Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol 63. No. 35

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Portions Os Gator Growl
Offensive To OConnell

By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Writer
Gator Growl was defended by
UF President Stephen OConnell
at a news conference Thursday,
while at the same time he
apologized for it.
THE HOMECOMING event,
which has drawn the wrath of
some state legislators, is
intended as a satire, OConnell
said. He admitted that he, too,
was offended by portions of
Growl.
Complaints about Gator
Growl came earlier this week
from Florida Senate
President-elect Jerry Thomas,
D-Jupiter, Sen. Ed Blackburn,
D-Tampa, and Sen. Alan Trask,
D-Ft. Meade.
Growl is not intended to be
an expression of student life or
of ethical standards on the
campus it is a satire.

Graves Calls Athletics Fee Reasonable

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
UF Athletic Director Ray
Graves foresees no increase in
the part of the activities fee
going towards athletics.
IN AN OPEN HEARING
before the Student Government
Activity Fee Committee, Graves
said the present $3.25 athletic
fee paid by each student every
quarter is a reasonable one.
He pointed out the Athletic
Association (AA) does not plan
to ask for an increase of this
allotment from the activity fee
for next year.
Figures released by the AA
indicated the part of UF's
activity fee going to athletics is
the lowest in the schools
participating in Southeastern
conference sports.
THE PRESENT budget of

University of Florida, Gainesville

pr ik s

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: W
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... defends and apologizes
UNFORTUNATELY satire
is frequently misunderstood,
OConnell said.
A panel of judges reviews the
skits but does not pass on the
one-liners that fill in between
skits. Remarks in the one-liners

UFs AA shows a gross income
of $3,579,385. The expenditures
are listed at $2,709,718 plus
game guarantees and stadium
rental coming to $808,170;
leaving a surplus of $61,497.
However, the projected
surplus has to be reduced to
$36,924 since the south end
zone stands will be torn up after
the Miami game.
Graves said the stands had
been condemned by the
insurance company which holds
the policy for Florida Field, and
the new stands must be ready
for the next football season.
GRAVES POINTED OUT the
AA was planning to keep the
cost down on the renewing of
the stands by using their own
labor and some of the usable

Friday, November 6, 1970

may have been offensive to
legislators, OConnell said.
I understand the critics, and
I invite their opinions in writing.
Well do better next year,
OConnell said.
ALSO DISCUSSED AT the
press conference was the
unrestricted $5,000 check
presented to UF by the Eastman
Kodak Company.
The gift is part of a $151,250
program established by the
Rochester, N.Y., firm to aid 65
public colleges and universities.
The employment of five UF
graduates by Kodak was a direct
factor in determining the
amount, Dr. Peter Morrisett, a
1963 graduate of UF, said.
OCONNELL ALSO issued
figures to contradict a recent
report that UF ranked second in
(SEE 'GROWL' PAGE 31

material from the present stands.
He pointed out the stands
were built in 1951, and the state
of the stands now is not too
good. The cost of replacing the
south end zone stands would
come to about $20,000.
He said the excess funds of
the Athletic Association hav.
been reduced over the years, and
cited the purchase of the UF
golf course, which came to
$250,000, and the construction
of the east stands and Yon Hall,
which came to $2.5 million, of
which $500,000 came out of the
AA reserve funds, and $2 million
were borrowed.
GRAVES ADDED the debt
from the east* stands and Yon
Hall stands today at close to
$1.7 million.
Committee chairman Ralph

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KUNSTLER AND CROWD OF 3,000
... 'an obligation to stand together, to sacrifice'
Photos By Tom Kennedy
KUNSTLER:
( Do Something
About Wrongs

See Related Story Page 2
By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
Famed attorney William
5, Kunstler told some 3,000 people
at the Plaza of the Americas
Thursday, If you know things
are wrong, then goddamn it, you
have the obligation to do
something about it.
Kunstler, who came to speak
at UF to raise money for the
defense of dismissed instructor
Robert Canney, was referring to
the countrys liberal or other
concerned people who he said
should do something about the
many inequities in society.
HE SAID THAT people who
have a common end, no matter
how vague or indefinable ...
have an obligation to stand
together, to sacrifice
themselves.
The time has come to say
that we are prepared to go to the
wall for things we believe in, he
said.
Much of Kunstlers speech

Glatfelter pointed out to the
athletic director that he knew of
at least one case in which an
athlete had sold a ticket for a
football game at 9 high price..
GRAVES SAID HE did not
know of any case in which there
was any kind of ticket scalping,
but added if an athlete is
caught or apprehended (in
ticket scalping) he will be at the
mercy of the law and the honor
court.
Graves denied any rumors
that anyone in the department
was instrumental in the selling of
the tickets.
Glatfelter told Graves some
students holding athletic cards
had been denied tickets for the
Homecoming game.
IT COULD BE possible this
happened, Graves answered,
but said he had not gotten a

dealt with the Kent State
incident, which he said was
symbolic of whats coming
down the pike.
HE CHIDED the Ohio Grand
Jury for indicting 25 students in
the, antiwar protest incident in
which four students were shot
and killed by the Ohio National
Guard.
The Guard, Kunstler said, got
only a slap on the wrist, being
told to use rifles of less caliber
(those used were M-ls) in similar
future situations.
All that means, he said, is that
its a little easier for the
undertaker to patch up your
face if youve been shot by
someone using a small caliber
weapon.
KUNSTLER SAID the point
of Kent State is that they (the
system) have declared war on
you. He continued that the
Kent students died because they
were the prime symptom of
(SEE 'KUNSTLER' PAGE 2)

report on this matter so far.
But there might be an
improvement in the future for
Gator fans.
Graves said the AA is
working on increasing lighting*
to have night home games in
Florida Field.
jjpMiBBB
A UF professor
has illustrated
overpopulation lethality
with crickets page 10
Classifieds 13
Editorials 8
Entertainment 16
Letters 9
Movies .... 13
Page of Record 12
Sports 17
Whats Happening 4
World Wrap-Up 6



l. The Ftorida Alligator, Friday, November 6, 1970

Page 2

AIESEC Offers Oversea Jobs

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Writer
If youre at least a sophomore
and looking for away to
combine a change of scenery
with your summer job, AIESEC
may be the answer for you.
AIESEC IS a French acronym
which translated stands for the
International Association of
Business and Economic
Students. However, you dont
necessarily have to be a business
or economics student to
participate.
It is a student-run,
student-oriented organization
which helps place students in
overseas summer jobs according

KUNSTLER ...

PAGE ON^j
what is happening in this
country.
He talked about many
indecencies in society, among
them being that 38 per cent of
our troops are blackone of the
few areas in society where blacks
have more than proportionate
representation.
He also referred to the
defoliation of the Vietnamese
country side and the murder of
innocent women and children in
that country due to the war.
YOU KNOW in your hearts
that so much of what youre
a&ed to subscribe to is wrong. I
can no longer tolerate
indecencies, he said in
committing himself to the
rectification of repression in
America.
He said much needs to be
done by the various liberal
groups and that just hope, and
that playful demonstrations
won't change the course of
things.
Violence is proper on many
occasions... Its what brought

No More Rallies
At Plaza For FSM
Florida Student Movement (FSM) member Bruce Ellis said
Thursday he was told by a spokesman of the UFs Community and
Public Affairs committee that the FSM will not be permitted to use
the Plaza of the Americas for future rallies.
THE FSM HAS scheduled a counter-culture ripped off 1 rally for
noon Nov. 10 at the Plaza.
He said Mrs. Eleanor Roberts told him Thursday was the last time
the FSM could use the Plaza because buckets for donations for Robert
Canney were passed through the crowd during a speech given by
attorney William Kunstler Thursday afternoon.
EARLIER MRS. ROBERTS told Ellis he could make one reference
to the collection of donations but that money could not be collected
at the speech.
Mrs. Roberts denied she made the statement and told The Alligator
if the buckets had been stationary instead of being passed around
there would have been no problem.
Ellis said the Tuesday rally would still be held at the Plaza, but
would not say how the FSM would overcome the Plaza ban.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when Its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

to UF AIESEC President Sherri
Cox.
In order for an American
student to receive an overseas
job, a similar position for a
foreign student must be matched
here in the United States.
Members contact American
firms to obtain the positions.
ALL JOBS are in business and
the only requirement for an
overseas job is knowledge of
English.
Its a lot easier than finding a
job yourself, Miss Cox said.
This is the fourth year an
AIESEC chapter has existed at
UF.
THREE UF students worked

this country into being,
Kunstler said.
HE SAID AMERICANS glorify
violence in many of the great
stories of America history, but
they refuse to recognize that
violence will have to be a part of
what is happening today.
There are two essential things
which Kunstler asked of people
committed to the betterment of
society.
First, Kunstler said, if you
go from one plateau to
another, you should be sure to
have first exhausted the one
before you.
SECONDLY" HE said, if you
use violence you should use the
minimum of violence necessary
to accomplish the goal.
He said it will often be
necessary to function outside
the law since so much of what
is legal is indecent and wrong,
and so much of what is illegal is
decent and right.
Other speakers at the rally
were BSU Chairman Samuel
Taylor, Bruce Ellis of the
Florida Student Movement, Fran
Smith, a student of Canneys
and James Millikan, UF assistant
professor of philosophy.

in the Netherlands, Finland and
Yugoslavia this past summer.
According to Richard
Hubbell, secretary-treasurer of
AIESEC, positions are available
in Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia,
Chile, Peru, Yugoslavia and just
about any other country in the
world.
In past years it was necessary
for students to have taken
courses in business or

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PHIL COPE
RAT NOW HAS PINBALL MACHINES

No need to go off-campus to play pinball
machines, Foosball and bumper pool anymore the
Rathskeller now has them all! The Board of Regents

Watch
for special advertising
supplement coming in
The Florida Alligator
Tuesday, November 10
Special 200th Anniversary Offer
from
ENCYCLOPAEDIA
FREE!
t'i Limited Time
JL Mu A u 1 on this new edition in the
4 U r
Final 200th Anniversary Offer

economics, but it is no longer a
requirement.
STUDENTS USUALLY earn
the equivalent of $ 100 per week
and are tax-exempt.
Transportation abroad usually
consists of a chartered flight of
students and faculty. Last year,
students and faculty were able
to fly from Tampa to London
ound-trip for $220.

recently gave its approval for skill machines
on-campus so all skilled players" can ply their
skills at the Rat.

Blind Use
New Radio
A new unit designed by RCa
for the blind and called the
Audio Center radio also
carries braille-studded control
knobs for AM/FM radio and
tuning dials that for the first
time bring in the sound from
VHF and UHF television. A
visually handicapped person thus
can now enjoy the chatter of
Johnny Carson or the theatrics
of Bonanza, which always have
been video-oriented.
But theres quite a lot to just
listen to.



MWOTX4OC.X.X'REGISTRATION AID oomoooooome
Know Teachers
With SG Lists
Most UF students will have a chance to know who their
teachers are for next quarter.
ACCORDING TO Gail Merein, Student Government
secretary of academic affairs, a listing with names of professors
and the courses they are teaching will be posted outside of the
individual department offices in most colleges.
She said most of the colleges had cooperated with SG to
make up this listing, except the College of Engineering.
However, some of the departments in that college will make
listings of professors and courses available to students.
SOME COLLEGES will not have the listing in the
departments, but will be available in the deans offices.
Business Administration: listings of professors and courses
will be available in the deans office; all departments from BA.
will be included.
Journalism and Communications: there will be one copy
available for students in the deans office.
University College: departments will post a listing of
professors and courses, there will be one additional copy in SG
offices Monday, when registration starts.

GROWL. .
£mMPA6EM^J|
graduate student enrollment
among state universities.
UF has a graduate student
enrollment of 5,265, not 4,225
as earlier reported. FSU has
4,274 graduate students.
OConnell stated that the
athletic department would be
taking a harder line regarding
their employes. The people who
work there should go through
the proper channels if they want
changes.
In response to a question on
the effect on higher education of
a new Democratic state
administration, OConnell said
Gov.-elect Reubin Askew
understands the needs of higher
education of this institution. I
am convinced we will have an
attentive ear.
Spring Semester, 1970.
mwm ml
fSj rallies
Mayday.
A film on the
New Haven rally
to free Bobby
Seale.
Hick
Out
On your local Public Television
station.

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The Bethlehem Asylum, Ampex recording artists
now appearing at the Rathskeller, will present a free
show today at noon on the Reitz Union terrace. The

ASYLUM PRESENTS FREE CONCERT

.Friday. November 6. 1970. The Florid* Alligator*

group is appearing at the Rathskeller tonight and
tomorrow with two shows nightly at 8 and 10:30
p.m.

Page 3



Page 4

\, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 6, 1970

WHAT'S HAPPENING
/

PASTE UP: The General Dames
will sponsor an Arts and Crafts
course for aD Dames members in
Union room C-4 at 8 pjn. Nov.
9.Afeeof $330 is required for
five lessons. Those wishing to
attend are asked to bring
scissors, g|ne, thin cardboard and
pad backs to the first class.
A JEWISH RAP: Rabbi Dr. Max
A. Ijpsnhitz, of Beth Torah
Congregation, North Miami
Beach will be available at the
Hflld Foundation Nov. 9 and 10
for conferences with members
and friends of his congregation.
Those who would like to join
him for damn Nov. 9 at the
Foundation are asked to call
372-2900 for reservations.
THE MOUSE THAT ROARED:
The Council of International
Relations United Nations
Association is a new chib on
campus with an international
voice.' There will be a meeting
of all those interested in the
organization Sunday at 7:30
pan. in rooms 122-123 of the
Union.
RUGGERS BEAT IT OUT: The
UF rugby team will play the
Georgia team on Norman field
tonight at 7:30 pjn. Admission
is free.
NIGHT CHIRPERS: The UF
cricket team will practice
Saturday on Alice field at 10
am
AND IVE BEEN WORKING
LIKE A DOG: The Beatles first
flick, A Hard Days Night will
play in the Union auditorium
Friday. The Stalking Moon,
for all the Gregory Peck fans will

EVERYTHING H
YOUTH EVER
WANTED TO BS
KNOW #g fgH
ADOUTP M
DEER %M
(Btrt didn t know p/u* postage
wtiom to ask) and han fn '*
At last... in one great book ... a delightful mixture of lore, myth
and anecdote never before assembled in a single volume.
For instance, do you know how many bottles of beer it would take to
float the battleship Missouri? Or what beer can do for orchids? Youre
planning a party and you need to know how to tap a keg, and how
many glasses of beer you can get from a half-barrel... and how many
aervtngs you should allow per male guest... and per female. Maybe
beer steins intrigue you, and youd like to know more about them.
Bearch no longer... the answers are all here in Falstaffs Complete
Beer Book. And thats not nearly all- Youll chuckle at author Fred
Birmingham's light-hearted history of beer ... and youll join him in a
brewery tour with the brswmaster as your guide. Theres even a glos glossary
sary glossary of little-known brewing terms ... because everyone should know
what a swtefcer is! And wait HI you try "Hungerburgers made with
beer!
The perfect gift for Dad... or a fraternity brother... or even for
Unde Charley. In fact this deluxe paperback belongs on every book bookshelf
shelf bookshelf and baCkbarl
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play there Saturday, and
Bergmans Smiles of a Summer
Night will play Sunday. Times
are 5:30, 8, and 10:30 p.m.
Price for all is 50 cents.
FACULTY IN MATHERLY:
The annual fall meeting of Phi
Beta Kappa will be held Nov. 9
at 3:30 p.m. in Matherly
auditorium. All faculty members
are urged to attend.
NO GROW: An open meeting of
Zero Population Growth (ZPG)
will be held at 2 p.m. in the
Plaza of the Americas Nov. 8.
RELIGIOUS RAP: College Life,
sponsored by Campus Crusade
for Christ, will be held Sunday
at 9:31 pjn. in the Broward Hall
recreation room. Crusade
leadership training class will be
held tonight at 7 p.m. in room
346 of the Union.
HEALTHY BOOKS: The
J. Hillis Miller Health Center
Library will host the semi-annual
meeting of the Florida Medical
Librarians all day today.
ARTY DISPLAYS: The
Gainesville Fine Arts Association
will sponsor an annual sidewalk
show and sale at the Westgate
Student Center 9 a.m. to 6 pjn.
There will be an auction at
noon.
SOUTH OF THE BORDER: The
second part of a four-part study
of Latin America will be held in
the lounge of the University
Methodist Church from 9:30 to
11:30 tonight. Dr. William
Carter, assistant professor of
Latin American studies, will be
the guest speaker.

ITS YOUR SHOW:
Applications are now being
taken for the positions of
general chairman and assistant
general chairman of Student
Government Productions.
Applications may be obtained
from the Student Activities desk
in the Union, and must be
turned in by Nov. 13.
ETHICAL TECHNOLOGY:
There will be a panel discussion,
Ethics in a Technological
Society, led by G. Ronald

The Sisters of A$E invite everyone
to their
OPEN HOUSE
Friday, November 6, BPM l2
in honor of the 1970 pledge class
Featuring CELEBRATION

.STOP!
DON'T MISS
THE
semi-annual
Book&Reoord
Nov. 4.5.56 SJ
9T)oam-420mil^r
pMit: 392-0114 I
SBHBBBS J V,;
CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE

Dalton from biological sciences.
It will be held Nov. 8 at TO: 30
a.m. at the Unitarian-Universalist
Fellowship, 2814 NW 43rd St.
INTER-VARSITY RELIGION:
The Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship will sponsor a Bible
exposition on I Peter in the New
Testament tonight at 8 p.m.
room 349 of the Union.
CLOUD NINE: The residence of
any good angel. Angel Flight

by Maryann* Gillis
, i --

rush will be Nov. 9 from 7 to
7:45 for freshmen and 8 to 8:45
for sophomores and juniors. It
will be in rooms 122-123 of the
Union.
TENANTS ORGANIZE: The
Tenants Union is looking for
students to help organize the
union for their apartment
complex. Anyone interested, call
Mike Pugh, secretary of legal
affairs at 392-1665 and leave
your name, phone number and
apartment complex.



High Turnover In Union Parking Lot

By LINDA CREESY
Alligator Writer
Have you been complaining
about being charged to park in
the Reitz Union lot lately? Well,
there is a reason.
The purpose of the Union lot
is to serve the community as
well as students, according to
Lee Burrows, director of Traffic
and Parking Regulations.
THE CHARGE IS made to
provide a revenue for the
operation of the lot, Burrows
said. Two free hours are
provided so people who use the
facilities can eat, get haircuts or
use the recreational area will be
able to park without
charge, Burrows said.
We have gone through all
channels to have our operation
approved. Burrows
added, Were trying to control
the number of automobiles
entering and leaving the lot
daily, not trying to make a
profit*
We have been processing

ODK Evaluation
Due Next Week

The 1970 Omicron Delta
Kappa (ODK) Course and
Teacher Evaluation Magazine
will arrive next week in time for
at least half of the registration
week.
O\JR JACKSONVILLE
printer has assured us that a
large portion of the 11,000
copies will arrive Nov. 13 in time
for the second week of
registration, Managing Editor
Ken Driggs said.
He said a two-week delay on
the part of the printer caused
the late arrival of the 80-page
booklet.
We are a bit irritated about
the delay, but the printer has us
under a barrel. He has assured
me a large part of the quantity
ordered will arrive Friday,

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approximately 1,000 cars daily.
If we didnt hand out tickets, we
wouldnt be able to control the
lot, Burrows said.
TICKETS ARE given out
during the entire period the lot
is open (7:30 am. 6 pm.)..
The reason for this is to
prevent all-day free parking. If
cars enter the lot at 3 pm., no
charge will be assessed,
Burrows said.
We don't open the 'in' gate
after 4 pm. the reason for this
is we would have no proof of
when you came in. You could
enter the lot at 10 am. and rip
up your ticket. Then if you left
at 4:30 that afternoon, there
would be no way you could be
charged, Burrows said.
The attendant is on duty to
provide information to
passers-by, read the ticket to see
if there is a charge and to make a
decision as to the charge.
BURROWS MENTIONED the
possibility of more automatic
gates on campus in the future.
The rules and regulations of
the Union lot are as follows:

Driggs said.
THE MAGAZINE will be
distributed free to university
students, and is the first
published result of a course and
teacher evaluation. All 100- and
200-level courses and many
professors are reviewed in the
text.
The magazine was financed
largely by Student Government,
the course evaluation was
conducted spring quarter by
ODK.
A lot of people worked
especially hard on this thing, and
I feel it will be of great value to
students.
Well announce later in the
week where the magazine will be
distributed, Driggs said.

SERVES COMMUNITY TOO

The parking lot is available
to all vehicles. The regulations
are designed to encourage a high
turnover rate of parking spaces,
in order to provide a space for
those persons using the Union.
Regulations apply to
vehicles (including motor
scooters) except university
owned and operated vehicles
with state license plates and
marked commercial delivery
vehicles using loading zones.
Attendants will be on duty
7:30 am. to 6 pm. and will be
stationed on the main drive to
the Union just south of the
entrance to the parking lot.
All vehicles will be given
tickets.
Commercial vehicles using
the parking lot will be charged
regular rates.
All cars leaving without
tickets will be presumed to have

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arrived at 7:30 am. and will be
charged accordingly.
Any car arriving after 3 pm.
will be ticketed but will not be
charged when leaving.
Cars of overnight guests
staying in the Union will be
marked at the guest desk and no
charge will be made.
The $2 maximum charge
will be assessed to anyone who

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Friday, November 6, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

presents a parking card from a
previous date or fails to present
a parking card at the time of
exit.
Any person who does not
or cannot pay parking fees will
be issued a citation in addition
to the parking fee charge.
Rates are as follows: The
first two hours are free; the third
hour is 50 cents; the fourth hour
is a $1 and the fifth hour and up
is $2.

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 6, 1970

World Wrap-Up

MOSCOW (UPI) The Soviet
government will soon release the
three American Army officers,
including two generals and a
major, and the Turkish colonel
detained since their light plane
strayed into Soviet Armenia on
Oct. 21, unofficial Soviet
sources said Thursday. Neither
the U. S. Embassy nor
competent Soviet authorities
would confirm the reports.
* *
PHNOM PENH (UPI) The
Cambodian army will be
increased to 200,000 persons by
the end of the year, the high
command announced today. The
army is predominantly male but
there are many women under
arms in this war-torn nation.
Announcement of the
increases in the Cambodian
military came as U. S.
headquarters in Saigon reported
that 24 Americans were killed in
Indochina fighting last week,
lowest toll for any seven-day
period in five years.
* *
ST. LAURENT-DU-PONT,
France (UPI) A commission
investigating the dance hall fire
that killed 145 youths said
today a coroners report revealed
the blaze started when one of
the victims threw a lighted
match on a plastic-covered chair.
The investigating commission
said coroner Andre Viossat also
reported the plastic decorations
in the 5-7 dance hall gave off
an important quantity of gas
when burned which probably
had a considerably devastating
effect.
Viossat also told the
commission the dance hall was
not built according to the letter
of architectural plans approved
by building authorities.
* *
PARIS (UPI) U.S. and
North Vietnamese negotiators at
the Paris talks quarreled bitterly
today over the significance of
the American elections. A U. S.
spokesman said the Communists
used extreme and insulting
language.
Stephen Ledogar, the
spokesman for the U.S.
delegation, said the meeting was
adjourned after a sharp
exchange which followed
personally insulting, derogatory
remarks made by Xuan Thuy
about the President of the
United States.
Thuy, the chief North
Vietnamese negotiator, was
addressing his U. S. counterpart,
Ambassador David K. E. Bruce.
* *
HELSINKI (UPI) Failure
by the United States and Russia
to get down to serious business
soon could erode a strategic
THE
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1718 W. Univ. Ave.
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Specialists
Desks, Lamps, Files,
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arms limitation agreement by
the time it eventually is reached,
authoritative sources said today.
Ever since the strategic arms
limitation talks (SALT) began a
year ago, missile development in
the Soviet Union and the United
States has gone on with speed
and effectiveness.
Au t horitative sources said
that all this time missile
developments have been pushed
ahead both numerically and to
improve their performance,
accuracy and guidance systems.
* *
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Federal Trade Commission
(FTC) today accused the
nations five largest tire
companies of violating antitrust
laws through a S2O
million-a-year system of leasing
tires to bus companies.
The complaint named
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.,
the Firestone .Tire & Rubber
Co., the B. F. Goodrich Co., the
General Tire and Rubber Co., all
of Akron, Ohio, and Uniroyal,
Inc., New York.
* *
ROME (UPI) Italy and
Communist China ended 20
months of negotiations
Thursday with agreement on the
establishment of diplomatic
relations between Rome and
Peking for the first time, official
sources reported. They said an
official announcement could
come within the next 24 hours.
* *
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon considers
Tuesdays election a
tremendous success and
believes the new make-up of the
Senate will be very helpful in
promoting his domestic and
foreign policy programs, the
White House said Thursday.
* *
LONDON (UPI) Mayor
John V. Lindsay of New York
said Thursday he has no plans to
run for the U. S. presidency in
1972 and no intentions of
changing political parties.
Asked whether he had any
plans to run for president in two
years, Lindsay told United Press
International flatly, No,
absolutely none at all.
And as to any possibility he

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would switch to the Democratic
Party, Lindsay replied there
was none whatsoever.

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EAG Collects
Aluminum Cans

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Writer
Get off your can! read the
cardboard containers placed near
the vending machines on
campus.
DONATED BY THE
Pepsi-Cola company, 100 bins
have been placed by the
Environmental Action Group
(EAG) on campus.
Bins have been placed in 10
different areas in the Gainesville
community.
For each can returned to the
Reynolds Aluminum Company,
EAG will be paid one-half cent.
The money will be used to pay
student can collectors and the
cost of hauling the cans to the
compost plant where the cans
will be recycled into steel and
tin.
THE PURPOSE OF the bins is
two-fold. According to EAG
President Brad Raffle, The
reason we are undertaking the
program is not only to combat
Utter.
Aluminum takes an
inordinate amount of power to
produce, Raffle said, If we
can recycle the cans we can cut
down on a large amount of
power used.
Raffle stressed the importance
of placing only all-aluminum
cans in the containers.
FSM Meets
Sunday P.M.
The Florida Student
Movement will meet at 7:30
p.m. Sunday night to discuss
demands to be made at the
Ripped-Off Rally scheduled
for Tuesday at the Plaza of the
Americas.
The special meeting is open to
anyone interested and will be
held Sunday at 7:30 p.m. in
room 357 of the Reitz Union.
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THERE ARE SEVERAL
ways to determine if a can is
all-aluminum:
The bottom of the can is
rounded.
The sides of the can are
seamless.
The can is made of soft,
Ughtweight, pliable material.
The can may be printed
with an all-aluminum
marking.
The can may have an r
trademark on the bottom for
Reynolds Aluminum.
PEPSI-COLA CANS are not
all-aluminum.
EAG is looking for workers to
collect and haul the cans to the
compost plant weekly.
Transportation will be provided
and the pay is sl2. Those
interested may call the EAG
office.

Why isn't a big
company like General Electric
doing more to clean up
the environment?

How much can one company do
to clean up the environment?
Until the problems of pollution
are under controluntil its effects
are reversedno company can ever
be doing "enough."
What follows is a listing of
things General Electric is doing to
ease environmental problems.
Some are new. Some are as old as
twenty-five years.
Should we be doing more?
Yes, of course. Every company
should. These are only a few of the
more important ones. But every day
sees us take more steps in many
more directions.
General Electric is working
toward a process that will use
bacteria to convert garbage into a
high-protein food for cattle. One
possible answer to the mounting
garbage problem.
Modern, pollution-free mass transit
from General Electric is carrying
more and more commuters into cities
without their cars.
GE pioneered the development of
nuclear power plants. A nuclear
plant makes electricity without
making smoke. While there is still

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the problem of thermal effects, it's
being tackled on a site-by-site basis
and can be solved. But for now,
increasing demands for power can
be met without an increasing
output of air pollution.
GE has developed a waste wastetreatment
treatment wastetreatment unit to significantly
reduce the water pollution from
ships and boats.
We have been chosen by the
federal government to solve the
problem of jet-engine noise for the
aviation industry. Our present jet is
already quieter than those on the
passenger planes of the Sixties, and
yet it's nearly three times as powerful.
GE designed and built an
undersea habitat called "Tektite."
Several teams of scientists have lived
in the habitat while studying coral coralreef
reef coralreef ecology and ocean pollution.
We're designing an earth-resources
satellite which will be used for a
worldwide survey of the oceans.
A first step toward the ultimate
control of water pollution.
Our newest jet airplane engine,
for the DC-10, is designed to be
smoke-free. Os course, there's more
to jet exhaust than just smoke. And
our goal is to one day make them
run totally clean.
General Electric makes high hightemperature
temperature hightemperature vortex incinerators for
GENERAL ELECTRIC.

Friday, November 6, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

the complete combustion of many
types of solid waste. Complete
combustion drastically reduces the
amount of leftover ash, as well as
virtually eliminating air pollutants.
The problems of the environ environment
ment environment are many. And some of the
solutions will be difficult and
costly. But, as you can see, we're
working on them.
Why are we running this ad?
We're running this ad, and
others like it, to tell you the things
General Electric is doing about the
problems of man and his
environment today.
The problems concern us
because they concern you. We're a
business and you are potential
customers and employees.
But there's another, more
important reason. These problems
will affect the future of this country
and this planet. We have a stake in
that future. As businessmen. And,
simply, as people.
We invite your comments.
Please write to General Electric,
570 Lexington Ave., New York, N.Y.
10022.

Page 7



Page 8

t, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 6, 1970

EDITORIAL
Parker: Another
Gator Great?
It was only two days ago that John Parker said, The
drums are rolling for my head. I guess when people feel
threatened they think only of retaliation.
Parker was instrumental in forming the Union of Florida
Athletes (UFA) on campus. For the last few years, he had
given 100 per cent, as coaches are fond of saying, to the
cross country and track teams. He was an All-Southeastern
Conference champion. Currently enrolled in the College of
Law, Parker was an assistant track coach and a section
adviser at Yon Hall.
The UF athletic department and Athletic Association felt
threatened by the UFA. The drums rolled Wednesday; John
Parker was fired by Athletic Director Ray Graves.
Why?
Graves said, In my opinion, anyone on the payroll
should be loyal to the programs. Our coaching staff and I
feel in view of Johns recent statement (in The Alligator)
and his attitude, he is no longer capable of carrying out the
responsibility for which he was designated. Under the
circumstances I was compelled as athletic director to take
this action.
John Parker was fired for his beliefs and nothing else.
Graves admitted Parker was carrying out his responsibilities
as assistant coach and section adviser. But because of his
involvement with the UFA, Graves believed Parker to be
disloyal.
John Parker was and is not disloyal. He, in fact, has been
trying to help athletics on this campus, perhaps to save
athletics here.
Students are no longer relating to athletics. Academics
are far more important, they believe, and this is true. Parker
hoped to improve the image of the UF athlete through the
UFA, and to convince students that yes, athletics really do
belong.
The time has come for the athletic department to realize
that authoritarian tactics are no longer effective. Athletes
are not the obedient cattle they once were. And the athletic
department is not the Pentagon.
Parker realized this, along with many UF athletes. He
realized that the athletic department was not
communicating with its athletes. He realized this
communication gap is jeopardizing the entire UF
athletic program. The Union of Florida Athletes, Parker
believed, could be the bridge between the old fogey
network of athletic administration and the new athlete.
During the athletic forum in the Plaza of the Americas
Wednesday Parker told Graves that there was a
railroading atmosphere at council meetings between
coaches and athletes. He said athletes were not fairly
represented, there was no voting, and that athletes did not
voice their opinions for fear of reprisal from their coaches.
In other words, the council meetings were a joke. A few
selected athletes got to sit in on coaches meetings and listen
to them make regulations.
Graves response to Parker in the Plaza Wednesday was a
classic.
He said, Thats the way weve always done things and
thats the only way to do things. Weve done things like that
in the past and we have to do it that way.
Well, Coach Graves, that may be the way the athletic
department has administered its policies in the past, but it is
not the only way to do things and it will not be.
The UFA is not going to fold. It will remain and grow, as
more athletes become disenchanted by the heavy-handed
administration. This will happen whether Ray Graves, Doug
Dickey, Bill Potter and others in the athletic department
who clutch the status quo only because it is the status quo
like it or not.
And John Parker will remain and he will continue to
organize athletes. He will continue to believe the way he
does and he will continue to speak out.
You see, Coach Graves, you have not converted a man
merely because you have silenced him.
Alligator Staff
Denise Valiants Craig Heyl
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
Pubittwd by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Question is, can we get it cleaned up before 1972?

The Price Os Shame

Last May Dick Gregory,
speaking about the Kent State
murders, said that college
students are the new niggers.
Just as pigs used to squeal all
niggers look alike, today they
shoot students at will because
students, too, all look alike as
far as the murderers are
concerned. And the murderers
of students, plus the hard hats
who stop short of murder, are
by the cops and courts our
country, just as they used to
exonerate the klan cops who
celebrated Saturday night in
Philadelphia, Miss., by dumping
civil rights workers bodies in the
nearest ditch.
As everyone should know by
now, an Ohio grand jury
exonerated the trigger-happy
National Guardsmen unleashed
by Governor Rhodes, indicting
25 non-Guardsmen. The man
who directed the grand jurys
investigation, Seabury Ford,
said on Sunday, Oct. 25, that
the Guardsmen should have
shot all the troublemakers.
Okay.
ACCORDING to the Oct. 30
Miami Herald, Seabury Ford
once was a member of the Ohio
National Guard. I quote from
the Herald: He belonged to the
107th Cavalry in Cleveland in
the 19205. Soldiers of Troop G
in the 107th Cavalry, with
headquarters at nearby Ravenna,
were among the troops on the
Commons May 4 when National
Guardsmen fired into group of
demonstrating students. Is this
legalized murder?
In a letter to the Alligator,
Oct. 29, Ellen Levitov asked:
Did you know that a boy was
killed by police in Tampa
because they thought he had
dope on him? Well, I read The
Tampa Times of Oct. 30, and
here are some letters to the
editor:
On behalf of a great many
residents of North Tampa I want
to thank the Hillsborough
County deputies for their
bravery ..... We must have

DAVE MILLER

greater protection from these
wild-eyed, filthy so-called
students.
Hats off to Officers Chiles
and Fairfax for the job they
have done in restoring decency
to our neighborhood. I think the
decent people of Tampa will
agree with me.
A NEW York Post headline of
Oct. 23 read: Candidates
Running Against Students.
Bernard Bard wrote: Campus
unrest has become a major issue
in the November elections,
according to a nationwide survey
published in the current issue of
the Chronicle of Higher
Education, a weekly for college
administrations. Many
politicians feel they have found
an issue that can win votes for
them and they are not likely to
give it up, the publication said,
adding the issue is being used
primarily by the Republicans,
led by Vice President Agnew.
According to Harriet Van
Home (New York Post, Oct.
23), Spiro T. Agnew said that
Dr. Spock had produced a
generation that sits down at the
table with dirty bare feet. She
adds, concerning Agnew: No
matter how philosophical you
try to be about this countrys
swerve to the right, it still comes
as a shock to hear Mr. Agnew
again perverting the truth and
pandering to prejudice while the
crowd roars its approval
Perhaps no elected official has
ever strack so many low blows
from high places.
I have some quotes from A1
Capp, as printed in Esquire
Nov., 1970:
Students are tearing up
campuses today for the same

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement
Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor
Loretta Tennant
News Editor
it
T'i- . Y ; ;
Ken McKinnon
News Editor

reason a few years ago they were
wetting their beds.
The real Kent State
martyrs were the kids in
uniform.
The opinions of
18-year-olds are valuable on
things they know something
about, such as puberty and
hubcaps, but nothing else.
Alas! A big, bad deputy
shot and killed a poor, pitiful
pusher and user! And the
brains at the University
demand an investigation.
Baloney! I wish I knew who to
see to have the ACLU investigate
why my tax money must be
spent to help support
universities so that some hippies,
yippies, junkies, punkies, etc.
can spend all their time rioting
bombing and burning.
The President showed
angelic restraint when he called
students bums.
THERE YOU have it. Were
bums who steal hubcaps, not
human beings. In the latest Lil
Abner episodes, Capp shows
long-haired, bearded students
with flies buzzing around their
faces. This is from the man who
said Anyone who can walk to
the welfare office can walk to
work and There isnt any real
hunger in the country any
more.
We are the new niggers. We all
look alike, so were targets in the
Silent Majoritys shooting
gallery. But we just may shoot
back. Langston Hughes dream
deferred may wrinkle up like a
raisin in the sun, but, then again,
it just may explode. i



Unfounded Dogma
MR. EDITOR:
I want to commend John
Parker for his review of Morris
Cohens The Dark Side of
Religion.
Cohen has accurately exposed
the role of religious superstitions
in our society. Religion is not
only the justification of cruelty
but, through acceptance of
illogical and unfounded dogma,
its adherents learn to suspend
clear thinking whenever the
result is to their liking. Thus
religion has a harmful and
destructive effect upon the
ability of human beings to
coexist.
BILLY FINCH
Racist Disguise
MR. EDITOR:
In response to Graves
statement that the UF has been
actively attempting to recruit
blacks for nine years but that
blacks have thus far been unable
to reach the standards of
admission necessary for the
UF
This is a racist (particularly
Southern) disguise and
euphemism which is directly
analagous to the literacy tests
and other devices used by the
white supremacists to keep
blacks from voting.
Okay, if everyone from
Florida schools has to score a
certain amount on some
placement tests then why not
get some blacks from out of
state?
After all, some of the white
athletes arent from Florida high
schools.
As another alternative, blacks
from junior colleges could be
signed. But, again, this university
spent nine years looking for
black athletes. I cannot
over-emphasize the relation
between entrance requirements
and the deliberate exclusion of
blacks as both students and as
athletes.
Are you looking for blacks,
Bartlett, Dickey and Graves?
Let's examine the professional
ranks: in basketball they have to
recruit whites all-black
starting lineups were (until
recent expansion) too frequent
to please the front offices of the
teams.
The crowds want their white
hopes on the hardcourt.
Blacks took over basketball.
Why, then, no black basketball
players at Florida? They rule the
game at the high school, college,
and professional levels.
If you really want winning
teams then you're paying for
losers in basketball.
The lily-white basketball team
is really a joke even in the weak
(except for Kentucky) SEC.
There are dozens of eager,
responsive, (and, yes, even
submissive, Graves) better
qualified black athletes in the
ghettoes of Chicago who might

READERS FORUM

even consider attending the UF
if they were sought. Some of the
black junior colleges or high
schools in the Chicago area
would probably run the Gators
out of the gym. (but that gets
into another area; Florida never
plays against black schools in
major sports such as basketball
and football.)
Youve got the power to deny
the first amendment rights to
your athletes you may kick
athletes off the team when they
speak out you may ignore the
black or Latin American athlete
you may never play against a
black school but dont lie
(Dickey) and say that you have
nothing to do with the path of
history when your power
influences the lives of others.
Programs are now in existence
elsewhere to lower requirements
for minorities.
Florida is not a leader in
progressive educational reforms
but a timid, racist institution
that adopts policy only when it
seems that an overwhelming
majority of universities in the
SEC (or the South) make similar
decisions.
It seems improbable that
Florida will become an
innovator and the best bet is
that maintaining the status quo
will be the most radical thing
that the university authorities
can do.
808 NITZ
Supine Targets
MR. EDITOR:
I am forwarding a copy of
Parkers latest to the society for
the Prevention of Flogging Dead
Horses, for such disciplinary
action as they may deem fit. It is
a disappointment that the only
writer on the Alligator with any
sense or style should waste his
talent withering supine targets.
Taking the church or the
inarticulate fraternities seriously
enough to bully them smacks of
paranoia, and shows at best a
lack of grace.
Everyone knows that men
were formerly provoked to
violence by liturgical niceties
incomprehensible to us today.
Now and then relic crops up, but
better ignored than debated.
Let the Parkerian wit and
passion take on the current and
ambiguous targets men are
currently provoked to: violence
by astonishing political and
social niceties let him take on
those who can answer
articulately. If you read his
JOMO column the club makes
me nervous you will see hes
better that way.
HUGHES CHRISTOPHER
Means, Not Ends
MR. EDITOR:
Well people, there it is for all
of us to see; just one more
depredation against an individual
whos principles got in the way
of that infernal machine we call
the Athletic Association.
If it were a matter of

inefficiency or incompetence
one could at least see the cold
logic of it.
But for those who know
anything about him, words like
inefficient and incompetent
could never be applied to John
Parker.
And as for loyalty or the lack
of it, which seems to be Johns
mortal sin, one must ask
precisely what kind of loyalty
Ray Graves is talking about.
Ask any member of the track
team about Johns loyalty to his
teammates or his dedication to
excellence in his field of
endeavor and hell probably
think youre kidding.
J ohn takes running very
seriously and he is one of the
finest milers to ever don the
orange and blue.
But the kind of loyalty that
Graves is talking about can be
defined very simply as: BLIND
OBEDIENCE.
To Graves, it isnt how well an
athlete performs as a runner,
swimmer, tennis player etc. that
counts, (lets not even mention
performance in the classroom)
No, it has little if anything to
do with the prowess or
sportsmanship that an athlete
displays. Only this: How well
does he SERVE THE SYSTEM?
Beneath all the pious
mouthings about building
character, instilling certain
values etc., is this basic truth.
Athletes exist vis a vis the
Machine, as nothing more than
servo-mechanisms.

People Cant Take A Joke

Some people just cant take a
joke.
Heck-fire, its getting so a guy
cant poke a little fun any more
without somebody breaking a
leg to get to the panic button.
Now though, I guess everyone
knows where John Parker stands
with his radical ideas about
athletics. And I suppose, too,
that everyone knows where the
Athletic Association stands on
some basic American principles.
IT SEEMS that John was a
little upset about being fired for
his beliefs, even though he
should have known what to
expect.
A guy just can't go around
forever spouting radical rhetoric
about fair representation,
freedom of speech and freedom
of association without someone
taking offense.
But when he discussed his
case with his lawyer, the young
attorney smiled pleasantly and
said:
Sure, Ill do it. I think it

Alligator Staff
Denise Valiante Craig Heyl
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Friday, November 6, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

They have no value in and of
themselves no matter how well
they perform either as
individuals or as members of a
well integrated (sic) team.
They are merely means, not
ends; an infinite number of
interchangeable parts that must
be made to whirl smoothly and
noiselessly in a machine
carefully designed to cater to the
bigoted sensibilities of many
who patronize the athletic
association.
John Parker knows all of this
and more. He tried to do
something to redress the
means-end relationship and
make the machine more
responsive to the human needs
of its constituent parts. John
Parker was one part that got a
little too noisy and the result
was predictable.
John Parker got greased.
In doing this, Graves & Co.
have shown us that their
Machine is either unwilling or
unable to compromise with the
legitimate requests of those who
are supposedly the raison detre
of athletics on campus.
If they persist in this course
much longer there will be little
choice for those of us who want
athletics placed in reasonable
perspective.
The Machine will have to be
trashed.
RUSSELL TAYLOR

CRAIG HEYL

would be fun.
1 GUESS hes got the right
attitude. If you let yourself get
completely emotionally involved
in things like this, it has a
tendency to warp your
perspective.
J ohns perspective is not
warped.
He believes in the constitution
and intends to give some other
people a quickie course in
Americanism.
Although the firing is a
veritable grab4>ag of first
amendment questions, and since
the didsion was made following
John's comments in
Wednesday's Alligator, it boils
down to good 'ol freedom of
press.
I DON'T think athletics is the
most important thing in the

Believing In Rights
MR. EDITOR:
John Parker has been fired
by Ray Graves and friends for
no other apparent reason than
believing in rights guaranteed by
the Constitution of the United
States.
It is quite evident that the
Athletic Association uses a
different Consitution unknown
to many of us.
I am an eligible varsity athlete
at this University and the display
of unconcern in the past two
weeks on the part of Doug
Dickey and Ray Graves has put
me in a position to seriously
consider my role as a
representative of an Association
that doesnt believe in civil
liberties.
It was indeed a frustrating
Wednesday in the Plaza to know
the real truth and see that it was
being presented to the students.
I wish to withhold my name,
basically for fear of retaliatory
pressure from those select few
who have been given positions of
authority, namely the football
coaches.
Is this really America??????-
??????
NAME WITHHELD

world, though they mean a lot
John. But he doesnt think that
athletes having an effective voice
is one of the burning issues of
our times.
But he does believe that a
person cannot be discriminated
against for what he believes in
this country. Not yet, at least.
Its that simple. It is no longer
a murky issue of how long an
athlete's hair can be, or whether
he should be able to organize a
representative organization, or
whether he has a right to have a
voice in decisions that control
his life.
Now its a crystal-clear, black
and white case of a violation of
the rights of an American
citizen.
But then, who believes in
those silly ol rights anyway.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 6, 1970

Mendenhalls Models
Illustrate Overcrowding

By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
Alligator Writer
Insects represent masses of
people on a plastic world
assembled to illustrate the
dangers of increasing population.
Dr. Von t. Mendenhall,
assistant professor with the
University's Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences, built
two models of the world and
filled the major continents with
live crickets.

SGs Ombudsmen
Helps With Problems

By KATHY ROBERTS
Alligator Staff Writar
Who can I turn to?
This may be a familiar plaint
of every student seemingly
hung-up" on a problem.
NOW STUDENTS can take
their problems and complaints
to the official grievance center
of Student Government, the
Ombudsmen Action Line.
The Ombudsmen Office
originated in Sweden in 1809.
The word means
representative. U.S.
representatives are sometimes
referred to as ombudsmen
since they are representing their
constituents complaints.
The UF Ombudsmen concept
Range Opens
The University Police Pistol
Range will be opened Saturday
as a part of the Citizen's Safety
Council's Sight In for Safety
Day.
Students will be able to use
the range and targets free of
charge.
Police personnel and
instructors from the National
Rifle Association will check rifle
sights and give instruction of the
use of firearms.
Officers will also answer
questions on hunting season,
which opens Nov. 14.
Community support of the
program will produce a safer
hunting season, a police
spokesman said.
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
For information call
CASSELS
IN THE AIR
378-2646

One exhibit represents the
worlds current population of
35 billion with each cricket
depicting 10 million people.
The other model, containing
nearly twice as many insects,
predicts overcrowding of the
world in the year 2000.
The human population is
presently growing at the rate of
190,000 people a day, and
according to Dr. Mendenhall, the
impact of this population
explosion can not be accurately
assessed.

was created in '69 as an
individualized approach to
personal student problems. UF
Ombudsmen are 11 volunteer
members from the honorary
service club, Gamma Beta Phi.
STUDENTS CAN call the
Ombudsman office, rm. 232 of
the Reitz Union, from 1-5 p.m.
Monday-Friday and their
complaint will be recorded. The
next day the Ombudsman
replays the tape and contacts the
students who called. He then
goes to work solving the
problems.
All problems or grievances are
kept confidential.
We can generally help the
student or at least send him to
someone who can, said
Ombudsman Linda Sample.
MOST PROBLEMS are
campus oriented according to
Miss Sample. Some common
problems this quarter have been
concerned with housing
contracts, registration, and
football tickets.
The Ombudsman Action Line
hasnt been as big this quarter,
Miss Sample said, probably
because a lot of people dont
know it exists.
The Ombudsman Action Line
number is 392-1650. Students
can call or go into the office to
file their problems or
complaints.

Rb 1 H I mm jM V V b 1 B -..:>J>?£&K\?^tkSV\^K>} 'ssK^ J; iyh^u l

Feeding the masses of humans
will be a major problem and one
purpose of Dr. Mendenhalls
exhibit is to encourage students
to enter the agricultural sciences
and do something about trying
to feed the world's soaring
population.
Dr. Mendenhall named low
cost, high protein foods from
the oceans and crops such as
soybeans as areas meriting
research.
The crickets in Dr.
Mendenhall's model are fed
every four days. The death of
some of the insects in Asia,
Africa and Latin America vividly
illustrates the point of Dr.
Mendenhall's exhibit now on
display in the Architecture and
Fine Arts complex.

Correction
The American Federation
of Teachers (AFT) met
Wednesday for the first time
on campus since the spring of
this year, not since 1968 as
the Alligator stated.
The local AFT has
contacted the national
organization for funds to help
pay legal fees, not to bring
charges against UF. The local
attorney who has been hired
is not working on the Jones
case. He is working on the
Canney case.
The Alligator regrets these
errors.

4 : :

. ~ ~ s<. : : W
fe Y>
-' y ' Jro? v v:V- ; '4 '^>. | #il
DR. VON T. MENDENHALL
... displays his population model

LUMS DAILY SPECIALS!
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Lum's Features Famous Beers ON DRAFT
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e Pastrami Sandwich and French Fries
Lums Famous Sub

University Center
University of South Florida
presents
J>tont>&
w&WicJC
IN CONCERT
SATURDAY NOVEMBER 10,1970
CURTIS NIXON HALL 8:30 P.M.
Tampa, Florida
price $4.50 $5.50
Mail order c/o Warwick Concert
Please send self-addressed
stamped envelope



The Return
Os Just Desserts
By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
As any one who his bought the new Dylan album can tell you,
Three Angels doesnt finish side two as was indicated in the Dylan
review on Tuesday last. Father of Night ends the album. Father of
Night is a prayer-chant along the lines of Let it Be and Bridge over
Troubled Waters. It, with Day of the Locusts are the two most
interesting cuts on the album and are Dylan at his mystical best.
Father features a dark piano laying down an ominous beat and an
eerie chorus. Dylan chants the Fathers opposites, Father of Day,
fater of night., and then at the end pauses a religious light year
before singing, Father whom we most solemnly praise.
*
Speaking of records, a new record shop has opened that claims to
tell the lowest priced records in Gainesville. It is called Roc and is
located on NW 13th St. across from ABC liquors. All the records in
the store are selling at $3.00 for now but they will eventually sell at a
top price of $3.29 which is still 18 cents cheaper than any record I
can find in town. The diop also sells books and Marvel comics.
* *
SPEAKING of openings, a new double cinema has opened in
Gainesville, The Royal Park, which is located on West University past
34th St. Golly, gee, a new record store and a new movie house in one
week! What is this town coming to? Currently, Royal Park is showing
the forgettable Airport and the excellent Monte Walsh. In two weeks
time WUSA, the movie about right-wing politics with Paul Newman,
Joanne Woodward and Anthony Perkins will be coming as will
Catch-22.
* #
Not much has been written on the subject of books in this column
for various reasons but there are one or two around that might tide
you over any spare time you have in the final month of fall quarter.
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyns books are all excellent. Try First Circle if
you havent read any of him. A Day In the Life of Ivan Denisovitch, if
you think you havent any time.
Kurt Vonnegot Jr. is supposed to be the cult author of our
generation so be sure and read anything by him. Inspite of being a cult
author, Vonnegot is the most refreshing and original author around
today. His irreverance, fantasy and brilliant satire make his stories
outrageous and truthful absurdities. His most famous book Is
Slaughterhouse Five which is nothing more than his ultimate inability
to deal with the fact that America killed 130,000 Germans and
destroyed a beautiful, non-combatant city when the city of Dresden
was fire-bombed into oblivion in the closing days of WWII. Cats
Cradle, with its introduction of the religion of Bokonism, is just as
good. Once you read him youll want to read everything he has done.
ON A MORE bizarre, primitive note there is Jerzy Kosinski and his
two books, The Painted Bird and Steps. The Painted Bird is a novel
written in episodic almost self-contained chapters about a small boy
drifting the medieval back country of Poland during WWII. Kosinkis
fascination with sexual aberration and with superstitious cruelty
provides a fantastic and repulsive medium for exploring the brutality,
fear and sense of survival that exists in man, causing war and enabling
him to survive them.
Steps is a book of short stories written about one man and his
experiences with cruelty. Kosinski writes impassivly about truly
horrible things allowing the reader to realize that the cruelty he is
experiencing is common to man and many timesunthinking.
John Fowles, the author of The Collector and The Magus has
written his finest book, The French Lieutenants Woman. The story is
an exact replica of a classic Victorian tale, the dishonored woman, the
proper gentleman, their predicament. But Fowles causes 20th century
conceptions, humor and ecological conscience to continually intrude
into the story for comparison of Victorian values with our own. He
parodies the omniscient-author concept by writing himself into the
story to observe his characters first hand and then he reverses the
concept by letting the characters decide their own destiny. Fowles
feels that once characters are created they are autonomous creatures.
There are about five endings to the book, one to please the readers,
one to please the author, one to please the characters and two to find
out what would really happen.
SAVE!
I STARKE 0 /FLORIDA
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Friday. November 6, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

?, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 6, 1970

Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

GRADUATING SENIORS
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduation, granting
of credit or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
SENIORS WITH LOANS
If you are a graduating senior
and have a National Defense
Student Loan or a S.A.F.E.
Loan, you must complete the
exit interview procedure prior to
graduation in ofber to keep your
account current.
NATIONAL DEFENSE LOAN
PROGRAM
Students with approved release
of funds from the National
Defense Loan program tor the
winter quarter, and who have
pre-registered for that quarter,
may have fees deducted from
the loan. Fee cards should be
brought to Student Accounts
Office as soon as possible.
DEPOSITORY HOURS
Student Accounts in the Hub
will be open from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m., Jan. 4,1971. If lines are as
long as they have been in the
past, the lines will be regulated
so that there will be enough time
to wait on everyone inside by 3
p.m. There is an envelope drop
on the east wall of the
depository for students'
convenience.
COLLEGE WORK STUDY
PROGRAM
Students whose parents' income
is below $7,200 are eligible to
apply for the College Work
Study Program. Jobs are
available for November and
December. Interested students
should apply at the Student
Financial Aid Office, Room 23,
Tigert Hall.

Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest on Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance
3v j* llable for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement
CaD 392-0393 for monthly payment data for any type loan. "''*****j|^^^
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION J#R^
sth Avnu at M comor of 12th Street 3:30 p.m. Monday throuthFrijtw W W

Page of Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

TECHS WANTED
Students who qualifiy as a
registered x-ray technician and
an electronics technician may
apply for openings at the
Student Financial Aid Office,
Room 23, Tigert Hall.
SECOND QUARTER
RELEASES
University Controller Joseph P.
Hough has released information
concerning the adjustment to
second quarter releases for
educational and general and
health center budgets.
October budgetary ledgers
will reflect release adjustments
as follows:
Operating Expense 65 per
cent of operating budget
request;
Operating Capital Outlay
75 per cent of operating budget
request.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING NOV. 12
A meeting of the Graduate
Council is scheduled on
Thursday, Nov. 12 at 1:30 p.m.
in Room 235, Ribert Hall.
SLIDE RULE COURSE
The Florida Engineering Society
is sponsoring a slide rule course
Tuesday, Nov. 10, at 7 p.m. in
Room 211, Mechanical
Engineering Building. Anyone
interested in learning to rule a
slide rule may attend.
BLACK LAWYER TO SPEAK
NOV. 12
George W. Allen, a black
graduate of the University of
Florida's College of Law, will
speak on "Florida Justice: A
Double Standard?" at 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 11 in Norman
Hall Auditorium. His speech is
sponsored by the New
Elementary Program of the
College of Education.
FOREIGN STUDENTS
Those foreign students desiring
to accept hospitality in
Gainesville homes during
Thanksgiving, Nov. 26, are
requested to turn in their names
at the International Center.

INVENTORY CONTROL
PROGRAM
A recent memorandum from
University Controller Joseph P.
Hough discusses the inventory
control program. The recent
increase in the minimum value
of equipment to be recorded on
property records will necessarily
require adjustments in the
present inventory listings.
In order to effect these
adjustments the office will need
the assistance of each
department.
The inventories for this fiscal
year will be sent out as in the
past and will include all items
under SIOO. A physical
inventory of all items SIOO and
over and items of a sensitive
nature such as audio visual,
regardless of cost, will be made
and the room number noted on
the original copy of the
inventory. In addition, all desks,
file cabinets, equipment cabinets
and swivel type chairs will be
inventories and the room
location noted on the original
inventory listing.
The signed original of the
inventory listing must be
returned to Property
Accounting. When the signed
original is received the necessary
adjustments to delete all
equipment not included above
will be made.
Future requisitions will
require the following criteria be
applied to determine if the item
is to be purchased with
Operating Capital Outlay (OCO)
funds:
1. The cost of the item is
SIOO or more and the item has a
life of one year or more.
2. The item is of a negotiable
or sensitive nature such as a tape
recorder, camera, projector,
typewriter, record player or any
other audio visual equipment
regardless of cost.
3. The item is a desk, file
cabinet, supply cabinet, swivel
desk chair, power hand tool or
office machine.
4. The expenditiure is for a
major physical change in existing
buildings.
Questions concerning these
policy changes should be
addressed to Property
Accounting, 2-1238.

university calendar

Friday, November 6,1970
Womens Society of Christian
Service, Latin American
Study; Speaker: Dr. William
C. Carter, Wesley Foundation
Lounge, 9:30 a.m.
Union Movie, "Hard Days
Night", Union Aud., 5:30, 8,
10:30 p.m.
Block & Bridle, Little
International, Livestock
Pavillion, 5:45 p.m.
Federation of Cuban Students
Discussion on Cuba "Past &
Present", Union 361, 8:00
p.m.
Rathskeller Band: "Bethlehem
Asylum", 8:30 p.m.
Union Dance, "Birnam Wood",
Ballroom, 8:30 p.m.
Yulee Area Council Gator Hop,
Mallory Lobby, "Brothers
Grimm", 9 p.m.
Saturday, November 7,1970
Union Movie, 'The Stalking
Moon", Union Aud., 5:30,8,
10:30 p.m.
Rose Community Center
Concert, two bands,
University Aud., 8 p.m.
Rathskeller Band, "Bathlehem
Asylum", 8:30 p.m.
Gator Football, Univ. of Florida
vs Georgia, Jacksonville

iv?*; EI^L
j. .jf ; iw- !! VvjJ
The Quarterly is here and the waiting is over. The Quarterly is here
with fiction and poetry that are alive today, written by people that are
alive today.
We only did it for you.

Notices for the University Calendar
may be submitted to the Student
Activities desk, third floor of Reitz
Union or mailed to the Public Func Functions
tions Functions Office, G-72, Reitz Union. Dead Deadline
line Deadline for the Tuesday Alligator is the
previous Friday at noon; for the
Friday Alligator, the previous Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday at noon.

Sunday, November 8
Union Movie, "Smiley of a
Summer Night", Union
Aud., > 5:30,8,10:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge Club Meeting,
Union 150 C&D, 6:30 p.m.
Catholic Student Center Social
& Special Events Committee
Meeting, Catholic Student
Center, 7 p.m.
CIR UNA Meeting, Union 122,
123, 7:30 p.m.
Fla. Players, "A Man for All
Seasons", Constans Theatre,
8 p.m., Benefit AAUW
Student Loan Fund
Monday, November 9
C. 1.0. Film Festival & Int'l Club
Documentaries; Union Aud.,
5:30 p.m., 'The Shadow of
Melody" & "Portraits of the
East", 8:00 p.m., "La Dolce
Vita" & "Europe: Dawn to
Dusk"
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, Union
357, 361,7 p.m.
Science Fiction Club Meeting,
Union 356,8 p.m.
Fla. Players, "Man for All
Seasons", Constans Theatre,
8 p.m.
ON SALE AT UNION BOX
OFFICE
"A Man for All Seasons" Gen'l
Public $1.50, U.of F.
Students, 75 cents; Other
Students, SI.OODr. Ralph
Abernathy: Gen'l Public, 75
cents; U.of F. Students, 50
cents.



gator classifieds

.v.;.v.v.x-X'X*lvX*Xv-£vv-:X:Xt*v:*:-::
for sale
HONDA 350 Includes windshield,
luggage rack, helmet. Very good
condition. Makes good road and
campus bike. $525 call Reb
378-0105 (A-lt-35-p)
KEEP your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Electric upholstery
shampooers also available. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
ALTEC LANSING pa system 4 1203
power bottoms and new mixer
preamp. Best offer. Call 378-7865
evenings after 6:00 pm. (A-3t-35-p)
AKC reg. Poodle, sliver mlnature
female, 8 months, has all shots. 90$
Call 378-6247 after 5 pm.
(A-st-35-p)
TRIUMPH 650 CHOPPER Chrome
extended 6 inch forks custom paint,
seat-slssybar comb. Excellent Cond.
Clean $llOO or best 392-9616
(A-st-35-p)
Realistic portable stereo; 30 watt
amp, garrard turntable and
detachable speakers, only 6 mth old;
all for only $75 call 378-9531
(A-2t-35-p)
Stereo sacrifice, going to Germany 13
owt Pioneer amp/spkrs., Dokorder
2+2 tape deck $450. 378-6886 KR
will sell separately (A-st-35-p)
1970 Honda 175 CL excellent cond.
2 helmets; extra tire $450 or best
offer 378-91?9 (A-4t-34-p)
For Sale: bed In great shape I Only
$25. Call after 5. 372-3730
(A-2t-34-p)
Rummage sale, air cond-heat pump,
reverb unit, stereo, luggage, watches,
folding bed, fans, air cooler, albums,
books, morel 202 NW 15th St.
Sunday 1-5 pm or 378-6900
Bargains! I (A-2t-34-p)
FREE GUITAR LESSON I Meet Bob
Zuber, teacher, performer, and friend
here for 3 years. Finger style
specialist! Informa. 378-6900
(A-2t-34-p)
Gibson Kalamazoo bass amp. great
condition $175.00 Call after 5:00
376-3192 ask for Ken (A-2t-34-p)
BASSET HOUNDS
beautiful tri-colored, AKCreg.,
bred for temperament, 7 weeks old,
wormed, shots, males, females
378-7829 or 392-0872 (A-st-33-p)
1962 ford van, new paint, new tires,
new brakes, engine perfect, good for
camping or bands, $599, 378-7082
(A-3t-33-p)
Twin-lens reflex Minolta camera,
case, flash, filters, S6O. 392-1681,
room 330, Reitz Union. R. French.
(A-3t-172-p)
Sears Ken more apt. size refrlg. for
sale good condition cheap push
button defroster large freezer
compartment. Call 372-1212 Mary
Gage (A-2t-34-p)
HONDA 90 1969 exc. condition
Only 2500 miles. Step thru, with
auto, trans. $lB5 or best offer Inc
helment. Call Larry 373-2646.
(A-st-35-p)
ROTC Men: uniforms for sale size 40
Reg 1-dress blues, 2-Class A greens
call 372-7463 (A-3t-34-p)

Todays
more for your money meal
a.mORRISOITS
CAFETERIA
r -----i
| FRIDAY'S FEATURE |
J Morrison's Famous J
11 ROAST TURKEY j 1
| | With Mashed Potatoes | £
| Dressing, Gravy | £
o | and Cranberry Sauce | §
j 82<
I
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING
moisons
CAFETERIA ..beyond comparison!
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

Friday, November 6, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

for sale
For sale Honda S9O 1968 two
helments included runs good call
373-1534 and come by and see it
(A-st-30-p)
1970 Yamaha enduro 175 CTIB four
months old good condition SSOO
Phone 373-3350 (A-3t-33-p)
ONE CENT SALE. Buy one Item and
receive another for just one cent
more. CAMPUS CONE, 1226 W
University near Flagler. (A-3t-33-p)
68 Triumph 650 excellent cond. High
bars, roll bars, 2 helmets must sell
call Mitch 373-3854 *(A-st-34-p)
Add recorded music to your already
existing stereo phono system with a
Craig cassette stereo tape deck. Best
offer. Call 392-9972 after 10 pm
(A-3t-33-p)
Alrconditioner 20,000 BTU-Fedders
Cost 290. Asking $175.00 Call
372-5693. Very good condition
Married students 372-5693
(A-st-33-p)
Irregulars & seconds Beautlfui sheets
towels and plllowcaser. 103 SE First
St. Sheet & Towel Shop (A-20t-31-p)
for sale honda S-90, *69 low
mileage $230 call Dave 373-2771
(A-st-31-p)
CAMPSITES five of eight lots In the
ocala natl forest 6 ml from Eureka
within W ml of canal lots 80x100 ea
s2odn-s2omo for 2 yrs TOTAL
PRICE-NO INTEREST EVE
378-9385 (A-st-33-p)
FOR RENT
2 br townhouse apt. WW shag, A.C. 3
blocks to campus. Call 378-6898
after 5. 170 mo. Lease to June.
(B-3t-33-p)
MANAGER or GROUP WANTED to
lease Campus Cone delivery service.
SISOO per month, owner returning to
college. 372-3890 (B-st-33-p)
Small cottage for married couple. 4Va
miles from med center available Nov.
14. S7O per month. Call 378-9948
after 5:30. (B-3t-33-p)
AVAILABLE DEC. 12111 Very
reasonable 1 bdrm apt. 3 blocks from
campus A/C carpeting, pool, large
rooms. Call 378-0138 (B-3t-34-p)
2 or 3 persons for 2 br in large house
Each BR w/ private entrance large
kitchen central heat/ac near campus
rent 1 br or both Call Linda or Alan
after 6 pm 378-5522 (B-st-34-p)
WANTED
1 female to share Landmark apt. with
3 chicks 47.50 a month. Start winter
quarter. Call 376-7852 after 5 p.m.
(C-3t-33-p)
Male roommate for 4 bedroom 2
bath apt. 70 per month Inc. utilities
La Mancha apt. 3 lease through June
available Immediately (C-2t-34-p)

Page 13

WANTED
i ; : ; X-:-: ; :-:-X-: ; :-X ; x ; x2 ; x2 ; : ; X-x ; : ; : ; X ; X : : : x :
Male to share one bedroom apt. with
Vi utilities + $57.50 monthly. Bedrm.
kitch., and bath. Come by M-F3-6,
7-10 weekends, 12-6 1216 SW 2 Ave.
Apt. 22 (C-st-31-p)
Female needs housing (apt, room or
bed) near campus from Nov. 15 to
Dec. 4. Willing to pay months rent.
Call Sally 378-9784 after 6
(C-3t-35-p)
Small refrigerator, will pay up to S3O
if in good condition call 392-9204
anytime. (C-st-35-p)
Make $$ over xmas break!
Dependable couple needs room or
apt. over break Dec 12-Jan 3 will pay
up to SSO. Available for interview
392-7635 (C-3t-33-p)
Make $$ over xmas break!
Dependable couple needs room or
apt over break Dec 12-Jan 3 available
for Interview 392-7635 (C-3t-33-p)
URGENTI NEED a ride to and from
Pensacola. Leave here 2 pm Thurs.
Nov. sth or early the 6th. Call Dave
at 392-7360 after noon. Furnished apt. wanted for Winter
Quarter, willing to pay premium for
plush 2 bedroom-Jan-April Call
392-0151 or 372-5206. (C-st-30-p)
Female roommate to share 2 Br
trailer, own room, S7O month. Call
373-2577 after 8 p.m. or 392-3196
before. Ask for Mary. (C-st-26-p)
Liberal roommate $25/mo. tutll. own
room 1 block from campus call after
12 376-9755 move In now
(C-3t-33-p)
Male roommate studious but modern
wanted. Extra lahie apt. $50.00
month 4 NE Ist Ave, Downtown
Gainesville. Call Guy 378-8044 or
373-1108 (C-2t-34-p)
Os Agt ItequiMdJ
ininjmiiiinw
, ; Jfwm
B
*
t I *.
Starts Sun.:
% Space Thing
& Masterpiece

HEL PWANTED
Base player needed by one of
Floridas leading bands must be clean
cut Call 376-1270 after 6 pm.
(E-2t-34-p)
Desk clerk over 21 yrs of age night
shift midnight to 700 am. Saturday
noon till midnight In person Tom
Sawyer Motel (E-st-31-p)

You cant escape
The Stalking Moon.
GREGORY PECK* EVA MARIE SAINT
THE STALKING MOON
Saturday only
5:30, 8,10:30 p.m.
Union Aud. 50 cents
sponsored by JWRU
H3H133 fl \
IwTaiwim s/v
: THE JOHSi HANSEN
I Christines
jIORGINSEN STORY;
* THE FIRST MAN TO BECOME A WOMAN iMI J
HVIPIA Q I***'* *'* m
wmraa W 0 4
" :3 . 1-30 3:W.
JEUmMAH EXPERIENCE
5 A TOTAL EXPERIENCE IN SIGHT, SOUND I
l AND COLOR MAKE FANTASIA A MUST l
eeeeeeeeeeeee e e e e e e e e e e e-e eeeeeeeeeee
Pawwfow do) ivllU
IvlllliUl SHOWS: 2:00
| 213 W. Uefcwrify 4 W | 8;0 0 #
ADULTS / LAST 6 DAYS!
$1.25 e CLARK GABLE VIVIEN LEIGH
CHILDREN |ii i i il' inij 11
50 cents JQ| W
all rw
day f
\ % m mctrocolor e
eeeee M>M

AUTOS
xrviv:;:-:-:::-:-:-:::-:-:::;:-:-::*:::::-:-:*:-::-:::-:::-:
65 Ford Falrlane 6 cyl. good cond.
need cash $250 Ph. 376-3305 after 5,
ask for Randy (G-lt-35-p)
Corvette 66, 427 high perf, complete
set up, all finest equip, ultimate
street machine, perfect cond. must
sell Now. $2575 Bob 373-1524
(G-3t-34-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

X-x-X-X-x-X-X^-X-X-X-X^-X-XwXvXxX;
AUTOS
_
*
Bulck LeSabre, 1963. Automatic, air
cond., radio, heater, full power. Top
shape, runs great. $425 or best offer.
Call 378-4588 anytime. (G-3t-33-p)
Olds. 1963 station wagon all power
needs some work, runs ok, good
transp. best offer over $325. Call Bob
at 378-7007 after 5 pm. (G-3t-34-p)
1962 MGA 1600 MKII, New paint &
body, interior, new top-Full
Receipts-SI3OO. 373-1883, 411 N.W.
14th St. (G-st-34-p)
61 Ford good shape 4 new tires 292
V 8 radio/heater power steering new
Eag. $l5O call Woodrow 376-1044
(G-st-33-r)
1970 Volvo 6 mo old blue 12300
Call 372-0947 or 392-1479
(G-st-32-p)
1967 Black VW Squareback, 2 new
tires, In good shape. Must sale,
$1,190. Call 378-1710 after 5
(G-st-33-p)
1964 Olds Cutlass P.S. P.B. air great
condition must sell S9OO call
378-7876 after 5:00 (G-3t-33-p)
*6B MGB $1,555 16,900 ml must
sell: perfect tend, wire wheels
tonneau cover 1002 W. University.
Mike Austin 376-8941 (G-st-31-r)
FANTASTIC! I 111 1966 GTO conv.
excellent condition high performance
many extras must sell sacrifice
392-8153 (G-st-31-p)

Music By
BIRNAM WOOD
{Ok*
8:3012:30am I J
in the Unionallroom
Admission is 25< and a U of Fla. I.D.
N.W. 13th St. ?H. 372-9533
ACROSS FROM THIMAU
THUR-FRI-SAT
inu You never
met a pair like
J£Bwtchand The Kid!
ss&.,- v a > os <
' 'TBIi A :i
ir 9 jj|nlllP%> >
HBpfSuL NEWMAN IbL
M ROBERT REDFORD^^n
easufme Tafe
Mention this ad for special early bird price of
35 cents every night before 7 P.M. and Sat. A
Sun. Matinees. Regular Price SI.OO
Penthouse number 2 $1.50 Penthouse number
' * .'-v 37. v v vWVv.vc v v- \ ..

PERSONAL
Cathy-Happy 21st birthday to the
ginzo in 1161 Remember the old
saying A bird in the hand .. ."
Love, Pam, Carol, and Mariceli.
(J-lt-34-p)
Leather Goods Wholesale Prices all
stock must go: leather boxes $5-7,50
belts $3.50-6; 4 vests sls-20 barets
headbands bags pouches Custom
work also: 1118 SW 2 Ave number 6
upstairs after 2 every afternoon but
Weds. (J-st-35-p)
To ANYBODY, but especially Ken
HAPPY BIRTHDAY! Chickie-Babe
SINGLE MALES & FEMALESI Meet
more members of the opposite sex at
U,F. All dates In Gainesville. Most
dates with U.F. Students. Details
mailed in plain unmarked envelope.
For free details write: Nationwide
Dating Service, P.O. Box 77346,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-15t-24-p)
Hate to cook? i oo poor tor an apt?
CLO has openings for the winter
quarter. $195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 373-1622 (J-22t-30-p)
The Student Senate may be able to
help you. Dave Depew, 373-2771,
will listen to your problems. I need
to know your problems I Speak out!
(J-st-31-p)
JGK This has been the happiest 6
month's of my life. Thank You! I
LYI IY G I GAS (J-2t-35-p)

Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 6, 1970

V*VVrwVr#VVV
PERSONAL
;.>x*x*x # x*x*x\ # x*x # # # #v,# x* % x # x # x # x # xv
** *
Co Eds Facial Hair removed forever;
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist ...
102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for
appointment. (J-31tfc)

Wanted: Rock style drummer for
heavy music group. Serious musicians
only. Al 376-1042 Ron-376-9919
(J-st-33-p)
Rummage sale, air cond-heat pump,
reverb unit, stereo, luggage, watches,
folding bed, fans, air cooler, albums,
books, more! 202 NW 15th St.
Sunday 1-5 pm or 378-6900
Bargains!! (J-2t-34-p)
Robert Harris Wolf: All my love 34
years and forever. Happy
Anniversary, baby. Your, Barbara
(J-lt-35-p)
BARRY Is this Univ. ready for you
and vitamin E? Now that you know
it's secret, try it with shake and bake.
Apts. 503, 606. (J-2t-35-p)

HELD OVER! 2ad WEEK! ||
I Tl| mtimcna
IS A RIP-SNORTER A TMIIMI^^^^
BRILLIANTLY CONCEIVED, U^Hr'
BRILLIANTLY DONE! DEVASTATINGLY FUNNY! lliflflffll /MiMHffill
-Kathle^

I Loving,brawling and bustin'it up! I
JHyllk
VSikKsJfe'BL {H I
Joseph E levme presents An Arco Embassy Film starring
I JOE NAMATH & ANN-MARGRET I
I oiCCRycW # A I
"Everything Youve Heard about Joe ,n J^dL
Namath, The Actor, is true, Hes The £Jw*Ai MB jgHjj^ljJPr*
Male Equivalent of Elizabeth Taylor. wHjltaij&^
Hes A Hunk Os Now Mod Maleness,
SEXY PLUS. JjjHpr
With Williom Smith Executive Producer Joseph E levme Screenplay by Roger Smith
Produced by Alton Corr and Roger Smith Directed by Seymour Robbie
CotorbyMovielob AN AVCO(MSASSV '< J&mffigjLsy
I U I l**** 17 RfW> KMflt>| :ng #Z
P>eKet f f V
AT,,, 2:18 4:10 6:02 7:56 9:50 ImEP^
'*"* ** *V* **VW Vv* V-,*,* WV*i> ". k % s 2%X.W *Vh -'V\ - %\a, t .. ,* v %
v **''* *** *** ***+*m\s -* evw .-**, %

=i|lHlllllllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii*iii |,,H,,,H,lll,,,,lm,,m,HHmn '""
| ~J INGMAR BERGMAN'S
I Smiles of &
| rk SUMMER NIGHT
§| KIH Sunday Film Classic
's Showing in the Union Auditorium
| 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, 10:30 p.m.
H Mo- Admission 50 cents



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

RSONA t
GUITAR LOVERS pick my brains
and experience finger style is my bag,
teaching is my expertise for a free
appointment call 378*6900
(J-2t-34-p)
Tolbert Five Sends Peace and Love to
Weaver Hall, Thanxl (J*2t*34*p)
Need info about mustang hitting a
pedestrian In street in front of Plaza
of Am. during concert Sat. night
xPleas call 392-8725 Thanks
(J-2t-34-p)
COMPUTER DATING Why wait?
Meet your ideal date. Special
Introductory price. Now serving
leading colleges and universities
throughout the US and Canada.
Write: National Cybernetics, Box
221, Durham, N.C. 27702 (J-Bt-31-p)
ANTHONY My favorite lusty &
libidinous learned law st. May you
beachcomb always on the sea o life
rah Happy 22nd Luv, 264045642
(J-lt-35-p)
lost <& FOUND
LOST: one wlndbreaker (ATO) and
one blue overcoat in sec 43, row 76
at Fla/Aubum game. Call 373-2836
(L-2t-35-p)
General Motors car key found on
plaza grass call Russ 373-1366
(L-3t-34-p)
Found: Timepiece at the corner of
Union and Newell on Homecoming
weekend. Identify. Write to: Mr.
Jontz, P.O. Box 4940, Jacksonville.
(L-3t-34-nc)
Lost-Brown patent leather purse in
red car while hitching on highway
331. You were going the "wrong
way" remember? call 392-9046.
Need my IDS (l-3t-33-p)
I lost my wallet. You can't use It. I
can. Call 378-8760 for the surprising
reward. Rick McDowell (L-3t-33-p)
SUES JE2
SSSB ; SBSB§SB^^
Bridal shower. Surprise birthday
party. Money raising project.
Tupperware party. Call 454-1969
after 7 p.m. all day weekends
(M-st-35-p)
HORSES BOARDED sleepy hollow
horse farm complete care finest
facilities new barn pasture trails and
lighted ring close to Unlv. Ph
373-1059 (M-st-29-p)
Wete wired sos sight at two smelled,
i iglMi office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across #om Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
Typing-former New York secretary
Bklyn college grad-55 cents page &
up-term papers, theses, dissertations
373-1984 9-5, 373-1429 after 6
(M-Bt-31p)
tte*eee
I **- m 1
ifIMPS!
?. .... fl ir r -. : in
t
* np' epi
* Staning/ntfieHirst:
* -fitl(-length,hllarious,;
: actfon-pacfced Him! :
iIHM i
l 6 Brand New Songs %
* plus your Beatles favorites!
Tonight only
5:30,8,10:30 p jn.
Union Aud. 50 cents y
.
sponsored by JWRU

PERSONAL
:* :-:-: ': Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Electric service, 1111 S. Mein,
378-7330. Nowl Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
MBA Candidates: Representative of
Emory University, Atlanta, will
interview on campus Nov. 24. Sign
up at Placement Center. (M-3t-33-p)
I will make you an A" MATH
STUDENT or REFUND YOUR
MONEY. $3.50 per half hour.
372-3890 or 378-4066 (M-st-33-p)
HONDA SERVICE AT IT 7
BEST!!!! THE CYCLE WORKS 1220
S. MAIN OPEN 3 UNTIL 8 P.M.
(M-st-32-p)
Housewives: will do Ironing and
mending for three dollars a week.
Call after 5:30 and before 10 p.m.
372-5269 (M-tfc)

'w////m///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////^
| 1 GAINESVILLES NEWEST TWINS BORN! I | |
\ -1 - I 1
§ IS Nwh.vi. a m
I 1 f II
I 1 F / f II
M | T WEST UNIVERSITY AVE K >
I j u,JIVEI,s,I,o
I 1 FIRST TIME AT I I I
I I POPULAR PRICES! B Monte Walsh I I |
| I ,s I | |
| I 11 I 11
s I ll I 1
I I *jffisass--- I MONTE I I I
| I 1 WALSK I | (
1 I I JACK BALANCE I 11
I \ T" OP
I- | I

Friday, November 6, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

I LEE MARVIN I
I CLINT EASTWOOD |
I JEAN SEBERG £ I
I FAINT VOUR I
I "A BIG. BAWDY I
1 a)l ,, p RIP ROARING B
Ptus HOWLINGLY FUNNY! 1
[ WATERHOLE NO 3" M
wv.v.vrtvAvw.ww.%vvcww.y
PATRONIZE
GATOR
ADVERTISERS j

Page 15

| TONIGHT THRU SAT.
BETHLfHMJ uliv
45*fLU/D jmjKm,
TONIGHT & SATURDAY NIGHT
I/ /ij\\ \ \
TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY ADMISSION
8 & 10:30 pm $2 per person
You dont have to be 21 to make it at the RAT! ;
provided by SQP



The
Florida
Alligator

The Beatles, Lee Marvin and Joe

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
I think that we should all stay
in town and go to the movies
this weekend as if there were 40
Mike Kelleys or John Reaves
(who claimed inspiration)
playing around in Jacksonville.
There is sufficient provocation
to do so even without the
football team. Did you know
that football retards
homosexuality? Thats what a
psychologist told the Board of
Regents. Why would they want
retard homosexuals? On to the
weekend and a better America.
THE UNION. Nostalgia, (a
word I somehow never
associated with the Beatles)
weighs heavy on Friday night
when the Union presents A Hard
Days Night. The first of the
Beatle movies, it proved that the
Beatles would not do to us
cinematically what Elvis Presley
did. They combined their talents
with Richard Lester to produce
a funny, innovated movie that
was soon copied by every group
in the world. Technique aside,
the Beatles are the Beatles and I
can remember sitting through
this one more than a few times
with a silly grin on my face that
I could not control just because
they were up on the screen. The
Beatles aside, the movie is a
mine of character bits by
excellent actors, expecially
Victor Spinetti who plays the
harried TV director.
Revolutionary? Did anyone say
revolutionary? Well they should
have because thats what A Hard
Days Night really is. Remember
younger years and go to be
surprised again.
ON SATURDAY night a taut,
evil movie called The Stalking
Moon plays. Stalking Moon stars
Gregory Peck, Eva-Marie Saint
and Robert Foster who was the
star of Medium Cool. It concerns
a retiring army scout (Peck) who
is persuaded to take a woman
recently re-captured from the
Apaches and her half-breed son
to safety. The trip is harrased by
the boys father, an unseen
Apache who dogs their trail with
death. Life equated the movie in
terms of faceless, unfathomable,
evil with Moby Dick. The movie
ifrvignse and exciting and the end
is despafate.
THE CENTER. The Center
mixes the ridiculous and the
sublime. At Center 1, The
Christine Jorgenson Story. At
Center 2 Walt Disney 's Fantasia.

pj)SA
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville. Florida

~o~*f~~ *'.* T^W'WWiSjv l -- -Vf i T i '-**'- **' 4SSSS. -iii£2&; _£,. .L_JUj ~,'v.,..?!,--,. -. ,,,

The choice of which is ridiculous
and which is sublime is a matter
of personal preference. For me
Fantasia is the original
psychedelic motion picture.
Classical music is illustrated by
the lush colors and wild
imagination of freaky Walt
Disney. Im sure everyone
remembers being scared as a
child by Micky Mouse as the
Sorcerers Apprentice. The
movie had them in lines in New
York where they talked about
-ultimate trip and things like
that. Here you get to hear
beautiful music and watch
fantastical cartoons, the only
real light show in town.
THE PLAZA. Joe Namath
and Ann Margret? in C.C. Rider?
Come on. Staying over is Joe.
Joe was not as shattering as I
had been led to believe. It dealt
more in caricature and cliches
than it should have. Nor did it
provide adequate background
for the violent results it
produced. The acting suffered.
Peter Boyle as Joe was
magnificent but his supporting
players were a bit strained at
times. I tried to justify this by
figuring that this was the effect
sought by the director but it
wouldnt work, the poor acting
was just irritating. The movie
was honest in that it did not deal
in good guys and bad guys. The
lives of all the characters were
squalid no matter their station in
life.
*
JOE WAS interesting in that it
tried to present several life styles
at the same time. A similar
attempt is made in the superb
Five Easy Pieces with Jack
Nicholson. Apparently
Hollywood is no longer satisfied
to simply present a character on
face value, penetrating insights
into his environnment are
provided. The scenes between
Joe and his wife are especially
good.
The dialogue in the movie is
as real as life and therefore
probably offensive to some. Joe
should be seen and if you can
get by the more obvious faults it
is to be commended for not
taking sides.
THE FLORIDA. The biggie is
in town. GWTW is how it is
abbreviated and a classic is all
you can say about it. Scarlette
and Rhett and Ashly and
Atlanta and the Confederacy
and frankly my dear I dont give
a damn.' -F. Scott Fitzgerald
worked on the script. A fast

retreating fantasy that should be
seen. Dont Tara you all.
THE ROYAL PARK. The
new movie house in town has a
hit and a miss. I guess everyone
saw Airport so everyone knows
hokey, schmaltzy Hollywood is
alive if not well. Still the movie
manages to be exciting inspite of
everyone knowing the ending
and inspite of the gratuitous
ploys of Ross (I make movies for
families) Hunter.
On the other side of the aisle
is Monte Walsh, a quiet, sad
western starring Lee Marvin,
Jeanne Moreau, Jack Palance
and the best cast of character
actors this side of Sam
Peckinpah. Monte Walsh
continues to explore the theme
of the closing west and the men
it trapped out of place and out
of time that was dealt with in
Will Penny, the Wild Bunch and
The Ballad of Cable Hogue.
Walsh is closer in spirit to Will
Penny in that it deals with an
aging cowpoke who finds the
only life he knows fading.
The movie is photographed in
compositions reminiscent of
Remmington paintings. The film
starts slowly, establishing the
tough lonely world of cowboys,
not hurrying, just setting things
in their places. Marvin and
Palance play buddies who have
ridden together for years who
are hired on by corporation corporationowned
owned corporationowned ranch. There arent many
jobs and good men cant get
work. It is an unhappy time.
When Palance tells Marvin that
he is going to get married and
settled down, Marvin cant
believe it but Palance tells him,
No one can be a cowboy
forever. The pickings are so
slim that Jeanne Moreau, Walshs
woman and the towns
prostitute has to move on,
Monte unable to endure the idea
of settling down is left without
friends and his woman. As he
says, Theres a whole lot Im
having to get used to these
days. When a wild west
showman offers him a different

S downtown
W/cfonZ- 0N f
OPEN SUNDAYS
From 1 P.M TILL 6 P.M.
Shop Wilsons now 7 days a week
9:30 til 9 daily 1-6 p.m. SUNDAYS
Open and use your E.S.A. (early shopper account)
ESA. (early shopper account) is designed For November
Shopping, No Service Charge When Paid As Agreed. Shop In
November, Pay Next Year. You Pay 1/3 In January, 1/3 In
February, 1/3 In March. Open and Use Your ESA. NowF

WARD BRISICK G R EG JONES
Entertainment Editors

Page 16

name and the chance to become
a of himself, he
replies, Im not going to spit on
my whole life.
THE SCORE by John Barry is
impressively poignant and the
way they have shadow shadowphotographed
photographed shadowphotographed Marvin with his
long white hair lends a beauty to
the film. It is one of Marvins
best roles. He is a tragic figure
Â¥ Gum Guar- Gum
* Reloading supplies. Custom
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i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 6, 1970

but an indominatable one. Hard
times in the west, bitter men and
inescapable tragedy combine
with fine acting and a winsome
script to make this a good, good
movie.
THE RAT. Bethlehem
Asylum returns to the Rat after
a successful first appearance.
The group is all that was written
about them in the first review.
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5 minutes from Campus. I



The
Florida
Alligator

By PHIL PETTI JOHN
Alligator Sports Editor
The Florida Gators will be
seeking to salvage a respectable
8-3 season record when they
take on Georgia in the first of
the final three games after...
After Alabama, Tennessee and
Auburn, the top of the Gators
11 game schedule.
SALVAGING that respectable
8-3 record could however prove
to be quiet a task.
The betting line on the game
has Georgia a 15 point favorite.
In my opinion the spread may
be a bit too wide.
TEN POINTS would be a bit
closer.
But of the gamblers* 15 point
spread, seven or eight of the
points should go to the Bull dogs
merely on attitude.
Georgia has been improving
and expresses the attitude of a
winner.
FLORIDA, ON the other
hand, has a feeling of rolling
over dead. This is not to say the
Gators will not be out to win.
Nobody wants to be a loser.
But part of the teams
attitude seems to lean to looking
forward to next season when
they can try it again.
But how can the coaches who
devote their time to physically
preparing the team for combat
expect the mental readiness to
be there.
MEMBERS OF the team that
have taken part in the
organization of the Union of
Florida Athletes, seeking a voice
in the decisions that so closely
concern them, have been
repressed.
Threats aimed at the players
scholarships and starting
position roles have been made to

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Mental AttitudeA

ANALYSIS

those athletes involved with the
UFA.
Again I ask, how can the
coaches ecpect the team to be
mentally ready when the answer
given to their attempts at being
heard is if they dont like it
they dont have to play.
AFTERALL, THE coaches
jobs came about because of the
players being here who
themselves came here
presumably as a student first and
an athlete second.
The entire air about the
Athletic Association is not
conducive to a winning effort.
This is a situation that the men
at the controls of the athletic
system have created for
themselves with their its going
to be done this way because that
is the way it has always been
done attitude.
In considering the point
spread, the line makers have also

Lost youp Contact?
Qatoc AOs make Contacts!

considered the Florida team that
will play Georgia is exactly the
same team that has staggered
thus far to a 5-3 not-so not-sorespectable
respectable not-sorespectable record.
THE SAME offensive line,
lacking in overall ability and still
having difficulty executing the
plays, will play for the Gators.
They will still be trying to
open holes for the more than
adequate running backs and
provide pass protection for
nationally ranked passer John
Reaves when he throws to a
corps of receivers, some of
whom have a lot of talent.
The defensive secondary can
well use the speed Harvin Clark
adds with his return, but even
with Clark, the unit is slow to
react to the ball, and provides a
loose zone coverage.
SHOULD THE game get
close, Jack Youngblood will be
called upon to kick extra points
and field goals, since kicking
specialist Richard Franco has
been suspended for not
returning to Yon Hall at all
Saturday night.
Youngblood is a consistent
extra point kicker, but his field

Marty Perlmuttsr
Executive Sports Editor

Friday, November 6, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

9g
Gator Minus

goal kicking is barely adequate.
Georgia has a sound offense
engineered by former Florida
offensive head, Fred Pancoast.
THE BULLDOGS play a lot
of man to man defense, a
defense that proved so
vulnerable, at times last year to
Floridas passing attack.
Trying to consider all of this

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Phil Pettijohn
Sports Editor

objectively I can hardly pick the
Gators as a winner over Georgia.
The 8-3 record they are
trying, to what ever degree to
salvage, is three wins away.
I still look for the 6-5 record
that I predicted after the
opening game with Duke. In case
it matters, 6-5 is a win over
hapless Miami.

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Page 17



Page 18

i, The Florida Alligator,.Friday, November 6, 1970

Harrell On Way To Top Average

ANigrtor Services
Other problems which have
come about in the University of
Florida defensive picture have
not reduced the play or attitude

HF &
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TOM KENNEDY
ROBERT HARRELL(77) PUTS FINISHING TOUCH ON CHARLIE RICHARDS
... defensive end will be going home this weekend as Gators face Georgia
Georgia Rivalry Tabbed
Largest Cocktail Party

By DOUG KEITH
Alligator Sports Writer
When Florida and Georgia get together for their
annual tete-a-tete, almost anything can happen and
it usually does.
One of the oldest and keenest rivalries in the
nation, the Bulldog-Gator series has produced some
of the most exciting fireworks in SEC history.
THE SERIES dates back to 1915 with the Dogs
holding a comfortable lead. However the past ten
years have seen the Gators take a 6-3-1 edge.
This series dubbed the worlds largest outdoor
cocktail party by Sports Illustrated, has seen some
of the greatest players in college football history
down through the years.
Frank Sinkwich, Georgias great Heisman Trophy
winner, led the Bulldogs to a 75-0 rout of the
Gators in 1942. However, just weeks prior to the
game, most of the Florida team and coaching staff
was caught up in the patriotic fever of the War and
joined the army en masse. The big Georgia score was
piled up against a skeleton crew of Bteamers and
freshman.
PLAYING IN the same backfield with Sinkwich
was the legendary Charlie Trippi. As a one-twn

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1113 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
for
University of Florida
Gainesville High School P.K. Yonae High School
Buchholzz High School East Side High School
Howard Bishop Jr. High WestwoocMr High
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Converse Pacer for Jogging Tretorn Tennis Shoes
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FRATERNITY, SORORITY, and CLUB JERSEYS
TROPHIES AND ENGRAVING

of many players, most notably
end Robert Harrell.
Harrell, a 230-pound junior
from Jacksonville, is on his way
to an outstanding season in
which his defensive grade

punch, Sinkwich and Trippi ran over around and
through everybody on the Dog schedule and
climaxed the season with a 9-0 shut out of UCLA in
the Rose Bowl.
For Florida, Steve Spurrier stands out as the all
time best performer. Gator fans still recall how the
1966 Heisman winner pulled the 65 game out of
the fire in the last two minutes. Trailing 10-7 with
time running out, Spurrier faded back and spotted
lack Harper (Mr. Saturday) racing toward the end
zone. Harper, always a clutch performer, caught the
pass behind his back as he was falling face first into
the end zone. Seventy thousand fans went bananas
as Harper lay face down in the end zone with the
ball clutched against the small of his back.
TRADITIONALLY played on the neutral Gator
Bowl field, the Georgia-Florida weekend is one of
the major social events each year in Jacksonville.
Parties, pep rallies, and Southern fried chicken
highlight the festivities. But football is king with
booze a close second.
Always a hard hitting, hard fought contest, this
years game should be no different. Although
neither team is setting the world on fire, a victory
could go a long way toward salvaging something for
either school.

average is likely to wind up
among the highest ever recorded
for the Gators.
HARRELL HAS come to
play every Saturday and he has
emerged as a team leader and a

big play man on our defensive
team, Coach Doug Dickey said.
Weve got one defensive end,
Jack Youngblood, who ranks
with anybody at his position and
Id have to put Harrell right
there in that same class
Harrell has averaged seven
tackles per game and is the team
leader on fumble recoveries with
three. A big percentage of his
tackles have been made in the
opposing backfield.
He has good quickness and
lateral movement, Dickey said.
This enables him to penetrate
and to move across the field to
make tackles.
HARRELL WILL be
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IT SEEMS
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WANT AN
EVEN BREAK.
The realization that the public does
not like to be taken has taken a lot of
manufacturers by surprise.
Toasters that suddenly wont toast
suddenly wont be tolerated.
Nor will toys that break before
noon on Christmas day. (Weve
been raising a whole generation of
kids who think Santas workmanship
is terrible.)
People are showing their contempt
for cars that break down on the way
home from the showroom, too.
Theyre buying Volvos.
Volvos are built to last. Exactly
how long, we dont guarantee. But we
do know that 9 out of every 10
registered here in the last eleven years
are still on the road.
At Volvo, the new consumerism
is nothing new. We were for it before
anybody ever heard of it.
And if there is a sucker bom every
minute, you couldnt prove it by us.
They must be buying
something else. cvm^o)
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS
506 E. University
Your New Volvo
Dealer in Gainesville

returning to his hometown
Saturday when the Gators take
on Georgia in an effort to break
the Bulldogs three game
winning streak.
Last season, as a sophomore,
he played tackle and end and
was the nations lineman of the
week following Floridas 21-6
victory over FSU.
Harrell was a good football
player last year but, like many
sophomores, he wasnt
consistent, Dickey said. Now
he goes out there and plays a
good, solid football game every
week.
What Dickey would like is
more good, solid defensive
performances each week.
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Cagers Return To Home Sweet Home

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Writar
For any athletic team, it is an
understood axiom that one has
to win consistently on the road
to earn a good record.
Last year the UF basketball
team didnt win consistently as a
visitor and wound up with an
unimpressive 9-17 record and a
6-12 Southeastern Conference
slate.
THE GATORS, directed by
Coach Tommy Bartlett, dropped
13 of 15 away games. Both wins
came in tournament play at
Jacksonville one in the
Sunshine Classic and the other in
the Gator Bowl Tournament.
But Bartletts first losing team
in his coaching career didnt set
a hot pace at home either. The
Gators nabbed seven wins in 11
games in the oven at Florida
Gym.
As a contrast, Bartletts 18-9
team in the 1968-69 season
broke even on the road, 7-7, and
held a demanding advantage of
11-2 on the home court.
ONE OF the Gators away
losses came in the 82-66 defeat
to Temple in the National
Invitation Tournament at
Madison Square Garden.
1 iff
HP: ....
Jiff v
UIL. Jsni'
li : Z %x
r; iP?K ';* w ] '&&&:
'JF
GARY WADDELL
... back in good shape

Basketball Schedule
Dec. 1 Samford Home 7:45 Jan. 14 Miss. St. Home 7:45
Dec. 5 Louisville Away 8:00 Jan. 25 Miss. Home 7:45
Dec. 7 Houston Home 7:45 Jan. 30 Ga. Away 8:00
Dec. 18 LSU Away 8:00 Feb. 6 Auburn Away 3:00
Dec. 21 N.westcrn Home 7:45 Feb. 8 Vanderbilt Away 8:00
Dec. 23 Fordham Home 7:45 Feb. 10 LSU Home 7:45
Dec. 28 Gator Bowl Tourney 7:15 Feb. 13 Kent. Home 7:45
29 Jacksonville Feb. 15 Tenn. Home 7:45
Jan. 2 Auburn Home 7:45 Feb. 20 Miss. St. Away 8:00
Jan. 4 Vanderbilt Home 7:45 Feb. 22 Miss. Away 7:30
Jan. 6 Ala. Away 8:00 Feb. 27 Ga. Home 1:00
Jan. 9 Kent.
Jan. 11 Tenn. Away 8:02 Mar. 6 Ala. Home 7:45

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H 1
1 111
, 'm/tY
&. > MM, : jH
UL B HP H
TOMMY BARTLETT
... home advantage
Last year the schedule was
pretty tough, Bartlett said. We
had 15 on the road and 11 at
home.
With the hope of the home
court psychological advantage,
the 1970-71 basketball team
looks to a bit friendlier schedule
- 14 at home and 12 away. Two
of the games are slated in
Jacksonville, a place that has to
be considered more receptive to
Gator teams than Lexington,
Ky., or Knoxville, Tenn.
THE USUAL 18 SEC games
are on the schedule with two
Gator Bowl Tournament
contests, which may put UF
against two new opponents
Bradley and St. Bonaventure.
Samford, which opens the UF
season on Dec. 1, Houston and
Fordham will all play the Gators
for the first time. All three will
be visitors.
Recently added opponents
Louisville and Northwestern also
spice the early part of the
schedule.
THE GATORS will make the
TV scene on the televised SEC
games at Auburn on Feb. 6 and
at home on Feb. 27 with
Georgia.

Although Bartlett emphasized
that the team positions are still
open, it appears from early
practice that Ed Lukco (6-2),
Tony Miller (6-1), Cliff Cox
(6-6), and Jeff Miller (6-1) are
the top candidates at the wing
spots.
In the post positions, Gary

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If the tire should fail within 40,000 miles because of a defect in
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guarantee certificate to any B. F. Goodrich Llfesaver Radial retailer 40/0 fvHlvi II Call
and we will repair It or make an allowance for unused service,
prorated on 40,000 miles and computed on our then current Retail
Trade-In Price towards the purchase of a new tire of the same size UIwLT
and type. This portion of the guarantee does es not apply to
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Friday, November (>,'1970, The Florida Alligator,

Waddell (6-10), who was
redshirted last year with a back
injury, Dan Boe (6-8), and Earl
Findley (6-7) are prime starters.
THE POST positions took on
special attention after the
1969-70 Gators leading scorer
and All-SEC high post standout

Andy Owens graduated last
season.
Waddell is coining along real
well, Bartlett said. He just
needs working and playing time,
which we call experience.
Jerry Hoover, (5-11) has the
upper hand at point over Darryl
Ceravolo.

Page 1



Page 20

The Florida Alligator, Friday, November 6, 1970

Dominos Pizza
H/ iV 4. TWO FREE COKES A jA.
W '**' Every pizza r d* r d
Iptfl, \ The Harmon Football Forecast I [ iWflu
i \ ( ITEXAS 6STANFORD 11 MISSISSIPPI 16 SAN DIEGO STATE I ( /
2NOTRE DAME 7MICHIGAN 12 ARIZONA STATE 17 GEORGIA TECH I \ I
ls 1 I 3OHIO STATE BARKANSAS 13-AIRFORCE 18 HOUSTON I j / =W^^gi
iSSS= V k 4NEBRASKA 9L. $. U. 14 ALABAMA 19 WASHINGTON I // =55E353
Bgjgg|= \ STENNESSEE 19-AUBURN 15-U.C.L.A. 20NORTHWESTERN I g||M
Saturday, Nov. 7 Major Colleges highlights for nov. 7 I ||
Alabama 23 L.s.u. 21 The battle for the top spot in our national I
Arkansas State IS R?ce J se State *6 rankings is the closest we've had in many
I Boston College 26 BuAto' St3t6 *7 Y ears oh State he,d jt for four and I
Boston u 23 Rutgers 7 Texas grabbed it after the Buckeyes had I
SBSwIr Bowling Green 21 Ohio U 14 A
Brigham Young 25 Colorado State 21 some trouble With Illinois two weeks ago. I
cfncinnati 2i ncX'tw 17 The Longhorns just held on again this week I
BSSL 20 eS^kneT 83 15 to nOS ut Notre Dame Texas is I
Colorado 23 Kansas 14 118.8... the Irish, 118.3. Ohio State is a I
Cornell 27 Brown 13 hot breath behind in third, and Nebraska, in
Davidson* 1 17 SfaJStte a 4th, is moving closer every week.
Ei uk p e aso 17 Wyoming" 651 11 Notre Dama P |a Y s host to Pittsburgh
Florida state 24 ciemson 14 Saturday, but the Panthers will have to reach I
, Georgia Tech 33 Navy 7 super heights to untrack the Irish. Notre I
IDC Kansas state 20 Oklahoma state 17 Dame will win by 38. Texas should breeze I IDf
nUUKd KentucS ,te 14 wfndSblit by Baylor... the spread is 36 points. I HUUKw
Klmlhis 0 State 33 \SSJSST 14 Thre t6ams remai in ohi Stat S P B I
sOOnm I*oo am Sun .Thur Miami ( hio) 21 Dayton 12 to the Rose Bowl, and Wisconsin is first on I_ .. ___
awpm warn bun Thur mgg. g mm. the list. No trouble here... the Badger, will |s:oop m -l:00am Sun-Thur
5-00pm2 00 am Fri X Sat "SSST § okiitoS.. S b V 24 points. Nebraska continues to I- c e
3.w pm z.uuarn rn & sat Nebraska <0 lowa state 7 power its way to the Big Eight title and a P' 00 pm2:ooam Fn A Sat
New Mexico 24 Arizona 23
HAMIKIAIC North Carolina 49 v.m.i. o certain bowl bid. lowa State is this week's I mm *. i i
UUMINU 5 KSifiSKi s " § K2U s victim ... the Cyclone, will lore to the I DOMINO S
STsSS* £ SSS3S u Comhuskers by 33 points. I
Penn state 3i Maryland 7 Louisiana State, ranked Number 9, faces a |
mm m Princeton 21 Harvard 17 . . I
m Quantico Marines 20 Xavier 9 major tBSt in its quest for the Southeast I \A/LJ AT*#* k iri Ai
Cn OV Ql loutherr? o clffomia 2 Washington state 7 Conference championship. And though I WMAT 5 NEW ?
1 It.'nVord fl S in o IS 1h-ranked Alabama has already been beaten I
m A Syracuse 28 Army 13 three times, we're picking the Crimson Tide I
DADD'C Sx" a n s essee IX Carolma l to upret L.S.U. by two points. I nPri IIIR
IxMir O TaSto h 8 Northern Illinois I Still not out of the woods, but with the I RrrD AII I)
Wichita Fla smell of roses H***" stronger, 6th-rated I Mill/
. vmanova 22 LMah state 16 S** l olll meets tough Washington. The I
Wo Deliver we3 fM Virginia i 34 East Carolina 2 ? Huskies, another 3-time loser, aren't sbout I ni mp
Western M.ch.gan 27 west is to p|ant a rose -bush in honor of the Indians, I W |I|C MAUI
Mon Frij Other Games South and Southwest b Stanfo'di,avoredby l 2 points. I * Ull
Bth-ranked Arkansas will keep pace with I
From 5:30 PM wio e State lstian H il Texas in the Southwest Conference race. I
2KSHBT lo ouachite al _ Carson-Newman 22 Maryville 6 Saturday.
JL Cam. East Tennessee 17 Morehead 15 J ...
vUI Ot gun. Eastern Kentucky 26 Tennessee Tech 7 The forecasting average slithered up a few I
p _. i a ki Fayetteville 20 w?nston%aiem 17 points after a particularly good Saturday I _ m
rrom 12:00 Noon ci.n Henr, J two weeks ago. Through October 24th, our IMI M Mlf
CAII QQ77 iSSSis M sssa*p 11 average was 762 with 977right,305wrong. I AiLJlfWj
XmAALL |} ll Ov M m Hampden-sydney 24 Centre 7 sth-ranked Tennessee and 7th-ranked I m
I q Howanf Payne 23 Southwest Texas 20 Michigan should hold onto their lofty ratings I
JAMX/Prv tJSSSSSl 1 22 SffIUST Mm il With victories this week. The Volunteers will I
I/Cliveiy McN.es. 24 NW (i Uui.i.n. 21 whip South Carolina by 27 points while the I ft §W% MMI M
Prairie View A&M 21 Texas Lutheran 20 Wolves will beat charged-up lllinos. The I Mm |K #1 ill f I
CI%AS>: M I SSSSSSa-n S SSSSSSf* difference will be 28 points. I WVN IV#I
special southwestern, Tenn. 20
state College Ark. 14 Arkansas a&m 13 pick the Houston-Mississippi struggle. They I
Free can of soda Tampa 17 sw Louisiana 7 just might set an all-time scoring recordl I
Troy lty H Maruli Tech 21 We l1 venture a forecast in what could be a I
with every $1 ordered. e on Tenesse. *? ld ona: Jih-renked Mississippi over | TO GO ALONG WITH
wofford 31 Catawba 6 Houston by four points.
Free cheese cake
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RAPP S also has (NTHE AREA
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