Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Athletes Organize For Fair Representation

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
UF athletes, not satisfied with
the representation given to them
by Athletic Director Ray Graves,
have organized a group on
campus.
The organization, Union of
Florida Athletes (UFA), has
representatives from all major
jports, but football players have
been deactivated for fear of
retaliation, John Parker,
spokesman for UFA, said.
We are not going to stand by
'L O
2 m
w**
JOHN PARKER
... athletes too vulnerable

CHILES WINS SENATE SEAT
Florida Has A New Governor

MIAMI (UPI) Reubin
ODonovan Askew, a somber
Democrat from the Florida
panhandle who promised to tax
the rich and spare the poor,
defeated Republican Gov.
Claude R. Kirk Tuesday night to
lead a shattering blow to
Republican hopes in Florida.
Another Democrat, State Sen.
Lawton Chiles, beat Republican
Rep. William C. Cramer for the
seat of retiring Democratic Sen.
Spessard Holland.
AND, DESPITE President
Nixons llth-hour visit here last
week, the GOP failed to take
away a single Democratic
congressional seat.
Askew, a teetotaler,
Presbyterian elder and state
senator, vowed to end Kirks
reign of govememnt by
antics... by crisis.
With 65 per cent of the vote
in, Askew had 629,841 votes to
526, 029 for Kirk. Chiles had

SG Committee Choices Nixed

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
An apparent disagreement
over the selection process of
students for university
Mill Gator
CANDIDATES REPORT
expenditures for
their individual campaign
drives page 17
Academics 2
Classifieds 14
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies 14
Sports. 18
Whats Happening 3

and watch players be
discriminated against because of
their desire to exercise first
ammendment rights, Parker
said. A football coach has total
control of an athlete on the field
and he can bench anyone he
wants to. This makes players too
vulnerable.
He said that since there were
thinly veiled threats directed
at football players suspected of
being members of UFA, the
organization decided in a
meeting to deactivate them until
the end of the season.
The chairman of the group,
who is also a football player, was
deactivated along with the
others.
It is an uphill battle because

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 63, No. 33

585,981 to 531,875 for Cramer.
Eight incumbents and a GOP
successor to Cramer won easily
in congressional races, preserving
the makeup of the Florida
delegation.
THE BEST hope of an upset
to win back one of the three
seats in the 12-man delegation
held by the Republicans was in
the 10th District of Broward and
North Dade County. But
incumbent J. Herbert Burke put
down the bid of Democrat Jim
Ward with little trouble.
Cramers Bth District seat
which he won 16 years ago to
become the first modem Florida
GOP congressman and gave up
to run for the U. S. Senate
was taken over by Cramers
friend, Bill Young, a state
senator who handily defeated
Democrat Ted Bailey.
In the other congressional
race:
Ist District Veteran

committees has led to a UF
administration review of Student
Government (SG) nominees. As
a result of the review, 21 of the
nominees have been removed
from the SG nomination list.
The SG nominations were for
141 student positions on
approximately 40 university
committees.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder received a letter from
UF President Stephen C.
OConnells office Monday
showing that 21 students had
been removed from 18 different
committees. Two students were
removed from the Academic
Regulations Committee and
three were displaced from the
important Student Affairs
Committee.
Several students had not been

most of them are afraid they will
lose their scholarships because of
participation, Parker added.
This is not true, but athletes
are not lawyers, and it will take
time to convince them of their
rights.
He said the primary concern
of the group is to obtain fair
representation,since the
council which met last week
with the coaches is not a fair
representation of the athletes.
The council is little more
than a figurehead, since there
was no voting (at the meeting).
Most of the athletes did not
speak out.
He said some of the
representatives at the meeting
are also part of the

University of Florida, Gainesville

Democrat Robert L.F. Sikes of
Crestview beat the GOPs H. D.
Sam Shuemake of Chipley.
4T H DISTRICT
Democratic incumbent William
Chappell of Ocala downed
Republican Leonard V. Wood of
Altamonte Springs.
sth District Republican
incumbent Lou Frey, Orlando,
defeated Republican Roy Girod
of Melbourne.
6th District Democratic
incumbent Sam Gibbons of
Tampa won a new term over
Republican Robert A. Carter of
Tampa.
7th District Veteran
Democrat James A. Haley of
Sarasota downed Republican Joe
Z. Lovingood of Sarasota.
9TH DISTRICT Long-time
Democrat Rep. Paul G. Rogers
of Palm Beach beat Emil F.
(SEE 'ELECTIONS* PAGE 4)

accepted by the administration
before yesterdays notice,
including two SG nominees to
the Student Conduct
Committee.
OConnell said Tuesday that
SG had not recommended two
students for every position as
the administration had asked. By
presenting only one name for
each position SG had denied the
administration a place in the
selection process, OConnell
said.
Every year student
government has to be told again
and again we want two
recommendations for each
position, OConnell said. The
administration deserves a choice
(in the selection process), too.
No one at SG could recall
such a large number of rejections

representation of the teams in
UFA.
I know the group will
represent a threat to the Athletic
Association, Parker said. But I
wish they would not take it that
way.
UFA, according to Parker, is a
recognized campus organization,
holding a charter with Student
Government and has a faculty
bridge builder* instead of a
faculty adviser. He is Father
Michael Gannon, of the Catholic
Student Center, and UF
professor of history.
He said the athletes want to
be helpful in building up the
image of the athletes on the UF
campus.

Wednesday, November 4, 1970

fiVf U
~^-g% h
.A %: IP .*~
M" w
M P
v- H >
- : :V.a^ f --. '* V
< (&*£>'s ; 'Jfzj <9
'ssl jr
m J^b^SHBHR&> J
hHHHH 1
111 If '/ft; 1 A JWpl -if R& jJ&xJ- k m ~**m*iMm R^:-/
|i|9 --M
1 -^r/
v J^w^%f^RgJgH^
iHHIHHHiB * *. S^aHHH
H|
' i!
i/ YjfJ&S HHL ~. , f'* JN v '" l i,ifev*? t -'./j?X A 4* *'^V\~ I '^V'C v^
FLORIDA'S NEW GOVERNOR AND FIRST LADY
... Reubin Askew and his wife, here last week for UF's Homecoming

of SG nominees in previous
years. Gail Merein, who last year
headed the selection process for
SG and this year worked as an
assistant to Ann Sabin, said only
one student was not approved
last year. Miss Merein added that
last year SG had also given only
one nominee per position.
Uhlfelder said the
administration asked for two
names for each position three
weeks ago.
We (SG) have been working
on nominees for these
committees since July 30. We
had 70 percent of our list
completed by the time they
asked for two names, he said.
IJhlfelder explained if two
names were submitted the
(SEE 'COMMITTEES' PAGE 2)

We have a bad reputation
among students. They do not
look up to athletes anymore.
We are not threatening
demonstrations or pickets; we
want td talk, he said.
Parker, who besides being an
assistant to track team coach
Jimmy Carnes, is also a resident
assistant in Yon Hall and works
at the training table, said, the
drums are rolling for my head. I
guess when people feel
threatened they think of
retaliation,
Wr
&*- y:
Ji R9BRp||
jpW|k
MICHAEL GANNON
... bridge builder

*
PLUS ONE
... new U.S. Senator Chiles
m m r!
... L



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 4, 1970

William Kunsfler
To Speak At Plaza
Thursday Afternoon

ACADEMICS
" NEWS AND VIEWS
Interfratemity Council will being free tutoring sessions Thursday,
Nov. 5 for those students registered in CHN 251 Humanities and CSS
111 American Institutions.
BOTH SESSIONS WILL be held weekly beginning 7 p.m. at 219 C
in the Architecture and Fine Arts building. CHN 251 sessions will be
held on Thursdays, CSS 111 on Mondays starting Nov. 9.
All students registered in these two courses should take advantage
of this opportunity, said Richard Erickson of IFC. Especially since
the courses will be tutored by the professors currently teaching these
courses.
* *
Have you a favorite instructor?
UF STUDENTS will be given a chance Wednesday and Friday to
select their favorite instructors in a Florida Seminole survey which
will be conducted in every college and school on campus during the
two days.
Students will be asked to sign a sheet circulated in classrooms to
vote for the professor who has influenced you college career most, or
whom you admire most in either a personal or professional capacity.
THE INSTRUCTOR chosen from each college will represent his
college in the 1971 Seminole academics section, according to Gwenn
Meyer, academics editor.
Miss Meyer said by conducting the survey and choosing favorite
instructors, it is hoped the academic section will be more identifiable
for students.
She said the thoughts and ideas of each instructor chosen will be
used for the text about each college in the Seminole.
* *
A new text in economics titled An Economic History of the
United States has been writen by two professors of economics.
THE AUTHORS ARE Dr. F. W. Tuttle, professor emeritus and Dr.
J. M. Perry, assistant professor. The book, which will serve as a basic
text in courses in economic history, was published by Southwestern
Publishing Company.
It combines two popular viewpoints on economic growth the
chronological institutional approach and the approach based on
national income analysis.
Tuttle served on the faculty of the department of economics for
many years before his retirement in 1967.
PERRY CAME TO UF in 1964 and in addition to his teaching and
research, he presently serves as coordinator of undergraduate studies
in the UF department of economics.
* *
Forty members of the Florida Medical Librarians will seek to
increase their knowledge of libraries Nov. 5-6 at J. Hillis Miller Health
Center Library, according to Elizabeth Eaton, reference librarian at
the Health Center.
THE SEMI-ANNUAL meeting will begin Thursday night with a
tour of the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings home and then dinner at Cross
Creek. A social hour will follow.
Dr. Mark V. Barrow, of the division of cardiology, will discuss
Folk Medicine in Florida on Friday.
The Health Center Library staff will conduct three workshops on
the building and enrichment of library collections.
A PROGRESS. report on the Southeastern Regional Medical
Library Program (SERMLP) will be given by Miss Eloise Foster,
reference librarian of the SERMLP, followed by a business meeting.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when It's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.
I v v v . T.V.r. ft# > m + +

By MARIANNE MANCINA
Alligator Writer
William Moses Kunstler, famed
lawyer who defended the Chicago 7,
Rap Brown, Stokely Carmichael, Adam
Clayton Powell and the Kent State 25,
will speak at the Plaza of the Americas
at 1 p.m. Thursday.
KUNSTLER WILL TALK- about
political repression and will discuss the
case of the dismissed instructor Robert
Canney.
Before the civil rights movement of
the early sixties began to catch his
attention, Kunstler practiced law, wrote
bodes and was strictly a family man.
The Chicago Conspiracy Seven Trial was
the climax which transformed Kunstler
from a defender into an advocate.
Kunstler attended Yale where he was

COMMITTEES

ONE^j
student not chosen for one
specific position could be shifted
to another committee.
We dont recommend people
for positions they dont want,
Uhlfelder said. We would have
had to call every person we had
already chosen to ask them if
they would serve on some
alternate committee than the
one to which they were
recommended.
Although Uhlfelder cited the
lateness of OConnells request
the real dispute seems to center
on whether SG or the
administration has primary
authority in the selection of
students for university
committees.
He defended the SG selection
process by noting that all
students were encouraged,
through notices in the Alligator,
to apply for the committee
positions. No positions were
closed, Uhlfelder said. In fact,
he said, Miss Sabin and Miss
Merein had looked for persons

J&WBkKK VNK
'' MB *>>
I cant understand my boy,
Stanley. Last week he left dirty
socks all over the rug ... this
week hes picking up aluminum
cans all over campus. For what?
Mama he says, its for the
Environmental Action Group.
(§)

ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION GROUP

a number of the varsity swim team and
a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He served
in the army during World War II as a
major and after his discharge, earned his
law degree from Columbia University.
ACCORDING TO Bruce Ellis,
chairman of the program which is being
sponsored by the Florida Student
Movement, SI donations will be
collected from people in the crowd to
help support Robert Canney s defense.
Kunstler will also speak in
Jacksonville at the civic auditorium
Thursday night at 8 p.m.
Other speakers who will be speaking
at the Plaza on Thursday are Bruce Ellis
and Fran Smith, both former students
of Canney; Samuel Taylor, representing
the BSU; and James Millikan, assistant
professor of philosophy.

not associated with SG or other
organizations.
The UF president placed a
letter in the Alligator a week
ago, asking students to apply for
positions on university
committees, either to the
administration or to SG.
Uhlfelder called the letter
unjustified. We had told the
administration we hadnt filled
all the positions yet. But we had
about 70 percent and we were
working on the rest. By the time
the letter appeared in the
Alligator (a few days after it was
written) we had already sent the
administration our final list.
Mel Sharpe, assistant to
OConnell, said the UF president
had received complaints on his
dorm visits this year that more
people wanted to be involved on
the committees. Sharpe said that
was one reason for OConnells
letter to the Alligator. He also
said SG had indicated they had
not succeeded in finding
students for all positions.
Henry Solares, student body
vice president, believed there


was another reason for
OConnells letter.
OConnell just didnt like
some of the SG nominees,
Solares said. He wrote the
letter to get other applicants so
he could drop some SG
nominees and put other students
in their place.
OConnell and Sharpe cited
these factors in the
administrations review of a
nominee: Grade point average of
the student, interest which the
student has shown in the past
over the subject the committee
will be concerned with, ability
of the student to devote time to
the committee work, and the
class status of the student. This
last factor is reviewed to assure
that no sector of the student
body will be overly represented
on university committees,
Sharpe said.
PATRONIZE I
GATOR 1
ADVERTISERS |
WvAWAY*SK*>X*tm ;W

I dont understand
my son ... Last week
he wouldnt clean up
his room. This week
hes cleaning-up the
EARTH!
The Gainesville Compost Plant
pays EAG a bounty on all cans
turned in, and this gives us even
more funds for beautifying our
environment.
So, if you{rs out there, help
Stanley with die aluminum chitS; 1
and make sire he R tides Skip* 5
lunch. Then, please come home
with him, and help clean his
room. My environment also
needs beautifying.

Hyil/ -
HBr
'Wm ...'
WILLIAM KUNSTLER



WHAT'S HAPPENING

CIRUNA: No, its not a new
disease. CIRUNA is the Council
on International Relations
United Nations Association.
Theyll have an organizational
meeting Nov. 8 at 7:30 p.m. in
rooms 122 and 123 of the
Union. This is a new club on
campus with an
international voice. If youre
interested call Nancy Woods at
373-2772.
BRITISH FOOTBALL: The UF
rugby team will play Georgia on
Norman Field Nov. 6 at 7:30
pm. Admission is free.
A BEATLE IN THE HAND: For
all you nostalgic Beatlemaniacs, %
A Hard Days Night will play in
the Union auditorium Friday at
5:30,8 and 10:30 pm.
If the Old West is more your
style, The Stalking Moon will
play Saturday. Same time, same
plaix.
Or, if Bergman is your bag,
Smiles of a Summer Night will
be shown Sunday. Same time,
same place. Admission is always
50 cents.
Film Festival
Starts Nov. 9
The Council of International
Organizations and Student
Government will sponsor the fall
International Film Festival and
get together in the Reitz
Union starting Nov. 9.
CIO Chairman Guljit Singh
Kochhar said six films from
different countries will be shown
in the Union Auditorium during
three days, at 5:30 and 8 p.m.
The films are:
Nov. 9, The Shadow of
Melody, a Chinese film and La
Dolce Vita, Italian; with
Marcello Mastroianni and Anita
Ekberg.
Nov. 10, Viridiana,
Spanish, and The Trial,
French-German film directed by
Orson Welles.
Nov. 11, The Cranes are
Flying, Russian, and
Kancheijung^
ig s ; .;
HpEMP 1 V St
jpsssss
So Often ...
Its Too Late!
To have that
portrait made
to give.
Call New fr irrji.il ft 3*l
fer an Appointment,, tJ
JP
Ph. 372-2512
1915 N.W. 13th Street
Directly across from
GMntsvllli High School

HARPS AND HALOS:
Independents and greeks are
invited to Angel Flight Rush
Nov. 9 in Reitz Union rooms
122 and 123. Freshmen should
be there from 7 to 7:45 p.m.
and sophomores and juniors
from 8 to 8:45 pm.
THE PRODUCERS:
Applications for the positions of
general chairman and assistant
general chairman of Student
Government Productions will be
accepted until Nov. 13.
Applications may be obtained
from the Student Activities desk
in the Union.
MAN CENTERED: Zuber and
Company, a program of
musical involvement, will be
presented Nov. 5 at 8 pm. in the
Santa Fe Junior College
auditorium, 1001 SE 12th St.
The program is presented by the
Center of Man. Its free to the
public. Bring a musical
instrument or something to bang
on.

w i M §-.¥ B# i.M MM
a K m IM mm i; :m m l A jyf
jm JB /a/ iJM WA i*A A B Iff
ili* *1 wj rA wk A Awl
A A A A A Arnmmmi
transistor radio
] flM4M|||||,,|infl|
ONLY 12.95 The Royal 32 The PACEMAKER Model Z 260
Superb tone quality in a personal size 8-transistor radio. Push-pull Zenith's best clock radio buy features automatic electric clock
amplification. 300 milliwatts of undistorted audio output. 4 speaker. with clOCk/radiO Switch eaSV-tO-read numerals.
Play,up,o 260 hour,on 2 *,.,hii fl h,b.mri, E ,rphon, jack. Transistorized radio features automatic gain control, built-in
Wavemagnet* antenna. Polystyrene cabinet
in choice of decorator colors.
ONLY $17.95
Professional Service Guarantee
Couchs guarantees that you our customer will receive prompt, courteous, proses proses
sional electronics service by our team of Nationally Recognized CERTIFIED ELEC-
A >i ruff,
/\ TRONICS TECHjjCIANS. / V
A COUCH'S c
608 n. main "Serving Gator Country Since 1933 Ph. 378-1562
i 1 .. ""L"! U
fete^vef 1 f**.* f rvv* t.v.t * -aa *.* **

TEACHING THE TEACHERS:
The Student Florida Education
Association will meet Nov. 5 at
7:30 pm. in room 346 of the
Union. The film The
Engineered Classroom will be
shown.
SKI BUNNIES: The Gator Ski
Club will meet tonight at 8:30
pm. in room 349 of the Union.
UNDERGROUND
RUMBLINGS: Therell be a
meeting of the Florida
Speleological Society tonight at
7 pm. in room 347 of the
Union.
MOVING TOWARD PEACE:
The Florida Student Movement
will meet tonight at 7:30 p.m. in
McCarty auditorium. All are
invited.
HANOI PEN PALS: Circle K
will sponsor a program by
Arnold Air Society, a UF Air
Force ROTC honors
organization that is participating
in a campaign to send petitions

Wednesday, November 4, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

to the Hanoi Peace Delegation in
Paris to protest inhumane
treatment of American
prisioners in North Vietnam.
The program will be tomorrow
at 7:30 p.m. in room 361 of the
Union.
JUST TALKIN IT OVER.
Student Government is
sponsoring an open forum
discussion in the Plaza of the
Americas today from 12 to 1
pm Guests will include Ray
Graves, director of athletics,
Head Football Coach Doug
Dickey, Mandell Glicksberg,
chairman of the board of
directors of the Athletic
Association and two Gator
football players.
LA.: No, not Los Angeles, Latin
America. The second of a
four-part study of Latin America
will be held in the lounge of the
University Methodist Church
from 9:30 to 11:30 pm. Friday.
Dr. William Carter, associate
professor of Latin American
studies will be guest speaker.

by Maryann* GiHis

AMERICAN TEACHERS: Dick
Hixson, director of the
university and college section of
the national American
Federation of Teachers (AFT),
will speak to local AFT members
today at 5 p.m. in the Union.
rr*S A LIVE-IN: The Tenants
Union is looking for students to
help organize the union for their
apartment complex. Anyone
interested, please call 392-1665
and leave your name, phone
number and apartment complex
for Mike Pugh, secretary of legal
affairs.
SUMMER SIGHTSEEING:
There will be a meeting of
AIESEC on Thursday at 8:30
p.m. for all students interested
in working overseas next
summer. It will be in room 347
of the Union.
(NOTE: All notices for Whats
Happening must be typed.
Typewriters are available at the
Alligator.)

Page 3



The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 4, 1970

Page 4

Jane Fonda To Speak
For Accent Jan. 23

Jane Fonda, one-time actress
and fuD-time activist/ is coming
to UF.
SHE WILL HE here Jan. 23,
and will lecture on the topic of
alternatives.
Mia Fonda's appearance is
being sponsored by Accent 7l,
whose Accent Week theme will
be Challenge of Our
Dilemma.
Mia Fonda recently took an
automobile tour of the country,
at which time she discovered
America.
I wanted to meet the silent
majority I had heard so much
about, die said.
According to a press release
issued by die American Program
Bureau, die found a country
that many Americans do not
know exists. Specifically:
She met with sailors,
soldiers and Marines who have
formed antiwar organizations on
every base in America and on
every. American drip at sea.

H
" 5SSr
. < Si, JY
'>
TO BE YOUNG,
GIFTED AND BLACK
"To Be Young, Gifted and Black," Lorraine Hansberry's much
acclaimed off-Broadway play will be performed one night only at the
University Auditorium on Thursday, Nov. 5 at 8:15 p.m. Miss
Hansberrys sensitive, eloquent play about the black experience will
be performed by the original cast. Tickets are on sale at the Union
box office.
RAPPS DELIVERS
Mon-Thurs-5:30 P. M.-12:30 A.M.
Fri-Sat-12K)0 Noon-1:30A.M.
Sun-12:00 Noon-12:30 A.M.
Free Delivery
$2.00 minimum
ONE free can of soda with
each SI.OO of food ordered
pepsi-grape-root beer-7up-orange
with every 5.00 order
I piece cheese cake Free
enjoy at RAPPS
* t.t.t.t :

She met with Black Panther
party leaders and members. She
visited their free breakfast for
children programs and clinics.
She talked with survivors of
police raids upon their offices
and homes.
She has talked with
hundreds of veterans of the war
to learn in the most direct way
about the war in Vietnam.
She has visited Indian
reservations, the occupation of
Alcatraz and has met with
Indians in prisons.
AFTER DISCOVERING the
invisible America, Miss Fonda
cofounded the G1 office in
Washington, D.C., where
complaints from Gls allegedly
disciplined illegally by the
military and deprived of their
First Amendment rights are
collected. She has met with
congressmen and senators and
secured their support for the
Gls.
Miss Fonda has picketed with

the Indians, publicly supported
their efforts for
self-determination and assisted a
foundation concerned
exclusively with fair treatment
for Indians.
She has also spoken out in
opposition to the police attacks
upon members of minority
groups arid the slaying of Black
Panther party members
specifically. She has directly
supported various programs of
the party.
MISS FONDA also serves as
the national coordinator of
Vietnam Veterans Against the
War.
Like many Americans, Jane
Fonda is deeply troubled by the
America she encountered. I
think that there is no weapon so
powerful as the perception of
the alternative, Miss Fonda
said.
Two To Brew
Americas first help wanted
advertisement appeared in
London in 1609, report
researchers at Rheingold
Breweries. The ad called for
brewers for service in Virginia.
Two men responded and,
according to records, proved
satisfactory.

"Ahh yes my little chickadee
make a date to see jgfe? < f
4 me tonight at the f
Rat it's one of my
4 with Edgar Bergen, Charlie McCarthy Mortimer Snerd
SHOWS TONIGHT AT THE RAT: ADMISSION: I
4 7=309:1510:30pm 25< per person J
QEBEEB^&HD^^ffI
t Pr*ntd by Student Government Productions
* *"* |
StaQian styfie spaghetti with meat sauce, g/tated cheese. Ife^Saof 13
4 bowl choice o{ saCad dressing, ga/t&c kaad.
4
4 Spaghetti Special Good 4:30-7PM 4
* * *^

v "I I
wf W mr r I B.
ml
s 'll
V fl ji'^B
JraK | F it
Sj& If las f
i flB # I BB
ACTIVIST JANE FONDA
... found an America that doesn't exist to many
ELECTIONS ...

ONE^|
Canciu of Boca Raton, the GOP
candidate.
12th District Incumbent
Democrat Dante Fascell
defeated Republican Robert A.
Zinzell of Miami.
Three incumbents who got
another two-year term without
opposition in the general
election were Democrat Don
Fugua of Altha in the 2nd
District, Democrat Charles E.
Bennett of Jacksonville in the
3rd, and Democrat Claude

Pepper of Miami Beach in the
11th.
On the National scene,
Democrats cut into the
Republicans lopsided lead in
governorships. Their victories
included Maryland where Vice
President Spiro T. Agnew fought
hard to return his home state to
the GOP fold.
Gov. Marvin Mandel, the
Democrat who filled the vacancy
created when Agnew became
President Nixons 1968 running
mate, romped easily over
Republican C. Stanley Blair, a
former top aide to the Vice
President.



Write-In Senate Hopeful Sues Cramer

TAMPA, (UP!) Perennial
political candidate Jim Fair, a
qualified write-in candidate for
the U.S. Senate, filed a
$300,000 libel and slander suit
in federal court here Monday
against Republican UJS. Senate
candidate William Cramer.
Fair also named as plaintiffs
television commentator John
Daley, and WPBT, Community
Television Foundation of South
Florida, Inc.
THE SUIT is a result of a
statewide political program
sponsored by the state
educational television stations
and on which candidates for
statewide office appeared.
The format had been for the
candidates for each office to
appear jointly when that time
dot arrived. But Cramer refused
to go on with Fair and as a result
the U.S. Senate candidates
Democrat Lawton Chiles,
Republican Cramer and
Senate Prexy
Doesnt Wont
Special Session
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Senate President-designate Jerry
Thomas called on Gov. Claude
Kirk Monday to call off plans
for a special 10-day session of
the legislature beginning Nov. 17
and said the legislature probably
would adjourn without taking
action if Kirk insists on the
session.
Thomas (D-Jupiter) will be
sworn in as presiding officer of
the Senate today, immediately
following the general election.
He was elected to the post last
summer and will succeed Sen.
John Mathews (DJacksonville)
who resigned the Senate to run
for governor.
THOMAS SAID a select
House-Senate committee needs
more time to consider a program
of substance to cope with
Floridas complex insurance
problems. House
Speaker-designate Richard
Pettigrew (D-Miami) has
expressed a similar view and
both men have said they would
prefer a special session in
January.
A moratorium on insurance
rate increases imposed by the
legislature in a' special session
Oct. 9 and currently being
tested in the courts wont
expire until early in February.
Thomas also said he will
announce the appointment of
several committee chairmen
after he is sworn in. One of the
chairman is expected to be Sen.
Louis de la Parte (D-Tampa)
who is slated to head the
powerful ways and means
committee.
OPEN HOUSE
Ntvfmbtr 6, 1970
BPMI2
Featuring:
CEHRATtOH
ovryono wlcow

Independent Fair appeared
separately.
Fair contended he was libeled
and slandered by remarks made
by Cramer.
IN A STATEMENT issued
after the suit was filed, Cramer

ASFSDFDSF

The lampyridae beetle family.
Delight of small boys. Biological
light bulb. And prime source of
raw material for another Du Pont
innovation.
Luciferase, an enzymatic protein
with intriguing properties, obtain obtainable
able obtainable only from fireflies. Luciferin,
an organic molecule also found in
fireflies, but synthesizable. Adeno Adenosine
sine Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a common
energy-yielding substance found in
all living cells.
Those are the three main ingre ingredients
dients ingredients in lampyridae's love light.
And because ATP is common to all
living cells, university researchers
discovered they could produce an

ALSO TVS JOHN DALY

called the suit another example
of the smear tactics being used
by the new left conspiracy
which is determined to defeat
me.
The new left, the campus

artificial glow by mixing luciferin
and luciferase wherever life is
present.
Noting that phenomenon, Du Pont
scientists and engineers went on
to develop it into a practical ana analytical
lytical analytical system. Correlating the in intensity
tensity intensity of the artificial "glow with
the amount of ATP present in
bacteria, they designed a means of
measuring the reaction.
The result is the luminescence
biometerthe first really basic im improvement
provement improvement in bacteria-counting
methods since the time of Louis
Pasteur. Rather than waiting days
for a culture to demonstrate growth
density, a doctor or technician can

I 1
I
[ Du Pont Company
Room 7890, Wilmington, DE 19898
Id like your latest information on opportunities at
[ Du Pont for graduates with degrees in
i
Name
| University
I
t Degree .Graduation Date
I Address
j
j City .State Zip
An Equal Opportunity Employer (M/F)
I 1

Wednesday, November 4, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

revolutionaries, the cop-killers,
the bombers and the burners
dont want Bill Cramer in the
U.S. Senate, the Cramer
statement said. Those who
would scream obscenities and
throw rocks and bottles at our

president dont want Bill Cramer
either.
He called the lawsuit "a
desperate, last-minute effort of a
losing candidate to defeat me.

now get a digital readout of bacteria
concentration in a matterof minutes.
Other potentially lifesaving uses
for the biometer are being sug suggested
gested suggested every daysuch as diagnos diagnosing
ing diagnosing metabolic rates, enzyme de deficiencies
ficiencies deficiencies and nerve damage.
Innovationapplying the known
to discover the unknown, inventing
new materials and putting them to
work, using research and engineer engineering
ing engineering to create the ideas and products
of the futurethis is the venture
Du Pont people are engaged in.
You can become one of them,
and advance professionally in your
chosen field. See your Du Pont
Recruiter. Or send us the coupon.

(nil UIINT)
Ventures for better living.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 4,1970

Migrant Kids Can Earn And Learn

By MARCIA GREEN
A *- ***
AllvyAlOf ff rlTBf
Dr. Bob Cage, UF assistant
professor of foundations of
education, is piloting a program
geared toward facing the
problems encountered by
children of the states migrant
workers.

UF Days Presents Speakers

By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
af
AlllyVCOv WrVTBr
Twelve UF faduty, staff and
student speakers are venturing
into three Florida counties to
present civic groups with current
information about the university
campus.
Within the next two weeks,
22 civic dubs in Polk, Pinellas
and Hillsborough counties will
host sneakers.
THE PRESENTATIONS are a
part of the University of
Florida Days, a community
relations project sponsored by
the Division of Information

'U
1 |
808 LYNCH
... outlines program's purpose
Hixsoa Speaks
At Reitz Uaioa
Richard Hixson, director of
the colleges and universities
section of the national American
Federation of Teachers, will
speak at the Reitz Union
auditorium at 4 pm. today.
Hixson will discuss collective
bargaining with local AFT
members and anyone interested
in attending.
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
For information call
CASSELS
IN THE AIR
378-2646

The program, Earn and Learn,
is designed to lower the school
dropout rate of migrant children
and to teach prevocational dulls
to those of junior high school
age. The program was initiated
in September.
UNDER THE DIRECTION of
Dr. Ira J. Gordon, Cage, four

Services and the Alumni
Association.
According to Information
Services Director Bob Lynch,
the purpose of the program is
to take the menage of the

SAE Aids Samson
With 'Coice Float

Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE)
fraternity sponsored a Coke
Float in this years
homecoming parade as a service
project to help Samson.
SAMSON IS an organization
of UF students who do
volunteer work in
socio-economic programs in the
Gainesville area.
Some 1,500 Cokes were given
away during the parade by SAE.
The S6B was collected strictly

FORESTS CANT I
Introduces The
Post-Homecoming
Student Financial Aid Program
************************** *****
Wednesday Cafeteria Lunch & Dinner
Oikkas l Noodles 4s{
Apple or Cherry Cobbler lss
Coffee 9s
************************
Thursday
Moat Loaf A Osios Gravy 45$
FrsH Psddisg 15$
Coffee 9$
*******************************
m
_
HOURS Located Conveniently HOURS
6:45 a.rn. 12:00 p.m. Across From Murphree Area 6:46 .m.l2:00 p.m.

staff members and six graduate
assistants will do most of their
work on site the citrus
growing areas.
Working in mobile homes
converted into classrooms and
laboratories, students involved in
Earn and Learn are persuaded to
get additional education. The
students, 12 to 16 years of age,

university to people.
All 12 speakers will present
current general information
about UF, such as enrollment
growth, degrees and curriculum
changes.

from crowd donations.
According to SAE President
Kevin Davey, the S6B profit
from the float and a matching
check will be presented to
Samsot today to be used in any
way the organization wishes.
BECAUSE SAMSON is a
Student Government-sponsored
program and Project Hope is
not, SAE decided to turn over
the float profits to Samson,
Davey said.

aft told education is meaningful
and with education the ability to
earn more money is greatly
increased.
Twenty of the mobile
laboratories house an
automotive tune-up shop on one
end and a simulated
supermarket, complete with

IN ADDITION each speaker
will focus on the area in which
he is involved. These will include
student activities, engineering,
law, education, pharmacy,
business, admissions, educational
television and alumni services.
Among groups hosting
speakers are Rotary, Kiwanis,
Lions, Optimists, Sertoma and
Exchange Clubs. The
person-to-person approach
available through attending civic
dub meetings is the most
effective way weve found to
present UF to citizens, Lynch
said.

Blue CrossBlue Shield
Insurance Identification Cards Must Be
Picked Up Tuesday/Wednesday
November 3rd or 4th.
In Room 331 J. Wayne Reitz Union Between
9:ooam and 4:30 pm.
IN ORDER TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR BLUE
CROSS-BLUE SHIELD BENEFITS YOU MUST HAVE
YOUR IDENTIFICATION CARD.
Commit Yourself.
If
>ei | /* \
if I' BPS el V m Ijsl Lt ;
the '' 1
BCTHLSHM 45^UWl|
AT THE RATI |
Thurs., Fri., and Sat. 1
November 5. 6 A 7 I
TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY I
8 A 10:30 PM |
$2 per person V
You don't have to be 21 f
to make it at the RATI ft
provided by Studnt Cmrerwmenl Productions ft

check-out registers, on the other
end. A simulated motel room
and a hospital room are built
into the remaining units.
EMPLOYERS IN THE general
area who are willing to
cooperate with the program
provide jobs and supervision for
these students. While the
students are involved in Earn
and Learn the state pays their
wages.
In addition to the vocational
training, there is an emphasis on
reading and mathematics.
Because the migrant parents*
financial need is so great, their
children's education usually has
to take a back seat. The reading
and math program should help
anmensely with the serious
problems the migrant family
encounters due to lack of
education.
Cage became interested in
such a program after viewing a
recent documentary on the
conditions of migrant camps in
Florida released on NBC TV.
We don't expect him to be
an auto mechanic, but we hope
to entice him to stay in school
until he graduates," Cage said.



. upm?''
MR
j/k/b mttm wm am
W
J**l mm
IJjyUPERMMKETT|WrSiUSJTUKEITIS!
,
H lIIK HH I
I fl Hi II HI IV
i§ Hj| HHI as fHp; 1 aHfe JHHp |SHH 9HR |HHp awp-- HE "VHHP "91 *3| bIHk 'VHGI HHp
WEDNESDAY NOV. 4TH

V
S.
nH
Z \ \ LITTLEWOOO
>- \ \ 9 ELEM. SCHOOL
\ \ r
(EW^BAVOWE^
-A ] ~
_ iPf / uwivEKsmr ave.
5 \v S 1 AVE /
r

3736 NEWBERRY ROAD
IN GAINESVILLE
' '
A brand new supermarket with loads of new ideas to save
you money any day of the week, any week of the year.
Ideas like marking every can, every jar, every package with
its own individual low price. No two-for-this or three-for-that con confusion.
fusion. confusion.
Ideas like prices that are rock-bottom low Monday through
Saturday. Prices that stay low no matter what day you shop.
Ideas like unlimited savings -no minimum purchase to buy
something on special; no limits to your savings.
Ideas like new decor and sparkling sunsfei*?. colors to match
the Sunshine State.
Ideas like faster, easier check-out lanes.
Lots of new ideas to make food shopping a lot more fun...
and a lot easier on your pocketbook.
OPEN MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 9:00 A.M.
TO 9:00 P.M. # SUNDAY 12:00 NOON TO 7:00 P.M.

Wednesday, November 4, 1970, The Florida AMpAor,

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 4, 1970

EDITORIAL
Tuned In?
A poll conducted by Newsweek magazine has revealed
that most Americans believe the news media are doing a
good job of reporting.
The majority of 1,560 adults polled by the weekly
magazine gave good marks to newspapers, news magazines,
radio "and television and at the same time, maintained a
e
healthy skepticism about what they read, hear and see.
The poll showed that 75 per cent rate television reporting
as good or excellent. And 62 per cent gave newspapers
a high rating.
The news media in the past year or so has been under fire
from the Nixon Administration, mostly from Vice President
Agnew, who has blamed directly and indirectly many
problems of society on those Eastern establishment
newspapers who report all that bad stuff.
We trust the findings of the poll will come as a shock to
the Vice President. The Silent Majority is not buying all of
his tiresome rhetoric.
Television newsman Walter Cronkite in a Nov. 17 Look
magazine article says that Agnews criticisms of the news
media have had a reverse effect in their intention of
intimidating the media.
Cronkite says that most people and he surely was
including Mr. Agnew do not understand journalism or
how the journalist works.
We must never, never, never consider the consquences
that our information will have on people or on ourselves,
he said, speaking, perhaps, for all news media. All we must
do is to be sure that we are right, that the facts are correctly
presented.
We should not decide what is good and bad for people,
whoever these people are. The moment we make that moral
judgement, free journalism is over.
We could not have said it better. We pray the Vice
President is ttined in.
Voice Complaints
This is your chance to voice those complaints about the
Athletic Association to someone beside your roommate
someone who can do something about it.
Today at noon on the Plaza of the Americas, Student
Government is sponsoring another open forum, this time
with representatives from the AA.
Guests at the forum will include Athletic Director Ray
Graves, Head Coach Doug Dickey, Chairman of the Board
of Directors Mandell Glicksberg and two Gator football
players.
Student Body Vice President Henry Solares said possible
questions will involve such things as Astro-turfing Florida
Field, the $5 student athletic cards, the recent dismissal of
two tennis players, the code of standards for athletes, the
overselling of Homecoming tickets and the current financial
standing of the AA.
This is your chance. If you dont go and hear their side,
listen to their explanation, you really cant complain any
longer.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

Ask Question And Be Amazed

Today at noon in the Plaza of
the Americas Ray Graves, Doug
Dickey and various cohorts
present themselves to the
student body to answer
questions about athletics on this
campus.
Students will quickly find
that their bitches and gripes
about tickets, fee cards and bloc
seating will be easily dealt with
by vague reasoning and evasive
generalities.
It is with this in mind I
present to the student body a
list of unanswerable questions
which I hope someone has the
presense of mind to bring up at
this once-in-a-lifetime chance to
hear what the Athletic
Association believes about itself
and its athletes.
First let me make my position
clear: I am an ex-athlete, last
year a captain of the track team,
I work in Yon Hall as a section
advisor, and I helped to organize
a group called the Union of
Florida Athletes which is seeking
nothing more but a
representative voice with the
athletic association. I am looked
on by the association as a cross
between Benedict Arnold and
HoChiMinh.
The questions:
Why is the association
afraid to let athletes have a real
voice?
Football players have been
warned against having anything

Alligator Staff
Denise Valiante Craig He y|
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Boerd of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

JONH PARKER

to. do with the organization.
Instead athletes are supposed to
be content with a figurehead
committee, set up by Graves,
which is not apportioned fairly,
takes no votes, and contains as
many coaches as athletes. What
is the Association afraid of?
What are the criteria for the
associations dress and grooming
standards?
Certain types of clothing, and
hair that touches the ears and/or
collar are taboo in the Yon Hall
dining hall. Who decides where
to draw the line? Does he go by
contemporary community
standards? Is it the function of
the Association to control all
phases of an athletes life? How
far can this control logically
extend, i.e. does an athlete lose
his civil rights because he wishes
to participate in a sport?
Where is all this leading to
in athletics?
If players must follow all rules
blindly, if they lose all rights of
individuality, if their only goal is
to win, win, win, hasnt athletics
lost its original and true goal,
that of individual physical
expression?

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

Loretta Tennant
News Editor

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1609

If I may be so bold as to make
a prediction, anyone asking
these or similar questions will
likely be met with answers
such as these:
e Athletes represent thejr
school. Long hair connotes
radicalism, therefore the athletes
have a duty to misrepresent their
school to the public.
Athletes have to be able to
respond immediately to
command. Therefore when an
athlete is told to cut his hair and
he refuses, he will not be reliable
in a game situation.
Athletes need discipline.
Long hair, and careless dress,
and permissive conduct are
indicative of a lack of discipline.
Athletes dont need
representation because they can
talk to coaches personally at any
time and therefore there is
complete and open
communication.
There it is. Someone ask the
question and you may be
amazed to see how the Athletic
Association stands on the
Constitution.



'Feather Free Gas
Just Chicken Manure

Working in a damp, musty
cellar laboratory, a British
scientist has made a discovery
which could shift the balance of
power in the Middle East.
Ellito Newton, the inventor
responsible, was interviewed in
his living room as an angry torch
carrying mob of oil company
vice presidents stood silently
outside.
I KNOW its hard to
believe, said Newton, whose
nickname, Fig, is derived from
his costume I am told at a
party in his wild but obscure
past.
I have developed a practical,
inexpensive process by which
chicken manure is converted
into gasoline, said Newton.
Work started some years ago
when scientists were making dire
predictions about running out of
fossil fuels.
But if put into use soon it

READERS FORUM
W3$?7 *- / ; ** I .ms&mMmlm y^ ;t
j mlmimimmmmilmmmmmmlllimm^^

Player Award
MR. EDITOR:
This weeks player of the
week award goes to President
Steve Uhlfelder for his
exceptional game against the
Florida Degraders (vis-a-vis
Mike Kelleys remarkable
statement at Growl).
Will the player of the week
please pick up your free meal at
the Florida training table.
Right on, Steve.
JOEL FLEISCHER, (4AS)
National Monument
MR. EDITOR:
This is to announce that
donations are now being
accepted for what it is hoped
will be a new national
monument.
The monument will be
located in our own Dogpatch
(Beta Woods) and will be known
as the Jubilation T. Dickey
monument. The monument will
be a figure of a football player
astride a flrey Gator holding a
football that looks suspiciously
like a large lemon. This figure
will sit eternally atop a granite
base inscribed with the Generals
achievements: Dickeys Defeat
(Battle of Tuscaloosa), Dickeys
Rout (Battle of Knoxville), and
Dickeys Hoomiliashun (Recent
Battle of Gainesville).
All donations, large or small,
appreciated.
JERRY SERVICE (3LW)
Tenants Union
MR. EDITOR:
Re: Your editorial of 28
October. It sounded just like my
situation.
In my case, I am a returning

" toi 1 1 :i
REG | I
ICROWDER 1
,I ; 1
1
could take the heat out of the
Middle East situation, he said.
If the vital interests of the U.S.
and the Soviet Union in Middle
East crude oil were removed, the
conflict would de-escalate.
IN ADDITION oil tanker
disasters would almost
disappear, he said. Now if
crude oil covers the ocean it is
enormously destructive to
marine life, but if one of those
super tankers broke open with
chicken manure...
Even as we spoke, British
White House and Pentagon
experts were busy studying the
political implications of

veteran and was not planning to
attend school until the winter
quarter when last minute
circumstances changed my mind.
My rush for last minute
acceptance left me with little
choice as to living quarters.
Luckily, I found someone who
needed a roommate and here is
our situation:
My roommate had already
signed the lease on the
apartment last August amid
promises of a fixing and
cleaning campaign soon to
come.
Needless to say, this never
materialized.
When we moved in September
15, the, apartment was still
filthy, roach-infested, and
lacking in furniture.
What furniture it had was
lacking, period! Old, mildewed,
and falling apart, we finally gave
up on some of it and threw it
into the hall storage closet.
I dont believe the apartment
has been painted since it was
built in the 1950s (except,
maybe, once by amateurs).
My roommate has yet to
receive a security deposit he paid
on his apartment last year from
the same company.
The outside yard is constantly
littered with trash, our parking
area is not adequately supervised
often resulting in no place to
park.
We park in the yard!
The front doors are broken,
hanging, and the exterior paint is
flaking and dirty.
We pay all the utilities, and
this is what we get for $135.00
monthly.
If the rent were lower, I could
see less reason to complain, but,
when it is almost on a par with
the newer and bigger apartment
complexes, I consider the rent
too high for the services
received.
The lease is mandatory for
one year though we have no
present plans to attend summer
quarter. It also became effective

converting over to the chicken
standard.
The Defense Department,
meanwhile, reported a Russian
trawler coming dangerously
close to shore near a Texas
chicken farm.
THE U.S. delegate to the
United Nations delivered a draft
resolution to the General
Assembly asking for an
international treaty calling for
the limitation of chickens to
peaceful purposes.
Scott Carpenter, the former
astronaut, signed a contract with
Shell Oil for a series of
commercials. He was reported
signed to promote their
soon-to-be marketed feather
free gas.
I think Im going to be sick,
commented consumer advocate
Ralph Nader.

immediately, two weeks before
we would move in.
Its one redeeming value is its
close proximity to campus, (one
block to Tigert Hall). Yet, this
advantage pales before the
services offered at other
complexes such as swimming
pools, health clubs, socials, etc.
I believe most of the students
simply have little choice. My
point is: My roommate, also a
veteran, and I are both older,
responsible, voting citizens and
we deplore the landlords
lackadaisical attitude toward a
transient population which
has little or no permanancy and,
therefore, no influence.
We support the establishment
of a tenants union.
CHARLES SUTTON
GREGORY PENNINGTON
Misrepresentation
MR. EDITOR:
A letter published last
Thursday from Mr. Peter
Langley was a gross
misrepresentation of the facts
and immersed in lies. It seems
the only relevant thing Mr.
Langley finds is a Gator football
weekend with its 2 to 5
entertainment at an average cost
of $40,000 per hour.
He has accused Mr. Uhlfelder
of sitting on the fifty yard line
for the Auburn game and
changing his position for that
reason. Mr. Uhlfelder has never
changed his position concerning
making homecoming more
meaningful or else abolish it.
Nor has he ever sat on the fifty
yard line, nor did he attend the
Auburn game.
In the past Student
Government has had a 30 seat
bloc of preferential seating,
established by law, located on

Wednesday, November 4, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

.
. x-Kv.x .- .!! A ,l i!^(SsHB^S? 1 j
s ;; ; |^|M!PIPB|HHPPP
Ms s I
',::<< r.^-^m^SsaWKggjsKftiwi^^^^^^^e^Ms^-S.xs^^y:-:^- ?S> -Xvvrv^^S^SSJ^^vX> : w: :
j^'y-yx^ :s. !£J^>? 'i-:'y<-><\'.'' roSt*:-: vXj.-X. jj!;
This is Scat Trueblood, all-American astronaut, with more
on how Ultra Oil Company is cleaning up the air ...

the SO yard line for each game.
This year President Uhlfelder has
terminated that policy in favor
of equal treatment for all. The
Student Government bloc this
season has been located in the
organizations section and has
been treated as any other
organization.
President Uhlfelder and Art
Wroble are the two student
representatives on the Board of
the University of Florida
Athletic Association, Inc. This
entitles them to four 50 yard
line seats each for every home
game. They have turned these
down voluntarily so as not to be
hypocritical when they express
themselves concerning the
inequities of the Athletic
Association.
Mr. Langley also criticized Mr.
Uhlfelders boycott of the
Orange and Blue game. The
purpose of the boycott last
spring was for the expression of
discontent over the new ticket
policy. The opportunity was
made available for the students
to demonstrate their feelings,
but as usual apathy reigns.
Mr. Uhlfelder has continually
insisted that participation in
Homecoming be channelled
towards constructive ends. The
means he has left to the
individual. It has been his desire
that Homecoming reform with
the times and that students
should determine the type and
extent of their personal
commitments.

*'
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must: e
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and not exceed
300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer diows Just
cause. The editor reserves the right to edit all letters for ~r
space.
Writers may submit longer essays, columns or letters
to be considered for use as "Speaking Out" columns.
Any writer interested in submitting a regular column is
asked to contact the editor and be prepared to show
samples of his work.

In the future when anyone
feels the necessity to criticize, it
would be useful if the facts were
ascertained before
misrepresentation and
innuendoes are lodged.
HENRY M. SOLARES
Vice President
Student Body
Blackened Names
MR. EDITOR:
Is Mike Kelley a god? We all
realize he is a football jock,
but...
When a jock gets up in front
of 50,000 people and has the
power to and precedes to
blacken a persons name and
reputation without equal chance
for a refute by that individual
then it IS time to reconsider the
role of athletes.
Steve Uhlfelder was blackened
in such that manner. And even
our own Student Body President
was not given equal status to a
jock.
If jocks are to run this campus
then perhaps the A.A. should
have exclusive control over the
entire U. of F. campus and its
operations instead of just
Florida Field. GO GO GATORS.
BEAT STUDENTS
PETE HOBBS
Student Senator

Page 9



, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 4, 1970

Page 10

mp* i
jdJPii 'M * |l
ffl Vii"' 1 (
1,1 f mm 3 m3HtvJ%
i*' i,.^
~/ Design by Fotiou } _~~~~ =s^^ i r -
3 Photos Cope-Surrency*Banmster " ' ~

- ' [
COLONY SHOP
This jump suit Cheryl's wearing has all the GO with matching
complimentary vest. The boots are by Divina.

. t.
Rkl 1 v V'-,v wH
rol|y fit i
Bp*T' BB
| : r i
; J
ns| I
j^^^SflLjj^. K mmEkp
SVi (Vi>KllW jSTii'ViH
li >; - t
WILSON'S
Bonnie wears a cling knit sweater and pants set called
''Sweater Bee" by Banff. It is a hand washable blend of 3
fibers in a wood grain design. Glacks have elastic waistband,
top has zip-front neck placket all for easy wear.
All from Wilson's, downtown on the square.

!> a vr^^^friwiHi^B:
KT" '<'.&' \ss£'* rf* i^r^H|B^BT :> .fi^S^^^j^^^EjjFjt.
ZM r k
SUSAN SCOTT
The gouch and this Gypsy are being featured at Susan Scott. TN
Don t miss this display of pleasant pleasantry. Modeled by
Judy.




t wear your love like heaven j^ss

* l^
Ha jriniiihifii ..^ij(
jpfppi!
|?jl
v^^TT
nittftMS 1§ .-*
H jB
AES'. If
. B
i> >
t ',l^-
" B
B
fl|. ''' .
JfP yiM
I S
it fe' '-.
V. jr I
(l I
fl Hk K
x :^B;!
raw | 8
All b i
biH ASS 1 m
b s 1
Bi BBBBPf ft I^^^^^^mmmmmmnmbW
Br
- %, > ;
v ;|.
J^^BB
> \

* ,.>
- ;^m
m£e : A
r--T9 Abl A b
S|. MAi'.;
,^Bl^AflPiii^^^B
ajas-yx- fMBRMB|g^Smi2MBB^B
SILVERMAN'S
. f f-
- f- _, ,j, .. '.. ~ '
.%

MASS
The shape of fashion now and to come is supple, soft, fluid,
free in a word, young. Black velvet trims up this young fun
Gibson dress. A ruffle at the hemline adds to the soft
sensational look that is acceptable for daytime wear, too.
Modeled by Tanya
Bi 9s ; F^IL,- iL
. ia. jg Jr \ 9 jsv
> j
% B?L 4 iAj%
*v Aiw * be % it 1 t
? k
EnS S^Kijtl
jap
!
\ ?fm |||. ,'
SCOBr : --Ww K
J jpgpp
JW ~
* fl| a *** --* gfIABB
<'%M*S&saK mm HI
o .
SEARS
Maxi mystic makes the party scene peasant style. Bl**,* and
gaily embroidered cotton skirt & washable blouse were
chosen by Rita. Sears Junior Bazaar.

Wednesday, November 4,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Belk Lindsey
Give those raindrops a real treat when they fall all over you
with this striking two-tone snake skin raincoat. Together
with patent leather, top and bottom, the total outlook will
be an experience you'll never want to shed.
- -9? it : iuvt .M
||j||jjj| t| i I;
Mb > |
jtHS Ssi- ,'
' ,f* Wgk .. '<**'..
f WHWlifpnnMi' Jj^j^i
. 11l J>b WH. T i> | itl|r|MM)MMjV ni 'f i'DMg|jiAni>j^|- **'
s }; isl
> % m i i
*"?. MlllMyilllHiilai^^
i .*
>. >
.^viiotv.wwiifcai^Mmijffiffliliilllil^^BwHUiHlm^Mi^^HpliWwm^lK.i-xvy.i'-'
i BHB|pi|r
1 IBMIS
i H
FIGURE FAIR
Be cozy for the cool nights that are coming in this long
quilted red & white robe. The umpire waist line is
accentuated with a navy grosgrain ribbon belt. The sleeve & J
neck is trimmed with white edged in eyelet embroidery, price/
$22.00 y

Page 11



Page 12

:,.The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 4, 1970

NOV
4.8.56
LIFE WITH PICASSO. By Francoise
Gllot & Carlton Lake. Intimate and
revealing memoirs of the artist by the
woman who shared her life with him.
Candidly discusses his volatile moods, his
aesthetic philosophy, his magnificent
inventiveness. Includes perceptive
portraits of such acquaintances as
Matisse, Chaplin, Stein, Gide, Cocteau,
et al. Over 50 photos. Pub. at $6.95. Sale
2.98
A READERS GUIDE TO MODERN
MEDICINE. By Dr. A. G. Dally.
Reliable, thorough account of the
causes, symptoms, and treatment of
hundreds of ailments, that provides a
comprehensive description of all the
major functions and malfunctions of the
human body. Pub. at $5.95. Sale 1.98
THE HISTORY OF JESUS CHRIST. By
R. L. Bruckberger. Conveys the human
aspect of the story of Christ to today's
reader with immediacy and power, while
making plain the Churchs teaching, and
promise it holds for modern man.
Imprimatur. Pub. at $8.50. Sale 1.98
THE AMERICAN AUTOMOBILE. By
John B. Rae. Complete, authoritative
history of the automobile industry. 35
photos. Pub. at $5.95. Sale 1.00
ANCIENT SEMITIC CIVILIZATIONS.
By Sabatino Moscatin. Lucid, absorbing
history of their origins, languages, and
races. In separate chapters on the
Babylonians and Assyrians, the
Canaanites and Hebrews, the Aramaeans,
Arabs and Ethiopians, the author
discusses the history, religion, literature
and arts of each. Highly-praised in the
scholarly journals as the best new book
on the subject. Illus. Pub. at $5.00. Sale
2.98
FRENCH IMPRESSIONISTS. By
Maurice Serullaz. 102 drawings, many in
color. A dazzling survey of the whole
19th century, from Delacroix to
Cezanne and Seurat, reflecting scores of
crucial moods and movements:
Romanticism, Realism, the impact of the
scientific age, much more. Presents
works that are beautiful, violent,
emotional, intellectual, all composing
the fountainhead of modern art. Pub. at
$5.95. Sale 1.98
GUIDE TO WESTERN
ARCHITECTURE. By John Gloag.
From the Parthenon to Manhattan--a
vigorous account of 6,000 years of
architectural progress in Europe, the
Middle East and the Americas. Covers all
styles and periods and all types of
structures, monumental, ornamental and
functional: Classical, Byzantine,
Renaissance; Greek temples, Roman
aqueducts, French chateaux, Spanish
cathedrals, etc. Over 400 illus. Special
Import 5.95
LAROUSSE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE
EARTH. Fwd. by Sir Vivian Fuchs.
Large, updated volume on the anatomy
and history of our planet-geology,
minerology, palaeontology-presented in
a lucid and lively manner. Over 500
photos and diagrams, 20 in color,
detailed index. 418 double-columned
pages. 8M*xll%. Pub. at $15.00 Sale
8.95

Campus Shop S Bookstore

SEMI-ANNUAL
BOOK and RECORD
SIDEWALK SALE
1 V '' ~
vllfiprPP I x
f1 3 I *ll asl I
II SIR s :iR
JL nnBIUIA tff jPL S-ifN McGee IS k
x/>; /V -a J

900
until
430
PLEASURES & TREASURES:
SPORTING GUNS. By Richard Akehurst.
100 illustrations 24 pages in color.
Describes in detail the various types and
shooting qualities of muzzle-loading guns
and rifles created for sportsmen from the
16th century to the present day. Includes
famous gunmakers, sportsmen and
hunters, special features of design,
decoration and finish of blrding and
gaming rifles, more. A book to delight
antique collectors and shooting enthusiasts
alike. 8x8fe". Pub. at $5.95. Sale 3.98
CASTLES OF EUROPE. By Geoffrey
Hindley. Incredible medieval bastions.
180 illus Only 2.95
ABBEYS OF EUROPE. By lan Richards.
The majestic Charterhouse at Pavia,
much more. 180 illus Only 2.95
PALACES OF EUROPE. By Wayne
Dynes. The art and architecture of royal
mansions. 180 illus Only 2.95
CATHEDRALS OF EUROPE. By Ann
Mitchell. Europes Gothic masterpieces.
180 illus Only 2.95
MODERN BUILDINGS. By John
Winter. 180 illus. Masterworks of Le
Corbusier, van der Rohe, Nervi,
Buchminster Fuller, et al Only 2.95
BAROQUE CHURCHES. By P. & C.
Cannon-Brookes. Spectacular fusion of
painting, sculpture, architecture. 180 illus.
Only 2.95
BRIDGES. By Derrick Beckett. History,
materials, techniques, builders of
dazzling art and architecture. 200 illus.,
12 in color. Only 2.95
COOKBOOKS WITH A CONTINENTAL
FLAVOR

Beautiful, easy-to-use kitchen classics
designed for foolproof gourmet cooking.
Excellent gifts for all occasions. Illus. in
color 8 x 11.
FRENCH COOKING FOR PLEASURE.
By Mary Reynolds. Step-by-step dishes
from every region, illus Only 2.95
CHINESE COOKING FOR PLEASURE.
By Helen Burke & Fu Tong. Delicious
Cantonese and regional specialities. Illus.
Only 2.95
JEWISH COOKING FOR PLEASURE.
By Molly Lyone Bar-David. Bagel, Kugel,
Blintzes, etc. Illus Only 2.95
ITALIAN COOKING FOR PLEASURE.
By Mary Reynolds. Pizza, Tortellini in
Brodo, Zabaglione, etc. Illus.. Only 2.95
MEDITERRANEAN COOKING FOR
PLEASURE. By Robin McDouall.
Delicious recipes from Barcelona,
Marseilles, Italy, Turkey, Lebanon, etc.
Illus. Only 2.95
SCANDINAVIAN COOKING FOR
PLEASURE. By Jytte Hardisty. Fruit
soups, Smiling Eggs, Smorgasbord, etc.
Illus. Only 2.95
TRADITIONAL BRITISH COOKING
FOR PLEASURE. By Gladys Mann. All
the mouthwatering favorites, including
recipes for roast beef, Juarns, Yorkshire
Pudding, jugged hare, scones, pies,
chutneys, home-made wines, etc. Illus. in
color. 8V2xll". Special Import 2.95



\ FAMOUS LABEL STEREO / ssjk
} CLASSICS FOLK JAZZ OPERA f
£ AT THE UNBELIEVABLE pf>f SCHWANN
£ LOW PRICE OF CV / / CAT. LIST X
M UI | | 4.98 PER DISC
§ B EACH \
m BOX SET VALUES j qn \
m TO 34.95 NOW ONLY 1/ TO Zm \
| Hundreds of Titles Thousands of Records 1
EE7HOroI
NO MAIL OR PHONE ORDERS QUANTITIES LIMITED
Qr m ABSOLUTELY NO DEALERS^^g|o|Plll^J
\ BOX SET VALUES INCLUDE: /
/..*- r srs V i@^
/ STsSi£?*r $y.97 m SELLING $5.97 NOW SELLING *T $4.97 NOW SEIUHG AT $|W X V*^
( Cfljffl ffIOPANO)
V BOOKSTORE >/^
located in the HUB \

Wednesday, November 4, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

vv,v/.v//.v/.%\%\v.v.v.v.%y.y.y.v.y.;
FOR SALE
rXvXv:*:^
CAMPSITES five of eight lots In the
ocala natl forest 6 mi from Eureka
within V mi of canal lots 80x100 ea
s2odn-s2omo for 2 yrs TOTAL
PRICE-NO INTEREST EVE
378-9385 (A-st-33-p)
GARRARD CHANGER LAB
SERIES TYPE A $45.00 or best
offer call after 6 pm Ph: 378-9947
ask for Philip (A-2t-33-p)
Olds. 1963 station wagon all power
needs some work, runs ok, good
transp. best offer over $325. call Bob
at 378-7007 after 5 pm. (A-4t-33-p)
BASSET HOUNDS
beautiful tri-colored, AKC reg.,
bred for temperament, 7 weeks old,
wormed, shots, males, females
378-7829 or 392-0872 (A-st-33-p)
1962 ford van, new paint, new tires,
new brakes, engine perfect, good for
camping or bands, $599, 378-7082
(A-3t-33-p)
Twin-lens reflex Minolta camera,-
case, flash, filters, S6O. 392-1681,
room 330, Reitz Union. R. French.
(A-3t-172-p)

I B'l rrn IyMP HELD OVER 2nd, week
dWMB I AT ... 1:40 3:37 5:34
7;36 9:43
A rip-snorter. A triumph!
Judith Crist, New York Magazine
ITel LAST 2 DAYS AT ... 1
2:11 4:04 5:57
1-Kg-aaw.rf ~ 7:53 9:50 R
* "Ahh yes, don't miss p
* one of my favorites
* tonight at the Rat!" WmmfSfmllk
*
Him C FIELD
*
* Ton Can't Chut An Homst Man"
SHOWS:
* 7:3opm Weds. Admission I
J 10:30pm N V 4 26

* YOU DONT NEED TO BE 21 TO MAKE IT AT THE RAT
*********** PROVIDED BY SGP* **** ******
L LAST
DAYS
HO PATTON 2:00| f
OJJPI I 5:10 .8:20 I [GPI
/ ELlioT
ouloi \ i , jgr
* iCT MOVIE Him, |
111 ILX k j / 4 (iEOROEC. f!
* ELLIOTT GOULD / % SCOTT KARL
PAULA PRENTISS * t
* m m +
Jr* tojwPvrlWf I
gpACE inemost
An, Htc \
ADULTS 0 r-4
1 *,* Winner In new screen spfcndor... 1
, r child;
50 i [ Awards. f
all DAY t\ i w
* VLARKG4BLE VIVIEN LEIGH /
METROCOLOR +
MGNfc matt

a*

FOR SALE
Tame baby ferrets coons monkeys
bob cats ocelots skunks parrots
hawks snakes lizards turtles for sale
trade or buy kongo pet 475-2546
(local) (A-tfc)
For sale Honda S9O 1968 two
helments included runs good call
373-1534 and come by and see it
' (A-st-30-p)
1970 Yamaha enduro 175 CTIB four
months old good condition SSOO
Phone 373-3350 (A-3t-33-p)
ONE CENT SALE. Buy one item and
receive another for just one cent
more. CAMPUS CONE, 1226 W
University near Flagler. (A-3t-33-p)
Add recorded music to your already
existing stereo phono system with a
Craig cassette stereo tape deck. Best
offer. Call 392-9972 after 10 pm
(A-3t-33-p)
Alrconditioner 20,000 BTU-Fedders
Cost 290. Asking $175.00 Call
372-5693. Very good condition
Married students 372-5693
(A-st-33-p)

Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 4, 1970

.
a

FOR SALE
Medium sized army uniforms. Jungle
& stateside fatigues, raincoat, khaki,
greens (w/2 pants), Dress blues.
378-7238 (A-2t-33-p)
Surfboard, must sell. HOBIE
EASTERN STAR, 6 feet with 7 in.
fin, no dings, very strong. $125. call
373-2237. (A-3t-29-p)
7O Triumph Bonneville 650 2000
miles 378-9208 (A-10t-25-p)
for sale honda S-90, 69 low
- mileage $230 call Dave 373-2771
(A-st-31-p)
DESK & chair $lO. udlco port.
OVEN-broiler S2O. Call Jane after 5
p.m. 378-4251 (A-st-29-p)
1970 5,000 b.t.u. norge Air Cond.
with thermostat & warranty. Perfect
condition. SIOO. Call Jane after 5
pm. 378-4251 (A-st-29-p)
Honda S9O 1968 Just overhauled
$165 or best offer includes helmet
and lock Call Roy 373-2316 after 7
(A-3t-31-p)
Irregulars & seconds Beautiful sheets
towels and pillowcases 103 SE First
St. Sheet & Towel Shop (A-20t-31-p)
MAGNAVOX STEREO 2-12"
speakers walnut cabinets plus over 30
records. $195.00 Call 373-3769 No.
41 Williamsburg Apts. (A-3t-31-p)
BROWNING light auto 5 12ga
shotgun with 2 extra barrels S4OO
Value yours $250 call John 373-1365
(A-3t-31-p)
1966 Porsche 912 Engine rebuilt this
summer. Like new condition $2900
392-7266 (A-4t-31-p)
1968 Honda 125 CL, Good
Condition $250. with new helmet
$275. Phone 376-8902 keep trying.
(A-st-30-p)
YASHICA JP 50mm, f/2.8 single
lens, timer, ac-dc electronic flash,
hand light meter, tripod, cases, like
new $95.00 All, 373-2204 after 5 pm
(A-st-29-p)
Tape Cartridges Quality recorded 2
of your albums for $6 Inc. tape &
every sth tape FREE. 10 albums on
tape for the price of 4 1-album tapes,
dig it? John 378-5916 4-8 pm
(A-st-33-p)
AKC German Shepherd pups. 3 mos
excel, pedigree, love children. 85 ea.
Terms available. 378-5222
(A-4t-30-p)
RCA combination stereo FM-AM
radio. Contemporary style,
mahagony finish. Excellent
condition. $140.00 Call 376-1970
(A-4t-30-p)
KEEP your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Electric upholstery
shampooers also available. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-tfc)
TV 2 yr old excel 19" S6O; stereo
S2B; refrigerator sls; also other
household goods; going abroad will
bargain. Call 372-3205 (A-3t-31-p)
FOR RENT
1 br furnished apt., AC, 102.50 mo
Married couples only no kids pets
372-3202 1716 NW 3rd Ave number
10. (B-4t-33-p)
Male roomate wanted 1103 SW 4th
Ave your own B.R. $41.25 per mo.
Call Larry 372-5746 or stop by. 1
block from Tlgert Must rent
immediately (B-3t-33-p)
2 br townhouse apt. WW shag, A.C. 3
blocks to campus. Call 378-6898
after 5. 170 mo. Lease to June.
(B-3t-33-p)
Need female roommate for academic
year-one BR garage apt near Town
$25 per mo plus utilities call Judy
378-5170. (B-st-29-p)


ms jdNfagf 4| A Wntm Aa Jf JjH
.yjZ^HiNj
My

FOR RENT
Small cottage for married couple. 4V2
miles from med center available Nov.
14. S7O per month. Call 378-9948
after 5:30. (B-3t-33-p)
MANAGER or GROUP WANTED to
lease Campus Cone delivery service.
SISOO per month, owner returning to
college. 372-3890 (B-st-33-p)
WANTED
*
Liberal roommate $25/mo. tutll. own
room 1 block from campus call after
12 376-9755 move In now
(C-3t-33-p)
Urgent! Want car driven from reno,
Nevada to Gainesville! Call Dan
Beardsley at 376-7539 between 9-5
(C-3t-33-p)
1 female rmmate winter & spring
quarters 1 bdrm 55/mo + V 2 utilities
air-conditioned pool 1 blk from
campus call Tina at 373-3656
(C-2t-31-p)
1 female to share Landmark apt. with
3 chicks 47.50 a month. Start winter
quarter. Call 376-7852 after 5 p.m.
(C-3t-33-p)
Make $$ over xmas breakl
Dependable couple needs room or
apt. over break Dec 12-Jan 3 will pay
up to SSO. Available for Interview
392-7635 (C-3t-33-p)
Home for 3/4 Siamese kittens. 2 for
free. Call 372-2759 after 1:00 pm.
Prefer you take pair. Sisters. Mother
pure Siamese. Father V 2 Siamese.
(C-lt-33-p)
URGENTI NEED a ride to and from
Pensacola. Leave here 2 pm Thurs.
Nov. sth or early the 6th. Call Dave
at 392-7360 after noon. (C-3t-32-p)
Furnished apt. wanted for Winter
Quarter, willing to pay premium for
plush 2 bedroom-Jan-April Call
392-0151 or 372-5206. (C-st-30-p)
Female roommate to share 2 Br
trailer, own room, S7O month. Call
373-2577 after 8 p.m. or 392-3196
before. Ask for Mary. (C-st-26-p)
Male to share one bedroom apt. with
V 2 utilities + $57.50 monthly. Bdrm.
kitch., and bath. Come by M-F3-G,
7-10 weekends; 12-G 1216 SW 2 Ave.
Apt. 22 (C-st-31-p)
HELP WANTED
Viviane Woodard Cosmetics has
openings for women Interested In
exciting new makeup techniques.
Three hours dally can earn S4O-SIOO
weekly. Call Cindy 378-9879.
(E-st-29-p)
Retire at age 30 with SIOOO./mo.
Income. Others have, so can you! Can
you spend 1 hour to find out how?
Call 378-9987 after 5:00 pm.
(E-lt-33-r)
Someone to iron and clean one
day/wk. Must provide references and
own transportation or work on
Saturday. Call 378-1041 after 5:30
(E-2t-33-p)
Desk clerk over 21 yrs of age night
shift midnight to 700 am. Saturday
noon till midnight In person Tom
Sawyer Motel (E-st-31-p)


AUTOS
61 Ford good shape 4 new tires 292
V 8 radlo/heater power steering new
Eag. $l5O call Woodrow 376-1044
(G-st-33-r)
1967 Ellack VW Squareback, 2 new
tires, in good shape. Must sale,
$1,190. Call 378-1710 after 5
(G-st-33-p)
1964 Olds Cutlass P.S. P.B. air great
condition must sell S9OO call
378-7876 after 5:00 (G-3t-33-p)

autos
65 IMPALA 396 4-SPEED STILL
FOR SALE $795 call ,John
378-7315, 847 S.W. 9 St. (G-2t-33-p)
1970 Volvo 6 mo old blue $2300
Call 372-0947 or 392-1479
(G-st-32-p)
68 MGB $1,595 16,900 ml must
sell: perfect cond. wire wheels
tonneau cover 1002 W. University.
Mike Austin 376-8941 (G-st-31-r)
FANTASTIC!MiI 1966 GTO conv.
excellent condition high performance
many extras must sell sacrifice
392-8153 (G-st-31-p) ___
65 MGB good condition, must sell,
need money. $925, might consider
trade for cycle and cash Ph.
372-5006 (G-3t-31-p)
\ MWWmTTTZ si -373.9533
Acres* Frem The Moll
ADM. SIOO
EUudMthDvlor
i J^g ( 2g|srGagmlm222L.
PCNTHOUW2
Mention inn M (or eoUI tarty KrO
price of IS tort* otory t*Kl Ooforo -Tl
O.M. ano Sat a Son. Mat Into*. Aoeoltr UTVDIII l ,*F. w I
nr let s 1.00 Otrthouat No. a- *>.*# I
AOOH ARTjI Persons Under 18 I
Not Admitted! 8
Positive Proof 8
Os Age Required! 8
[YJ 11 1 j un
f!fWfjffMWWfcf \mLrm
11 Sj 12 j ; {'l|| j .Hflnp
w* Sit |H
W' j m
'fv
m Starts Sun.:
"Space Thing" |
m $ Masterpiece" 4
Kv^K^V



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
-...CK LeSabre, 1963. Automatic, air
JJSr radio, heatar, full power. Top
Mt, run* great. $425 or beat offer.
Sm 378-4588 anytime. (Q-3t-33-p)
personal
-And He said unto Knute Rockne
on you I will build my church.
JMewteronomy 84:64 hlkel The
Great Newt (J-lt-33-p)
Hate to cookTToo poor for an apt?
CLO has openings for the winter
ouarter. $195/qt for room and board.
Salt Vince at 373-1622 (J-22t-30-p)
The Student Senate may be able to
Mtp you. Dave Depew, 373-2771,
will listen to your problems. I need
to know your problems! Speak out!
(J-St-31-p)
COMPUTER DATING Why Walt?
Maat your Meal date. Special
Introductory price. Now serving
loading colleges and universities
throughout the US and Canada.
Write: National Cybernetics, Box
221, Durham, N.C. 27702 (J-Ot-31-p)
HELP! Newly-wed couple NEEDS
reasonably priced
APARTMENT to rent starting
December or January. Please call
Dave, night*. 373-3924 (J-st-30-p)
FIGHT POVERTY and add a twist to
this year's Christmas. Bring In the
bread selling our far out protest
Christmas cards. This year our cards
are against war, smog, water
pollution, and other things despicable
and evil like poverty. Send 25
cents for samples and complete
Information. Plnetree Enterprises;
Dept. 148; P.O. Box 4269;
Shreveport, La. 71104. (J-lt-33-p)
Develop management & sales skills. If
you like $$ and are willing to work
part time, this will Interest you. All
explained at opportunity meeting.
Call 378-9987 after 5:00 (J-lt-33-p)i
SINGLE MALES A FEMALES? Meet
more members of the opposite sex at
U.F. All dates In Gainesville. Most
dates with U.F. students. Details
mailed In plain unmarked envelope.
For free details write: Nationwide
Dating Service, P.O. Box 77346,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-15t-24-p)
MbasHMiminii
M
i m
I
A / IMM' I
Ni.. 1

PERSONAL
Happy Birthday liebchen. Oh how I
wish you were my liebchen. Legal or
not. you're still the greatest. I love
d n,t let that you;
Just be happy. (J-it-33-p)
Alpha Epsilon Delta members please
OU L name and addre m Dr.
Elliott s office, 102 Anderson, If you
a,read y registered there.
U a £roo-p)

N^. E METZ Congratulations
President of 38 KD Pledges and My
Little Sister Too! Kappa Delta Love
Debbie K. (J-lt-33-p)
BARBARA AND ENID I It's about
tlmel Love to Your New Sisters. KD
LOVE ALWAYS DEB (J-lt-33-r)
Co Eds Facial Hair removed forever;
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist ...
102 N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for
appointment. (J-31tfc)
Wanted: Rock style drummer for
heavy music group. Serious musicians
only. Al 376-1042 Ron-376-9919
(J-st-33-p)
LOST <& FOUND
Lost pair of octagon shaped, amber
colored womens glasses In red glass
case. Please help a blind person to
see. Contact Diane at 373-2979
Lost-Brown patent leather purse in
red car while hitching on highway
331. You were going the wrong
way remember? call 392-9046.
Need my IDS (l-3t-33-p)
I lost my wallet. You cant use it. I
can. Call 378-8760 for the surprising
reward. Rick McDowell (L-3t-33-p)

~ v.v.%v.v.%v.v.v*y*:.:wx*>xw*w., Mww:wxv.ww.-.v.v.vrtv.Tr...
>
NOW SHOWING NOW SHOWING S
CINEMA 1 CINEMA 2 l
FEATURES AT: FEATURES AT: |
7:40, 9:45 GRAND OPENING 7:05, 9:40 {

w a ROSS HUNTER Production
Kirpoftt
0 STARRING
JBURT LANCASTER DEAN MARTIN
S JEAN SEBERG
JACQUELINE BISSET
GEORGE KENNEDY
{ HELEN HAYES
VAH HEFUH
MAUREEH STAPLETON
2 BARRY NELSON
! LLOYD NOUN
DANA WYNTER
S BARBARA HALE
MUSIC COMPOSED A CONDUCTED BY FROM THE NOVEL BY
ALFRED NEWMAN ARTHUR HAILEY
fP WRITTEN FOR THE SCREEN & DIRECTED BY PRODUCED BY
GEORGE SEATON ROSS HUNTER
9 A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLOR* Produced in TODD-AO*
ALL AGES ADMITTED
General Audience*
W sdund Track Album exclusively on OECCA RECORDS
Also available on 8-Track and Cassette Tape!
#

Wednesday, November 4, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Typing-former New York secretary
Bklyn college grad-55 cents page &
up-term papers, theses, dissertations
373-1984 9-5, 373-1429 after 6
(M-Bt-31-p)
FLY! No more long trlpsl Weekend
trips from G-vllle to Ft. Myers and
points between. For Information
378-8329 after six (M-3t-32-p)
Plano teacher for beglners of age 5 &
up. or advanced students. Certified
teacher from Miami. Lower rate for
first 3 calls. 372-1156 (m-st-29-p)
HORSES BOARDED sleepy hollow
horse farm complete care finest
facilities new barn pasture trails and
lighted ring close to Unlv. Ph
373-1059 (M-st-29-p)
Alternators, generators, itiMirs,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Agio Electric Service, 1111 S. Metis,
379*7330. Now! Bank Araertcefd
Master Charge (M-ffc)
We're wired for sight at the smemp
eyeglass office In town. Driver your
own welting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
MBA Candidates: Representative of
Emory University, Atlanta, will
Interview on campus Nov. 24. Sign
up at Placement Center. (M-3t-33-p)
I will make you an A MATH
STUDENT or REFUND YOUR
MONEY. $3.50 per half hour.
372-3890 or 378-4066 (M-st-33-p)
HONDA SERVICE AT IT'S
BEST!!!! THE CYCLE WORKS 1220
S. MAIN OPEN 3 UNTIL 8 P.M.
(M-st-32-p)

Page 15

r =**
Todays 1
more for your money meal I
moisorrs
CAFETERIA I
l 1 I
'WEDNESDAYS I
| SAVORY BEEF STEW | I
§ I WITH 7Q. I ? I
a RICE /VC 1 >
| I IS I
i j THURSDAYS FEATURE J | I
I ~ j PORK CUTLET PARMESANj ~ I
I I WITH OOA I
I SPAGHETTI 77> I
I I- -J I
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING
m or r isons
CPFETERIR ..beyond comparison!
Horiaa quarterly we only did it for you

When a whole way of life ends
for half a nation, look for trouble.
And Monte Walsh. |
wmmsBmmmMBMSmSsMSaSSSSmSm-.mmsmk^mmm-my:,
.
B^:i 7, *slfm |
-W -MUI
tIM KHISHHf
>jmEm HHMP
* .. 9* .. Si
% jypSSS^^f**!l^^ps
'*' y 1 #
LEE jk
MARVIN. P
MONTE WALSH** II
A Real Western 9(1
\j
2
costofnng
JEANNE MOREAU JACK PALANCE {
A CINEMA CENTER FILMS PRESENTATION A
A LANDERS ROBERTS PRODUCTION Screenplay by LUKASHELLERond DAMDZ GOODMAN £
Based upon the novel by JACK SCHAEFER Music by JOHN BARRY or>ocrc A
THE GOOD TIMES ARE COMIN Sung by MAMA CASS Produced by HAL LANDERS ond BOBBY ROBERTS W
Directed by WILLIAM A FRAKER PANAVISION* and TECHNICOLOR A
A NATIONAL feENERAI PICTURES RELEASE |Sg

AA in IS sAp A H 4H| Ab $Ap Ap AA AA JAp JAh A| An At AA An Hp sAp |^H



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 4,1970

Y :^ v
' ? "'' ' 3 r rtmm'
tmm' rtmm' WMWfflSffi '...';.;V : (I BPS'- CHB^^fl^BHIKllP
rfv |§ wf' >' v
.',*' 3-~Ml&;
I 1 I £?^l
I 'Bllli?!* 1 jifAik'. #s.*l
B Si i§ 1 illlfi i;
S I 11 Iteli BBBBWfois6pl^^^^>.v.. w*
y- SSgp Ipi MBMMifcj
j^^afisssgsg >N ,i ii >S fy. ; i#
r"' We&S&k B JBL B M II If imi^ ,V: ""^lk ;
I b If 1 111
, *' MMfmmmL si
' 1 M| fc jl||j||.> W x a^R JJ"',;, I '.
B B 'fl's I J
mm
BBIHBS Im WS>J H[ w^-
IJB BlmiiHH Bttd Bl "JF mf&kihh
' v I: 1 ji< f .' *m(
'jM| v a
BBS mSL -~ ,-.. -1% ;.
B BB BBi |
awitai i a Mum i mm .'' WUtmmam' # / <1
| sj?fi^J'y i ~ v ' t ^ r r B# B-v
B"' fl B CJKw* Bb %./
' W%f w W I jf ,w BraL
9 Bi If
V. X r j JniS mJB, £ $Mm U ~' ""
- B gg -mg Wssr*$ e (
!.' s ?
PHIL BANNISTER
PEACE CORPS RECRUITMENT ON REITZ UNION COLONNADE
... returned Peace Corps volunteers (I to r) Jill Ruhlman, Anita Botti and Elsa Valle talk to Frank Gladstone
Magic Math Blocks
Need More Money

By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
A UF student who has
invented Magic Blocks" to
teach children math stands to
loose the patent on his invention
by Nov. 19 unless he comes up
with $152 to pay the patent
office.
Sixty-five year old William
King Skinner, who calls himself
a Renaissance scholar, has
come up with the idea for
childrens building blocks which
have the signs of his instant
arithmetic*' embossed on them.
THE SIGNS tell the
quantitative value of the block.
The combining of two signs
creates the sign which is the sum
or value of the two numbers.
Thus any child who can count
on his fingers one through ten
can learn to add and subtract
rasr
GolfClth
STUDENT MEMMRSHF
THRU MONTHS FOR $25 TAX
SPECIAL RATE
( WEEKDAYS $2 All DAY
f WEEKENOS $3 AU DAY
I For information toll
I JL 3 76 0080
O tMNWOOP
* Ml IM.AMNH **' W

simple numbers without making
errors, and at the same time
build the sort of things children
build with blocks.
Before offering the blocks
commercially, it was decided to
test them experimentally.
AN EXPERIMENTAL
GROUP and a control group in
two kindergartens were set up at
P. K.Yonge school to test the
blocks. But Skinners
experiment was pre-empted by
an experiment conducted by a
professor, so the test never
materialized.
Skinner made another
agreement to test the blocks in
two nurseries. The woman who
was to supervise the experiment,
however, wouldn't accept a
lesson planner Skinner had
already prepared. So that
experiment, too, failed to come
about
Presently there are $525
V, .*
Studoni Spoeial j
Any car or color! j
12 mo. Guarantee \
j
Jay's Paint &Bdy Shop j
2*17 N.E. 27tk Am.
Ph. 373-IMS
Vnavnai. w.vwv.TT.vyfmnr. mi rmj

worth of the blocks (30 sets of
blocks, 16 blocks in each set) in
a storeroom at Pit. Yonge. They
cannot be tested until another
experimental group can be set
up.
MEANWHILE, Skinner is
willing to sign over 50 per cent
of his panent rights to anyone or
any group that will pick up the
$152 bill.
Skinner said if the patent can
be saved by paying the bill by
Nov. 19, the blocks can still be
tested and marketed.
The blocks would be a whole
new idea of teaching young
children math without having
them learn by rote
memorization. Instead, the math
is learned by playing games and
building bridges, towers and
other structures.
Interested parties may get in
touch with Skinner by dropping
him a postcard at 1533 NW 15
St., Gainesville.
/ffis
| OVERHAULED Sdknll
I* ASO /
alac^WSSWty
GENERATOR SERVICE
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARD.
Mon.-Fri. Bam-7 pm St. til spm
371-4011

Peace Corps
Recruits At UF
.r
By JANES OLES
Alligator Writer
A team of Peace Corps representatives are visiting the UF campus
through Friday to recruit senior students for its spring and summer
programs.
The four representatives have set up booths on the ground floor of
the Reitz Union and one at the Student Service Center located across
from the Hub.
Representatives will be available for questioning in McCarty and
Norman Halls from 9 a.m. to 5 pjn. throughout the week.
STUDENTS APPLYING in the fields of education and agriculture
will be taking priority over applicants in other fields since these two
areas are most needed for the spring training program of 1971.
For the spring program in agriculture four agronomists are needed
to work as counterparts to the Honduras Government Agricultural
Extension Service, the only nationwide agency teaching modem
farming methods to the Honduran population.
Volunteer agronomists will work in the capacity of backing up both
Honduran agents and Peace Corps volunteers in the fields of crops and
cattle.
Students in agriculture or with an agriculture background who are
married can apply for this program.
INTEREST IN THE Peace Corps by Florida students has recently
increased with Washington reports showing Florida as one of its top
contributors of volunteers overseas.
Nearly 150 UF graduates have joined Peace Corps and it is
extimated that 40 of these are actually overseas at the moment.
This vested interest in the Peace Corps is expected to grow even
more considerably with the enforcement of the provision that senior
men with high draft numbers can participate in a 2 year program
without having to face military service when they return.
ALSO, THOSE with low lottery numbers can arrange for
postponment of induction until the completion of their service.
Recruiters will accept applications throughout the week. Because
application in take has increased 40 per cent in comparison to last
year they suggest students apply as early as possible.
Forms can be obtained from representatives and upon completion
can be returned to any one of the four designated areas.
Peace Corps recruiters will also present their program at Murphree
Area tonight. They will speak to the residents of Buckman Hall at
7:30 pjn. in the Buckman library.
HRr ill
WILLIAM KING SKINNER
... Renaissance scholar's blocks in trouble
~!
1 Wraf (WiHlriwTWign) 1
I , Mr *' 93 Stookburgnr.
luncheon And Any 15 Drink 1
, siov u .Only 90<- *!
i Steak n Shake i
L _ __ _a /e



A&S Starts Do-It-Yourself Advisement

By DAVE MAN KIN
Alligator Writer
The College of Arts and
Sciences has announced it is
ieparting from its current
system of academic advisement
and adopting the use of
computer printouts to facilitate
student self-advisement.
ALTHOUGH EACH student
in Arts and Sciences will still be

Major Candidates Report Expenditures

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
Floridas politicians have
revealed an unmistakable
relationship between money and
politics you cant have one
without the other.
Gubernatorial and U.S. Senate
candidates have increased their
expenditures substantially
during their last full week of
campaigning.
DEMOCRAT REUBIN
ASKEW has continued to
outspend incumbent Claude
Kirk throughout his entire
general election bid. Financial

Myrdal Tells Black Students
To Join With Other Minorities

ATLANTA (UPI) Swedish
social scientist Dr. Gunnar
Myrdal told an audience of black
university students here Monday
that Negro Americans should
ally themselves with other
disadvantaged minorities in their
quest for social justice.
Myrdal told an Atlanta
University audience that Negroes
actually only make up about 25
or 30 percent of those
victimized by discrimination in
the United States. He said
Indians, Mexicans, Puerto
Ricans, Asians and poor whites
are also victims of
discrimination.
NOTHING IS more certain
than it is of greatest importance
that the American under classes
be brought to join hands,
Myrdal said.
It is healthy for a democracy
that disadvantaged groups join
together to press for justice;
otherwise justice will not be
done.
Myrdal noted that other
groups tend to resent every
advantage given only to
Negroes. He cited that as the
I Airplane Rentals I
I 1969 Cessna 150 I
I $12.00/1 Hour I
f T § mm
Champion Citabria
$ll.OO/Hour
I Hying Hawks Corp. I
| Stengel Field 376-0011
from Cerwput.

assigned to a faculty adviser for
guidance throughout the year,
the new system will enable the
student to handle his choice of
courses independently.
The new system is the result
of a two-year attempt to
separate the advisement process
from the registration process,
whereby the college hopes to
eliminate the long and tedious
procedures students and faculty

CLAUDE Klniv
... spent $223,664

reason for his refusal to endorse
a so-called Marshall Plan for
Negroes.
The sociologist denied the
benefits of black capitalism of
significantly aiding Negroes out
of the ghettos in which they
now live.
I WOULD like to make such
fundamental changes in the
social structure that it would be
just as possible for you as it
would be for a white boy to
reach whatever position your
intelligence makes possible,
Myrdal declared.
Myrdal predicted America
will ride out its problems. He
said the nation needs a moral
and intellectual catharsis to

I £ ICnVjA

must endure during registration.
According to Dr. A.B.Clubok
of the department of political
science, each student in Arts and
Sciences will meet with his
adviser once a quarter, at which
time he will pick up his
computer printout containing all
the necessary academic data to
enable the student to fill out his
academic advisement card on his
own.

reports Monday revealed
expenses totaling $271369 of
which $112,785 was spent
during the seven days proceeding
Sunday.
Governor Claude Kirk
revealed expenses of $107,254
during the past week and
$223,664 throughout the
five-week general election
canqiaign.
Kirk spent most of his funds
on television advertising while
Askew concentrated on radio
spots. Both candidates
pruchased a great deal of
full-page advertising.

realize the war in Vietnam is
illegal, unconstitutional, cruel,
criminal, and bad, morally bad.
He said this would eventually
happen and will have a healthy
influence on other problems in
the nation.
i Free For Fee
DENVER (DPI) The Denver
Free University announced
Wednesday it was accepting
registration for fall quarter
classes.
George W. Sivler, general
coordinator, said participants
would have to pay $lO apiece to
help meet operating expenses.

Wednesday, November 4, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

THUS EQUIPPED with a
written record of his academic
standing, the student is free to
tailor his own program, taking
special care to meet all
departmental requirements.
The student may consult with
his faculty adviser at any time in
the quarter, should the need
arise.
Computer printouts are now
available for those students in

BOTH GUBERNATORIAL
hopefuls were well below the
$350,000 legal limit for general
campaigning in the
governor-senate races.
But, final financial reports are
expected to reveal figures much
closer to the legal limit. If all
contributions are utilized this
will undoubtedly be true.
Kirk listed contributions last
week of $114,255 and $322,139

SAVE!
1 STARKE, FLORIDA *=[
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS I
WEEKDAYS BAM -6PM I
SATURDAY BAM IPM I
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT |
ivXv
'toKlPsP*
''y
Heading home? If you're under 22, you can qualify
for Shawnee's special youth fare. Just bring us
identification showing proof of age and you'll get
your ticket for 25% off regular rates. There's no place
like home and no better way to get there than on
Shawnee where you don't have to pay to fly for
less.
For reservation information see your travel agent or
call Shawnee Airlines in Gainesville, 378-1633
SHMNEE AIRLINES
The convenient commuter.
' k
\ r f
Atlanta Ft. Lauderdale Jacksonville Gainesville Miami Ocala
Tallahassee Tampa Orlando West Palm Beach Nassau Freeport
V u.i UV V/ V,* Vj*-V^ i fr4, l ViV l V 1 Ilf U.'Usif.* U Tfririat' - -r t

the College, although there are
still, admittedly, several errors in
the system. Once this initial
exoerimantation with the system
is concluded, Clubok said, the
printouts will be available to the
students each quarter during the
fourth week of classes.
Further information may be
obtained at the College of Arts
and Sciences office, 113
Anderson Hall.

for the campaign. Askew
reported $97,224 for the week
and $336,306 for the five-week
general campaign.
In the U.S. Senate race,
Democrat Lawton Chiles
reported expenses last week of
$97,016 and $ 154,457
throughout the general
campaign.
Republican William Cramer
did not submit a financial
report.

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator

Buchanans
Excuse 'Legit

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Writer
Suspended weakside
linebacker Richard Buchanan
said Tuesday he was sorry for
the curfew violation, but called
his explanation to Coach Doug
Dickey, a legitimate excuse.
I had a legitimate excuse,
but the coaches wouldnt further
consider it, said Buchanan, who
was warned once before this
year for a curfew violation.
COACH DICKEY told me
several weeks ago that one more
time and youre through in
front of the team, said
Buchanan. So if he said it in
front of the team I knew he was
serious, and I wouldnt have
done it on purpose.
Buchanan said he missed the 2
a.m curfew after Saturdays
Homecoming loss by 30
minutes.
Buchanan, a 6-2, 206-pound
junior from Pensacola, admitted
that he had tardiness problems
at team meetings in his freshman
year.
MY PREVIOUS suspension
came during my freshman year,
which was two years ago. I was
late to several team meetings and
was suspended for the second
spring game. I was not
suspended from any regular
season game last year, as was
reported in Tuesdays Alligator.
I think its fair that Coach
Dickey punished me, but I
didnt have any idea it would be
this stiff, he said.
Buchanan said he pleaded
with coaches Sunday afternoon
to give him one more chance. I
told them Id do anything they
wanted to do anything but
Rifle Team
Beats Auburn
1,057980

Joel Dobson shot a 272, the
teams highest individual score
this year, to lead the UF Rifle
Team to a 1,057-980 win over
visiting Auburn Saturday.
Dobson was suspended from
competition earlier this season
because of long hair, but he now
has his hair cut.
Lee Duke (264) Dave Waller
(261) and Alan Eldred (260)
also contributed to the Southern
Collegiate Riflery Association.

SALES
808 STACY,IUC service
378-8222 PARTS
ACCESSORIES B&ra
~~ CAMPUS REP
MILLER-BROWN MOTORS
mM V JKKSKKk 4222 N. W. 13TH ST. 378-4882
****-**** *****************'

~ ' ii, i iii 11 i | ------

getting kicked off the team.
Maybe even running laps the rest
of my life.
IM SORRY about the
matter, because I felt I let the
team down, because I hope my
playing has helped the team, he
said.
Buchanan said he would
continue living under the
training rules, but would not
practice or dress out for games.
After my bad freshman
attendance, and with the
coaches before Dickey came, I
felt it hard to play for them,

' \ -V** i s''/ x
PHIL BANNISTER
RICHARD BUCHANAN (88) HITS JOE REED (19)
... action caught in Mississippi State game

Frosh Rally Falls Short
As Bullpups Win 32-14

By DOUG KEITH
Alligator Sports Writer
The Baby Gators suffered their first defeat of the
season in Athens Monday at the hands of the
Georgia Bullpups.
The final score of 32-14 was not indicative of the
Gator Frosh performance however, as the young
Dogs got two touchdowns late in the fourth quarter
while the Gators were playing catch-up.
THE BULLPUPS jumped to a 21-0 lead in the
first half on an 87-yard bomb from Andy Johnson
to Ralph Clark, a 52 yard run by Johnson and a 17
yard return of an interception by Ed Derb.
Playing the first half without starting quarterback
Chan Gailey, the Gators were inconsistent on
offense. In the third quarter however, Gailey came
in to spark two quick touchdown drives before the
Bullpup defense stiffened.
Gailey has been bothered by a sore arm, so we
didnt start him, explained Head Frosh coach
Jimmy Haynes. But we brought him in for the
second half and he got us going. Gailey scored

Â¥
Buchanan and Franco
were suspended for
violation of training
regulations. I regret the loss
of the players to the
football team.
IVe do not need
complainers or people who
shift the blame.
DOUG DICKEY
* *
because I felt they didnt trust
me, Buchanan said.
Im now afraid the same
thing will carry over to my
senior year.
Through Saturdays game
with Auburn, Buchanan was
considered by coaches as one of
the steadiest starting defensive
performers.

* / SebastiansN. J
/'Shop v" 88
Month's Special for V. W. DriverX I
Xliil)*, oil chanp, cloan air & oil fHtar, and Just dip Otr\
X dutch and braka adjiNtmant all for $3.95 this ad \ I
I / Normal cost 511.50 a saving of $7.55 present it at \ I
If/Sebastians 535 S.W. 4h Ave. and¥| |
fake advantage of this special 1
\ \ PHONE /
V y \37^.3.1/

both Florida touchdowns, including a 59 yard
sprint.
IN ADDITION to Gailey, Haynes singled oui
running back Vince Kendricks, defensive tackle
David Hitchcock, and linebackers Rickey Brown
and Rich Boedy as having outstanding games.
Kendricks played better than he has all year,
said Haynes. The big fullback totaled 101 yards on
22 carries, the longest going for 17 yards. Big Vince
also gathered in three passes which gaines 28 yards.
Coach Haynes felt the Baby Gators didnt play as
well as in their previous games but was quick to give
credit to the Georgia Frosh. They hit us with a few
big plays early and overall played very well.
The Georgia Frosh were led by Athens High
product Andy Johnson, who ran and passed the
Bullpups to a total 448 yards offense from his
quarterback position.
We were inconsistent in the first half but did an
excellent job in the third quarter, added Haynes,
whose squad next takes on LSUs undefeated Baby
Bengals in Baton Rouge Nov. 14.

Marty Perimutter
Executive Sports Editor

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 4, 1970

Page 18

Stiff Penalty
Hurts Franco

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
C
Richard Franco is a quiet
unassuming man dedicated to his
job of placekicking. But his
recent suspension from the
Gator football team just doesnt
fit his personality.
However, like Franco says, if
that stiff a penalty is needed for
him, he will accept it.
I WAS hoping Coach (Doug)
Dickey would penalize just me
and not the whole team,
Franco said. But by suspending
me from competition the rest of
the year, it sure hurts the team.
Franco was 20 for 21 in his
extra points this year, a marked
improvement from last year
when he missed seven out of 40
attempts.
In the juniors place comes
George Wester, a sophomore
from North Miami Senior High
who kicks soccer style. In
practice, Wester has been known
to kick with consistency from
3540 yards out.

Phil Pattijohn
Sports Editor

BUT DICKEY has indicated
that Jack Youngblood, who did
some kicking his freshman year,
would do the extra points and
field goals while Wester would
be used mainly for kickoffs.
Im sorry I let the team and
the coaches down, Franco said,
but I will be back next year.
Franco missed his curfew by
more than 30 minutes as he was
out all night long. But he had
never been warned before this
year as to being late for meetings
or curfews. Dickey may have
brought Francos excessive
violation into consideration as a
reason for the stiff penalty.
I WOULD much prefer my
own suspension, something like
running laps, Franco said.
With three games remaining in
the season, the Gators are now
faced with having an
inexperienced extra point kicker
who may wilt under pressure.
And the Gators need all the
points they can get to win.
ROD-REEL & GUN SHOP
WE FIXTRADESELL
omtmtmrn *tar,mc.
ARCHERY-PISHING-HUNTING
I 378-1696 I
1223 E. UNIVERSITY AVE.
SWING
AROUND
TO
Budget
Rent a Gar
OF GAINESVILLE
CALL
376-1245
FOR
Free pickup and
delivery anywhere
in Alachua County
GAINESVILLE/JACKSONVILLE
ONE WAY SPECIAL
15.00 FLAT RATE
Includes Gas, Air Conditioning
3 HOURS 100 MILES
MAXIMUM
WE RENT
BETTER CARS
FOR LESS!



/Manning Taking Backseat To Sullivan

By DAVID MOFFIT
UPI Sport* Writer
ATLANTA Archie
Manning, the Souths candidate
for the Heisman Trophy, is being
upstaged by Auburns Pat
Sullivan.
Manning, the Ole Miss senior
who was second to Purdues
Mike Phipps in last years
balloting for All-America
quarterback, is having a fine year
- especially when you consider
that hes played his last three
games with a pulled groin
muscle.
BUT SULLIVAN, a junior,
has been sensational.
Each week Sullivan seems to
get even better. He was the
regional player of the week after
Auburn handed Tennessee its
lone loss so far this season and
again after the win over Georgia
Tech in which his coach, Shug
Jordan, said hed never seen his
equal.
Those were only tuneups for
this past Saturday when Pat
passed and ran for five
touchdowns and 384 yards in
Auburns 63-14 rout of Florid
THAT PUT UF Coach Doug
Dickey, who was the Tennessee
coach last year when Manning
led Ole Miss to a 38-0 romp over

Getting Back In Class.
Goal Os Coach Dickey

By KEN MCKINNON
Alligator News Editor
Doug Dickey said Tuesday he
hopes his Florida Gators can get
into the same league with the
Georgia Bulldogs this Saturday
in the Jacksonville Gator Bowl.
After seeing his team go down
royally to the Auburn Tigers in
last weeks homecoming game,
63-14, he said the Gators were
just not in the same class with
teams like Auburn, Tennessee,
Alabama, and LSU. He did say
he thought his squad would do
better against its last three
opponents, Georgia, Kentucky
and Miami, they had not seemed
to fare as well as some of the
Gators better opposition.
BUT AFTER taking a quick
look of the filins of the
Georgia-South Carolina game,
which Georgia won 52-34, hes
not so sure as to whether or not
the Gators rate with them,
either.
I dont know, Dickey said.
Maybe we can get into their
league Saturday.
M Pj£kejr_ seemed overly
THE
Copy Center
1718 W. Univ. Ave.
Thesis & Dissertation
Specialists
Desks, Lamps, Files,
and supplies available
376-9334 Bam -9pn|

oMo
the Vols, on the Sullivan
bandwagon although Dickey
has no intention of favoring one
over the other.
There was nothing you ask
of a quarterback that Sullivan
doesnt provide, says Dickey
who adds that the Auburn
quarterback, is all hes written
up to be.
Thats reminiscent of what
Bill Battle, the man who
succeeded Dickey as coach at
Tennessee, had to say after
Sullivan led the Tigers to a 36-23
win over his Vols.
SULLIVAN MOVED past
Stanfords Jim Plunkett and Bob
Parker of the Air Force to
become the nations
major-college total offense
leader thanks to that

DOUG DICKEY
... likes Georgia defense
impressed with head Georgia
coach Vince Dooleys defensive
work.
THEY HAVE a defense that
has been awful tough, Dickey
said. Four of their seven
opponents have only scored a
total of 13 points. Only South
Carolina and Ole Miss have done
anything worthwhile against
them. They play good sound
defense.

DEROSA
JUL STEAK HOUre \
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

FOR HEISMAN TROPHY

performance against Florida.
Sullivans now gained 1,907
yards in seven games for an
average of 272.4 yards per game
and he leads Archie Who? in
just about every offensive
category you can name.
Manning, who has played one
less game than Sullivan, has a
218.8 yard per game offensive
average with Sullivan leading
him in touchdown passes, 13-11,
and in touchdown responsibility,
18-17.
SULLIVAN PLAYED in the
shadow of Manning and
Floridas John Reaves last
season. Reaves, the national
passing champion, set a new
Southeastern Conference total
offense mark with 2,852 yards
and Manning took over the
all-time No. 2 spot with 2,261.
Sullivan, with an 1,892 total,
wasnt even tops in his own state
since Alabamas Scott Hunter,
who has been hurt this year,
took third in the conference
with 2,157.
But Jordan, loyal to his own
player, said then, and again
before this season began, that he
wouldnt trade Sullivan for any
of them.
ALTHOUGH THE fact almost
slipped notice at the time,
Manning took over the SEC

But Dickey had high praise
for the Bulldog offense, also.
They have an offensive line
that may be as good as
Tennessees, he said. And they
have big, big backs behind the
line. They are just beginning to
execute their passing game,
too.
DICKEY SAID Brad Powell,
weakside linebacker to replace
suspended Rich Buchanan, who
was kicked off the team for
missing curfew, was as good a
hitter as there is on the Gator
team.
Powell has played good ball,
as good as Buchanan at times,
Dickey said. Im very pleased
with his play.
Dickey said there were many
individual mistakes made by
some of his players against
Auburn, but that didnt stop the
fans in Florida Field.
The team let down many
times, I noticed after watching
the films, Dickey said, but the
student body never let down.
That was the most impressive
student support I have ever
seen.

Wednesday, November 4, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

career total offense lead from
Steve Spurrier in his last outing,
two weeks ago against
Vanderbilt.
Archie, who still has four
games to go, has now gained
5,295 yards five more than
Spurrier, now with the San
Francisco Forty Niners, gained
in his career at Florida. Spurrier,
by the way, was the South's last
Heisman Trophy winner.
Manning is also close to some
other SEC career marks. Hes
only four shy of the 57 pass-run

f KINGS CURB COUPON |
f' 1 Curb tsrvic* only IT
1430 S.W. 13th Street lg
Hamburger Platter |
and reg. Pepsi B
sl.lO value 85< |
w/coupon M
Check for Kings Royal Treats |fl
U Big savings everyday Both locations N
IT SEEMS
THE SUCKERS
WANT AN
EVEN BREAK.
The realization that the public does
not like to be taken has taken a lot of
manufacturers by surprise.
Toasters that suddenly wont toast
suddenly wont be tolerated.
Nor will toys that break before
noon on Christmas day. (Weve
been raising a whole generation of
kids who think Santas workmanship
is terrible.)
People are showing their contempt
for cars that break down on the way
home from the showroom, too.
Theyre buying Volvos.
Volvos are built to last. Exactly
how long, we dont guarantee. But we
do know that 9 out of every 10
registered here in the last eleven years
are still on the road.
At Volvo, the new consumerism
is nothing new. We were for it before
anybody ever heard of it.
And if there is a sucker bom every
minute, you couldnt prove it by us.
They must be buying
something else. cvo>)
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS
506 E. University
Your New Volvo
Dealer in Gainesville

touchdowns Babe Parilli
accumulated at Kentucky two
decades ago; he needs only 17
more pass completions to top
Spurriers record of 392; and
hes only 375 yards short of
Spurriers all-time conference
passing mark of 4,848.
OLE MISS fans are hoping
that the extra weeks rest,
occasioned by switching the Ole
Miss-LSU game from last
Saturday to Dec. 5, will mean
that Archie will be his former
self when the Rebels meet
Houston this week.

Page 19



Page 20

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, November 4, 1970

g §
i Sports Letters (
g $
$ .V

Sports Editor:
We welcome and appreciate
the attention which is slowly
being accorded cricket. We are
grateful about the coverage even
if we must read more about Miss
Newton than about the game
(Oct. 29). We would gladly have
played host to such a fine
sportsman as Prince Philip.
But we protest in the
strongest possible way when
Chuck Keller, your sports writer,
refers to cricket as English
variety baseball.
IN JUSTICE to the game, to
the sportsmen who play it, and
the international student body
on campus, Keller should set the
record straight and point out
that gentlemen were playing
cricket long before Americans
bastardized it into baseball.
BRIAN M. DU TOIT
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
Sports Editor:
I am in the process of
initiating a drive hoping to
convince the NCAA rules
committee that a majority of
college football supporters

| Intramurals (
by Harvey Spooner J

Bristol section of Hume Hall
demolished Staff section of
Graham Hall 40-0 to capture the
dormitory all-campus football
championships Tuesday.
Not lacking in humility, the
quarterback of Bristol gave the
credit for the championship to
the team.
IN INDEPENDENT action,
the Celtics rolled through two
opponents in the bracket
playoffs before facing the
Shifthawks in the finals. The
Celts were forced to come from
behind in the big match as the
Shirthawks took a quick 15-9
lead in the first quarter and held
it till the half.
The Celtics, however,
outscored the Shifthawks in the
third quarter, 16-6 and held on
for the 5046 win and the
independent championship. The
SAPHER Womens Basketball
Tournament is continuing and at
the halfway point Team A has
the lead.
Team A decidedly trounced
Team C in the third round of the
competition. Kathy Hopfensack
and Zannie Daniels, high scorers

New Swiftie
Ontario Motor Spoodway CalH. Porsche
9-20-70 914 S STHEWNNER
THEWNNER STHEWNNER
'"; hmmagKS triumph TR6
AND LOOK AND HOW
Datsun 240-Z | WHO WAS SECOND ABOUT THIRD? |
, Godding & Clark
Building Superior 77?e Datsun
Automobiles is not > nos made attitude ; c
N, For Datsun. Different"
Sales are zooming Se Habla
as more people Espanol 378-2311
Discover this. 2nd Ave. & 2nd St. S.E.
OPEN SUNDAY 2-5

would like the question of the
nationalchampionship decided on
the field rather than by the
pollsters. My feeling is that a
team can well be overlooked in
the ratings when they are in
competition for the top spot
with a team with a reputation of
football success in the past.
THIS TASK for gaining
support for such a game is next
to inpossible for one person.
The problem is that most people
would like to see the game but
no one has the time or effort to
see it through. It is my hope that
you can help this cause along by
making this petition available to
your readers. I am asking the
help of all the major universities
in the country.
Success would be attained by
flooding Sports Illustrated
Magazine with thousands of
letters supporting the cause. This
would undoubtedly cause them
to bring the subject to light and
show the public and the NCAA
the feeling of many football fans
in the country.
JAMES R. PARLAGI
MAHWAH, NJ.

for Team C, couldnt stop
powerhouse and resident
sharpshooter Tina Lowell from
scoring 16 points to insure As
victory.
TEAM B and Team D went
into the fourth quarter with
only one point separating the
two squads. Team D outscored
Team B 4-1 in the final quarter
to win the game.
In Law League action, the
Ball Busters are continuing to
devastate their division as they
are undefeated in six outings.
In the second division, the
Redshirts were upset once again,
this time by the Hop n Gators.
The loss put the Redshirts in a
tie with the Frosh for third
place, each with two losses.
WITH ONLY two more days
of action, the big games feature
the Hopn Gators against the
Walking Wounded who have lost
only one game, and the same
Wounded team against the
Redshirts. Browns Bandits play
only one more game and that is
against the Jockeys of Jenson
and that is expected to be an
easy win.

TO BOLSTER WICHITA STATE
UF Plans To Aid Fund

The UF Athletic Association
is considering a monetary
contribution to the Wichita
State Fund.
A t H
NORM CARLSON
... 'we'll do something'

Carnes Selected
To NCAA Post

Jimmy Carnes, UF head
cross-country and track coach,
was recently named to the
Executive Committee of the
United States Cross-Country
Coaches Association of the
NCAA.
Recognized as one of the
finest track and cross country 8
coaches in the nation, Carnes
served this past summer as one
of the track coaches of the U.S.
track team which toured
Europe.
CARNES CAME to UF from
a Furman University track job,
where he had an outstanding
record both in cross-country and
track and field.
He was selected as Olympic
training coach for the 1968 U.S.
team, and spent several weeks in
Lake Tahoe coaching the
: mm Mi n
i mk
m
l Jpissi
JIMMY CARNES
... honored by NCAA

Im sure well do something
for them financial-wise, but I
dont know how much it will be
until the next meeting in several
weeks, Sports Publicity
Director Norm Carlson said
Tuesday.
THE NATIONAL fund was
started after 13 Wichita football
players, plus their head coach
and athletic director were killed
on Oct. 2 in a plane crash
enroute to a game.
Contributions will hopefully
bolster the crippled Wichita
State athletic program.
Carlson said UF was already
aiding the effort by announcing
fund information during home
football games. We also used
four or five spots last weekend
on the Gator radio network, he
said.

nations greatest track and field
athletes.
In 1967 Carnes received the
distinguished service award for
the Outstanding Young Man
in Gainesville, and is also listed
as one of the U.S. Jaycees,
Outstanding Young Men of
America.

ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
\psj AND SALES
IMiCMAMCt
\ ai Student's Friend
* Specializing in tune ups General
Auto Repeir and Corsairs.
Free Estimates AN Work Guaranteed
1031 So. Main St. Ph. 378-8632
[Central Chari#} [Bank Amertcaidl [Master Charge]
HailtotheShef!
(The Super Shes)
A Super Burger ...
for a Super Meal.
right up the street
715 N.W.l3th St. Ws*
io B 'Vm o C h es -h. Jas^BS!)
to please the student 1412 N. MAIN ST. f

Individuals may send
contributions to the Wichita
State Fund, Wichita, Kansas.
THE WICHITA team voted to
continue its season a week after
the crash in the Colorado
Rockies. After two games, the
Wheatshockers have lost to
Arkansas, 62-0, and Cincinnatti,
35-5.
With special NCAA
permission, Wichita State have
been starting freshmen.
RECORDS!
Oldies! 20,000 In Stock. Send 35
cents for 2,000 listing catalog. Mall
Orders Filled. RECORD CENTER
1895 W. 25th Clove., Ohio Record
Tapes
" Guns Gun* Gum
m Inventory oner 460. Buy
X Sell Trade Repair.
4 Reloading supplies. Custom
4 reloading. Hairy Beckwith,
Z gun dealer, Micanopy. Z
* 466 3340.
Only At
Kiser's Office Equipment
Art Students
and
Draftsmen
Special on Pencils 25 cants rag.
Now Only 5<
Most Supplies 50% off
604 N. MAIN