Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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VoL 63, No. 32

IT'S A BUG ...
ITS AVW...

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SUPERMAN'S CAR?
Nope. It's Linda Finch's car. Linda, 4AR, must be majoring in the
finer points of automobile body work and painting, because her car
is really a work of art. No more jokes about having to pedal VWs; this
one really flies through Gainesville and surrounding areas on special
missions with the greatest of ease. Look out Batmobile!

7 Constitutional Amendments On Slate

By CARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Staff Writer
Besides deciding a hotly
contested governors race today,
Florida voters will be voting on
seven amendments to the
Florida Constitution.
The amendments deal with
more rights for 18-year-olds,
revision of the Florida Court
Structure, a change in language
dealing with Floridas
sovereignty lands, lengthening
die terms of members of the
House of Representatives,
authorization of sewer and
pollution facility bonds and
pay-as-you-go financing of
school construction.
THE FIRST amendment on
the ballot deals with Article VI,
which sets the voting age in the
state.
It states, that every citizen
of the United States who is at
least 18 years of age and who
has been a resident for one year
in the state, and six months in
county, is registered as
provided by law, shall be an
elector of that county.**
UF Political Science Professor
Manning Dauer cited pros and
cons to this amendment in a
recent publication dealing with
the amendments.
ON THE PRO side, Dauer
cited the draft age-voting age
argument, the question of

The
Florida Alligator

constitutionality of the recent
federal voting rights bill, the
capacity of the 18-year-old to
vote, letting the younger
generation work within the
system and the high percentage
of people over 65 within the
state.
Opposing views Dauer cites
are lack of experience and
maturity of younger voters, plus
the fear of radicalization of
many youths.
In summary, Dauer said,
The arguments concerning the
18-year-old vote are based in
considerable degree on emotion
as well as fact.
ON THIS PARTICULAR
amendment it is deady before
the Florida voter simply to
decide whether or not the
18-year-old should vote.**
the second amendment on
the ballot deals with the age of
majority.
The proposal is an
amendment to the state
constitution adding a new
section to Article X, providing
that every person shall reach
legal majority upon attainment
of the age of 18 years, and
thereafter shall have all the
rights and responsibilities of an
adult**
THOMAS C. MARKS, UF
graduate student in political
science who worked with Dauer
. 01} the.. publication, stated, If

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

AGREES WITH SENATE
O'Connell Endorses
18-Year-Old Vole

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell endorsed the
constitutional amendment
supporting the 18-year-old vote
in a statement issued by his
office Monday.
I HAVE BEEN asked my
views on the proposed
constitutional amendment,
which, if adopted, would lower
the voting age. I favor the
amendment, OConnell said.
As a member of the
Constitution Commission, I
voted for the 18-year-old vote. I
did so because I believed then, as
I believe now that the
responsibility and privilege of
participating in government
ought to be vested in our
citizens as soon as they are
capable of exercising it with
reasonably good judgment,
OConnell said.
The great majority of
todays 18-year-olds are as
capable of doing this as were
most 21-year-olds when that age
was established as the norm,
OConnell said.
THE AMENDMENT appears

the proposed amendment is
adopted, a person at age 18
could assume management and
control of his estate, contract
and be contracted with, sue and
be sued.
Marks states that supporters
of the proposal see merit in that
it opens up to a broader
segment of the population the
rights and responsibilities of
adulthood.
Opponents see the
amendment as a further
surrender to the young,
according to Marks.
THE DECISION boils down
to whether or not a voter feels
that a person between 18- and
21-yeariold is ready and capable
of assuming the mantle of
adiilthood.
Amendment three deals with
Article V, and proposes changes
in the Florida court structure.
The changes include
abolishing county courts in
counties of less that 100,000
people, abolishing justices of the
peace and creating magistrates
courts, in counties of more than
100,000 people, changes in the
judicial circuit and transferring
jurisdiction to magistrate courts.
THE STRONGEST point
concerning this amendment,
both Dauer and Marks point out
is a reorganization of the
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as one of several referendum
questions on todays ballot for
the election of Florida governor
and one U.S. Senate seat.
In addition to OConnells
statement, support for the
18-to-20-y ear-old vote was.
shown by Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder in a
statement released last week.
The Student Senate also passed a
resolution Tuesday dealing with
the vote.
I have previously supported
the 18-year-old vote and
majority rights. I feel the voters
of the state will be doing a great
service by allowing the youth of
the state the opportunity to vote
and receive majority rights,
Uhlfelder said.
A JOINT news conference
with OConnell and Uhlfelder
had been planned to issue the
statements, however it was felt
that the issuing of two
statements would be more
beneficial, Uhlfelder said.
Points covered in last weeks
Student Senate resolution
include:
Since 18-year-olds are
called upon to sacrifice their

court structure and jurisdiction
is concerned.
The proposals greatest
weakness results from the
compromises necessary to secure
its initiation, particularly in the

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SPECIAL SECTION E4SIDE
The Alligator explores the candidates and the issues involved |
* in today's general election in a special four-page Election 70
:: section beginning on page 7.

Tuesday, November 3, 1970

O'CONNELL UHLFELDER
lives they should have the right
to elect those who end the war.
People in the
18-to-20-year-old age bracket are
better motivated than at any
other time in the history of the
United States.
The lowering of the voting
age would help bridge the
generation gap.
Support by UF students for
the amendment included a
campaign this past weekend
headed by Student Government
involving canvassing of
Gainesville residents, and the
distribution of 30,000
information sheets pertaining to
the amendment at Saturdays
Homecoming game.

grandfathering of judges,
Dauer and Marks state.
Pollution abatement is the
object of the fourth amendment.
It proposes an amendment to
(SEE 'DAUER' PAGE 2)



!, Th* Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, November 3,1970

Page 2

Dauer Discusses Amendments

Article VII of the constitution
by adding subsection 14
permitting the lssuance, when
authorized by law, of state
bonds to finance the
construction of air and water
pollution control and abatement
and solid waste disposal
facilities.
DAUER STATES severe
pollution of Floridas lakes and
streams, and greater flexibility
of financing and safeguard
legislative approval of the system

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SAIGON (UPI) Communist
gunners shelled Saigon with
rockets early Monday for the
first time in more than three
months in an attack timed to
coincide with National Day
celebrations and the anniversary
of the overthrow of former
President Ngo Dinh Diem. Six
persons were killed and IS
others were injured.
* *
QUITO, ECUADOR (UPI)
Gen. Cesar Rohon Sandoval,
Commander-in-Chief of
Ecuadors Air Force, who was
kidnaped last Tuesday was
released unharmed Sunday, the
Defense Ministry said.
The general is well and later
an official communique on the
circumstances of the incident he
was involved in will be issued,
said Defense Minister Jorge
Acosta.
* *
BOSTON (UPI) Cardinal
Richard Cushing, 75, the
common mans prince of the
Roman Catholic Church who
also was a confidante of the
powerful Kennedy family, died
Monday of Cancer.
DEATH CAME shortly before
2 p.m. EST at the cardinals
residence. Archbishop Humberto
S. Medeiros, whb succeeded
the cardinal less than a month
ago, was reported at his bedside
when the prelate died.
* *

Delta Chi Frat Selling
Environmental Stickers

Delta Chi fraternity will be
selling Support Your Local
Tree environmental
bumperstickers door-to-door in
the dorms and this weekend in
the Plaza of the Americas.
Proceeds from the sale will go
to establish a Rachel Carson
Reading Room in the UF
Library next quarter which will
contain population and

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when It's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
' insertion.

of bond issuance as pro
arguments.
The main arguments against
the amendment are the threat of
new taxes, and that the
amendment might lead to fiscal
irresponsibility, even if there be
adequate supervision by the
legislature and elected executive
officials.
Dauer said, a critical
problem in regard to sewerage
and pollution exists in Florida.
THE VOTER will have to
determine whether he wants to
vote on the idea of state
guarantee and supervision of
bonds for sewerage systems and

WASHINGTON (UPI)-
National Chairmen Rogers C. B.
Morton of the Republicans and
Lawrence F. OBrien of the
Democrats both predicted
Sunday their parties would
control the Senate after
Tuesdays senatorial elections in
35 states.
Were going to organize the
Senate, said Morton. We will
continue to have a majority
position in the Senate, said
OBrien.
* *
WATERLOO, lowa (UPI)
Sen. Harold Hughes (D-Iowa),
Sunday blamed President Nixon
and Vice President Agnew for
the dirtiest politic- I have ever
seen in their campaign swings
around the country.
Hughes, returning to his home
state to stump for underdog
Democratic candidates,
predicted the nation is on the
verge of a great economic
depression and cited the fact
that 1,750,000 more persons are
unemployed now than when
Nixon took office in January,
1969.

environmental reading material.
Suggestions for materials to
be included in the room should
be given to Hal Barcey, Student
Government secretary of
environmental affairs, in the SG
suite, third floor of the Reitz
Union.
The bumperstickers are
three-colors on vinyl and will
not fade or peel. Price is 25
cents each or five for $ 1.

for other pollution control
facilities.
The fifth amendment would
call for amending Section 11 of
Article X to provide authority
for sale of sovereignty
submerged lands only when in
public interest and providing
authority for private use of
sovereignty submerged lands
only when not contrary to the
public interest.
Political Science Professor
Ernest R. Bartley, who also
worked with Dauer and Marks,
states, The proposed
amendment represents an
attempt to tighten control over
the remaining sovereignty lands
beyond the previous statutory
and 1968 Constitutional
controls.
In 1968, laws dealing with the
sale of the submerged lands were
given constitution status. These
lands were declared by the
constitution to be held in trust
by the state, and sale
authorization could be made
only when not contrary to the
public interest.
Bartley says of the proposed
change, As with so many things
governmental, the proposed

Rumors To The Contrary,
Museum Not Crumbling

By TERRY VENTO
Alligator Writer
Is it true that the Florida
State Museum is crumbling even
before it opens to the public?
Thats ridiculous, says Dr.
Joshua C. Dickinson, director of
the museum.
IF NOT crumbling, the new
museum, with poured concrete
approaching 18,225 tons and
another 800 to 1,000 tons of
precast, prepressed concrete
panels forming the exterior roof,
is having a minor problem with
cracking in the concrete.
Project Inspector E.J. Lanum
said a degree of cracking can be

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language is adequate in the
hands of a legislature and
executive branch determined to
maintain the states interest, and
thereby the publics interest, in
the soverignty lands.
In the hands of a legislature
or executive branch dominated
by develop-at-all-costs develop-at-all-costs-psychology,
-psychology, develop-at-all-costs-psychology, the language may
prove to be a feeble reed.
Lengthening the terms of the
members of the house of
representatives is the object of
the sixth amendment.
Simply, the amendment of
Article 111, Section 15(b) would,
in Marks words, change the
terms of office for members of
the House of Representatives
from the present two year term
to a term of four years.
The new four year terms
would are to be staggered so not
all districts throughout the state
elect their represnetative at the
same time.
The staggered terms would
make it no longer possible to
change the entire membership of
the lower house in a single
election, and would make the
house less subject to the
pressures of temporary public

expected, since much of the
concrete was not poured on the
project site, but was precast in
Jacksonville and carried here on
trucks.
The cracking is visible only
under careful scrutiny and is not
considered a hazard. A problem
arose when some slabs shifted in
the roofing. But this has been
taken care of, says Edward A.
Munyer, spokesman for the
museum.
CONCRETE HAS a
tendency to keep hardening as
time goes on, becoming stronger
and more durable. Buildings on
the UF campus are generally
designed to last for 70 to 80
years, but there seems to be no

opinion on an issue/* Marks said.
Arguments against the
amendment propose the four
year term would remove the
represnetative from immediate
influence of public opinion and
would make the Senate and
House too similar,
On this proposal,** Marks
stated, the voter is faced with a
decision among a maze of
philosophical arguements about
the nature of representation
and a practical look at the
bicameral system itself.**
The last amendment would
authorize pay-as-you-go
financing of school
construction.
This would be an amendment
of Artide VII, Section 9(b).
On the pro side, Dauer states
the school population is
increasing every year. The con
argument is that the no real
property is already heavily
burdened with taxes.
In summary, Dauer stated,
Florida is short hundreds of
millions of dollars of needed
school buddings.*
The proposed method of
raising additional revenue might
help and would give and added
opinion for Florida voters to
consider.**

reason why this particular
building could not last hundreds
of years, he said.
Skip Livingston, information
specialist for the museum, said
the building was substantially
completed in August, at which
time a structural inspection was
conducted and approved. Final
approval, which covers details
not included in the structural
examination, was received about
three weeks ago.
The Florida State Museum,
built by the Auchter
Construction Co., is the largest
museum south of the
Smithsonian Institution and
ranks in size among the top ten
public museums of the nation.



Student Interest
Up In Election

By STEVE STRANG
Assistant Assignments Editor
Even though students have
been vocal in their concern over
politics in the past, students
have never turned out in great
numbers to vote.
The election today may be
different, however, with a slate
of nine offices up for election
including governor and U. S.
Senator, and eight referendums.
STUDENTS ARE expected to
be more interested because the
ballot contains a proposed
amendment to give 18-year-olds
the right to vote, and majority
rights.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder also expects more
students to vote because they
are able to believe in the
candidates who are running for
election.
In the past students havent
shown much interest in elections
because there wasnt much
difference between conservative
Democrats and conservative
Republicans. This year there is a
difference, Uhlfelder said.
STUDENTS WILL vote to
keep negative candidates out of
office.
Alachua County Supervisor of
Elections, Mrs. Alma Bethea,
said more students havent voted
because of human nature.
People get all wound up over
emotional issues. But time
changes us, and cools our
emotions, and we dont even
vote though we have been
emotionally involved, she said.
This applies to oldsters as well
as young people.
MRS. BETHEA expects more
students to vote this time due to
an increase in students
registering to vote since a drive
by Student Government last
summer secured the right of
students to register in Alachua
County.
Only 899 students were
registered in Precinct 31 (the
Reitz Union precinct) wfcei
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voting registration dosed in
March. After the drive,
registration in that precinct
jumped to 1,383.
Mrs. Bethea said less than one
third of the students register in
Precinct 31, only the students
living on campus. She hesitated
to estimate how many
off-campus students have
registered to vote since March.
SHE SAID the fact that the
18-year-old vote is on the ballot
this year will cause a greater
percentage of students to vote.
Mrs. Bethea also thinks the
amendment will pass.
I dont think anyone would
vote against it, she said.
Uhlfelder also thinks the
amendment will pass along with
all the other amendments on the
ballot, although he said the vote
on the 18-year-old vote will be
dose.
THE SECOND PART of the
amendment concerning
18-year-olds having majority
rights will hurt the amendment
more than anything, Uhlfelder
said.

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PRODUCTIVE STUDENTS:
Applications for the positions of
general chairman and assistant
general chairman of Student
Government Productions will be
accepted from Nov. 3 to 13.
Applications may be obtained
from the Student Activities desk
in the Union.
BULLDOG-GATOR CLASH:
Tickets to the Florida-Georgia
game Nov. 7 are now on sale at
Gate 13 from 2 to 8 pan. The
price is $3.50 per ticket. Both
IJD.S are needed. No date tickets
are available.
INVOLVED MUSICIANS:
Zuber and Company, a
program of musical involvement,
will be presented Nov. 5 at 8
pjn. in the Sante Fe Junior
College auditorium, 1001 SE 12
St. The program is presented by
the Center of Man. Its free to
the public. Bring a musical
instrument or something to bang
on.
CIVILIAN SERVICE: Collegiate
Civitan will meet today at 7 p jn.
in room 363 of the Union.
PRISONER PETITIONS: Circle
K will sponsor a program by

Arnold Air Sodety, a UF Air
Force ROTC honors
organization who are
partidpating in a campaign to
send petitions to the Hanoi
Peace Delegation in Paris to
protest inhumane treatment of
American prisoners in North
Vietnam. The program will be
tomorrow at 7:30 p. m. in room
361 of the Union.
MOVING STUDENTS: The
Florida Student Movement will
meet tomorrow at 7:30 pjn. in
McCarty auditorium. Everyone
is invited.
THE ROAR OF THE ENGINE:
The Gator Sky Club will meet
tomorrow at 8:30 pjn. in Reitz
Union room 349.
COOKING UP A STORM: The
UF Dames Cooking Interest
Group will hold its first meeting
of the year tonight at 7:30 pjn.
at the Gainesville Gas Co., 530
W. University Ave. The program
will be on Holiday Foods.
CLASSY TEACHERS: The
Student Florida Education
Assodation will meet Nov. 5 at
7:30 pjn. in the Union room

TuaaMay, Mwmrt+mr 3,1*70, Thm FtartMi AMIIf,

346. The film The Engineered
Qassroom will be shown.
SPORTS* RAP: Student
Government is sponsoring an
open-forum discussion in the
Plaza of the Americas tomorrow
from 12 to 1 pm Guests will
include Ray Graves, director of
athletics, Head Football Coach
Doug Dickey, Mandell
Glicksberg, chairman of the
board of directors of the
Athletic Association and two
Gator football players.
MEDICALLY SPEAKING:
Captain Gary L. Swallow, Army
Medical Department personnel
counselor will be available for
consultation in the J. Hillis
Miller Medical Center student
lounge from 11 am to 2 pm
today.
TENANTS UNITE: The
Tenants Union is looking for
students to help organize the
union for their apartment
complex. Anyone interested,
please call 392-1665 and leave
your name, phone number and
apartment complex. The names
will go to Meta Pugh, secretary
of legal affairs.

Page 3



Tla FhrMi BKaitor, Tuwdiy, November 3,1970

Page 4

Kappa Sigma Stands 'ln Limbo'

By KATHY ROBERTS
ASpftor Writer
Kappa Sigma fraternity is
undergoing organizational
changes, but has not fallen
yet, according to former KS
President Rick Miller.
Right now we still have a
charter, and we are still
recognized as a student
organization, Miller said.
KS FRATERNITYS local
chapter was suspended by the
national fraternity this fall.
However, Miller contested,
They (the national fraternity)
never really sad one way or the
other. We aie not a member of
IFC, but we are still a student
_
organization.
Heavy financial debt was the
reason given by the national
organization for dosing the KS
house. Miller agreed monetary
troubles was the only real
major problem we had last year.
We didnt have the money to
pay the bills.
Executive Vice President of
the Interfratemity Council
(IFC), Miles Wilkin said, We
recommended that KS be
suspended from the IFC until
the University Committee on

Center Os Man Presenting
Musical Zuber And Company

Zuber and Company:
Musical Involvement will be
presented by the Center of Man
Thursday, Nov. 5, at 8 p.m. in
the gymnasium of the SE Center
of Santa Fe Jr. College, 1001 SE
12 St.
The second presentation this
year of the Theater of
Involvement, the program will
feature Bob Zuber, a local
guitarist and some of his
musical friends, according to
Dr. Alan Dahms, one of the
three directors of the Center of
Man.
BECAUSE THE concept of
Center of Man deals with
growth, involvement and
creativity, each person will be
part of the program as
participants in a rhythm band.
Each person is asked to bring a
i
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
For information call
CASSELS
M THE AIR
378-2646

Student Organizations conducts
an investigation on charges of
racial discrimination. Thats
where KS now stands kind of
in limbo because the
committee hasnt met yet.
THE CHARGE that the
real reason the house was closed
was that the local chapter tried
to pledge black students was
dismissed by Miller as untrue.
Everyone tried to bring out all
these minor problems, he said.
But we brothers talked it over
since then and found that
finances was the only problem.
The KS house met with one
more problem last Saturday
morning when fire erupted in an
east wing bedroom around 6
a.m.
Capt. Doyle Smith of the
Gainesville Fire Department
estimated the building damage at
$15,000 and content damage
(furniture, etc.) at SSOO.
MILLER SAID the fire didnt
financially hinder the fraternity.
We had sufficient insurance to
cover it. Besides, the students
left in there were moving out,
he said. According to Miller, the
fraternity brothers are
considering selling the house.

musical instrument, said Dahms.
Active involvement is the
key to the success of this
non-organization, Dahms said.
The idea of a lecture is being
replaced by a more humanistic
approach to getting people,
together white, black,
students, faculty and Gainesville
citizens. All are equal, all are
involved, Dahms said.
THE CENTER of Man is built
in its entirety upon the idea of
man as unlimited in potential for
love, creative achievement and
continued self-renewal, he said.
One of the basic assumptions

Burger Kings
8 N.W. 16th Ave.
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... fire did approximately $15,500 damage to the east wing

Miller said there was no
possibility of arson Saturday
morning. According to Smith,
the fire is being investigated by
the State Fire Marshals office.
The KS fraternity brothers are
now spread out in their living
arrangements. But everybody is
still active, Miller said. We are
probably going to elect new
officers soon.

of this program is that we can be
committed to humanity more.
In addition to this Theater of
Involvement the Center of Man,
under the direction of Dr.
Sidney Jourard, Dr. Carl Clarke
and Dahms, also sponsors
encounter groups and a series of
lectures.
All interested persons are
asked to bring themselves and
their instruments this Thursday.
The program is free of charge.
On Dec. 3, the third program
in this series, The Power of
Positive Feedback with Dr. Carl
Clarke, will be offered.

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November 6, 1970
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IU INCREASE COMMUNICATIONS
Athletics Subject Os Forum

By JEANINE HUTTO
Alligator Writer
An open forum discussion,
centered on the Athletic
Association, will be held in the
Plaza of the Americas Nov. 4
from 12 to 1 p.m.
Guests at the forum
Wednesday will include Ray
Graves, director of athletics;
Doug Dickey, head football
coach; Mandell Glicksberg,
chairman of the Board of
Directors of the Athletic

~~~~~ 1: :
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Association and two Gator
football players.
THE PURPOSE of the forum
is to increase communication
between the students and
faculty and to give students the
opportunity to express their
opinions and receive direct
answers to their questions,
according to Gail Merein,
Student Government secretary of
academic affairs.
Henry Solares, student body
vice president, will moderate the
informal discussion between

students and panel.
Possible issues for discussion
will be the Astro-Turfing of
Florida Field, the five dollar
student athletic cards, the recent
dismissal of two UF tennis
players, the code of standards
for athletes, the overselling of
Homecoming tickets and the
current financial standing of the
Athletic Association, according
to Solares.
Solares said the players are
upset with the change of
conditions since Dickey took

over. With the close of the
Graves era and the opening of
the Dickey era, came stricter
rules of dress for athletes and
stricter rules at the athletic
training table being enforced,
Solares said.
The monthly forums are a
Student Government project.
They were originally started as a
question and answer session
concerning the different colleges
at UF. Later the forums were
expanded to include other
aspects of campus life.

Tuesday, Noaambar 3,1t7Q. Tha FMbAlpaar. I

ft
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ii
RAY GRAVES
3X1600 JullftllC rorum

Page 5



Page 6

U Tlte FNrtte AWifatar, Timdiy, NowtaWw 3,1970

Marketing Dept. In Survey Contest

By RANDY BELLOWS
AHifrtor Staff Write
If the UF Marketing
Department has a better idea
about marketing Fords new
Pinto, it may win SI,OOO to be
used for scholarships and
student loans.
For the first time in its
history, the Marketing
Department has entered
competition in a national survey
contest. The contest, sponsored
by an independent research firm,
on behalf of the Ford Motor
Company, will involve two
marketing classes, who will
conduct a public survey on
sub-compact cars, particularly
the Ford Pinto..
IF WE DO well nationally,
this could really make the school
manifest in the nation, Prof.
R. J. Boewadt said. He is
handling the survey with Dr.
R. B. Thompson.
UF is competing with more
than 60 other colleges. These
include both big league
universities like Texas,
University of Michigan, Michigan
State, Columbia ahd smaller
schools.
The object of the survey is to
assess consumer attitudes
regarding the sub-compact, and
exactly how effective the Pinto
is in Meeting these demands.
THE RESEARCH will include
two subdivisions. One will be a
survey of 100 people, mi the
other, an independent panel of
average coaManess, Boewadt
said. The independent panel will
go into great depth.
Approximately 25 people will be
given Pintos to drive for several

53 Released On Bail
From USF Confrontation

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Writer
The 53 persons arrested in
Saturday mornings
student-police confrontation at
the University of South Florida
(USF) have been released on bail
according to Sheriff Malcolm
Beard of Hillsborough County.
The students were arrested
when they failed to heed a 2
a.m. court-injunction curfew.
USES ACTING President
Harris W. Dean sought the
injunction after an
underground organization
printed pamphlets publicizing a
fmt two-day festival of life pop
festival.
Originally, the Student
Mobilization Committee (SMC)
planned an antiwar
demonstration which was legally
sanctioned by the university and
the police. The demonstration
was to include several speakers,
mrm bands and a candlelight
march around the university.
My two of the seven bands
played.
The confrontation started
shortly before 3 a.m., when Jack
Prehl, head of USFs campus
aecority police announced to the
TTTwmiag group of about 500
people that they were in
vinhrtion of the court injunction.
IT was a peaceful
confrontation, according to
Beard. The police tactical riot
squad from the Hillsborough
County Sheriffs Department

hours, and will then be asked to
record their reactions.
Our largest survey will
include the entire Gainesville
area, Boewadt said. The survey
will be divided into several
subgroupings including
occupation, income, students,
age and people who normally
drive a sub-compact. It will be a
general demographic analysis of
the potential consuming public.
4, Well attempt to simulate a
national breakdown as nearly as
possible, Boewadt said.
Ford is awarding several

*T By? srwH RmEXMI
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GATOR BAND ECOLOGY

It seems everyone is frftii into environmental issues these days.
The Gator Band itiurt rated the idea of the balance of nature at

marched in formation across the
USF intramural football field,
and followed students into
nearby dorms.
Os the 53 persons arrested,
most non-USF students were
charged with trespassing and
USF students were charged with
disturbing the peace. One person
was charged with resisting arrest
with violence, a felony, and two
other persons under 17 were
charged with violating the
county curfew of 11 p jn.
One policeman suffered a cut
on his hand, but none of the

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competitive prizes. Each of
several national regions will be
awarded a SI,OOO prize. UF, in
the Southeastern region, plans
on using the money, if won,
toward scholarship funds for
students. The scholarships would
probably go to marketing
students.
AFTER COMPILING this
data, the Marketing Department
will file a final report with this
independent research agency.
The report will provide
promotional strategy and a
model to be used by Ford. The

persons arrested were injured.
Although the university
sought the injunction, Beard, the
officer in charge, is pressing
charges. A Nov. 12 hearing date
has been set.
It's Their Bag
The nations supermarkets
will use enough packaging film
on meat and produce this year
to form a band 15 inches wide
stretching from the earth to the
moon and back, says a firm
which makes packaging film.

agency acts as a buffer between
Ford and the participating
colleges, to wash out the effect
of a direct commercialization
influence by Ford.
The survey will be completed
in the next two weeks, but the
department has until Feb. 15 for
the final report.
The other schools will be
dedicating a lot of time, effort,
and resources towards their
analyzation. Our trick is to just
do a better job, Boewadt said.
THE PINTO is presently
breaking into the new

Saturday's Homecoming game by forming the ecology balance symbol
during their halftime show.

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sub-compact market. Their main
foe will probably be the
Volkswagen. One of our
purposes is to find out why the
VW is so effective, and provide
promotional strategy toward
building up these features in the
Pinto, Boewadt said.
For example, we might find
out that VW owners particularly
like the aspect of an unchanging
style. If people are worried
about this, the American
sub-compacts, like the Vega,
Gremlin, and Pinto might
include a 5-year no-change
feature along with their cars.



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REUBIN ASKEW
UPP
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CLAUDE KIRK

During the last four years, the state of
Florida has been a stage for its flamboyant
actor-governor, Claude Kirk.
A newsmans delight, he has managed to
keep the state in constant uproar: with
outlandish statements; confrontations over
busing; a disappearing act during the teacher
strikes crisis, the Governors Club, and
sleight of hand political dealings.
We could go on and on. In short, the
governor has embarrassed the state and at
the same time, failed to provide effective
leadership.
We believe it is curtain time for his
Theatre of the Absurd style of politics.
Before the state primary in September,
The Alligator stated that the most important
issue in the Florida elections in 1970 was to
vote Old Claude, as he calls himself, out
of office. It still holds true.
With that in mind, here are our
recommendations for todays elections:
For governor:
We recommend Democrat Reubin Askew
for governor. While Kirk has split the
Republican party in the state, Askew has
unified his, and we believe he can do the
same for the state.
His record speaks for itself: in the state
senate, he fought for tax reform,
reapportionment and governmental
reorganization.
Askew favors the establishment of a
state-wide system of rehabilitation clinics for
drug abusers. Kirk has been all Law and
Order. Since he took office, however, the
crime rate in the state has increased.
Askews running mate Tom Adams has

ELECTION SPECIAL

The Alligator Suggests

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been attacked for personal business failures
by opponents who insinuate that Adams
would drag the state down to financial
disaster. But he has been a more than
competant secretary of state. And his
financial misfortunes are explainable.
As various state polls during the last
weeks of the campaign have revealed Askew
ahead by a comfortable margin, a
panic-stricken Kirk has labeled Askew a
super liberal and has maintained that
because Askews law firm once defended a
man accused of selling pornographic
material, Askew himself is a pomographer.
Thursday he called Askew a Mommas
Boy because of the senators clean-cut
reputation.
Okay. Elect a mommas boy
today.
For senate seat:
We recommend Democrat Lawton Chiles
for United States Senator.
Chiles is a fresh face in Florida politics
and is known as Walkin Lawton for his
1,000 miles-plus trek through Florida during
his campaign.
While William Cramers campaign has been
strictly law and order, with few exceptions,
Chiles has offered solutions. Through his
face-to-face in interaction with over 45,000
Floridians, he knows what people expect of
a U.S. Senator.
There is nothing to indicate that Cramer
would be anything but another Ed Gurney;
that is, a pawn of the Nixon Administration.
We believe if elected, Chiles will be his
own man according to his conscience with

EDITORIAL--

Tumdtvi November 3.1970 k TW FforidfrAMigttor, I

the needs of the state in mind.
Amendments
We recommend a For vote for the
proposed amendment permitting
18-year-olds the vote.
The argument against those persons
seeking political change through somewhat
radical measures is the work within the
established institutions song and dance.
What is more established than the
electoral process in America? This
amendment would give persons in the 18 to
21 age bracket the tools to work within the
system.
The fear that giving the 18-year-olds the
right to vote will bring about radical
legislation is unfounded. The Harris and
Gallup polls have revealed no pronounced
difference in voting between 18 year olds
and others.
Persons in the 18 to 21 age bracket are
liable for criminal prosecution and
punishment. Males are obligated to serve in
the armed forces.
In short, 18 year olds deserve a voice in
issues which pertain to them, and this
amendment would give it to them.
We also recommend a For vote for the
proposed amendment setting the age of legal
majority in Florida at age 18.
Since we believe 18-yearolds should be
given a vote, we believe they cannot logically
be denied the responsibilities and privileges
of adulthood.

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LAWTON CHI LES
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BILL CRAMER

Page 7



Page 8

I, Ttw Florida Alligator, Tuesday. November 3,1970

THE CANDIDATES

BILL CRAMER
By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writer
Can a St. Petersburg attorney and 16-year veteran
of Congress break into the ranks of what has been
called the most exclusive club in the world?
Todays senatorial election results will yield the
answer to whether Bill Cramer can attain a six-year
stint in the upper chamber of Congress.
A GOOD PART of Cramers campaign strategy
has been based on the premise that President Nixon
urged him to run for the Senate.
After a hard-fought battle with Supreme Court
Justice nominee G. Harrold Caiswell of Tallahassee
for the Republican party nomination, Cramer has
been waging a more traditional campaign than has
his opponent Lawton Chiles of Lakeland.
HE STRESSES patriotism and conservatism in his
appeal to the voters. In a campaign tour of factories
in the Orlando area last week, Cramer donned a
hard hat while speaking to prospective voters
according to Linda Zimmerman, UF campaign
worker for Cramer.
The 48 year-old Congressman and graduate of
Harvard Law School primarily bases his campaign
on the single issue of busing. Hes against it.
As author of the Cramer Anti-Busing Law, an
addition to the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Cramer
showed foresight in predicting a trouble spot in the
implementation of integration guidelines.
THIS MAY TURN out to be'a strong factor of
approval or rejection by Florida voters in the wake
of events resulting from the desegregation of
neighborhood schools.
Cramer is also firm on the topic of law and order.
He has repeatedly voiced his support of stronger
legislation in areas concerning bombings and
violence and it was under an anti-crime bill of his
that five members of the Chicago Seven were
convicted.
IN FLORIDA, where much of the electorate is
composed of senior citizens on retirement, the law
and order policies might be persuasive in scope.
On Vietnam, Cramer is a Nixon administration
supporter. He favors gradual withdrawal.
He is down on what he calls heavy spending**
yet favors money spent on defense such as the ABM
system.
LIBERALS AND radicals are a prime target for
Cramer's wrath. This has been expressed in several
campaign ads stressing his opposition to Chiles.

REUBIN
ASKEW

By SUE CUSTOOE
Alligator Staff Writer
Until a few months ago, not many people knew
about Reubin Askew, state senator for
Escambia, and Santa Rosa counties since 1962.
Now Askew, 42, is the state's Democratic darling,
candidate for governor.
PRIOR TO SERVING as state senator, Askew
was Escambia County representative from 1958 to
1962 and was re-elected without opposition in 1960.
He defeated Earl Faircloth for the gubernatorial
candidacy in the Sept. 29 primary runoff.
Askew hails from Muskogee, Okla. and has lived
in Pensacola since 1937. He received his law degree
from the UF in 1956. Before that he received a
degree in public administration from Florida State
University and did post-graduate work at the
University of Denver.
A DEMOCRAT since 1949, Askew said even
before his campaign started that No one will
believe a man who has represented Pensacola for 12
years could be a liberal.
Thus he hasnt even bothered to refute

V
o
T
E

LAWTON
CHILES

Republican charges of liberalism and doesn't seem
to have been hurt by being nicknamed
Radical Reubin by his opposition.
The center of Askew's low-key campaign has
been his fair share tax program.
ASKEW SAYS his program would end our
complete reliance on consumer taxes, close
loopholes and end the wrongful exemptions so that
no special group gets undeserved
consideration... rewrite our corporate tax
structure so that big businesses pay their fair share
of our tax burden... and end the system that
thrives on political payoffs, special considerations
and unfair tax burdens on low- and middle-income
families.
Included in the program are a new tax on
phosphates and other minerals, the elimination of
capital stock tax and the removal of sales tax on
utility bills.
Here are some of the other stands Askew has
taken:
He is in favor of the 18-year-old vote.
Advocates drug education programs in the
public schools. Along with this, he favors vigorous

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
Governor Claude Kirk stood on the sidelines at
Florida Field Saturday and watched the UF Gators
fight for two touchdowns against the favored
Auburn Tigers.
But, his interest in the game appeared somewhat
stifled. His thoughts were undoubtedly on another
fight. A fight for his political life.
KIRK, LIKE the Gators is called the underdog in
the gubernatorial race. If he is, its not a new
position to him. Hes been one before in 1966
against the late Robert King High, mayor of Miami.
But this race is different. His record is on the line
and he is there to defend it.
Conservation, a hot issue today, works
exceptionally well as a Kirk campaign theme. His
record here draws approval from conservationists

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writar
Its been a long road since State Sen. Lawton
Chiles (D, Lakeland) began walking after his partys
nomination for U.S. Senator.
Chiles walked more than 1,000 miles and shook
an even greater number of hands in his walk through
middle Florida. He talked to tough-talking hardhats
in the cities, farmers in the orange belt and tomato
pickers in South Florida.
THE ONE-TIME UF student, describing
himself as a progressive conservative, during his
waUc for the primary tackled some of the old
leaders of the Democratic party; former governor
and s P ealce r of the state house
red Schultz. He did it in a most unconventional
warmer, he walked. During his walk, he was



prosecution of drug violators and suppliers.
Favors development of a public hospital
treatment program and statewide rehabilitation
clinics for drug users.
Feels the barge canal should be stopped if so
recommended by the Presidents Council on
Environmental Quality.
Would discourage industrial development of
business expansion that would impair the
environment.
He is in favor of strictly enforced pollution laws
and supports the sewer bond amendment on todays
ballot.
Thinks cross-busing should not be used in the
preservation of the neighborhood school system.
Advocates the development of a program of
state aid to promote wider use of private colleges
and universities.
Askew is a member of the board of directors of
the Florida Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease
Association and member of the Childrens Home
Society of Florida, Pensacola Rotary Club,
American Legion and Shriners.
He is married and has two children.

throughout the state.
UNDER KIRK, Florida gained its first state-wide
air and water pollution control agency. Nat Reed, a
Kirk conservation aide, has become one of the states
most respected officials.
But, the cross-Florida barge canal, once firmly
supported by Kirk, has come back to haunt him in
the form of accusations from state environmental
leaders.
Recognizing the pressurb, Kirk recently asked the
interior department to press for rerouting of the
canal to save the remainder of Upper Oklawaha
River.
We are not going to proceed with public works
programs, even if they are authorized programs,
unless the full weight of environmental research has
been studied and continued, he said.
Kirk said there were no campus disorders in

dubbed die walking senator, and the name
stuck.
. Tall, boyish-looking, and easy going, Chiles was
one of the leaders of a move to place the
amendment giving 18-year-olds the vote on the
ballot for the November elections.
Chiles is a backer of setting a date for
withdrawing from Vietnam, and getting out. He said
he had talked to the people of Florida during his
walk, and they had helped him to change his mind
n the issue he used to be a hawk, advocating a
total victory.
CHILES ADVOCATES the dtamtad from the state
universities of demonstrators involved in violent
actions, takes a tough line on those involved in
bombing, and recently blasted the students who
Pelted Richard Nixons car with eggs in California.

CLAUDE KIRK

e mm c, emTuotw

FACE THE SSUES

Florida, but added that something must be done
about the rowdies and hoodlums who are
committing violent acts in schools throughout the
state.
THE VIOLENCE Kirk cites involves the
physical molestation of teen-aged girls.
He gave several more examples. Unprovoked
assaults upon young children, groups of students
attacking other groups, a teen-aged girl trapped in a
telephone booth while 15 youths yelled obsentities
at her, extortion attempts, threats against school
personnel...
OTHER ISSUES facing the incumbent Kirk are
the 18-year-old vote and drug legislation.
Why do you want to know how I feel about the
18-year-old vote, he said. The public will be
voting on it Tuesday. Whatever they decide, Im in
favor of.

The inflation issue was also picked-up by Chiles,
who said he favors more stringent controls on the
economy, such as enacting wage and price controls
to harness inflation.
Chiles also backed the proposal made by
Democratic nominee for governor, Reubin Askew,
which calls for the initiation of a corporate income
tax in Florida.
As the political race drew to a close, the
campaign has become more peisonal in its attacks.
DURING A PRESS conference last Friday, Chiles
accused his opposition of buying an ad in Florida
papers saying Chiles is needed by the northern
liberals^
Chiles said an out of state group was go w .o
have the ad appear in most Florida papers Monday,
as a last ditch effort to swing voters to the sagging
Republican side. ( A poll by the Miami Herald last

Tillay, Nmbar 3,1970, TVm Florida AWprtor,

!*X*X*X*X*M*X*I*>X*I*X*X*I X*X*X*X*X*I*W

Drug legislation is one issue he doesnt shrug off
so lightly.
Everytime someone is convicted of a narcotics
charge, the agent has to go to court along with the
felon. We have adequate legislation, now we need
the enforcement officers to carry out that
legislation.
Crime is nothing new to Kirk. He launched his
War on Crime the first day he took office.
He hired a private detective firm for the job,
taking donations to pay the fees.
The critics, and Kirk hears from them
consistently, charged that the venture was a
half-million-dollar failure. But, it forced a reluctant
legislature to create a state-wide crime fighting
force.
Claude Kirk has always been there when you
needed him, one campaign slogan reads. Now be
there when he needs you.

week shows Cramer behind Chiles.)
HE SAID THE same ad has appeared in other
newspapers in other states, attacking Democratic
party candidates. All they do is change the
names.
The ad further states that college radicals need
Lawton Chiles to get elected.
Chiles, who has described himself as a
conservative throughout his campaign denied the
allegations in the ad. But you can be sure I wont
have any ads like that.
CHILES SAID he was confident of the support
shown to him by the voters. He said he was
counting on support from all segments of Florida
voters.
I think I have the support of the hard hats, the
blue collar workers, the white collar workers and
also the students, Chiles said.

Page 9

i



Page 10

>, The FldridaT AfKgetor, Tuwdiy, November 3,1970

Proposed
Constitutional no. i for against no. 2 for against no. 3 Foi against
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
Amendment ARTICLE VI, SECTION 2 AMENDMENT AMENDMENT ARTICLE X, SECTION 14 AMENDMENT AMENDMENT ARTICLE V AMENDMENT AMENDMENT
18 Year Old Voting. Proposing an amendment to Section 2 of Article VI 18 Year Old Majority. Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution, Judiciary. Proposing a revision of Article V of the State Constitution re-
WT of the Constitution providing that every citizen of the United States who adding a new section 14 to Article X, providing that every person shall lating to the Judicial Department of the Government
M is at least eighteen years of age and who has been a permanent resident reach legal majority upon attaining the age of eighteen years, and there- f
for one year in the state and six months in the County, if registered as after shall have all the rights and responsibilities of an adult.
provided by law. shall be an elector of that County.
__ NO 6
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AGAINST CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AGAINST CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
\ ARTICLE VII, SECTION 14 ARTICLE X, SECTION 11 AIaAiNM ARTICLE 111, SECTION 15(b) AGAINST
Pollution Abatement. Proposing an amendment to Article Vlf of the Con- AMENDMENT AMENDMENT Land Sales. Proposing an amendment to Section 11 of Article X of the AMENDMENT AMENDMENT Representatives. Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution; AMENDMENT AMENDMENT
stitution by adding subsection 14 permitting the issuance, when authorized Florida Constitution, providing authority for sale of sovereignty submerged amending Section 15 by law. of state bonds to finance the construction of air and water pollution lands only when in the public interest and providing authority for private members of the House of Representatives,
control and abatement and solid waste disposal facilities.' use of sovereignty submerged lands only when not contrary to the public
interest.
s i
* v '\
NO. 7 FOR AGAINST NO. 8 FOR AGAINST
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT LOCAL GOVERNMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 9 AMENDMENT AMENDMENT RESOLUTION PROVISIONS OF SECTION 230.241 AMENDMENT AMENDMENT
Local School Capital Improvements. Proposing an amendment to Article FLORIDA STATUTES
VII, Section 9 of the State Constitution to authorize school boards to levy SCHOOL BOARD OF ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA
ad valorem taxes in excess of ten mills for periods up to ten years for
capital improvement purposes when authorized by vote of electors who A proposition to make the office of Superintendent of Schools of Alachua
are owners of freeholds not wholly exempt from taxation. County, Florida, appointive by the School Board of such County. tl
OFFICES 1 2 4 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
CONGRESSIONAL STATE STATE STATE STATE STATE STATE *I ATI COUNTY
( U. S. Senator Governor and Lieutenant Governor Secretary of State Attorney General Comptroller State Treasurer Commissioner of Education Commissioner, Florida Public Clerk of the Circuit Court
ItSy Service Commission, Group 2
(Vote for one) (Vote for one group) (Vote for one) (Vote for one) (Vote for one) (Vote for one) (Vote for one) (Vote for one) (Vote for one)
1 A 12A 13A 14A 15A 16A 17A 18A 19A 2QA
Lawton For Governor' For Governor Don D. Richard (Dick) Thom Robert L. James R. Fred D. (Bud) Tom Thomas D. Robert Lawrence Floyd T. David L. William H. (Bill) A. Curtis J. Ponaan
AjKr Cramer j Chiles Ray c. Osborne Tom Adams Meiklejohn Stone Rumberger Shevin Sabatino Dickinson Slade OMalley Froemke Christian Lindsey Bevis Powers Roberts
(Rep.) (Dem.) } (D#m } (R*P) (Dem.) (Rep.) (Oem.) (Rep.) (Dem.) (Rep.) (Dem.) (Rep.) (Dem.) (Rep.) (Dem.) (Hep.) (Dent.)

COMPLETE ALLIGATOR ENDORSEMENTS
' '.*,* ; I-" f . .. *i _
* ]
Blue Levers Designate Our Recommendations



| The
| Florida
Alligator

Dylan Brings A New Morning

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Bob Dylan, lately of
Woodstock, Nashville and other
pastoral locations, is back in the
city musically and back into our
heads lyrically.
New Morning is his latest
album and his best since John
Wesley Harding. New
Morning is not a Get Back
album. It moves into
piano-dominated rock and roll.
Aretha Franklin gospel-blues and
even some wry jazz conceits
with a vengance. But the
predicates of an extraordinary
career are evident in each song,
be it a country touch here, the
old Dylan voice there, or the
unmatched lyrics everywhere.
The most evident New
Direction on this Dylan album is
the extensive use of piano and
organ. Dylan plays piano on
eight of the 12 cuts and A1
Kooper does his usual excellent
job on organ on almost every
song.
The second most evident
direction is subject matter. For
awhile it was family, love,
contentment and simplicity.
Well, on New Morning Dylan
sings about gypsies, locusts, god
and weasels, as well as the above
mentioned eternals.
It is exciting. The Man speaks
in parables. I mean, Country
Pie was good, and all that, but
when a cut opens up with a dark
piano and steaming organ and
that raspy, wailing voice comes
crying out about visions,
watchtoweis, things down
beyond the road, and Dylan
city-life, it is exciting.
New Morning is exciting,
mysterious and rich listening.
A sample:
Side one opens up fast with
If Not For You. The
drumming pushes a strumming
guitar and smooth organ and
Dylan jumps in with, If not for
you, I couldnt find the door,
couldnt even see the f100r...
But hes shouting again, folks,
and his testimony of what he
would be like without his
woman is so right. It is sit up
and listen time.
Day of the Locusts is about
Dylan receiving his honorary
degree from Princeton. It opens
with heavy gospel piano chords,
a guitar toying round the edges,
and Dylan saying, Oh the
benches were stained with tears
and perspiration. He sings a
haunting picture of the scene,
the heat: The weather wasliot,
Airplane Rentals
1969 Cessna 150
$12.00/1 Hour
Piper J-3 SB.OO/Hour
Champion Citabria
$ll.OO/Hour
Flying Hawks Corp.
Stengel Field 376-0011
5 minutes from Campus.

IB I H iMLmmP 2K 88. H
y M JjK .jHpP fHBHy S JHpH| IBHU^^BI
rv.v1vXv;>!.v. , .v11v1:. , ..v!!1?:.v! l )~l>!^. ,, !^!?pNW!W , M!W!M*l^^>!MN%Mv
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1 > * A A *-*-*~ r yX*T* **'.V.VAWA

nearly 90 degrees/The man
standin next to me, his head
was explodin/I was prayin the
pieces wouldnt fall on me.; the
atmosphere: I glanced into a
chamber where judges were
t a Iking/Darkness was
everywhere, it smelled like a
tomb. And the chorus with
Dylan shouting it out, Oh the
locusts sang, it give me a chill/
Oh the locusts sang such a sweet
melody/Oh the locusts sang
their high whining trill/ Oh the
locusts sang and they were
sanging for me. Dylan is
relieved to put down his robe
and pick up his diploma and
beat it back to the hills of
Dakota, so glad to get out of
that life.
Went To See The Gypsy
opens with piano. Koopers
organ is like a memory as Dylan
tells about going to a hotel to
see a gypsy. Again the country
Dylan re-enters the sinister city.
But the Gypsy smiles and says
ooh, well, well. A dancing girl
describes the gypsys powers and
adds that he did it in Las Vegas
and he can do it here. When
Dylan returns the gypsy and the
girl are gone so he watches the
sun come rising from that little
Minnesota town. Which little
Minnesota town? Maybe the one
Bobby Zimmerman was bom in.
The first side ends with
Winterlude, a waltz with
Dylan using a McCartney voice,
and a guitar doing a little Marty
Robbins-El Paso thing, and the
campy If Dogs Run Free.
Dogs sounds like a smokey
little nightclub with its cocktail
hour piano and an acoustic jazz
guitar that brings memories of
Scotch and Soda. Dylan
whispers the lyrics, carefully
enunciating each syllable while
an Ella Fitzgerald voice does

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I 1802 West University Avenue I
I across from Murphf orw, wxt to King's Pood Host |

mm
1 i i 1 ' &
scat runs with scoobie-doobie.
No kidding.
Side two begins with the title
song New Morning. Koopers
organ plays around with a
driving bomp-bomp-bomp beat
I Games for Thinkers U
A NSW DIMENSION IN EDUCATION I
Designed by university professors to I ft
teach and challenge those who enjoy I ff
BRAIN TO BRAIN ACTION. Ul
WFF 'N PROOF (logic) 18.75* |
EQUATIONS (mathematics) 5.50
ON-SETS (set theory) 5.50
PROPAGANDA (social studies) 6.50
CONFIGURATIONS (geometry) 5.50
5-GAME SPECIAL (the above) 27.95 LA
Postage Included §
Send check to: WFF N PROOF U
Box 71 MK New Haven, Conn. 06501 I §
Free Catalog Dealer inquiries invited
Satisfaction Guaranteed |

Tuday, November 3,1970, The Florida Alligator,

as Dylan sings about how great
it is under the skies of blue on
this new morning. He continues
to draw natural images and
celebrate them on the new
morning but somewhere he
innocently notes that the
automobile is coming into style.
Sign On The Window.
Sign on the window says
lonely/sign on the porch says
threes a crowd, go the lyrics to
gospel chording on piano and
backup vocals. Dylan sings with
his Lay Lady Lay voice about
loneliness, and each line ends
with a hitch like an Irish ballad.
He expects that he will Build
me a cabin in Utah, marry me a
wife, catch rainbow trout/have a

HgS||i
X;>' : li
1. A DATE WITH JOJO. THE DOG i#
FACED BOV j^jk
2. AN ARTICHOKE HEART AND/OR
L,VER I
3. THE UNUSED PORTION OF EUROPE A
4. AN INCREDIBLE 48' X 25' CIRCUS
POSTER IN FULL COLOR. FEATURING:
CAPTAIN MAX BORDINI (PICTURED HERE) AND MORE
THAN A DOZEN OTHER ACTS SO SENSELESS THEY HAVE
BEEN PERFORMED ONLY ONCE.
COMPLETE DETAILS AND BOXTOPS WILL BE FOUND
CONVENIENTLY ATTACHED TO THE BRAND NEW
SCREAMING YELLOW ZONKERS BOX WHICH IS
COVERED WITH BRAND NEW CRAZY WRITING.
OVALTINE FOOD PROOUCTS VILLA PARK. ILLINOIS (OISI

GREG JONES
Entertainment Editor

bunch of kids who call me pa.
That must be what its all
about.
One More Weekend is a
raunchy blues" number slippin
and slidin like a weasel on the
run. Dylan, in high spirits and
earthy language, implores his
lady for just one more weekend
as he shouts above a honky-tonk
piano.
The album finishes with a
strange little talk-song about
three Christmas angels that play
from where they hang in the
city to the procession of life
that passes them by. No one
listens and no one even tries.
Beautiful description of the
passing parade.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS




FOR SALE
Surfboard, must sell. HOBIE
EASTERN STAR, 6 feet with 7 In.
fin, no dings, very strong. $125. call
373-2237. (A-3t-29-p)
Refrigerator-freezer, 14cu ft, 2-door
automatic ice-maker. $l5O, call
before 8:30 am or after 6:00 pm
378-6365 (A-st-28-p)
1970 OSSA stilletto; 650 cc BSA
custom; 1948 Indian chopper; must
liquidate stock of bikes to buy car.
(BSA $650-OSSA $650-4B make
offer) Ph 378-7903 BRUCE
(A-st-28-p)
7O Triumph Bonneville 650 2000
miles 378-9208 (A-10t-25-p)
for sale honda S-90, 69 low
mileage $230 call Dave 373-2771
(A-st-31-p)

returning to the IflfiflftMflK
* Rat, Wednesday
W.C. FIELDS
* *You Cant Cheat J
* An Honest Man
* 7:30 pm Weds. Admission
I iosoZ Nov. 4 25

* YOU DONT NEED TO BE 21 TO MAKE IT AT THE RAT
+ + + + + + + + + + ) PROVIDED BY SGP
The /i\
BETHLEHEM /A)/
ASYLUM
committed jMrvf
to the v r
Rat! Wk
THURS. thru SAT. NOV 5-7 { X
TWO SHOWS ADMISSION
8 & 10:30 PM $2 per person
Provided by SGP
I '* s I
I guaranteed!!
S The 5
PFAn Florida 5
8 l\Cffl7 Alligator


a#
****

FOR SALE
Irregulars & seconds Beautiful sheets
towels and pillowcases 103 SE First
St. Sheet & Towel Shop (A-20t-31-p)
DESK & chair $lO. udico port.
OVEN-broiler S2O. Call Jane after 5
p.m. 378-4251 (A-st-29-p)
1970 5,000 b.t.u. norge Air Cond.
with thermostat & warranty. Perfect
condition. SIOO. Call Jane after 5
pm. 378-4251 (A-st-29-p)
8-track TAPE CARTRIDGES Have
quality double (2) album tapes
recorded from your albums at single
(1) album prices $6 Inc double tape
every sth tape Free 378-5916 4-8 pm
(A-st-28-p)
Honda S9O 1968 Just overhauled
$165 or best offer includes helmet
and lock Call Roy 373-2316 after 7
(A-3t-31-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 3.1970

a*
FOR SALE
Citation stereo system incl. AM-FM
radio-turntable-and tape deck-perfect
shape-must sell-$200.00 call
392-7956 after 5 pm (A-st-28-p)
MAGNAVOX STEREO 2-12
speakers walnut cabinets plus over 30
records. $195.00 Call 373-3769 No.
41 Williamsburg Apts. (A-3t-31-p)
BROWNING light auto 5 12ga
shotgun with 2 extra barrels S4OO
Value yours $250 call John 373-1365
(A-3t-31-p)
1966 Porsche 912 Engine rebuilt this
summer. Like new condition $2900
392-7266 (A-4t-31-p)
GERTS a gay girl ready for a whirl
after cleaning carpets with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Electric upholstery shampooer now
available. Lowry Furniture Co. (Atfc)
Yamaha 125 YAG, Just tuned and
cleaned, runs well, dependable
transportation, luggage rack. Bell
helmet, need $l5O. Jeff Berry
376-9208 (A-3t-31-p)
TV 2 yr old excel 19 S6O; stereo
S2B; refrigerator sls; also other
household goods; going abroad will
bargain. Call 372-3205 (A-3t-31-p)
1968 Honda 125 CL, Good
Condition $250. with new helmet
$275. Phone 376-8902 keep trying.
(A-st-30-p)
Small business, part-time operation.
Earn over SSOOO. Annually for only
3-4 hours work. Recover full cost In
first year. Ideal for student operation
call 378-8724. (A-4t-28-p)
YASHICA JP 50mm, f/2.8 single
lens, timer, ac-dc electronic flash,
hand light meter, tripod, cases, like
new $95.00 All, 373-2204 after 5 pm
(A-st-29-p)
RCA combination stereo FM-AM
radio. Contemporary style,
mahagony finish. Excellent
condition. $140.00 Call 376-1970
(A-4t-30-p)
AKC German Shepherd pups. 3 mos
excel, pedigree, love children. 85 ea.
Terms available. 378-5222
(A-4t-30-p)
FOR RENT
Need female roommate for academic
year-one BR garage apt near Town
$25 per mo plus utilities call Judy
378-5170. (B-st-29-p)
WANTED
Female roommate to share 2 Br
trailer, own room, S7O month. Call
373-2577 after 8 p.m. or 392-3196
before. Ask for Mary. (C-st-26-p)
Furnished apt. wanted for Winter
Quarter, willing to pay premium for
plush 2 bedroom-Jan-Aprll Call
392-0151 or 372-5206. (C-st-30-p)
Male student wants roommates for 3
br house call 378-9695 or see at 225
SW sth St S6O/mo utilities included.
(C-3t-30-p)
wHSEm I now!
N.W. I ltd sl. M I*4 NO / hi
I 3TI 2414 I' 1
I "A TRIUMPH!!
Judith Crist, New York Magazine
FEATURE AT ...
1:40 3:37 5:34
7:36 9:43
2nd. GREAT
til ee m
WEEK!
"AN IMMENSELY ROMANTIC
MOVIE WITH STYLE AND
CRITICAL INTELLIGENCE!"
-Vinctnt C aaby, W.Y. Timt
I w tji jj
Color Pnno by Montlab
Pictures Relate: i dmum of Gnccom Corpora wn
(R)@> FEATURE AT...
2:11 4:04 5:57
7:53 9:50

WANTED
URGENT! NEED a ride to and from
Pensacola. Leave here 2 pm Thurs.
Nov. sth or early the 6th. Call Dave
at 392-7360 after noon. (C-3t-32-p)
HELP WANTED
EXPERIENCED DELIVERY BOYS
NEEDED. $1.60 per hour also
waitresses. Campus Cone Ice Cream
Shoppe. (E-st-28-p)
Vlviane Woodard Cosmetics has
openings for women interested in
exciting new makeup techniques.
Three hours dally can earn S4O-SIOO
weekly. Call Cindy 378-9879.
(E-st-29-p)
Desk clerk over 21 yrs of age night
shift midnight to 700 am. Saturday
noon till midnight in person Tom
Sawyer Motel (E-st-31-p)
Business Opportunity. Experience
not needed, we train. Be your own
boss, work your own hours. Rewards
limited only by your ambition. Call
for time/place of next opportunity
meeting. 378-9987 after 5:00 pm.
(E-lt-32-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -100 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* ft
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X-w-I-XvX^^
AUTOS
64 Dodge, 6 cyl, automatic, rad,
heat, good tires, sound mechanically,
care free transportation, $449 Mike
373-1924 anytime Number 23
tanglewood (G-st-28-p)
Acres* Frsw The Moll
ADM. SIOO
warn
Elizabeth Tfcylor
Mention t*M art for seoeUl early I
yrtee of at eeott every n*t Nfow g M l 1 ',-^1
PM. enO Set. A ton. Mitineet fteeoter Lllllinn *'' 1
Vrlcr tl VmthooM No tl.tt R** lU Uy MMM I
PtMMgtOSOja^



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

SHOWS 1:30 3:10 I
5:10-7:10-9:10 j^fl
i cm ckmtr LAST
Half jfJaISM Q y 3
wsTTwim itAffn days
PATTON-2:00 j i.
b;IQ,jL2S i
Jy'GeorgeC.
Scott's
m portrayal
1/ a
if ~ NY Da '* y
V KARL
X. MALDENV^r
Pwwhwi OwhmtvUU |
tl W.
SHOWS-1:30 J >k
4:00 6:30 9:00
ADULTS 1/ LAST 2 DAYS
$1.25 f( H
child I The ultimate
s,s I trip in sight
II and sound!
KTtTiWB
T|
1\ experience in Jm

Todays
more for your money meal
.moisons
CRFETERIP
p T
| TUESDAY'S FEATURE |
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
I ALL YOU CAN EAT
t! 99< j
I I WEDNESDAY'S J
i I FEATURE 5
a J SAVORY BEEF STEW ~
, WITH v |
RICE / TV I
L
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING
moisons
I CAFETERIA ..beyond comparison I
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

AUTs
f/ 0 ead truck converted to camoer
VB, auto, air con, toilet irp
sundeck with latter to roof $i oo^
?G-5 b t e 2 st P r fer caM j e3 7 -^
AUSTIN HEALEY SPRITE IQfi7
Radio, heater, tonneau. Low mileaae
New battery brakes. snoo?r 2rt
Offer 392-0528 392-0560 (G-a&nS
seM- M^e?ffirt 595 16,900 mi
sell- perfect cond. wire wheels
*" neau cover 1002 W. University
Mike Austin 376-8941 (G-st-31-r) V
FANTASTIC!!!!! 1966 GTO conv
m a C ni Cnt c ondition h '9h performance
Mailed. J? 1 Se sacrifice
392-8153 (G-st-31-p)
65 MGB good condition, must sell,
need money, $925, might consider
trade for cycle and cash Ph
372-5006 (G-3t-31-p)
"
1970 Volvo 6 mo old blue $2300
Call 372-0947 or 392-1479
(G-st-32-p)
1970 Maverick, Gold and In excellent
condition. Campus Credit Union,
1200 S.W. sth Avenue. Mr. Nellinger
(G-st-28-p)
1968 Volkswagen fastback. Campus
Credit Union, 1200 S.W. sth Avenue.
Mr. Nellinger (G-st-28-p)
PERSONAL
Weaver Hall loves Tobert Five!
(J-lt-32-p)
Hate to cookTToo poor for an apt?
CLO has openings for the winter
quarter. $195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 373-1622 (J-22t-30-p)
The Student Senate may be able to
help you. Dave Depew, 373-2771,
will listen to your problems. I need
to know your problems! Speak out!
(J-st-31-p)
COMPUTER DATING Why Walt?
Meet your ideal date. Special
introductory price. Now serving
leading colleges and universities
throughout the US and Canada.
Write: National Cybernetics, Box
221, Durham, N.C. 27702 (J-Bt-31-p)
HELP! Newly-wed couple NEEDS
REASONABLY priced
APARTMENT to rent starting
December or January. Please call
Dave, nights. 373-3924 (J-st-30-p)
INTERESTED IN EARNING
EXTRA MONEY? We need a student
who owns an old school bus. Contact
Campus Cone Ice Cream Shoppe.
(J-st-28-p)
Os ~
ALPHONSE ZULLI league says great
day subterranean CHE. Save your
bullwinkllan money, the moose will
rise again hello to white-wells
enterprizes J. Bagonia (J-lt-31-p)

Tuesday, November 3.1970, The Florida Alligator,

~ jm I
...... pER SONA L
Samson needs volunteer to work with
Cub Scout pack in Lakeshore male,
21, 2 hr meeting per week with 10-11
yr o!d boys. Call 392-1608
(J-3t-30-p)
Tired of poor impersonal BICYCLE
service and high prices. Try the
PSYCLE SHOP. 1230 NW 3rd Ave.
New & used sales & repair now open
10-7 (J-st-28-p)
What Supernatural method created
the holy inscription on the curb 34in
S.W. off the Library East sign? The
Great Newt. (J-lt-32ip)
Rick wish I could fly south now
with the rest of "the birds Robyn
(J-lt-32-p)
SINGLE MALES & FEMALES! Me
more members of the opposite sex at
U.F. All dates in Gainesville. Most
dates with U.F. Students. Details
mailed in plain unmarked envelope.
For free details write: Nationwide
Dating Service, P.O. Box 77346,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-15t-24-p)
The uninformed and ill advised
always seem to vote. Make your voice
heard for better government. VOTE
on Tuesday. (Paid for by Students
for ASKEW) (J-3t-30-p)
I-:-:-:-:::-:::::::::::::::::::::::::-:;:-:.:.:-:-:-:.:-;-:-:-:-:-:-;.
LOST <& FOUND
Lost pair of octagon shaped, amber
colored womens glasses in red glass
case. Please help a blind person to
see. Contact Diane at 373-2979
(L-st-29-p)
SERVICES
Typing-former New York secretary
Bklyn college grad-55 cents page &
up-term papers, theses, dissertations
373-1984 9-5, 373-1429 after 6
(M-Bt-31-p)
FLY! No more long trips! Weekend
trips from G-ville to Ft. Myers and
points between. For Information
378-8329 after six (M-3t-32-p)
Charles Chips Campus Delivery
Potato Chips Pretzels Cookies Order
before 2 pm Dally Minimum Order 3
Containers 376-6943 (M-st-29-p)
For once In your life, plan ahead:
reserve a seat to get to New York
over Christmas on a privately
chartered greyhound bus. Our price
beats all commercial modes of
transportation: S6O round trip! Call
the New York Holiday club 5-7 pm.
378-6376 (M-st-27-p)

*2kv'\StW9S
The Quarterly is here and the waiting is over. The Quarterly is here I
I with fiction and poetry that are alive today, written by people that are I

Page 13

SERVICES
MATH TUTORING. Specializing in
correcting basic defficiencies. Phone
372-3890 or 378-4066 (M-st-28-p)
We're wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now! Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)

!
1 (\fi AQON ARtJ y Mu*t Be 18 Year, of I
to Enter & Prove it! I
JjIIVJ j .M&
' f I 'Hh .* f'/'*W '?? Vfflk
I IbPLEASURES*^^^^^|
bPLEASURES*^^^^^| IbPLEASURES*^^^^^|


SERVICES
HORSES BOARDED sleepy hollow
horse farm complete care finest
facilities new barn pasture trails and
lighted ring close to Univ. Ph
373-1059 (M-st-29-p)
-ORGAN LESSONS. Professional
organist specializing in popular
music. $3.50 per half hour. Phone
372-3890 or 378-4066. (M-st-28-p)
Plano teacher for beginers of age 5 &
up. or advanced students. Certified
teacher from Miami. Lower rate for
first 3 calls. 372-1156 (m-st-29-p)



Page 14

i, Tha Florida Allisr, TuwOy, Nawwhir 3,1970

Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

MID TERMS SCHEDULED
All students are expected to
report for the following tests
and to bring No. 2 lead pencils.
They will be required to use
Social Security numbers.
CY 201 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CY 201 will be given Wed., Nov.
4 at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-C report to Little
101 or 109; D-F to Little 113,
121, or 125; G-N to Matherly 2,
3,4, 5,6, 7,8, 9,10,11,12,13,
14, or 16; O-Z to Matherly 102,
105, 108, 111, 113, 115, 116,
117,118, or 119.
(7 >
MS 201 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
MS 201 will be given Tuesday,
Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. All students
report to Walker Auditorium.
MS 204 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
MS 204 will be given Tuesday,
Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. All students
report to Walker Auditorium.
CPS 121,12 Y MID-TERM
\
The mid-term examination for
CPS 121 (including 12Y) will be
given Thursday, Nov. 5 at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A report to Bryan
Hall 120 or 201; Bto Little 101
or 109; C to Architecture and
Fine Arts 4,8, 14. 16, 213, or
219; D-E to Little 113, 121 or
125; F to Little 201, 203, 205,
or 207; G to Little 213, 215,
217, 219, or 221; H to Little
223, 225, 227, 223,235 or 239.
Others report as follows l-L to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13. 14 or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110 or
112; to Floyd 104, 106 or
m; nm Flint 101,102 110 or
112; S to Walker Auditorium;
T-V to Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18
f 20; W-Z to Walker

I Low Interest Rates Still Available aPgIiBiM^BIiGjMEBA.
interest oe Credit Union loans never exceeds 1% per month on unpaid balance
Reduced rates available for new car loans, FHA title I Itome Improvement ~ ~
loans, and Share loans
CaD 392-0393 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
I GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
>HMi JJours^Wo2J^Jb3^jjij^onda^rtjroog^Fndojj^ i 2^ -I JSEL

LETTER TO STUDENTS
FROM PRES. O'CONNELL
There are presently 141 student
positions on University
Committees. These committees
assist in developing policy
recommendations for the
University, It is vital that
students be represented on
them. All students willing to
serve on University committees
are urged to give their names in
writing to either my office or to
Student Government along with
qualifications and specific areas
of interest they may have.
Student Government has been
urging students to volunteer to
serve on committees. The
response has been poor;
therefore, this additional urging.
University committees with
student appointments include:
Constitutional and Senate
Committees: curriculum,
libraries and student petitions.
Presidential Committees:
intercollegiate athletics,
University budget, campus
planning and land use, lake use
and preservation, academic
regulations, admissions, junior
colleges, appeals committee for
admissional denial based on
conduct, fraternity-sorority
house plans and construction,
placement, student affairs,
student financial aid, student
organizations and social affairs,
Wauburg committee, parking
and transportation and
commencement.
Other presidential committees
include: public functions policy,
building construction priorities,
creative and fine arts, space
utilization, academic schedules
and calendar, honors programs,
teaching evaluation,
disadvantaged students, campus
student housing, off-campus
housing, student cooperative
housing, board of managers, J.
Wayne Reitz Union, student
conduct, student publications
civil defense and safety.
STUDENT LOAN FUNDS
Florida State Student Loan
Funds have arrived for those
students whose names were on
the second requisition. Those
students should report directly
to the Student Depository, the
Hub, to obtain their money.

Page of' Record
Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

INTERNATIONAL CLUB
A campus International Club has
been established with the
purpose of organizing social,
cultural and fraternal activities.
The main aim of the
organization is to promote
mutual understanding through
personal contact. Membership is
open to students, staff and
faculty (including Americans).
Announcements for program
and activities schedules will be
made on this page after
mid-terms. Anyone interested in
joining the group may contact
Kulwant Singh, president,
telephone 372-0613.
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF
TEACHERS
Dick Hixson, the director of the
College and University Section
of the American Federation of
Teachers, will speak on
"Collective Bargaining for
College Teachers" on
Wednesday, Nov. 4 at 4 p.m. in
the Union Aud.
SURPLUS ITEMS
Surplus items are available for
inspection at the Property
Warehouse. Department
representatives may inspect the
equipment between 8 a.m. and
12 noon, and 1 p.m. and 5 p.m.
any Thursday. Items available
include tables, work benches,
chairs, desks, lamps, beds, and
lab stations.
SOCIAL SECURITY
MATCHING CONTRIBUTIONS
Social Security matching
contributions for employers will
increase from 4.8 per cent to 5.2
per cent on Jan. 1,1971.
Therefore, on contract and
grants budget worksheets, it will
be necessary to compute Fringe
Benefits (in the Salary Category)
at 9.2 per cent (4.0 per cent for
State Retirement and 5.2 per
cent for Social Security) of
non-academic (Career-Service)
salaries.
The rate for academic
employees under Teacher
Retirement reamains at 6.25 per
cent.

university calendar

Tuesday, Nov. 3
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, Union
123, 7:30 p.m.
Young Republicans Meeting,
Union 347,8 p.m.
Florida Baroque Ensemble,
Union Aud., J.S. Bach, 'The
Musical Offering", 8:15 p.m.
Open Discussion on Organic
Food, Lounge 122,123, 7:15
p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 4
Discussion on Occupational and
Physical Therapy, Speaker:
Major Betty Landon, Health
Center, Room A 93 at 11:15
a.m. Room M 321 at 1:25
p.m.
Open Forum Discussion, Plaza,
12 Noon
American Federation of
Teachers, Richard Hixon,
"Collective Bargaining for
College Teachers", Union
Aud., 4 p.m.
Union Chess Tournament, Union
150 C&D, 7 p.m.
Rathskeller Movie, You Can't
Cheat an Honest Man", 7:30
p.m.
Epsilon Mathematics Club
Meeting, Union 150 B, 7:30
p.m.
Gator Saild Club Meeting, Union
346, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Engineering Society
Meeting, Union 118, 7:30
p.m.

$1.25?
I We 11... yes. The magazine is $1.25.
I But it's not for us. That's not so much to 1
llt goes for paper and ink pay for free expression. |
and production work and fj J
other things you need if HuTUM
youjegoingic.ma.ea j
So the expression is free. **
I we only did it for you |

Notices for the University Calendar
may be submitted to the Student
Activities desk, third floor of Reitz
Union or mailed to the Public Func Functions
tions Functions Office, G-72, Reitz Union. Dead Deadline
line Deadline for the Tuesday Alligator is the
previous Friday at noon; for the
Friday Alligator, the previous Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday at noon.

Thursday, Nov. 5
Student Florida Education
Association Meeting & Film,
Union 346, 7:30 p.m.
A.S.C.E. Meeting, Union 349,
7:30 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, Union 357, 8 p.m.
Rathskeller Show, live band,
8:30 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 6
Union Movie, "Hard Days
Night", Union Aud., 5:30, 8,
10:30 p.m.
Block and Bridle, Little
International, Livestock
Pavillion, 5:45 p.m.
Federation of Cuban Students
Discussion on Cuba's "Past
and Present", Union 361, 8
p.m.
Gator Football Films, Union
Aud., 8 p.m.
Rathskeller Show, live band,
8:30 p.m.
Union Play, 'To Be Young,
Gifted & Black", University
Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Union Dance, "Birnam Wood",
Union Ballroom, 8:30 p.m.



The
Florida
Alligator

CURFEW VIOLATION
Franco, Buchanan Suspended

By PHIL PETTUOHN
Alligator Sports Editor
Two of Florida's starting
players, including the Gators'
second leading scorer, have been
suspended for the remainder of
the season for violating curfew
regulations.
Richard Franco, the Gators
kicking specialist and Richard
Buchanan, a starting linebacker
were informed of the suspension
by head coach Doug Dickey
Monday morning.
They will miss the Gators' last
three scheduled games.
BUCHANAN AND Franco
were suspended for violation of
training regulations," Dickey
said in a prepared statement. I
regret the loss to the football
team.
Franco is the Gators' second
highest scorer with 29 points on
three of five field goal attempts
and 20 of 21 extra point tries.
Buchanan has been starting at
weak side linebacker since after
the opening game with Duke,
when he was moved to second
team for not learning his plays.
DICKEY REFUSED to go
into details, but said the pair had
been warned before.
Buchanan was one of several
plavers suspended last season for
vjjir
RICHARD FRANCO
... second leading scorer

WHOS KIRKS CLERK?
In Sept. Alachua Countians Nominated...
Democrats:
Reubin Askew.Jor Governor
Lawton Chiles... for U.S. Senate
Perman Roberts... for Clerk of the Circuit Court
Republicans:
Jack Eckerd for Governor
The APPOINTED Clerk Is Claude Kirk's ChoiceWhos Yours?
Give a Young Family Man a Chance
ELECT J. PERMAN
J ROBERTS grs
HI CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE >fo)
Your vote & support will be appreciated f
Pol. Ad. Pd. for by J. Perman Roberts, Campaign Fund.

GATOR SPORTS

\ "W*
JACK YOUNGBLOOD
... will share kicking
the North Carolina State game
after a curfew violation.
They will be welcome back
to the team next year, Dickey
said. But for now they have
been moved to rooms not
located in the middle of the rest
of the team in Yon Hall.
THE PAIR reportedly did not
return to their rooms by 2 a.m.
Saturday night.
Ive never been warned
about curfew, Franco said.
But I didn't come back all
night. It not only hurts myself,
but my team and the coaches
who depended on me.
m m
m Wm V
Sr JO
RICHARD BUCHANAN
. weak side linebacker

JIM KELLY
... moves to linebacker
The players were not together
on the night of the violation.
YOURE SUPPOSED to be
in bed, with the lights off and
the door closed at curfew time,
Buchanan said. I was about a
half an hour late.
Neither Buchanan nor Franco
have been involved in the recent
player disputes.
Jim Kelley and Brad Powell
will work at Buchanans
linebacker spot.
SOCCER-STYLE kicker
George Wester will handle the
kickoffs and may work on field
goals. Defensive end Jack
Youngblood, who has done
some kicking for the Gatois
before, will kick extra points
and field goals.
The Gatois have passed the
height of their schedule, but still
have games with Georgia in
Jacksonville next Saturday,
Kentucky the following week in
Tampa and Miami here after an
open weekend.
We (the team) had a long
talk today and we are looking
for the answer, to the problems
that have affected us, Dickey
said. We do not need
complainers or people who shift
the blame.
Haivin Clark and Ted Hager

Marty Parimuttar
Executive Sports Editor

Tuaaday, Nov mb or 3,1970, Tho Florida Alligator,

returned to the defensive
secondary Monday. The team
practiced in shorts and shoulder
hewmeei
GolfClri
STUDBIT MMKRSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR S2S TAX
SPECIAL RATI
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL OAY
WEEKENDS S 3 ALL DAY
For information caff
JjL 3 76 0080
O IZONWOOP
Nf )*t* AVINM < if M

SALES
808 STACY ,lUC service WSM
370-9222 PARTS WXIM
accessories
CAMPUS REP
MILLER-BROWN MOTORS
Bi fIHH 4222 N. W. 13TH ST. 370*4592
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
\ MftUO
MKHIMKI
Students Friend
Specializing in tuns ups General
Auto Repair and Contain.
Free Estimates -Al Work Guaranteed
1031 So. Main St. Pit. 378-8632
[Cwitnl Ch>ml IBank Am fleam] [MtrtirChiinl
la Be Yau/Kg, Gifted, and B lmk
By Lorraine Hansberry
'THAT MARVELOUS LAUGH. That marvelous
face. She was my sister and my comrade... on the
same side of the barricades, listening to the
accumulating thunder of the hooves of horses and
the treads of tanks. A very young woman with an
overpowering vision ... She was not trying to 'make
it'-she was trying to keep the faith."
James Baldwin, ESQUIRE
Lorraine Hansberry's story was last year's
longest-running off-Broad way hit. The same New
York company will perform here on Thursday,
November 5 at 8:30 p.m. in the University
Auditorium.
Tickets on sale now at the Constans Box Office $1.50 &
$2.50 students $2.00 & $3.50 non-students.
Sponiofd by th> J. Wayna Raltz Union

Phil Petttyohn
Sports Editor

pads.
No changes were made in the
offensive line.
/'Your Gooorotor\
£ OVERHAULED SmcM%
s£so I
INC LABOR
ALAI^TOSWty
GENERATOR SERVICE
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARO.
Mon.Frl. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm
378-4011

Page 15



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, November 3,1970

CAGE COACH HAS HIGH HOPES
Bartlett Gears For Rebuilding Year

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
Rebuilding the Gator
basketball team is the primary
aim of coach Tommy Bartlett
for the 1970-71 season after
suffering through his first losing
year as a basketball coach last
season.
Bartlett is counting on juniors
Jeff Miller, Jerry Hoover, Dan
Boe and Earl Findley to bring
the Gators up to the black side
of the ledger in the won-lost
column.
LAST YEAR, five of our
seven players posting the most
playing time were sophomores,
Barlett said at the opening of
practice. And, that playing
experience will help us alot this
year.
Although the Gators height is
not the best (Gary Waddell is the
tallest on the team at 6-foot-10),
Bartlett feels he has a fine
shooting squad.
Tony Miller is just as good a
shooter as Pete Maravich,
Bartlett boasted. If Maravich
and Miller were in a contest for

liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuiiiiiiimiiwiwiiiiiiiniiiUHiHiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiig
Intramurals

An inspired effort by Sigma
Nu in the finals of Orange
League volleyball almost broke
the backs of heavily favored
Sigma Chi. But the Chis pulled it
out in the third game of a best
of three championship to win
the volleyball crown and move
into first place.
The Sigma Chis were forced
to come from behind to salvage
an 18-16 overtime win in the
first game only to be stopped in
the second game, 15-12. Great
defensive work on the part of
the Nus enabled them to win the
game. The spiking of Alan
Simonsen and Richard Reep
were also instrumental in the
victory.
The Sigma Chis got their big
horses running in the third game
where Frank Saier, Gary Keller,
and Chip Thome blasted the
Chis to a 15-3 win.
AS TO THE question of how
good the Nus really were, big
Frank Saier of Sigma Chi, the
leagues premier player, said the
Nus could have beaten any
team in the tournament that
night.
They played outstanding
against us tonight and probably
had an off night in their
unimpressive victory over
AEPi, Saier said.
In the Blue League, Chi Phi
moved back into first place on
the strength of a volleyball
THINK!
your own home,
- fully furnished,
complete setnjp
in perk of your
choice.
LOW DOWN, LOW MONTHLY
3600.00
only at
Mustang*^
MOBHJE HOMES wa\
4820 N.W. 13th St 378-1346

JEFF MILLER
... 'good as Maravich'
shots made from a point on the
floor, it would be a close
contest, he said.
MILLER, a 6-foot-l guard,

championship win over second
place Delta Tau Delta. The Chi
Phis now lead the Delts by 10
points. The Chis beat the Delts
15-7 and 15-9 to take the
championship.
Chi Phi, Delta Tau Delta, and
Theta Chi seem to be
monopolizing the league with
Delta Upsilon 100 points back.
All dorm and independent
intramural students who have
not received schedules for their
sports should stop by the

I Introduces The I
I Post Homecoming I
Student Financial Aid Program!
TuesdayCafeteria LineLunch/Dinner
Scalloped Beef&Potatoes 45(1
I Largo slice off Cake 15(1
I Coffee 9( I
I Wednesday 1
I CkkkeaSMoodlos 45(1
I Apple or Cherry Cobbler 15(1
I Coffee & I
HOURS I Located Conveniently I HOURS I
|a:46>jw. 12;00 p.m.|Across From Murphree Aroo|e ;
Roger Peace from Coral Gables,
Tim Fletcher and Mark
Thompson bring to the varsity a
solid carp of sophomores which
Bartlett says could help us
considerably.
Peace led the freshmen in
rebounding last year despite his
6-foot-l height.
Thompson gives you 101 per
cent all the time while Fletcher
is more of a playmaker,
Bartlett said.
THE GATORS lost only one
person from last years line-up,
that being high scoring Andy
Owens due to graduation. But
injuries, an old enemy of
Bartlett, are still around.
Waddell suffered a back injury
last season and never came back
to his best again. Ed Lucko is
also recovering from last year
when he hurt his thumb in the
first game of the year and never
recovered his precision shooting
skill.
The SEC will look about like
last year, Bartlett said summing
up his chances for the
conference title. Kentucky still
has players lined up three deep

Intramural Department to pick
them up.
Womens Tennis is almost
upon us. Entrees must be in the
Intramural Office by 5 p.m.
today. Squads consist of three
girls including one singles and
one doubles team. Each dorm
can enter an unlimited number
of squads. All interested persons
are advised to contact the
Intramurals Chairman in their
dorm to sign up.

and they have to be considered
the number one contender.
Tennessee will be strong if
its transfer comes through, and
dont count LSU out because
they lost Maravich. They have an
outstanding sophomore coming
ROD-REEL & GUN SHOP
WE FIXTRADESELL
ARCHERY-PISHING -HUNTING
I 378-1696 I
1223 E. UNIVERSITY AVE.
11

Blue CrossBlue Shield
Insurance Identification Cards Must Be
Picked Up Tuesday/Wednesday
November 3rd or 4th.
In Room 331 J. Wayne Reitz Union Between
9:00 am and 4:30 pm.
IN ORDER TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR BLUE
CROSS-BLUE SHIELD BENEFITS YOU MUST HAVE
YOUR IDENTIFICATION CARD.
rr seems
THE SUCKERS
WANT AN
EVEN BREAK.
The realization that the public does
not like to be taken has taken a lot of
manufacturers by surprise.
Toasters that suddenly wont toast
suddenly wont be tolerated.
Nor will toys that break before
noon on Christmas day. (Weve
been raising a whole generation of
kids who think Santas workmanship
is terrible.)
People are showing their contempt
for cars that break down on the way
home from the showroom, too.
Theyre buying Volvos.
Volvos are built to last. Exactly
how long, we dont guarantee. But we
do know that 9 out of every 10
registered here in the last eleven years
are still on the road.
At Volvo, the new consumerism
is nothing new. We were for it before
anybody ever heard of it.
And if there is a sucker bom every
minute, you couldnt prove it by us.
They must be buying wj
something else.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS
506 E. University
4
Your Now Volvo
Dealer in Gainesville
Vjfj -* *- r r >=- vrrrrrm w r-sf t

up this year which will be a big
help to their title chances,
Bartlett said.
The season begins Dec. 1 for
the young Gators against
Samford at Florida Gym.
I RED PM qX I
MIGHT flu
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA