Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Goodsteins Plan
Fails Prematurely

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
Bob Goodsteins brainchild
died prematurely.
Goodstein, president of
Murphree Area, planned to sell
Cokes at Florida Field during
home football games for less
than 25 cents a cup the price
charged by the official
concession.
HIS PLANS, however, were
dashed before he could
undertake the venture.
Weve run it around as much
as we could and our plans just
havent woiked out, he said. I
doubt if well ever sell them.
Apparently the problems
Goodstein confronted while
trying to undersell the existing
concession sanctioned by the
Athletic Association (AA) were
unsurmountable, although
Goodstein wont say so.
Michael L. Bryant of the
Legal Aid and Defender Clinic
said prior to Goodsteins
attempt that it Wouldn't be a
mystery that theyre going to
have a hassle.
BRYANT SAID the AA has
exclusive control over
concessions in the area of
Florida Field.
UF AA concessions manager
808 GOODSTEIN
... cheap eokes didn't sell

Showdown Wants
Draft Boycott

By DAN MCDONALD
Alligator Writer
A movement for national
support of a draft boycott,
started by several California
peace groups, has apparently not
spread to the UF campus.
The plan calls for youths to
collectively defy their induction
orders after the first of Jan.
Through mass violations it is
felt, the government will not be
able to prosecute everyone
involved.
THE ORGANIZING group,

RON SACHS, Alligator staff
writer, reports on the firing
of Capt. W. L. Guthrie by
Eastern Airlines page 9
Classifieds 12.13
Editorials 8
Movies 12,13
What's Happening 5
LIU.. I -

W.D. Squires said he was
unaware of Goodsteins decision
to not sell the cheaper cokes. 1
knew he was going to try to sell'
them, he said.
Earlier, Squires said, He
(Goodstein) will do it until the
police catch him then hell sit
out the rest of the game in the
police station.
GOODSTEIN SAID prior to
the UF-Richmond game, he
called the local Coke distributor
to cancel a cola dispensing
machine he had on reserve when
he found out he couldnt sell the
cokes.
Coke officials said Squires had
already called them and
cancelled the order for him.
Goodstein said he was unaware
of Squires* action, and added
that he never even talked to him.
Goodstein would not disclose
whether he changed his mind
because of pressure from the
AA, but this is believed to be
the reason for his change of
plans.
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR Ray
Graves and UF Attorney Tom
Biggs could not be reached late
Sunday for comment.
Goodstein said his venture
would have benefited not only
Murphree Area residents, but
other students who feel they
arent being properly served by
the AA soft-drink concessions.
Negotiations between
Goodstein and Graves ensued
following Squires' statement.
Graves said Squires was just
taken by surprise when he made
foe adverse remark.
Goodstein said a similar
project to provide students with
less expensive beverages has been
recently undertaken by Student
Government.
A verification of the project
could not be received Sunday.

Showdown, feels the plan will be
a meaningful action against the
war. It is trying to unite all
resistance groups, draft
counseling services and
universities.
As of this date, however, no
known contact has been made
by Showdown to the UF draft
counseling service.
The local service is run by the
Presbyterian Social Club with
the support and assistance of the
Student Government.
I HAVE NOT heard
anything about the movement,
SG President Steve Uhlfelder
said. As far as I know, no one
in our program has been
contacted.
Uhlfelder explained that even
if contacted, the draft
counseling group would not
officially take part in the
proposed draft boycott.
Our service is non-ppUfical,
Uhlfelder said. We tell
interested people the legal
options available. We would
never try directing students in
that type action.
UHLFELDER SAID he felt
(SEE SHOWDOWN* PAGE 3)

X

7r
WHERES THE ACTION?

Nowhere! This is the Plaza of the Americas as it
was yesterday, when the Enviromenlal Action
Group (EAG) was to have had a rally, marking the
beginning of a campaign by the EAG to make

The
Florida Alligator

V 01.63, No. 26

PILOT INJURED

Cadet Dies In Plane

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
One UF student was killed
and another seriously injured
when their small rented plane
crashed north of Gainesville
Friday.
Joseph S. Vallejo, 24, 3BA,
passenger in the craft, was
crushed to death in the
wreckage.
THE PILOT, Francis 0. Rawls
HI, 23, suffered extensive facial
fractures. His condition was
listed as satisfactory late
Sunday.
Vallejo, a UF ROTC cadet,
had gone up in the plane to
practice for an air-ground
exercise which was to be held
Saturday. Rawls, the pilot, is not
a member of the ROTC unit.
The exercise planned for
Saturday was one using air to
ground communications and

(k,, VEMP |P J|
K
hi
:"3. pp v M J 8 fc HpF- w m
MARK HAUSER
HIGHER

Singing Sly Stone's Higher/' the Rhodes
Brothers finished their four night-stand at the
Rathskeller. Saturday night's two-shows were said
to be the best of alt the Miami Beach trio's

THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Rawls apparently volunteered to.
take Vallejo up for a practice
run/* Executive Officer Lt. Col.
C.A. Valey said.
RAWLS RENTED the single
engine Piper Cub at the
Gainesville Airport and took off
at 4 pm The airport called
Valey at 7 pm and told him the
plane was an hour overdue.
Members of the ROTC unit
were on the ground
communicating with the aircraft.
The last communication from
the craft was received about
5: IS pm
Valey said Rawls had just put
the plane into a steep bank turn
when he apparently lost control.
A 23 pound radio in Vallejos
lap could have slipped and
jammed up against the control
stick due to the sharp turn.
THE PLANE hit the ground
at about a 40 degree angle and
spun around. The cockpit

Gainesville voters more aware of the petitions that
will appear on next month's ballot for the Florida
general elections. See a related story on Page 4.

performances while at UF. The Rat fared pretty
well Saturday, considering the Rhodes Brothers
were in competition with the movie If*' and
a _e ana*.- e_ ta .. ;* ...
Jonnny wintsf ftivwotT*

Monday October 26,1970

collapsed, crushing Vallejo In the
front seat against the instrument
panel.
Rawls, piloting the craft from
the rear seat, was thrown against
the front seat upon impact,
tearing his seat belt from the
floor and snapping the flight
stick.
There were no witnesses to
the crash and the wreckage was
not located until 1 am
Saturday, seven hours later.
VALEY ORGANIZED search
parties of ROTC cadets and set
up a command post at the units*
headquarters on campus and also
at the airport.
Cadets searched the area
where the plane was last seen
about one mile west of Waldo
Road and south of the
Gainesville Dragway. Valey said
jSEE CADET PAGE 3)



!, Tlw Florida ANifator, Monday, October 26,1970

Page 2

Homecoming Speakers

I
MARY BROOKS
... Mortar Board-Savant
U.S. Mint Director
Speaks At Banquet
By MURIEL EVERTON
Alligator Writer
Director of the United States Mint
Mrs. Mary T. Brooks will be the speaker
at the Mortar Board Savant Banquet,
Oct. 30.
The banquet, combining the women's
honoraries for the second year, will be
held in the Reitz Union Ballroom. A
reception for Mrs. Brooks will begin at
5:15 p.m. followed by the banquet at
6:00.
TOASTMKSTRESS will be Dr. Mama
V. Brady, associate professor of logic.
Mrs. Brooks, the third woman ever to
fill this position, was appointed
twenty-eighth director of the mint in
1969 by President Nixon.
Her responsibilities indude the
manufacture and distribution of the
supply of coinage, and supervision of
governments holdings of monetary
metals, the refining of gold and silver,
coinage for foreign governments,
manufacture of medals for the armed
services, and the manufacture and sale to
die public of medals of historic interest
and special coin sets of numismatic
interest.
MRS. BROOKS had been assistant
chairman of the Republican National
Committee before her appointment as
director of the mint.
She became a committee member after
the death of her husband, Illinois U. S.
Senator C. Wayland Brooks. She was
elected vice chairman of the committee
and was an official Hostess to the
National Convention in Chicago in 1960.
Mrs. Brooks was also a senator in the
Idaho state legislature where die served as
chairman of the Republican caucus.
Tickets for the banquet may be
obtained at the Mortar Board Savant
office, Room 303, Reitz Union. The cost
is $3.2S for students and $5,25 for
non-students.

the FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

I
ft a
RICHARD HATCHER
... at ODK breakfast
Black Mayor Guest
At HC Breakfast
By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writer
Richard G. Hatcher, the first black
mayor of Gary, Indiana will also be the
first black man ever to speak at a UF
Homecoming function.
Hatcher, elected in 1967 on a 32-page
platform for progress, will be the guest
speaker for the Homecoming breakfast
jointly sponsored by Omicron Delta
Kappa (ODK) and the American
Association of University Professors.
THE BREAKFAST to be held at the
Flagler Inn, will begin at 8 am Saturday.
Robert Mautz, chancellor of the
Florida Board of Regents, will serve as
master of ceremonies.
Hatcher's speech will deal with race
relations in American cities and what
students can do about them. Following
tibe breakfast, Hatcher will hold an
hour-long informal question-and-answer
session with those attending the
breakfast.
ODK PRESIDENT Ralph Glatfelter
said the choice of Hatcher as guest
speaker is a sincere effort o n the part
of ODK to make Homecoming useful.
A lot of people have been running
around saying they did not like this or
that about Homecoming, Glatfelter said.
We felt Hatcher has something more
to say than the pious platitudes of
politicians who usually speak at UF, he
added.
Students and faculty are invited to
attend the breakfast. Tickets are available
in room 304 of the Reitz Union. Prices
are $2.50 for students and $5 for faculty.
There are 600 tickets available.

- 11 1 " 1 l
University of Florida Music Department
* and J. Wayne Reitz Union
"7* present
THE TUESDAY EVENING
zja l CONCERT SERIES
THE
W* \\ UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY
\*L AYN J MI ORCHESTRA
C M y Tuesday,Oct27
Ifni University Auditorium
8:15 p.m. free

I
CARL ALBERT
... FBK banquet
House Leader
Talks To FBK
By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Honorable Carl Albert (D-Olda.),
majority leader of the U. S. House of
Representatives, will be the main speaker
at the Florida Blue Key banquet (FBK)
Friday.
State Sen. Jerry Thomas, president of
the Florida Senate, will serve as
toastmaster for the 41st annual banquet,
held at 5:15 p.m. in the Florida Gym.
ALBERT HAS represented his district
in the House of Representatives since
1947. He was chosen majority whip in
1955 and majority leader in 1962. He is
considered a major candidate for the
position of Speaker of the House.
Albert served on the Democratic
National Committee and several
committees in the House.
Thomas, from Riviera Beach, was
chosen the Most Outstanding Member of
the Florida Senate** in 1970, and one of
the Five Outstanding Young Men of
Florida.**
WE EXPECT it to be an exciting
Banquet,** FBK President Steve Zack
said.
**lt should live up to its expectations as
the largest political caucus in the state.
All candidates for major office in Florida
have sent replies that they will be in
attendance.*.
Tickets for the banquet will be on sale
beginning today in Room 303 of the
Reitz Union between 2 and 5 pjn., for
$6.



UhHelder's
HC Stand
Clarified
7 have encouraged the
people who want to
participate, to participate
in away that is
meaningful.
Steve Uhlfelder

Cadet...

IJFBOM PAGE ONE^jj
searchers passed within 300
yards of the plane several times.
Witnesses at the scene said
that Vallejo was alive after the
crash, but apparently died in the
plane before searchers reached
it.
RAWLS SAID he didnt
remember hearing any search
vehicles. He was apparently
knocked unconscious for several
hours and then stumbled from
the wreckage, calling to the unit
that found the plane.
He (Rawls) was hanging on
the wing of the plane when we
reached him, Sgt. H.
Montgomery of the Alachua
County Sheriffs Department,
said.
Rawls was taken to Shands
Teaching Hospital and later
transfered to the Veterans
FM Dmmllm
Moved Up
The deadline for turning in
Blue Key applications has been
changed from Oct. 26 to Oct.
30.
The applications can be
picked up at the information
desk on die second floor of the
Union, or at the activities desk
on the third floor. They must be
turned in to the Blue Key office.

HOMECOMING
TRAVELERS:
HoWay Ranch
Mofel t
Restaurant
Bronson, Fla.
24 milos SW
of UF on SR-24
*
Call collect
. ... o ;
for reservations
Friday and
Saturday only
486-2121
real pit B-B-Q, tool

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writar
As Homecoming nears, confusion reigns about
the attitude of Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder.
Uhlfelder has been critical of Homecoming and at
one time suggested abolishing it. His stand was
incorrecdy interpreted to mean that he would
boycott Homecoming or would try to cancel it.
HE SAID he made the suggestion last spring when
tension on campus was high following the Kent
State event.
The references made to calling off Homecoming
were based upon the assumption that if the campus
situation was like it was in May, Homecoming might
be called off as a legitimate protest, he said.
The atmosphere seems to be quieter now, but I
still feel it was a legitimate suggestion.
UHLFELDER said he was expressing his personal
feelings and they were presented to the
Homecoming staff before planning began.
I by no means thought they would be fully
accepted, and I didnt push them.
He emphasized that he is not boycotting

Administration Hospital where
he is undergoing treatment in an
intensive care unit.
INVESTIGATORS said the
25-year-old plane appeared in
good condition and had passed
an annual inspection last week.
They said there was fuel in the
tank and the field was smooth

Showdown .

U^OMPAGEON^J
the movement would probably
fail though, because of the
nature of the proposal.
The movement calls for the
ultimate commitment,
Uhlfelder said. I doubt if that
many people in the country are
really that ready to go to jail for
their convictions.
If a person went to jail for
his beliefs, I could respect him,
Uhlfelder said. But I dont
think there are that many
students ready to go to that
extreme. In the end, probably a
handful of people would wind
up in jail.
ORGANIZERS OF the plan
feel it will become one of the
nations biggest peace
movements to date.
In a statement sent to The
Alligator, they claim to be

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enough for a no-power landing.
National Transportation
Safety Board investigator Henry
Moyers is supervising the joint
investigation as to the cause of
the crash. He said the details of
the investigation would be
released by the department in
Washington at a later date.

working with student bodies
down to the high school level,
and feel the boycott will
effectively stop the war.
It also states that though
students do not have the power
to vote, they collectively have
the power to stop the war.
Uhlfelder feels the aim at
students is another weak part of
the proposal.
Even if they could get all the
students to boycott the draft,
the government would draft
non-students to make it up. In
the long run, people not in
school would suffer, not the
government.
Trapped Rabbit
An adult rabbit, when
trapped, often will thump the
ground with its hind feet to
warn others in the area.

Homecoming and he is not encouraging others to do
so.
I HAVE encouraged the people who want to
participate, to participate in away that is
meaningful," he said.
I am encouraging people not to spend money
for the sake of spending mcr.ey on a project they
can use their time and effort during Homecoming to
show student concern.
Students can talk to alumni during the weekend
about problems such as the environment, racial
prejudice, the war and the 18-year-old vote, he said.
UHLFELDER WILL not ride in the parade as
student body presidents in the past have done, but
he will participate as a student and will try to talk
to alumni and legislators during the weekend.
Uhlfelder said he hoped his Homecoming stand
will not be made a major issue in his administration.
Homecoming is not the big problem on the
campus; he is just trying to make it into something
meaningful, he said.

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Monfey. Octob* 28.1970, Th. FtorMa AWtor.

:Ji
Bt
'M Hp9| BE BL,
m
k% Mii
STEVE UHLFELDER
... HC no big deal

Page 3



Page 4

Th Florid* AlHgrtor-, Monday, Orfhwr 28, t7O

EAG Rally
Fails To Get
Big Turnout

Police To Use Camera
Primarily For Training

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
Our videotape camera will
never be used for intimidating or
recording events at any peaceful
and lawful demonstration,**
University Police Department
Chief Audie Shuler said.
The statement came in
response to an attempt to define
the exact use of the police
video-tape camera that is
awaiting public bidding.
ACCORDING to Shuler, the
primary purpose of the
videotape camera is as a training
device in the Police Recruit
school. Riot control is only a
secondary purpose. We wont
even bring it to a demonstration
until it has been declared a
disruptive gathering.**
A UPD spokesman explained
that the camera will be used in a
series of police training script

Violinist In Concert Tuesday
The UF Symphony Orchestra will present Elwyn Adana in a violin
solo concert Tuesday at 8:15, in the University Auditorium.
Adams is a black violinist who joined the department of music
Acuity this fall. He will play the Beethoven Violin Concerto in
recognition of the Beethoven Bicentennial year now being celebrated
all over the world.
WE FEEL that this is an occasion for satisfaction and pride for UF
and particularly for black students. Reid Poole, chairman of the
department of music, said.

1971
Seminole
at jennings.
5 8 pm.

By CAR LOB J. LtCEA
Alligator omTt wnxar
A Sunday rally by one Environmental Action
Group (EAG) in the Plaza of the Americas fizzled
when UF students failed to show up.
The rally was supposed to mark the beginning of
a door-to-door campaign by the EAG to let voters in
Gainesville know of amendments on the Florida
ballot for next months general election.
THE THREE amendments EAG wants to bring to
the attention of the voters are:
e Pollution abatement An amendment, to
Article VII of the Florida constitution by adding
subsection 14, which will permit the issuance, when
authorized by law, of state bonds to finance the
construction of air and water pollution control and
abatement and solid waste disposal facilities.
Land sales A proposal to change Article X,-
section 11, providing authority for sale of
submerged lands only when in the public interest
and providing authority for private use of

filmings. Twenty scripts have
already been professionally
written. They will be performed
by police officers playing various
roles. The police recruit class
will then analyze the film and
decide if the officer handled the
situation correctly.
It will also be used to film live
situations. A police officer
directing traffic may be the
subject of a film shooting.
THE UNIT consists of a
camera and a play-back, and will
cost approximately $1,500. The
exact price cannot be
determined until the police tool
is placed on public bid.
In the past UF has borrowed
the citys video equipment to
use in case of campus
disturbances.
Its purely for identification
purposes. It can be used as
admissable evidence, though, in

There will be another
rally next Sunday. We are
not blaming the students,
there was not enough
publicity.

AUDIE SHULER
...UPD chief
prosecuting a crime. We used it
last year after Kent State, when,
for a while things were touch
and go, the spokesman
concluded.

HAVE YOU READ THESE INSPIRING BOOKS?
The Prophet
by KAHLIL GIBRAN
This past year alone 400,000 people in search
of life's meaning turned to Gibran's
masterpiecetoday it is even more read and £ C Viflg
loved than when it first appeared 47 years ||T SJrjfj Wgtk
(and 3Va million copies) ago.
85th printing. $4.50. JJ
Buy This and Other
Inspirational Books by
Rod McKuen-at
\
CHESNUTS
Downtown at 106 W. University
Avenue and in The Gainesville Mall

sovereignty submerged lands only when not
contrary to the public interest.
The 18-year-old vote the controversial issue
once defeated in the legislature, but now put by the
legislature in the ballot for the general election.
This part of the ballot contains proposals giving
18-year-olds the right to vote in Florida, making 18
legal age (making contracts, drinking, marriage) or
both.
Brad Raffle, EAG president, said the rally was
not publicized enough to provide students with the
information neccessary.
STUDENT BODY President Steve Uhlfelder, who
also showed up in the plaza, also blamed the lack of
publicity for the failure of the rally to attract more
people. In all, about 10 people came to the rally;
mostly EAG and Student Government officials.
There will be another rally next Sunday, Raffle
said. We are not blaming the students, there was
not enough publicity.
This time we are providing information in
advance for them to come, Raffle said.

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BRAD RAFFLE
EAGPresktont



UnitedFund
Support Low

By Alligator Services
Chairman of the UF United
Fund Drive, Dr. E. T. York Jr.,
provost for agriculture, said
Sunday he was greatly
concerned over the manner in
which UF is lagging in its
support of the United Fund
program this year.
Although our 1971 goal is
substantially below that of
comparable communities at this
date we have reached only
approximately two-thirds of this
goal, York said.
UF and Gainesville have for a
number of years had a record of
participation in United Fund
decidedly below average. Less
than half the UF faculty and
staff contributed anything to
United Fund last year, and the
average contribution from those
who did was about a fourth of
the national average for
comparable salary levels, he said.
GAINESVILLES per capita
contribution last year was $2.16
compared to $3.73 for
Jacksonville and $3.82 for all
cities of the nation. Comparable
university communities in the
South, Athens, Georgia, and
Tuscaloosa, Alabama, gave $4.22
and $4.02 per capita
respectively.
In fact, all the United Funds
in Alabama and Mississippi,
states with the lowest average
income in the nation, had
greater per capita participation
than Gainesville which has the

PEACEFUL CARS? Not exactly but the Vets for Peace are holding
an important meeting, Tuesday at 7:30 pm, at the Bench and Bar.
All members and new veterans are urged to attain.
SEE ME ... Sunday, the Union will show Ingmar Bergmans,
Through a Glass Darkly. Show time is 5:30, 8;30, and 10:30 p.m.
in the Union Auditorium. Tickets are 50 cents.
BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL... To Be Young, Gifted, and Black, a
long running off-broadway hit, will be presented at the Union, Nov. 5,
at 8:30 p.m
TEKE FOR TWO ... The brothers of Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity
and the sisters of Phi Mu sorority are conducting the sixth annual
Teke Canned Food Drive today and tomorrow.
The collected cans are donated to the Red Cross who then
distribute them to the needy in Alachua County.
NEED A H088Y?... The Collector will be shown Friday and
Saturday at 5:30, 8, and 10:30 p.m. in the Union Aud. Tickets are 50.
cents.
GIVE PEACE STILL ONE MORE CHANCE. There will be a peace
mass in commemoration of the moratorium anniversary, at the 5:30
p.m folk mass, Friday, at the Catholic Student Center. The church
will also be open all day Saturday for meditation.

1971
seniinole
at lnime.
.) 8 pm. j

ma
|jsggf |
m
E. T. YORK
... United Fund chairman
second highest income per
household in Florida.
York said he was citing these
statistics not to criticize past
performance, or to exert
pressure on anyone in
connection with the current
drive.
HOWEVER, the fact that
we as a university and a
community have not given
better support to the United
Fund in the past means that
many extremely useful and
needed programs and services
have gone without support, or,
at best, have been grossly
underfunded, he said.
He urged everyone to consider
carefully the great needs of our
community which can only be
met through the various agencies
supported by the United Fund.

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Red
is no
weenie.
So don't put mustard on &>tq Red. Mo matter
how hunqry you are. He's not lunch. He's a pen.
A -funky red pen With a soft tip that puts out
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or anyth inq else ha ndy. You don't
throw him m the qarbaqe,either:JK J
WJhen he runs out of ink, he's M/ / K \
re-fillabie.Biq Red. from Parkergr J 'Ymes 1
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WOMEN. TOO. DON'T YOU KNOW SOMEBODY WORTH IT? A
Th Parkar sn Company. Janesville. VUscoo**. USA


Monday, Octotoar 26,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

>.ll* Florid.

II Albert Pictures
On Sale At HC
By CARL CRAWFORD
* Alligator Staff Writer
The Environmental Action Group (EAG) is
sponsoring one of the UFs former caged greats in
a new promotion.
The EAG will be selling one of the last pictures of
Albert the Alligator ever taken, to students, faculty
and alumni.
THE PICTURE was one of the last taken of the
released UF mascot, and was taken by EAG
photographer Bud Skidman.
Hal Barcey, secretary for environmental affairs,
said Sunday, the picture will be sold to raise money
for EAG, and especially to pay for EAG
photographic expenses.
We are starting a regular service, Barcey said.
Any photograph our photographers take will be
available in a 9 by 7 size for 40 cents a piece, or
three forsl.
The money earned from the picture sales will be
used to finance the new photographic department,
promotion, publicity and education.
THE EAG HAS two volunteer photographers in
its serivce, Bud Skidman and Mike Gorham.
There will be 1,000 of the Albert pictures
produced, and some of these pictures will be sold at
the Homecoming Game on the 31st.
Those desiring copies of the picture should
contact the EAG office in the Student Activities
Office in the Reitz Union.

Cleaver Says Leary I*l Jordan

ALGIERS (UPI) Black
Panther Information Minister
Eldridge B. Cleaver said Sunday
Dr. Timothy F. Leary had been
granted political asylum by
Algeria but had gone to Amman,
Jordan, to study the Palestine
liberation movement.
Cleaver, in an exclusive
interview with UPI, said Leary
had been accompanied on the
trip to Amman by his wife and
three other persons. He
identified them as Martin
Kenner, national chairman of
die Black Panthers in New York,
Field Marshal Don Cox of
Cleaver's eight-man Algiers staff,
. and a Miss Dohm.
He refused to say whether
Miss Dohm was Bemadine, 28, a
leader of the militant
Weatheimen in the United States
and a recent addition to the
Federal Bureau of Investigation's
most wanted list, or her sister
Jennifer.
LET'S SAY both are
welcome here, Cleaver said.
There was no official
confirmation from the
government on the granting of

U Ir akSSMSSS&I mmfftt \
41\ t A
With a Fief 850 Spider it's
there: sports car sports
ride, great sports car look. A Bertone body
Q Cf"\ jammed with the good things of driving like front disc
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bucket seats. The driver's car-all there because it's a Fiat!
o EMUaa
HarfredAuto Imports
_ r You iPw. JElf-ffJ e r

All I can say is that I received a phone call at home
from my office saying Prof. Leary had arrived. This
simply shows that J. Edgar Hoover and his FBI is a
paper tiger.
Eldridge Cleaver

asylum to Leary, who escaped
last month from a California
prison. High Algerian sources
said Saturday Leary had left
Algeria that day on the advice of
government officials until
things simmer down.
Leary flew to Amman, via
Paris, according to the sources.
Airport sources in Beirut said
Leary arrived in the Lebanese
capital Sunday on a flight from
Cairo. They said- he was
accompanied by an unidentified
white woman and an
unidentified Negro. The three
went underground immediately
and their whereabouts are not
known.
CLEAVER, SEATED in a
plastic-covered black and blue
chair in his office in the hilltop
Black Panther headquarters, said
Leary was studying the Palestine
liberation movement with a view

H ij BUkw 1 f jf*' m
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Sr *-* ... £
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to denouncing U. S.
intervention in the Middle East
where it uses Israel as a tool.*'
He said, however, the
Panthers had no immediate plans
to adopt the military methods of
the Palestine guerrillas.
Each movement has to adapt
its own methods to its particular
condition,** he said. But we
have no reservations at all about
methods using armed struggle."
He refused to say how Leary
arrived in Algeria. All I can say
is that I received a phone call at
home from my office saying
Prof. Leary had arrived. This
simply shows that J. Edgar
Hoover and his FBI- is a paper
tiger."
Leary was serving a
one-to-10 year sentence at a
state prison in California for
possession of marijuana when he
escaped Sept. 13.

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. L take advantage of this special U
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I XEROX SPECIALIST I
I 1718 W.University |
I THE |
COPY CENTER
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J We specialize in thesis and 1
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I OTHER LOCATIONS |
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SS£ : ' r P* : '
Georgia Places First
In Debate Tournament

By MARIAN JEORUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writar
The University of Georgia
captured the number one
position at the Third Annual
Gator Invitational Debate
T oumament, junior division,
held here Friday and Saturday
by winning 11 out of 12 rounds.
The intercollegiate debate
tournament, hosted by the UF
Debate Society included student
participants from North
Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama,
Georgia, Virginia and Florida.
THIS YEARS intercollegiate
debate topic is: Resolved: That
the Federal Government Should
Adopt a Program of Compulsory
Wage and Price Controls. The
same topic is debated
throughout the academic year.
Samford University of
Birmingham, Alabama, placed
second in over-all wins with a
10*2 record.
Broward Junior College,
Emory University, and Florida
State University also ranked in
the top five.
UF DEBATERS fared 7-5
overall.
Affirmative debaters Doug
Clark, who placed ninth out of

Prof. Criticizes Kent Report

KENT, Ohio (UPI) Defying
court officials to hold him in
contempt, a Kent State
University professor Sunday
criticized a special grand jury
report on disorders athii
school last spring. He said the
report contained naive and
stupid conclusions.
Glenn Frank, a geology
professor at KSU for 17 years,
issued his statement in response
to comments by Seabury H.
Ford, erne of three special
prosecutors who conducted the
grand jury investigation.
FORD AND Frank were
quoted in an article published in
die Akron Beacon Journal.
Frank said he spoke... in
contempt of court, in contempt
of the naive and stupid
conclusions of the special
Portage County grand jury, and
specifically as to their reasons
for the May 4 disturbances.
The grand jury indicted 25
Flyin* Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
For information call
CASSRS
M THE AIR
378-2646

TOM KENNEDY
DAVID BEERS AND SID HILL
... top UF debater and tournament director

172 speakers, and George
Braddock won four rounds and
\>st two.
Negative debaters Mike
Joannou, Rob Gidel and Paul
Rosenthal won three of their six
rounds.
THE UNIVERSITY of
Georgia had the top two-man
affirmative team, which has an
undefeated record.
Samford University ranked
first in negative debate. Initially,
Samford was tied with
University of Georgia at 5-1, but
the tie was broken by a count of
individual speakers accumulated
points.

The grand jury indicted 25 persons in connection
with the May disorders which ended when the Ohio
National Guardsmen opened fire at anti-war
demonstrators, killing four students.

persons in connection with the
May disorders which ended
when the Ohio National
Guardsmen opened fire at
anti-war demonstrators, killing
four students..
THE GRAND jury did not
indict any guardsmen, saying
they fired in self-defense.
The permissive attitude of the
university to a large extent was
responsible for the disorders and
slayings, the jury said.
Ford told UPI Sunday I was
misquoted, referring to the
newspaper which reported he
said the National Guard should
have shot all troublemakers
during the disorders.
FORD WAS quoted as saying
I think the whole damn
country is not going to quiet

AU-CAMPUS TOURNAMENTS
1970-1971
U Billiards, Chess, >£2B/
Bowling, Bridge &
£ Table Tennis.
B § Individual trophies for each event
Students, staff & Faculty may participata
Oct. 26
All others begin Oct. 28 or 29
and run concurrently
you can enter only one category
HHEITZ UNION GAMES AREA
I 1118 l ' I. II I I I Mll I. I

Visiting coaches were
pleased with the high caliber of
competition at the Gator Junior
Tournament and also the
smootheness with which the
tournament was run, Dr.
Michael Cornett, director of
forensics, said.
HE ATTRIBUTED the high
caliber of competition .to UFs
reputation for excellence in
debate.
Next on the debate agenda is
the Emory University Peachtree
Tournament next
weekend. David Beers and Paul
Rosenthal will represent UF.

II I I
down until the police are
ordered to shoot to kill.*'
Those taking part in the grand
jury investigation were
forbidden by Portage County
Common Pleas Judge Edwin
Jones from "making
extrajudicial statements and
from participating in interviews
and from making statements for
publicity referring to the grand
jury, its activities and related
proceedings.*
Later, Jones prohibited
interested parties'* and KSU
President Robert I. White from
criticizing the grand jury report.
Frank had testified before the
grand jury and Ford has assisted
in its investigation.

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sport cost
SALE
only
30.00
reg. *45.00 & 50.00
Belk Lindsey
in the
Gainesville Shopping Center

. j r t a
iwonoiy, # nv rionui A9Vi|BW|

Page 7



Page 8

, Th* Florida Alligator. Monday, October 21,1670

EDITORIAL

Give Farmer
CLC Credit
, * v v
Gainesville City Manager B. Harold Farmer has done his
logic homework.
When affronted by a UF journalism student, Richard
Glenn, who had registered a complaint with the city
commission concerning harassment he received from a
city police officer while filming a racial incident at a local
junior high football game, Farmer reverted to One of the
oldest defense mechanisms in the CLC 141 textbook
argumentum ad hominem.
He chose to ignore Glenn's original complaint that a
officer shoved the camera into my face, while trying to
film sheriff officers placing two black youths into a patrol
car.
Instead he (speaking for Gainesville Police Chief William
Joiner) pointed out that press cards issued to student
journalists are really only a courtesy and do not carry the
weight of those issued to professional members of the press.
He then attacked Glenn, stating that he should not inject
him into a potentially dangerous situation. The press must
recognize that they must be responsible too.
Mr. Farmer's attack of Mr. Glenn appears to be an
overwhelming success. It seems that most people have
already forgotten the camera shoving incident.
Instead, Glenn's role as a student has been questioned
questioned to the point that John Paul Jones, dean of the
College of Journalism, was prompted to update his policy
concerning the role of student journalists.
Jones said, when a student newsman is covering a regular
story and an additional news event spontaneously occurs
the student should leave if trouble arises.
The fact that Glenn is a student is of no relevance to the
issue at hand. When the alleged assault took place, Glenn
was not asked to present his press card. Therefore, if Glenn
had been a member of the professional press it is highly
likely the incident would have still taken place.
It should also be noted that the student press card issue is
also absurd. All press cards, no matter who they are issued
to, are a courtesy and can be revoked at any time.
We feel that instead of clouding the main complaint with
minor side issues, lets have the commission act upon the
incident as if it were registered by any member of the press,
as it should be.
As for Dean Jones, might we suggest that in order to
avoid sending a student into a potentially dangerous
situation, why not send a crew of WUFT-TV cameramen
out to the local interstate highway to film an in depth study
entitled Safe Driving Ran Rampant of 1-75 Last
Thursday.
Bonds Os Unity
The tragic accident which claimed the lives of 30 persons on an
ill-fated flight to Logan, Utah united the community of Wichita in
common sorrow.
Students and non-students, friends and family, black and white
were united in common kinship with their fellow man which
transcended the usual pattern of political, social and racial alienation:
In these times of unrest and trouble within the country and
throughout the world, every man has his eyes open and his senses
keyed for a chance to share a common bond with all members of the
human family.
Sometimes this realization accentuating our sameness instead of our
differences comes from a common threat; sometimes in the form of
tragedy, as it did in this instance. One thing is sure it nearly always
follows a natural disaster such as flood, fire, or accidental death,
because these events say to us it could happen to you.
The memorial services and tributes given for those who perished in
the Colorado mountains exemplifies this common unity.
We can only regret that this common bond prevails only when the
atmosphere dictates.
Memorial services should not be the only function at which
tranquility prevails. The togetherness expressed at Cessna Stadium
Monday night should be remembered every day of our lives.
-WICHITA STATE SUNFLOWER

The
Florida
Alligator
The future Is not
gift: it is an achievement

, jjk I i i §3l*' HMraf
ft
7/. / m -I
If Wm. i_
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Hey! We got a body count!
Modern Glories Trite

We live in the age of
super-civilization.
We have within reach of our
fingers the ability to
manufacture any machine, to
totally destroy ourselves and our
planet, or to cure almost any
disease.
Within reach of our brains we
have the stars, life prolonged
almost indefinitely and
hopefully a real understanding
of the nature of mankind.
Its very easy for those of our
time to claim supreme
civilization for all time. The
claim is not always valid.
But occasionally there are
windows that pass by, openings
into our past as a race. They
allow just enough of the lost
glory of our ancestry to pass
through to humble us. Our
present glory is great, but it can
somehow seem awfully small.
Such a window was opened
by two British archiologists,
Lord Carnarvon and Howard
Carter, In February 1922.
It was then that the tomb of a
very young and historically
insignificant pharaoh was
opened and found remarkably
complete.
The Pharaoh Tutankhamun
(probably better known as King
Tut) was only 9-years-old when
he became supreme god-king of
the Upper and Lower Kingdoms
of the Nile. His reign was brief,
1352 to 1343 8.C., and
unglorious when compared to
those of other pharaohs. But the
treasures found in his tomb, one
of a few tombs to escape grave
robbers, assured his ever lasting
fame.

Alligator Staff
Denise Valiante
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant
Steve Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
Publlwd by student, of the Uniwshy of Florid, unttor the of
the Board of Student Publications. M OT
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student du,
third floor. Reitz Union. Student Publications Suite.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are
of the write, of the article .nd no. tho* of noX

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor
Ken McKinnon Loretta Tennant
News Editor News Editor

j | KEN PRIGGS |

During some 200 years before
the birth of Tutankhamun his
royal ancestors had led the Two
Kingdoms of Egypt from one
success to another. Victorious
wars had garnered an empire,
including Palestine and Syria to
the north and Sudan to the
south.
But the glorious XVIII
dynasty of Egypt was now on
the decline. Tutankhamuns
father and brother, who ruled
before him, had neglected the
nations defense while struggling
with internal difficulties.
Heathen peoples ringed the
empires borders waiting to
attack.
Only one other pharaoh after
Tutankhamun would wear the
crown of the Vulture and the
Cobra (symbolic of the united
Upper and Lower Kingdoms)
before Egypt colapsed at the
hands of a Hittite invasion.
While the historical panorama
has been documented, little is
known of the personal lives of
Tutankhamun and his Queen
Ankhesenamun.
Tutankhamun was probably
born at the familys vast,
rambling palace at Malkata, near
the one-time capital city of
Thebes.
He took the throne upon the
death of his older brother
Amenhotep IV (or Akhenaten)
who had placed himself in
history with his efforts on behalf
of a simplified monotheism for
the masses. Those efforts had so

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

enraged the powerful Egyptian
clergy that the very security of
the throne of the god-man
pharaoh was threatened.
The young pharaoh listened
to his court advisers and
immediately restored the old
religion with its many gods. He
dispatched royal troops to put
down uprisings in Syria, but he
did little to assure the future
safety of Egypt from the
heathen tribes on her outskirts.
It became obvious that major
decisions of state were the
decisions of his advisers rather
than his own.
Inscriptions and old records
tell us the pharaoh delighted in
court acrobats. One of his most
prized possessions was a Negro
dwarf given him by a governor
of Nubia (modern Sudan)
following an expedition into the
Land of Ghosts deep into
Africa.
At some point the young
Tutankhamun was married to
Ankhesenamun, the daughter of
his brother Akhenaten. The
queen was some two years older
than her husband and had
already been married to her
father, as was often the practice
of Egyptian royalty, and had
borne him a daughter. But she
was of royal blood and therefore
suitable.
But the youthful rulers days
o( laughter and rejoicing soon
drew to a close. Shortly after an
annual festival in January 1343
8.C., Tutankhamun died, the
causes today unknown.
For 70 days priests and
technicians prepared the kings
remains for the journey into
another life. As was the custom,
all his internal organs except the
heart were removed and buried
in four separate mummies. His
brain was drawn out of the skull
through the nostrels and his
body completely shaved before
hundreds of yards of fine linen
was wrapped around him.



|T I ALLIGATOR VIEWPOINT I H

W. L. GUTHRIE:

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
On August 1, 1970, Captain
W. L, Guthrie celebrated an
impressive 30 years of flying
with Eastern Air Lines.
On Oct. 16 he received a
letter through registered mail at
his SW Miami home plainly
informing him he was fired.
It was not a complete surprise
to the 58-year-old Guthrie. For
the last eight years he has
persisted in strongly urging the
airlines to discontinue a flight
practice of dumping unused
kerosene into the air.
And in those eight years
Eastern has virtually ignored
him, adhering to the practice
maintained by every airline in
the country.
Its criminal, thats what it
is, Guthrie said Saturday in the
living room of his home.
Eastern is telling the press that
I was fired because Ive been
consistently delaying flights.
Guthrie explained the
dumping of the kerosene, and
the events that led to his firing.
When an aircraft lands, there
is always some kerosene left in
the lines of the engines that has
not been used, he said. If the
engines are turned on and off
more than three times without
draining these engine lines, the
kerosene will overflow onto the
runway.
But the policy of the airlines,
Guthrie said, does not include
removing the kerosene while
planes are on the ground.
Instead, the pilots are
required to blow the kerosene
out as they take off, and the
kerosene falls all over whatever
cars, homes or people happen to
be in its path.
Since 1962, Guthrie has made
it his project to convince Eastern
executives that the kerosene
dumping process is not in our
best interests.
But they havent done a
damned thing about it, Guthrie
said. They dont let it flow
onto the runway because it
creates a hazard, but they
hypocritically allow it to be
released in the air under the
naive assumption that it will
dissipate. Well, it doesnt.

F

Guthrie appeared to be
upset... not because he was
fired, but because of the
inability of Eastern and other
airline executives to realize
they are making skies that are
already a risk to fly in even more
dangerous.
Since early August, Guthrie
has written in his log book
instructions to pre-flight
mechanics, Drain cans to be
.scavenged.
He refused to take-off until
ground crews emptied the excess
kerosene. Because of the
reluctance of ground crews to
follow Guthries orders, a few of
his flights were delayed for a
few minutes.
The entire job of emptying
the cans really takes no more
than about a minute per
engine, Guthrie said. Thats
four minutes at most, but
because of executive rules, my
orders were not carried out in a
routine manner.
Guthrie received memos from
the Director of Flight, D. H.
Sigler, reminding him of the
policy that calls for scavenging
the kerosene in the air.
Guthrie was informed that
continued delay to his flights
might result in his removal
from flight status.
On Oct. 15, as Guthrie was
stopping over in Miami after
flying in from San Juan he
routinely made the request
for the draining of kerosene
from his lines.
But they (Eastern
management) took a stand
then, Guthrie explained. They
would not allow my cans to be
drained, and I would not fly on
to Dallas until they were.
Subsequently, Guthrie was
removed from the flight on the
spot, replaced by another pilot.
But he wasnt remorseful for
persisting in refusing to dump in
the sky.
Hell, they cant force me to
do something that further
degrades the sky that is already
filled with all that man-made
garbage.
Guthrie was fired, Eastern
told the press, because of
insubordination.
But isnt that a crock of
something, Guthrie said. I

Fired For Insubordination

wasnt really fired by Eastern
Air Lines, but by a few men who
exercise authority in their
position as managers.
Guthrie expressed displeasure
with the managers who have
shown that their judgement is
poor regarding whats good for
the company.
Sigler, who is Guthries
immediate superior, called the
requests by Guthrie for
on-the-ground draining an
unnecessary request.
A memo sent to maintenance
personnel told them to
disregard requests to drain fuel
cans.
In another two years, Guthrie
would have been pensioned by
Eastern, in observance of a
regulation limiting the age of
pilots to 60.
But, even though the
international organization of
airline pilots has protested
Guthrie's dismissal, he said he
wont go back even if they
offer me my job back... not
until Eastern Air Lines can say
they have respect for the air, the
people we fly over, and in
essence, respect for the company
itself.
Guthrie pointed to the need
for changing the manner in
which the kerosene is dumped.
It all boils down to a respect
for property, he said.
The way things are now, the
cost of a passenger ticket is
much greater than just the
money paid by the passenger.
What of the immeasurable cost
we impose on anyone who is
victimized by the kerosene
dumping?
Guthrie made reference to the
numerous complaints over the
years from irate neighbors and
motorists regarding the kerosene
they find on their cars, on their
homes, and in their pools.
But, Guthrie explained, that
doesn't even include the hazard
made to air vehicles by
continuing to dump in the sky.
Weather bureau reports made
to pilots often include reference
to haze in the atmosphere.
That's so damned
misleading, Guthrie said. The
word haze implies a natural
condition, when reallly what the
weather bureau should note is

RON SACHS
c
ir ... f- 5
Sta/jf wr/fer flow &?c/is recently spent
some time with W. L. Guthrie a fired
Eastern Air Line Pilot who fought against
dumping unused kerosene into the air. Here
Guthrie explains his stand and his
subsequent dismissal.

'The law oriented to
failure... If you set these
standards of dirtiness, you
then say that property
means nothing, that the
public shall bear the costs
of production for private
gain.
that its man-made smoke,
grime, and kerosene in the air.
Pilots have continually
criticized the weather bureau for
those misleading reports,
Guthrie said, and have asked for
a clear statement of smoke
being smoke.
Guthrie said that pilots hope
to show the public, in this way,
that the skies are filled with
trash we allow to be dumped.
Not surprising is the fact that
Guthrie is president of a Miami
group concerned with pollution.
The group is called
Environment.
Guthrie said he planned to
continue in his efforts to make
the airlines stop the process of
dumping in the air.
The reason I became
concerned so much with the
problem dates back to 1962,
Guthrie said. A pilot friend of
mine was killed during an
attempted landing at Kennedy
airport because of vision
conditions he had to land in.
But largely to blame for his
death and the 45 people who
perished with him was the
smoke, the man-made smoke
that is so casually termed
haze.
In the following years,Guthrie
wrote numerous letters to the
airlines, pollution boards, and
individuals with power to make
the changes.
In almost every case, his
letters were unanswered.
Its a vast problem we are
faced with, Guthrie said. And
we are not coping with it in the

Monday, October 21, 1670, Thafflortd* ANMpfrr.


SI
R( t
Jr ]x
W. L. GUTHRIE
... 30 yean of flying
proper manner when we initiate
minimum action and create
pollution control boards. Those
organizations, and measures they
issue are a part of planned
failure.
Planned failure, Guthrie said,
is what we indulge ourselves in
when we set up acceptable*
levels of pollution.
What we need to do is
simply outlaw the pollution, not
set up a proper level for filth to
be kept at. There should be
none.
While Guthrie had been
responsible for his own flights
and refused to dump the
kerosene, he estimated that at
least 700 gallons of kerosene are
dumped over Miami every day.
And thats only one city,
he added.
Guthrie has spent the last
eight years and some $30,000 of
personal funds to try to put an
end to all the punishment the
sky takes from mankind.
Hes been retired from the
airline against his will. Hes
58-years-old. And his plans are
still to continue in his efforts
to change the policy followed by
the airlines.
I think Id like to go around
to schools and colleges and talk
to students... tell them about
whats wrong with the sky, and
how regulations are helping to
keep our environment filled with
dirt.
Eastern Air Lines removed
Captain W. L. Guthrie from his
job on Oct. 15.
Only a week before, in a letter
written to a board which was to
set air pollution standards,
Guthrie perhaps summed up the
entire problem.
The law ia oriented to
: failure... If you set these
: standards of dirtiness, you then
: say that property means
: nothing, that the public shall
\ bear the costs of production for
| private gain.
Guthrie concluded, Try a
little confidence, gentlemen. Go
for dean air.

Page 9



>, Ttw Florida Alligator, Monday, Octotof 26,1970

Page 10

I Campus; Crier
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
l^"^^ 811 I
I - If you have a complaint about your landlord or your apartment jutt U 392-1665 and your I
I complaint will be referred to Mike Pugh, head of Student Govt, legal Affairs. He will I
I your situation is looked into.
Arnold Air Society Petitions For POW S Draft Counseling!
I The Arnold Ah Society will be conducting a petition campaign seeking *"?l
I American Prisoners of War from now until the end of October. There will be booths set up in the I
Plaza and at the Union. Find one and sign.
I Draft Counseling I
I The Dept, of Student Affairs has the draft counseling program going full swing now, and wilf I
I soon begin a program of birth control information.
I The International Club Comes To Florida I
I This club has been established with the avowed purpose of organizing social, cultural and I
t fraternal activities. The main aim is to promote mutual understanding between International
I visitors and the Student Body. Any student on campus is eligible to become a member, andl any
staff person or faculty member may become an associate member. Programs and will be
announced in two weeks. For more information write International Club, Box 14165 Umv.
| Station, or call Dr. Robert Stanley at 392-1851.
I Briefs From The Cabinet Meeting I
The Student Govt. Cabinet is working for you, the student. Here is howConsumer Affairs
reports that a vending committee has been formed to handle problems with the machines on
campus and continues work on the Discount Plan.
I The Dept, of Health and Insurance has begun a program that will teach students how to
identify pills as well as to learn how they will affect the body.
In the Dept, of Legal Affairs there are plans to establish a Legal Referral Service by which
students could seek aid in finding a lawyer if they were to need one. Also a program whereby
certain volunteer law students will be available to give free advice to students who must appear
before the University Disciplinary Committee.
These are just a few of the programs that your Student Govt. Cabinet is instituting and
planning to benefit you, the student.
I To Be Young, Gifted, And Black I
The J.Wayne Reitz Union is bringing the New York company of Lorraine Hansberry's TO BE
YOUNG Gl FTED AND BLACK to the University of Florida. Tickets go on sale Mon., Oct. 26 at
the Constans Box Office.
I Student Government Comes To You I
Your student govt, officers are now making three visits a week to the dorm areas in order to
establbh better communication with the student body. If your dorm te interested in having a
discussion session with any officer or with any cabinet official you should call 392-1666 and
request that official.
I Now You Can Have A Bulletin Board I
I Bulletin board space is available for the asking. Interested people need only call 392-1665 and
I request space.
I Having Problems? Need A Question Answered? I
1 Call the Ombudsman Office at 392-1650 Anytime or Stop by Room 232 in the Union 1-5
I Weekdays. This service is sponsored by Student Government and Gamma Beta Phi -for Students
1 -Use It!! I
I ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE I
I THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY THURSDAY AFTERNOON 5 00 OF EACH
I WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER.
I THANKS, I
* BRUCE SCHWACK
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT



Construction 'On Schedule
Music Building Open

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Staff Writer
UF construction firms will be
greeting returning students with
the sound of music, following
Christmas vacation.
Jan. 30 is the scheduled
opening for the new music
building, according to Director
of UF Physical Planning Walter
Matherly.
Construction on the
$1,745,000 building began
shortly after the bid date of July
24, 1969, and according to
Matherly, Were right on
schedule.
THE ONLY problem we had
was waiting to break ground
because we hadnt gotten a bit.
But that was taken care of, and
the building is now being
completed by Drake
Construction Firm.
The firm worked straight
through the last school year,
including this summer. They
handled the actual building
themselves, Matherly said,
although the Board of Regents
previously checked on
construction.
This duty has been taken over
by the Department of General
Services in Tallahassee. We do
keep track of construction,
though, and pay the
construction firms, Matherly
said.
THE FLORIDA Museum, also
a recent construction project,
wont be open to the public for
quite a while, Matherly said,
although occupancy of the
building began over a month
ago.

Bowl Queen Contest Opens

The Gator Bowl Association is
now accepting entries for its
annual Gator Bowl Queen
contest. A queen and two
princesses will be selected to
reign over the holiday activities
held in conjunction with the
Gator Bowl Football Classic.
Judging for the contest will
take place Thanksgiving
weekend, and the young women
selected are expected to reign
through the Christmas and New
Years holidays.
ALL ENTRIES for the
contest must be received no later
than 5 p.m. Nov. 4.
Accompanying each entry
should be a 5x7 glossy
head-and-shoulders shot of each
participant. All girls entering
must be full-time students at an
accredited college or university
and a resident of Jacksonville or
the Beaches area.

1971
scminole
at the hub.

lif
If
IfPMMftil .gjp la rimF ;V
EBm ~ v 'll
MWB
:4m I mmw'l
JB' m UPS
B >IBR
t ES ss aB f* j-
v MM
1 < Jk
1 : ; yy|Uw'vr~~-y
4>.. ill^
MisaMik -% f
PHIL COPE
MUSIC BUILDING
... scheduled to open Jan. 30

There are several projects
under planning now, and
awaiting future bids. Included
are the Graduate and
International Studies Building,

Stipulations for eligibility also
include that each entrant be
between the ages of 17 and 23
and have maintained at least a C
average in academic scholarship.
Enrollment
Goes Up
Final UF enrollment figures
have shown an increase of 1,484
students since fall quarter, 1969.
The figures, released by
Registrar Richard H. Whitehead,
puts total enrollment at 22,253.
Undergraduates accounted for
17,503 of the total. Graduate
enrollment, increased by 485
over last year, showed an
additional 1,300 students
enrolled in the Colleges of Law
and Medicine.
University College topped the
list with the largest college
enrollment (7,918); followed by
Arts and Sciences with 3,800
and Education with 2,500.

the Psychology Building, Health
Center Project I, Matherly and
McCarty Hall air conditioning,
and Walker Hall and Florida
Gym renovation.

The winner of the Gator Bowl
crown will receive a SSOO
scholarship, a wardrobe and a
formal gown. Princesses will
receive a $l5O scholarship and a
formal gown. Former Gator
Bowl Queens are ineligible, as
are former court members.
SWING
AROUND
TO
Budget
Rent a Car
OF GAINESVILLE
CALL
176-1245
FOR
Fr pickup and
dolivory anywhere
in Alachua County
GAINESVILLE/JACKSONVILLE
ONE WAY SPECIAL
15.00 FLAT RATE
Includes Gas, Air Conditioning
3 HOURS -100 MILES
MAXIMUM
Budget
RentaGan
WE RENT
BETTER CARS
FOR LESS!

I YOUR NEWEST SERVICE I
[ DEALER FOR AU FOREIGNCARS |
I YOU KNOW IME VALUE OF SERVICE. I
t GAT on
SHOP
has got
Pea Coatsl
36-44
Only
GATORSHOP
We have just received a IHHHB
shipment of Adidas
Vienna-Rom.
Bank Americard Master Charge
H J H HI
3
i
OPEN 24 HOURS
MON.-WED.
Special 15 for *1 10
2111 N.W. 13th ST.
Mister
_ Donut*

Monday. October 26,1970, The Florida AWftoc,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
BICYCLE Schwinn 26-Inch boys
2-spMd transmission $35 528 NW 36
St Ph. 372-2067 (A-st-24-p)
Basset Hound AKC rag. 5 weeks old,
wormed, shots, tri-colored, bred for
temperment, conformity, 7 males 3
females $75 Call 378-7829
(A-5t24-p)
Beautiful Irish Setter puppy female 7
months AKC all shots Wormed call
373-3435 after 6:30 PM (A-st-123-p)
1969 KAW Mach 111 500 cc excellent
condition with 1970 wiring kit good
miles $760.00 Ph. Tom Shires
462-2082 (A-10t-18-p)
MEN'S TIES FOR SALE N.Y.C.
manufacturers inventory regularly
$7.50 SIO.OO now only $4.50
$6.50. Call Bob at night 378-4730
(A-st-2 S-p)
Realistic portable stereo garrard
turntable 4 speakers, 45 watt amp
$l5O new w/turo-test hd. phs. S2O all
6 mo. old for sllO 378-9531
(A-3t-25-p)
Weimaraner pups 6 wks. AKC
registered 3 males SIOO 3 females
$75 call 373-2319 after 7 378-2646
(A-st-2 S-p)
FREE GUITAR LESSON meet Bob
Zuber, teacher, performer, and friend
here for 3 years. Finger style
specialist Call soon 378-3538
(A-st-23-p)
'7O Triumph Bonneville 650 2000
miles 378-9208 (A-10t-25-p)
MUST sacrifice: AM-FM stereo
receiver SSO; cassette stereo tape
deck absolutely like new $75;
kingsize blue spread $6. 376-8194
(A-3t-25-p)
IF carpets look dull and drear,
remove the spots as they appear with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Electric upholstry shampooers
also available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-tfC)
1967 Kawasaki A7 350 Excellent
condition Low Mileage S4OO. Firm
Call Roxana After sp.m. phone
392-9872. (A-2t-26-p)
Bob cats, coons, skonks, ferrets,
squirrels, monkeys, parrots, hawks,
ducks, foxes, snakes, turtles, for sale,
trade or we will buy call 475-2546 or
475-2181 local.
Double rollaway bed almost new, will
sell for S3O call 378-4671.
(A-3t-26-p)
Arvin tape recorder with 5 3 tapes.
$25 or best offer. Call 378-0695 after
6:00. (A-J t-26-p)
Sony-150 stereo phonograph girrard
turntable $125 excellent condition
call 372-0736 6 to 10 p.m.
(A-st-26-p)
BIKE for salel Girls 2-speed, only
2-months old Will take best offer
over SSO. Call 373-3933. (A-2t-26-p)
At... m m TW
2:08 3:57 M 1,
5:46 7:37
9:31 H
NOW! OS
At. .2:18 4:08
5:58 7:23 9:48
"AN IMMENSELY ROMANTIC
MOVIE WITH STYLE AND
CRITICAL INTELLIGENCE!
Vincut Ctabf. N- y. Timtt
STARTS WEDNESDAY
COUM |Ti|pe


Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 26,1970

JROR SALE
Bicycle for sale, 3 speed dunnelt
engllsh type like new disc brakes and
other extras need S4O 378-5624.
(A-3t-26-p)
New Akai Taperecorder. Makes 8
track cartridges. 16 cart, and tapes.
$375 or make offer. Call 373-3537
ask for Pat. (A-4t-23-p)
FOLDING BICYCLES sls discount.
Beautiful SSB $63 fits In car or
closet. Earn-a-bike agents wanted call
David 378-2728 eves. (A-3t-26-p)
AKC GERMAN SHEPERD PUP
35$ 3 months, female, great
personality and smart, Call 378-6247
or 373-4395. Browning light auto 5 shotgun 12Ga.
with two extra barrels retail S4OO
yours $275 call John 373-1365.
(A-3t-26-p)
HONDA CL 175 K 3-SS 1970 With
metal-flake helmet and Scrambling
accessories Showroom condition
asking $475 call 372-4946.
(A-3t-26-p)
FOR RE BIT
FOR LEASE campus cone ice cream
shoppe, minimum Investment
required $3500 plus inventory,
phone 3 72-3890 or stop by.
(B-st-26-p)
Roommates needed Nov. Ist no. 70
Mt. Vernon SSO a month 376-8959.
(B-3t-26-p)

I Curl up with a friend.
I B I HL
96 friendly pagespoetry,
short stories, photograph
& drawings
florida quarterly
we only did it for you
on sole here:
Mike's Bookstore Ro-Mo Camera Shop
Campus Shop & Bookstore AND ...
Florida Bookstore at card tables on campus .-- _
Subterranean circus

WANTED
Female roommate to share 2 Br
trailer, own room, S7O month. Cali
373-2577 after 6 p.m. or 392-3196
before. Ask for Mary. (C-st-26-p)
Male roommate wanted: 2 br 12x60
trailer, ac & heat at moblleer tr pk
60.00 month+% util. Call 376-8136
immediate occupancy! (C-4t-26-p)
Need two male roommates, to move
In as soon as possible cin city area
call 376-0803 evenings. (C-2t*26-p)
thl
Copy Center
1718 W. Univ. Ave.
4< Xerox 3<
Thesis St Dissertation
Specialists
Desks, Lamps, Files,
and supplies available
376-9334 Bam -9 pm

A new group of experimental
film buffs at the Union
have organized this first
in a series of wild new films.
SOME WONT GO THE LOVE GIFT
THE SEASONS CHANGE
Monday, October 26 7:00 & 9:30
Union Auditorium 50 cents



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
Tutor NOW to prepare student weak
m math or MS 102 A during course
next quarter. Cell 3 7 2-4567
(C-3t-25-p)
Hio dude needs e roommate 85 a
mo Plus elec, you get your own
bedroom, furnished, walk-ln-closet.
walk to campus. Call 5-7 pm
378-6376 (C-3t-24-p)
need MONEY? I need student
tickets to auburn oame PHONE
378-0495 (C-St-22-p)
** ,m I
J

Todays
more for your money meal
.moisons
CAFETERIA
r---- T
{ MONDAYS FEATURE |
J BAKED CHOPPED STEAK {
f: WITH HASH a
* BROWN 70/ 5
O 2 POTATOES fr \J §
I I TUESDAY'S FEATURE | §
3 I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN I 3
I ALL YOU CAN EAT I
l ?.?;
I LUNCH: mil 2 8-FREE PARKING I
moisons
I CAFETERIA J
2620 N.W. 13th Street In the GalnesvilleMan^^^

WANTED
Listeners wanted: will pay 82.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Susan between 8
and 5 for appointment. 392-2049
(C-10t-22-p)
Architecture grad student to help
design addition to our tract thing so
It has some style, and to make
drawings. Phone 372-5409 soon.
(C-2t-25-p)
Still looking for Housing and
Roommates? Come to the Gator
Placement Center. Our business Is
designed to locate you In the perfect
place! 373-2688 1105 W. Univ. Ave.
Room number 2 (C-st-25-p)
I need the use of a females fee card
and football card for Auburn game.
Will pay 7 dollars for such service.
Contact Warren 378-0508.
(C-lt-26-p)
Math tutor to prepare for GRE by
Dec. Will pay SIO.OO per hour for
competent Individual call 378-8817.
(C-3t-26-p)
HELP WANTED
SALES: would you be Interested In a
week end Job earning $2 to $5 an
hr.? Call fuller brush to see If you
qualify. Call 378-0121 (E-st-24-p)
AUTOS
eee
a* <
1967 Slmca 4 door, 4 speed std. R &
H, tires like new, needs tag. New
inside. Best offer over 450.00 Call
378-3963 after 6 P.M. (G-4t-24-p)
*66 Corvair 3 speed, runs great, new
paint Job S4OO call 378-8528
(G-4t-23-p)
Volvo, 6 mo. old, blue, $2400. Call
372-0947 or 392-1479. (G-st-22-p)
LARGEST STOCK o* USED
IMPORTS In Nth. CENTRAL
FLORIDA I HARFRED AUTO
IMPORTS, 1946 N. Main 378-7085.
(G-tfc)
V Buy a nev. car when you can get an
almost new one for Vz the price 68
DART only 19150 ml exel. cond best
offer $1195 Gregg 373-1162
(G-st-23-p)
1969 VW sedan automatic
stlckshift; AM/FM radio Phone:
372-5817 (G-3t-25-p)
1963 Falcon ford white RAH at new
tires xtra clean. Real economical! In
good shape! Must sell! S4OO call
376-9540. (G-st-26-p)
65 IMPALA 396 4 SPEED NEW
PAINT, TIRES GOOD MECH
$795 CALL John, 378-7315, 847
SW 9 Street. (G-st-26-p)
67-MGB new in '6B. New
transmission new batteries, good
I condition 32000 mi. need money
now, reflects reasonable price
$1150.00. Call 378-3972 Pax.
(G-st-26-p)
1969 Datsun 2000, 5-speed, radio,
heater, 135 hp. SIBOO or best offer.
Ph. 373-2139 after 6 p.m.
(G-st-26-p)

Monday, October 26,1970, The FlorMe Alligator,

PERSONAL
Dear Julie, I have not seen you yeti
Please dont hldel I would like to
find you this year! Please call me
soon. Where are you? RG (J-3t-24-p)
Any groups Interested In raising
funds? Famous Fla. candies sell
themselves and build your profits
fast. Contact Carl at 372-2059
(J-st-24-p)
Dear Jim, guy, and Jonn: meet me
after con law. I love you. Can you dig
It?!? Mary Jane (J-3t-25-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever;
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist.. .102
N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for
appointment. (J-20t-170-p)
SINGLE MALES & FEMALES! Meet
more members of the opposite sex at
U.F. All dates In Gainesville. Most
dates with U.F. Students. Details
mailed In plain unmarked envelope.
For free details write: Nationwide
Dating Service, P.O. Box 77346,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-15t-24-p)
FREE GUITAR LESSON meet Bob
Zuber, teacher, performer and friend
here for 3 years. Finger style
specialist Call soon 378-3538
(J-st-23-p)
Tired of the dorms? Too poor for an
apt? CLO has openings for the winter
quarter $195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 373-1622 (J-27t-25-p)
Stutterers wanted for an auditory
feedback study. Will pay you SB.OO
please call Michelle Jensen evenings:
378-0104 Days: 392-2046 (J-st-25-p)
Students for Askew meets at Bpm
Mon. nlte at the Dem. Party Hq, 9 W
Univ Ave. All Interested persons
welcome. For information call
373-1427. (Pd. Pol. Adv.). (J-lt-26-p)
Floridas government Is unfit for
human consumption! ELECT
ASKEW Nov. 3. Help stamp out
political pollution. (Pd. Pol. Adv.)
(J-st-26-p)
It's a good thing new delhl Is soon to
deliver like, one of their love
sandwiches could feed 2 freeks. Oh
man, their potato salad!
Oooooooom. (J-lt-26-p)
LD-October 26. You made It. Sorry
about those midnlte fights. The next
21 well go thru together. Your the
most Imp't thing in my life. Love,
Fran. (J-lt-26-p)
Astrology course taught by
professional Astrologer. Starting
soon. For Info on time, place, and
cost call: 372-7883 or 373-2546.
(J-st-26-p)

mmmm^mmmmmsmmm^mssssaasssssssssi
1 4 v inu isaa at on
miA'f N Ai ACHUA HlljH SPRINGS
oi mi sh.mi \ H
kimi mi H rM Sm^w'
'SwgS
intiAkN \m ii i H WW Wwmmm
Ml* I'M IMIS',n pP* Wt*m
IMIS',s lll\l MOM & Hp V BHK
OI IMHIMIUS H V
KVIU l\N Igf f |'|H
IWm | J| 1
SHI A( HIIUI) hik S ff
c kl 1)1 |K B> IIUIM, 7m m&
Hlk HOMIWOKk I
)PI Kl>OkK AIHI K W L /
IMPkOPtklk MU Ek \ Ja|
w\s imi sk,mi jjflHi |
SC MOOI SC HOI AK
III! MIDSKiII I
/-
WHAIIVIK DIO SMI jmk :. K
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V\ H A II \ I k 1)11) sHI 3P*** T
UARS' r
mi i
I 111 lilt. 11 I
(.1 M l VII
COLOR r \
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STTO
-

Page 13

LOST LOST black wallet In boy's gym I.D.S
Important. $lO reward. No questions
asked call Dave 392-6823.
(L-3t-26-p)
FOUND: young male Weimeramer
with flea collar in vicinity of Norman
Hall. Call 376-6326 (L-3t-24-NC)
LOST: Gold watch on leather band
left In Tlgert mens room on ground
floor Oct. 9 PLEASE call Bruce
373-1676. (L-st-22-p)
Lost contact lenses in white plastic
case. Bring to room 236 of Infirmary
from 8-5 or call Jere In evenings at
378-5750. (L-st-22-p)
Lost brown wallet with all ID reward
offered Gary Furman 127 north
phone 392-8063 return appreciated
(L-2t-25-p)
Found black cat, male, 7-8 months
old, found near Music Building,
phone 392-8721 (L-3t-24-NC)
SUES XT'TJ'
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists
trained to type theses, dissertations,
textbooks, manuscripts, etc. 1405
NW 13th St IBM Bldg., Rm 206,
Phone 376-7160. (M-15t-10-p)
HORSES BOARDED sleepy hollow
horse farm complete care finest
facilities new barn pasture trails A
ring close to univ. Ph 373-1059
(M-st-22-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now! Bank Amerlcard A
Master Charge (M-tfc)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own watting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
We SERVICE ALL IMPORTS.
Factory trained' .mechanffcs*
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS. 566 E.
Univ. 372-4373. (M-tfc)
HONDA STEVE has got another
mechanic! I Now he can service your
Honda TWICE as Fast!!! The CYCLE
WORKS 1220 S. Main open 3 until 8
p.m. (M-st-26-p)
Theses, Dissertations & Term papers
typed by former UF secretary Rates:
50 cents per page & up Barbara
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Page 14

i'fXifkridmAn&tv, Monday. Oetobar 26/1970

Fellowships Available
For Minority Groups
: .... ; \ '. 4

By MICHAEL CAHLIN
Alligator Wrltar
Attention all black, American Indian,
Mexican-American and Puerto Rican students.
Doctoral fellowships are for those of you who
plan to enter careers in higher education.
THE FELLOWSHIPS are offered to those
students who have received a bachelors degree
during the ten years ending September 1971, plans
to enter graduate school and study full time for a
Ph.D. in the humanities, the social sciences, or the
natural sciences, and plans to enter careers in higher
education.
A person is not eligible if he has previously, or is
now, engaged in professional or graduate study.
Recipients will be selected upon the
recommendation of a panel of faculty members in
the respective academic disciplines.
EACH FELLOWSHIP award will support
full-time graduate study for up to five years if the
student maintains satisfactory progress towards the
Ph.D.
Students may begin study in either the summer

Chiles Army Chief Dies

SANTIAGO, Chile (UPI)
Gen. Rene Schneider,
commander of Chiles army,
died Sunday of gunshot wounds
inflicted three days ago by a
group of men who police believe
were trying to block the election
of Marxist Salvador Allende as
president.
A joint session of Congress
confirmed Allende
president-elect on Saturday, and
he will take office Nov. 3 as the
first freely elected Marxist chief
of state in the Western
Hemisphere.
SCHNEIDER'S death was
announced by the military
hospital early Sunday, and
shortly afterward the chief of a
special police force investigating
the attack said most of those
involved have been arrested.
He identified the suspected
gunman as Leon Cosmeli Pereira,
son of a wealthy landowner and
farmer who had been a
provincial governor during the
administration of former
President Jorge Alessandri.
Alessandri, a conservative who
was president from 1958 until
1964, was the runnerup in the
three-man presidential campaign
that Allende won by a 1.4 per
cent plurality in elections last
month.
BECAUSE NONE of the

the New Yoik Company of
~la B& Yowttg, Qi-fied, and Blaak
The J.Wayne Reitz Union is bringing TO BE YOUNG,
GIFTED, AND BLACK to the University of Florida. The
play is the work of Lorraine Hansberry, who also wrote
RAISIN IN THE SUN. James Baldwin has said of the play,
Never before, in the history of the American theatre, had so
much of the truth of black people's lives been seen on the
stage."
m.wtbir.. IWO
tickets go on sale on Oct. 26 at 12:00 noon at the Reitz
Unton Box Office $1.50 and $2.50 for students $2.00 and
$3.50 for non-students.

candidates received a popular
majority, the election was
thrown into Congress which
named Allende over Alessandri
by a vote of 153 to 35 Saturday.
About 150 persons have been
arrested in the investigation,
which was being carried out
under a state of martial law that
lame duck President Eduardo
Frei declared within hours of the
attack on Schneider Thursday.
The plot, as outlined by a
police spokesman, was to kidnap
Schneider and to issue
communiques in his name from
a mythical rebel military
command post demanding that
Congress elect Alessandri.
SINCE ALESSANDRI had
said he would not accept office

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sessions of 1971 or the fall term of 1971.
Each year the award will cover the full tution and
fees required by the graduate school, an allowance
of S3OO for books and supplies, and a monthly
allotment for living costs.
AN UNMARRIED student will receive $250 per
month, while a married fellow will receive $250 a
month and may also claim his/her spouse and up to
two children as dependents. If the gross income is
not more than $2,500 per year, allowances for each
dependent will be SSO per month.
The deadline for submitting applications is
January 31, 1971. The names of the recipients of
the fellowships will be announced on or about April
15,1971.
For application forms and additional
information, write to: Doctoral Fellowships
for... (state whether, black, American Indian,
Mexican American or Puerto Rican) Students The
Ford Foundation, 320 East 43rd Street, New York,
N.Y., 10017.

on the basis of a Congressional
vote, this would have forced the
government to call another
nationwide popular vote for
president in which Allende
would have had only one
anti-Marxist opponent instead of
two as in the elections last
September.
Schneider, 57, was shot when
he resisted the kidnaping,
according to police theory.
Men in four cars blocked the
Army commanders chauffeured
limousine as he was en route to
his office in the Ministry of
Defense Thursday morning.
One man smashed rear
windows in the car with a
hammer, according to police,
and another fired into the car.

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PHIL?
Jgj

AND WHENEVER
PHIL SEES YOU,
CHANCES ARE

YOU WILL SEE IT IN THE

WM
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1971 SEMINOLE

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Monday, Octofaor 26,1170, Tha Florida AMpMar,

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Page 15

,'*p



The
Florida
Alligator

A Bleak Day For The Gators
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Scott Endures Rush

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TOM KENNEDY
WALKER INTERCEPTS REAVES
.. .one of four for Vote

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Breaks Went To Vols

Defensive end Jack
Youngblood summed up the
play of the Gators in the 38-7
loss to Tennessee, We did what
we had to do on defense, but we
just didnt get any breaks on
offense.
It was about all that needed
to be said about the second loss
in seven games for Florida. Time
and time again, the Volunteers
drove on the Gators. But in the
first quarter, the UF defense
stopped their drives, except two
which went for touchdowns.
Quarterback John Reaves was
constantly being rushed by the
Vol defense, forcing him to
hurry his throws.
THEY HAD A very tough

With Jack Youngblood pulling at his shirt sleeve,
Vols' quarterback Bobby Scott got this pass off to
Joe Thompson for a 42-yard touchdown.
Youngblood had knocked over his blocker and got a
hand on the tear away jersey. Steve Robinson (71)

Short Passes
And Punting
Mar Effort
Gator fullback Garry
Walker (right) drops a John
Reaves pass as Volunteer
defender Tim Priest readies
for the tackle. Tailback
Tommy Durrance looks on
attempting to size up the
situation.
John James (left) lets fly
on one of nine pqnts for a
38-yard James
registered a 52-yarder for his
longest in Saturdays clash
with Tennessee.

rush on all day, Reaves said. I
cant judge rushes, but this was
as good as the one in Alabama.
My offensive line gave me
time to pass, but our receivers
were slipping on the carpet,
Reaves said. The morning rain
had made the Tartan turf
slippery causing receivers
difficulty.
We just have to go back to
work, Coach Doug Dickey said.
Two losses blemish the Gator
record with rivals Auburn and
Georgia coming in the next two
weeks.
But one game doesnt make or
break the season. The home
game with Auburn can revitalize
the Gators.

Marty Perlmuttar
Executive Sports Editor

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 26,1970

Page 16

Jk lnr JipP'
jKjMS 4 i t; x
TOM KINNCDY

braces to take the shock of Alan Cole's (68) pass
rash at right. Between Robert Harrell, Cole, Danny
Williams and Youngblood, the Gators have one of
the best rushes in the SEC.

I
Qfcfeay tfe. t'i l <'' | ," t ,'
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PKIL COPE
REAVES WATCHES SCORE
... downhill for Gators

Phil Pettijohn
Sports Editor



| MARTY PERLMUTTER j |
Artificial Turf
Not For Gators
Attention Ray Graves and all interested in buying artificial turf for
Florida Field. Dont buy it if you want to win any games.
So far this year, the Gators have been hopelessly outclassed when
playing on surfaces other than g r a s s. At Tuscaloosa, Alabama, the
Bear (Paul Bryant) and his Crimson Tide crunched Florida 46-15 on
their Astroturf.
This past weekend, UF traveled to the hills of Tennessee to meet
the Volunteers on the former Dougs Rug, the Tartan Turf playing
surface.
AND LIKE ihe other out-of-state game for the Gators, the home
team won decisively, this time 38-7.
As in the previous loss this year, the Gators were against a win
streak at the stadium they were playing. In Alabama, the Crimson
Tide hadnt lost at Denny Stadium since Steve Spurrier did the trick
in 1967. In Knoxville,Tennessee hadnt lost on the Tartan since the first
game ever played on it, 19 wins altogether.
Before the game began on the rotten day (it was cloudy and rainy),
UF knew they had to stop the running game of Curt Watson and
Lester McClain.
BUT WHAT they didnt count on was the passing of Bobby Scott,
the Vols senior quarterback.
With 11:50 remaining in the initial period, Scott passed to Joe
Thompson for 42-yards for the first touchdown of the game and the
Vols were bn their way.
At this point, the Gators were behind and when they fall behind,
they often get unwound and come back to tie the score. But this time
Florida couldnt put it together and Tennessee went on to dominate
the game.
JOHN REAVES led Florida back in the late first period when he
climaxed a 64-yard drive in eight plays with a three-yard quarterback
sneak. But as the first period ended, so did the hopes of the Gators.
By the third period, the Vols had dominated the game, stopping
Gator drives as they were getting started and ruined Doug Dickey and
his staff of coaches first appearance back in Tennessee as the
opposition.
When Dickey stepped onto the field for pre-game practice, he was
not given a resounding round of boos, or a standing ovation. In fact,
most people didnt notice he had arrived.
RUMORS HAD spread the day before the game that all eggs and
tomatoes were sold out in Knoxville in preparation for the clash with
Dickey.
But it never came about. A few oranges were unleashed from
the stands, but no eggs were found on the field.
Leaving the field after the loss, Dickey just waved to the crowd
surrounding the entrance to the locker room. He was greeted by a few
people clapping and a few booing.
THE BREAKS went for Tennessee the entire game.
With Jack Youngblood hanging onto his tear-away jersey, Scott
completed his touchdown pass to Thompson to start the scoring.
On that play, I hit him hard and I still had his jersey in my hand
when he threw the pass, Youngblood said in the quiet of the locker
room.
AFTER THE game, Watson and Durrance met at midfield where
the Vol running back asked, Do you want to exchange chin straps?
But Durrance knew he was kidding and both just laughed it off.
We have to go back to work this week as it doesnt get any easier
from here on in, Dickey said.
One aspect of the Gator recovery must be the defensive secondary
which allowed 385 yards through the air. Volunteer receivers were
open all day. But the statistics could have been higher if not for a few
dropped passes.
Auburn is next and luckily for Florida, it is home at Florida Field.
The game is another grudge match for Florida due to last years loss to
the Tigers. But Auburn lost this past weekend and will back to avenge
that defeat.
Avengers versus revengers, that is the way the game is shaping up.
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Gators Defeat Miami

By Alligator Servic*
A 19 point fourth period
saved the freshman Baby Gator
football team from defeat
Friday night in the Kiwanis
Classic with the freshman of the
University of Miami as they
defeated the UM 29-6.
The freshmen fumbled 12
times in the game, but were
down only 6-3 at the half after
Ed Carney scored on a one-yard
run for Miami and Elwood Aust
kicked a 47-yard field goal for
the Baby Gators.
Quarterback Chan Gailey
started the Gators in the third
period to their first lead of the
game, one which held up the rest
of the way against the
undermanned Canes. Gailey
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Use E.S.A. the entire month of November,
Shop Wilsons 9:30 A.M.-9 PM.

FRESHMEN WIN IN ORANGE BOWL

BUBBA MCGOWAN
... imp reseed by Kendrick
fired a 50-yard strike to wideout
A1 Dorminy at the Miami eight.
Four plays later, Vince Kendrick
carried two Miami defenders

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Monday, October 39,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

into the end zone for the Gators
first touchdown of the game.
BUBBA MCGOWAN, a coach
for the Gators, said, Kendrick
gives the varsity a heck of a
show in scrimmages. He gives
them as stiff a show as theyll
get in any game.
After Kendrick scored, Aust
kicked another field goal, this
time from 29-yards, Gailey
scored on a five-yard run and
reserve quarterback David Pope
added another quarterback
sneak from one-yard out to dose
out the scoring.
Kendrick was making his first
appearance in the Orange Bowl
after playing at nearby Miami
Springs High last year where he
was all-city honorable mention.
He picked up 95-yards in 17
carries on the ground.

Page 17



Page 18

i. The Florida Alligator. Monday, October 26,1670

Clay Picked To Stop Quarry In 11

(EDITOR'S NOTE: WflUun
Classman, 4AS, has been
following and witnessing
professional prize fights for
several years. The following is
his prediction on the
Clay-Quarry bout slated for
tonight in Atlanta.)
By WILLIAM GLASSMAN
Alligator CorrMpondent
Muhammad Ali, pride of the
armed forces, will hit the boxing
trail again at 10:00 tonight in
Atlanta's convention hall. His
first rival in nearly four years
will be Jerry Quarry.
Ali, boxing king until the
Army decked him, will try to
beat a man who has proven in
the past that he can only fight
well if he is especially motivated.
AND FOR. .this, the biggest
fight of his life, he had better be.
Quarry came into the
forefront when he went the
distance four years ago with
Floyd Patterson, gaining a draw.
They fought one year later and
this time Quarry fumbled his
way to a split decision.
Thinking that he was another
Rocky Marciano, the World
Boxing Association put him in
an elimination tournament to
decide who would rule the
heavyweight division since Ali
would either go into the Army
or to jail. Quarry then lost to
Jimmy Ellis in the finals of the
tournament.
SINCE THEN, Quarry has
also lost to George Chuvalo, the
Canadian who usually stands in
the ring like a lump of lard.
Quarry took Chuvalo to easy,
figuring that he could beat him
because he was too fast for the
slow-footed Canadian.
Now, Quarry faces a man who
could possibly be the quickest
UF Ritters
Get Blasted
In a close match, the
Tennessee rifle team outshot the
UF squad, 1,063-1,050,
Saturday at Knoxville.
The loss dropped that Gators'
record to 1-4.
Alan Eldred lead the UF team
with a 267 total, followed by
Bill McCrory, 266; Joel Dobson,
264; Dave Waller, 253 and Jim
Wells, 246.
UF's next match is a home
shootout against Auburn and
Florida Southern this weekend.
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heavyweight of all time.
Ali, at his fighting weight of
210 pounds can punch
powerfully with both hands. The
former heavyweight king can
dance around the ring non-stop
for 15 rounds as he has many
times in the past. So there is
little possibility Ali will get
tired. He is usually taller then
most opponents and has a longer
reach.
ALI TAUNTS his rivals,
talking to them as he fights and
will not put a fighter out until
he has gotten his kicks. Call it
sadistic but, boxing is not a
patsy sport. When a boxer goes
in file ring he should be ready
for anything. Quarry had better
be. As Ali puts it, he "dances

3 Future Foes
Fall To Defeat

Auburns Tigers had a taste of
defeat Saturday as did two other
future UF opponents.
Louisiana State University
upset the previously unbeaten
Tigers 17-9, capitalizing on a
fumble, a pass interference
penalty, and their own tough,
stingy defense.
Auburn plays next Saturday
at UFs homecoming game.
IN OTHER Southeastern
Conference games, Georgia
downed Kentucky, 19-3, and the
University of Miami Hurricanes
fell to the Pittsburgh Panthers
28-17. Kentucky and Miami
meet the Gators later this
season.
Rain kept Auburns passing
sensation Pat Sullivan off target
in their LSU clash, and for the
first time this year, the Tigers
were held without a touchdown.
They had to settle for three field
goals from Gardner Jett.
THE SIXTH-RANKED Tigers
had a chance to tie the score
with less than four minutes left
but LSU held on downs and
took the ball at the one.
LSU scored on an 11-yard
pass from Buddy Lee to Andy
Hamilton in the first quarter and
a dive by tailback Arthur
Cantrelle in the second period.
Cantrelles TD followed an
Auburn pass interference
penalty. The conversion was
successfiil.
Then, in the fourth quarter,
LSU brought Sullivan down in
the end zone for a safety.
SULLIVAN HAD a fair day
even though he couldn't hit
paydirt. He completed 17 of 33
passes for 217 aerial yards.
In the Georgia-Kentucky

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WIN FOR TRIPE OF ARMED FORCES

Analysis

like a butterfly and stings like a
bee.
This is also true if you can
comer him. This is your best
bet.
Ali is just too fast to hit in the
center of the ring. The only way
to beat him is to do what Doug
Jones did in 1963. Dance away
from him; just jab, dont throw
any bombs or roundhouse
punches. Make him come to
you.
IT IS Alis personality to
tease, so a boxer should resist

clash, the Bulldogs utilized the
Mike Caven to Charles
Whittemore combination to
score their only touchdown on a
65-yard bomb. Caven was 16 for
28 with two interception.
GEORGIA'S KIM Braswell
added four field goals to tie the
SEC record.
Bobby Jones field goal of 37
yards accounted for the only
Kentucky score.
Pittsburgh scored their fifth
consecutive victory in a near
28-0 shutout over Miami. The
Hurricanes came from behind to
make 28-17.

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trying to wipe the smirk off Alis
face and just jab, jab, jab.
Jones did not win his fight
with AH but many fans thought
he did, including this writer.
My prediction for the fight
tonight will be that the first
three rounds will be used by Ali
to get the rust out. He hasnt
fought in almost four years and,
no matter what anyone says,
regardless of how much training

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a boxer has, only competition
can make him razor sharp.
THE FOURTH and fifth
rounds will determine the courae
of the fight. Ali will jab and run,
and like a fool Quarry will came
running after him. In those
rounds Ali will hit almost at wifli
with good strong punches to the
face and chest.
In the sixth through ninth
rounds, Ali will continue to
motor and, will cut Quarry
above one eye. Ali will then see
blood, giving him a target and,
this will mean the end for
Quarry.
I will go further still out on a
limb and say Muhammad Ali will
stop Jerry Quarry in 11 Rounds.

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Home Comforts Ease Fans

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports WrHwr
Sitting in the Reitz Union
movie theater watching the
Tennessee-Florida football game
on cable TV Saturday had all the
comforts of home.
It had a comfortable seat,
ideal room temperature,

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tillr w %
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fpilF ,j
JB ||fflH| j- wHE;.
PHIL BANNISTER
DOUG WHO? FANS WAVE
... become hams on TV
Soccer Team Ties
With Miami-Dade

The Gator Soccer Club tied
Miami-Dade Jr. College 3-3, in a
hard fought gams, Saturday at
Florida Field.
Max Ventura opened the
scoring for the Gators in the
19th minute, when he blasted
home a strong drive from dose
range.
STEWART McLaren
increased the lead to two in the
30th minute, when he scored
from a penalty kick, after being
fouled
As the first half drew to a
dose the Gators appeared to be
in control of the game.
The second half was only 30
seconds old, when the Gator
goalkeeper, Rual Grumberg,
Med to hold a long shot from
Miami-Dades Miguel Sanchez.
Grumberg watched the partially
blocked shot just trickle over the
goal line.
SIX ftfINUTES later Carlos
Fllori added another for the
Gators, to lift the score to 3-1.
The lead was short lived,
however, when goals by Miami's
Wilson Deleo and Dennis Sadler
brought the score to three each.
ALTHOUGH THERE were
scoring opportunities at both

~ TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
1 STARKE 01 FLORIDA
**SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEA LER
- hours
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

comradeship with people of
common interests and a modem
color TV.
But for the Gator football
team, in chilly and overcast
Knoxville, it was nothing near to
the comforts of friendly Florida
Field, where Gator losses are
very rare.
AND FOR both students glued

ends the final score remained
3-3.
The Gator Soccer Club plays
St. Leo College Tuesday, Oct.
27. Kickoff time is 4:00 pm. at
Fleming Field.
UF Ski Team
Takes Meet
With Record
The UF water ski team won
six categories Saturday to
capture the fifth annual Fall
Intercollegiate Water Ski
Tournament here.
Victories came in the mens
team slalom, jumping tricks,
mens overall competition,
womens slalom, womens tricks
and womens overall scoring.
UF finished with a
record-setting 4,530 points,
Which smashed the old marie of
3,161. Tampa and Rollins,
second and third respectively,
also broke die record with 3,210
and 3,205 points.
Polk Junior College finished
fourth with 2,295, while
Seminole Junior College tallied
2,135.

to the tube and the players glued
to a 38-7 loss in Coach Doug
Dickeys homecoming, it was
agony.
Between idiotic commercials,
the only thing that shone bright
for the Gators were their
colorful blue and orange
uniforms. Unfortunately pretty
uniforms dont win games.
The ABC announcers uneasily
fumbled through their lines,
mistaking a football assistant for
Dickey on a sideline shot.
ONCE AGAIN, the media
characterized Florida as a
faceless batch of football players
lead by the invincible team of
John Reaves and Carlos Alvarez,
who was tritely labeled as a
Cuban refugee.
It probably amazed viewers
that ABC didnt need a Spanish
translator for a pre-game
interview with Alvarez.
In more pre-game activity
Vols Coach Bill Battle looked
dapper in his coat and tie, while
Dickey, in his football jacket,
cleats and baseball hat, seemed
to growl at the camera as he was
introduced.
SOMEONE AT ABC mixed
!*!|!!*****l"*******"***!!;*y**|*^^fe^***^^^^?^^!^*!

W 00000 o_ c
w O o O O O ; O
O O 00 o^o
# o O OOOOC
00000 o
*
Do you still need books lor this term
and plan to buy them later 7
As a service to you, the student,
this ad is to notify you that the
Campus Shop and Bookstore wHi
be making returns to the publisher
of un-sokl books tor the current
term beginning November 2nd.
If you still need books for this
term come in nowi
CcAMPUS SHOP. BOOKSTORE
.... located in the Hub

nameplates over the halftime
statistics, thus giving the Gators
a demanding lead in yardage,
first downs, etc. Realizing the
mistake the announcer laughed
and said, Its really the score
that matters, and that is
Tennessee over Florida, 24-6.
There wasnt much laughter in
the theater.
The announcer further said it
would be interesting to note
Florida was concentrating on
passes to the middle instead of
ineffectual passes to the
sidelines.
HOW CAN anything be
interesting when the Gators are
getting clobbered?
With the miracle of instant
video playback, ABC, however,
did show the officials erred
when they ruled an incomplete
pass in a controversial sideline
play to Alvarez.
PmorM
DggL
Th new Citroen is its own high highpowered
powered highpowered salesman. Standard power
includes: the stopping power of
front inboard disc brakes. The last lasting
ing lasting power of functional design. The
power of Citroen's Constant Level
Ride System. The going power of
a hemi" engine. Now let Citroen
demonstrate its selling power. Take
a test drive.
Citroen
WE KNOW THE VALUfc OF
CARS, YOU KNOW THE
VALUE OF SERVICE
EDS JL
MEHARI CITROEN
4308 NW 13TH St
GAINESVILLE. FLA

Monday, October 26,1970, The Florida Alligator,!

1970 CADILLAC $6295
Sedan de ViMe I
Four doot hardtop Blue with white leothtr interior. Full I
power mciuding. oir conditioning, power steering, power I
brakes, plus much,' much more in comfort options.
1969 CADILLACEIdorado .... $5695
Front wheel drive. The world's finest personal cor. I
Equipped with stereo radio, automatic climate control, I
cruise control, tilt-telescoping steering wheel, power door I
lochs. Aout 13000 savings over the cost of a new model.
1969 CADILLAC $5495
Fleetwood 60 Special
Unexcelled luxury and comfort. Cost over SBOOO when I
new. Stereo AM-FM radio, air conditioned, leather seats, I
power door locks, tilt-telescoping steering wheel, autronic I
1969 OLDSMOBILE .$3695
98" luxury Sedan, local cor, one owner. Transferable I
factory warranty, air conditioned, electric windows and I
seat. White over gold.
1969 OLDSMOBILE Delta $3595
Four door sedan. White vinyl over green. Ait conditioned, I
power steering, power brakes, electric windows ond I
seats, tilt-telescoping wheel, cruise control, remote trunk I
release, AM-FM radio.
1969 OLDSMOBILE $2795
Cutlass lour door sedan, blue. Air conditioned, electric I
windows, electric seats, remote control trunk release. Elec-1
trie antenna. Factory warranty.
1969 VOLKSWAGEN "Bug" $1595
I Aia4xxMjn4x# adjls m L .As I m llenne
I AUiOfmiwi STICK SfliTT, dton, low miivugv. 1.001 wnirw.
1969 MUSTANG-Mach I 52595
I Fastback coupe a streamlined beauty? VI, power I
I steering, power front disc brakes, air conditioned, auto-1
1965 CADBIACS $4095
I Several reedy Me* cars from which te pick. They o 8 feo-1
I ture the new 472 cubic inch motor, air tuwdfriened, lots of I
196$ OLDSMOBILE .. $26501
I Delta sedan, lots of extras including, air Condemning, I
I electric windows and seat, power doer locks, disc brakes. I
196$ OLDSMOBILE 4-4-2 ..... slsso
I Sports coupe. Fa werful 4-4-3 performance. Stick shrtt
1196$ OLDSMOBILE .$229$
I Delmnnf BB
I Four door sedan, Wue. Radio I
11968 FOBD Forlorn 500 ..~51895|
I iWT 99W HMwl< VrTwWn WeVl* WtWew 111181 ewe 0 8
I QlilOlfic
1 1967 CHEVROLET ... ...... $149 3 I
I power steering, power brakes, radio, heater.
m7BO*mAC-GwM Ate ROW
19670LDSMOBBJ ... $2295
| TOROMAOO* froet wheaf drive. Gold. Afr ceedl- j
1 1967 FOBD 51595
I **&£s& VII 4 I
1966 MEBCIMY $1395
1966MMUKY .x^Bllfsl
I fliOfOOfl I
1966F08P-FaMawa $9951
I BMBNBf kSllfs
1961 COMET BUM 1
19660LMMOMLE sl69s
I riAlnilipmawt n .r/
lIOESUICK-fcrtra 215 sl79s|
11966F08D FALCON $9951
|1 965JOLDSMOBIU sl39s
1966 QWVBOLET Oiavy N ... $10951
I 51U1HHI wyOrl. 9U CjraafltT, UVrwIIHJIK TiwnefraNlVn, WV I
196$ CNiVBOLiT- M ahit s99s|
1964 PONTIAC-Bonn. $7951
I C n nnartlkla xese rrsaslitiAiso e4 xxjswar I
I vVll vwll|VW| wtr wiSSIIIIVVVVw, pwwgt tlwwl HCgf pvvT 8
I wKbbl tim 1
1 160Bwflq$iadi j

1969

Page 19



I, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, Octobar 26,1970

Page 20

BONANZA SIRLOIN PIT
THERE IS ONLY ONE A
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OPEN DAILYFROM 11-9 PM PLUS OTHERS
John James P
Ll \ This week's player of the week award goes Ok jy
lUltHli i to punter John James for his exceptional play f
j j in a rather dismal game sirturday at
\ i James punted nine times for 339 yards for f 1 £/ J
Wl / an average of 38 yards per punt in the 38-7 I Hi jtt
\ loss. His longest punt of the day went 52 BHfIL rfC / Jk
yards which put the Volunteers deep into -J
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PBh| Other's receiving a vote for the award were f
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Richard Buchanan.
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