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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Reinstatement Os UF Atheletes Fails

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
V.
A move to reinstate Ralph
Hart and Dan Landrum to the
tennis team failed Wednesday
when the board of directors of
the Athletic Association (AA)
voted not to let the pair rejoin
the squad.
ACCORDING TO Student
Government Secretary of
Athletics Art Wroble, only two
votes were cast in favor of the

Foci
All Amnio*.

Vol. 63, No. 25

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BIG BOOZER
A rally big one, too. That beer can you see was placed by
somebody who couldn't find a trash can in the hand of Dr. Walter
Murphree his statue, that is, located between Peabody Hall and the
College Library. Photos by Phil Bannister.

By CARLOS J. LICEA
And LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writers
A special committee of the
Board of Regents will meet next
Thursday in Tallahassee to
decide if athletic programs in the
state universities should be
de-emphasized.
UF Student Body President
sve Uhlfelder has appealed for
student opinion to aid him and
other students as they prepare a
report to be presented to the
regents.
CHUCK SHERMAN and
Donna Hawkins, student body
presidents at Florida State
University and Florida A&M
University will also be present at

The
Florida Alligator
o
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Athletics Fate Up To Regents

dissenting athletes at the
meeting; his and that of Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelder.
We felt the length of the hair
makes no difference in
performance, Uhlfelder said.
The AA makes the rules and
has the power to change them.
Uhlfelder said members of the
board had told him there has
been pressure put on the AA
from the alumni and Gator
football fans who do not want
to see UF athletes sporting long
locks.

In DEPH

the meeting.
The meeting comes after a
Council of Student Body
Presidents recommendation to
the Regents Oct. 9 that athletic
programs in the universities be
re-evaluated.
Considering inadequate
funding, inflationary economy
and student pleas for more
relevancy in education, it seems
the role of multi-million dollar
athletic programs needs to be
evaluated by this board before
we proceed further, the

THE TWO sophomore
athletes were dismissed from the
tennis team Tuesday because
they allegedly did not conform
to rules laid down by tennis
team Coach Bill Potter and
Athletic Director Ray Graves.
The pair had initiated a
petition last week among UF
athletes asking for more voice in
the decision-making process of
the Athletic Department, and
changes in the present athlete
dress and conduct codes.

University of Florida, Gainesville

COSTS RISING

Infirmary Asks SG
To Separate Fees

BySUECUSTODE
Alligator Staff Wrtor
The Student Government
Activity Fee Committee
Thursday heard Dr. Wilmer J.
Coggins, director of Student
Health Services, suggest student

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statement of the council said.
IN RESPONSE, Regent
Chairman D. Burke Kibler 111
who is a member of UFs
Athletic Association agreed to
set up a committee to study the
intercollegiate athletic program.
Kibler said the committee will
meet next Thursday for an all
day public hearing in room
307 in the state capitol in
Tallahassee.
UF athletic officials will be
present at that meeting.
UHLF ELDER SAID he

Hart and Landrum have
become the second and third
students to be dismissed from a
varsity sport since the dismissal
two weeks ago of Joel Dobson
from the rifle team because of
longhair.
THE RIFLE team is not
considered a varsity sport, but
its members observe the varsity
rules and regulations of the
Athletic Association.
In a morning press conference
Thursday, UF President Stephen

health fees be made separate
from the present activity fee.
FUNDS FOR STUDENT
health services now come from
the $32.50 student activity fee.
The Infirmary receives sl3 of
that amount. Other agencies
receiving portions of the fee are

expected athletic officials from
FAMU and FSU to be present
also.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, as chairman of the
Athletic Association; Mandell
Glicksberg, president of the
association; and Athletic
Director Ray Graves will be
among the delegation of UF
officials at the meeting,
Uhlfelder said.
Dr. Louis C. Murray,
chairman of the special
committee, said Wednesday, I
feel certainly satisfied with the
matter in which (state
university) athletics have been
conducted to date. They
(SEE UHLFELDER PAGE 4)

C. O'Connell said participation
in the athletic program was
voluntary, and in that case,
those who participated had to
abide by the rules the coaches
have made.
Uhlfeldei had disputed these
rules, contending all students on
the UF campus were equal, and
rules should apply equally to all
students.
I am very disappointed that
the board of directors did not
reinstate the athletes, Uhlfeider
said.

\ J
9 /
\* Int # S

Friday, October 23, 1970

the Reitz Union, $9; Student
Government, $4.97; Athletic
Department, $3.75 and Student
Publications, $1.58.
Coggins said an exciting
possibility would be to have
the health services fee
completely separate, like
housing fees. He said he thinks
students are willing to commit
their support to student health
services, though he said he
would be very reluctant to
have the system become
voluntary.
According to Coggins
suggestion, all students would
pay a fee of sls per quarter for
health services. Commercial
health insurance would not pay
for health service fees on this
separate plan, but/ the costs
would be tax-deductible.
THE PLAN WOULD HAVE
to meet with UF and Board of
Regents approval to be
implemented.
Coggins also told the
committee there are many
reasons for an increase in
Infirmary funds. Among them
are:
Total patient visits from
June 1967 to June 1970
increased from 44,000 to
59,000.
Prescriptions dispensed have
increased from 30,500 to about
46,000. The Infirmary dispenses
drugs at cost phis 20 cents,
except drugs costing less than a
dollar, which are dispensed free.
Individual lab procedures
(SEE 'INFIRMARY* PAGE 17)
UF HOSTS the largest
junior debate tournament
in the nation starting
today page 17
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 18
Letters 9
Movies 12
Page of Record 10
Sports 20
Whats Happening 7



!, Tht Florida Alligator, Friday, October 23,1970

Page 2

SEIU Unionization Request Denied

By CARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Staff Writer
State Secretary of
Administration Samuel Tucker
rebuffed a movement to
unionize local non-academic
employes, attacking the chief
organizer for forming the union
to advance his radical
philosophy.*
According to Dave Smith,
Business representative for the
Service Employes International
Union (5.E.1.U.) Local No. 626,
AFL-CIO, the attack on him was
made in a letter sent to Val Cox,
the S.E.I.C. international
representative.
PART OF THE letter,
according to a Florida Times
Union article Thursday, reads,
The governor and I are fully
aware of your activities on
behalf of the Students for a
Democratic Society and other
militant groups.
Your contributions to the
rantings and railings of radical
groups on campus indicate that
you are merely seeking to
organize large groups of

No Bombing Threats
Announced At Games

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Staff Writer
Should there be a bomb
threat in Florida Field during a
football game, the spectators
will not be told of the danger to
avoid panic.
UF PRESIDENT Stephen C.
OConnell announced Thursday
the UF policy concerning bomb
threats in the stadium.
If a threat is received after
the fans begin to eater the
HaMp nr during a mm, the
tiiiiiu wit! ha mrM
immediately, but to avoid
possible damage to guests from
crowd hysteria, no public
announcement of the threat will
be made,*' OConnell said.
The restatement of the policy
comes from the 11 bomb threats
which have hit the campus since
the beginning of the fall quarter.
THE LATEST bomb threat
on campus was in Florida Field
last Saturday during the
UF-Richmond football game.
He said the stadium was
searched midway through the
game, but no bomb was found.
O'Connell said it takes about
20 minutes i to search the

I abort getting a part-time job? I
I Alligator HEIP WANTED a# help |
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
_ more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion. . :

nonacademic and nonclerical
employes at UF to advance your
radical philosophy, which is
certainly repugnant to the
national labor movement,
Tucker added.
The letter was a reply to a
request sent to Gov. Claude Kirk
by Smith and Cox, asking the
governor's corporation in calling
for a secret ballot of university
employes to determine if they
want to be represented by his
union.
I DONT HAVE any
membership figures at this
time, said Smith, except that
a clear majority of the physical
plant employes are members.
Smith says the attack on him
is an attempt to cloud the issue
on Kirks part.
The issue is whether or not
state employes have a right to
unionize, said Smith.
THE CONSTITUTION,
Askew and the State Committee
on Labor says they do, Kirk says
they dont.
Kirks reply, according to
Smith, said the workers dont
want to be represented, and then

stadium, using about 55 to 68
police officers.
TO INSURE that no bombs
would be placed in Florida
Field, OConnell said the
stadium would be closed the
Friday night prior to the
football game, and searched
thoroughly.
University Police Department
officers will remain on
continuous duty in the stadium
until after the game.
After the stadium is opened
or Saturday morning, police
offices* will slop asy person
attempting to carry a
questionable object into the
stadium, OConnell said.
IF A BOMB threat is reported
in sufficient time before a
game, Florida Field will be
searched and details released to
the news media so the public
will be aware of the situation
before arriving at the stadium.
One additional deterrent for
false bomb threats are the
tracers put on phone calls made
to the campus.
OConnell said some of these
tracer devices already have been
installed on UF phones, and
more will be provided in the
future.

denies an election which is the
oily real way to determine if the
workers want representation.
Kirk knows that in such an
election, the union would win.
CONCERNING THE attack
on himself, Smith issued a
statement saying Kirk has
chosen to ignore the real issues
involved, and indulge in his
customary smear tactics.
Further he states, I am not
now, nor have I ever been a
member of, or organizer for, the
Students for a Democratic
Society. The only organization
to which I belong is the S.E.I.U,
aflx:io.
Smith said he doesnt know
where Tucker got his
information, but it might be
from the fact that he was
involved in the anti-war
movement on the campus two
years ago.
BILL GIBSON, director of

Peace Groups Celebrate
3-Dav Antiwar Moratorium

By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Writer
A coalition of UF peace
groups will begin the three day
anniversary of last years
moratorium with the film You
Dont Have to Buy War, Mrs.
Smith Thursday at 7:30 pjn. in
room 361 of the Reitz Union. A
25 cent donation will be
collected, Lynne Edelman,
student leader of Florida
Student Movement (FSM) said.
FSM and Vets for Peace will
march in the Homecoming
parade Oct. 30. Anyone
interested should meet west of
UF track under the Vets for
Peace banner at 11 ajn. Kenneth
Megdl, and members of the BSU
and Vets for Peace will speak at
a peace raiy is toe Plaza of top
Americas after 4m parade.
PLANS FOR participation in

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2411 SW 13th Street
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Mrs. Callie Hunt In Charge
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DAVE SMITH
.. attacked for 'radical philosophy'
information for the State
Department of Administration,
when reached by the Alligator
Thursday said the governor came
across the information from
sources considered reliable.

Gator Growl are not yet
complete, according to Atilla
Dkson, ILW.
ODK is sponsoring a breakfast
at Flagler Inn at which the
mayor of Gary, Ind., Richard
Hatcher, wifi speak Saturday
morning. There is a 52.50
charge for the breakfast, tort he
*Om f MOT bjwNmMNIN mmm*
FSM is encouraging students

Gibson also said a letter was
sent to Smith, and the main
theme of the letter was that
there was no need for an
organization of this type,** and
pointed out some benefits to
state employes.
Smith earlier had stated he
didn't receive a copy of the
letter.
SMITH SAID the officers of
the local were going to meet in a
few days to determine further
actions, and that they would
probably meet with Cox, the
international representative.
He said he didnt know what
course of action would be taken
by the union officers, but said
there are many possibilities to be
taken including court action.
Theres an election coming
up too, and we probably would
take action in court after the
election.

to attend during this hour.
PICKETS WITH signs saying
How can you attend mock war
while real war is going on? will
walk along the sidewalks around
the stadium before the
Homecoming football game,
according to Miss Edelman.
During the game, students will
meet on the north lawn of the
Union to sing antiwar songs and
have poetry readings and
discussions.
We want students to get
their football tickets, but not go
to the game, Miss Edelman
said.
A statewide coalition of
antiwar groups will gather in
Tampa for three days of rallies,
speeches, and discussions during
this tine.
coahhon coinsts of
Federation of Teachers and
Black Student Union.



Rhodes At Rat

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writer
As if there werent enough
other good things happening
right here in Gainesville what
with Johnny Winter at the
Suburbia, and Z and Zorba
the Greek at the Reitz Union,
the Rathskeller presents another
weekend of fine entertainment
with the Rhodes Brothers.
You may have seen them on
the Mike Douglas Show. If you
havent, dont let that put you
off. Theyve also appeared with
Johnny Carson, Merv Griffin,
Dom Delouise and in their own
special aired in South Florida
which you may have caught if
you happen to be from the
Miami-West Palm Beach area.
AND OH yes, they really are
brothers. Although I don't have
a chromosome test to prove it,
they do look alike. The
three-voice blend of Tom, John,
and Ed have an appeal thats
contagious.
Audience participation seems
to be a big part of their act.
Nobody beats you on the head
to get you to clap your hands or
stomp your feet, but what else
can you do?
Maybe you have this secret,
burning desire to dance on a
table which only you .and your
psychoanalyst know about. Well,
here's your chance to loose your
inhibitions. Just step right on
stage ladies and gentlemen with
the Rhodes Brothers
Dance-Along. Forget the podunk
table stuff.
THE BAND is another good
thing about the act. With a
driving, dynamite beat the
organ, trombone, trumpet, two
guitars and drums along with the
brothers Rhodes tie in for a
put-together effect geared to a
younger audience.
The theme song from Mash,
Tell It All, Higher and
Make Me Smile among others
are some of the songs you'll be
hearing.
Nightclub appearances as well
as television appearances have
given the group a professional
polish which an over-30
audience would enjoy. Light
comedy is an added attraction.
BREAKING INTO the college
A ill % gg
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JACKSONVILLE
CIVIC AUDITORIUM.
SATURDAY, OCT. 318:30 P.M.
BANK MABTKR
\MERICARD PRICES CHARGE
3.50-4.50-5 50
t icicats now on Sato Jax 6Me
AuditoriumHemming Park
Ticket Office and Coliseum
Reservations Accepted
Phone Auditorium 354-2041
Mail orders accepted. Send check
or money order to Jax civic
Auditorium, Jacksonville, Fla.
and enclose self-addressed
stamped envelope.

concert circuit is what the
Rhodes Brothers have been
doing lately. Although they
prefer a youthful sound for
themselves, they value the sound
of more traditional-sounding
music such as Cole Porter. All
music is good, says Tom,
Everybody's in a bag today,
but we're trying not to be.
So if you're in the market for
some unbaggable entertainment
come to the Rathskeller tonight
and/or tomorrow night. The first
show is at 8 p jn. Tickets at $2 a
head are available at the Record
Bar, The Rathskeller, or the box
office at the Union.

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THE RHODES BROTHERS AT THE RAT
... play last two shows there Saturday

Friday, October 23, Y7O, Tlm Florida Aiplir,

Page 3



ITtofli 111 Octofaf 23, tS7Q

Page 4

Uhlfelder Questions

pIP46E OWE^j
(atUetks) I wm made it possible
for fee mmamtia to develop
fenfeagfeu* pirate areas which
would mat be able to do
WGGG mom, prompted
Ufa Udder to comment Thursday,
Id, ekmmdj feis is not going
to be ai mMmmi committee.**
The UF student body
may m vfekfc fee Regents were
*Thii n not exactly what I
had m wind, bHdder said. He
had hoped fee Regents would
make fear own independent
study of inleacoUegk*e athletics,
to be ca*pa*d with similar
stofecs by students at
"We'aHENOT trying to get
nd of aUcfes* UUfelder said,
but the eapfenb placed on
athletics meeds to be
xc^wAntod***
Ufaifdier arid Wednesday he
drShi^SrSdeeMrfirr
Does the atbjrtr, budget
UMfcMer nU Ike UF Athletic
Should acaey which state
universities receive from
pnartaal betting be devoted to
schoiadHpd* The money is now
devoted to afekfic scholarships.

'Playboy Flick Scheduled
At Campus Religious Center

If you ftak fihn features at
irfipnM are definitely
too sedate for your interests, try
making it to the Center for
United Wastries this Sunday at
7 pm
They*! be Acahng Hugh
Hefner and Haney Cox in The
Playboy and foe Christian.
HEFNER, PUBLISHER of
Playboy, and Coot, author of
The Secular City, wil discuss
premarital seat and the rote
of the church in the fihn.
The mcrvie is the third in a
series of four fihns comprising a
M fihn festival
According to Rick Payne,
assistant to Minister Jack

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e Should athletic
departments be allowed to
compete with the universities in
raising the private dollar?
e With respect to UF, is
participation in die Southeastern
Conference costing us money
by, for instance, requiring
participation in more sports than
the university budget can
reasonably bear?
UHLFELDER complained of
the short time students would be
allowed to complete die study.
They seem to want to get
the whole thing over with in one
day, he complained. Tm not
criticizing the Regents for not
trying, but maybe they dont
understand an effective,
meaningful study will take
longer than one week.
Some Regents and university
officials give the impression they
just want this question to be all
cleared up quickly so it will all
blow away and things can get
back to normal.
WE ARE NOT going out for
a witchhunt, we want real
facts, Uhlfelder continued.
He expressed fear that the
forthcoming meeting may be a
public relations show for the
athletic departments.
Uhlfelder added, I fed
athletic budgets may get out of
hand within a few years if we
dont make a thorough study
now.
BUT OCONNELL expressed
support Thursday for
intercollegiate athletics saying,
The campus balance between
academics and athletics (at UF)
is a good one
OConnell said, I will

Downey of the University
Methodist Church, previous
films were The Para-le and
St Matthews Passion
OUR FILMS have been
basically of a religious nature,
Psyne said, but were
attempting to ascertain the
interest of the student body far
any future film festivals.
The Center for United
Ministries, also called the
Presbyterian Student Center, has
been showing these fihns free of
charge, at total expense of about
$65.
Wed like to have future
festivals. We dont necessariy
plan to have fihns of an

recommend to die Regents to
keep die athletic program at UF
as it is. We are proud of what we
have accomplished.
Uhlfelder slid the UF
students proposal will be in line
with itseariier statement on the
/Uumphc7ing of athletics. SG
members and otter students will
meet at the Reitz Union Sunday
night to begin writing their
proposals.
UFS STUDENT body
president encouraged students
with opinions either pro or
con on the athletic question to
call in to SG at 392-1665 to give
their views.
UF football player Carlos
Alvarez is among the students
who will be at the Sunday
meeting, Uhlfelder said. Student
Body Vice President Henry
Solares has talked to suspended
UF tennis players Ralph Hart
and Dan Landrum, and said they
might come to the meeting.
The student group which is
making the study is trying to get
athletes opinions on the
question of intercollegiate
athletics, Solares said.
UF, FSU and FAMU
participate in most major
intercollegiate sports, and are
the only three state supported
institutions with football teams.
The student body presidents
of the three universities will be
asked by the committee
Thursday to provide details of
their programs, specifically, the
sources of money which run
them and how this money is.
spent.

explicitly religious nature,
Payne said. There are many
other films in existence today
that also raise die question of
meaning and values.
After the films, the center has
beat holding discussion groups
for those who care to
participate. Hopefullysaid
Payne, the films stimulate them
into some sort of reaction.
ATTENDANCE IN the last
two weeks has been poor,
ranging from 40 to 50 persons
each night. Payne expressed
hope that Sunday nights film
will draw approximately 100
people-
There is no charge for
admission to any of the fihns.

Athletics Role

Sherman said Thursday FSITs
report will specifically concern
the damage done to the
university and athletes by
athletics in the scale they are
done today.
SHERMAN ADDED he will
outline a program on how
athletics should be structured
for the benefit of athletes and
students in the state universities.

w I
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Red and White Wines H
Cold Duck fl
Multiple Topless
Come To
k TRADERS M\

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GAINESVILLE MALL
IF VmU
COUNTRY *N WESTERN
She was only a fanner's daughter but
they loved her in these new navy blue
overalls. Cotton denim, of course. Put on
your best shirt underneath, and
show those city slickers the way to dress;
S-M-L, 10.00, Young Junior Sportswear.

Miss Hawkins, FAMU
president, was not available for
comment Thursday.
The St. Petersburg Times
Thursday reported Regent
Chairman Kibler as saying he did
not want anyone to think the
meeting was the first step in
de-emphasizing athletics in the
Florida campuses.



* v 9 JL fl|
6 V
UF Science Fiction Club:
Just Ordinary Freaks

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Contrary to popular belief, the campus science
fiction club isnt an organization of warty,
deformed monsters.
INSTEAD, ITS a group of UF students
interested in science Fiction literature. The group
meets weekly to swap, loan, and give science
fiction books to one another.
John Beckner, associate professor of botany, is
the clubs faculty advisor and top science fiction
fan. Beckner often conducts discussions with the
grout) on the works of a particular science fiction

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Friday, Octobac 23.1970, Tha Florida AlU*rtor,


writer. £
Field trips are also planned in future weeks. :
HIGHLIGHTING THE groups schedule is an j:
excursion to Cape Kennedy for the launch of j:
Apollo 14. The launch is scheduled for Jan. 31, ;j
1971. r I
Another trip is planned to St. Petersburg for :
the purpose of visiting noted science fiction $
writer Pierce Anthony. ;
Interested SF afficionados should call Phyme J
Bacon at 376-9539. >:

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 23.1970

Honor System
'ln Trouble'

We have found it hard
to determine why the
code isnt working but
we have reached some
alternatives for revising
the system.
Dan Stephens
Honor Court Chancellor

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By LINDA CREESY
Alligator Staff Writer
The honor system is obviously in trouble, Honor Court
Chancellor Dan Stephens has said.
The honor code is not being upheld as it is designed, Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelder said.
Why?
Uhlfelder believes difficulties stem from student silence, not telling
on each other, a laissez faire attitude among students, and student
laziness.
I think the system should be revised and not replaced by a proctor'
system, Uhlfelder said.
Uhlfelder and Stephens agree that an informative program is the
answer. They believe the student body needs to be educated as to how
the system works.
This is the start of returning our code to prior standards,
Stephens said.
We feel that our code is important as an ideal self-government, but
many students are unaware of the offenses which the system guards
against, he added.
The offenses are cheating, stealing, passing worthless checks, and
ticket scalping of any university sponsored activity.
For convicted students, punishment may range from expulsion to a
maximum of 20 penaly hours. Convictions will remain on a students
record until the student petitions for removal.
We hope students will stop and think before the honor code is
broken, Stephens said.
In an attempt to salvage the system, as stated by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, a five member committee was set up during the
summer to study the future of the honor system.
We have found it hard to determine why the code isnt working
but we have reached some alternatives for revising the system,
Stephens said.
In attempting to decrease the possibility of cheating during an
exam, a space seating program will be instituted by finals time.
This will hold true for every college not just University
College, Stephens said.
We will also have a brief questionnaire at the conclusion of every
exam. Students will be asked their opinions of the honor systems
effectiveness, alternate tests, and possible modification of the honor
system, he said.
Stephens does not foresee a straw ballot this year.
If students truly want change of systems, it should become
evident in a very in-depth study much more detailed than what was
done by University Squires this spring.
This would tend to be more representative of what UF students feel
about their system.
The Honor Court is also hoping to change procedures. In the past
the court has operated under Florida Statutes.
Were too legal. Many technical problems have evolved that dont
concern us. We want to protect the accused and not let the guilty out
of conviction. /
If we relax our procedure rules, we will better fit the proceedings
of honordefense,* Stephens said.
Maybe if we de-emphasize grades and direct our attention to
learning, well solve the honor systems problem, Uhlfelder said.
/
/
/

JI I'
B|r ; -.
.
'
I
( Honor
System
-<*

Fall film festival
- THE CENTER
1402 W. UNIV.
Supper at 6 PM
film Showing at 7 PM
SUNDAY, Oct. 25
IHE PLAYBOY AND THE CHRISTIAN
Sex, Ethics, Morality and the Role of the Christian
SUNDAY, Nov. 1
THE MAGICIAN
A modern allegory dealing with the forces
of evil in man.



Friday, October 23.1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

\\J\//ft &IT 11 A 9 m m \ ft **
GOING UP? A College Life meeting, sponsored by Campus Crusade
for Christ will be held Sunday at 9:13 p.m. at the Pi Kappa Alpha
(Pike) house on University Avenue.
It is rumored the College Life Players will be there. Everyone is
invited to attend.
Campus Crusade will also hold its Christian Leadership Training
Class tonight at 7 p.m. in room 361 in the Reitz Union.
n
IF ..The Union Films Committee is sponsoring a discussion of
the film 1f... after the 8 p.m. showing Saturday night.
The discussion will be in rooms 361 and 362 of the Reitz Union.
Coffee will be served.
TRANSFER TIME: The Transfer Student Organization will hold a
get-together for all transfer students behind Hume Hall Sunday at 2
p.m.
The group will play football, music and volleyball and a good time
is planned for all.
POPULATION PREACHING: Dr. Seymour Block will talk on Ethics
and Populatiop Limitation at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at the
Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship, 2814 NW 43rd Street.
For transportation, call 376-1174.
WHAT DO INSECTS USE TO MAKE FIRE?: A cricket match. The
UF International cricket team will play the powerful Esquire Rebels
from Freeport, Grand Island, Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. both
days. The games will take place on Alice Field across from SAE.
GIVE PEACE ANOTHER CHANCE: Students interested in making
banners, putting on a skit, organizing a rally, or helping in anyway
with the Oct. 31 moratorium are urged to attend a meeting Sunday in
McCarthy Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.
BARGAIN BOOKS: The sixteenth annual book sale sponsored by the
Friends of the Library will continue today and Saturday from 9 a.m.
to 6 p.m. The sale is at Ruddys on the south side of the square, and
has been underway since Wednesday.
This year there is a large number of textbooks, fiction, childrens
books, and back issues of magazines.
HONOR THE SABBATH: The group that brought the sun to the
Plaza of the Americas is back for a Live Celebration a folk concert
and sing-in. It will take place Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Catholic
Student Center next to the C.I.
DIG THIS AGAIN: The Florida Speleological Society (that means
caving club for all you surface people) will meet tonight at 7 p.m. in
the Union. Non-cavers welcome too.
FBK, MB-S: That stands for Florida Blue Key, Mortar Board-Savant.
They are selling tickets to their respective banquets now in room 303
in the Union from 2-5 p.m.
Tickets to the Mortar Board-Savant banquet cost $3.25 for students
and $5.25 for adults. Florida Blue Key tickets cost $6.
SAILING, SAILING .... All students siped up for Bahama Flotilla
are invited to attend a shake down sail aboard Morgan 34 and
Beach Party in Clearwater Saturday. It costs $5 per person.
Second Kent Student
Arrested For May Riot

KENT, Ohio (UPI) A
second student who was
wounded last spring on the Kent
State University campus when
National Guardsmen fired into a
group of demonstrating students
was arrested Thursday on an
indictment handed down by a
special state grand jury.
Joseph Lewis, 19, of
Massillon, Ohio, charged with
second-degree rioting, was
wounded seriously last May 4
when four students were killed
by Guardsmen. Lewis, who was

1971 Seminole
On Safe At
Broward
4-7 p.m.

Page 7

listed in critical condition when
he was first hospitalized, was a
freshman sociology major at the
time he was wounded.
Lewis was the second of nine
students injured in the May
shootings to be arrested on the
indictments. Alan Canfora, 21,
Barberton, Ohio, arrested
Tuesday and charged with
second degree rioting, was
wounded superficially in the the
shooting.
Lewis was arraigned Thursday
and released on $ 1,000 bond.

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Page 8

y The Florid* Alligator, Friday, October 23,1970

EDITORIAL
Abortion Laws
Need Change
Mary Jones, 19, coed, was raped while walking from the
library to her dorm one night.
Jane Smith/26, housewife, has three small children and is
on the verge of a nervous breakdown.
Susan Brown, 20, newlywed, holds down two jobs while
working to put her husband through school.
Kathy Baker, 32, career girl, doesnt want children.
Joan Doe, 18, coed, is engaged, but she wants to finish
school before she marries.
Karen Cook, 29, housewife, was exposed to German
measles and is afraid of bearing a deformed child.
These six women have something in common. For them,
pregnancy is a personal disaster. But if they live in Florida,
abortion is illegal in all their cases.
Mary, Jane, Susan, Kathy, Joan and Karen are not real
people. Their stories, however, are those of many of the
more than one million American women, two-thirds of
them married, who have criminal abortions each year. An
estimated two dozen UF coeds have criminal abortions each
month. Their abortions are not performed by licensed
physicians in sanitary hospitals. Theyre performed in back
rooms and private homes, and they cost exorbitant sums.
Last year about 8,000 women paid with their lives,
When abortions are illegal, the conditions under which
they are performed cannot be regulated.
Under sanitary conditions, and with a good doctor, an
abortion in the first three months of pregnancy is a
relatively safe 20-minute operation. It requires only one
days hospitalization.
State Sen. Bob Saunders of Gainesville says he believes an
abortion should be a personal judgment between a woman
and her doctor, considering her individual situation. We
agree. Every woman deserves the right to choose whether to
bear a child. And every child deserves to be wanted.
But the road to human rights and equality isnt 1-75. Its
a difficult road with some steep hills which Florida on
occasion has trouble climbing. The state sometimes seems
like a dilapidated old Ford, just waiting for a bigger car to
give it a push.
Recently the U.S. Supreme Court let stand a Federal
court ruling which said Wisconsins abortion law is
unconstitutional. The Federal court said the law is a
violation of womans privacy rights, and the Supreme Court
refused to review the case. This invalidated the Wisconsin
law.
Floridas law, allowing abortion only when a womans life
is in danger, is similar to Wisconsins. It looks like only a
matter of time before someone will bring a test case. The
courts no doubt will invalidate our law too, and Florida will
be pushed over another hill on the road to human rights.
Why should we wait?
The past two sessions the Florida legislature has defeated
bills to liberalize our abortion laws. In 1971 things must be
different. ? i
We do need a law. It should require that abortions be
performed by a liscensed doctor in a liscensed hospital.
Period.
Sen. Kenneth Myers, D-Miami; Sen. Cliff Reuter,
R-Sharpes; and Rep. Miley Miers, D-Tallassee; are among
abortion law reforms biggest advocates. They will see that
the bill is introduced in the legislature. Our own legislative
delegation should join them in working for its passage.
Our representatives Bill Andrews and Ralph Turlington
both voted for liberalized abortion laws last spring. Our
other representative, Kenneth Mac Kay, D-Ocala, did not. It
is important that all three representatives and our senator
place their votes on the side of human rights.
Kenneth Mac Kay and the other legislators who vote
against changing Floridas archaic abortion laws are helping
condemn thousands more Florida women to the horrors of
criminal abortion. And they are keeping Florida from
climbing another hill. >
We dont need to wait to be pushed.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

V/- 1
Y fS VEAR &D We! \
: ifwPfrir )
( GLASS FERIWj/
Childish Exchanges..
Make It Better Next Time

This one is for Bruce Alper
and Dave Miller, the rest of you
folks might find it just as dull as
their recent exchange of
columns.
Gentlemen, the editorial pages
of the FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
are not a (dace for the exchange
of personal letters; especially
when that exchange begins to
sound like two suitors quarreling
over a woman.
Your exchange of names and
charges (its interesting to note
that in your accusation of
literary offenses, you commit
those same crimes yourselves)
complete with ideological
mystics interests no reader other
than yourselves.
Your readership, I should
.imagine, has tailed off
considerably since this
childishness began a few weeks
back.
If a newspaper column is to
be effective it has to have an

Alligator Staff;' 8
Denise Valiants Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
Steve Strang
Assistant Assignment Editor
5 FlO,id und ,h *-
ttxsszr*. ,n ** *..
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are tho r eh.
of lhe wrilCT of ,h tkle "< * of th. um,.4,y of nogj

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

[ j KEN

interest to a broad readership,
not just a single written
adversary.
If you ever expect to change
some ones mind youll have to
first stop calling everyone names
and making all involved so angry
they wouldnt consider your
viewpoint. Secondly, try digging
up some new information, a
concrete, fact, for the reader to
help sway him.
To lash out at anything or
anyone who seems a possible
threat and then only with vague
philosophical generalities is
beneath even the point of
journalistic irresponsibility.
The editors of THE
ALLIGATOR have been very
lenient with all contributing
columnists this year. However, a
sustained display of tantrum ad

Phyllis Gallup
Managing Editor

Loretta Tennant
News Editor

nauseam will serve not only to
cut back on the readership of
anything on the editorial page,
but our access to print as well.
We are able to participate in a
unique role as opinionists in a
college newspaper. I consider
our continued exposure to the
public in this manner to be a
priviledge; lets make an effort
to present material worthy of
that privilege.
In the future, please confine
your bickering to letters in the
mail. If you need the six cents
for postage Ill gladly donate it
to either of you.
To my usual readership:
forgive me for feeling it
necessary to write this one. I
promise something better next
time ...

Stutifent Publicafidris
Ifcuiihess Staff j
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1619



Select Service
MR. EDITOR:
Answer me this: Is it at all
ethical to give one full time
student a particular standard
service and not another at the U
of F? For more than one half of
the U of F*s 1970 enrollment, a
specific service is not being
performed, while this same
identical service is being
executed for a select few. Ill
be willing to bet that not even
Albert our mascot knows of
what service I am speaking. I will
give you the scoop, the way I
got it the hard way.
Being a transfer student, I
nevertheless, had all of those
familiar freshman characteristics
with the troubles of location of
classes, the strain of
line-standing, and a little less
than confident look or
expression, as I approached the
U of F campus for my initial
exposure to the south's
academic outlook. I had to live
temporarily in a lounge,
unfortunately, with a stereo,
four suit cases, and a great array
of other various paraphemaly. I
moved into Hume Hall to share a
study lounge with seven other
scholarly-hungering youth.
When I was notified,
approximately two weeks
thereafter, I was confounded
with the idea of transporting all
of my prized possessions to
Murphree Area. Moreover, the
housing office requested that I
complete my trek across campus
before sundown that day.
You might have known it
was raining out pouring! Well,
to make my point, I was in a
position to do one of three
things: (1) carry my stereo, its
amplifier, and speakers across
campus, (2) ask someone for a
ride, or (3) stay in the study
lounge at Hume Hall. The last
one was voided by my notice of
residential space; I found
myself calling the director of

Somebody Up Top Likes
Whats Going On Here

A high level confidante of the
Nixon administration has
revealed that the University of
Florida is the scene of a secret
research project.
A task force made up of
Defense Department, Justice
Department, and Chicago Police
experts wants to find out how
future journalists react to overt
repression.
WE H^YjS e been fjmt*
satisfied with the administration
response at the school, said the
spokesman who declined to be
identified.
I understand that the dean
of the school of journalism even
told students that if an
unexpected story breaks out
while they're on an assignment
they should leave, he said. I
still can't believe he said it
publicly.
Some of the newspapers
with strong administration ties
have played down news critical

IlA a] gj § V# * v
READERS FORUM

housing, only after numerous
attempts to locate persons who
would transport me to my
destination. But, unfortunately
everyone whom I asked could
only offer their assistance with
the aid of their bicycles.
The director informed me
that the U of F only moves
females to their places of
residence! Talk about womens
liberation!
This residential-transport rule
is the most outlandish,
ridiculous, descriminatory, and
absurd one that I've ever
encountered; what can I say?
I sincerely hope that the
abolishment of this rule is
immediate. Moreover, I hope
that we, as the majority (males)
should publicize, act on, and
amend this ordinance. Need I
say more?
ROBERT BROWNING
Rock WRUF
MR. EDITOR:
The letters in the Reader's
Forum the past few days
concerning the playing of
classical music on WRUF seem
to be ignoring the fact that the
students overwhelmingly voted
for an increase in student
oriented (i.e. rock) music. Even
though WRUF supposedly serves
the community, it is not serving
the large part the University
students make up.
A re-ordering of priorities is
needed so that the large majority
of students can hear what they
wish. At the present time no
local station plays an
appreaciable amount of
progressive music.
Judging by the election
results, if classical listeners
received time in proportion to
their numbers, they would
receive very little time at all.
However, there is no need for
the elimination of classical
sounds. A rock format could be

HI REG CROWDER pga

of police but this is really an
unexpected breakthrough.
HOW HAS the police team
been working?
Quite well considering their
newness to the field, he said.
When that officer pushed the
camera into that kids face we
expected the police to go by the
book and just mutter a few
thing* about an investigation,
wait for it to cool off, and then
fry him on traffic or drugs or
something.
But they really took a bold
and heartwarming step by
actually threatening to arrest the
kid on charges of interfering
with a police officer, he said.

presented in the evenings, after
7:30 for instance. In this way,
all parties could have the music
they enjoy.
1 bought my FM radio to
listen to progressive sounds not
available on AM radio. It seems
that in Gainesville they aren't
available on FM either. When a
commercial radio station is more
responsive to student desires
than the University's own
station, the question needs to be
asked if WRUF is actually
serving the community or only
the desires of the people who
control the station.
JIM SCOTT
Classic WRUF
MR. EDITOR:
Your editorial advocating
changes in WRUF-FM was in
some ways well-founded. Yet I
feel a certain contradiction
exists in your suggestion, as is
evidenced by your closing line,
We feel its time for WRUF-FM
to grow up and begin planning
for the students first"...
Do you feel the students are
in some way more mature than
the general listening public that
the station would grow up" if
it planned its programs for
them? This seems to be implied.
And if you do believe this, why
then do you suggest exchanging
the classical music program for
the progressive sounds" (your
euphemism)? This would be
trading the most mature form of
listening pleasure for a child's
fancy!
A university is often called an
institution of higher learning."
This implies that experiences
more challenging and rewarding
than the ordinary or
commonplace are offered. To
my mind, listening to great"
music (written by men

Mitchell has been kicking
himself all day for not thinking
of that himself.
THEN I guess things are
pretty well sewn up? I asked.
Nd, not really. We laiew that
the journalism school wouldn't
back the kids up, he said. The
question now the big one
really is how the kids react to
repression topped off by lack of
support.
It's a question of whether
the students will report the news
they can cover lawfully or give
in to the pressure. We figure if
they give in at this point in their
development it will be smooth
sailing for the administration
from here on.

recognized as superior when
they were alive, and still admired
today), played by great artists
who offer such extraordinary
talent and creativity as to be
enthralling, is more
representative of an institution
of higher learning than music
which appeals as much to a
14-year-old as to some students
here, and is smug by people
with a voice no better than my
own.
The students voted to change
WRUF-FM, but why do you
think they want it changed as
you do? I have no more evidence
to support your proposal than I
have for my own opinion, that
the classical portion must be
preserved and hopefully
enlarged. Change is not
necessarily change as you want.
FM has traditionally been
associated with good music.
Why not keep it that way? Why
don't you suggest playing
progressive music on the AM
station? I am sure more students
receive AM anyhow! As Lisa
Stewart says, WRUF-FM is
your classical music oasis. Do
not do anything that may even
remotely contribute to the
sinking of this precious little
island. Play your new music on
AM, play it instead of the
Broadway, or popular etc, but
please, do not take the classical
program and shove it into some
comer, or diminish it in any
way.
I am a student, too, as are my
friends who prefer classical
music. I know we are not in the
majority in our tastes, but by
the same token, 1 am not sure
that your tastes represent the
majority, either, and I feel it
would be a great loss if
WRUF-FM acted on your
suggestion as representing most
of us.
ELLA KAY CARL, (3AS)

I%^
flr PHP
That wasn t murder. It was a manifestation of our long
suppressed desire to assert ourselves as a free and
independent people

' ' I !>, j| > ~* Friday, Octabar 23,1970, TbaFlartda WaHir.l

Bob Camay
MR. EDITOR:
Who cares what happens to
Bob Canney? Many people on
campus probably dont even
know who Bob Canney is. Most
of the so-called relevant dubs
and organizations at UF don't
give a damn about what happens
to him. Canney is the victim of a
"silent majority deeply
entrenched on the University of
Florida campus.
But have you ever noticed
how cold and comp meatless the
silent majority h? Do any of
the readers of tie Alligator
realize that Bob Cwnry is a real
person? Not a felon, not a
menace to society, but a real
person. He has very human
emotions; he showed them in St.
Petersburg. He has, what is
becoming a raze human quality,
courage. He shows that every
day in Gainesville.
Bob Canney was fired because
we students, the strongest arm
of this institution, let is happen.
We let a man, who cared about
us, be destroyed by a callous
unconcerned administration. We
let Mr. O'Connell ruin Bob
Canney's future because we
don't care what happens to
ourselves. Bob is one of us, and
we let him down; we really
failed ourselves.
But why worry about Bob
Canney when we've got the
excitement of football games
and Saturday night socials? This
type of involvement is
acceptable to everyone in the
University life everyone,
except Bob Canney. His
involvement goes much deeper.
He is fighting for our cause.
We MUST support his.
PHILLIP HOUSER (3AS)

Page 9



Page 10

r. The Florid* Alligator; Friday, October 23, W 0

Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

MID-TERMS SCHEDULED
All students are expected to
report for the following tests
and to bring No. 2 lead pencils.
They will be required to use
Social Security numbers.
CMS 171 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CMS 171 will be given
Wednesday, Oct. 28, at 7 p.m.
All students report to Walker
Auditorium.
MS 102 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
MS 102 will be given
Wednesday, Oct. 28, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-C report to Little
101 or 109; D-F to Little 113,
121, or 125; G-N to Matherly 2,
3, 4,5,6, 7,8, 9,10,11,12,13,
14, or 16; O-Z t o Matherly 102,
105, 108, 111, 113, 115, 116,
117,1180r119.
CBS 262 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CBS 262 will be given Tuesday,
Oct. 27, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101, 102, 112,
or 114.
CBS 263 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CBS 263 will be given Tuesday,
Oct. 27, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A report to Bryan
Hall 120 or 201; B to Little 101
or 109; C to Architecture and
Fine Arts 4,8, 14, 16, 213, or
219; D-E to Little 113, 121, or
125; F to Little 201. 203, 205,
or 207; G to Little 213, 215,
217,219 or 221.
Others report as follows; H to
Little 223, 225, 227, 233, 235,
or 239; l-L to Matherly 2,3, 4,
5,6, 7,8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14
or 16; M to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 111, 113, 115, 116, 117,
118, or 119; N-0 to Anderson
104, 110, or 112; P-Q to Floyd
104, 106, or 109; R to Flint
101, 102, 110 or 112; S to
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,3, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.

I drive like a king
HI sf' \\ Add to the trade-in value and at the Aw
I VT /f\ y\\ ? me t,me en iY air conditioned com com
com I \)V\ \\ We'n' a make 1 and wrink,e free!
UNION is for! CREDIT
, L tlX \\ #ss sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street
M GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS
U.S. Male students with at least
junior standing who were
between 18 and 24 years old on
Oct. I, 1970 are eligible to apply
for a Rhodes Scholarship tenable
for two to three years at Oxford
University, England.
Scholarships are for about
$3,100 per year. Interested
persons should apply to Or. A.A.
Murphree, 202 Anderson Hall
before Oct. 24.
WILSON FELLOWSHIPS
Students completing a bachelor's
degree by August, 1971, who
plan to begin graduate study in
preparation for a career in
college teaching in a liberal arts
field are eligible to be nominated
for a Woodrow Wilson
Fellowship. Interested persons
should consult their faculty
advisor or Or. John Algeo, 235
Tigert Hall, by Oct. 30.
J
CUBAN-LOANS
Cuban Student loan borrowers
who have not yet received loans
for the fall term are urged to
contact the Foreign Student
Adviser at the International
Center.
BETA GAMMA SIGMA
SCHOLARSHIP DEADLINE
Undergraduate students in the
College of Business
Administration are eligible to
apply for the Beta Gamma
Sigma scholarship of SIOO to be
paid in each the fall and spring
quarters. Application forms are
available from Mrs. Young in the
dean's office, and should be
completed and returned to her
by Oct. 30. Scholarship (3.0
minimum), accomplishment and
need are the primary bases for
selection of the winner.
LETTER TO STUDENTS
FROM PRES. O'CONNELL
There are presently 141 student
positions on University
Committees. These committees
assist in developing policy
recommendations for the
University, It is vital that
students be represented on
them. All students willing to
serve on University committees

Page of Record

Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

are urged to give in
writing to either irny office or to
Student Government along with
qualifications and specific areas
of interest they may have.
Student Government has been
urging students to volunteer to
serve on committees.' The
response has been poor;
therefore, this additional urging.
University committees with
student appointments include:
Constitutional and Senate
Committees: curriculum,
libraries and student petitions.
Presidential Committees:
intercollegiate athletics,
University budget, campus
planning and land use, lake use
and preservation, academic
regulations, admissions, junior
colleges, appeals committee for
admissional denial based on
conduct, fraternity-sorority
house plans and construction,
placement, student affairs,
student financial aid, student
organizations and social affairs,
Wauburg committee, parking
and transportation and
commencement.
Other presidential committees
include: public functions policy,
building construction priorities,
creative and fine arts, space
utilization, academic schedules
and calendar, honors programs,
teaching evaluation,
disadvantaged students, campus
student housing, off-campus
housing, student cooperative
housing, board of managers, J.
Wayne Reitz Union, student
conduct, student health services
advisory, student publications,
civil defense and safety.
NSAPQ TEST
Registration forms are available
for the National Security
Agency's Professional
Qualifications Test which will be
given Dec. 5.
Interested students should
complete the form contained in
the Professional Qualification
Test Bulletin of Information
which is available in college
placement centers. Deadline for
receipt of forms is Nov. 20.
NAACP SPEAKER
Marvin Davies, field director of
the Florida NAACP will speak
on "Crisis in Housing" at 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 28, in Norman
Hall Auditorium. His appearance
is sponsored by the New
Elementary Program of the
College of Education.

FACULTY CLUB PARTY
The University's Faculty Club is
sponsoring its first party of the
year Oct. 24 from 7 to 9 p.m. in
the Arredondo Room of the
Reitz Union. A German buffet
will be served. Cost is $5 per
person and reservations should
be made by Friday, Oct. 23 by
calling Mrs. Sybil Haveard,
392-1674.
RETIREMENT VOTE
Persons having to vote oh
selecting or rejecting the Florida
Retirement System and Social
Security must have their ballot
marked and given to their
department chairman so they
can be turned into the Personal
Division by Oct. 30.

university calendar

Friday, October 23
Seminole Picture Taking, Union
346,8 a.m.
College of Education Curriculum
& Instruction Department,
Faculty & Student
Organizational Meeting,
Norman Aud., 1 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
Meeting, Union 349, 355-57,
361.7 p.m.
Rathskellar: The Rhodes
Brothers, 8 p.m. & 10:30
p.m.
Federation of Cuban Students
Discussion on Cuban "Past
and Present", Union 347, 8
p.m.
Union Movie, "One-eyed Jack",
Union Aud., 7 p.m. & 9:45
p.m.
Union Dance, "Blackfoot",
Union Ballroom, 9 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 24
Seminole Picture Taking, Union
346.8 a.m.
University of Florida Cricket
Team vs. Esquire Rebels,
Alice Field, 10 a.m.
Football, University of Florida
vs. Tennessee, Knoxville
Union Movie, "If", Union Aud.,
5:30,8 & 10:30 p.m.
Octoberfest, German Buffet,
Union Arredondo Room, 7
p.m.
Rathskellar, The Rhodes
Brothers, 8 & 10:30 p.m.
Catholic Student Center Folk
Concert & Sing-In, Catholic
Student Center, 8 p.m.

Notices for the University Calendar
may be submitted to the Student
Activities desk, third floor of Reitz
Union or mailed to the Public Func Functions
tions Functions Office, G-72, Reitz Union. Dead Deadline
line Deadline for the Tuesday Alligator is the
previous Friday at noon; for the
Friday Alligator, the previous Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday at noon.

SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS
All teacher education majors,
regardleai of coHege enrollment,
are required to satisfy the speech
screening requirement before
being admitted into the
Advanced Professional
Sequence.
Students expecting
certification to teach English are
required to take SCH 201 and
do not need the screening test
Appointments are available in
Rnnm 124 Norman Hall.

Sunday, Oct. 25
Seminole Picture Taking, Union
346,8 a.m.
Newell Entomotogical Society
Picnic, Camp Wauburg, 1
p.m.
SIMS Meeting, Union 361, 6:30
p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, Union 150 C
& D, 6:30 p.m.
Union Movie, "Zorba the
Greek", Union Aud., 7 &
9:45 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
College Life, Pi Kappa, Alpha
House, 9:13 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 26
Seminole Picture Taking, Union
346,8 a.m.
Transfer Student Organization
"Get Together", Hume Hall,
2 p.m.
U nion Movie, "Experimental
Films"; "Some Won't Go",
"Seasons Change", 'The
Love Gift", 5:30,8,9 p.m.
Christian Scientist Meetings,
; Union 362,7 p.m.
Union Bridge Tournament,
Union 362,7 p.m.
Chess Tournament, Union 150 C
& D, 7 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, Union
357.7 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, Joseph Weil Hall, 8
p/n. to
Science Club Meeting, Union
356.8 p.m.



Friday, October 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

DR. JOSEPH HENSON, Ph.D.
Chairman of the division of pure and
applied science, Bob Jones University.
Received bachelors degree from BJU,
master's and doctorate from Clemson in
entomology. Lectures in anatomy and
physiology at Anderson Memorial Hospi Hospital.
tal. Hospital. Listed in "American Men of Science,
"Leaders in American Science, Whos
Who in Education. Member: American
Association for the Advancement of
Science, Sigma XI, American Scientific
Affiliation, Entomology Society of Ameri America,
ca, America, others.

DR. EMMETT L. WILLIAMS, Ph.D.
Earned bachelors and master's degrees
in metallurgical engineering at V.P.1., and
the doctorate in his field at Clemson.
Prior to joining the B.J.U. faculty was
development specialist with Union Carbide
Nuclear Corp., associate aircraft en engineer
gineer engineer at Lockheed Georgia, and metal
iurgical consultant with several industrial
firms. Member: Creation, Research So
ciety, American Association of Physics
Teachers. Listed: American Men of
Science and "Whos Who in American
Colleges.

PROF. GEORGE MULFINGER, M.S.
Granduated summa cum laude from
Syracuse U. with B.A. in chemistry.
Holds masters in physics and is candi candidate
date candidate for doctorate at Syracuse. Additional
studies at Harvard and U. of Georgia.
Research grant from National Science
Foundation. Author of book now in
preparation: "Christian Men of Science.
Listed: "Leaders in American Science.
Member: American Association for the
Advancement of Science, Creation Re Research
search Research Society. Phi Beta Kappa.

CALL 378-1395

8:30 am Baptist Student Center
8:35 am Buckman, Fletcher
8:40 am Mallory, Reid tnebvsz
enita:4s arh Broward silo* 0 j w\?,
8:50 am Rawlins
8:55 am Towers
SPONSORED BY
UNIVERSITY BAPTIST CHURCH

THE BIBLE AND MODERN SCIENCE SEMINAR
Designed to equip serious Christians with a reasonable and philosophically
consistent alternative to the General Theory of Evolution or Darwinism.
Close attention will be given to Bible passages that deal with the Creation.
Students and Teachers alike will benefit from the many specific examples of
data that these lectures will present. The seminar will give you valid
ammunition with which to refute unfounded attacks upon your faith.
Mimeographed materials will be given at time of registration.
SCHEDULE OF SESSIONS

Page 11

j*v

15 minutes will be reserved at the end of these six sessions for questions from the audience.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23 OPEN ADMISSION
:45 p.m. Registration Table in lobby
7:30 Call to Order Prayer and introduction of speakers:
Pastor George
THE NECESSITY FOR CREATIONISM:
Sound/Color Filmstrip produced by the Bible Science
Association
SATURDAY. OCTOBER 24 $3.00 REGISTRATION FEE
9:15 Registration Table In lobby
Call to Order speakers: Pastor George
Prayer and introduction of
10:00 FAITH AND EVOLUTION: Dr. Joseph Henson
The theories of evolution are not properly considered
as scientific theories but rather as phllasophlcal theories.
A person will accept or reject these theories not because
of the evidence but because of his own preconceived
opinions.
*10:45 FIRST & SECOND LAWS OF THERMO-DYNAMICS
Dr. Emmett Williams
The first law Is commonly called the law of
conservation of energy. Energy Is now neither be being
ing being created nor destroyed. In other words, creation
b finished. This Is opposed to the theory of evolution which
indicates creation Is still going on. The second
law Indicates that a natural system isolated from the rest
of the universe tends to degenerate. In the theory of evolution,
systems tend to Improve with time In the postulated upward
process. This Is In opposition to the second law.
11:30 Break 10 minutes to relax
11:40 FALLACIES OF "SCIENTIFIC' DATING METHODS:
Prof. George Mulflnger
Many scientists have chosen to use as clocks, certain
radioactive processes that were not Intended by their
Creator to be clocks. Numerous alternative dating
methods which Indicate a young earth are deliberately
overlooked because they Imply that there has not been
enough time for evolution to have occured.

9:00 am Jennings
9:05 am Hume
d i;s ) 9:10 am Fraternity Bow i
or 9:15 am Trust#, Graftem >
9:20 am Tolbert, Weaver, North
9:25 am and South, Murphree
Return to campus noon and 5 p.m.

3401 NORTHWEST 34th STREET OCTOBER 23, 24, 1970
* V *.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

12:30 Box lunch served In the Church kitchen. Use free
time to get acquainted and to visit book tables.
*1:45 THE INCONSISTENCIES OF "THEISTIC" EVOLUTION:
Or. Henson
Evolution Is basically antagonistic to theism.
An Individual who claims to accent thelstlc evolu evolution
tion evolution is being Inexcusably Inconsistent.
t t*2:3o
*2:3o t*2:3o THE CREATION AND SCIENCE: Dr. williams
Creation occurred by direct acts of God. No
processes involving millions of years were neces necessary.
sary. necessary. The scientific method cannot be used In
discussing the origin of the universe.*'
3:15 Rest Break 30 minutes to Max and visit book tables
*3:45 PALEONTOLOGY: Prof. Mulflnger
An honest appraisal of the fossil record in
the earths crust clearly contradicts evolution and
furnishes strong proof of the Genesis Flood. Such
recent finds as pollen grains In the lowest strata
of the Grand Canyon and human skeletons In
coal deposits are totally unexplainable by the
evolutionist.**
4:30 THEORIES OF EVOLUTION:
Or. Henson. Dr. Williams, Prof. Mulflnger (A panel
discussion and open forum.)
7:00 SPECIAL MUSICAL PACKAGE
7:30 CHALLENGE:
featuring brief personal testimonies
by the three scientists and a soul-stlrrlng message
from the Bible
9:00 ADJOURNMENT
| L' -
~ r, L---+V

FREE SATURDAY BUS SCHEDULE
FROM CAMPUS

M.W. AVK.
. V<.w.a &u/k
MSMW- AVE.
t rWMh-WOOP V
j J* Wl*M 2
____ w. umiy. r-v c
WIN>4 {P.** P.
DlXIt. ICAHWSj



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

IL.
5:30^8:00,
Advance tickets on sale, 2nd
floor box office, every Fri. M
from 12:30-4:30 pm. for all
weekend film showings C
sponsored by JWRU Jv | v k jjj

' Todays T
more for your money meal I
moisons
CRFETERIfi I
I 1 I
FRIDAY'S FEATURE {
I Morrison's Famous J
I ROAST TURKEY 11 I
< I With Mashed Potatoes I § I
t I Dressing, Gravy I >
y. | and Cranberry Sauce |
i 82<
I 1
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING 1
moisons
CRFETERIA beyond comparison! |

| Florida
{ Classified
I Blwork
| JggiSl^
jftiAfUWWVUMWiwuw n n ri

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 23,1970

Page 12

FOR SALE
Aha! Guess who has a boys 3-speed
engllsh racer for sale asking 50 but
Ill take 25. Call between 5-7 PM
before I change my mind. 378-6376
zap I (A-2t-24-p)
BICYCLE Schwinn 26-inch boys
2-speed transmission $35 528 NW 36
St Ph. 372-2067 (A-st-24-p)
2 altec-lansing Madera speaker
systems reg. $l5O ea. must sell SBS
ea. or both for $l6O 9 months old.
Call 373-3468 and ask for Glenn
(A-2t-24-p)
Basset Hound AKC reg. 5 weeks old,
wormed, shots, tri-colored, bred for
temperment, conformity, 7 males 3
females $75 Call 378-7829
(A-st-24-p)
1968 Yamaha 250 DT 1 Enduro in
very good condition, two helmets
and buddy seat Included call
373-2320 after 5 (A-2t-24-p)
8-track TAPE CARTRIDGES Save
ss. 2 of your albums recorded for
less than $3 Inc tape per album
pick-up delivery 378-5916 4-8 PM
(A-st-21-p)
Honda SSO 1967 new tags, new
helmet. S9O 378-5105 or 372-2900
student (A-st-21-p)
Beautiful Irish Setter puppy female 7
months AKC all shots Wormed call
373-3435 after 6:30 PM (A-st-123-p)
1969 KAW Mach 111 500 cc excellent
condition with 1970 wiring kit good
miles $760.00 Ph. Tom Shires
462-2082 (A-10t-18-p)
Two NEW 40 watt Pioneer Spkrs 12"
woofer 8 ohms $175 or best offer
walnut cabinets. 373-3537
(A-3t-23-p)
4 Fla. Tenn. football tickets call
376-9588 after 6 PM (A-3t-23-p)

ROCK CONCERT
BLACKFOOT
a 5 piece dynamite group
TONIGHT IN THE UNION BALLROOM
8:30 12:30 a.m. 50 cents wwV
NEEDED FOR
a Sponsored by
ADMISSION j. Wayne Reitz Union
Htfl
m y&t

PH IL
is not I
a four-letter I
word! I

FOR SALE
FREE GUITAR LESSON meet Bob
Zuber, teacher, performer, and friend
here for 3 years. Finger style
specialist Call soon 378-3538
(A-st-23-p)
Left-handed guitarists for sale a 3
month old custom made left-handed
gretsch tennesean substantial price
reduction call 372-1031 after 5
(A-3t-23-p)
BSA 650+ custom chopper w/class.
New engin. Xlnt condition. Lots of
chrome guaranteed to eat stock
machines. $650 also have 70 ossa
stilletto 5 dirt bike 250 cc very fast
Ph 378-7903 (A-3t-23-p)
United Audio Dual 1009 turntable
with Shure super-track cartridge plus
extra supertrackabillty stylus
SIIO.OO or best offer phone
373-2871 (A-3t-23-p)
Garage sale furniture, childrens items,
antiques clothing & mlsc. Sun. 10-4
4510 NW 13 Ave 392-0951
(A-lt-25-p)
Wanted: 1 pr koss pro4A headphones
price open Bill Conners 378-7397
(A-lt-25-p)
MENS TIES FOR SALE N.Y.C.
manufacturers inventory regularly
$7.50 SIO.OO now only $4.50
$6.50. Call Bob at night 378-4730
(A-st-25-p)
Realistic portable stereo garrard
turntable 4 speakers, 45 watt amp
$l5O new w/turo-test hd. phs. S2O all
6 mo. old for sllO 378-9531
(A-3t-25-p)
Weimaraner pups 6 wks. AKC
registered 3 males SIOO 3 females
$75 call 373-2319 after 7 378-2646
(A-st-25-p)
Accordian excellent condition case
Included Phone 466-3238 after 5:30
(A-lt-25-p)

FOR SALE V
*7O Triumph Bonneville 650 2000
miles 378-9208 (A-10t-25-p)
MUST sacrifice: AM-FM stereo
receiver SSO; cassette stereo tape
deck absolutely like new $75.
kingslze blue spread $6. 376-8194
(A-3t-25-p)
NEVER used anything like lt say
users of Blue Lustre for cleaning
carpets. Rent electric shampooer $1
Electric upholstery shampooers also
available. Lowry Furniture Co (A-tfc)
FOR RENT
roomate needed 3 br house near sin
city private room 50 mo privacy and
good liberal people call dave & norm
378-9057 late after 10 such a deal
(B-3t-23-p)
Sublet one bedroom furnished apt
Near campus. Lease through June
begin renting Jan. Contac Edward
Scroggin 376-2061 after 6:00 p.m
(B-2t-24-p)
WANTED
Listeners wanted: Will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Susan between 8
and 5 for appointment. 392-2049
(C-lOt-22-p)
Hip dude needs a roommate 85 a
mo. plus elec, you get your own
bedroom, furnished, walk-in-closet,
walk to campus. Call 5-7 pm
378-6376 (C-3t-24-p)
NEED MONEY? I need student
tickets to auburn game PHONE
378-0495 (C-st-22-p)
Female roommate wanted Gatortown
Apt. number 126. $46 a month plus
utilities. Call 378-1728 (C-lt-25-p)
Tutor NOW to prepare student weak
In math or MS 102 & during course
next quarter. Call 372-4567
(C-3t-25-p)
Architecture grad student to help
design addition to our tract thing so
it has some style, and to make
drawings. Phone 372-5409 soon.
(C-2t-25-p)
Still looking for Housing and
Roommates? Come to the Gator
Placement Center. Our business is
designed to locate you in the perfect
place! 373-2688 1105 W. Univ. Ave.
Room number 2 (C-st-25-p)
*
HELP WANTED
SALES: would you be interested in a
week end job earning $2 to $5 an
hr.? Call fuller brush to see if you
qualify. Call 378-0121 (E-st-24-p)
vx-x-iv::::::::::;::::::;:::;:::::::::;:;:::
AUTOS
1967 Simca 4 door, 4 speed std. R &
H, tires like new, needs tag. New
inside. Best offer over 450.00 Call
378-3963 after 6 P.M. (G-4t-24-p)
66 Corvair 3 speed, runs great, new
paint job S4OO call 378-8528
(G-4t-23-p)
Volvo, 6 mo. old, blue, $2400. Call
372-0947 or 392-1479. (G-st-22-p)
LARGEST STOCK of USED
IMPORTS In Nth. CENTRAL
FLORIDA! HARFRED AUTO
IMPORTS, 1946 N. Main 378-7085.
(G-tfc)
Y Buy a new car when you can get an
almost new one for V* the price 68
DART only 19150 ml exel. cond best
offer $1195 Gregg 373-1162
(G-st-23-p)
70 Charger RT, 440-6 brl, 4 spd, disc
brks, ps, 4:10 gear, blue with bik
vinyl rs, blk Int., loaded with extras,
exc. cond, list was S4BOO, will sell for
$3450. Call 392-7714 (G-st-21-p)
1969 VW sedan automatic
Stickshift; AM/FM radio Phone:
372-5817 (G-3t-25-0>
>
I HAVMIIfINS I
I IWUISION t'OlJtlt by hrl.u\ j|
PLUS (IMHEaw I
Cleef 737



gator CLASSIFIEDS

if
Haooy birthday SSM. Long live pasta
Sn and popsl. LOVE C. and the
twofellnes (J-H-25-P)

t fc \ ANTHONY QUINN
ALAN BATES IRENE FARAS
MCHAELCACOTANNB PRODUCTION
TOBBATHE GREEK
Film Classic
Showings at 4:15,7:00+9:45 p.m.
Union Auditorium 50 cents
Buy advance tickets this afternoon
sponsored by JWRU

A new group of experimental
film buffs at the Union
have organized this first
in a series of wild new films.
SOME WONT GO THE LOVE GIFT
THE SEASONS CHANGE
Monday, October 26 7:00 & 9:30
Union Auditorium 50 cents

W^mtM
InHKED^nM
wider I wBmA
Ilerther Ww
BaH
I. n,"ES, is iMNIHOUSiat^
l?** "*. <* * oMMmrydm I ADM ADM
ADM 2" 7 *** and Sat. A Sun. I fmek
iRKKti-W *l* sl,#o I Sw##t Trasn
No. I ~~ mbRWMRMI

Friday, October 23,1970, The Florida Alligator^

Dear Jim, guy, and Johns meet ms
aftre- con law. I love you. Can you dig
Itm Mary Jane (J-3t-25-p)

Page 13

PERSONAL
STEVE CARES about your HONlt*
see him at the CYCLE WORKS 1220
S Main open 3 until p.m. Bettor
service for Ices!lt (J-St-21-p)
Happy Birthday DJADE. Your
venom may be dangerous, but It Isnt
harmful. Here's to whipped cream
and cinnamon toast. Love, cream
puff (J-lt-25-p)
The fat-cats take care of Claude.
Askew needs your helpl Send
contributions to Askew-Adams
Campaign Fund, PO Box 223,
Gainesville, or call 373-1427 for
Information (Paid for by Students for
Askew) (J-st-21-p)
BOSS: Much gras for a real
flipped-over time. You and the
BETAS are the GREATEST around!
Love, Chief. (J-lt-25-p)
Co-Eds Facial Hair removed forever;
fast, low-cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer, Electrologist.. .102
N.W. 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for
appointment. (J-20t-170-p)
SINGLE MALES A FEMALESI Meet
more members of the opposite sex at
U.F. All dates in Gainesville. Most
dates with U.F. Students. Details
mailed In plain unmarked envelope.
For free details write*. Nationwide
Dating Service, P.O. Box 77346,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-15t-24-p)
FREE GUITAR LESSON meet Bob
Zuber, teacher, performer and friend
here for 3 years. Finger style
specialist Call soon 378-3538
(J-st-23-p)
Tired of the dorms? Too poor for an
apt? CLO has openings for the winter
quarter $195/qt for room and board.
Call Vince at 373-1622 (J-27t-25-p)
LD. 3 more days, 3 more days, 3
more days, 3 more days. You won't
need Canada anymore. How come I
love you so much? Franl (J-lt-25-p)
Stutterers wanted for an auditory
feedback study. Will pay you SB.OO
please call Michelle Jensen evenings:
378-0104 Days: 392-2046 (J-st-25-p)
Love Is ... soggy beds ~. and dirty
turtle heads ... you me ... and
Stevie spend your money
time!!! Happy 22nd, Pesty!! ILY ...
(J-lt-25-p)
DEAR BIG Kid, It has been one
month of complete happiness. I hope
there will be many morel Remember
the record. Love, The Little Kid.
(J-lt-25-p)
THE QUARTERLY...
It's an opening.
Let it flow into you.
Let it expand your being.
florida
quarterly
I UNION FILM
Manon oranoo
KartftMdn
Showing today only
4:16, 7:00 +9:48 p.m.
sponsored by JWRU

SPECIAL SATIS FOR FLORIOA RCSIOINTS
GLASS BOTTOM BOATS mt
ffIHBMJ SPECIAL UMITBrV
SHOWS jf 7 B*r QKACtMENT! \
/ Starts TODAY! \
sao ffTHIS IS WHERE TRAILS END*
AND ADVENTURE BEGINS! I
* SQ I // A TRACKLESS LAAR Os I
< ,,, *l
1 GORDON EASTM/VNy
American International Pictur^^^^^^^^r^
rwrwHrimsa I
S *l:3O^ S J STH SMASH WEEK^p^By
8:20 I NEVER FORGET
"row. ONLY 2 MORE DAYS! |
!
|


I
% .
BH
M J Janet Gaynor & Charles Farral
In "Seventh Heaven" I
JENNIFER JONES & CHARLES BOYER I
IN "CLUNY BROLOhT .......J



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form beiow. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Dtodlm -300 pm. 2 stays prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY RHONE
W M r.
| |i 1| 1| oonocmno 5
H 3 fft 11 H* S
I !? i" |&! 1 g
g.
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mmmm 01 A w PO
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1 1 ll c
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1 Q > 3 Z
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E z f
in -4
wmmmmm mmmm mmmm mem^mm
=ll= r ip
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f, "' ' \. e f-, .
jap j fkJ - Iml Jfi
\ Hrai
t v m imiii'l wfl&iv J Km
?*-* '-W?' < 4*. *- Ll if IS HIM BAtK^BlM^B*
,i, -if 1 f r, dji, '> BT n t > ,,Fr M ' f TM

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday. Oetobar 23,1970

Page 14

LILAH SINGS ROCK 1120 S. W.
FIRST AVENUE SEEK (J-2t-24-p)
If tha now Delhi Delicatessen does
deliver then they'll be delivering the
best food In town. Their pickle alone
It a sensation. Too muchlllll
(J-lt-25-p)
Need a room for Homecoming? My
parents can't come up. Must rent
motel room on SW 13, pool, a/c,
double bed. Call 378*9614
(J-lt-25-p)
Barbara, tomorrow Is the big day.
Hope you have the happiest birthday
ever. We all love you because you are
so cool. The whole gang r.r.
(J-lt-25-p)
Any groups Interested In raising
hinds? Famous Fla. candies sell
themselves and build your profits
fast. Contact Carl at 372*2059
(J*st*24*p)
Dear Julie, I have not seen you yeti
Please don't hldel I would like to
find you this year I Please call me
soon. Where are you? RG (J*3t*24*p)
LOST FOUND: dark rimmed woman's
glasses In purple case on lawn In front
of Unlv. Apts. South, 1829 NW 2nd
Ave. Pick up at lost & found, JWR
Union (L-3t-23-p)
FOUND: young male Welmeramer
with flea collar in vicinity of Norman
Hall. Call 376-6326 (L-3t-24*NC)
LOST: Gold watch on leather band
left In Tlgert men's room on ground
floor Oct. 9 PLEASE call Bruce
373-1676. (L-st-22-p)
Lost contact lenses in white plastic
case. Bring to room 236 of Infirmary
from 8-5 or call Jere In evenings at
378-5750. (L-st-22-p)
Lost brown wallet with all ID reward
offered Gary Furman 127 north
phone 392-8063 return appreciated
(L-2t-25-p)
Lost: Dark rimmed glasses In black
case Lost between Murphee and
Tolbert areas Please Return Call
Doug at 392-8133 (L-3t-23-p)
Found black cat, male, 7-8 months
old, found near Music Building,
phone 392-8721 (L-3t-24-NC)
SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists
trained to type theses, dissertations,
textbooks, manuscripts, etc. 1405
NW 13th St IBM Bldg., Rm 206,
Phone 376-7160. (M-15t-10-p)
Yoga classes small groups weeknights
for more Info call Randi 373-1242
(M-3t-23-p)
HORSES BOARDED sleepy hollow
horse farm complete care finest
facilities new barn pasture trails &
ring close to unlv. Ph 373-1059
(M-st-22-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now I Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
We're wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
We SERVICE ALL IMPORTS.
Factory trained mechanics
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS. 506 E.
Unlv. 372-4373. (M-tfC)

j ibort selling That motorscooter? I
| Alligator TOR |
..... v II M
l:l*Ju<
ANTHONY QUINN ANN-MARGRET GARY LOCKWOOD .
FEATURE AT... 2:08 3:57 5:46 7:37 9:31
j ; | tmi y-a34 |j #
I y...v.V.. MW.>.WWWW.vJ
i "AN IMMENSELY ROMANTIC MOVIE WITH
STYLE AND CRITICAL INTELLIGENCE. The i
Virgin And The Gypsy* is satisfying because it realizes
itS goals!** Vincent Canby, N.V. Time*
I "A BEAUTIFUL AND ENGROSSING FILM. §
| NOTHING SHORT OF MASTERLY. PURE §
PLEASURE. Fascinating story of the sensitive and sen- |
sual Yvette. Joanna Shimkus has brought her to vivid §
and memorable life in a performance that reveals her jjj
remarkable talent She blends the rebelliousness and i$
romanticism of girlhood with the conviction and imag- $
| ination of young womanhood.** -j*m cm. N,ro* *** |
A finely made film. All the details delight-the finely :
etched portrait of the quiet renegade girl, played with §
jj: erotic daydreams in her eyes by Joanna Shimkus; Franco :j:
Neros snake-eyed gypsy, all purpose and passion. §
V -liwwrt Magazine *
| "No story-and no film-better reveals Lawrences moral |
| absolutism than The Virgin and the Gypsy*. Between
8 its boundaries is sown the seed of the Lawrentum canon $
-the familial conventions, die social hypocrisies, the |
annealing force of sex. An exemplary cast. -rim* m.,.,, ij
I <^ g H. c Lawi&\ces I
1
-c/ ''-***:. BJdi- jj
Color Prints by Movielab A CHEVRON Pictures Release: a division of Cinecom Corporation g] J
FEATURE AT ...2:18 4:08 5:58 7:23 9:48 ji
WATCH OUT FOR... ,I JOE



Briday, October 23.1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Nixon, Gromyko Meet

WASHINGTON *(UPI)
President Nixon conferred with
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko for hours
Thursday in talks the White
House said were helpful in
laying the groundwork for
improving Soviet-American
relations now chilled over the
Middle East.
THE IMPORTANCE of those
relations in maintaining world
peace will be stressed by Nixon
in his address Friday before the
U.N. General Assembly in New
York, Press Secretary Ronald
Ziegler said.
Despite Gromyko's charge the
day before that the United
States was misrepresenting
Soviet actions in Cuba and the
Middle East, the White House
said his lengthy discussions with
Nixon Thursday were
conducted in a friendly
atmosphere throughout.
The subject of Cuba, and
U. S. concern that the Russians

Cleaver, Leary Cancel
Algiers Press Conference

ALGIERS (UPI) Black
Panther Information Minister
Eldridge B. Cleaver Thursday
called off a scheduled news
conference at which he was to
introduce Timothy F. Leary,
LSD advocate and fugitive from
the U.S.
A SPOKESMAN FOR Cleaver
said unexpected
circumstances prevented the

aj| v v '; *}" % i
assured of the hest deals and
aat near, Plev^jx,
Crown
Altmans Stereo Systems |^H|
807 West University Avenue H^^^Hnl
Phone 376-9583
Financing
can be Hours 10 A.SVI.-9P.M. Mon.-Sat. Rectilinear XI
arranged 1 pm 6 pm Sunday
(Closed home game weekends)

Page 15

might be building a submarine
base there, was not discussed.
ZIEGLER SAID without
elaboration that the two
discussed European security,
including guarantees of Allied
access to West Berlin, the Middle
East, Vietnam and the Strategic
Arms Limitation Talks which
resume in two weeks in Helsinki,
Finland.
Ziegler said the session was
helpful for laying the basis of
improved relations between the
United States and the Soviet
Union. We also believe the
meeting was useful from the
standpoint that it allowed the
President to give his personal
and direct expressions on the
subjects discussed.
A possible summit meeting
with Soviet Premier Alexei
Kosygin at the United Nations
aborted, so Nixon sent word
through diplomatic channels
that he would welcome a chance
to talk to Gromyko, the

news conference being held as
scheduled. He said it might be
rescheduled for Friday.
A young woman named
Dohm also was supposed to
appear at the news conference
but officials at Cleavers office
were vague as to whether she
was Bemadine Dohm, a young
radical from the United States
who is on the FBls most

highest-ranking Soviet official he
has met for talks since he took
office.
THE TWO conferred for two
hours and 15 minutes in Nixon's
White House office,
accompanied by Secretary of
State William P. Rogers, who
escorted Gromyko here from
New York; Dr. Henry A.
Kissinger, Nixons national
security affairs adviser, Soviet
Ambassador Anatoly F.
Dobrynin, and interpreters.
Then Nixon took Gromyko to
his hideaway office in the
adjacent executive office
building for a 15-minute chat
alone. On their way back to the
White House afterwards, they
were preceded by Ziegler who
told newsmen, There will be no
questions.
At midaftemoon, the Soviet
Embassy issued a rare press
statement attributed to
Gromyko calling the talks very
interesting.

wanted list, or her younger
sister Jennifer.
BERNADINE DOHRN, a
leader of the militant
Weatherman organization, was
charged in a federal warrant
issued in Chicago March 17 with
interstate flight to avoid
prosecution for mob action,
rioting and conspiracy. Jennifer
Dohm is not wanted for any
crime.

EbascoWHi
kMMCiHWB
Frumember 13

Its find out time! Time for you to find out the role
you might play in the company that has designed
or constructed over 8 billion dollars of fossil fuel,
hydroelectric and nuclear plants.
Theres never been a more exciting time to join
Ebasco. Forecasts call for electrical power
systems 3V2 times the size of our present
national systems. As an engineer at Ebasco
youll be in the forefront of this activity. Ebasco
engineers always have been.
See your Placement Director soon to arrange a
p&A session with the Ebasco representative on
the above date. If this is not convenient, write to
College Relations Coordinator, Ebasco Services
Incorporated, Two Rector Street, New York,
New York 10006. An Equal Opportunity Employer.
EBASCO
SERVICES INCORPORATED
A Boise Cascade Company

GATOR ADS SELL!
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EIHINERMa BRUtMTES



Page 16

l. The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 23,1970

Mass In Memory Os Moratorium

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Wrttar
A Peace Mass to
commemorate the first
anniversary of the National
Moratorium for Peace sponsored

AAS Refuses To Picket Mall,
FeelsOfficialsWerePressured

By CHRIS LANE
Miivyiior dun nnw
Arnold Air Society (AAS), a
UF Air Force ROTC honors
organization, would rather
switch than fight.
AAS decided Wednesday not
to collect petition signatures at
the Gainesville Mall because they
feel Mall officials were
pressured into changing their
policy toward solicitors. The
decision followed a Young
Americans for Freedom (YAF)
sponsored picketing Tuesday.
AAS did not participate in the
picketing.
John Gunter, project officer
for AAS, said he didn't know
anything about the YAF
demonstration.
It's nice that they (YAF)
feel this way, but I just can't
agree with the way they did it,
Gunter said.
AAS is participating in a
nationwide campaign to send

Students To Campaign
For Referendum Questions

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligrtor Writer
Students are organizing on
Oct. 25 and Nov. 1 to campaign
door-to-door for four
amendments appearing as
referendum questions on the
Nov. 3 ballot.
THESE REFERENDUM
questions involve the 18-year-old
vote, 18-year-old majority rights
and two vital environmental
amendments/* said Brad Raffle,
president of Environment
Action Group (EAG).
Students are to meet at 12
noon in the Plaza of the
Powerful
Beal
The new Citroen is its own high highpowered
powered highpowered salesman. Standard power
includes: the stopping power of
front inboard disc brakes. The last lasting
ing lasting power of functional design. The
power of Citroens Constant Level
Ride System. The going power of
a .hemi' engine. Now let Citroen
demonstrate its selling power. Take
a test drive.
Citroen
WE KNOW THE VALUE OF
CARS, YOU KNOW THE
VALUE OF SERVICE
EDS
MEHARI CITROEN
4308 NW 13TH ST
GAINESVfILLE. FLA

by the Catholic Student Center
will be held on Friday, Oct. 30
at 5:30 pjn.
The mass will be held at the
Catholic Student Center.
ALL ARE welcomed to
express their desire for peace if

petitions to the Hanoi peace
delegation in Paris to protest the
inhumane treatment of
American prisoners in North
Vietnam. The group first sought
permission to collect signatures
on Man property last Thursday
from Joe Lichter, president of
the Man Association and a MaU
merchant.
Lichter told AAS no group
could petition in the Mall as part
of standing policy.
Gunter said YAF took the
issue and turned it around.
They (YAF) took the
signature thing and turned it
completely around to freedom
of assembly and speech, Gunter
said. It's just not right.
A scuffle occurred during the
picketing when Lichter
attempted to take a placard
away from Fred Vc llrath, one of
the picketers. The placard read
Mr. Lichter, have a (heart) for
American POWs.
Gunter claimed the signs

Americas to receive instructions
and briefing. Information will be
available concerning the
individual amendments as well as
pamphlets to be given to those
visited.
Transportation will be
provided for those who need it.
We need everyone who can
provide transportation to bring a
car/* Raffle said.
WE ARE pushing for the
18-year-old vote and 18-year-old
majority rights/* Raffle said.
The other two amendments
concern the sale of submerged
lands of Florida if it is in the

Open 7 days
\C Ka. x a week
WATCH Florida ilMg
Beat Tennessee
ON COLOR*
T.V. AT THE
Blnn Inn dr *ZT n
316 S.W. 16th Ave 376-4521

they wish to do so in a religious
way, Father Michael Gannon
said.
It will be a commemoration
of the moratorium of a year
ago, Father Gannon said, and
a reaffirmation of all present for

implicated Lichter as being
un-American.
During the sign-yanking
incident, Lichter was warned by
the police to check with his
attorney before he tried to take
the sign.
Soon after the picketing
began, Lichter changed his mind
and said he would send an
invitation to AAS giving them
permission to collect signatures
on Mall property. Earlier,
Lichter said no group could
petition at the Mail whatever
the cause.
Gunter, feeling that Lichter
was forced into submission, said
AAS would refuse any
invitation.
It was one of their policies
and you cant really break their
policy, he said.
Gunter said AAS would write
Lichter later in the year for
permission to gather petition
signatures at the Mall.

public interest and granting
authority to the state of Florida
to issue low interest bonds to
municipalities that want to build
sewage treatment facilities/*
Raffle said.
Voters dont take half the
interest in referendum questions
students do/* he said. This is
something meaningful that
students can do for the state.**
AN INTERESTED student
can persuade some voters in
matters concerning these
amendments because they have
gone out of the way to stand up
for them, Raffle said.

our desire for peace.
The mass will reaffirm our
Christian belief that peace is a
gift of God as well as a work of
man, Father Gannon said.
THE CHURCH will be open
all day Oct. 31, the actual
. . v : ; -v
FATHER MICHAEL GANNON
cdobffltw p6dCB mass

f
Student Special 1
(With The Coupon) |
I Our Regular 93< Steakburger |
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90< plus tax |
i Steak n Shake 1
| 1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville |
SENIOR jO
yf GREEK
PORTRAITS
FOR THE
1971 SEMINOLE
LAST DAY
SHOOTING
MONDAY-THURSDAY 1-SPM, 6-9 PM
FRIDAY 8:30-12 NOON, 1-SPM
SENIORS
MAY CALL 392-6550 FOR APPOINTMENTS.
SITTING FEE $1.50
& s
OCTOBER 15-23
SENIORS WITH LAST NAME OF M-Z
9TA SX 9A6 9M lls> 211
nKA SN KAO IIK9 TKE ZTA
IIA9 29E KA 2K 2AM
SAE TEs> 9KT 0X $Ke

anniversary, for private prayer
and meditation, Father Gannon
said.
The Catholic Student Center
will also sponsor a folk mass on
the Plaza of the Americas Nov.
21 at midnight, to
commemorate Thanksgiving.
We want to evoke the same
atmosphere of peace that we had
in the candlelight procession last
spring, Father Gannon said.
The occasion will be
Thanksgiving, and the special
theme will be Thank God for
Light/
A light show will take the
(dace of the sermon in that mass.
Open Season?
Traffic accidents in
Johannesburg are becoming just
too much for some people and
**E.N. of Residensia, a local
suburb, wrote off indignantly to
the African daily newspaper, the
World, about the situation.
Sir he wrote, Herein the
(Trans) Vaal, people are being
knocked down by buses almost
every other day.
This is very cruel...



UF Debate Tournament Starts Today

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Staff Writer
The Third Annual Gator Invitational Debate
Tournament, Junior, hosted by UFs Debate
Society, starts today.
Continuing through Saturday, the intercollegiate
debate tournament will include participation from
six states.
IT WILL probably be one of the largest junior
tournaments in the nation, Dee Scan, assistant
director of forensics, said.
The junior status indicates speakers are all first
and second year debaters.
Debaters from North Carolina, Tennessee,
Alabama, Georgia, Virginia and Florida will
participate in the activities in the Reitz Union.
AMONG THE entering teams will be students
from Emory, University of Georgia, University of
Miami, Middle Tennessee State and Mercer
University.
Others include Wake Forest, Washington and Lee,
University of North Carolina and University of
Tennessee.
The first three rounds of the six-round
tournament will be: first round, 3:45 pjn.; second

NFIRAAARY...
ErOM PA^a
lave increased from 31,500 to
54,000.
Medical care costs have
increased tremendously.
An automatic, across-the across-theboard
board across-theboard increase in nurses salaries
passed by the state has cost the
Infirmary an additional SSOO per
nurse within 12 months.
The State Personnel and
Classifications Board decided
two years ago it should be paid
about $25,000 per year for its
services to the Infirmary.
About $25,000 has had to
be expended for equipment, and
the cost has almost doubled over
the past, few yean for some of
the purchases.
COGGINS SAID the
projected budgetary need for the
Infirmary this year is
$1,196,593. The projected
deficit for this year is $77,000,
even with an expected $271,596
coming in from the new charges.
The committees meeting with
Coggins was the first of a series
of meetings with representatives
of the agencies receiving
portions of the activity fee.
At the meetings, the
committee will study the
preliminary budget proposal of
each agency (which are made to
President Stephen C. OConnell
by Jan. 1) and will ask for
justification of the amount each
agency asks for, as well as
whether their needs will be met
Iftheyreceive what they ask.
HOMECOMING
TRAVELERS:
Holiday Ranch
Motel &
Restaurant
Bronsofifftd. m
24 miles SW
of UFonSR-24
Call collect
for reservations
Friday and
Saturday only
486-2121
real pit B-B-O. tool I

| THE SALEof
I SALES
| AT MUNTZ STEREO DISCOUNT
I Tape & Record Center
I 8 TRACK TAPE PLAYER
left MODEL DS-700 SAVBB
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I DISCOUNT RECORDS A TAPES TOO!
I MUNTZ STEREO 319 NW 13th St.

This Years Topic

Resolved: That the Federal
Government Should Adopt a Program of
Compulsory Wage and Price Controls.

round 5:15 p.m., and last round will be at 7:30 p.m.
Each round lasts approximately an hour.
TOMORROWS TIMES are: round four, 8 a.m.;
round five, 10 ami., and round six at 11:30 a.m.
This years intercollegiate debate topic is
Resolved: That the Federal Government Should
Adopt a Program of Compulsory Wage and Price
Controls. As is the case in collegiate debate, the
same topic will be debated nationwide throughout
the year.
About 40 hours per week is involved in initially
researching the topic. As the year progresses and
more information turns up, this is implemented into
the debates presentation.
THIS YEAR THE debate team will be able to
continue their activities through direct funding firom

Friday, Octobar 23,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

the administration rather than through Student
Government funding.
Last year, when the debate team was cut off from
SG funding, their activities were financed through a
personal contribution of Sen. George A. Smathers,
D-Fla., who was able to obtain an additional
contribution for the team from Winn Dixie Stores.
UF debaters plan to participate in tournaments at
Emory, University of Houston, Brandeis,
Georgetown and Wake Forest, during the current
academic year.
UF debaters for this tournament include George
Braddock, Doug Clark, David Furlow, Mike
Joannou and Todd Price. Others are Gordon
Kennedy, Bob Storch, Rob Gidel and Paul
Rosenthal.
Students and the general public are invited to
attend todays and Saturdays rounds, according to
Miss Scan.
Information concerning debate pairings will be
found at the control desk located on the second
floor of the Union. Room numbers and times will
also be available.
Awards will be presented at a luncheon for all
debaters Saturday.

Page 17



The
Florida
l ?
Alligator

Everything Happens This Weekend

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
The hungry eat and the
thirsty drink, this our fifth
weekend, in Gainesville town.
Not since the beginning of
school has there been so much
cinematic sustenance, not since
die summer has there been such
a plethora of pleasant pastimes.
Music, movies, October
weekends and people getting
together this time to reckon and
be reckoned. Sound hedonistic,
a trifle strong on sensory
satisfaction in this waning
world? Ah but what messages
lurk in those pastimes, what
glimpses of alternatives. It will
be a weekend of experience and
learning. Study well.
THE UNION. What can I say?
Am I a shill for the Union? Who
would not be, I ask you, when
the offering boggles the mind,
boggles I say, with One Eyed
Jacks, 1F... and Zorba?
ONE EYED Jacks was Marlon
Brandos dibut as a director. If
memory serves, the critics were
not overjoyed with the movie
and yet it has remained a
favorite of many, a strange,
compelling western that seeths
with a biblical vengence and a
religious violence. The Great
Mumbling Enigma stars with
Karl Malden, who plays his most
repulsive role since he was
Frenchy in The Hanging Tree.
The supporting cast is excellent
featuring such reliable western
supporters as Katy Jurado, the
inimitable Slim Pickens and Ben
Johnson, who last played Mr.
Pepper in Chisum.
The story deals with
doublecross and revenge as it is
played out in the desolate wastes
of the Mexican desert and the
wild north coast around
Monterey, California. Brando
movies always feature a
gruesome beating scene and
Jacks is no exception. The
violence is not gratuitous
however, some great lines like
when he gutterly lisps, You
scum-sucking pig, or, Ill tear
your arm offrt your shouldei.
Brando is of course the
brooding, violent storm-center
of the movie. He is outrageous in
his scruffy Mexican clothes,
brilliantly highlighted by a long,
colorful scarf that John Wayne
would never wear. He rages, cons
and suffers in his most unique
style that forces immediate
acceptance or rejection. Friday,
with an extra afternoon show
thrown in at 4:30.
1F. .. and plays on Saturday
with a late afternoon show,
check the Union for the time. If
Js dealt with on a following page.
Zofbfrthe Greek roars in on
Sunday to re-affirm the value
and pleasure of life. The movie is
by now a classic with Anthony
Quinn in the title role doing the
thing he does best. Alan Bates,
who is surely one of the best
actors working, plays the young
English gentleman Zorba
attaches himself to, and the
great Irene Pappas graces the
screen as the widow. The story is
about, life, the confrontation of

m Mi Ml .- 9He9b::fli

life styles and the primal vitality
of a happy man. The movie
evokes the structures of rural
Greek society with fascinating
detail and the music by
Theodrakis is a triumph, but
then so is the movie.
|Pbj
% ~~ S v
IC
1
MARION BHAKDO) fl
KARIMAIDEI I Inn
THE PLAZA. The Plaza keeps
a movie I havent seen, RPM and
gets rid of a sleeper, I Did
Something For Everyone. Darcy
Meeker, whoever that is, hated
RPM and says it is trash. The
coming attractions induce me to
agree with him or her.
Something For Everyone was
great, a black comedy set in the
beatuiful country of Bavaria and
featuring fine performances by
Angela Lansbury and Michael
York. Dont miss it if it comes
again.
THE PLAZA redeems itself
by bringing in DU. Lawrences,
The Virgin and the Gypsy. So
far three movies have been made
from Lawrences books, The
Fox, which was interesting,
Women in Love, which was
exquisite and now The Virgin
and the Gypsy. The movie has

8 N.W. 16th Ave.

gotten really good reviews and
following so closely on Women
in Love, which got raves, the
reviews should be accurate.
Franco Nero who was Launcelot
in Came lot plays the Gypsy and
Joanna Shimkus is you guessed
it, the Virgin. The movie should
be good.
THE CENTER. Patton won
the war in Europe in less time
than this movie has been in town
and it stays another week. With
it is a true-life adventure, Savage
Wild which is about a man who
domesticated wolves up in the
Yukon. Whether he lived with
them or not is still being debated
in the courts.
THE FLORIDA. The Florida
inaugurates its new policy of
bringing classics back to the
silver screen. This week it is the
immortal D.W. Griffiths Birth
of a Nation. When Birth of a
Nation was released people
rioted in the streets because of
the sympathetic portrayal of the
KKK, good guys in white peaks.
Do D.W. dropped back and
made Intolerance. Perhaps they
should be shown together. Still
the Bonnie Blue Flag evokes
other rebels and other causes.
THE SUBURBIA. Naked
Under Leather is a flick that
wasnt released for about two
years. Its kinky, with Alain
Delon and J aggers woman,
Marianne Faithful. With it is,
The Wild Bunch, one of the best
movies of last year by possibly
the best American director, Sam
Peckinpaugh. A good double
bill.
MUSIC. Take your pick,
choose a band any band. The
Rhodes Brothers are at the Rat.
Anyone from Miami should
know about the Rhodes
Brothers who were an institution
at the Crossways Inn. They are a
high-powered night club act that
plays a variety of instruments, do
stylized versions of popular
songs and comedy routines
between numbers. One of the
brothers is a ringer for RFK,

Page 18

which once was probably cute,
but not any more. They are a
top notch act that entertains and
are probably just the thing to
drink beer to and have a good
time.
On Friday night Blackfoot, a
New York group, will play at the
Union. No word on how good
they are but their promotional
tape isnt bad. They are not a
night club act. JThey do not
entertain, they play music.
Yin/Yang it and catch them
both.
ON SATURDAY night after

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1970-1971 /G&k
6 Billiards, Chess,
Bowling, Bridge &
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Individual trophies for each event
Students, staff & Faculty may participate
Oct. 26
** All others begin Oct. 28 or 29
and run concurrently
you can enter only one category
m/
> kEITZ union games area

m GREG JONES
Entertainment Editor

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 23,1970

youve seen 1F... Johnny
Winter gets it on at the drive-in.
Power, an outstanding band is
with the Man and they can be
tough, Johnny better watch out
or theyll take him.
NOTES. On Monday the
Union begins a weekly program
of experimental films that will
touch on a little more, a little
deeper and probably a little
cruder, tilings not covered in
commercial films. So
experiment. Homecoming is a
week away, how far away are
the students?



By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
IF .is an amazing thing to
lee when you are in New York
or the first time in a long time
nd in the Village and in a cozy
ittle bohemian theater. I mean
t just seems so right surrounded
, y big city freaks who are into
who knows what maybe even
Weathermen or the Panthers. It
is especially pleasing when these
aded types, who had to be at
Columbia and Chicago, cheer
like children when Resistance
finally flashes on the screen.
Such a pure, non-political word,
resistance. It harbors no dogma,
no party line, no conspiracy, no
bombs just human free will, to
resist. Resist in thought, word,
manner, life-style, dress and wit.
To resist with style.
That is what IF is about.
Resistance. And as good as IF
was to see in the Village it is
better to see here at school. I
mean Jesus, the dean in IF even
looks like OConnell. And the

Is There Hope For Homecoming?

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
It would have been a nice idea
for Homecoming to be an
alternative this year.
Homecoming, they tell me,
relevancy oozing from every
pore, is for communication, we
need to communicate with the
alumni. I couldnt agree more.
People generally communicate
best by example. So since
students dont really take up a
lot of room at Homecoming
anyway, students should just
have their own Homecoming
right along side the traditional
one. Then participants in each
could wander over and dig on
each other.
But Homecoming isnt really
for students, you see, and people
who know will tell you, if you
get them mad enough, that
alumni mostly pay for
Homecoming and it wouldnt be
right to bite the hand that feeds
you. But that raises the
question, is presenting the
student life-style as it really is,
biting the hand that feeds you?
Well it seems that students have
been getting a little bad press
lately and alumni, unable to
break the habit of being parents,
dont cotton to much of that
life-style. Like long hair and
being against the war and not
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school in If, turning out all those
models of Englands ideal,
capital for Englands future,
looks and feels not unlike good
old home. It is the attitude that
brings it home, that equation of'
difference with troublemakers,
alternatives with immoral
subversion, life with duty.
Alternatives are subversive by
definition, and Mick is a
troublemaker because he no
longer believes in the answer.
That is the most subversive act
of all, when you cease to believe
in their heaven, their god and
their life. Then the whole
monsterous make-up job reveals
itself, mother becomes a leering
whore, hungry for your talents
not for yourself.
SO MICK with his moustache,
his personal room decorations,
his music and his polite, I no
longer believe this crap, manner
becomes an affront to the
establishment. Now a
righteous establishment does not
take kindly to affronts. If it did

hating blacks and questioning
values and being sexual and dope
and all that.
SO IT SEEMS behavior has
become political and in many
adult eyes you out there with
sideburns and you out there
with no bra are living the
revolution whether you know it
or not. But arent students
running Homecoming? you
might well ask. Well yes and no.
OConnell runs everything and
you dont cross him no matter
how friendly he seems. Then the
people who actually run
Homecoming are running it
according to their consciences
and that unconscience knows
where the power is and who
they have to please and it isnt
you dear student.
They say things like Uhlfelder
doesnt represent the
MAJORITY of students (god

LET RO-MO I
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LIGHTS M I
FLASH EQUIPMENT I
AT I

it would not be a righteous
establishment, it would be a
tolerent one which means it
probably would not be an
establishment. A righteous
establishment mouths pieties
about decency and image while
it breaks your arm or siezes or
proceeds to smother anything
substantive.
Your president himself will
tell you that students should
refrain from doing those things
that harm and to do those things
that will improve and enhance
the reputation of the student
body of this university. Another
administrator will write that
student leaders can best serve
this university by encouraging
students to maintain reasonably
high hygienic standards in their
attire and grooming. Reputation
and image.
The seniors in If tell Mick that
he is a degenerate. He was
chosen and he turned his back

where is that all elusive
majority) and that they are more
representative and that a piece in
the Gator Growl skit on God
and Republicans offends, I said
offends them. Never having been
to the plaza they refuse to
recognize its existence, long out
of the dorms they remember
them from 1965, and not having
participated in the new life style
they refuse to put much stock in
it. So they lump everyone
together, if you are different,
you are radical and therefore
disenfranchised.
BUT THEY are trying. There
is a semi-hip collage on the third
floor of the Union that
emphasizes the change in
Homecoming, how its going to
be relevant (a more cringing
word I have never heard). It
says, Protest. But not too much.
What Homecoming should be is
true not relevant.

on the promised land. Christians
call that apostasy. Ray Graves
would too. Athletes are the
chosen of the chosen so their
image is most important. They
represent the University to
alumni and fans who support the
UF athletic program. So long
hair goes, petitions are buried in
mounds of obfuscation and
administrationese and athletes
are reminded that every one has
a place. Oh, and a committee is
appointed.
NO COMMITTEES are
formed in IF. The film was
directed by Lindsay Anderson
on a very tight budget. Several
times during shooting Anderson
was unable to afford color film
and had to shoot in black and
white with quite good results.
The acting is superb. Malcolm
McDowell is magnificent as Mick
the leader of three
trouble-making students, at a
very structured English boarding
school. Their unconventionality

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Friday, October 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

causes the schools hierarchy to
deal with them on strict terms.
They refuse to play by the rules,
diverted by their romanticism,
their hollywood machismo and
their irony.
The film weaves in and out of
reality until it really doesnt
matter any more, each absurdity
becoming just another form of
reality. A similar experience can
be had by visiting Tigert Hall.
Seeing the game for what it is
they can no longer deal with it
seriously. They turn the game on
itself and it can't take it
The film suceeds because it
approaches things from a non
serious irreverent angle, it
indulges in fantasy, delicious
retribution and heroic
encounters. It ends like the
cavalry coming to the rescue and
deserves a good fantasy/reality
cheer. Look at If. If it means
anything to you, look around.
You wont have to look far.

Page 19



The
Florida
Alligator

Tennessee Has Home Field Advantage

EDITORS NOTE: Since the
UF-Tetmeflaee game has been in
the limelight for some time, The
Alligator and The
Beacon-Journal Sports Editors
exchanged columns. Larry
Green, sports editor of the
University of Tennessee's
Beacon Journal presents his
views on the game Saturday.
By LARRY GREEN
Sports Editor of Beacon-Journal
Around the South during the
months of September, October,
November and December, there
is much talk of between the
hedges" the playing of Auburn
on the Tartan. What it all adds
up to is football and the home
field advantage.
Saturday afternoon at 1:50
pjn. the Florida Gators will
hear, byway of the throats of
65,000 big orange backers just
what it is that makes being on
the Tartan (or as it was formerly
known Dougs Rug) such an
undesirable postion.
Since 1966 the Vols frave
rolled through 19 consecutive
games without a loss within the
confines of Neyland Stadium
with the only blemish during
that period being a 17-17 tie
with the University of Georgia in
the first game ever played on a
3-M surface.
THE MAN AT the helm of
the Vol ship when this pattern
of victory began was one
Douglas Adair Dickey, then the
head coach in his third season.
Dickey, a UF grad, turned the
tide of Volunteer football
fortune during his tenure as
leader and in six seasons
presented UT fans with 55
happy occasions, 14 solemn
Saturdays and four ties.
Os the 14 losses inflicted
during Dickeys reign, the one
which digs in the big orange
craw the thickest is the final
one. It all took place on national
television during the Christmas
season when UF whipped the
Vols 14-13 and then several days
later Dickey resigned and
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BEACON-JOURNAL SPORTS EDITOR COMMENTS

TIM PRIEST
. .."rather beat UF"
accepted the postion of head
coach at UF. From that time
forth, the people of Tennessee
had pointed to one game an
Oct. 24 showdown with the
Gainesville-based school.
The populace of Tennessee
feels that Saturday afternoon is
high time for Gator faithfuls to
understand that with better
mental atmosphere than that
which existed during the
personnel turnover of last
season, the orange can split the
John Reaves Carlos Alvarez
lead entrouage from the
Sunshine State.
THIS FEELING could be the
biggest factor going in favor of
the Vols. Incentive is an
immeasurable item and a vital
element in the psyching of a
football team. Saturdays edge
will belong to the team in the
orange and white.
As Tim Priest, the Vols
secondary leader and co-captain
put it, Id rather win the game
against Florida than any game in
my life. He was quick to point
out however, that the reasoning
behind this was not affected by
Coach Dickeys sudden

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departure but more
appropriately because of the
Florida victory in the silver
anniversary celebration in the
annual Gator Bowl.
But incentive, pride and
desire are not the only fires
burning in the Vols camp.
THERE IS A defense that has
allowed but 12 points in their
four wins this season, the only
pitfall coming in the meeting
with Auburn which turned into
a 36 point nightmare.
Time and again as in route to
last seasons 9-2 mark, the
defense has come up* with the
big plays to break open the big
games and take a considerable
amount of pressure off the
offense. Especially tight has
been the pass coverage, a phase
of the defense that the Gators
will serverely test this weekend.
JOHN REAVES likes to
throw the ball and Carlos
Alvarez likes to catch it. They
are both fine athletes but in the
phase of the Vol defense that
has heisted 19 enemy aerials
including eight in one game,
they could be somewhat
neutralized.
Even though the pass defense
is ranked ninth in the
conference, having given up
1,045 yards, the statistic is
somewhat misleading since in
just about every game the
oppostion has had to take to the
air in an effort to play catch up
at which time the UT defenders
were in a prevent defense giving
away the short passes.
On offense, there is little of
the razzle dazzle that is an
integral part of the UF offense.
The unit, headed by the running
of Curt Watson (399 yards
gained for an average of 4.9 a
carry) will for the most part {day
a game of ground-out football.

t /- M
Marty Perimutter
Executive Sports Editor

I. Th. Florid. AHKMW. Fri-toy. Ocmwr*VW7o

Page 20

However, in the past several
weeks, the air attack has become
more and more a potent
component in the Vol attack.
The point is this. The Vols are
under the spell of revenge, no
matter how animalistic the word
may sound, and to a man they
feel that this is THE game,
nonetheless. The offense is
sound and has begun to
eliminate the mistakes that
lolled heavily in the early going
of the schedule. Also the defense
has come around and gets
tougher each week.
Head Coach Bill Battle is a
man of confidence. The team
wants this one. Tennessee 28,
Florida 17.
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UF In Biggest Contest Os Season

The contest is being called
Doug Dickeys homecoming, but
in reality it will be the biggest
game of the year for the Florida
Gators.
After a crushing defeat to the
University of Alabama a month
ago, the Gators have won three
straight, although only one of
those victories was really
decisive.
BUT THE Gators will have to
be decisive to win at Knoxville
Saturday because Tennessee is
the eleventh ranked team in the
nation.
And win the Gators will.
Although the scores may not
be high in the five Gator
victories this year, the offense is
as good as last year.
JOHN REAVES and friends
compiled over 400 yards in total
offense last week against
Richmond.
And that was without the
Florida players minds on the
game. Most everyone on the
team was looking north to
Knoxville for the Volunteer
contest.
An encouraging note for the
Gators is the fact that the
offensive show put on last week
was the largest amount of
yardage piled up in one game
this year.

Rushing Machine Wound
For 13th Kiwanis Annual

By FRED JOY
Alligator Sports Writer
Have you heard about the
Baby Gator football machine?
Wind it up and it runs all over
you for four quarters?
Thats about the best way to
describe a team that piled up
246 yards rushing in its first
game against Auburn and is now
ready to take on the Miami frosh
tonight in the Orange Bowl.
LED BY running backs Vince
Kendrick, of Miami Springs, and
Lenny Lucas, of Daytona Beach,
the Baby Gators have put
together one of the finest
ground attacks in years. In the
27-13 win over Auburn,
Kendrick wiggled and faked for
134 yards and a 5.5 average,
while his partner in crime ran for
89 yards and a 5.1 average.
But Kendrick and Lucas
arent the only show-stoppers.
Quarterback Chan Gailey, from
Americus, Ga., is currently the
leading scorer after running for
two touchdowns throwing
another in the Auburn contest.
Carey Geiger, from Savannah,
Ga., gives the Baby Gators a
strong kicking game, too, after
punting five times for a 42.2
average. vt?
The offensive line did its job,
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gators against eleventh ranked vols

|

H'
V B
JOHN REAVES
... hitting peak
THE SCORE may have been
only 20-0 against Richmond, but
the offense is together.
The dynamic duo (Reaves and
Carlos Alvarez) are hitting their
peaks, and should be at their
best Saturday.
Alvarez has been plagued by a
sore knee all year and will have
exploratory surgery done after
the season.

also, and Coach Jimmy Haynes
had kind words for center Mark
King, from Tallahassee, strong
guard Joe Shepherd and strong
tackle Kris Anderson, both from
Orlando. Most of the plays
were run directly over their
positions, Haynes said.
EVEN WITH all this talent,
the Baby Gators might have
trouble throttling the Baby
Canes. The Miami team is also
undefeated after whipping
Georgia Tech 19-13 list
Saturday and features a running
game similar to Floridas.
The Baby Canes are much
better than the Auburn team we

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DEMIANS, RECORDSVILLE IN THE MALL, and MUNTZ STEREO

BUT A WOUNDED Alvarez is
better than any other healthy
receiver in the nation.
Mike Richs broken rib is
going unnoticed by the play of
Duane Doel. Doel has scored the
last four touchdowns for
Florida.
As if Alvarez isnt enough by
himself, Willie Jackson and
Andy Cheney also present
problems for the Vol defense.
JACKSON IS third on the
team with 16 receptions, but his
speed is harnessed on kickoffs
and is a threat to break one for a
long gain anytime he gets the
ball.
Cheney made the SEC
sophomore team last year, and
would repeat this year on the
all-SEC team if not for Alvarez.
Since Jack Youngblood
returned from a knee injury,
Floridas defense has allowed
only one touchdown when their
first team was on the field in the
past three games.
CAN THE VOLS throw
against the secondary of the
Gators?

played, warned Haynes, and
well have to show a great deal
of improvement over our first
game performance to be able to
give them an even battle.
The team will leave at 9 a.m.
today and will arrive in time to
practice on the Orange Bowls
artificial turf in the afternoon.
Today the Baby Gators will
be treated to a luncheon at the
McAllister Hotel by the Kiwanis
Club. For the 13th straight year
the Kiwanis will be sponsoring
the game in order to raise funds
for charitable purposes. About
40,000 fans are expected to
witness the game.

Not likely with John Clifford
roaming around in the defensive
backfield.
Clifford is one interception
away from tieing a university
season record with six
interceptions. Against North
Carolina State, Clifford picked
off three.
WE WILL need to be at our
best to win at Knoxville,
Dickey said. We have to put it
all together.
Alvarez and Reaves have been
getting together more in the past
two games to bolster the
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Friday, Octotoar 23,1970, Tha Florida AHiprtor,

offense.
The defense is coming off a
shutout last week and is finally
hitting their peak.
IT IS A sentimental game for
both teams.
Tennessee wants revenge for
its loss in last years Gator Bowl
to Florida, and for the loss of
their coach to the Gators.
But the Gators will be up for
the game, up like they never
have been this year.
I will not pick a score of the
game, but I will say after
Saturday, Tennessee will still
want revenge.
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Page 21



;, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 23,1970

Page 22

f D-Day 9 Nears For Gators, Vols

By DOUG KEITH
Alligator Sports Writar
Saturday is D-Day in
Knoxville, Tenn., but the host
Volunteers aint likely to roll
out the red carpet for Doug
Dickey. For Douglas Adair
Dickey, going back to Tennessee
will be about as much fun as
wrestling a rock ape.
You see, the folks up in
Tennessee didnt cotton to what
ole Doug done to em last year
leavin em like that. If Dickey
was running in a top 10
popularity poll in Tennessee,
hed come in No. 11.
BUT DOUG DICKEY doesnt
live in Tennessee anymore.
Weve got him, and after a
somewhat bumpy road at the
beginning of his tenure at UF,
things have begun to fall into
{dace and settle into a smooth
pattern.
Dickey has kept his cool while
enduring absurd criticism about
machine football, robots and
computers. In the meantime, the
Gators under Dickey have won
five of six, a fact many
grumbling Gator fans seem to
ignore.
But Doug Dickey now faces
one of his biggest challenges

Auburn, LSU Match Power

By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
ATLANTA It will be the
best-in-the-South offense against
the best-in-the-South defense
Saturday when the Auburn
Tigers host Louisiana State.
The sth-ranked, unbeaten
Tigers, sparked by the passing of
junior quarterback Pat Sullivan,
are averaging 35.4 points and
485.6 yards per game at
midseason. LSU, which hasnt
given up a touchdown by
rushing, has allowed an average
of only 7.4 points and 214.2
yards per game while posting a
4-1 mark.
The oddsmakers have made
Auburn a 12-point favorite.
Elsewhere in the SEC:
Alabama visits Houston as a
six-point underdog; Ole Miss,
upset by Southern Mississippi
last week, is heavily favored to
beat Vanderbilt and continue as
the SEC leader; Georgia is
favored by a touchdown in a
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... defensive plug
beating a Tennessee team he
recruited and coached to the
SEC Championship. Beating the
Vols in Knoxville is like selling
ice to an eskimo it aint easy.
FOR STARTERS, Tennessee
has one of the best football
teams around. On top of that,
the Vols will be fired up like no
team ever was before. They will
be playing on home turf (tartan
turf; before an expected 65,000

visit to Kentucky and Mississippi
State is expected to down
Southern Miss, despite that
upset over Ole Miss.
In top independent
southeastern games Georgia
Tech is picked over Tulane and

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fanatics who will encourage
mayhem. And its homecoming.
Formidable odds?
If theres not enough emotion
already involved in this grudge
battle, add in the fact its a key
SEC game and a regionally
televised match-up. Thatll make
your palms sweat.
Tennessees strength lies in its
balance on both offense and
defense. The trade mark of past
Tennessee teams has been a
strong running game and a stick
em defense. This year is no
different. Running backs Curt
Watson and Don McLeary lead
the running attack with Bobby
Scott at quarterback.
ON DEFENSE, the Vols rely
on safety Bobby Majors and a
solid corp of linebackers led by
Ray Nettles to make the big
plays. Majors has six
interceptions on the year.
The key to a Gator victory is
stopping the Vol ground attack.
Led by Jack Youngblood and
Bob Harrell, the big blue defense
has been stingy against
opponents rushing attack.
The stage is set for one of the

Tampa, which jumped into the
No. 1 spot in the small college
rankings, should roll over Xavier.
Miami and Florida State are
touchdown underdogs against
Pitt and South Carolina,
respectively.

most emotional football games
ever played in the SEC. All the
talking has been done. All the
songs have been sung. As coach
Dickey put it, What matters

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football field.
Andy Cheney summed it up
best, Itll be a helluva game.
Have at it.



Good Response To Getzens Rebuttal

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Writer
It might not be No. 1 on the
music charts, but Gator football
player-composer Jim Getzen is
getting favorable response to
his song The Ballad of Bad
Billy Battle.
Getzen, a B-team split end
and placekicker, penned the
western flavored fight song as a
rebuttal to The Battle Song, a
song that is out on record and is
very popular in Tennessee.
OF COURSE, the Battle
the song is referring to is Bill
Battle, first year football coach
of the Tennessee Volunteers
who will meet the Gators and
ex-Vol Coach Doug Dickey at
Knoxville Saturday in regionally
televised SEC game.
After hearing the The Battle
Song, written by a Lowden,
Tenn., banker, Getzen decided
the Gators needed a rallying cry
for a game he said is probably
the biggest Florida has ever
had.

Touchdown Tommy
Tied In Scoring

By Alligator Services
Fullback Tommy Durrance
and Terry Beasley of Auburn are
tied in the scoring derby in the
latest statistics released by the
Southeastern Conference. Both
have scored six touchdowns and
lead with 36 points.
Quarterback John Reaves has
compiled the most yardqge via
die air waves with 1459 hi m
games. His closest competitor is
Pat Sullivan of Auburn with
1144 and Archie Manning of CHe
Miss with 1099.
REAVES ALSO leads in
completions with 108 to 85 for
Manning and 68 for Sullivan.
Junior Carlos Alvarez has
been replaced as the top SEC
pass catcher this year, for the
number of receptions that is.
David Smith of Mississippi State
lias caught 43 in six games to
lead Alvarez by 15.
join the fun!
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The game is shaping up to an
emotional response to Dickeys
decision to leave the Vols for the
Gators after last years UF win
over Tennessee in the Gator
Bowl.
WITH MORE than three years
BATTLE SONG
By DON CANTOR
This song I sing is dedicated to
those in Gator land.
I sing it accompanied by a true
Volunteer band.
It|s just a slam at trickery, I hope
its not too long.
You may call it what you like, I call
it the Battle Song.
Well beat Doug Dickey on the
Tartanturf.
Hell wish he was in Jacksonville,
playing in the surf.
Watson will run the ball, McClain
will catch the ball.
And Alvarez will spend the day on
his looking glass.
CHORUS:
Trickey Dickey, a former
quarterback,
Trickey Dickey left us to earn more
jack,
Trickey Dickey hes going to pay
the price,
Hell find out that losing on the
Battle Ground aint nice.

An encouraging word for the
UF defense is its rise to number
four in rushing defense.
L.S.U. leads with only 204
yards given away on the ground,
an average of only 40.8 per
game. The Tigers have not
allowed a touchdown on the
ground yet this season.

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of guitar experience, along with
dance band stints, Getzen, a
Newberry native, composed his
song about two weeks ago.
Getzen performed the songs
musical debut last Thursday
BALLAD OF BAD BILLY BATTLE
By JIM GETZEN
Bad Billy Battle youd better be
prepared
Cause when the Gators come to
town I know they wont be
scared.
Theyll rip and snort and fight
like hell and throw you to the
ground.
Bad Billy Battle dont bring your
Vols to town.
Well leap over Lester
Walk over Watson, too.
Mop up on Majors,
Even drink your Mountain Dew.
Well dirty your carpet with
Volunteer blood
And have fun while we do.
Bad Billy Battle the scene looks
bad to you.
Chorus:
Bad Billy Battle you mean and
nasty boy.
You should have stayed in
Alabama with Bear and all the
boys.
When the fightings over and
when the war is won,
Well come home to the Sunshine
State
Sayin we are Number One.
Well do em in with Durrance
Well add the squeeze with
Reaves.
Well arch their backs with
Alvarez.
Well knock them to their knees.
The Volunteer fans will hang their
heads
The Gators will rejoice
Cause when the gun ends the
game,
Well be the Number One choice.
Chorus:
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night in front of a partisan
audience at a football player
talent show in Yon Hall.
' fcJ
From there it was instant
success. Punter John James, an
acquaintance of a local disc
jockey, worked out
arrangements with radio station
WGGG to tape Getzens
rendition after the talent show.
THE BALLAD of Billy
Battle hit the airwaves Monday
with lyrics like Well leap over
Lester (McClain), Well walk
over (Curt) Watson, too, Well
mop up on (Bobby) Majors, And
even drink your Mountain
Dew.
This is in response to The
Battle Song stanza of Oh,
well beat Doug Dickey on the
Tartan Turf, Hell wish he was in
Jacksonville playing in the surf,
Watson will run the ball,
McClain will catch the pass, And
(Carlos) Alvarez will spend the
day on his looking glass.
Furthermore, the Tennessee
musical effort also claims When
the Gators take the field the
town will shake with boos, They

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Friday, Octobar 23,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

will know from the mood of the
crowd, that they will surely lose,
Trickey Dickey was the name of
the leader of our team, and the
best dam trick he ever pulled
was his departure scheme.
BUT GETZEN refuses to be
denied: Well do em in with
(Tommy) Durrance, Well add
the squeeze with Reaves, Well
arch their backs with Alvarez,
Well knock em to their knees.
Its really too late to record
the song (on record) now, said
Getzen. I hadnt planned on it
being that big.
It was big enough for Dickey
to come up to Getzens room
before the song was taped and to
be treated with a performance.
He liked it, said Getzen.
Getzen named Go-Go by his
teammates, because I cut up a
lot dancing, whistling and
singing, said the song has been
a boost to the team this week by
easing tension in practice.
Despite his musical
masterpiece, Getzen will
probably not personally see a
Gator win of which he
confidently sings. As a B-team
member, he only attends and
dresses out for home games.

Page 23



Page 24

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 23,1970

Dominos Pizza
He, -|L TWO FREE COKES A
%ggf%S)M Call 376-2487 D
B FREE DELIVERY B /aa\
mm, Y The Harmon Football Forecast f fIBMWw
l r IOHIO STATE 6TENNESSEE 11 MISSISSIPPI 16L.S.U. ( /
i 2TEXAS 7MICHIGAN 12AIR FORCE 17 ALABAMA \ I
111 j 3NOTRE DAME BSTANFORD 13 ARIZONA STATE 18U.C.LA. I / =l
\ k 4AUBURN 9ARKANSAS 14 HOUSTON 19 SAN DIEGO STATE Z / m
\\ SNEBRASKA 10SOUTHERN CAL 15 MISSOURI 29 GEORGIA TECH |MV
Arizona Ce state 34 Although six weeks still remain of the
> Arkansas over Wichita 1970 football season, there is one team that i
| V Brown is Colgate 14 can almost clinch a post-season bowl game
cTSSS SaflT" S>ate 20 With win this Saturday. Sth-rankad
ccaurnbia 31
Dartmouth 30 Harvard 7 U.C.L.A., can take a giant stride toward its
Duke 25 Clemson 7 first Rose Bowl appearance since 1952. The
Georgia Tech 22 i! Indians are a 10-point choice to win the big
Houston 23 Alabama 22 one.
Kansas 20 lowa State 10 ...
Memphis state 20 North Texas 17 It seems wed better do a quick analysis of
Michigan h 23 sfinnes*ta* reen H our college forecasting average... there jurt
!3i2&i S,a,e Serb.it 14 hnt room anywhere else. Through garnoc of
Mississippi state 24 south'n Mississippi 16 Saturday, October 10, we've been right in
Nebraska 27 Oklahoma state io 676 games and wrong in 214 for a .759
HOURS New Mexico state ll wETtS*. li W"* percentage. Two weeks ago, wa HOURS
North Carolina 20 wake Forest is practically struck out in the East picking
No. Carolina State 20 Maryland 16 ,WUCR wu ,n "* can P K m
Northern Illinois 21 Ball state 20 only 14 winners out of 28 games. However,
s:oopml.-OOam Sort -Thor
SSK 1 28 cln^ose 51316 27 crystal bail bounced amazingly right on
s:oopm2:ooam Fri A Sat &&£* 15 {&,,. 38 game, out of 43. So, it all seems to 5:00 pm-2.00am FH & Sat
Princeton 22 Pennsylvania 14 balance out. As weve said so many times,
DOMINOS sEK'clwtn. 17 Fforidi*sS *? make no wild claims of an unbelievable DOMINfYC
ItaiSoS* 031 27 82BL 17 forecasting average... just consistency. U\JwV lll'lw 3
Syracuse 2| Navy 13 Meanwhile, back in the football warfare wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
S Tennessee 28 Florida 6 department, top-ranked Ohio State will I
T lxll a&m lo Baylor 14 ramble over Illinois by 45 points, and Texas, A ||||A| ||| AC|U| E||T|
is 1 II K.ni U s.,t. o 4 ~n* r 2, Will crush Rice by 27. ANNUUII vCPICN I
% W' 1 Utah 24 Arizona 23 Notre Dame, still in third, has a vacation.
Yc |V SSStir 3 SSfvTross ng S Nebraska take, on the Cowboy. __ _
X^ 9 gS &&174 7 of Oklahoma State. The Cowboys have a Mg j|UP
Washington 27 Oregon state 25 habit of surprising the daylights out of
. fc U S' /Stern' r Michigan le Sarahau State 13 top-ranked teams in the Big Eight. However, l
.. \3 wofford Sin 27 Davidson ii Comhuskers will escape trouble and win
- CsYl M***' Yale 21 Cornell 7 by 17 points. m m
4cA J Other Games South and Southwest With the Little Brown Jug up for grabs, AM J
X a Arkansas' 3 state u 20 SiKWtiL. i? the 7th-rated Wolverines of Michigan will L fAfK£|fWJ|
Chattanooga 22 Furman 20
\\|rfl East Tennessee 26 Murray 14 Tennessee is 22 points stronger than Florida.
_ ifi S zab T e e th as city 20 Kentuckystate 5 Wichita State starts its 1970 football
. Grambling 38 Jackson State 0 season all over again this week aaainst
#i\\ V Guilford 21 Presbyterian 20 ".. ayain um wtok againn mm* m a
VW l\ Hampden-sydney 28 Johns Hopkins 6 9th-ranked Arkansas. The Razorbacks will
\ Howard S Payne 4i fa!rteton S A&M 7 win it, but we're offering no point spread. rllSl6r jQlllMf ICll
y t oX Maryville 5 g&m*** 3 The Air Force and Arizona State, rated
Oe' Ki?r2lfea T d enneSSee 3 Tennessee a Tech 2! I?th respectively, Will continue tO
.\\ w v no. Carolina a&t 33 winston-saiem 7 win. The Falcons will beet Boston College .f i 0m m
\N''' < sz c L zr iana s saar Tech -m. *. sun D ib w i big nt natAr rAiinirv
vkie C.hb' Randoiptiwcon 27 TKh § needle to Texas *t El Pan... the spread is Wl WM,WI VVUIIII |
O' Sam Houston 23 SW Texas 22 24 points.
fN Southern State 21 State College Ark. 13
\\ \)V I sw Louisiana 24 Lamar Tech is The Southeast Conference feature game
K\\ V ir h R'S ,en Tenn 11 IS this wk pH. 4thvsnked Auburn egtfnst r - l|A
n X T---, St... 33 FMjjgMM The Timr. from Louidmw \T|| I 11(1 1
A v v Tex.s Lutheran 3o Austin 7 have whipped everyone since bsmg upset by W ILL 11 Wl I
Ms* 1 Troy ,ty li 6 Texas A&M in their opener. However, the
" ir H lSlrwm 24 T| 9 Alsbnmn appear to be stronger:
-iJ# 11 Western Kentucky 28 Eastern Kentucky 20 Aubum to win by 13 over Louisiana State
Western Maryland 21 Washington & Lee 17 T uuuisiana diaxe.
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