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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Vol. 63, No. 30

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The
Florida Alligator
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THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Friday, October 30, 1970



Homecoming Gets A New Image

By GLENDA COHN
AWgstor Staff Writer
Homecomu% as a time of fun and
frolic has given way and the new age of
Hamecamiiig as confrontation has been
bom at UF.
Those who are responsible for getting
Home craning off the ground have
expressed the feeling that the weekend
should be a time when students confront
alumni with the problems they feel are
important.
BECAUSE HOMECOMING is the only
time when alumni in large numbers return
to their alma mater, it is the most logical
time to get together, discuss problems
and show the alumni that the students are
concerned, or so the reasoning goes.
But there is no universal agreement on
the means of achieving the goals.
Some say tire frivolity of Homecoming
is a waste of opportunity. Others say
Home coating should be both entertaining
and relevant. Everyone admits the word
relevant is trite, but it is appropriate.
THE THEME OF Homecoming and of
Gator Growl speak for the feeling of the
event.
The Homecoming slogan, chosen on a
basis of awareness and relevance to the
7os, is Gators Create a New Decades
Fate.
The Growl theme, Hope for
America, reflects the change in Growl
from a collection of inside fraternity
jokes to a satirical look at America.
Florida Blue Key President Steve Zack
said Homecoming is a time to get to
know one another.
There are 65,000 people on campus,
representatives of all the major state

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Whats Happening This Weekend :
Parade
Gator Growl
JMBA skits
Colonnade displays
Alumni breakfast
Football game
Parties, parties, parties
Whats Happening Next Week:
Hangovers
Midterms

TIME FOR CONFRONTATION

newspapers and most of the major
television networks. We should use
Homecoming for erasing some of the lines
that are drawn during the year between
the various segments of the University
community.
JEFF WARREN, general chairman of
Homecoming, explained this years
changes as not in the activities, but in the
message.
In the past the alumni came back and
saw only the superficial things
decorations, floats and so forth.
This year they will come back and see
the students concern over the war. racial
problems, the environment and other
issues, he said.
THE GOOD TIMES are not to be
ignored, but Homecoming can be used to
express the ideas of the students at the
same time, he said.
It is important to try to bridge the
gap of communications, not to cover it
up.
WARREN EXPLAINED that this year
greater efforts are being made to
co-ordinate Gator Growl skits to unify
the program more and emphasize relevant
problems.
Students are being urged to attend the
Alumni Barbeque so they can meet the
alumni.
The time and effort the housing areas
have spent on house decorations in the
past will hopefully be spent on such
activities as inviting underprivileged
children to spend Homecoming weekend
with the students, Warren said.
GATOR GROWL is undergoing
changes this year to allow more students
to participate and to make the program

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fit in with the Hope tor America
theme.
Miles Wilkin, executive producer of
Growl, said he and his staff are working
more closely with skit contestants this
year than was done in the past.
Scripts are being submitted to the
Growl staff so inside jokes can be
eliminated and skits can be tied in closely
with the overall theme.
WE ARE NOT censoring, Wilkins
said.
This is a process for working with the
organizations to help them reach the
standards we are trying to achieve. We are
interested in quality and relevance to
what the students want.
The elimination of inside jokes is part
of the appeal to the whole audience to sit
up and recognize problems, he said.
INSIDE MATERIAL has no place,
and if a skit is just a series of dirty jokes
its not appropos to Growl, he said.
The Growl staff is trying to get a
balance of satire and relevance in the
skits. Possible topics include pollution,
dissent, the war, racial problems, and
other current topics placed in a humorous
situation.
The other innovation in Growl is the
super-emcee, as Wilkin calls him,
Buddy Ebsen.
EBSEN ATTENDED UF, is known to
the general public and is a
conservationist. These qualities make him

Homecoming.
A time for students to
forget they are students a
time for alumni to
remember when they were.
A happy time for most.
A time of football, parties,
skits and fun.
A time to store up
memories and laughs and
for some, more tender
things.
Yes, homecoming is a
nice time.

IN DEPTH

UnTverlty of Florida 5 he o,ficia udnt newspaper of the
June I Juit and August iSJn f.f b K^ ed fiVC times week| V except during
noMdays and exam phW Shed semi w eekly, and during student
C? their authors f na L S represent only the official opinions
Union Building Universitv r>f eS Fi nd ,f nCe to the F,orida Alligator, Reitz
AHlgatoMs r,da i Gai "esvi.le. Florida 32601. The
at Gainesville, Florida S matter at the United States,Post Office
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and o
The Florida Alligator reserves the r? n hf 3 , per Quarte^
tone of all advertisements and to revse or tum 9 *** the ty k9 raph cal
objectionable. rev se or turn away copy it considers
The Florida Alligator will not mntirt.,
advertisement involving typographic r !J u n S ments of P ayments for any
notice is given to tfte advertising err prs or erroneous insertion unless
advertisement "appears. Rortda 1m25 Withi (1) one day after the
more than one incorrect insertionof?l ''! not be r esponsible for
several times. Notices for m ?, d J ei L tlSement schedu,ed to run
insertion. : correction must be given before the next
fl 1 / f

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 30,1970

Page 2

an excellent choice for emcee, Wilkins
said.
The sweetheart contest also has some
new features this year, according to
Sweetheart Chairman Mike Malone.
Grades and activities are now
categories for the contestants so the
Homecoming Sweetheart will be not a
beauty queen but the perfect,
-.veil-rounded co-ed.
Mark Grayson, chairman of the parade
committee, said the parade will be
different this year because many of the
floats will be in the protest vein.
Because there will be no house
decorations and the floats will be
displayed in the housing areas after the
parade, the floats should be better than
ever, he said.
STUDENT BODY President Steve
Uhlfelder sees the changes in
Homecoming this year as still not
reaching the goal of what Homecoming
should be.
The alumni who come to
Homecoming are the ones who have been
responsible for some of our problems
today by not meeting them when they
were here.
We must make them aware of what
they have placed upon us, he said.
UHLFELDER EARLIER in the year
suggested eliminating Homecoming
completely until there could be a
Homecoming for all Gls.
Dialogue between students and alumni
is Uhlfelders vision of Homecoming.
We have to try to influence these
people to have more of an interest in the
university than coming back to get drunk
and have a good time.
HE SAID THERE may be a program
soon in which alumni come back during
the year to discuss problems, but that
Homecoming is still a golden
opportunity to be used to its full
potential.
Eddie Floyd, Alumni Association field
secretary, disagreed that Homecoming
should be a time of confrontation.
He said that alumni need to get
together with students so they can be
aware of the problems, but another time
would be better.
HOMECOMING would be a good
opportunity to pose problems and
announce to the alumni plans for a day in
the spring for a student-alumni
conference, Floyd said.
He praised UF alumni as being more
concerned than most other alumni
groups.
Protests within the context of
Homecoming might be helpful if handled
properly, Floyd said.
You dont alienate the ones you want
to help you, he said.
He suggested protesting in away that
would appeal to establishment alumni.
Id like to see a float in the parade
Id like to see it be the biggest and best
float called Problems of Our Times
with demonstrators on it with big banners
for everyone to see, protesting whatever
they want.



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... looks like fun

Nominees Join Parade At UF

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writar
This year, nominees from both the
Democratic and Republican parties will
join the floats and clowns in the
Homecoming parade.
According to Homecoming Parade
Chairman Mark Grayson, the
Homecoming parade will attract the
Democratic party nominee for governor
Reuben Askew and UJS. Senate Candidate
Lawton (the walking senator) Chiles.
Gov. Claude Kirk and William C. Cramer
Republican nominees for governor and
U. S. Senate will also join the parade.
LEADING THE parade will be Grand
Marshall Spessard Holland, retiring
U. S. senator whose seat Chiles and
Cramer are vying for.
Todays parade will start on W.
University Avenue, west of the stadium,
and march 22 blocks to Main Street in
downtown Gainesville where it will
disperse.
Grayson said campus organizations are
providing the 38 floats participating in

Why do you think
Homecoming is funny,
its never been funny/
the big-wig said, striking
a match on the bottom
of his shoe and lighting
his cigar and looking out
the window of his Tigert
Hall office.

Homecoming

iElrhrouah Gator Growl

EVERYBODY LOVES
... a parade
the parade. Florida high schools will be
represented by more than 30 marching
bands during the Homecoming event.
THEY WILL BE led by the Gator

By JEFFRY KLINKENBERG
Alligator Aaaociata Editor

There is nothing funny about
Homecoming.
I looked and looked. Through old
copies of The Alligator, I looked, with
hopes of finding something smileable. I
talked to people.
THERES NOTHING funny about
Homecoming, stupid, they told me, in
unison.
The managing editor wanted to see
me. Hey you, whats your name, I have
a story for you, the managing editor
said. Do a story capturing the humor
of Homecoming, past and present.
MY CHANCE TO show what a
newshawk I am had arrived!
There is a lot of behind-the-scenes
research that goes into such a story, and
a lot of interviews. It is an in-depth
thing.
First stop: The Alligator library.
MY INVESTIGATION of 1969
editions told me that the law, married
and medical students sitting in the
card section of the stadium had
thrown them up in anger during the.
Homecoming football game. Their idea
was to protest the Student Senates
decision to move them from their seats
at the 50 yard line to the 30. The card
section also had signs saying, Go to
hell, Shepherd. They were upset with
Charles Shepherd, then student
body president.
I called on a medical student who had
taken part in the extravaganza for some
inside stuff. You medias are always
trying to dig up the dirt, he shouted, as
he closed the door.

Funny

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writar
Four skits will be part of this years
Gator Growl.
Growl which has been termed by
its officials the largest student-produced
show in the world was criticized in
the past for its lack of relevance, but this
year a change has come.
THE THEME for this years Gator
Growl is Hope for America.
Fred Leonhardt, Growl skit chairman,
said the skits this year have shown a

marching band, and if there is time, the
Auburn band, although they may get
here too late, Grayson said.
If Buddy Ebsen, Gator Growl host,
arrives on Friday, he will also be present
during the parade.
In addition, there will be special units,
such as the Shriners, to give more color to
the parade, Grayson said.
THE PARADE this year will stress
student involvement.
I hope dorm areas, and sections, will
participate. Homecoming is supposed to
be more relevant, Grayson said. He said
any student who wishes to participate
will be given a chance.
The spirit of relevance and
participation will also be carried to the
floats. Grayson said most of them will
have a relevant message.
The parade will start at 2 p.m. Friday,
and last until the final section disperses
around 5:30 pjn.
The candidates running for office will
be permitted to appear, but they will not
be allowed to give speeches during the
parade, Grayson said.

The 1966 editions of the Alligator
told me (when 1 put my ear to them)
that 250 students had spent a sleepless
night outside the stadium, waiting to get
first crack at tickets to be sold at 8 a.m.
for the football game.
THEY HAD DRAGGED mattresses
and chaise lounges out there and even
played guitars. Pretty funny stuff. But
then some wise jock threw some water
balloons from his Yon Hall dorm. And
that was not funny at all.
You wouldnt believe what was in
those balloons, said one person
unfortunate enough to be struck by
one. Had to bum my clothes. But
thats not particularly funny.
Panic stricken, I decided to talk to
some big-wig in administration.
WHY DO YOU think Homecoming
is funny, its never been funny, the
big-wig said, striking a match on the
bottom of his shoe and lighting his cigar
and looking out the window of his Tigert
Hall office. Kind of a stupid question
if you ask me. By the way, do you want
to come to breakfast next Sunday?
Deadline was approaching. Still
nothing funny.
I thought and thought. 1 needed to
talk to someone, someone who has a
comment on anything, someone who
would have something to say about
Homecoming.
I walked into the Student
Government offices. Wheres the
big-wig? I snapped. I need some
info.
I was ushered into the big-wig's office
and seated. He entered the room.
Theres nothing funny at all about
Homecoming, he said. In fact,
Hoifcedbihirigis irrelevant." *'*'**

Friday, Octobar 30.W70, Tha Florida Alligator,

Pi Lambda Phi
Phi Mu and Delta Chi
Sigma Kappa and Chi Phi
Delta Gamma and Delta Tau Delta

distinct trend towards relevancy and
away from trite campus jokes.
Three skits will be humorous but one is
serious.
PI LAMBDA PHI fraternity will
present America, love it or leave it.
This will be a Groucho Marxian satirical
look at America.
Phi Mu and Delta Chi teamed up to
produce The Odd Couple with Richard
Nixon and Spiro Agnew being featured as
the odd pair.
The third skit is Port-O-John. This
skit is supposed to be a bowls eye view of
contemporary America presented by the
members of Chi Phi and Sigma Kappa.
THE ONLY serious skit is presented by
Delta Gamma and Delta Tau Delta.
Entitled The Trial of America, this skit
will present a confrontation between
Captain America and the American Way,
something which could be interpreted as
students against the hard hats.
The four skits were selected from a
field of 12 presented to the judges last
week.
They will be performed during growl,
starting at 8:15 tonight at Florida Field.
Pre-growl will start at 7.

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4

THE WINNERS

Page 3



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GATORS VS. WAR EAGLES
The battle of the mascots is displayed above and
right with the UF alligator and Auburn War Eagle.
The outcome of last year's game had the Eagle
killing the Gator 38-12. Will the Gator close it's
mouth around the war eagle's neck this year? Game
time is 2 p.m. Why not find out for yourself by
coming to the game.

The
Florida
Alligator

AUBURN:

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Executive Sports Editor
The tide has turned the opposite way
this year for the UF-Aubum game.
Last year the Gators went to Cliff Hare
Stadium in Auburn with a national
ranking, while the Tigers were having a
mediocre season.
The game, the first loss of the season
for the Gators, was Auburns
Homecoming game.
Added to that, the Tigers were playing
at home with the monstrous War Eagle
cheer that raised many Gator fanss
decibel level.
Now look at the rivalry game this year.
The Gators dont rank in the top ten,
while Auburn does.
Auburn has to travel this year to the
Gators* Homecoming game, just the
reverse of last year.
Last year, John Reaves was the top
passer in the Southeastern Conference,
while Auburns Pat Sullivan ranked near
the top. This year, Reaves is still number
one in the SEC, but Sullivan is closing in.
The seniors on this years Gator team
have never beaten Auburn, something
they want to change desperately.
Auburn is our Homecoming game and
as far as I remember, the home team, is
never supposed to lose a Homecoming
game. No matter how bad you are
playing, the team has to beat the visiting

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PHIL COPE
INTERCEPTIONS CAUSED LOSS
... Alvarez (45) prime receiver on play

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A Bad Word Around The Gators

B
TOMMY DURRANCE
... 'against a legend'
team on Homecoming, sophomore Willie
Jackson said.
Jackson saw last years game on
television, and what he remembers is bad.
I think the whole team was off,
Jackson said. But you can bet this year
they wont be.
The rivalry has dated back to 1912
when Auburn defeated UF 27-13. Since
then, Auburn has captured 27 victories
while losing only 17 and tieing two.
UF has beaten Auburn only twice in
the past six years with the last triumph
coming in 1966.
Last year, Reaves completed 33 of 66
passes for 369 yards, all three single game

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records in the annals of UF. However, a
larger record looms on the opposite side
for the junior quarterback from Tampa.
Reaves had nine interceptions in the
game, a National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) record. He wants to
beat Auburn even more than some of his
teammates because of those
interceptions.
They took care of us last year,
Reaves said. But that was mainly
because of my terrible playing.
We definitely have something to
prove this year against them, Reaves
said.
Reaves favorite target on pass plays
this year has been flanker Carlos Alvarez.
Alvarez, an All-American flanker last
year, caught nine passes for 83 yards
against the Tigers.
Theyll be fourth or fifth in the
nation when we play them, just the
opposite of last year, Alvarez said. And
everyone on both teams will be up for
this one.
It will have to be one of our biggest
rivalries of the year, ranking above Miami,
Georgia, and Tennessee.
For rivalry matches, the Gators past
history is not as bright as this years team.
In the grudge matches Alvarez
mentioned, only with Florida State
University have the Gators won more
games than their opponent.
Andy Cheney, who came off the injury
list for the North Carolina State game,
also mentioned rivalry when asked about
the Tigers.
Because of what they did to us last
year, I think the team will definitely play
better than they do, Cheney said.
They will be tough, better than last
year according to their rankings, but this
team has never lost on Florida Field,
Cheney said.
Scoring champ Tommy Durrance
quickly added to Cheneys thoughts.
Playing at Auburn, you are up against
a legend that the Tigers never lose at
home. But this year well beat them at
Florida Field, Durrance said.
It is the biggest game of the year for
me. A big grudge match you might call
it, he continued.

Marty Pari mutter
Executive Sports Editor

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 30,1970

Page 4

Phil Pettijohn
Sports Editor

ay fa*
Ip IKS
W it MOtiSSi
QUARTERBACK JOHN REAVES
... has something to prove with Auburn
Junior Bob Harrell from Jacksonville
has his own personal grudge with Auburn.
When I was a freshman, we lost to
Auburn. When I was a sophomore, we
lost to Auburn. But this year it will be
different.
All the guys think the same way I
do, Harrell said. Last year we were
undefeated and fired up for them, but
they really put it on us. We need to
avenge that loss. We can beat them.
Harrell sounded pretty convincing.
Jack Youngblood said, Because of
them (the seniors), I want to win the
game even more.
And since it is the Homecoming game
I believe we will beat them, the
defensive end said.
Back-up quarterback John Schnebly
adds, I am looking to Auburn more than
anything else because of what they did to
us last year.
The stage is set.
Will the tide turn to the Gator side this
year?
Can UF avenge their only loss last year,
and satisfy the seniors and their wish to
beat the Tigers?
Well know about 5 p.m. Saturday,
Bob Harrell concluded.



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Vol. 63, No. 30

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STEVE UHLFELDER
... wants athletics money rechanneled
Peace March
HC Alternative

By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Writer
A UF peace coalition is
offering an alternative to
traditional Homecoming
activities.
COALITION MEMBERS will
be marching for peace in the
Homecoming parade according
to Lynne Edelman, president of
Florida Student Movement.
Following the parade there
will be a rally in the Plaza of the
Americas. Philosophy instructor
Kenneth Megill and other
faculty members will be on hand
for discussions.
After the rally, the coalition
plans to move to the Catholic
Student Center where a peace
mass with Father Michael

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The
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Florida Alligator

Gannon will be said at 5:30 p.m.
ON SATURDAY THE
coalition will meet at the
Reasearch Library to begin
picketing the streets with
antiwar posters, Miss Edelman
said.
During the day a guerilla
theater skit will be presented
on several locations on campus.
Interested students will then
gather at 2 pjn. on the north
lawn of the Reitz Union, Miss
Edelman said. Individuals with
guitars will provide music,
singing antiwar songs and songs
of peace. There will be antiwar
poetry readings and speakers
from the various coalition
groups who will mingle with the
students.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

REGENTS MEET

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
UF Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder, in an
attempt to rechannel an annual $157,000 now used
for athletic scholarships into academics, told a
special fact-finding Board of Regents committee in
Tallahassee Thursday that big-time football is
fighting a battle for survival and losing.
UHLFELDER TOLD the committee, chaired by
Regent Louis C. Murray of Orlando, that the UF
Athletic Department now receives close to
$500,000 in direct subsidies from the state or state
agencies.
Besides these direct subsidies, the Athletic
DepartmentVreceiYes many other benefits and
hidden subsidies from the state and university, he
said.
Among these hidden subsidies Uhlfelder
included maintenance and janitorial costs at athletic
events, salaries for local and state police at games
and time lost by administrators involved with the
athletic program.
UHLFELDER SAID the Athletic Department is
supposed to be self-supporting.
He added that $157,000 is given to the univesity
annually from parimutuel betting. In addition, he
said $276,000 from the student activity fee from
student tuition goes to the athletic program.
Does the Athletic Department really need this
money? Uhlfelder asked the Regents committee.
Why cant these funds be rechannelled into
academic scholarships?
UF PRESIDENT Stephen C. OConnell then told
the committee the $157,000 the Athletic
Department receives annually from state parimutuel

Uhlfelder Presents
UF Athletics Picture

Halloween came early this year for the children
of Corry Village and Flavets when they were
tricked and treated Wednesday night by Sigma
Chi fraternity and Delta Delta Delta sorority.
Clad in their freakiest costumes, youngsters
between the ages of four and 15 were escorted
by the students to the Sigma Chi house, where
they engaged in two hours of eerie excitement.
Nearly 200 kids and several curious parents
turned out for the festivities, which featured a
house of horrors, an apple bob, a fishing booth,
fortune telling and plenty of goodies. g*
After all the prizes had been won and every
kid had gotten as much candy as he or she could fi
hold, everyone settled down to listen to ghost
stories. S
Energy spent and arms loaded, the youthful
band marched back to their homes through the
spooky night.
Photos By Phil Cop* §
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wagering is a generosity and doesnt have to be
given to the university.
Ralph Glatfelter, president of ODK, said the
funds given to the university from parimutuel
wagering are used for 70 athletic scholarships. But,
he added, the same amount of money could be used
for 280 academic scholarships.
Every time one athlete gets a scholarship, four
students are denied an education, he said.
GLATFELTER ADDED that over 1,000 students
were turned down for financial aid from UF this
year.
If the money were taken from athletics and put
into academic scholarships, those 1,000 students
could have received the funds necessary to obtain an
education, Glatfelter said.
Chuck Sherman, president of the FSU student
body, told the committee the emphasis now placed
on athletics is wasteful and immoral.
THE MONEY USED for athletic scholarships
should be given to students in need of those
funds, Sherman said.
OConnell, representing UF as the president of
the Athletic Association, urged the Board of
Regents to re-evaluate the role of athletics at the
state Universities.
OConnell added that in his opinion, the athletic
program at the UF is properly balanced.
UHLFELDER SAID the purpose of the meeting
was to reform not destroy the existing athletic
program.
Committee Chairman Murray and members
W. Hopkins of Pensacola and Mrs. E. D. Pearce of
Miami were asked by Uhlfelder to seriously
consider the proposals presented at the meeting.
A solution to the athletic controversy will be
presented by the special committee at a
forthcoming meeting.

* i

Friday, October 30, 1970



i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 30,1970

Page 6

CRISIS IN CANADA:

(EDITORS NOTE: Canada,
which prides itself on its sanity
and civility, has experienced
profound shock and change
since Oct. 5, the day a hand of
terrorists seized a British
diplomat to underscore their
violent insistence that Quebec, a
province twice die size of
France, must be freed from
the rest of Canada. UPI reporters
Terrance W. McGarry, Marie
Grebenc and Jerry J. Kambites
in Montreal and Robert Bott in
Ottawa have pieced together this
team report on Canadas crisis.)
MONTREAL (UPI) The
Portuguese maid hurries to
answer the doorbell at 1297
Redpath Crescent, a quiet street
set against the hill rising in the
center of the island city of
Montreal.
Birthday gift for Mr. Cross.
Sign here, says one of the two
men waiting at the door. The
maid does not have a pencil. A
man reaches into his pocket and
pulls a pistol. He pushes her
aside. The gift wrapping, tom
off, reveals a machinegun.
JAMES RICHARD Cross, 49,
British trade commissioner, is
taken away in a black taxi.
The phone rings at police
substation No. 10 on St. Luke
Street.
The lady sounded nervous
and hesitating. She kept starting
to say things and then changed
her mind, recalls Sgt. Seville
Brabant. First she says send
someone right away, then she
says, no, dont send anyone,
they told me not to call the
police for an hour.
BRABANT FINALLY turns
to his boss, Bernard Seguin.
The lady says its a kidnap.
Oct. 5.
In the hallway of the ornate
provincial capital in Quebec city,
reporters stop Pierre Laporte,
49, the hardworking, crusading
journalist-turned-reform
politician. A wind of folly
seems to be sweeping over
Quebec, says the minister of
labor and immigration, and I
hope it will soon subside.
Five days later, Laporte is on

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a um $ and reg. Pepsi Df
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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence-to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida AiHgator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for

Can Two Cultures Coexist?

the lawn of his home in St.
Lambert, after idly tossing a
football with a nephew,
Claude,l6, waiting for his wife
to dress for dinner out.
Two men drive up in a green
Chevrolet Biscayne, license
9J240. Pierre Laporte is
kidnaped. A communique
announcing this is to
contemptuously call him the
minister of unemployment and
assimilation. Oct. 10.
ONE WEEK later, Quebec
Premier Robert Bourassa, 37, in
office only six months after
contesting Laporte for the
Liberal party leadership, is going
on television with a final offer
to the kidnapers. A helicopter,
he will say, is standing by at the
Concordia Bridge which crosses
the St. Lawrence River to the
Expo 67 site. It will take the
kidnapers to a waiting plane, to
freedom in Cuba, he is to pledge,
if they will only turn Laporte
and Cross over to the Cuban
consulgeneral, Alfredo Ramirez,
who keeps vigil in a trailer on
the bridge.
Bourassa speaks too late.
At 7 p.m. French language
radio station CKAC had received
a call. A package is to be
found in the suburb of St.
Hubert. The call is dismissed, as
the work of cranks. An
impatient second call comes 7S
minutes later. A newsman is
directed to a death notice left
under a book in the deserted
lobby of the Place des Arts, a
new cultural center: In the face
of the arrogance of the federal
government, and of its valet
Bourassa, the FLQ has decided
to act...
A CRUDE MAP leads CKAC
men to a parking lot near the
armed forcesbase at St. Hubert.
A Chevy, 9J240, stands isolated
in the dark. Demolition men
behind a steel shield pry open
the trunk. It yields the body of
Pierre Laporte. 12:08 a.m., Oct.
18.
In that instant, Canada good,
solid, civil Canada-loses its
innocence.
Eric Hoffer, the
longshore-man-philosopher, has

analyzed fanatics in his book,
The True Believer. Only they
know the realities of poverty
and injustice. They alone know
the solution. All others
especially the Liberals
Drapeau the fog, Bourassa the
sidekick, Trudeau the tapette
(French slang for homosexual)
they are the lackeys.
BUT THE FLQ? Are they to
be considered one with Arabs in
Jordan who hijack and blow up
airplanes; with South American
guerrillas who seized diplomats
for ransom; with rock-throwers
in Ulster who forment religious
strife?
Canadians had called the FLQ
considerate revolutionaries
and teddybear terrorists for
their courtesy in warning
occupants of buildings where
they had planted bombs. True,
six had been killed by FLQ
activities since 1963, but all
inadvertently. Since 1963, there
had been almost 400 explosions
in the province 250 in
Montreal.
Now, in a moment in history
when malcontents who cannot
command majority feel their
rage justifies any tactics, the
FLQ teddybears had decided to
show their claws.
BY ONE POLICE intelligence
estimate the Front de Liberation
du Quebec numbers perhaps 120
hard-core members, many of
them school dropouts with
above average intelligence. A few
are intellectuals who quote Marx
and Mao. Some are hoodlums
with scant ideology. Most are
young.
They operate in autonomous
cells of four or five or eight
members. In their manifestoes,
they denounce the big shots,
the damned money-makers in
their Cadillacs.

To all my friends
in Gainesville
JOHNNY WINTER AND
INCLUDING:
ROCK AND ROLL, HOOCHIE KOO
NO TIME TO LIVE/AIN T THAT A KINDNESS
PRODIGAL SON/LOOK UP
C 30221*
Winter now has a new group, a new
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Available at

They seek an independent,
revolutionary socialist nation of
Quebec. Os Quebecs 6.5 million
citizens three quarters of
whom are of French heritage
perhaps 25 per cent share the
FLQ goal of independent
nationhood for Quebec, which is
bigger than Alaska, and twice
the size of France.
THE SEPARATISTS,
grievances, bitterly held, predate
Lincolns Emancipation
Proclamation.
Rural, provincial, artisan,
taught by the Roman Catholic
church to work the soil and
forsake the pursuit of profit,
educated in the arts and not the
sciences, held back for years by
the inbred tyranny of the
government of Premier Maurice
Duplessis, who was Canadas
Huey Long, the French long
have felt themselves second class
citizens, a majority in Quebec
dominated by an Anglais
minority.
They felt ruled by the
English-speaking bankers and
civil servants and by
American-owned industry. In
dismay, they saw their children
desert the soil and heritage of
Quebec and move elsewhere.
IN 1967, Charles de Gaulle
shouted Vive le Quebec Libre!
Long live free Quebec from
the balcony of Montreals City
Hall and gave Quebec separatism,
an international legitimacy.
Ottawa has not forgiven.
Prime Minister Pierre Elliott
Trudeau, a French-Canadian
committed to keeping Canada
whole, sought to strengthen
federalism and biculturalism.
In Quebec City, premier
Bourassa advicated
Frenchification of industry
and education. The separatists
deplore them as vendus
sellouts, turncoats to the French

cause.
AND SO PERHAPS inspired
by the Palestinians hijackings,
they strike-taking first Cross,
the symbol of the old racist
colonial power, and then
Laporte, the symbol, perhaps, of
an intolerable English-French
coexistence.
The FLQ seeks to demoralize
and shatter a nation; Trudeau
will not be trapped. He plays it
cool. A day after Cross is
abducted, the prime minister is
the relaxed host at a party at 24
Sussex Drive, the Canadian
White House, mixing genially
with members of parliament and
their wives.
Top officials in Ottawa insist
that not for an instant did the
government consider giving in to
the demands of the bandits.
ENUNCIATED IN THE first
of a stream of FLQ
communiques, the demands
are: Release of 23 political
prisoners whose crimes range
from murder to bombing;
$500,000 ransom in gold; an
airliner to fly the political
prisoners to Algeria or Cuba;
identification of a police
informer who had turned in
FLQ members; publicity in
newspapers and on television;
broadcast of the 1,400-word
FLQ manifesto on French radio
and TV; jobs for 400 jobless?
truck drivers laid off by a change
in the postal system.
On Oct. 6, the day after Cross
is seized, Mitchell Sharp, the
brisk, energetic and unflappable
external affairs minister, walks
into a cramped television studio
in the basement of the
parliament with the
governments reply:
Clearly wholly
unacceptable.
( SEE CANADA' PAGE 171



Environment
Takes Part
In Homecoming

Davies Asks
Student Help
By JAY FAULKNER
Alligator Writer
Marvin Davies, state field
director of the NAACP from
Tampa, spoke on the U. S.
housing crisis at Norman Hall
Wednesday night.
DAVIES ISSUED a plea to
the students to help in the fight
for better housing for low
income groups. He said more
than 62 per cent of bad housing
is in rural areas and there is an
extreme need for personnel to
help the people in these areas.
According to Davies, many
professors and students talk
about what needs to be done but
wouldnt set foot outside the
campus. This is hypocrisy of the
highest form.
Housing is a bigger problem
than pollution, Davies said.
HE SAID MOST of the
pollution is caused by
automobiles and that the
problem could be solved by one
piece of legislation if Congress
would pass it.
But housing is a much more
complex problem and the
government should show more
concern with it, he said.
HE SAID students should
get out where the action is
and will achieve great
satisfaction by helping the poor.
He said this kind of satisfaction
cant be found in drugs.
Through the 1968 Housing
Act and its various programs,
sufficient monies have been
made available for housing.
Money is no problem, but
adequate personnel is, according
to Davies.
Describing the housing
industry as archaic and
disorganized, Davies said, if all
business was run like the housing
industry, there would be no
business.
HE STATED several reasons:
a lengthy and complicated
skill training period which can
last up to six years,
difficulty in getting the
housing zoned,
inability to establish credit
for construction costs,
rising costs for land.
D avies also said the
development of low income
housing would give rise to more
jobs for the poor. These jobs
could provide a feeling of pride
and responsibility for the
underprivileged.

WELCOME ALUMNI
& STUDENTS
GATORS BEAT AUBURN
WE MUST WIN
MILD I RED HOT
MILD II DOUBLE RED HOT
MEDIUM SUPER HOT
CONTRAST I SUPER DUPER HOT
CONTRAST II SUPER SABRE HOT
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PARKER S BAR-B-0
1214 N. W. sth Avenue
Ph. 378-3673

I you
H for bankings New H
Breed? H
, Theyre young. Our average new officer is 26. Theyre flexible.
The kind who rush out to meet change. Theyre self-starters.
Because they know stagnation our style.
We need managers. You need a job. Does this suggest anything
to you? Why not see C&S, the billion-dollar bank at the
crossroads of the South? Where 80 out of the top 100 m
U.S. companies bank.
C&S Don Rochow will be on your
L campus next week. Like to meet him?
Check with your placement office now! 7,!
The Citizens and Southern Banks in Georgia
iMm i s r ~ r ~

ByCARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Staff Writer
Environmental concern now has its
part in the 1970 Homecoming activities.
At Gator Growl, the Florida Players
will be presenting their production of
Rehearse For The Apocalypse.
THE BRIEF production deals with life
styles and needs of man in a world
returned to a primitive state by
over-population, pollution and depletion
of natural resources.
The Gator Growl fireworks display will
also include the Balance of Nature
symbol.
The Homecoming halftime show is
going to be dedicated to environment.
RICHARD BOWLES, director of the
Gator Marching Band, said the four songs
for halftime are Beyond the Blue
Horizon,* Where Have All the Flowers

Kisers
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Gone, *Smoke Gets In Your Eyes, and
On A Clear Day (You Can See Forever).
During the last song, Bowles said,
the band will form the Balance of
Nature symbol.
We interpret the Homecoming theme
as having ecological connotation.
Hal Barcey, the UF student who
designed the symbol, said the ecology
activities are more than a gesture of the
peoples concern, it is participation in the
changes to come.
These activities symbolize a
consciousness that must permeate all
aspects of our life styles.
Barcey said the activities also present
the dilemma in an entertaining manner.
Although the float designs are not
released, there is speculation that some
floats will be built around the
environmental theme.

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| 1610 S. W. 13th St. Gainesville |

Friday. October 30.1970, Tha Florida AHioator,

Page 7



Page 8

!, Tin Florida Alligator, Friday, October 30,1970

n / w

By SUE CUSTOOE
AlpOor Staff Writer
Come one, come all to the
Halloween Ball!
This is the advice of one
organizer of the ball to students
interested in participating in a
night of tmisk, and fun at the
Plaza of the Americas beginning
at midnight Saturday.
THREE BANDS, Power, RGF
and Blackfoot, will provide the
midnight musk which is
scheduled to last until 4 a.m.
There will be free food
provided by the Hogtown Food
Corp.
Several architecture students
are working on a meditation
room** which will be constructed
around a tree in tire plaza.
THE SPOKESMAN said
anyone interested may use the
room.
After the amplified music
ceases at 4 ajn., the
music-making w3l be taken over
by individuals with acoustic
guitars.
A Black Mass, a high mass
for the Satanic Church, will be
held at sunrise.
STUDENTS ARE urged to
turn out in costumes. Everyone
can 'live out their most
freaked-out fantasies* Saturday
night, the ball spokesman said.
He also said there will be real
witches and warlocks from a
local coven on hand to enhance
the Halloween atmosphere.
Be there at the witching hour.
Heh-heh-heh.

The Gators Create Auburns fate,
and Burger Chef creates the
DROP IN AND SEE US
DURING HOMECOMING
right yp the street at If
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goes all out and iHAMiuR^roJ
Ito please the Student j 1412 N. MAIN St., Jr

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DING DONG, DING DONG
.. it's Steve squared

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WHAT'S HAPPENING

THE INVOLVED MAN: Zuber
and Company, a program of
musical involvement, will be
presented Nov. 5 at 8 p.m. in the
Santa Fe Junior College
auditorium, 1001 SE 12th St.
The program is presented by the
Center of Man. Its free to the
public. Bring a musical
instrument or something to bang
on.
REAL CUT-UPS: The General
Dames will sponsor an Arts and
Crafts course for all Dames
members in Union room C-4 at 8
p.m. Nov. 9, Dec. 7, Jan. 11,
Feb. 1 and March 1. A fee of
$3.50 is required for the five
lessons. Those wishing to attend
are asked to bring scissors, glue
and thin cardboard to the first
class.
FUNNY FLICKS: The
University Lutheran Church is
sponsoring an outdoor film
festival Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. at the

Banquet Speakers Listed

By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
Alligator Staff Writer
Homecoming plans for
Florida Blue Key (FBK),
Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK),
Mortar Board and Savant include
banquets today and tomorrow
featuring distinguished speakers.
U. S. REPRESENTATIVE
Carl Albert, D-Okla., will speak
at FBKs 41st annual banquet
today.
Albert, who has been majority
leader of the U. S. House of
Representatives since 1962, will
address an audience which will
include all candidates for major
office in Florida.
The banquet, which begins at
5:15 p.m. in the Florida Gym,
will present as toastmaster Sen.
Jerry Thomas, D-Riviera Beach,
president of the Florida Senate.
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
and the American Association of
University Professors will begin
Saturdays activities with an 8

Murphree Area
CROSS CAMPUS CAMPUS WIDE
BICYCLE RACE
Sunday Nov. 1, 2:00 p.m.
3 CLASSES 6 PRIZES
5& 10 speed sls-class Ist
(7 mi. course) $5 class 2nd
3 speed standard
(3.5 mi. course)
Race begins at 2:00 p.m.
Come early to register
a|t, Murphree faea office.

church. Films shown will be
The Great Chase, Laural and
Hardy Murder Case, and
California Bound.
HEAVY FILMS: The Student
Florida Education Association
will hold a meeting Nov. 5 at
7:30 p.m. in room 346 of the
Union. There will be a film and
refreshments.
YOUNG BLACKS: The Union
will present To Be Young,
Gifted and Black, a movie on
what it means to be young and
black today. Tickets are
available at the Union Box
Office. They are $2.50 and
$1.50 for UF students, $3.50
and $2.50 general admission.
LIFE AT UF: College Life,
sponsored by Campus Crusade
for Christ, will be held Sunday
at 9:13 p.m. in Rawlings Area
recreation room. Everyone is

a.m. breakfast at the Flagler Inn.
Mayor Richard G. Hatcher of
Gary, Indiana will speak on race
relations and student effects on
situations in American cities.
Hatcher, the first black
speaker at a homecoming event,
will conduct an hour long
informal exchange to answer
audience questions.
WOMENS HONORARY
leadership organizations, Mortar
Board and Savant, will conduct a
reception in the Reitz Union
Ballroom at 5:15 p.m. Friday.
The honored guest will be Mrs.
Mary T. Brooks, director of the
U. S. Mint.
Mrs. Brooks, who has served
as a state senator in the Idaho
legislature and as assistant
chairman of the Republican
National Committee, will speak
at a banquet following the
reception.
Banquet tickets cost $3.25 for
students and $5.25 for

invited even crushed Auburn
fans.
MIND OVER MATTER Robert
Gervais, M.D., will speak on
Our Local Community Mental
Health Center Present and
Future at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at
the Unitarian-Universalist
Fellowship, 2814 NW 43rd St.
For transportation assistance or
information, call 376-1174.
BROWN BAGGERS: Law
students, alumni and friends are
invited to the Brown Baggers
luncheon being held at the
Spessard Holland Law Center
Saturday. Food will be served
from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
HALLOWEEN ON THE
PLAZA: There will be a
masquerade ball on the Plaza of
the Americas Oct. 31 from
midnight to 4 a.m. The bands
Power, RGF and
Blackfoot will play. Free
treats will be provided by the
Hogtown Food Co-op.

nonstudents and will be on sale
at the ballroom.
UF Alumni Association is
sponsoring a pre-game barbecue
at the Florida Gym from 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets are $2.50
and can be purchased at the
door.
Correction
The Alligator reported
incorrectly Thursday that John
Parker was a member of the
track team. Parker is a law
student and is no longer on the
team he used up his eligibility
last year and is now an assistant
to track team Coach Jim Carnes.
Easy park right in front!
bucket**
112 SW 34th St. 376-2431
I It i / 4 *tr"

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Friday, October 30,1970, The Florida ANifetor,

Page 9



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Peace Corps To Recruit Here

By JANET OLES
Alligator Writer
A team of Peace Corps
workers will be on the UF
campus next Monday through
Friday to recruit qualified
people for its spring and summer
programs.
The team will be available
outside Reitz Union and in the
student service booth from 9-5
throughout the week.
Priority in accepting
applications for the spring
session will be given to students
in math and science education,
and agriculture.
The spring program begins in
late February. Winter quarter
graduates are expected to be
given prime consideration.
ACCORDING TO recruiting
team member Miss Anita Botti, a
former mental health worker in
the Leeward Islands, the need
overseas for qualified people in
education and agriculture has
always been high because the
majority of countries are
agriculturally based.
The recruiting for the spring
will be mainly to send graduates
to the Phillipines as teachers and
agricultural assistants. The
deadline for all applications is
Jan. 15.

Homecoming Special
JEROME ALEXANDER ''PJ
Lioness Long Shag \ M
Reg. 30.00 NOW 26.99 \ M
LONG TOGETHER WIG WITH TENDRILS'
Reg. 40.00 NOW 32.50
PRICES SHARPLY REDUCED ON SHORT SHAGS,
. DUTCH STYLES & WEN'S WIGS
IQI3 WUN | VERS | TY AVE.
W'
r/9, 372-1189
)V 5 \T %v i11

The summer program will not
be confined to agriculture and
education graduates, but will be
open to all those with degrees in
fields such as business
administration, economics,
accounting, industrial arts,
biology, physics and nursing.
As part of the recruiting
program three films will be
shown in room 363 of the Union
on Nov. 3,4, and 5. Hope and
Harvest, a mainly agricultural
film, Confrontation, a general
film on the corps itself, and
The Foreigners, a highly
controversial documentary, will
each be shown on their
respective days.
THE FOREIGNERS, which
was previously banned by the
Peace Corps because of its
stimulating impact and highly
realistic portrayal of the political
side of the Corps, is expected to
solicit the' greatest audience
reaction. Following each
showing, members of the team
will be available to answer
questions and provide additional
information on the Peace Corps.
The term of service is two
years and volunteers, in addition
to free language training, receive
a living allowance and a
readjustment allowance upon

return. Student response to the
Corps is expected to be
markedly higher this year now
that the Peace Corps can
guarantee a two-year
postponement of draft
induction.
Interested students can obtain
applications at the recruiting
headquarters and can return
them there upon completion.
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5 minutes from Campus.

Stop & Browse In Our
Uof F Gift Department
Sweatshirts ££ll Florida Jackets
T-shirts Orange A Blue Hats
P#nnanti Umbrellas
B,er Mb * Stuffed Animals
Jewelry Childrens Shirts
MALONE'S
Book & Supply Inc.
I riT" -> 1712 W. University Avenue __
K MASTER CHARGE BANK AMERICARD

CARRY THAT
WEIGHT
As part of the Florida
Showcase, the U. S. Army
Exhibit Unit's "Today's Vision
Tomorrow's Victory" will be
shown on the Reitz Union
Colonnade from noon today
through 10 p.m. Saturday.
The exhibit tells the story of
the U. S. Army Combat
Developments Command, and
explains, with the aid of original
artwork and special weightlifting
devices, how the Command is
working to reduce the weight
which future soldiers will carry
into combat without impairing
the soldier's effectiveness.

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THE FIDELITY SHOP
420 NW 13 ST. 378-8045

I, The Florida AHigator, Friday, October 30, 197 J

Page 10

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OConnell Raps
At Murphree

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
Thirty years ago back in
1940 in a different era, in a
different life, a young man
studied law with great diligence
in the Fletcher study lounge of
Murphree area.
Wednesday night that same
man -a little older and much
wiser returned to Murphree
area, his residence years ago, to
rap with the students now
occupying what he refers to as
the most historical part of the
UF.
UF PRESIDENT Stephen C.
OConnell spoke to more than
150 students, humorously
recalling his experiences in the
residence hall and rapping with
them on several controversial
campus issues facing them
today.
Discussions ensued on the role
of athletics at the UF, the recent
dismissal of tennis players Ralph
Hart and Dan Landrum and the
restrictions of athletes now
living in Yon Hall.
OConnell, admitting to not
knowing much about the
operation of Yon Hall, said
athletes should lead a different
life. They should do this, well,
because they are athletes.
OCONNELL THEN asked
the group, How many of you
are in favor of abolishing
football at UF?
Eight hands went up.
He then asked, How many of
you feel football is a very
important aspect of university
life?
A MULTITUDE of hands
were enthusiastically raised.
But what we want to do,
one student corrected, is
de-emphasize sports by reducing
the number of athletic
scholarships.
OConnell explained that the
money used for athletic
scholarships some $157,000
annually is derived through
generosities from state
parimutuel betting
establishments. OConnell said
the funds are earmarked for use
in the athletic program.
IF CUTTING OUT football,
or all sports for that matter,
would give us the $2 million we
need for academics, Id be the
first to support it, he said.
Referring to the recent Hart
and Landrum case, tennis
players suspended for long hair,
OConnell called athletics a
voluntary thing. A student
doesnt have to participate. If he
doesnt want to follow the rules
he can quit.
I think the reaction to hair is
blown up on both sides by the
kids and by everyone eke,
OConnell said.
A PETITION NOW being
passed around the Murphree area
asks that the statue of Dr. Walter
J. Murphree, located north of
Peabody Hall, be moved to a
YOU DESERVE A BETTER LAMBDA!
NOT L
NOT (
BUT \
The versatile Greek letter X, apart
from its use by certain social groups,
is used in all sorts of scientific work
where it can mean
wave length
atomic decay constant
charge density
mean free path, as \
If you are writing a thesis or dis dissertation,
sertation, dissertation, your paper deserves our ser service.
vice. service. We can make it look just like
the printed page. We know. Va typad
thit antira ad! Please address
TONIA S. PARISH, TYPIST
Ita 4% 'urf* f Pft ft'fr i-i V t & v C#
108 Birch Street, Milton, Florida 32570

position adjacent to the
Murphree Commons building
under construction. The
residence hall is named after
Murphree.
OConnell, admitting he was
unaware of any such petition,
called it an excellent idea.
Doing that would create
something badly needed on this
campus a sense of pride,
OConnell said. Ill help you do
it if it can be done.
THE SESSION was the third
time OConnell came before the
residents of Murphree area to
hear student gripes.
Bob Goodstein, president of
Murphree area, called the rap
session a definite benefit to
those who attended and had a
chance to see and question those
people who make and enforce
the policies which they follow.

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Friday. Octobar 30,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 30,1970

EDITORIAL
Let 'Em Leap
The natural human use of reason is to support
prejudice, not to arrive at opinions. Which leads to the
conclusion that rational arguments would only be effective
if we can get the people to make the emotional leap, or
what theologians call the leap of faith. Raymond K.
Price, a former editorial writer for the New York Herald
Tribune, who became Richard Nixons most prominent
speech writer during the 1968 campaign. As quoted by Joe
McGinniss in The Selling of the President.
As the posters have been telling us this fall, Homecoming
1970 is supposed to be relevant. Fun and frolic will give
way to confrontation between students and alumni.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder has said, The
alumni who come to Homecoming are the ones who have
been responsible for some of our problems today by not
meeting them when they were here. We must make them
aware what they have placed on us.
We should try to make homecoming an opportunity for
students to show the alumni and the people in the state
what is wrong with the state and the country, and to show
dissent and concern.
We agree with Uhlfelder Homecoming does afford us
an opportunity to express our concern to alumni in a
meaningful way. However, we fear that a ramming it down
their throats approach will be ineffective.
We want to make the alumni this weekend aware of our
feelings toward the problems of the world. We want to
convince them to advertise and sell our idea. As Raymond
Price said, we want them to make the emotional leap.
We must remember that the alumni are here this weekend
to enjoy themselves, to reminisce. And there is nothing
wrong with that. Others are here, as Uhlfelder has said, to
get drunk and have a good time.
Nevertheless, we believe a Look what you done
approach in showing our concern will not work.
A man selling life insurance does not insult a prospective
customer regardless of how rude and hardheaded that
customer may be. A good salesman keeps plugging. He
attempts to convince the customer that life insurance can
only benefit him.
We are the life insurance salesmen here. We are selling
ideas to the alumni that many problems in the world need
not exist. And to stamp them out would benefit all
students, alumni, the world.
Homecoming is a perfect time to do it. But as Eddie
Floyd, Alumni Association field secretary has said, You
dont alienate the ones you want to help you.

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The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

Ugly Noises
Os Refusal

By KEN DRIGGS
Alligator Columnist
Youre big boys now and old
enough to take care of
yourselves...
Thats not what Tigert Hall
seems to be thinking.
TWO FRATERNITIES, Beta
Theta Pi and Pi Kappa Phi, have
been placed on social probation
because they declined to have
housemothers this year.
Interfratemity Council leaders
are concerned that the next step
against them will be university
officials contacting their
nationals in an effort to get
charters pulled.
Last year the Fraternity
Action Conference
recommended that Floridas
fraternities be allowed the
option between housemothers, a
graduate assistant living in the
house or a faculty member living
in the house
HOUSEMOTHERS are

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

optional at Florida State and
Miami and the situation hasnt
brought any rampant
immorality.
Tigert Hall, or more correctly
the Office of Student Affairs,
returned a flat no to the request.
Fraternities are still required to
have a housemother, provided
they own a building able to
accomodate one.
So now the heat is on the
Betas and Pi Kaps.
Fraternities were the first
group to master self government
and have compiled an acceptable
record in that effort, yet only
ugly noises of refusal come to
this effort towards liberalization.
DORMS ARENT required to
have housemothers, a plain
ordinary working student called
a Resident Adviser seems to do
there. I guess the presumption is
that a freshman or sophomore
dorm-rat is better able to master
his own behavior than a junior
or senior fraternity man.
The plain fact is very few
fraternities would opt to go
without a housemother if given
the chance. Most make good use

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

Loretta Tennant
News Editor

of a housemother and would
retain them.
But thats not the point.
Some fraternities hang on to
some invalid escape from the
grave singly to satisfy a
university rule which is outdated
at best. It costs them money,
money no fraternity can afford
to waste, to abide by a rule that
should be an option.
IFC PRESIDENT Charlie
Brackins can justifiably be
irritated with the manner of
Tigerts refusals. They must still
have a 1955 calander hanging in
somebodys office over there
and whoever it is doesnt seem
interested in a 1970 one.
Assistant Dean Jay Stormer,
responsible for fraternities and a
fellow who has long lent
honest support for them, finds
himself responsible for enforcing
someone higher ups out dated
rules.
It seems sort of sad that the
bastions of slow change,
fraternities, are being held up by
an even less progressive
administration.



MURPHREE WEEK:
; 'Building Human Bridges'
If ?55%
'*' MU II -.. M II i | N | v -> \-
; ; §9 M Emm^l Mfe IJj *-*-* ->
||
THIS BUILDING, PART OF THOMAS HALL, WAS ONE OF THE FIRST TWO BUILDINGS CONSTRUCTED IN 1906
... Murphree Area housed every UF graduate from 1906-1938 including UF President Stephen C. O'Connell

Alumni Open House
Ends Murphree Week

An alumni open house wraps
up Murphree Week tomorrow
morning before the game.
All dorms will be open to
alumni from 10 a.m. until game
time according to Murphree
Week Chairman Charlie Heekin.
WERE INVITING alumni
and their families to visit their
old rooms in the area, chat with
the men living there now and
share refreshments with them,
he said.
Every UF alumni who
graduated before 1947 lived in
one of the Murphree dorms
(Sledd, Thomas, Buchman,
Murphree and Fletcher).
The alumni open house
concludes a week of planned
activities in the area for
students. They included open
forum sessions with Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelder
and UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, himself a former
Murphree resident, as well as

s BSbSI
Murphree banners often earthy....
This one's cleaner than most.

other student and administration
officials.
HEEKIN EMPHASIZED that
the idea of the open house was
to encourage dialogue between
students and alumni.
If the two groups can gain a
better understanding of each
other because of this thing, then
weve accomplished something,
he said.
Bike Race
The final student event of
Murphree Week will be a cross
country bicycle race Sunday
afternoon said race chairman
Andy Van Bueren.
The race will include classes
for standard, three-speed,
five-speed and ten-speed
bicycles.
The race will begin at 1 p.m.
Sunday. Interested students who
live in Murphree Area are urged
to call Van Bueren at 392-7212.

If the two groups can
gain a better under understanding
standing understanding of each other
because of this thing,
then we've accomplished
something.
Charlie Heekin
Murphree Week Chairman
iWSS^SSiSSiSSSSSSWI^SiWSSSi
Human Bridges
The whole theme behind
Murphree Areas brand of
student service is building
human bridges according to
area administrator Steve
Haulman.
The area is staffed by
Haulman, two other
counselors and 17 Resident
Advisors.
Each R.A. works with two
sections, about 85 men,
encouraging their participation
in self government, extra
curricular activities, academic
efforts and simply learning to
cope with life.
Were not trying to do
anything for them, but rather to
get them to do things for
themselves, said Ray Holbrook,
an R.A. of the past three years.
Perhaps the best example of
this is section government, a
scheme of self-government
which originated in Murphree
last year and has spread to othef
dorms on campus this year, is
the measure of responsibility
taken by its residents.
Each section has a
government with representatives
from each floor. The body sets
up rules for open house,
intramurals or any other section
activity.
When problems arise, it is that
body which acts as policemen
and disciplinary court.

Cradle Os The University

Murphree Area lays claim to
the title Cradle of the
Universityand well they might
after a look at the role of those
buildings in the universitys
history.
Every student who attended
the university prior to 1947
lived in the Murphree Area, or
Community as they prefer to
call it, because there was no
other dorm on campus.
The list of former residents is
long and illustrious; beginning
with Stephen C. OConnell (a
relative late comer from the late
19305) and including former
Senator Spessard Holland and
nearly every major apolitical
figure in 20th century Florida
history.

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>x? . y X. y .-. 3$
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:HIFi 'i 11
J. WALTER MURPHREE
Murphree Residents are currently circulating a petition to have this
statue of former Midvapfity President J, Murphree moved to the
Thomas courtyard naa# #ie new Murphrae Commons Building.
; >&\

Friday, October 30,1970, The Florida Alligator,

When the first buildings were
constructed in 1906 they were
the most modem campus
dormitories in the nation.
Among their feature attractions
were indoor plumbing, hot and
cold running water, showers and
heating.
Before being turned over as
dormatories, Thomas housed the
administration's office, a mess
hall, and the infirmary.
The size of the area was
slowly increased until the newest
building, Murphree, was added
in 1938. Until 1938, Murphree
Area comprised every building
on campus except the
gymnasium and part of the old
student union.

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

*
a

FOR SA LE
-:xx::*xv:v:*:vx-:v:->x*x*x-x-x-x*x*x*x
Sony-150 stereo phonograph girrard
turntable $125- excellent condition
call 3 7 2-0736 6 to 10 p.m.
(A-st-26-p)
AKC GERMAN SHEPERD PUP
35$ 3 months, female, great
personality and smart. Call 378-6247
or 373-4305. (A-3t-26-p)
7O Triumph Bonneville 650 2000
miles 378-9208 (A-10t-25-p)
Gibson long-neck 5-string banjo and
hard shell case. SIOO call 378-0128
(A-st-27-p)
8-track TAPE CARTRIDGES Have
quality double (2) album tapes
recorded from your albums at single
(1) album prices $6 Inc double tape
every sth tape Free 378-5916 4-8 pm
(A-st-28-p)
70 Honda 350 w. luggage rags 2400
miles. Must sell moving. SBOO sincere
Inquiries call 1-497-2401 collect after
3 s 30. (A-3t-28-p)
69-cl-450-honda-with helmet-just h._
S7O of work on it 4500 ml $550 call
Tom 378-8991 (A-3t-28-p)
Refrigerator-freezer, 14cu ft, 2-door
automatic ice-maker. $l5O, call
before 8:30 am or after 6:00 pm
378-6365 (A-st-28-p)
1970 OSSA stllletto; 650 cc BSA
custom; 1948 Indian chopper; must
liquidate stock of bikes to buy car.
(BSA $650-OSSA $650-*4B make
offer) Ph 378-7903 BRUCE
(A-st-28-p)
4 yr old Zenith TV excel cond rem
cont. S7O or best offer. Phone
378-7881 (A-3t-28-p)

U.S : 19 >t_FUL SO e e FLORIDIANS
Lets See. .1 GotMashed
.. I Got Straight 1 . Now
Hkv The y Want Me To Move! vk
% Who needs Bob $ Carol & II
Ted & Alice when have
- Paula Prentiss to
PAULA PRENTISS yW
GENEVIEVE WAITE
Bod on ov*( by JOEI
by DE
ri.:!:;. v2y! LAST y DAYS J""|
A MAN YOU WILL NEVER
I FORGET!!! GEORGE C. SCOTT I
| Pewfeww fteitWWe
coaster off'an g

a e.e.e .e_e.e.e,e e_e e e # e,e.e e.
FOR SALE
Citation stereo system incl. AM-FM
radio-turntable-and tape deck-perfect
shape-must sell-$200.00 call
392-7956 after 5 pm (A-st-28-p)
Austin healy 3000 63 6 cyl o d.
trans. BRG good cond. also
triumph daxtona 500 bike ext. forks
call Randy at 378-3742 (A-3t-28-p)
1968 KAWASAKI 250 Good
Condition street Scrambler $380.00
Only Call 392-7374 Ask For Eli
(A-2t-29-p)
TR3 good top tires & interior runs
good SSOO or best offer 376-9593
(A-3t-29-p)
Akai X -1800 SD Tape Recorder.
Cross field head-Plays and Records 4
track reel and 8 track cartridge, only
$225. 1225 SW Ist ave Apt 431
(A-3t-29-p)
DESK & chair $lO. udico port.
OVEN-broiler S2O. Call Jane after 5
p.m. 378-4251 (A-st-29-p)
1970 5,000 b.t.u. norge Air Cond.
with thermostat & warranty. Perfect
condition. SIOO. Call Jane after 5
pm. 378-4251 (A-st-29-p)
Surfboard, must sell. Hoble Eas.
Star, 6 feet 7 in. fin, no dings, very
strong. $125. call 373-2237.
(A-3t-29-p)
26 in girls bicycle, 3 months old,
chrome fenders, back carrier, front
light, rear reflection, $30.00; call
392-6076, ask for Lisa. (A-lt-30-p)
1968 Honda 125 CL, Good
Condition $250. with new helmet
$275. Phone 376-8902 keep trying.
(A-st-30-p)

Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 30,1970

FOR SALE
KEEP your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Electric upholstery
shampooers also available. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
Yamaha 125 YAG, just tuned and
cleaned, runs well, dependable
transportation, luggage rack. Bell
helmet, need $l5O. Jeff Berry
376-9208 (A-3t-31-p)
For sale honda S9O 1968 two
helments included runs good call
373-1534 and come by and see It
(A-st-30-p)
RCA combination stereo FM-AM
radio. Contemporary style,
mahagony finish. Excellent
condition. $140.00 Call 376-1970
(A-4t-30-p)
Small business, part-time operation.
Earn over SSOOO. Annually for only
3-4 hours work. Recover full cost in
first year. Ideal for student operation
call 378-8724. (A-4t-28-p)
Craig 8-track auto player, 2 speakers;
also wood cased home 4 and 8 track
player, 2 speakers; 20 cartridges;
$125. for all, call 373-3685
(A-3t-29-p)
Akai Stereo Tape recorder Record 8
track carts and reel to reel A-l
condition $250 or trade 373-3890
(A-3t-29-p)
YASHICA JP 50mm, f/2.8 single
lens, timer, ac-dc electronic flash,
hand light meter, tripod, cases, like
new $95.00 All, 373-2204 after 5 pm
(A-st-29-p)
AKC German Shepherd pups. 3 mos
excel, pedigree, love children. 85 ea.
Terms available. 378-5222
(A-4t-30-p)
!-!-!-X-:-!-:':-:IxX-:IxX;X:I:X;X;XxX;X;X;X;X
FOR RENT
tt-x*:-x^
Need female roommate at La
Mancha, own bedroom, utilities paid,
call 372-5651. (B-3t-28-p)
FOR LEASE campus cone Ice cream
shoppe, minimum investment
required $3500 plus Inventory,
phone 372-3890 or stop by.
(B-st-26-p)
2 br. LAKE HOUSE, fully furnished,
AC, oil heat, melrose, 25 min. fr.
campus, SIOO/month. Call 475-1967
(B-st-27-p)
Need female roommate for academic
year-one BR garage apt near Town
$25 per mo plus utilities call judy
378-5170. (B-st-29-p)
:-:.>X^>::>S;X;X:XxX;X;XxXxXv>;;X;;;X;
f WANTED
.nv.v.v.v.v.v.nv.v.v.-.vav.v.v.v.v.vX
Female roommate to share 2
bedroom 2 bath Point West Apt.
SIOO/mo plus utilities 373-2370 after
5:00 p.m. (C-10t-26-p)
Female roommate winter and spring
to share 1-bedroom Sin City apt. Air
conditioning, pool, color TV. $62.50
a mo., /2 utilities. 372-7937
(C-3t-28-p)
NEED MONEY? I need tickets for
Auburn game call 372-7090
(C-3t-28-p)
NEED FOUR TICKETS TO
AUBURN GAME call John 373-1620
(C-3t-28-p)
Listeners wanted: Will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Susan between 8
and 5 for appointment. 392-2049
(C-10t-22-p)
Female roommate to share 2 Br
trailer, own room, S7O month. Call
373-2577 after 8 p.m. or 392-3196
before. Ask for Mary. (C-st-26-p)
Two tickets to Auburn game call
373-3404 (C-2t-29-p)
FILM CLASSIC
prnttMAHS** nj
V W stS
THROUGH Mm
ftawSr
Sunday Nov. 1
Union Auditorium, SO cents
3:00, 5:30, 8, 10:30p.m.
sponsored by JWRU

WANTED
Wanted Austln-Healey soft top
62,3000, 4 pass, model. Call
392-7496 ask for Ed (C-2t-29-p)
Furnished apt. waited for Winter
Quarter, willing tor pay premium for
plush 2 bed room-Jan-Apr ll Call
392-0151 or 372-5206. Male student wants roommates for 3
br house call 378-9695 or see at 225
SW sth St S6O/mo utilities Included.
HELP WANTED
x^xSxSxSx^
EXPERIENCED DELIVERY BOYS
NEEDED. $1.60 per hour also
waitresses. Campus Cone Ice Cream
Shoppe. (E-st-28-p)
Viviane Woodard Cosmetics has
openings for women Interested in
exciting new makeup techniques.
Three hours daily can earn S4O-SIOO
weekly. Call Cindy 378-9879.
(E-st-29-p)
Charles Chips Home delivery service
potato chips pretzels cookies route
salesman 21 married available 230 to
7 call Ray Welch 376-6943 after 7
pm (E-3t-29-p)
AUTOS

Classic 1959 Jag, wire wheels, good
tires, looks good but needs a little
work. A steal at $250 firm. Must sell
call 376-2708 soon (G-3t-29-p)
1966 TR4. exceptionally good shape.
New top, tires, paint. Wires.
Mechanically flawless. Best offer over
SIOOO 378-0340, 392-3685.
(G-3t-29-p)
1969 Datsun 2000, 5-speed, radio,
heater, 135 hp. SIBOO or best offer.
Ph. 373-2139 after 6 p.m.
(G-st-26-p)
64 Dodge, 6 cyl, automatic, rad,
heat, good tires, sound mechanically,
care free transportation, $449 Mike
37 3-1924 anytime Number 23
tanglewood (G-st-28-p)
1970 Maverick, Gold and In excellent
condition. Campus Credit Union,
1200 S.W. sth Avenue. Mr. Nellinger
(G-st-28-p)
Bread truck converted to camper,
VB, auto, air con, toilet, ICE box,
sundeck with latter to roof, SI,OOO
or best offer, Call Joe 378-1078
(G-st-28-p)
1963 Falcon ford white R&H at new
tires xtra clean. Real economical! In
good shape! Must sell! S4OO call
376-9540. (G-st-26-p)
65 IMPALA 396 4 SPEED NEW
PAINT, TIRES GOOD MECH
$795 CALL John, 378-7315, 847
SW 9 Street. (G-st-26-p)

Across From The Mall
iiiiillitiMiiH ADM. SI.OO
I PtnoniunOtr 18 '!!,'^JflS^oPe '!!,'^JflS^oPe
'!!,'^JflS^oPe
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jj!|||| !*!! Jf Jjj jvg}' ? J i ,, i ''i"'-''£" Xj?s von
l I PENTHOUSE 3 B
Mantion thit ad for tpeclal early bird | >'J *l 1J Tt J I
prlea of 3S cant* avary ntfht before 7
H J-**- ,ml ** *" Matinee*. Regular I *'.
ea*ii" ff No. a- st.so IRATEDQQ 1

AUTOS
1966 Volkswagen fastback. Campus
Credit Union, 1200 S.W. sth Avenue.
Mr. Nellinger (G-st-28-p)
j>jgj y
Stutterers wanted for an auditory
feedback study. Will pay you SB.OO
please call Michelle Jensen evenings:
378*0104 Days: 392*2046 (J*st*2s*p)
CAROL: Happy Halloween & a
groovy weekend! Just be your sweet
little self and lay off the BOOZE!!
Love dumb little naive! (J-lt-30-p)
Funkiest junk in town. Free incense
with each purchase. Call Judy Ann
373-1476 or come by 1419 NW 3rd
Ave (J*3t*2B*p)
INTERESTED IN EARNING
EXTRA MONEY? We need a student
who owns an old school bus. Contact
Campus Cone Ice Cream Shoppe.
(J-st-28-p)
POETRY WANTED for possible
Inclusion in cooperative volume.
Include stamped envelope. Palomar
Publishing Co., Box 4444, Whittier,
Calif. 90607 (J-3t-29-p)
Free love! 4 fluffy kittens need
homes. Assorted colors! 5 weeks old
one can cat food Included. Call
376-8678 after 6 (J-3t-29-p)
SINGLE MALES & FEMALESI Meet
more members of the opposite sex at
U.F. All dates in Gainesville. Most
dates with U.F. Students. Details
mailed in plain unmarked envelope.
For free details write: Nationwide
Dating Service, P.O. Box 77346,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-15t-24-p)
Tired of the dorms? Too poor for an
apt? CLO has openings for the winter
quarter $195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 373-1622 (J-27t-25-p)
WANTED: 8 tickets to the
Florida/Georgia game In pairs If
possible. Call Chris at 372-8895 after
5 pm (J-4t-27-p)
Dear ace trucking company, Mals je
ne m'en souviens pas. Now? Love.
The Pink Bundle of Joy. (J-2t-30-p)
IQipmteE, 1
m 7:07 A 10:29 I
PLUS AT 8:54 COLOR
UXW SANDRA OEE The
W > DEAN STOCKWELL UUfIWICH
ED BEGLEY LLOYD BOCHNER 1800000
M SAMJAEFE a ||UHHUH J



PERSONAL
Conflict Is too interesting to give up.
Water wars are the answer Bring your
' own weapons. Plaza of Americas
Sunday 4pm (J-lt-30-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever;
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologtst.. .102
N.W. 2nd Ave. Cal 372-8039 for
appointment. (J-20t-170-p)
Hate to cookTToo poor for an apt?
CLO has openings for the winter
quarter. $195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 373-1622 (J-22t-30-p)
Sharon, its so great to have you here
cause times with you are the best. I
love you more than ever. Peace and
happiness to USI TU (J-lt-30-p)
CHI PHI Brothers and Pledgesl May
the great pumpkin treat you right I
Happy Halloween! Love, the Little
Sisters (J-lt-30-p)
Happy B-Day Crack Sometimes it
does matter. Be beautiful and
flagrant. Believe In the Great
Pumpkin. Love Daniel. (J-lt-30-p)
The uninformed and 111 advised
always seem to vote. Make your voice
heard for better government. VOTE
on Tuesday. (Paid for by Students
for ASKEW) (J-3t-30-p)
GET FRESH only 60 cents LARGE
ham & swiss on fresh bun, roast
BEEF 65 cents, hotdogs 20 cents,
soft drinks 15 cents KENS BAKERY
15 SW 2nd St. Down the street from
Pennys. (J-lt-30-p)
HELPI Newly-wed couple NEEDS
REASONABLY priced
APARTMENT to rent starting
December or January. Please call
Dave, nights. 373-3924 (J-st-30-p)
Samson needs volunteer to work with
Cub Scout pack In Lakeshore male,
21, 2 hr meeting per week with 10-11
yr old boys. Call 392-1608
(J-3t-30-p)
KTtten-911 days of happiness past;
954 left to go before your day.
Happiness Is a kiss and a hug. Keep
those eyes sparkling Tom
(J-lt-30-p)
Silly Rabbit, you mean everything to
me now. Please understand me. I love
you Bye, Bye QB (J-lt-30-p)
Happy Halloween to my sweet
Johnny Baby. So glad you're here
because I love you and miss youl Be
here always winter! Jo Ann r&w
(J-lt-30-p)
New Emerging World Theology needs
devotees. Watch for cryptic messages
from The Great Newt 1) Join a
Newtlst colony today TGN
(J-lt-31-p)
Astrology course taught by
professional Astrologer. Starting
soon. For Info on time, place, and
cost call: 372-7883 or 373-2546.
(J-st-26-p)
AUSTIN HEALEY SPRITE 1967,
radio, heater, tonneau. Low mileage.
New battery brakes. 81100 or best
Offer 392-0528 392-0560 (G-2t-30-p)

W\ l AND OVER!
fsa Aeon ARTi d s CHECKED
Hf
I jfl . K'
^Bm
;-
Jjl L
ffil II IRi I

PERSONA L
SILLY RABBIT Been a beautiful 5
months. Looking forward to this
weekend and many more. Love to Sir
from your purple owl (J-2t-30-p)
BRIANT Happy 21st have a great
day and a great weekend. People
wouldnt have problems If everyone
had Just a little you. Love woman
(J-lt-30-p)
Tired of poor impersonal BICYCLE
service and high prices. Try the
PSYCLE SHOP. 1230 NW 3rd Ave.
New & used sales & repair now open
10-7 (J-st-28-p)
LOST <& FOUND
Lost pair of octagon shaped, amber
colored womens glasses In red glass
case. Please help a blind person to
see. Contact Diane at 373-2979
(L-st-29-p)
Lost slide rule removed from union
Oct 27 between 11-11:30 this rule Is
very Important in my work so please
return J Searcy 376-4200 please
(L-2t-28-p)
Lost: Silver ring with clear stone and
nick in side In area of Florida Gym.
Reward offered. Call Pat or Chris at
392-9453. (L-4t-28-p)
'SLacitfaili.' antSmay"
COUKtRMOtt&
MSfiDDUMB
THNCm
OWUTWCLBBS
AjMiorua ocits/ovs
B&jwovax
Col ujherl WAcm is
| 376-JI7Q
\yt> n.l. awr

SERVICES
MATH TUTORING. Specializing In
correcting basic defflclencles. Phone
372-3890 or 378-4066 (M-st-28-p)
Charles Chips Campus Delivery
Potato Chips Pretzels Cookies Order
before 2 pm Dally Minimum Order 3
Containers 376-6943 (M-st-29-P)
Plano teacher for beginers of age 5 ft
up. or advanced students. Certified
teacher from Miami. Lower rate for
first 3 calls. 372-1156 (m-st-29-p)
ORGAN LESSONS. Professional
organist specializing In popular
music. 83.50 per half hour. Phone
372-3890 or 378-4066. (M-st-28-p)

I I'm the Joe the whole |
I country's talking about! I
I "A TBIUMPHI A RIP-SHOBTEB! 8 'THIS MINUTE' FILM! I
I "'JOE' MUST SUBELY RANK 18 IMPACT _Jud h CM I
WITH 'BONNIE AND CLYDE'!Time Magazine
I " I WVE ITlChlcgo-SunTlnw* I
I "TAUT AND COMPEUOI6I-whingtonPo,i I
"WILL BE A BOXOFFICE SENSATION!-Chicago Tribune I
I "AN OCCASION roBCHEEBIN6!-PMM.iphia D.iiy N.w> I
I "A MASTERPIECE!Chicago Today I
I "CLEARLY THE MOVIE OF THE MOMENT AND I
MAYBE THE MOVIE OF THE
"% BRILLIANTLY DONE, DEYASTATINGLY FUNNY! I
H New York Dally Newt U
ivQm xjxfx-:
-;ia a vjR:
jjL j^^M
f FEATURE AT... |
I I
\ COLOR A CANNON [R
Telephone 378-2434 WT
BBSM HELD OVER! 2d SHKI WONDERFUL I
K~ ANIMMENSE)CYROMANTIC
MOVIE WITH STYLE AND
4 5 CRITICAL INTELLIGENCE!
vj| MB VincarH Canfey, W. Y. Tint#a
EBOI
Wfm 1 LaiiSl
B* \ Coiof PhHtbyMoU> AOHM^NON
l H* 1 FEATURE AT...
\ / ' ,~) \ \ 2:11 4:04
\ \ 6:67 7:63
\ \Z// \ *:6O
ADimitn De Grumraki presentation

For once In your life, plan ahead:
reserve a seat to get to New York
over Christmas on a privately
chartered greyhound Dus. Our price
beats all commercial modes of
transportation; 860 round trip! Call
the New York Holiday club 5-7 pm.
378-6376 (M-st-27-p)
HORSES BOARDED sleepy hollow
horse farm complete care finest
facilities new barn pasture trails and
lighted ring close to Univ. Ph
373-1059 (M-st-29-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
Call 373-1984, 9-5. (M-st-f)

Friday, October 30,1970, The Florida ANigator,

SERVICES
^SSSS99SSSSSSSSSSiSSSSA
HONDA STEVE has got another
mechanic! I Now he can service your
Honda TWICE as Fast!!! The CYCLE
WORKS 1220 S. Main open 3 until 8
p.m. (M-st-26-p)
Were wfrad for sight at the smelts at
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own wetting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tasted and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 s. Main,
378-7330. Now! Bank Amsrlcard ft
Master Charge (M-tfc)

Page 15



Page 16

i. Tha Florida Aliigrtor, Friday, October 30,1970

\
Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Qoomes, Division of
Information Sen/ices, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

MID-TERMS SCHEDULED
All students are expected to
report for the following tests
and to bring No. 2 lead pencils.
They will be required to use
Social Security numbers.
CY 201 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CY 201 will be given Wed., Nov.
4 at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-C report to Little
101 or 109; D-F to Little 113,
121, or 125; G-N to Matherly 2,
3, 4,5,6, 7,8, 9,10,11,12,13,
14, or 16; O-Z to Matherly 102,
105, 108, 111, 113, 115, 116,
117, 118, or 119.
MS 201 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
MS 201 will be given Tuesday,
Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. All students
report to Walker Auditorium.
MS 204 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
MS 204 will be given Tuesday,
Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. All students
report to Walker Auditorium.
CPS 121,12 Y MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CPS 121 (including 12Y) will be
given Thursday, Nov. 5 at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A report to Bryan
Hall 120 or 201; Bto Little 101
or 109; C to Architecture and
Fine Arts 4,8, 14, 16, 213, or
219; D-E to Little 113, 121 or
125; F to Little 201, 203, 205,
or 207; G to Little 213, 215,
217, 219, or 221; H to Little
223, 225, 227, 223, 235 or 239.
Others report as follows l-L to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110 or
112; P-Q to Floyd 104, 106 or
109; R to Flint 101,102 110 or
112; S to Walker Auditorium;
T-V to Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18
or 20; W-Z to Walker
Auditorium.

Low Interest Rates Still Available
C***' l anS never exceeds 1< C P r month on unpaid balance
Call 392-0393 for monthly payment data for any type loan. ^"***^^
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

BETA QAMMA SIGMA
SCHOLARSHIP DEADLINE
Undergraduate students in the
College of Business
Administration are eligible to
apply for the Beta Gamma
Sigma scholarship of SIOO to be
paid in each the fall and spring
quarters. Application forms are
available from Mrs. Young in the
dean's office, and should be
completed and raturned to her
by Oct. 30. Scholarship (3.0
minimum), accomplishment and
need are the primary bases for
selection of the winner.
WILSON FELLOWSHIPS
Students completing a bachelor's
degree by August, 1971, who
plan to begin graduate study in
preparation for a career in
college teaching in a liberal arts
field are eligible to be nominated
for a Woodrow Wilson
Fellowship. Interested persons
should consult their faculty
advisor or Dr. John Algeo, 235
Tigert Hall, by Oct. 30.
STUDENT LOAN FUNDS
Florida State Student Loan
Funds have arrived for those
students whose names were on
the second requisition. Those
students should report directly
to the Student Depository, the
Hub, to obtain their money.
FUTURE OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY MAJORS
All sophomore students
interested in beginning the
professional sequence of courses
as juniors in the fall of 1971
should contact the Department
of Occupational Therapy. The
admissions committee will begin
holding meetings in late
October. Call 392-2617 for more
information.
SLIDE RULE COURSE
The slide rule course (third of
four classes) will meet Tues.
Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. in 211 Mech.
Eng. Bldg. Sponsored by the
Florida Engineering Society, the
last meeting will be Nov. 10.

Page of Record

Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

BLUE CROSS-BLUE SHIELD
CARDS
Students who have applied for
Blue Cross-Blue Shield health
insurance may pick up their ID
cards next week.
Cards will be available Nov. 2
and 3 room 331 (Student
Government Offices) of the
Reitz Union, between 8 a.m. and
5 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL CLUB
A campus International Club has
been established with the
purpose of organizing social,
cultural and fraternal activities.
The main aim of the
organization is to promote
mutual understanding through
personal contact. Membership is
open to students, staff and
faculty (including Americans).
Announcements for program
and activities schedules will be
made on this page after
mid-terms. Anyone interested in
joining the group may contact
Kulwant Singh, president,
telephone 372-0613.
SURPLUS ITEMS
Surplus items are available for
inspection at the Property
Warehouse. Department
representatives may inspect the
equipment between 8 a.m. and
12 noon, and 1 p.m. and b p.m.
any Thursday. Items available
include tables, work benches,
chairs, desks, lamps, beds, and
lab stations.
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF
TEACHERS
Dick Hixson, the director of the
College and University Section
of the American Federation of
Teachers, will speak on
"Collective Bargaining for
College Teachers" on
Wednesday, Nov. 4 at 4 p.m. in
the Union Aud.
UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY
SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED
University employees will
observe the following holiday
schedule for the balance of the
1970-71 academic year
Homecoming (Oct 30), half
day
Thanksgiving Day
Day after Thanksgiving
Christmas Eve half day
Christmas Day
Monday after Christmas to
substitute for day after
Christmas since this falls on
Saturday
New Year's Eve, half day
New Year's Day
A half day to be scheduled at
the discretion of the department
chairman is added to the above
list.

university calendar

Friday, Oct. 30
Florida Showcase, Union
Colonnade, 12 noon
Homecoming Parade, University
Avenue, 12 noon
Florida Student Movement
Peace Rally, Plaza, 2:30 p.m.
Homecoming Blue Key Smoker,
Gym Basement, 4 p.m.
Blue Key Banquet, Florida Gym,
5:15 p.m.
Homecoming Mortar
Board-Savant Banquet, Union
Ballroom, 5:15 p.m.
Catholic Student Center Peace
Mass, Catholic Church, 5:30
p.m.
Union Movie, 'The Collector",
Union Aud., 5:30, 8, 10:30
p.m.
Baha'i Association Meeting,
Union 357, 8 p.m.
Gator Growl, Florida Field, 8:15
p.m. (pre-growl, 7 p.m.)
Saturday, Oct. 31
Catholic Student Center
Meditation, Catholic Student
Center, all day
ODK & AAUP Breakfast, Flagler
Inn, 8 a.m.
Alumni Reunion, North Terrace
of the J. Wayne Reitz Union,
8:30 a.m.
Florida Showcase Colonnade of
the J. Wayne Reitz Union, 9
a.m.
John Marshall Bar Association
Skits, North Terrace of the J.
Wayne Reitz Union, 9:45
a.m.
Homecoming Barbeque, Florida
Gym, 11 a.m.

I WILLIAM WYLER'S I
the collector
*,'A l 1

Notices for the University Calendar
may be submitted to the Student
Activities desk, third floor of Reitz
Union or mailed to the Public Func Functions
tions Functions Office, G-72, Reitz Union. Dead Deadline
line Deadline for the Tuesday Alligator is the
r previous Friday at noon; for the
Friday Alligator, the previous Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday at noon.

Veterans for Peace Rally, Plaza,
12 noon 2 p.m.
Football, University of Florida
vs. Auburn, Florida Field,
2:00 p.m.
Union Movie, 'The Collector",
Union Aud., 5:30, 8, 10:30
p.m.
Homecoming Dance, 'TAMS",
Florida Gym, 9 p.m.
Student Freedom Halloween
Party, Plaza, 12 midnight
Sunday, Nov. 1
Murphree Area Bike Race,
Murphree Area, 2 p.m.
Union Movie, 'Thru a Glass
Darkly", Union Aud., 5:30,
8,10:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge Club Meeting,
Union 150 C&D, 6:30 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
Meeting, College Life,
Rawlings Area Rec Room,
9:13 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 2
Union Chess Tournament, Union
150 C&D, 7 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, Union
357, 361, 7 p.m.
Block and Bridle Club Meeting,
Union 349,7:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, UE&I Bldg., Room
525,8 p.m.
Science Fiction Club Meeting, 1
Union 356,8 p.m.
University Committee on
Teaching Evaluation meeting,
150-D Union, 3:30 p.m.



Problems Suppress Loans

By MIKE CAHLIN
Alligator Writer
Banks will be able to offer
more financial aid to students if
legislation presently before
Congress is passed.
ONE OF THE major problems
preventing aid to students is the
lack of equal distribution of
these loans throughout the state.
In order for this project to be
successful, all banks must
allocate loans equally all over

CANADA...

THE GOVERNMENT WILL
NOT yield to blackmail. The
FLQ sets a deadline on Cross
life. It will be extended again
and again.
From both prisoners come
pathetic letters, pleas for
survival.
The authors may have written
them with guns at their heads,
but they have the ring of
authenticity.
FOR TRUDEAU THE
probable death of one or both
men must be weighed against the
likelihood of more kidnapings,
more deaths, if the government
gives in. A deeply religious, shy,
thoughtful man shaped by an
aristocratic Roman Catholic
background, Trudeau gives no
sign of hesitating,
notwithstanding the savage
consequences and the wrenching
letters.
In Ottawa, the national
capital, escalation.
The government grants a
request from the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police
(RCMP) and moves nearly 1,000
army troops into the capital Oct.
12. Trudeau, who usually scorns
security, rides to work in a
special armored limousine.
HE TAKES THE elevator to
his third floor office and there
finds an RCMP intelligence
report that radical groups in
Montreal plan violent
demonstrations which,
combined with terrorism, could
plunge the city of 2.5 million
toward chaos.
The day, Trudeau allows
himself to be drawn into an
extraordinary interview with
Tim Ralfe of the Canadian
Broadcasting Corp. on the steps
of Parliament. Ralfe, sleepless
for 48 hours and pushed around

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Florida, according to I. Douglas
Turner, director of student
fin ancial aid atUF.
Other problems are:
The newness of the
program.
A lack of administrative
information.
Bad communication
between HEW and banks.
The frozen asset condition
which results from the fact that
once a student receives a loan,
the bank cannot move or sell the

by troops, argues with the prime
minister.
How far will Trudeau go? he
asks.
JUST WATCH ME.
In Ottawa, the Cabinet meets
behind a guarded oak door until
midnight. Reporters are
awakened, summoned and told
at 5:15 a.m. the Cabinet has
found a state of apprehended
(threatened) insurrection exists
in Quebec and proclaimed the
emergency war measures act,
never before invoked in
peacetime. The FLQ is
outlawed.
If fully employed, the law
allows the Cabinet to suspend
Canadas Bill of Rights, decree
laws, impose censorship,
reinstate the death penalty.
IN PARLIAMENT, the
opposition parties are outraged.
Replies the government,
confident of its majority: We
have reasons. We cannot disclose
them. We have intelligence
reports. Read between the
lines, urges Labor Minister
Bryce Mac Kasey. Rumors fly of
FLQ plots to bomb, terrorize
and tyrannize Quebec.
A gun barrel glints in the sun
from behind the gold cross atop
Montreals Notre Dame church
at Laportes funeral Oct. 20.
Four thousand soldiers, 9,000
police press the hunt for
Laportes killers and for Cross
and his kidnapers.
STILL TRYING TO
comprehend the charges
provoked by two incredible
weeks and a few hate-filled men,
Canadians, bruised by a century
of trying to make two cultures
coexist, recall what poet and
constitutional law professor
Frank Scott had once told them:
There are two miracles of
Canadian history. The first is the
survival of French Canada; the
second is the survival of
Canada.

bank note, but must wait for the
student to graduate.
GAINESVILLE has been a
leader in providing financial aid
to students, according to Turner.
Gainesville banks have given
more government loans than
reasonably expected, he said.
A good part of these went to
out-of-town students. These
banks have given more aid than
any other section in the state of
Florida.
This is not the situation in
other areas.

CofMeg# r&TMt
*.****- *** + .** * * 4 *

1728 West University Avenue
Enjoy Your Homecoming Dinner
With Us This Weekend.
Weve Served Three Generations Os Gator Fans

FLORSHEIM
PUTS IT ALL
TOGETHER
FOR FALL
: "
Jgk v
MEr i,"
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where the in crowd goes out
4130 N.W. 6th St. 376-9457

Friday. Ootobar 30,1970, Tin Florida AJUftor,

Page 17



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 30.1970

Page 18

Broward Endures Pumpkin Heist

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writer
Halloween is traditionally a
time of spooks, spirits, and
hobgoblins, but Tuesday night
Broward Hall caught the mood
of the occasion with the Great
Pumpkin Heist.
IT ALL STARTED out with a
resident, eighty-pound pumpkin
serving as a focal point for
Browards service project in the
Broward lobby.
The girls of Broward Hall are
adopting children from the

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A DAY FOR HOPE

Gainesville Mayor Perry C. McGriff, Sue Scranton
of Delta Delta Delta sorority, and Ralph Childs
(left) and Dave Quackenbush of Delta Upsilon
fraternity, observe at the mayor's office Wednesday
his proclamation of Saturday, Oct 31, as "Project
Hope Day" in Gainesville.
Donations will be collected at the UF-Auburn
football game Saturday for the world-traveling
medical ship "Hope." Money collected will also be

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for the weekend. They will take
them to the parade today and
will hold a chicken dinner
Sunday afternoon for the
children in lieu of spending
money on a Homecoming float.
Mary Smith, a resident of
Broward Hall, received a call
around 10 pm. from the lobby
saying four guys had done
away with the pumpkin.
APPARENTLY, ONE of the
students had diverted the
woman at the lobby desk while
the other three high-tailed it out

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medical center.
Delta Upsilon is sponsoring the project, with the
aid of Tri-Delt.
The goal of DU and Tri-Delt members is to gain a
25 cent donation or more from all parsons attending
the football game Saturday.

the door with the pumpkin.
Cliff Conrad, partner-in-crime
was held hostage by about 50
girls.
According to Phil Cope,
Alligator photographer, Conrad
did not struggle excessively.
IF EVER there was a
contented pumpkin thief, he was
one, Cope said.
The three desperados returned
and were corailed in the ladies
shower room. A water battle
ensued with much moisture
dispersed by all.

---rnTitT
%. %

Finally, after the campus
police were called in the
pumpkin was reinstated in its
former resting place.
AFTER ALL the hubub was

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over a nightwatchman decided
to hide the pumpkin in a
telephone booth in the lobby.
Oh well, Halloween comes but
once a year.
Thank goodness.



The
Florida
Alligator

Are Athletics Really That Relevant?

PHIL PETTIJOHN

Before one can consider the
strong points and weaknesses of
either the Gators or Auburn, and
before a prediction to the game
can be made, it seems necessary
to question the total relevance
of the game itself.
Athletics have had a place in
mans life since he first settled
with other men. They still
maintain a lofty place in
civilization.
BUT ONE must question
whether athletics, particularly
football, should be delegated a
position of such grandeur on a
campus where educational
facilities, teachers and housing
situation are so lacking in funds.
Millions of dollars, some state,
some alumni contributions,
much from the student's pocket,
go into Floridas athletic
program each year.
A person donating to the
athletic fund, or a legislator,

Bulldogs Favored
Over Gamecocks

By Alligator Services
The Georgia Bulldogs, UFs
opponent next weekend, are
12& point favorites over the
South Carolina Gamecocks for
their homecoming football game
Saturday at Athens.
If those odds stand up, the
Bulldogs, struggling to avoid
their first losing season in seven
years under Coach Vince
Dooley, will move over the .500

WHOS KIRKS CLERK?
In Sept. Alachua Countians Nominated...
Democrats:
Reubin Askew.Jor Governor
Lawton Chiles... for U.S. Senate
Perman Roberts... for Clerk of the Circuit Court
Republicans:
Jack Eckerd for Governor
The APPOINTED Clerk Is Claud* Kirks ChoiceWho's Yours?
Give a Young Family Man a Chance
jH ROBERTS
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
democratic NOMINEE yfoj
j|||m 1 |MW Your vote & support will be appreciated f,
ffIMgBMHftBBjjHMEB Pol Pd,, for By J. P.rm.n Roberts, C.mp.lgn Fund.

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|| ANALYSIS M
should ask himself the question,
is this the best place to spend
this money?
OR, IS IT more that this is
where the dollars have gone in
the past, so this is where they
should go now?
But now, not yesterday or
tomorrow, the world is
different. There are places of
more importance, more
immediately in need of the
dollars that now flow into sports
here at Florida.
Is it really that important that
we beat FSU, or Georgia, or
even Auburn tomorrow? Dont
things like overpopulation and
environmental pollution of the

mark for the first time this
season.
GEORGIA HASNT lost to
South Carolina since 1959, a
year the Bulldogs went 9-1, won
the Southeastern Conference
championship and the Orange
Bowl.
The Georgia offense,
sputtering through the last half
of this one, appears to be
smoothing out under the
guidance of rejuvenated senior
quarterback Mike Cavan.

IN TIME OF EDUCATIONAL CRISIS

very world in which you live,
demand more attention than the
outcome of the game?
A GAME THAT taken in the
total context of what is
happening now, has no
importance at all.
This is not to say that
athletics deserve no funds at all.
Sports have always, and will
continue to have, a place in
society.
But is that place to be
attained and held at the cost of
other areas, including the field
of education, which is the
original purpose of this
university in the first place?
SO WHEN YOU go to the
game tomorrow, and you rise
from the depths of the silent
majority to cheer a contest of
little significance, pause and
think, if you can, of all the
issues that you have remained
silent about.
Is a game in which the
outcome means little more than
the gratification of ones ego
really more important than all
else?
If the answer is no, then
support the move by the
honestly concerned student
body presidents of the states
universities.
THESE YOUNG men,
unbiased themselves by a role in
athletics, and not prejudiced by
the petty desire to merely see
their alma mater beat so and so,
are calling for a re-evaluation of
Ironwood
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Marty Parlmuttor
Executive Sports Editor

Friday, October 30,1970, The Florida Alligator,

the role athletics should play in
the overall college community.
Perhaps it is better termed an
emphasis of those things that are

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Sports Editor

Page 19

really important, at the expense
of a sports program that denies
its athletes the freedoms
afforded to other students.



Page 20

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 30,1970

ReavesHas SomethingTo Think About

By PHIL PETTI JOHN
Alligator Sports Editor
John Reaves will have a lot to
think about when he
quarterbacks Florida against
Auburn here Saturday.
Last year in Auburn the
Tigers intercepted nine of
Reaves passes, a national record,
and handed the Gators their
only loss of the season 38-12.
BUT I wont be thinking
about those interceptions,
Reaves said. When that ball is
snapped, Ill be thinking only
about throwing it.
When Reaves throws, itll be
into the Tigers zone defense, led
by Larry Willingham, a 9.9
sprinter at defensive sideback.
Their defense looks real
good, said head offensive
Coach Jimmy Dunn. But their
offense has done so well for
them that the defense has been
able to play relaxed and gamble
at times.
THE SECONDARY is not the
same one that picked off Reaves
nine aerials last year. The Tigers
have lost Buddy McClinton, who
is now playing for the Atlanta
Falcons.
Ive thought a lot about this
game, Reaves said. Ive never
lost at Florida Field, and I
would sure like to beat Auburn
here Saturday.
But the memory of the
drizzly day in Auburn last year
is not all that is on the junior
signal callers mind.
WE HAVE had so much
happen to us this year, and none
of it has been good, Reaves
said. If we were 7-0 Id feel a
lot different about the game (UF
is 5-2).
Id like to win it just to
prove we can do it against the
big team.
To win, Dunn feels Florida
will need its best effort.
WELL HAVE to play a
perfect game, Dunn said. Itll be
much like Alabama and
Tennessee in that we cannot let
them get ahead of us.
The game plan is much the

JOHN REAVES
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losses.
Well have to establish our
running game to keep their
linebackers from dropping

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NINE INTERCEPTIONS HAUNT QB

back, Reaves said. It is hard
throwing into seven men.
AUBURN DOES not have a
impressive a corp of linebackers
as Tennessee.

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But John Hayworth is as
good as the Vols Jackie
Walker, Dunn said. Walker
returned a Reaves pass for a
touchdown last week.

They dont look as strong
against the run as Tennessee,
Reaves said, so maybe we will
be able to get our rushing game
going early.



Auburn Stumbling Block For UF

By DOUG KEITH
Alligator Sports Writer
Auburn comes to town
Saturday and theyre loaded.
They have a stable full of horses
that is nothing less than
ominous. Sullivan, Beasley,
Zofko, Willingham, etc. Its a
long list.
A perrenial stumbling block
for the Gators, Auburn ruined a
near perfect season for the Super
Sophs last year. Vowing revenge
after the whipping suffered in
Cliff Hare Stadium, the Gators
have their work cut out.
ALTHOUGH UPSET in the
rain by LSU last Saturday,
Florida coaches feel Auburn has
one of the strongest teams in the
SEC in several years. Averaging
over 450 yards of total offense
per game, the Tigers both throw
and run well. The
Sullivan-to-Beasley combination
is dynamite.
On defense the Tigers boast
the best pass coverage in the
conference, giving up less than
100 yards per game to their last
four opponents which
included Tennessee.
Led by All-America candidate
Larry Willingham, the
Plainsmens defense will no
doubt set up in the seven deep
zone coverage they employed
last year and that Tennessee
used so successfully last week.
TO CRACK the Auburn pass
defense, the Gators will first
establish a ground attack to pull
the Auburn linebackers up close.
The return to action of Mike
Rich will help in that
department.
HAMLET
f notes
I d Take ne |
4 ; before I
I E studying
I Cliff's Notes...always the right
I prescription when you need
I help in understanding litera litera-1
-1 litera-1 ture. Prepared by educators.
I Easy to use. Titles available now
I cover nearly 200 frequently
I assigned plays
I : i
(a
I Look \
for the
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Station wherever
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I CliffS^Notes
i P. O. Box 80728,
1

On defense, the big blue has a
big job in stopping the
league-leading Tiger offense. The
task of rushing Sullivan will fall
mainly to Jack Youngblood and
Bob Harrell.
We can win if we take away
the bomb and stop their running
game, Youngblood said.

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Sullivan has been dropped one
time in six games.
THE GATORS have a lot
going for them despite the
impressiveness of the Auburn
record. Its Homecoming and this
Gator team has never lost at
Florida Field. Last years game
at Cliff Hare is a bitter memory
and revenge will be sought.

Well be sky high,
Youngblood predicted.
There is a lot of personal
feeling among some of the
players in this game.
After last years game,
Auburns starting tailback
Mickey Zofko made a remark to
the effect that Florida football
players werent very tough.

Friday, October 30,1970, The Florida Alligator,

JACK YOUNGBLOOD
remembers. Im personally
gonna prove to Mickey Zofko
that Florida football players are
tougher than Auburn football
players.
Last year Auburn rolled in
Cliff Hare Stadium. But this year
UF doesnt play there theyve
got em in The Pit.

Page 21



Page 22

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 30,1970

UF Pass Defense

Braces For Eagle

- =
;
| MARTY PERLMUTTERj
' . * u 1 ff'

Auburn has an outstanding
football team, Florida Head
Coach Doug Dickey said this
week as he prepared his Gators
to face the Tigers.
But it will be more like
feeding the Tigers Saturday at
Florida Field because of the lack
of a defensive backfield which
allows the opposition to rack up
yardage through the air easier
than if they were in Lear jets.
IT IS A fact that John
Clifford is only one interception
away from tying the university
record for most interceptions in
one season. Add to that the
team has a total of 18
interceptions in the seven games
played. But now look at the
yardage given up through the air.
The opposition has gained
1,585 yards through the air with
quarterbacks that dont compare
to UFs John Reaves who has
only 1,748 yards this season.
Scott Hunter, rated one of the
most consistent passers in the
SEC, Bobby Scott, Leo Hart and
Charlie Richards all are fine
passers but dont compare to
Reaves although the four have
had great games against the
Gators.
HUNTER, FOR Alabama,
completed seven of nine passes
in the first half against Florida
and finished with a percentage
of over 50 per cent, despite a
bruised shoulder. Scott, from
Tennessee, toyed with the Gator
secondary piling up 385 yards
through the air, despite the
presence of Gator defensive end
Jack Youngblood pressuring him
all day.
Not many teams will run over
the defensive line the Gators
start. Last week in Tennessee,
Youngblood, Robert Harrell and
Alan Cole stopped Curt Watson
and Don McCleary all during the
game until the last quarter, when
the game was out of reach.
But Auburn is a passing team
with the likes of Pat Sullivan at
quarterback and Terry Beasely
at split end.
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SULLIVAN GAINED 1,686
yards in the air last season as a
sophomore and set the Auburn
school record for total offense in
one season with 1,891 yards.
This year he is ahead of that
pace.
Auburn is the most explosive
team in the conference, Dickey
said. They can strike from
anywhere on the field.
Mike Rich returns at fullback
for the Gators after missing two
games because of broken ribs
suffered in the Florida State
game. His return may spark
Florida to an upset, something
the Gators desperately need at
this time.
THE REMAINING games for
the Gators this year are in state.
But this season may have ended
last week in Tennessee when the
Vols crushed UF 38-7.
The Gators can pull an upset,
but they cant fall behind in the
game if they want to win
Saturday. If Auburn scores first
and Florida doesnt come back
to tie the score immediately, it
will be Auburn all the way.
But John Reaves and his
playmates have something to
prove in this game. The Gators
have a lot riding on this game,
but so does Auburn.
Boozin Pickets
PONTIAC,Mich. Acting
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frequented by General Motors
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Or they buy a bottle of booze
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PHIL COPE
JOHN REAVES HIT IN VOLS' GAME
... quarterback must get more time to set up to throw

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Education
1. Initiated free state kindergarten
system
2. Stood up against unfair unjust
busing
3. University reform, with better
classroom utilization an
"expansion" program and not a
"caretaker" policy
4. Brought together private and
public college administrators for
first time to coordinate and plan
future and present needs for higher
education
5. Moved Florida teachers pay
scale to 12th highest in nation
6. Emphasized vocational and
rehabilitation schools
7. Initiated "Operation Concern"
in Gainesville

The Kirk-Osborne team can provide
the dynamic and efficient leadership
necessary for the 70s
Vote for Competency in State Government!
v.' .v , .v /.;.**. v,, / V f <* b V Campaign Treasurer,
' Alachua County Republicans
. c f r *. r .*,* , ** r, *.
. %V* i * * a*ea + 4*%**e

PftkJ Political Advartiwmant
Let
The Record
Speak
facts not fiction
KIRK-OSBORNE
Accomplishments

Environment
1. Fought the dumping of toxic
gases which helped lead to
Government ban on "ocean
dumping"
2. Established Florida Air and
Water Pollution Control
Commission nation's toughest
laws on pollution with civil and
criminal penalties
3. Florida's air pollution second
lowest in nation
4. Asked for moratorium on
Florida Barge Canal until a new
study can be completed, which
considers effects on nearby
waterways
5. Appointed Governor's
Committee on natural resources -a
liasion of private citizens and
conservation groups
6. Twelve new State Parks l4l
new campsites for a total of 2,562
campsites within the state

Friday, October 30,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Efficiency
1. Closed "notorious" road prisons
continuing investigation
2. States first Central Planning
Agency which projects 5 and 10
year plans for sound state
government growth
3. State agency heads now meet
together for regular management
meetings
4. Installed uniform personnel
system for all state employees
5. Saved Florida taxpayers money
by streamlining the management of
state agencies, installation of data
processing and other business-like
approaches to state finance.
s

Page 23



Page 24

I, The Florida AHigator, Friday, October 30,19)0

Dominos Pizza
4, TWO FREE COKES A
With Every Pizza Ordered \
Mflf, \ The Harmon Football Forecast ( fIWV
|H H \ { ITEXAS 6MICHIGAN 11-AIR FORCE 16 ALABAMA 1 /
' ; 2NOTRE DAME 7STANFORD 12 MISSISSIPPI 17 HOUSTON \ I Bl\
f 3OHIO STATE BARKANSAS 13-ARIZONA STATE 18-U.C.L.A ) /
WH= \ i 4NEBRASKA 9L. S. U. 14 MISSOURI 19 GEORGIA TECH / / "L"
BjSjjKSSS2|S \\ STENNESSEE 10AUBURN *ISSOUTHERN CAL 20 SAN DIEGO STATE Z*S
I Saturday, Oct. 31 Major Colleges It's that time of the season when we feel
||f Air Force 31 Arizona 7 we should remind readers that our weekly
Alabama 27 Mississippi State 22
'Wa 4pJwP Arkansas 35 Texas a&m 7 ratings of the Top Twenty Teams are based
II Boston College 20 Army l3 io on a team's power quotient, NOT on games
'Voung 22 wJSSfng 17 won and lost, NOR on personal opinion. The
Buckneii 21 Rutgere 17 power quotient itself is based on an average
cincinnnati 34 Wichita 6 of how well a team does against all
cienison it KES? 14 opposition... in other words, it's a past
cStt. 30 cSiln 27 parformance rating. Each of tha 640 football
Dartmouth 24 Yale 17 teams we follow receives an adjusted rating
Dayton 26 Northern Illinois io each week. These twenty, then, in our
Furman State 23 East Carolina 21 opinion, are the most powerful football
Georgia 25 south Carolina 7 teams in the nation this week I
Georgia Tech 21 Duke 15 , ...
Harvard 20 Pennsylvania is This explains why a team s position in the
Kentucky Jf No.'ceroiin. state s Top 20 might fluctuato from weak to weak
HOURS mIS state S southn >a Mississippi 24 wen though it remains undefeated. It must HOURS
1 Michigan 35 Wisconsin 13 maintain its expected level of power. For
Minnesota State 26 towa l j example, the Air Force and Arizona State
5:00pm1:00am Sun -Thor SEXii !! Sr New Mexicp 24 El Paso 21 AVERAGE of their performances each week I P oUFI- inur
North Carolina 24 Virginia 13 .
9.nn#.w, c,: c-i North Texas 20 New Mexico state 17 does not place them among the top five or c.nn onn c e
5.0Upm2.00 am Fr. A Sat No*.* o even amoog the top ten. (At lea*, not yet.) 5:00 pm2:ooam Fn_A Sat
DOMINOS SShSSI State 22 ISSas S ,e 21 resulting power quotients would rate HOMINOC
witiii *# pacific 27 Santa Barbara 19 them as underdogs against many of the top W
Pittsburgh 23 Syracuse 20 teams. (You re right, we ARE wrong 25 per
W it BISS?. iJ cent of the time I)
D ADDIC louthem* < caHfomia § 8 Many letteraivriters feel that when e teem WHATS NFW
V fl W* W 0 Stanford 26 Oregon state 14 has been beaten a couple of times, it should v I ! V V :
Texas ssee it s!maj. Forest io be dropped from any ranking. In some
Kic cur io c. Texas Tech ?i mcJ or 16 national rankings, this happens. We maintain
nZcU 37 Washington 0 State 7 ** " 9 ** Bnd W9n thr " tim DEED A klh
C-_* c 7C Utah 20 San Jose 7 losers are among the finest teams in the |ji |lf AIIII
beating For 75 Utah State 27 Colorado State 16 llnt _. aflrf . rQ+ . 1/kLll Mill/
Vanderbilt 17 Tuiane is country, ana should be rated accordingly.
Carry Out Delivery v.pT ova 27 wmS r m & Mary 7 Alabama and U.C.L.A., for example, have
Was y SSiiSSw. 2 ; been bwten three times, but certainly are lit mr ||AU| II
373-3377 Western Michigan 21 Ohio u io among the top teams in the nation. Ml] MV
Other Games South and Southwest This is probably only a partial answer to *" lllfc lIV f f aa
stitaV la it the Q*tions we receive, asking why
Arkansas Tech 20 Southern State 7 we Still include Missouri in OUT Top A X
UAUCTAUIUr- Chattanooga g 2 f 20... why umMttttd teams such s, AT
lUnQrVrl InU US.m n SSky IJ te? y chi,n IS Dartmouth and Toledo aren't included (our
Elizabeth city 21 Fayetteville 13 Elite Group, as we've said in the past, is not
VvH GiemJiMe 14 weTtva. state 8 haven for undefeated teams!)... or why
<* Hampden-Sydney 30 Henry J Stanford might be 16th one week and 9th ill JIJ6fV
FRI. SAT. SUN. ST'seSST a SiSuSSSK, the >'*'* al ra '' s interesting to speculate /iLAIfV^
D a Jacksonville 26 nw Louisiana 20 > *> relative power of college football
rastram 1-Coleslaw tsp* I! gS"' Newm,n iJ teams, and naturally, ours in only one
Rapps Dressing Se Tennessee is tSTSS, iJ P* nio "- We can be a. wrong a. anyone elwl
ali in one" SSgSri.n Io iJ squabble, that will be brewing Saturday, it's I I Iff #1 sis #
iewanee M mSSSlton & Lee 7 <****** to where any of the tofwanked
se Louisiana 27 Youngstown 14 powers will hav6>much trouble. (It seems we
sw Texas 27 East Texas 25 made a foolish statement like that a couple
************************** Texas Lutheran 23 Jackson State 16 f W6eks *9 about 8 181811 Called Southern
Dmacf D*al o JO ID West bertv 33 Tssrh Mississippi!) Our new Number One teem,
KOfIST M6l 2.4 VLB Western Kentucky 26 Morehead 7 Texas, will beet S.M.U. by 28 TO GO ALONG WITH
I Wofford 40 Waynesburg 7 pojntj
WeTw!ll"Deliver | the MST DAMN SANDWICHES
Sat And Sun INTHE AREA
From 12:00 Noon- FREE DELIVERY DAY £ NITE
ENJOY AT RAPP^
#-ii i\nr r university plaza and cin city
GatorsGive Auburn 3761252
A Rapp In The Mouth! s 37ft 1230 ;
. .idgai'i -t, ,V,v, .f tt(< t 4 4 4-4 44.4.. ee 4 4-4 .. ... _ 4 *