes of last springs violence

editors conferred with the
faculty advisors concerning a
cartoon which they decided not
to run.
We resigned over the manner
in which this cartoon was
pulled, Miss Daugherty said.
After the other cartoon, we
were assured that we would be
consulted before any cartoons
were pulled. We knew they had
the authority to pull the
cartoon, but they had just given
us the assurance they wouldnt
do it without consulting us.
WE REGRET WE had to
walk out, she said. But there
was no way I could have stayed
on the staff and maintained any
ethics when we couldnt express
our own editorial opinion.
In a statement submitted to
USF President Harris Dean, Miss
Daugherty said, We had met
with The Oracle management
and discussed the problem of
procedure and alteration of
editorial material.
Unfortunately, the staff was
unable to get some assurance
from the management that we
would be included in editorial
decisions, although we certainly
recognize the authority of the
publisher in these matters.
We do not demand; we are
not radicals. The problem is
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are still present on many
campuses.
In a UPI Washington Window
interview, Byrne said many
college administrators
interviewed by the commission
around the country didnt
appreciate that the problem was
theirs.
They took the position that
this isnt going to occur on our

ORACLE...

purely a professional one, and it
is not related to the present
crisis on this campus, the
statement said.
SANDERSON SAID THE
original cartoon had niches in
the policemans gun and the
word oink over the officer.
As a state-owned university
we can not ridicule law
enforcement officers in this
manner.
Sanderson said he has decided
to run the cartoon in Tuesdays

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campus. Now 1. think they
realize that it can occur on their
campus. They realize theyd
better set the rules... whats
going to happen when it does
occur.
IN REPLY to questions,
Byrne said the Indochina war
has been a major source of
student alienation .and there
would certainly be a reduction

paper minus the niches in the
gun, and the word oink. He
plans tp run it as a news item
because The Oracles readers
have a right to know what was
censored.
THIS IS DIFFERENT, he
said, than running it on an
editorial page, which would be
giving it editorial backing and
approval.
The cartoon was drawn by
George Parrish, who signs his
works Penn.

Monday, November 9, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

id the tensions that exist on the
campuses today if the war were
ended.
But, he said, there are other
problems within our society that
the college community is
concerned about and therefore
the unrest is going to continue
even if the Indochina war comes
to an end.
Byme said he is hopeful the

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relative peace which has prevailed
on most campuses this fall will
continue. But he added:
a
UNFORTUNATELY, Im
not able to say that in my
opinion there wont be any
further problems on campuses,
because Im sure there probably
will be ...

Page 3



Page 4

h The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 9, 1970

ZPG Tackles Awareness

By RMKE CAHLIN
Everything revolves around
the population, Dr. Seymour
Block, professor of chemical
engineering, sad to a group of
about 30 at a Zero Population
Growth (ZPG), rally Sunday.
We have limited resources,
everybody wffl start to get less.
Things anil get worse as we go
along, Nock said. More
people wQI starve and the
standard of living will be
lowered.
ZPG IS A non-profit,
volunteer group which advocates
that measures be taken
immediately to stop the rising
population growth. Started a
little over a year and a half ago,
ZPG has over 25,000 members
in over 280 chapters throughout
the country.
The main problem the group
is tackling is awareness. The
seven chapters in Florida are
trying to make people more
aware through the following
committees:
Letters to the editors of
various newspapers;
TV and radio spots;
Speakers bureau to talk at
public functions;
campus bulletins;
posters for supermarkets,
films, newsletters;

Yippie Hoffman
At FSU Nov. 16

Civil rights advocate and
Yippie (Youth International
Party) leader Abbie Hoffman
will speak at FSU Nov. 16 on
whatever he thinks is relevant.
WE HA VENT given him any
specific topic to speak on,
Chuck Sherman, FSU student
body president said.
Hoffman has a lot of
interesting things to say and a
lot of people want to hear him,
Sherman said.
Hoffman, presently involved
with the defense in the
Panther trials in New Haven,
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birth control clinics,
political activity.
THE ENVIRONMENTAL
Action Group (EAG) sponsored
the meeting at the Plaza of the
Americas.
When the original speaker and
chairman failed to show up at 2
p.m., Block, who organized the
Gainesville chapter last year,
spoke to the crowd for about an
hour and 15 minutes.
Mrs. Eddie Barkers, president,

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9 jbeii
DR. SEYMOUR BLOCK
... discusses population with ZPG

Conn., has been speaking at
campuses throughout the nation.
HOFFMAN WAS also the key
defendant in the Chicago Seven
trial resulting from disturbances
during the 1968 Democratic
National Convention.
I think we should try to
bring in people of all beliefs,
Sherman said. We have to see
these people face-to-face and
hear what they have to sav.
Hoffman will speak in Ruby
Diamond Auditorium on the
FSU campus at 8 p.m.

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and Mrs. George Herrington,
secretary, explained how more
organization was needed and
how to join. Membership cost $4
yearly for students and $lO for
adults. This includes the
delivering of the ZPG
newspaper. Literature was also
passed out to those present.
The ZPG literature stated that
no family have more than two
children, that all methods of
birth control, including legalized

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abortion, should be freely
available at no cost in poverty
cases, and that a revision of our
tax laws to discourage, rather
than encourage, large families be
made.
The organization is based
primarily on The Population
Bomb, by Dr. Paul R. Ehrlich,
professor of biology at Stanford
University.

TUESDAY NIGHT
BOWLING LEAGUE
.*
The Games Area is organizing a league to
bowl Tuesday evenings at 6:30 p.m. An
organizational meeting will be held
Wednesday, November 11 at 7:00 p.m. at
the Union Lanes (Games Area)
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
For more information call 392-1637

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Desks, Lamps, Files,
and supplies available
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WHATS HAPPENING

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL
TREE: The UF Forestry Club
will meet Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
in room 310 Rolfs Hall. Dr.
John Gray will speak on The
School of Forestry: Present and
Future. Everyone is invited.
SLIDE RULE SET: Benton
Engineering Council will hold a
meeting Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
in rooms 362-363 of the Union.
All engineering students are
invited.
FIGHTING THE COMPUTER:
Mortar Board, a womens
honorary society, will help
students with registration
problems tonight from 7:30
p.m. in Jennings lobby. Advice is
available to all. Mortar Board
members will represent their
colleges.
FOREIGN FLICKS: The
Council of International
Organizations in cooperation
with Student Government
presents an international film
festival. Tonight The Shadow
of Melody (China) will show at
5:30 p.m. and La Dolce Vita
(Italy) will show at 8 p.m.
Tuesday Viridiana (Spain) will
show at 5:30 p.m. and The
Trial (France, Germany, Italy)
will show at 8 p.m.
Kanchenjunga (India) and The
Cranes are Flying (U.S.S.R.)
will show Wednesday at 5:30
and 8 p.m. respectively. The
movies will play in the
auditorium and admission is
free.
FIGURING OUT THE
FINANCES: The Secretary of
Finance reminds all
organizational presidents that
their monthly financial reports
are past due. If you have any
problems with the report please
call Eliot Abbott at 392-1622.
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THE ART OF PRODUCING:
Applications will be taken until
Friday for the positions of
general chairman and assistant
general chairman of Student
Government Productions.
Applications may be obtained
from the Student Activities desk
in the Union.
CRAFTY DAMES: The General
Dames will sponsor an Arts and
Crafts course for all dames
members beginning tonight in
room C 4 of the Union at 8 p.m.
A fee of $3.50 is required for
the five lessons. Those wishing
to attend are asked to bring
scissors, glue and thin cardboard
to the first class.

Sure, you got through Shakespeare in class.
You can even quote lines from his plays.
But have you ever walked down the
streets where he walked? Like Henley Street
where he was born. Or visited Halls Croft,
the home of his daughter Susanna? Or some
of the other homes he held dear? Because
only then can you truly understand the man
and his times.
Theres so much more you can learn about
history simply by being where it happened.

Ifou know him,
but have you ever been to his house?

HEAVENLY GIRLS: Angel
Flight Rush will be held tonight
in rooms 122-123 of the Union
from 7 to 7:45 for freshmen
coeds and 8 to 8:45 for
sophomore and junior coeds.
LEADING THE FLOCK:
Campus Crusade for Christ will
conduct a leadership training
class Tuesday at 7 p.m. in room
346 of the Union.
AMERICAN LATINA: The
third part of a four-part study
of Latin America will be held
Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to
noon in the lounge of the
University Methodist Church.
The speaker isDr. M. J. Hardman
of the department of
anthropology.

r 1
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Box923,Dept.CN-1.N.Y..N.Y. 10019 I
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Britain for Young People.
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VETS FOR ANIMALS: The
Pre-Veterinary Club will sponsor
a talk by Dean D. 0. Spinks,
assistant dean of agriculture at
UF, on The Characteristics of
Past Pre-Veterinary Students
Accepted to Veterinary School.

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Monday, November 9, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

by Maryoitn Gi His

And in Britain you can travel through
thousands of years of history. And you can
do it on a very limited budget.
To find out about accommodations for as
little as $3 a night (full English breakfast
included), places where lunch or dinner
costs $1.50, special discount tickets and lots
more ways to save money, send for our free
booklet: Britain for Young People.
It*s one way to get acquainted with the
right people and places.

Following the talk, applications
to Auburn and Ohio State
Veterinary Schools will be
available. The meeting will be
Wednesday at 7:30 pjn. in the
Mechanical Engineering Budding
auditorium.

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 9, 1970

LONDON (UPI) A London
television official called Sunday
for an inquiry into how a mob
of American revolutionaries
invaded the David Frost Show
while Frost was interviewing
Jerry Rubin and drove the host
off the stage with obscenities.
Rubin, Chicago seven
defendant and founder of the
American Yippie (Youth
International Party) movement,
refused to answer Frosts
questions at first but lit a
cigarette which he implied was
marijuana and offered it to
Frost, who refused it.
About 20 hippies in the
audience then stormed the stage
at Rubins invitation, shouting
four-letter obscenities, sprinkling
the stage with flower petals and
squirting a water pistol at Frost.
*
SEOUL (UPI) Sen. Edward
J. Gurney (R-Fla.), arrived in
Seoul Sunday from Japan on the
second leg of a 14-day Far East
tour to investigate possible
corruption at American military
installations in the Far East.
Gurney is a member of the
permanent investigations
subcommittee which uncovered
corruption at Army service clubs
in South Vietnam and West
German. He plans to visit eight
countries during his two week
trip.
* *
JERUSALEM (UPI)
Premier Golda Meir met with her
cabinet in Jerusalem for five and

Black Lectures
Presents Allen

The Black Student Lecture
Series sponsored by the College
of Education will present W.
George Allen, at 8 p.m.
Wednesday in Norman Hall
Auditorium.
Allen graduated from Florida
A&M with a bachelors degree in
political science, and then spent
two years in the U.S. Army as a

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one-half hours Sunday amid
reports that Israel may soon
return to the UN.-supervised
Middle East peace talks. Arab
leaders continued efforts to
settle the Jordanian crisis and
revive the Arab Eastern Front
against Israel.
The guns remained silent
along the Arab-Israeli fronts
where a de facto truce has been
in effect since the expiration of
the 90-day U.S.-initiated
cease-fire on Nov. 5. Egypt has
agreed to another 90-day
extension while Israel has said it
will not fire unless fired upon
first.
* *
MOSCOW (UPI) The wife
of former Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev has said the
purported memoirs of her
husband being published in the
West were not genuine and
denounced reports that they
were as rubbish, a Soviet
dissident leader reported
Sunday.
But he qualified his report by
saying there was a 20 percent
chance she was not telling the
truth because she knew the
telephone conversation was
being monitored.
* *
PHNOM PENH (UPI) A
10,000-man task force of
Cambodian and South
Vietnamese troops opened a
campaign south of Phnom Penh
Sunday and made almost
immediate contact with

first lieutenant. He was the first
black to graduate from UFs law
school in 1962 and now has his
own practice in Ft. Lauderdale.
Allens topic Wednesday night
is Florida Justice: A Double
Standard?
The lecture is open to the
public and will end with a
question and answer period.

sdfsdfds

Communist units entrenched in
a heavily wooded area, military
sources said.
The sources said the Allied
force battled briefly with the
Communists, then pulled back
to permit its support artillery
and air cover to attack the
Communist postions. At least
one South Vietnamese was killed
and five wounded in the
fighting, they said, and five
other South Vietnamese were
wounded in sporadic fighting
elsewhere in the operation.
4*
* *
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Something other than engine
trouble caused the plane crash
that killed 13 members of the
Wichita State University football
team in Colorado last month, a
government agency indicated
Sunday.
Testimony taken at a hearing
by the National Transportation
Safety Board indicated the
accident, which also killed 17
other passengers and crew, was
operational in nature and that
there were no mechanical
failures or malfunctions
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affecting the performance of the
aircraft, the board said.
The board said it was now
checking the pilots flight
planning before the plane took
off for Logan, Utah.
* *
WASHINGTON (UPI) A
team of medical and law
students working for Ralph
Nader said Sunday the medical
profession is not protecting the
public from incompetent
doctors.

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If you buy a Volvo 145,
mechanics won't always
be fixing your wagon.
Volvos reputation for holding up wasnt earned by breaking
down: 9 out of every 10 Volvos registered here in the last
eleven years are still on the road. We cant guarantee every
Volvo will last that long, but we can tell you this: Buy
a Volvo 145 and youll have more than a wagon you can get
a lot of stuff into. Youll have a wagon you can get a lot of
years out of.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS
506 E. University
Your New Volvo
Dealer in Gainesville

The team called for a
presidential board to set up
quality control standards for
doctors.
In a 253-page study directed
by Dr. Robert S. McCleery, the
Nader investigators urged the
government to set up a uniform
nationwide system for licensing
doctors and requiring them to
have specialized licenses rather
than a state license entitling
them to practice in all fields of
medicine.



Murphree Gets Back Open House

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
Murphree Area Council
President Bob Goodstein called
an end Friday to the week-long
open house moratorium placed
on residents of the Murphree
community, and warned that
future violations will bring a
removal of open house privileges
on a more elongated basis.
Steve Haulman, a Murphree
Area resident administrator,
enforced the moratorium
following what he called a
growing disregard of the hour
limitations. The moratorium
was scheduled to conclude at 5
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 11.
GOODSTEIN informed
Murphree residents of the
decision through a letter
distributed Friday throughout
the area. In the letter,
Goodstein:
Called for a restoration of
open house policy,
Said representatives from
the area councils will rove the
area and report any violations
seen to the individual house
councils,
McGovern Wonts
FBI Off Campos
WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
George S. McGovern, D-S.D., has
asked Attorney General John
Mitchell to keep FBI agents off
college campuses unless local
officials request or approve their
call up in advance.
McGovern said Sunday his
request to the Justice
Department was based on the
results of a nationwide survey of
college presidents, local police
chiefs and student body
presidents on the role of the FBI
in investigating campus incidents
where explosives may be
involved.
He said 53.9 per cent of those
responding disapproved of the
administrations proposal to
send uninvited FBI agents onto
campuses. He said 84.4 per cent
favored the Justice Department
seeking prior approval of the
local authorities before
dispatching agents to troubled
campuses.
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
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For information call
CASSELS
IN THE AIR
378-2646

Informed residents that
actions taken by the individual
house councils will be reported
to the Murphree Area Council.
THIS IS NOT to suggest that
there will be organized policy
type patrols cruising the area,
Goodstein said. This should not
be necessary in any case.
Goodstein called the action a
method of insuring an adequate
student controlled policy.
Calling open house a benefit
of dormitory living, Goodstein
said for every benefit in society
there is a corresponding
responsibility.
GOODSTEIN SAID it is the
responsibility of the various
house councils to enforce open
house policy. If those
responsibilities are disregarded
again, area council will be forced
to remove open house privileges
on a more elongated basis.
This is not a thinly-masked
threat but a concrete fact based

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He asked all Murphree
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Monday, November 9, 1970, The Florida Alliqator,

new decision.
If we are ever to see the
fruition of a more liberal policy

it must first be shown that we
are capable of handling those
already in existence, he said.

Page 7



Page 8

t. The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 9, 1970

EDITORIAL
Calm Follows
The Storm
* t
A new calm has come to Florida politics. The Big Top is
closing down; Old Claude is leaving us. The era of
confrontation in the state capital, it appears, has ended.
Governor-elect Reuben Askew has the opportunity to
make his administration one of issues, rather than
personalities. And we will welcome the change.
Askews campaign was constructed around tax reform.
Old timers who supported Askew shook their heads sadly.
In the past, tax reform have been naughty words in the
vocabulary of any politician worth his salt.
But Askew hammered away, and his fair share proposal
of taxes got him through the primary.
Gov. Kirk tried to insinuate that Askews corporate
income tax proposal was really some kind of personal
income tax in disguise. It is to the credit of those persons
who voted for Askew that they did not buy it.
Thus, as The Miami News has pointed out, Askew has a
strong mandate for change from the electorate. He should
have the support of the Legislature since the Democrats
retained a two-to-one margin in the Senate and strengthened
their grip in the House.
And Legislators and special-interest lobbyists will think
twice before obstructing his tax program.
Now we do not know for sure whether it was Askews tax
proposals or the voters eagerness to get rid of Kirk that
elected Askew to office. And we are not concerned.
We just look forward to the day Reuben Askew takes
office and the day Kirk leaves.
Athletics An Issue

In the light of recent
developments concerning
athletics at this university and
newly arisen issues, I must now
frankly admit that athletics have
become a very real issue and one
which is in need of being met.
The recent firing of John
Parker from his job of assistant
trade coach by Athletic Director
Ray Graves and his dismissal
from his duties as a Section
Adviser in Yon Hall constitutes a
grave travesty of justice and
blatant repression of one
students right to dissent.
MR. PARKER was quite right
in stating: I was fired not for
failure to perform my job not
for a cause but for my
beliefs.
Mr. Graves has acted not in a
fair and proper manner but
much like a dictatorial head of a
privileged group. Anyone who
will not wholly agree with him
and knuckle under is promptly
removed from his position.
Just because John Parker does
not agree with Graves on certain
issues does not mean he cannot
continue to perform his duties in
a competent manner as he has
done.
THE SUSPENSION of Ralph
Hart and Dan Landrum from the
tennis team is another example
and clear manifestation of
efforts by certain coaches to run
athletics THEIR way with
complete disregard for an
athlete's abilities.
One wonders just how much
respect Ray Graves has for
students. He appears quite busy
being a taskmaster of athletes
but is noticably lacking in a
common sense of fairness and
justice.
In view of ah these recent
developments involving athletics

BRUCE
I ALPER

I am now withdrawing my
objections to Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelders
efforts to achieve reform in this
area.
JOHN PARKER is a victim of
gross injustice. It is not likely
that those who are resisting
change will soon come over to
our way of thinking. Yet, to sit
idly by in the face of such gross
injustice and misconduct on the
part of those who administer
athletics is to condone
repression and hypocrisy.
Many are questioning how I,
often critical of John Parker and
Steve Uhlfelder can now come
out in support of them. I am one
who believes in speaking the
truth and calling the shots as I
see them.
I believe we can forget our
ideological differences when we
must unite in defense of what is
right.
INDEED, the great tragedy
today is that many of us refuse
to admit the validity of much of
the other fellow's ideals. Yet, we
are really alike, separated only
by emotion and impatience to
achieve a better university and a
truly just society.
Just as I have reconsidered my
stand on the athletic question, I
hope that Mr. Graves will
reconsider his decision with
respect to John Parker and
reinstate him in his job.
It is the only fair and decent
thing to do. ... ..

The Sam Pepper Phyllis Gallub
Florida, Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
Ail Jeff Klinkenberg
Alligator Associate Editor
The future is not a Ken McKinnon Loretta Tennant x/Hhjx
gift: it is an achievement NeWS Editor NaWS^ditOr
IP
E
Sidewalks Safe For Citizens

Jesue, Im a criminal!
I ride my bicycle on
sidewalks, and once I even
brushed up against a (cringe)
pedestrian...
But the good people of the
city of Gainesville have little to
fear ; the local forces of good and
right are going to crack down on
my kind, hippie bicycle freaks,
and make the sidewalks safe for
your children!
I dig riding a bike. Its a gas,
the wind feels great and my feet
love not walking. I much prefer
the bike to getting in a car,
honking my horn, causing a real
threat to pedestrians and
fighting for the elusive campus
parking space.
So now comes a crackdown
(Monday's ALLIGATOR)
designed to drive me and my
beat-up red machine
underground. The certain result
of an intimidation of bicycle
riders is an increase of
automobiles on campus.
Somebodys simply not using
his head...
Automobiles on campus make
so much noise sometimes I cant
even hear the lectures in class.
Cars make me leap back up on a

KEN DRIGGS

curb a split second ahead of my
life. Cars spew out exhaust that
*
makes me cough even on the
Plaza. Cars on campus are a big
pain in the neck.
If anything, the university
should be seeking to increase
bike traffic and decrease auto
traffic. Why seek to curtail
bikes?
Regardless of events, Im not
going to pay $8 or whatever to
buy those season bus tickets.
Which leads me to one of
those hell-no-I-wont-negotiate
demands, (Up against the wall
Tigert style).
Tigert had better build walls
across the campus check points,
outlaw ALL but absolutely
necessary automobile traffic
onto campus proper. Only buses
and service vehicles. No more of

those damned area one decals
for every member of the
President of Krappa Krappas
family.
Once that auto traffic has
been contained, and its auto
traffic that poses the real threat
to pedestrians, Ill ride my bike
in the street and never (well,
hardly ever) darken the
sidewalks again.
But only then will I be safe in
the streets. I've had my bike
barely two quarters and I've
already been nudged by careless
drivers a half dozen times.
Now I ask you, who's a threat
to who?
Until those demands are met
I'm going to ride by bike on the
sidewalks, down one way streets,
and up the trees in the plaza. In
other words, anywhere I can
avoid the danger of somebody's
damned wreckless auto driving.



Bike Crackdown
MR. EDITOR:
I have written this letter in
response to a Nov. 2 article in
the Alligator titled, Police
Considering Bike Crackdown.
Each morning I rise to greet a
new day of bicycling terrors. I
eat my breakfast, I strap my
child to my back, and travel
from Flavet to Baby Gator
Land.
I have a car.
It even has a smog control
device. But I know that the
fumes coming from that little
pipe in the back are still deadly
and poisonous.
So I brave the onslaught of
the true speed-freaks and their
fuming, rumbling automobiles,
and quite often their complete
disregard for their manpowered
road-mates.
I generally travel north on the
road that goes by the west side
of the stadium. As I reach the
north end of the stadium there is
a one-way street going west. I
need to go east. So I have a
choice, travel on down to
University Avenue, or go the
wrong way down the one-way
street, which is very lightly
traveled by automobiles.
Which one would you choose?
1 could ride on the sidewalks,
but I dont expect pedestrians to
have to watch for bikes. I could
ride down alongside the road
between the moving cars and the
parked cars, but its a mighty
strange feeling when youre
traveling fifteen miles an hour
on a bike and somebody who
just parked slings open his car
door as you are going by.
Its like instant visions of
smashed teeth and broken noses.
So I hereby make a proposal
to all drivers of non-polluting
vehicles.
TAKE YOUR OWN LANE!!!!!!
The campus speed limit in
most areas is twenty miles per
hour. Get in the middle of the
lane and keep those dangerous
smelly automobiles behind you.
Youll even be doing the
Policemen a favor by keeping
traffic down to fifteen or twenty
miles an hour.
BIKE RIDERS UNITE!!!!!!!
DOUGLAS A. DEWEY
Mad Dogs Bite
MR. EDITOR:
Many people in this world
dont realize that a mad dog
exists until they are bitten by
one.
Bob Canney was bitten by
one of the mad dogs on this
campus. r
Messrs. Landrum and
Parker were bitten by another
mad dog on campus. These mad
dogs co-exist with their own
fiefdoms one in Tigert Hall
and the other in the Stadium.
Who the hell is the Athletic
Association to tamper in the
lives of the students of this
I am here as a student
first and everything else second.
I want to go to a school with
other students not professional
athletes.
The athletes on this campus

READERS FORUM

are students first, their dress or
their hair are only a matter of
concern on the playing field if it
gets in their way.
Why the hell cant an athlete
wear anything he wants off the
field?
Why does the Athletic
Association consider anything
longer than a crewcut to be
long hair.
Why cant John Parker
express his beliefs?
If it was up to Mr. Graves or
President 0 Connell this campus
would be turned into a mass of
people who dress alike, wear
their hair alike and think alike.
These sort of people are the
perfect examples of a mindless,
bland mass that totalitarian
societies are made of.
I think its about time that
some people with some sort of
an educational background are
put into power at this campus,
instead of a frustrated politician
and flunky coach.
After all, this is a university
or so I was told when I applied
here.
Neither the athletes nor the
students should wait until they
are bitten by a mad dog.
Act now!
A. ILKSON (ILW)
Union Theater
MR. EDITOR:
Not long ago I went to the
Reitz Union theater to see the
10:30 showing of The Graduate.
My date and I got there at 9:30
since we did not buy advance
tickets and we wanted to be sure
to get seats.
When we got there, we were
told by some bystanders that the
tickets were sold out. There was
no sign to this effect, nor was
there a theater official to tell
people. But the rumor was that
they might sell a few tickets if
holders of advance tickets did
not show up.
So we got into line at the
ticket window. We were second
in line.
A few people came in and
started selling their advance
tickets for $1 to whoever would
buy. Two boys bought some
tickets in this way.
The crowd was growing. At
about 10 p.m. a theater
attendant came to the door of
the theater, around the comer
and out of sight of those
standing at the ticket window.
He told the people to line up
behind him to get any tickets
that might be available.
So, of course, by the time the
message got to the people who
were at the box office window,
where tickets are supposed to be
sold, about 25 people were in
line in front of the door to the
theater.
Needless to say, we did not
get in to see the movie. We were
told that no more than 15
people, it that many, would get
in.
I would like to protest several
things about what happened
Tuesday night.
The people who were in the
usual ticket line and who arrived
first were not able to get into
the movie because of this sudden
reversal of locations for ticket
selling.

All tickets were sold in
advance instead of holding a few
for people who came at the time
of the show.
4 No sign was posted to
announce that the tickets were
sold out.
The first two people who
got in line at the door were the
two who had bought the tickets
for $1 each earlier. I can only
suppose they got tickets and in

On a campus the size of the
UF, rumors seem to be the most
effective and popular form of
communication.
Rumors are wonderful things.
They are information, and if
they are used properly, they can
be transformed by the user into
facts. A good rumor is like one
of UF President Stephen C.
OConnells speeches it can be
taken many different ways. Just
apply what you want to hear to
the speech and you have got the
message Steve wanted you to
get.
ITS EASY to start a rumor
too. The secret is in making the
rumor so outlandish that it has
to be true. For instance ...
Steve Uhlfelder is a good
student body president. Then
you follow it with another
unfounded statement... Steve
also represents what the students
believe.
Now that you have your
outlandish rumor, you need to
spread it.
How do you get your message
to the people?
The fastest and easiest
method is to write a column for
the Alligator. Not only is this an
ego trip but it is far cheaper than
a classified ad.
ANOTHER GOOD way to
spread your rumor is to tell
someone. Not just anybody, but
a specialist in spreading rumors.
Your best bet is to tell it to a
strange creature known as a
Third Floor Honcho.
By using a Third Floor
Honcho you not only employ
an effective rumor spreader, you
have also given your rumor
bloom and dimension. You see,
a Third Floor Honcho has an
uncany ability to add his own
touches to the rumor like
.. Steve Uhlfelder is the
reincarnation of Bobby
Kennedy.
If you want to use a Third
Floor Honcho to spread your
rumor for you, you first have to
attract his attention.
THE BEST way is to put on a
tie and a jacket or if you are a

Alligator Staff
Denise Valiante Craig Heyl
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Spread A Rumor

Monday, November 9, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

turn sold them for higher than
the 50 cents they cost.
4 A boy walked up to the
front of the line at about 10:20,
claiming he had been in line
earlier (he had not). When others
in line objected, the theater
attendant asked him if he broke
in line. The boy denied it while
everyone else said he had. He
was allowed to remain.
The film was required for

JOEL WHALEN

girl a pants suit. Loosen your tie
and mess up your hair. Then,
taking a rolled up piece of paper
in your right hand, stride briskly
into the student affairs office
on the third floor of the Reitz
Union.
As you enter the door, stop,
look left and right quickly. Fix
your eyes on the office of
Florida Blue Key. Stride briskly
once again, across the office and
find a Blue Key. Your best bet
in identifying a Blue Key is not
by his appearance. Most Blue
Keys tend to be overweight and
look a lot like your Uncle
George. (Remember the one
who used to smoke cigars and
pinch your cheek? His big line
was, Skarf, Skarf, Hows my
little soldier?)
The only sure way to tell a
Blue Key is by his Blue Key.
A BLUE KEY is a small
medallion worn on the belt
loops of ones trousers.
In the days of yore, when
students with talent, drive and
creativity .were in campus
politics the charm meant
achievement, skill and integrity.
The Blue Key charm has since
been lowered to its present
position. It now means that the
wearer has hung around the
third floor looking important,
sold himself right, and
dripped a few classes (to do a
little work around Student
Government.)
HAVING FOUND the Blue
Key, approach him with caution.
Let him know by your actions
that you arent sure if he is the
right one to tell your rumor.
This makes the Blue Key
anxious to help you.
Then, look around to make
sure no one hears you. Tell him
the rumor (in the utmost
confidence of course).
It helps is you emphasize the
important parts of your rumor

freshmen, but many freshmen
who showed up to buy tickets
were left like me because of the
obscure theater policy.
The managers of the union
theater should analyze their
policies and revise them so the
people who deserve tickets can
get first chance.
JOHN WALKINSWAN (4JM)

by gesturing with your rolled up
piece of paper. The Blue Key
thinks this gives you added
creditability. For all he knows it
could be a petition from the
student body (something that
this student leader has been out
ot touch with for years) or even
a letter from Steve OC.).
AFTER YOU are sure that
the Blue Key has gotten the
rumor, leave quickly. Thank the
Blue Key for his help and leave
with all the dynamism with
which you entered.
Thats all there is to it. Its
simple, fun and the Blue Key
does all the hard work.
TRY IT some time, its easy.
Just think up a rumor and
spread it.
Here are a few sample
rumors... Coach Dickey is going
to take over WRUF-FM so John
and Carlos can have a nice
stereo, or try this one... The
Housing Administration charges
too much for the dorm rooms.
The secret is making it
outlandish and thus believable.
Have fun... if youre good at
it they may ask you to run for
president of the student body.

LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed,
double-spaced and not exceed
300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if
writer shows just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
letters for space.
Writers may submit longer
essays, columns or letters to be
considered for use as Speaking
Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular
column is asked to contact the
editor and be prepared to show
So flip I l os o nis WORC

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392*1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. 8. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392*1609

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 9, 1970

Campus: Crier
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
Student Government's Accent Brings Abernathy To The Campus
Accent 71 is proud to present Dr. Ralph Abernathy, Chairman of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference to the university students. Dr. Abernathy will lecture in the University
Auditorium on Nov. 12, at 8:00 p.m. Student tickets are $.50 and will go on sale Nov. 3 in the
Union Box Office.
Blue Cross-Blue Shield I. D.s
Students may pick up their Insurance Cards at the Reitz Union, Rm. 331 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30
p.m.
Volunteer Tutors Needed
Volunteers are still needed to staff the Student Government Tutoring Service. Any students with
at least a 2.0 grade-point average are invited to participate. To volunteer call the Student
Government Office (392-1665) and leave your name, telephone number and area of proficiency.
This is your chance to help a fellow student.
The Florida Players Present
A Man for All Seasons by Robert Bolt. One of Broadway and Hollywood's most exciting and fast
moving contemporary productions. The play will be presented Nov. 9-14, each show beginning at
8:00 p.m. Students of the university will be given two extra days to buy tickets. They will go on
sale on Nov. 2 at $.75 a seat.
Thanksgiving Drive
The Student Government Office of Community Affairs is sponsoring a drive to collect clothes
and food for local migrants and to collect magazines and books for Alachua County Jail Inmates.
The Service Booth across from the Hub will be used as a collection point. Please help by giving
what you can.
Draft Counseling
The Student Government Office of Student Affairs reports that the Draft Center is now in
business. Personal appointments are available by calling 392-1665.
Come To The International Film Festival
The International Club is pleased to announce the following.schedule of International Movies:
Nov 9: 5:30 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
Nov 10: 5:30 p.m. & 8:00 p.m.
Nov 11: 5:30 p.m. & 8:00 p.m.
The program is being organized in cooperation with the Council of International Organizations
and Student Government. The names of the movies are listed elsewhere in the Alligator.
. And To International Evening
International Visitors and American Friends, in cooperation with the Council of International
Organizations. International Evening will be on Friday Nov. 13 at 8:00 p.m. in lounge rooms
122, 123, Reitz Union.
.
Towers Players Present:
Towers players will present their fall performance of "The Just Assassins" on Nov. 19, 20, and 22
at 8:00 p.m. in the Towers Area Commons Building. Admission is free. Tickets may be obtained
as follows:
Towers residents Nov. 9& 10
U of Fla. Stud. & Public ) Nov. 11-19
Tickets may be picked up between 8:00 a.m. & 5:00 p.m.
Budget Requests Are Due
Organizations must submit requests fro the Student Government 1971-72 budget no later than
December 1, 1970 in the Student Senate Office. In order to request money an organization must
"WHY DON'T YOU COME UP AND SEE ME be chartered by Student Government.
SOMETIME.
Any unchartered organization desiring Student Government funds must submit their proposed
Don't forget to see W. C. Fields and Mae West in charter to the Student Senate for approval no later than Thursday Nov. 12, so that it can be
"My Little Chickadee" at the Rathskeller on Wed. approved by the budget request deadline. For further information, call the Student Senate office
Nov. 11 at 7:20,9:15, and 10:55 p.m. Admission is 392-1699.
25 cents.
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER, MUST HAVE
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY THURSDAY AFTERNOON,S:OOOF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. THANKS
BRUCE SCHWACK (R.G.8.)
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
vZ~~ ~ STUDENT GOVERNMENT



In G-ville, Hairy Probably Means Jobless

I By TERRY VENTO
Alligator Writer
It is 7 a.m. and you are rudely
akened by your alarm clock.
Stumbling out of bed, you
ince in the mirror and the first
ing that catches your eye is
at long, glorious head of hair
hair that has barred you from
tting a job. Discouraged and
v on funds, youll try again
day to beat the system.
IS THIS A typical scene in the
e of a job-seeking long-hair? If
e town is Gainesville, it
rtainly may be.
When asked about
lployment policies concerning
ig hair on gentlemen, a
ajority of the managers
terviewed leaned toward
nservative short hair.
The manager of a well-known
ain department store put it
is way: We frown on long
ir because of the clean-cut
age we are trying to uphold as
national organization. He said
ards were out of the question
it that moustaches were
ceptable if well-kept.
ANOTHER MANAGER of a
fferent chain store said, If the
ir is not over the collar, we
11 consider him, but we like
m trimmed.
Subterranean Circus, a
>velty and clothing shop, has a
ore liberal policy than many
ores.
Manager Bill Killeen said, We
nt care what a person looks
e or what he wears, as long as
does a good job.
However, concerning
lployment in which food is
ndled, a tighter rein seems to
the case.
AUBREY COMBS, manager
Kings Food Host, explained,
/e normally dont employ
ortor Board
Helps Stadoats
In Registration
Members of Mortar Board, a
women's leadership, scholarship
organization, will be on hand at
the Jennings lobby at 7:30
tonight to help students with
egistration.
Student representatives from
;ach college will be present to
mswer questions or help
itudents with curriculum
Jroblems.

Performance is the pleasure
Fiat 850 mil radial tires, a new 58 hp engine with overhead valves,
£ I dash-mounted tachometer, 4-speed synchromeshed stick shift,
ODlder bucket seats. The driver's car -all there because it's a Fiat!
Harfred Auto Imports
Your NEW Fiat Dealer

it
MARK HAUSER
808 CARDULLO
... won't cut hair
long-haired gentlemen, not
because of personal prejudice,
but because of public prejudice.
And since we deal with food,
short hair is more sanitary.
Some of our employes have
hair on their collars now, said
one local grocery store manager,
but we really dont accept long
hair, for the customers sake. We
like to go along with style but
we have a limit. No hippie
styles past the nape of the
neck.
Charles Dell, manager of a
local McDonalds restaurant,
said, We require haircuts.
A FEW OF OUR boys have
longer hair, but under normal
circumstances this wouldnt be
so. A lot of managers wouldnt
have them. It doesnt bother me.
Its not a question of being
against fashion, but we want to
keep hair out of the food. We
require women to wear hair nets,
so the boys would have to
follow that policy, too.
We have no real problem
with long hair, said Marion
Voyles, manager of the
Gainesville Personel Center and
Placement Service. Not many
gentlemen come with long hair.
Although if they do and are
offered a position, many of
them will at least trim it.
However, not all job-seekers

\ STAK SHAKC"!
Student Special
| (With The Coupon) |
I Our Regular 93< Steakburger |
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90{ plus tax |
i Steak n Shake 1
1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville |

will sacrifice their locks. Bob
Cardullo, 4AS, applied for two
jobs recently, and was turned
down on the principle of hair
length.
THE FIRST ESTABLISH ESTABLISHMENT,
MENT, ESTABLISHMENT, which specializes in
pizza, refused to consider him
because the clientele would
diminish.
Cardullos second attempt, a
motel in need of a night clerk,
would not hire him for the same
reason. They had nothing
against long hair, so they said, if
not too long. But beards were
prohibited, he said.
Cardullo described his hair as
moderately long. I comb and
trim it.
HE HOPES PUBLIC
sentiment will change toward
long hair and jobs, but for the
present, his hair will remain
long.
Theres no question about it,
I wont cut my hair.
Mr. Maurice Mayberry,
Director of the University
Placement Center, explained
how long hair can affect your
career chances at the university
level.
THE PURPOSE OF the
placement center is to give the
student the full benefit of his
education in terms of career
employment, he said.
This quarter the
consequences of long hair has
taken on a different complexion
than in the past. Because of the
down-turn in the market, the
demand for employes has
dropped, and employers are
extremely selective. Grooming,
dress and attitude are more
crucial than before.
Formerly, hair was not so
important, but now long hair has
become the kiss of death.
STUDENTS MUST
understand that the policy is not
necessarily discriminatory or
unreasonable, Mayberry said.
Just because you have long hair

you are not barred from a job
interview or the use of the
placement center. We assume
that a student knows what is
appropriate in relation to the job

Cafeteria Line Special 1
Monday
Southern Style
Scalloped Beef & Potatoes 45(1
Large Slice of Cake I
[* ********* * * * * * * *1
Tuesday
Old Fashion I
Meat Loaf & Onion Gravy 45( I
HeJJralt^Cebbjer^^ls(j
1 ir>r A r%M
1970 CADILLAC. Sedan de Ville $6295
4 door hardtop, full power. Blue with leather
interior.
1969 CADILLAC. Fleetwood $5495
Unexcelled luxury cost SB,OOO when new. Full
| power and all the comfort options.
1969 OLDSMOBILE"9B $3695
Local car, 1 owner. Air conditioned. White over
gold. T ransferable warranty.
1969 OLDSMOBILE Cutlass $2695
4 door sedan. Blue. Full power and air
conditioned. Factory warranty.
1969 MUSTANG. Mach I $2895
Fastback coupe. VB, power steering, power front
disc brakes, air conditioned. Automatic
transmission.
1968 OLDSMOBILE. Delmont $2095
Four door hardtop. Gold 42b V, radio, heater,
automatic transmission, power steering and brakes.
Clean. Local owner.
1968 VOLKSWAGEN. Camper $2395
Pop-up type with three beds, icebox, 414 gallon
water supply, lots of cabinets and drawers.
Mosquito nets, jalousie windows, 110 volt outside
connection. Excellent condition.
1968 OLDSMOBILE. Delta $2650
Air conditioned sedan with electric windows and
seat, disc brakes.
1967 CHEVROLET. Impala $1495
2 door hardtop, automatic transmission, power
steering and brakes.
1967 FORD Fairlane $1595
2 door hardtop, 390 VB, 4 speed, air conditioned,
power brakes, radio, heater.
1966 FORD Fairlane $995
4 door sedan, white. 6 cylinder, automatic
transmission, radio, heater.
1966 CHEVROLET. Nova $1095
4 door sedan, 6 cylinder, automatic transmission,
radio, heater.
1965 CHEVROLET. Malibu $995
Convertible, air conditioned, automatic
transmission, radio, heater, power steering.

Monday, November 9, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

he is seeking.
So, guys, if you really need a
job badly, you may soon be
giving a barber some shear
enjoyment!

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

(a
a* r#

FOR SAEE
KEEP your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Electric upholstery
shampooers also available. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
ALTEC LANSING pa system 4 1203
power bottoms and new mixer
preamp. Best offer. Call 378-7865
evenings after 6:00 pm. (A-3t-35-p)
AKC > reg. Poodle, silver mlnature
female, 8 months, has all shots. 90$
Call 378-6247 after 5 pm.
(A-st-35-p)
TRIUMPH 650 CHOPPER Chrome
extended 6 inch forks custom paint,
seat-sissybar comb. Excellent Cond.
Clean $llOO or best 392-9616
(A-st-35-p)
Realistic portable stereo; 30 watt
amp, garrard turntable and
detachable speakers, only 6 mth old;
all for only $75 call 378-9531
(A-2t-35-p)
Stereo sacrifice, going to Germany 13
owt Pioneer amp/spkrs., Dokorder
2+2 tape deck $450. 378-6886 KR
will sell separately (A-st-35-p)
1970 Honda 175 CL excellent cond.
2 helmets; extra tire $450 or best
offer 378-9129 (A-4t-34-p)
BASSET HOUNDS
beautiful tri-colored, AKCreg.,
bred for temperament, 7 weeks old,
wormed, shots, males, females
378-7829 or 392-0872 (A-st-33-p)
HONDA 90 1969 exc. condition
Only 2500 miles. Step thru, with
auto, trans. $lB5 or best offer Inc.
helment. Call Larry 373-2646.
(A-st-35-p)
ROTC Men: uniforms for sale size 40
Reg 1-dress blues, 2-Ciass A greens
call 372-7463 (A-3t-34-p)
68 Triumph 650 excellent cond. High
bars, roll bars, 2 helmets must sell
call Mitch 373-3854 *(A-st-34-p)
For sale Honda S9O 1968 two
helments included runs good call
373-1534 and come by and see It
(A-st-30-p)
Aircondltloner 20,000 BTU-Fedders
Cost 290. Asking $175.00 Call
372-5693. Very good condition
Married students 372-5693
(A-st-33-p)
Irregulars & seconds Beautiful sheets
towels and pillowcaser. 103 SE First
St. Sheet & Towel Shop (A-20t-31-p)
CAMPSITES five of eight lots in the
ocala natl forest 6 ml from Eureka
within V ml of canal lots 80x100 ea
s2odn-s2omo for 2 y;s TOTAL
PRICE-NO INTEREST EVE
378-9385 (A-st-33-p)
HAMS Sxl 1 receiver good cond.
SIOO, ARC-5 xmtr converted for
novice use, accessories Included $35.
392-8782 (A-lt-36-p)
Airedale, AKC, 9 mos., female,
champlonsired, excellent pedigree,
fine watchdog, companion SSO. Call
Lynn 392-1911 days, 372-6558 eves.
(A-st-36-p)
1968 Firebird gold w/black interior
take over payments call 376-2530
(A-st-36-p)
USED ROOMS for sale (with wheels
yeti) 8, 10 and 12 ft. wide, drive &
savel HWY 20-10 m E. of Hawthorne
Cooper Lake Trailer Sales.
(A-st-36-p)
Ampex Blank Recording Tape 50%
Off List Capitol Blank Recording
Tape New Mod Pak Cassettes, 8 Tr.
Catridges, Reel We Pay Postage on
All Orders Send for Price List Exhlbo
West, P.O. Box 5174, Dept. 023,
Mission Hills, Ca. 91340 (A-lt-37-p)
How much RELY ABILITY can you
buy for 200 dollars? Call and see
378-7989 59 Plymouth reblt auto
trans, tires, breaks etc, etc
(A-3t-36-p)

jf

FOR SA EE
Anniversary Salel A store-wide 10%
discount is In effect Wednesday thru
Saturday this week only. Buy now
for hunting season and Xmas. The
most fabulous sporting goods store
you have seen. B & B SPORTS
CENTER 5320 NW 13th St.
(A-st-36-p)
STEREO Components-e Ico am-fm
tuner $75; 80 watt amp $75; Roberts
997 tape recorder $275 D F Dunson
Ph. 904/684-2531 collect after 6 pm
(A-st-36-p)
Tame baby ferrets coons monkeys
bob cats ocelots skunks parrots
hawks snakes lizards turtles for sale
trade or buy kongo pet 475-2546
(local) (A-tfc)
FOR RRNT
2 br townhouse apt. WW shag, A.C. 3
blocks to campus. Call 378-6898
after 5. 170 mo. Lease to June.
(B-3t-33-p)
MANAGER or GROUP WANTED to
lease Campus Cone delivery service.
SISOO per month, owner returning to
college. 372-3890 (B-st-33-p)
AVAILABLE DEC. 12111 Very
reasonable 1 bdrm apt. 3 blocks from
campus A/C carpeting, pool, large
rooms. Call 378-0138 (B-3t-34-p)
Furnished 2-bedroom apt. available
December 1. Couples or graduate
students only. slls monthly call
376-5828 after 6 pm (B-st-36-p)
Male roomate wanted 1103 SW 4th
Ave. your own B.R. $41.25 per mo.
Call Larry 372-5746 or stop by 1
block frbm Tlgert. Must rent
Immediately (B-2t-36-p)
Must sublet apt by winter quarter
$l5O per month for 2 or 3 persons
May move In before Christmas Call
Karen or Terry after 8 pm 378-0768
(B-st-36-p)
Female roommate to share 2
bedroom apt. Fred. Garden Apts.
42.50 a month. Start winter quarter.
Call 373-3934 after 7 p.m.
(B-3t-36-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom AlrCond furnished
apt. Beginning Jan 1 sllO mo. Call
376-4877 1404 SW 10th Terr apt. 19
Very clean (B-st-36-p)
WANTED
Male to share one bedroom apt. with
V 2 utilities + $57.50 monthly. Bedrm.
kltch., and bath. Come by M-F3-6,
7-10 weekends, 12-6 1216 SW 2 Ave.
Apt. 22 (C-st-31-p)
Female needs housing (apt, room or
bed) near campus from Nov. 15 to
Dec. 4. Willing to pay months rent.
Call Sally 378-9784 after 6
(C-3t-35-p)
Small refrigerator, will pay up to S3O
if In good condition call 392-9204
anytime. (C-st-35-p)
Make $$ over xmas breakl
Dependable couple needs room or
apt over break Dec 12-Jan 3 available
for Interview 392-7635 (C-3t-33-p)
Furnished apt. wanted for Winter
Quarter, willing to pay premium for
plush 2 bedroom-Jan-Aprlt Call
392-0151 or 372-5206. (C-st-30-p)
Female roommate to share 2 Br
trailer, own room, S7O month. Call
373-2577 after 8 p.m. or 392-3196
before. Ask for Mary. (C-st-26-p)
Roommate wanted starting next
quarter In village park good
roommates reasonable rates call Dave
373-1620 (C-3t-36-p)
Room mate wanted immed. plus la
bonne vie apt. $53 month call
378-5823 or stop by apt. number
361 dishwasher brush carpet pool
tennis court boxes (C-st-36-p)

Page 12

University Center
University of South Florida
presents
ffisa
IN CONCERT
SATURDAY NOVEMBER 14,1970
CURTIS HIXON HALL 8:30 P.M.
Tampa, Florida
price $4.50 $5.50
Mail order c/o Warwick Concert
Please send self-addressed
stamped envelope

:, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 9, 1970

..v.*.*.*.*..* v.vx.v-x-x-x*x*x*x*x-x*x
AUTOS

a*

Corvette 66, 427 high perf, complete
set up, all finest equip, ultimate
street machine, perfect cond. must
sell Now. $2575 Bob 373-1524
(G-3t-34-p)
1962 MG A 1600 MKII, New paint &
body, interior, new top-Full
Recelpts-SI3OO. 373-1883, 411 N.W.
14th St. (G-st-34-p)
61 Ford good shape 4 new tires 292
V 8 radio/heater power steering new
Eag. $l5O call Woodrow 376-1044
(G-st-33-r)
1970 Volvo 6 mo old blue $2300
Call 372-0947 or 392-1479
(G-st-32-p)
1967 Black VW Squareback, 2 new
tires, In good shape. Must sale,
$1,190. Call 378-1710 after 5
(G-st-33-p)
1964 Olds Cutlass P.S. P.B. air great
condition must sell S9OO call
378-7876 after 5:00 (G-3t-33-p)
FABULOUS 1970 BEACH BUGGY
must SACRIFICE, need cash and or
trade 200 NE Bth st. apt. 1 378-9702
ask for Rick (G-2t-36-p)
62 VOLKSWAGEN Bug good tires
good paint, stop by 220 u Flavet 3 or
call 392-6033 and ask for Bill youll
like it. (G-3t-36-p)
jpajgj Y
Leather Goods Wholesale Prices all
stock must go: leather boxes $5-7.50
belts $3.50-6; 4 vests sls-20 barets
headbands bags pouches Custom
work also: 1118 SW 2 Ave number 6
upstairs after 2 every afternoon but
Weds. (J-st-35-p)
SINGLE MALES & FEMALESI Meet
more members of the opposite sex at
U.F. All dates In Gainesville. Most
dates with U.F. Students. Details
mailed in plain unmarked envelope.
For free details write: Nationwide
Dating Service, P.O. Box 77346,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-15t-24-p)
M Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory oner 460. Buy ~~
Sell Trade Repair.
+ Reloading supplies. Custom
M reloading. Henry Beckwith,
gun dealer, Micanopv.
* 466-3340.
< ... S V.-. . .HI .... .1-
! Student Special
Any car or color! \
| 12 mo. Guarantee j
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373-1665
e d
THE QUARTERLY. .
It helps you see.
Become one mth it.
florida
quarterly
We only did it for you.

wx:^
PERSONAE
JGK This has been the happiest 6
months of my life. Thank You! I
LY! IY G GAS (J-2t-35-p)
Hate to cookTToo poor for an apt?
CLO has openings for the winter
quarter. $195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 373-1622 (J-22t-30-p)

The
Q g TEMPTATIONS
~?\nriP' SATURDAY NOV. 21
f Record Bar JWRU Box Office
A SGP Production
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
U W M o
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PERSONAL
COMPUTER DATING Why wait?
Meet your Ideal date. Special
introductory price. Now serving
leading colleges and universities
throughout the US and Canada.
Write: National Cybernetics, Box
221, Durham, N.C. 27702 (J-Bt-31*p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

persona l
.; : ;.:;; ; : ; : : >:- : r ; ; : ; : : : ; ; ; : : : : : ; : : : ; : ; : : : : : : : ;::>:-:-:r:*:r::t:r:r:!
Wanted: Rock style drummer for
heavy music group. Serious musicians
only. Al 376-1042 Ron-376-9919
(J-st-33-p)
Attention dream girl 1 got your card
and wish contact-maybe we will
love-maybe we wont-but call
me-Ronnie 378-6158 maybe, huh?
(J-lt-36-P)
To the one who thinks birthdays are
just anydays: Ive thought of a reason
to celebrate. Im glad you were born
on an anyday. Hope that reason will
make you celebrate. Happy 21st.
number 1 bitch (J-lt-36-p)

m, a .SLeam
: s| j I
II ADULTS ONLY ffj|

I LUMS DAILY SPECIALS!
Good Thurs, Fri, and Sat!
Lum's Features Famous Beers ON DRAFT
I 16 OZ. SCHOONERS-SCHLITZ,
I BALLANTINE, MICHELOB, BUDWEISER
I Any sandwich plus 16 oz. schooner
H SI.OO
Ham Sandwich and French Fries
Pastrami Sandwich and French Fries
I Lums Famous Sub
a Todays 1
I more for your money meal I
I moisons
CAFETERIA I
I I J I
j MONDAYS FEATURE j I
I J BAKED CHOPPED STEAK | I
_ J WITH HASH I a
I! b own 7Q> i I
O j POTATOES /7y | |
I I | TUESDAYS FEATURE | $ I
3 | GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN | s
| ALL YOU CAN EAT |
I 99C j
|l-*
I LUNCH: 11 tiI2*SUPPER:4:3OtiI 8-FREE PARKING
1 moisons
CAFETERIA ..beyond comparison! J
m 2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall M

F*E RSONA L
Do you sculpt? Batik? Paint? Whittle?
Make something nobody else does?
The Reitz Union is having a
Christmas Sale of International gifts
and original crafts. We want it to be
an open sale of interesting items so
everyone is invited to sell their
creations, no fees, registration or
Insurance. No businesses either. Nov.
30 and Dec. 1 Union Ballroom 11 to
9. Questions? Call 392-1655
(J-st-36-p)
BARRY Is this Univ. ready for you
and vitamin E? Now that you know
its secret, try it with shake and bake
Apts. 503, 606. (J-2t-35-p)

c222SSmSi£9 now
I SHOWING
M N.W. 13th ST. -PH
ACROSSFRO^TH^AI^^a
easy wife
3* THE
Jcfcgfe
PENTHOUSE 2 PENTHOUSE 3
'Getting x RATED
rT T, BEYOND THE
Straight valley of
RATED R THE DOLLS
Mention this ad for special early bird price of 35 cents every
nite before 7 P.M. and Sat. & Sun. Matinees. Regular Price
SI.OO Penthouse number 2 51.50 Penthouse number 3
" I

Monday, November 9, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

.VV.VV.V*V.VV.V.%V.V.V.V.V*%V.V.V.'.
PERSONAL
Co Eds Facial Hair removed forever;
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist ...
102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for
appointment. (J-31tfc)
Riders wanted to Denver or
thereabouts after finals split gas call
Dave 373-1620 (J-2t-36-p)
it:::::::::;:::;:::;:::;:*:;:;:::;:;:::::::*:*:::::::*:::*:::*
LOST dc FOUND
LOST: one windbreaker (ATO) and
one blue overcoat in sec 43, row 76
at Fla/Auburn game. Call 373-2836
(L-2t-35-p)
Found: Timepiece at the corner of
Union and Newell on Homecoming
weekend. Identify. Write to: Mr.
Jontz, P.O. Box 4940, Jacksonville.
(L-3t-34-nc)
LOST: Black-framed prescription
glasses the night of Gator Growl. May
be around Murphree dorm area. Call
376-4863 if found. (L-2t-36-p)
General Motors car key found on
plaza grass call Russ 373-1366
(L-3t-34-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 line?.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -100 pun. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* o
ll l| | rn £
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Ol CO CO
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Page 13

SERVICES
.\v.\w.%v.vrtWMv;v. .v.'.viv;v;v;v;v.
HONDA SERVICE AT ITS
BEST!!!! THE CYCLE WORKS 1220
S. MAIN OPECM3 UNTIL 8 P.M.
(M-st-32-p)
I will make you an A MATH
STUDENT or REFUND YOUR
MONEY. $3.50 per half hour.
372- or 378-4066 (M-st-33-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now! Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
Typing-former New York secretary
B'klyn college grad-55 cents page &
up-term papers, theses, dissertations
373- 9-5, 373-1429 after 6
(M-Bt-31-p)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
Rubys alterations apt. 217-100 N.E.
Bth Ave. Gainesville, Fla. 32601 Mrs.
Ruby Miller (M-st-36-p)

SERVICES
Quality tape cartridge Recording
accumulate 4 tapes and sth Is Free
(2) of your albums $6 Inc cartridge
averages to only $2.40 per album.
Figure the savingsl 378-5916 4-8 pm
(M-3t-36-p)
Typing done, theses, term papers,
etc. Guaranteed accuracy & neatness.
Electric typewriter. $.50 per page.
Good references 378-7493
(M-st-36-r) &
FLY I This weekend G-ville to Naples,
Fla. and points between. IV2 hours
enroute. $25 rdnArlP for information
378-8329 after six (M-3t-36-p)
Bridal shower. Surprise birthday
party. Money raising project.
Tupperware party. Call 454-1969
after 7 p.m. all day weekends
(M-st-35-p)
HORSES BOARDED sleepy hollow
horse farm complete care finest
facilities new barn pasture trails and
lighted ring close to Unlv. Ph
373-1059 (M-st-29-p)

/ mssmi \
M I r 1
/ LAST 2 DAYS \
I AT... 1:40 3:37 I
5:34 7:36 9:43
f 1 ITII4M l J M
/ JOE MAMATH I 1
I a**w-margbetJ^l
as his girl
_ 1
\ AT... 2:18 4:10 i
\ 6:02 7:56 9:50 g
I MIN W. IMS* \ S V.^ S
THE FIRST LAST 3:30 J
e MAN TO 2 5:30
BECOMEA JAYS 7:30
WOMAN 9:30
? s3L.. '''
wiChHstim* :
! )OR6iHttNSfORY" JI R
MMIIMMMMMSM
WSikllSlsl 3 I SHOWS*
llflis'ww 1 llS** 1:30
I 3:30
7-30
; FOR EVERYONE! J;
i
e e e
UUSIaIJUJUmshows
1 111 W. UthmHr 3:00 8:00 J
ADULTS $1.25
CHILD 50 cents ALL DAY



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, November 9, 1970

Alvarez Scores Winning Touchdown

... 11. I
Hts m Bk.
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PHIL COPE

Shades of the past! It looked like reruns of 1969
Gator game films in Jacksonville's Gator Bowl
Saturday. Carlos Alvarez and John Reaves combined
to form that effective scoring duo which earned
them the name of the "Super Sophs" when they
guided the Gators to a 9-1-1 record last year. The
action could only be described as a dogfight. The

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TOM KENNEDY
YOUNGBLOOD (74) TACKLES HONEYCUTT
... defense finds holes in Bulldog line

It Wasnt Notre Dame, But Thats Cool

ByPHILPETTIJOHN
AHkptor Sports Editor

The jubilant Gators gave Doug
Dickey his first shoulder high
ride away from a Florida game
when they paraded him out of
the Gator Bowl Saturday.
Beating Georgia 24-17 is a
feat worthy of excitment in any
season.
COMING AFTER devastating
defeats by Alabama, Tennessee
and Auburn, who could blame
the happy Gators for acting like
they had just beat Notre Dame
to win the national title.
But file win will not send all
of the doubters that Dickey feels
he has now shown where it is

really at, scurrying for a place on
the band wagon.
THE BULLDOGS were a 4-3
team going into Saturdays
contest.
They managed to dominate
the first three quarters of play.
It took a Georgia fumble
under the Gators goalpost to
halt a 66 yard drive. If the
Bulldogs would have scored then
the Gators would have needed
two touchdowns to win.
But they did fumble, and Jack
Youngblood wrestled it away
from a Bulldog to give Florida a
chance.
AND THE GATORS did
make fine use of the

REAVES, ALVAREZ CLICK IN 1969 FORM

Bulldogs of Georgia were taken by surprise by the
underdog Gators 24-17. And, it was the
Reaves-to-Alvarez duo which caused Florida to
emerge top dog. Alvarez snagged five of Reaves'
nine completions. Two of the passes resulted in
touchdowns one on a 32-yard toss and the other
on a 48-yard bomb. In the photo to the right.

SOME DOUBTERS STILL DOUBT

L jf bBE*
l TSmM/rn^
TOM KENNEDY

The
Florida I '^Bwllit;j
Alligator
m B.WPk ~ jl w w
. JJ>
s. Jw M | \ #
pp. \
MHVf < JR" #
HI
PHIL BANNISTER
TOMMY DURRANCE DASHES FOR A SHORT GAIN
... Georgia secondary ineffective against determined Gator

opportunity, for which they
were justly rewarded.
Indeed, it might be noted that
the 4-3 Georgia squad was
probably a better team than the
Gators.
It should also be noted that
the Florida coaching staff, one
of the winningest in the nation,
had better prepared their team
than Vince Dooleys outfit.
FLORIDA OFFENSIVE chief
Jimmy Dunn certainly found an
effective way of establishing the
running game that had so long
been his concern. He restricted
John Reaves to two passes in the
first half.
The Gators managed to
eliminate many of the mistakes

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PHIL COPE

Alvarez grabs the 32-yarder while Bulldog defender
Phil Sullivan tries unsuccessfully to stop the "Cuban
Comet." In the center Alvarez searches for the
quickest route to the goal line and left, he finds it
with a little help from Willie Jackson.

that had plaqued them before.
Reaves threw no interceptions
and there was only one Florida
fumble.
FLORIDA DISPLAYED alot
of old fashioned guts to even
remain in the contest which
almost everyone had given up as
a loss to archrival Georgia.
But the fact still remains that
Georgia is certainly closer to
Floridas class than Alabama,
Tennessee and Auburn.
With this win under their
belts, Florida now seems in a
more likely position to beat
Kentucky.
THE WIN even makes the

respectable 8-3 Record the
Gators are after a definite
possibility.
Somebody even started
talking about a post season
Peach Bowl bid.
Beating Georgia, regardless of
what their ability is, is just great,
but in the minds of many it will
not overshadow the GatoiS
performances in their first eight
games.
Trophy Winnor
The United States has won
the Wightman Cup women's
tennis trophy 34 of the 41 times
the competition has been held.



Dooley Suffers Most Frustrating Loss

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
Bulldog coach Vince Dooley
stood outside the Georgia locker
room while his frustrated
football squad inside cursed and
slammed their fists against the
wall in disgust.
There was a reason for their
highly emotional response. They
had just been beaten by the
underdog Florida Gators 24-17
before a Gator Bowl audience of
70,294.
THAT WAS the most
disappointing loss this season,
Dooley confessed following the
unexpected Georgia defeat. Its
just one of those things you
cant explain.
But Dooley tried his best to
explain it.
I thought wed win, he said.
We had a chance to take
control and we fumbled.
THE FUMBLE occurred early
in the fourth quarter when
Bulldog quarterback Paul Gilbert
dropped the ball with a
secon d-and-one for a
touchdown.
The Georgia liability became a
Florida asset when defensive end
Jack Youngblood jumped on the
loose ball on the Gator six yard
line.
A few plays later, Carlos
Alvarez made a successful diving
attempt to snag a John Reaves
pass to give the Gators better
field position. A few
disappointing plays later, punt
specialist John James kicked
into the Georgia end zone and
the solid Gator defense held the
Bulldogs.
GEORGIA WAS forced to
punt and the Gators took the
ball on the Bulldog 43.
Fullback Mike Rich gained
ten yards up the middle and
Reaves hit tight end Jim Yancey
for 14 more. On the next play.
Reaves connected with the
fleet-footed Alvarez for 32 yards
and a touchdown with 5:13 left
in the game.
Dooley said it was that
fumble which turned the game
into a win for Florida.
DOOLEY SPOKE of the
Reaves-Alvarez scoring
combination with respect.
Theyre two super athletes, he
SALES
SERVICE KV
'££ |yfl
MILLER-BROWN MOTORS
<222 N. W. 13TH ST. 376-4332
7]
IjJ
808 STACY ,lUC
378-3222
CAMPUS REP

said. Two great athletes. Bang
bang. And it hurts.
Alvarez scored on two passes
from Reaves. Besides the 32
yarder following the fumble,
Reaves hit Alvarez later in the
fourth quarter on a 48-yard
decisive touchdown bomb.
But Dooley found little praise
for his own Bulldog secondary.

Ironwood
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMBERSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 + .TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 All DAY
WEEKENDS $3 All DAY
For information coll
JL, 376-0080
teoKwoop
Ni 39,h AVENUf Celf

Hew Honda
Motosport3so.

Its not easy to improve on perfection, but Honda
engineers have done it. Theyve developed a
revolutionary, tough, lightweight double-cradle
frame. And put it on what was already the worlds
hottest dirt machine to trim off more than 40 lbs.
The result this new SL-350 K1 a dirt-eating tiger
that handles like a kitten. They improved on
perfection in other ways, too. The new Motosport 350
has light, durable aluminum fenders. A smaller,
racier tank. A specially-designed lower seat to give

-'fwm ; wk \ m B K h.
w f I in,.
Vi l JUI I k<* MJ IX
~i / ;WF t if M J 4
Your Honda Dealer in Gainesville
;> Stteitb \
SdtuuHHSola (rStwice
PHONts{ Lar e Part* Inventory
818 West University Ave. I* ,CYCW

IN 27-14 LOSS TO FLORIDA

He said there appeared to be a
breakdown on assignments to
let Alvarez loose on his two
identical touchdown receptions.
I want to look at the films
before I make any further
comments, he said.
If the final score surprised
Vince Dooley, Floridas

Your Generator %
$$ OVERHAULED SoeciaT
50 |
incuioj/'
alachWBQWtV
GENERATOR SERVICE
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARD.
Mon.Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm
378-4011

Monday, November 9, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

offensive passing did not. It
wasnt much of a surprise, he
said refering to Reaves nine

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
1 STARKi 1 FLORIDA I^Bjf
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER"
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
IAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMEN

you more body control. Primary And
an ignition switch close by the throttle for safety.
But, thats not all. The dependable, powerful Honda
four-stroke OHC twin now delivers just the kind of
performance you want for the dirt. Low-end torques
been boosted. And the torque curve flattened.
Gear ratios have been opened up in the rugged
five speed trans, too. No doubt about it this babys
ready to race. Take a test ride and youll be convinced.
The new Motosport 350s loss was your gain.

completions for 14 attempts and
166 yards. Its 1 something you
have to be aware of every play.

Page 15



Page 16

vThe Florida Alligator, Monday, November 9, 1970

BONANZA SIRLOIN PIT
'THERE IS ONLY ONE A
nniTTiinw 2445 sw l3 ST / ) /wm
BONfiNZfi Jake Out 378-0946 rs\
"Congratulates the i 1
Plover of the Week Player Os The Week >-/
r,U / CI V M # Your choice of juicy, tender Bonanza steaks,
9 chicken, fish, and our famous Vlb.
Hr c
Bonanzaburger lOO% beef, French
Fries, salad, pickle and chicklets JOO
I Our steaks are served with a steaming-hot, buttery I
baked potato, Texas toast, and a cool, crisp, green
1 lad ttt
H
Bunkhouse Special % lb. 100% chopped
b it
Carlos Alvarez sandwich -vn
Sirloin Strip savory, hearty meat,
OPEN DAILYFROM 11-9 PM WKrZrftm- PLUS OTHERS
Jack Youngblood j^SSsgS^B^^S
W / \ To one outstanding player in Saturday's
\ game against the Georgia Bulldogs would be rather
\ difficult. Recognition is due to both end Carlos J B2j
I \ Alvarez and defensive end Jack Youngblood.
' Alvarez passes from quarterback
l|! \ John Reaves. Two of those passes, however,
- ,m 4= V resulted in touchdowns. One of them came on a hB^T
48-yard bomb to secure the Gator's sixth victory
of the season.
11 Youngblood keyed a stingy defense which held
the Bulldogs one yard short of the goal line early in
the fourth quarter. A Georgia fumble was jumped NVOLVEMiNT
on by Youngblood on the Gator six yard line, We 3,1 coach football team as
putting Florida back in the game. TT
r 9 the problems of the team. There is only
, one thing wrong with this, we aren't
n me m really involved and have no power. Our
- |i A MON.- FRI. lives are much the me w.y. We watch
fl and talk about the answers to todays
M M M 0-0 problems, but we aren't involved. Maybe
U 111 1111 111 Jl I l##U we feel we aren't "big" enough and will
%0 m W SAT. get hurt if we indulge. Or maybe we find
0.|2 our foot in our mouth when we do speak
up because of lack of knowledge. Much
CD CC r\CI l\/CDV of our knowledge comes from experience
f KPr IJrl IVCK T but bein 9 informed is also very
1 important. Reading is the best way to
HVSjSjBS| become informed and the materials
PAM PI | C offered are as various as life itself. So
_ || *\*w £ f\ Aat o BHBH vHIfirUO read, learn, and become involved.
Call 376-2487 H SHOP & BOOKSTORE
|__ P9H ....located in the Hub
1710 S. W. 13th ST.