Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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PHIL BANNISTER
STUDENTS REGISTER PROTEST
... with Mall President Joe Lichter

PRESS CARDS f A COURTESY'
Student Newsmans Role Questioned

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
An incident involving the
coverage of news by a UF
journalism student last Thursday
has raised questions regarding
the role of the college journalist
in Gainesville.
Richard Glenn, 4JM, was on
assignment for a class to film a
junior high school football game
at Citizens Field Thursday night.
During halftime Glenn saw a city
policeman arresting two youths
for scaling a wall to get into the
game.
As Glenn attempted to film
the arrest, an officer shoved the
camera in my face, he said.
Glenn complaimed to Gainesville
Police Chief W.D. Joiner about
the treatment he received.
This was an attempt to tell a

Tenants Union
Reactions Sought

A questionnaire aimed at
determining UF student
reactions to the idea of a
tenants union will be
distributed today in off-campus
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR
Hay Graves gives an
answer to a petition by
UF athletes page 3
Classifieds 12
Editorials.... 8
Letters 9
Movies 13
Sports 18
Whats Happening 14

newsman what to film and what
not to film, Glenn said.
In a meeting with Joiner on
Monday, Glenn presented his
complaint and sought to find
out what action the police
would take. Glenn said he was
surprised to hear Joiner inquire
about taking possible action
against him through the
university.
The Gainesville City
Commission, after hearing
statements from Glenn and
Gainesville Press Association
President Don Reid at a Monday
night meeting, voted to have the
incident investigated by City
Manager B. Harold Farmer.
In a telephone interview
Tuesday, Joiner said as long as
Glenn is pursuing the matter,
were going to continue our
investigation of it.
Joiner said he would make no

apartment complexes.
THE QUESTIONNAIRE was
prepared and is being distributed
by staff members of the Student
Government Office of Legal
Affairs.
J:
If response is favorable, a
tenants union could be set up to
.defend the rights of student
tenants with respect to local
apartment landlords and
managers, said Mike Pugh,
secretary of legal affairs.
Students favoring a tenants
union will have four options to
choose from on the
questionnaire:
(SEE 'UNION' PAGE 3)

YAF, AAS Picket Mall

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
A group of 11 students
successfully picketed the
Gainesville Mall Tuesday in
protest of their recent refusal to
allow members of the Arnold
Air Society on Mall property for
the purpose of collecting
signatures for a petition.
The Arnold Air Society,
(AAS), an Air Force R.O.T.C.
honors organization, recently
asked Joe Lichter, president of
the Mall Association, for
permission tc collect signatures
for a petition. The petition was
to be sent to Hanoi to protest
the inhumane treatment of
American prisoners in North
Vietnam.

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol 63, No. 23

statement about the incident but
explained, The policy toward
the news media is what it should
be. They (the news media) have
the right to report any public
gathering, as long as they dont
interfere with the duties of a
policeman.
The incident involving Glenn
has raised questions regarding
the position of a student
journalist covering a story.
John Paul Jones, dean of the
College of Journalism, said
Tuesday that student journalists
are not sent where any violence
is taking place or is likely to take
jdace.

Tennis Coach Dismisses
Two Protesting Athletes

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Two UF tennis players, Ralph
Hart and Dan Landrum, were
dismissed from the squad
Tuesday, because they
apparently did not abide by the
rules set down by Athletic
Director Ray Graves and Coach
Bill Potter.
When we walked onto the
courts today, he told us we
could not play, Landrum said.
He wouldnt give us a reason,
he just said that it was obvious
that we were not going to abide
by the rules.
LANDRUM INDICATED that
Potter was particulary upset
with their long hair and that
they would have to get it cut. He
then ordered them to leave the
tennis courts.
Potter confirmed the
dismissal, but declined to
comment any further. Last
week the two initiated a petition
that circulated through UFs
athletic dorm, Yon Hall, asking
for more voice in the athletic
departments decision-making
process and changes in the

Permission was refused.
ABOUT AN HOUR after the
picketing began, however,
Lichter changed his mind and
said he would send an
invitation to AAS giving them
permission to collect signatures
for the petition.
At first, Lichter told Young
Americans For Freedom (YAF)
no group could petition in the
Mall as part of their standing
policy.
A minor scuffle ensued when
Lichter attempted to take a
placard away from one of the
picketers.
MIKE CARR UF chairman
for YAF said Lichter started to
yank a sign from one of our

University of Florida, Gainesville

Jones said that when a
student newsman is covering a
regular story and an additional
news event spontaneously occurs
the student should leave if
trouble arises.
Safety insurance on a student
journalist is not the same as
that of a reporter working for a
newspaper or other
professional media, Jones said.
Consequently, Jones said, We
dont want students to get hurt,
or our equipment.
While Glenn has pursued in
making his complaint of a
broader nature regarding the
treatment of the media and the

present athlete dress and
conduct codes.
THE PRESENT code
prohibits the wearing of beards
and the wearing hair beyond the
collar. Both Hart and Landrum
wear their hair long.
Landrum said that they were
told by Potter that as long as
they didnt use the cafeteria
facilities in Yon Hall, they

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RALPH HART DURING A MATCH LAST SEASON
.. long hair lad to dismissal from team
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members but, he was quickly
informed by die police to check
with his attorney before he did
it.
Fred Vollrath, ILW, a
participant in the YAF
demonstration, said that AAS
was refused permission to collect
signatures last Thursday when
they first asked the Mall
Association.
I COULDNT believe it when
the Mall turned them down,
Vollrath said.
Vollrath, calling the policy
disgusting, said that Lichter
told the group nobody had the
right to collect signatures for a
(SEE TICKETS' PAGE 3)

Wednesday, October 21, 1970

manner in which the police
investigate complaints against
themselves Jones said The
college (journalism) has no
means for taking any legal
action.
Glenns instructor and news
director of WUFT-TV, Don
Grooms, said Student reporters
are full fledged reporters..
their work is presented for
public consumption.
Joiner, in the Monday
meeting, told Glenn and Grooms
that press cards issued by police
to UF journalism students are
really only a courtesy and do
(SEE 'PRESS' PAGE 3)

would have no problem with
their hair.
When school began,
Landrum added, we werent
told to get a haircut. But when
we went to practice Tuesday it
was different.
UFs tennis team will begin
regular season play sometime in
February.



i. Th Rorida Alligator, Wadnwday, October 21,1970

Page 2

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Photos by Mark Hauser
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville. Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and 53.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to'revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

~ mF Mm
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fcjdgfr Jj sfl
v' ; ;M

Population is
EVERYBODY'S BABY
Professor Richard Anderson of the Psychology
Department and Professor Seymour Block representing
Zero Population Growth will debate the question of over
population. Open discussion of the problem or lack of a
problem is encouraged.
Wednesday, October 21,1970 8:15 p.m.
Union lounges 122 & 123,15 t floor.
Sponsored by J.W. Reitz Union

WHOSE ZOO?
Nobody's. All of these animals have lots of running room in their
own habitats in the state of Florida.
Alligator Darkroom Manager Mark Hauser found a peacock, two
kissing flamingoes, a couple of squirrels that seem to blend into their
tree home and a monkey peeking out of his cage at night.
You might say Hauser has his own photographic zoo, but he only
shoots with a camera, and only then when not attacked.
CoCieg*
Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday
Lunch and Dinner
Cafeteria Line
Fried Chicken- 48{
FrvH Cobbler- 18(
Soda Fountain 10:30AM 12:00
Berger Basket
. 81111)6
Chocolate Shake
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HOURS Located Conveniently HOURS
6:45 a.m. 12:00 p.m. Across From Murphree' Area 6:45 a.m.12:0G p m



Graves Answers Athletes' Petition

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Staff Writer
UF Athletic Director Ray
Graves released a statement
Tuesday answering a petition by
athletes who asked for a stronger
voice in athletics.
We have always listened to
any group of athletes who have
suggestions or problems to
discuss, the statement said.

PAGE ONE^
An organization limited to
your apartment complex to act
and improve problems within
your complex and with your
landlord.
A citywide organization to
upgrade tenant treatment
generally.
A loose organization for
channeling complaints from
tenants to managers or owners,
and providing information to
prospective tenants.
A strong organization,
capable of invoking sanctions
against noncompliant landlords,
PRESS...
PAGE ON^
not carry the weight of
professional credentials,
according to Glenn.
Grooms said the college of
journalism's policy is an old
one, and needs to be updated.
John Walkinshaw, another UF
student newsman, was covering
part of the UF-Richmond game
on Saturday. Walkinshaw said
that he saw campus police
checking students as they
walked in as part of a
regulation passed this year
banning containers in the
stadium.
But I noticed that they
(campus policeman) were not
checking alumni as thoroughly
as they were students, he said.
Walkinshaw said he received
some cold looks from alumni
and campus policemen when he
began to film some of the
checks.
Its upsetting to student
journalists to be working on an
assignment and not feel that the
department (journalism) is
backing you up in your work,
Walkinshaw said.
If we're to learn the real
basics of actual reporting, we
should not have to pass up a
chance to cover a big story, he
said. f
Jones said he will release a
statement soon making clear the
standing policy regarding the
role the student journalist
should fulfill in his class
assignments.
Grooms repeated his concern
that the student journalist needs
a change in the old policy to
back him up in his work.
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We take all such petitions or
requests under advisement and
they are all considered and
handled in a normal process.
THE PETITION asked that
athletes be responsible only to
their respective team coaches in
matters of grooming, dress and
personal conduct.
Graves said the rules of
conduct resulted from many
hours of discussion and thought

such sanctions to possibly
include blacklist, picketing, rent
strike, and legal action.
STUDENTS WILL ALSO
have an opportunity to register
their complaints on the survey
form concerning current policies
at their apartments.
The questionnaires will be
picked up Thursday.
Pugh said Tuesday that
students with specific
complaints could call the SG
number, 392*1665. Complaints
would be referred to the office
of legal affairs. The call could be
returned to the student to
discuss possible action that
might be taken, Pugh said.

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at two levels nationally, in
meetings of collegiate athletic
directors, and locally, in
meetings with all head coaches
of teams at UF.
He said the rules were
designated to enable athletes to
feel comfortable among their
peer group and be members of
teams which represent UF in
athletics to many interested
groups.
THE STATEMENT said these
groups were alumni and fans
which help support the UF
athletic program.
Graves said the rules were
made as part of the discipline
the athletes have to go by.
If you want to be part of a
team, or of the athletic program
you have to be regulated there
will be training rules, Graves
said.

PICKETS ...

PAGE ONeJ
petition in the Mall whatever
the cause.
We regret it took this type of
action to make the Mall

THE NEXT PROPOSAL from
the athletes concerned alleged
harrassment by some coaches,
football coaches were singled
out in this proposal.
Graves said he had received
only one complaint from such
harrassment. He said those
complaints are usually settled by
the athletes and the coaches.
He said the rules were
enforced uniformly for all
athletes by coaches assigned this
responsibility.
AS FAR AS setting up open
house hours in Yon Hall,
Graves said this would be more
difficult because the athletic
dorm was not like other
dorms.
He pointed out Yon Hall is
not set up in the same way as
other dorms there is no lobby.
Furthermore, there is an overlap

recognize their responsibilities,
Vollrathsaid.
VOLLRATH SAID permission
was first obtained from the local
police to picket the Mall
property.
He added that Lichter refused

Wednesday, October 21,1970, The Florida Alligator,

in the seasons for a number of
sports and an open house
policy could interfere with the
athletes who have to be up early
in the morning.
Graves said the no open house
policy in Yon Hall is a training
rule.
THE FOURTH proposal of
the athletes, to have
representatives to a committee
to have more voice in athletics,
has already been considered.
I have asked each head coach
to appoint two of his athletes,
one to serve as a member and
the other as an alternate on a
committee to meet and discuss
problems and areas of concern.
We have done this in the
past, Graves said, and believe
it is necessary for good
communication and expression
of ideas.

the AAS permission to collect
signatures because they didnt
follow due process.
But due process is a legal
term and theyre (the Mall) not a
legal body, Voll rath said.

Page 3



v Tlm Flaridb AMgator, Wednesday, October 21,1970

Page 4

KENT, Ohio (UPI) Four
more persons, including a former
strefcat wounded at Kent State
Unmiiky the day four students
were Ant to death by National
Guardsmen, were arrested
Tuesday.
Taken into custody on
warrants issued by a special state
grand jury which investigated
the Kent shootings were Alan
Canfon, 21, Barberton, Ohio;
Douglas C. Cormack, 20,
Willoughby, (Kuo; Larry Shut,
19, Cleiefand Heights, Ohio; and
Kenneth Hammond, 21, of
Mayfield Heights, Ohio.
THE ARKESTS brought to
seven the number of persons
taken in custody since the grand
jury mdicted 25 persons last
Friday after a month-long
investigation into the campus
shooting deaths last May 4.
Canfon suffered superficial

18 Make UF Hall Os Fame

By BECKY LLOYD
AKpftor Writer
Eighteen UF students have
been selected to the UF Hall of
Fame, the highest honor a
member of the student body can
attain, Jim Okula, Seminole
editor, said.
Hall of Fame members chosen
by a committee for this year are
Charlie Bmcfcms, Sherri Cox,
Mitch Dasher, Jessica
Everingham, Phyllis Gallub,
Ralph Ghtfefter, Rick Horder,
Sue Jacobs, Sue Johnson,
Marsha Kaufman, Don
Middlebrooks, Jim Okula, Brad
Raffle, Henry Solares, Dan
Stephens, Steve Uhlfelder, Jeff
Warren and Miles Wilkin.
Each student mist be in his
10th quarter of college or
higher, have attended the UF at
lease two quarters, have a 2.0
overall average, have excelled in
one major field of service to UF
and not be a previous member,
in order to be selected to Hall of
Fame.
Students were either
nominated by deans and
presidents of organizations or
submitted an application
themselves.
A committee of eight voting
members and an impartial
chairman considered all
applications equally. Each
application was read and re-read
to the committee, Okula said.
Okula refused to disclose
names of the committee
members.
THE
Copy Center
1718 W. Univ. Ave.
4{ Xerox 3{
Thesis at Dissertation
Specialists
Desks, Lamps, Files,
arid supplies available
376-9334 8on -9 pm

Four More Indicted At Kent

wounds of the wrist when
guardsmen opened fire during a
campus demonstration. Canfora,
charged with second degree riot,
also was indicted last month by
the regular Portage County
grand jury on narcotics charges.
Cormack, who had never
attended Kent State, was
charged with first degree riot,
interference with a fireman at
the scene of a fire and tossing
rocks at firemen.
SHUB, A FORMER Kent
student, was indicted on charges
of first and second degree riot
and an attempt to burn
property. Hammond, a junior at
Kent State, was charged with
second degree riot.
Craig Morgan of Upper
Arlington, Ohio, student body
president, was arrested Monday

The full number of available
positions in the Hall of Fame
was not filled. There were 25
members last year.
The committee saw fit to
chose only 18 students. They
were very selective and realized
the responsibilities of then thendecision.
decision. thendecision. They didnt feel that
there were 25 students who
deserved recognition, Okula
said.
A major consideration in the
University
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by Portage County sheriffs
deputies. His arrest touched off
a shock wave on the campus.
At a news conference
Tuesday, Morgan said students
were afraid to do anything for
the very reason they might harm
the case of those indicted.
Morgan, who said he was
advised by his attorneys not to
discuss his case, talked about the
role of Chicago Seven attorney
William Kunstler in a possible
defense of those who were
indicted.
WE ARE attempting to see
that people who need lawyers
are put in touch with those who
know lawyers, Morgan said.
Despite adverse publicity,
Mr. Kunstler is nonetheless
probably one of the best
attorneys in the nation.

choice was the extent of the
applicants service to the UF
outside of his major field,
according to Okula.
A students future service to
UF was also considered.
Nominations from the UF for
Whos Who were selected by the
committee and sent to the
national organization for
consideration. After the final
decision is made, UF will be
notified.
Airplane Rentals
1969 Cessna 150
$12.00/1 Hour
Piper J-3 SB.OO/Hour
Champion Citabria
$ll.OO/Hour
t09919999W199999999Â¥9l
Flying Hawks Corp.
Stengel Field 376-0011
5 minutes from Campus.

Kunstler spoke at Kent Monday
night and said the indictments
were a form of Mississippi
justice. He said he would send
attorneys to the campus to
coordinate a defense of those
indicted.

ELECTRONIC MUSIC
Concert with commentary by Reid Poole,
chairman, Department of Music
Thursday, October 22 from 4-5 p.m. in the Reitz
Union Music Listening Room
Admission is free; but due to limited seating, please
obtain a ticket from the librarian in the Music
Listening Room.
\ Pea Coats are in
Sfej and
Lichters
/ias em
IVM Sizes: 36-44
\ p I Navy Only
1 *3O
KULL MALL

Morgan emphasized that none
of the persons indicted to date
were required to accept
Kunstlers services.
The Kent campus was calm
Tuesday.



Honor: A Tradition Here

By LINDA CREESY
Alligator Staff Writer
(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first in a series of three
articles by Alligator staff writer
Linda Creesy dealing with the
Honor Court, honor system and
the honor code.)
Do you know what UFs
oldest and most preserved
tradition is?
The answer is the honor
system, which was established in
1914.
CHEATING, STEALING,
passing worthless checks and
ticket scalping for any
University function are the four
areas the system guards against.
The success of the system
primarily depends on each
member of the student body.
Basic principles included are
self-discipline as the greatest
builder of character,
responsibility as a prerequisite
of self-discipline, and that these
are essential to the highest type
of education. Each student takes
upon himself the responsibility
for his conduct.
The Honor Court is
responsible for informing all UF
J students of the purpose,
advantages and principles of the
honor system. Violations of the
code are reported to the court
by students, faculty or
administration members.
COURT MEMBERSHIP is
composed completely of
students. Chief member of the
court of the chancellor who is
responsible for maintaining and
enforcing the system. He and the
vice-chancellor determine the
degree of penalty to be leveled
at the convicted student.
These range from severe
reprimand or penalty hours to
suspension or expulsion.
Convicted students may appeal
to the Committee on Student
Conduct.
Other members of the court
staff include the attorney
general and his staff of
presenting counsel and the chief
jsb
11§B BBBBHBHBHBb^^h^HbB I^l
a 0140 W 0040011
Easy park right in front!
mum
BUCKET**
112 SW 34th St. 376-2431
: i

| IN DEPTH]
defense counsel and his staff of
defense counsel.
JUSTICES ARE elected from
the different colleges on campus
and the jury is picked from the
student body at random.
Court members inform their
constituents of the honor system
through orientation programs
given during Orientation Week,
high school discussions (by
request), talks to fraternities,
sororities and other
organizations on campus, and
brochures.
This year we are trying
harder to inform the student
body of the honor system, said
Dan Stephens, honor court
chancellor.
WE HAD AN article in the
orientation issue of The
Alligator, this summer. For the
first time, I had the opportunity
to speak at the Presidents
Welcome along with University
President Stephen C. OConnell
and Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder, Stephens said.
Uhlfelder and I sent a
prepared statement to all faculty
encouraging them to inform
their classes of the system,
Stephens said.
We are planning to speak to
the Comprehensive English
classes on Oct. 19, 20, 22 and
23, Stephens said.

I 'm '
II fW I
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! 94 W 0t o*Jr & - T*. JiP " §
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TWO SHOWS TONIGHT!
soo A 10:30pm AT THE RAT
per person
1 I
Box

K&,. 1 Ji ST.HSi
. r. -tjjKyy
HONOR SYSTEM
... is it just?
Rerouting For Constuction

By JEANINE HUTTO
Alligator Writer
Because of construction on
the new music building, Newell
Drive will be closed Thursday
and Friday from Stadium Road
to Inner Drive, and bus service
on Newell Drive will be
rerouted, according to Lee
Burrows, traffic and parking
coordinator.
Bus service on Newell Drive
will be rerouted Thursday and
Friday, and possibly Monday
and Tuesday, depending on the
weather, Burrows said.
BUS SERVICE for the red
bus to the Med Center will be

changed to run from campus
down 13th St. to Museum Road
(formerly Radio Road) and then
back to Newell Drive. The rest
of the route will remain the
same.
Bus service for the orange bus
will run from Newell Drive down
Museum Road, up 13th St., and
back to campus at Tigert Hall.
Neither of the blue bus routes
will be affected by the closing of
Newell Drive.
BECAUSE OF the detour, red
buses will run every 15 minutes
rather than every 10 minutes as
usual, according to Burrows.
There will be no schedule
change in the buses running to

Wednesday, October 21, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

the married housing areas.
Burrows said students who
normally board or get off buses
on Newell Drive should make
other arrangements to catch the
bus.
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Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 21,1970

Consumer Affairs Air Student \?ripes

By MARIAN JEDRUSIAK
Alligator Writ*
Have local merchants been giving you the run-around?
Maybe youve been having problems with rent deposits.
IF EITHER is the case, the place for you to air your
gripes is the SG Consumer Affairs Office located on the
third floor of the Reitz Union..
The office of consumer affairs is a new addition to SG.
Its purpose is to aid students who encounter any kind of
consumer difficulty.
THE WAY THE office works involves students first
approaching the staff with their problem. The consumer

BASAC
Senres As
Ombudsman
By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Writer
The Business Administration
Student Advisory Council
(BASAC), an outgrowth of the
Action Conference two years
ago, has successfully served as an
ombudsman between students
and faculty in the College of
Business Administration since
last February.
BASAC WAS set up by
students to better relations
between students and faculty,
BASAC member Glenn Warren
said.
The council was set up last
February and consists of two
representatives from each
department and two graduate
students.
If you have a problem,
Warren said, BASAC will listen
to your complaints and go to the
faculty members involved.
BASAC HAS WORKED to
improve communications within
the college in the following
ways.
We have worked to place
students on faculty
committees, Jerry Hermanson,
secretary, said.
We have a co-op program in
the mill now, Warren said.
Two students would share the
same job and each would rotate
working and studying each
quarter.
THE COUNCIL HAS
attempted to make changes in
the curriculum to make it more
relevant to the students, said
Warren. We are also attempting
to change the present system of
drop and add to make it more
appealing to the student.
The administration has been
very open-minded about the
whole thing, Warren said.
The formation of this council
was spurred on by Dean
Robert Lanzillotti, Hermanson
said. He was interested in
having students* voices made
known to the administration.
THE COUNCIL IS broken
down into specific committees
to work on individual problems.
It meets once a month or more
according to need, said Warren.
We want people to discover
that BASAC exists, that we have
done something for the student
body and .will continue to
function, Warren said.
The Business Administration
Student Advisory Council
(BASAC) will elect council
members on Wednesday, Oct.
28.
Students are self nominated
and must be in good standing
with the college. Applications
mast be in by Friday.

Pre-meds & Pre-dents
What is A.E.A.?
What is the new counseling
system?
Who is the chairman of U.F.s
admissions committee for
med school, for
dental school?
Find out Thursday, 7:3opm
in H-011, J. Hillis Miller
Health Center
-Refreshments will be served served

STEVENS
STUDIOS
OF BOSTON AND MAINE I
v *v H
* ...
has been selected as the I
official Portrait Photographer 1
for the 1971 Seminole
yearbook of the University of Florida. I
Senior and Greek portraits will be
taken October 6-23 in room 347 of
the J. Wayne Reitz Union.

affairs office then contacts the owner or the manager of
the establishment involved. From there the staff member
more or less plays it by ear.
The office also works with the department ot legal
affairs.
We have the power of 20,000 students, said
Schwartz, secretary of consumer affairs. We let the
students know what the story is, not to maliciously harm
die merchant, but only to let the students know the
truth.
WERE DOING this for no other reason than to let
students know the facts concerning these situations,
Schwartz added.
Some of the cases in which the consumer affairs office

has aided students include helping students with
apartment damage deposits, book store difficulties, and
unfair treatment with a guarantee for car repairs.
We havent done this on a wide scale due to the fact
that weve been trying to set up procedures and
consequently we felt we wanted to wait until we could do
a proper job, commented Schwartz.
Plans for this quarter include the placing of 13
consumer complaint boxes around campus. They will be
located in the dorm area offices, in front of Little Hall,
next to Library West, and hopefully in the married student
complexes.

1971 Seminole
On Sale At
Broward
4-7 p.m.
.... ~ -..r~. - Vmi *3m,



DUs Project Hope
Means No HC Float

By STEVESTRANG
Amstant Assignments Editor
There will be no homecoming
float this year for Delta Upsilon
(DU).
The fraternity is scraping its
plans to enter a float in the
homecoming parade in order to
donate the money to Project
Hope, to fit in with this years
Gator Growl theme, Hope for
America.*
PROJECT HOPE, begun by
comedian Bob Hope, operates
the medical ship Hope, and
domestic projects helping
Indians and Mexican Americans.
DU is donating the money
they would have spent on their
homecoming float to Hope, and
are encouraging other
organizations to do the same
We thought there should be
a better way to use funds to
make the Gator Growl theme of
Hope for America more
relevant, Ralph Childs, DU
Project Hope co-chairman said.
A LOT OF TIMES
fraternities put S6OO into a float
only to bum it the next night. It
seems like a waste of money,
he said.
We are in no way trying to
boycott Homecoming. We feel
Homecoming traditions are
imperative, Dave Quackenbush,
DU Project Hope co-chairman,
said.
What we are trying to do,
however, is add a little meaning
to Homecoming, he said.
DELTA UPSILON IS hoping
to raise SIO,OOO for Project
Hope. The money will be
divided among three levels.
One third of the money will
go to the medical ship Hope.
One third will go to aid Hope
domestic projects among Indians
and Mexican Americans.
One third of the money will
be contributed to the North East
Medical Clinic, a volunteer
community medical service in
Gainesville.
The DU project has already
drawn the support of Bob Hope;
Mayor Perry McGriff; Lester
Hale, vice-president in charge of
student affairs; and Dr. Paul
Elliot, assistant dean at the UF
medical school.
THE FRATERNITY hopes to
get support from fraternities and
sororities by encouraging them
to construct less expensive floats
this year, and contributing the
money to Hope.
They also hope to set up
buckets outside Florida Field
the day of Homecoming so
alumni and students can
contribute to the project. This
must be cleared first through the
Athletic Board of Directors,
however.
Delta Delta Delta sorority has
been working closely with DU
on the project. Tri-Delt plans to
host a benefit dinner for the
project Oct. 30. They will also
Typewriter Sale
Oct 19 to 23 only
All Popular Makes
of Manual Machines
fto(.s6&s6
ON SALE
$49. so
HOK piWU 3O ***
Klaars 604 N. Mel*
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sell tootsie roll pops to raise
money for Hope.
OTHER GREEK houses
supporting Project Hope include
Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Chi, Phi
Sigma Sigma, Delta Phi Epsilon,
Alpha Omicron Pi, Alpha
Epsilon Phi, Sigma Kappa, Phi
Mu, Zeta Tau Alpha, and Kappa
Alpha Theta.
Florida Blue Key, the
Methodist Student Center, and
the Catholic Student Center are
also supporting the project.

I Heres all you have to do to insure \
the fall of America;
til Phoenix
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Member. The ptioenix ctmueiwet J

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TOM KENNEDY
DISCUSSING PROJECT HOPE
... Vice President for Student Affairs Lester Hale, Dave Quackenbush, Ralph Childs, Dr. Retort S. Eliot

WEDNESDAY

Page 7



Page 8

I. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 21,1070

EDITORIAL
Silent Majority, 1
Universities, 0
*
The State Grand Jury of Ohio has certainly given the
Silent Majority what it wants to hear.
The jury Friday handed down indictments on 25 persons
in a special probe of the rioting at Kent State last spring.
Important, certainly. But what we believe to be more
significant, the grand jury also exonerated the National
Guard of the fatal shooting of four students and put the
blame on the university.
The students died, the grand jury wants us to believe, due
to permissiveness and laxity in discipline on the part of
the Kent State administration and not because a handful of
guardsmen lost their cool and began firing.
Okay, the deaths may not have been the entire fault of
the National Guard. Obviously, guardsmen believed their
lives to be in danger. But to put the entire burden of guilt
on the university is incredible.
The Presidents Commission on Campus Unrest, in its
investigation of the Kent State incident, said it found no
evidence of snipers. Some guardsmen had claimed there
were snipers.
The Presidents Commission on Campus Unrest released
in September found, among other things that:
Too many students have acted irresponsibly and even
dangerously in pursuing their stated goals and expressing
their dissent. Too many law enforcement officers, have
responded with unwarranted harshness and force in seeking
to control disorder. Actions and inactions -of
government at all levels have contributed to campus unrest.
The words of some political leaders have helped to inflame
it. Law enforcement officers have too often reacted ineptly
or overreacted. At times, their response has degenerated
into uncontrolled violence.
We cannot argue with this.
The state grand jury of Ohio agreed in part it blamed
students. But it chose to ignore that law 'enforcement
officers the National Guard were also to blame.
The trend in this country is anti-university, and the grand
jurys findings reflect this.
The Silent Majority can again relax. The blame rests
elsewhere.
[other colleges comment] |
Fools Medicine
Lets face it: drugs are very much on the campus scene
and just about anybody can get them. Thats the serious
past. An experimental smoke is one thing; entrusting ones
life to a stranger is quite another.
Many members of the University community find it hard
to resist the constant temptation to explore the mysterious
world of Psychedelia, and a joint of marijuana usually
satisfies their curiosity. Others, usually at the urging of
friends, feel compelled to go one step beyond and see
whats behind all those weird names like acid, mescaline,
THC, MDA, and the like.
The law is slowly coming around to a realistic stance on
drugs, going a little easier on the young experimenter and
putting the emphasis where it belongs: on the makers and
pushers of street drugs and the fools who) buy them.
The pusher can no longer be regarded as harmless, if
youre too smart to buy, dont just look the other way; he
may kill someone else. Ohio State Lantern
p i

Alligator Staff
Denise Valiants Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
Steve Strang
v Assistant Assignment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
X.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

Law n Order Time

Law n order again. I thought
I would step up and offer Spiro
Agnew and Bruce Alper some
solutions to this countrys
skyrocketing crime problem.
First of all, do you remember
several years ago when everyone
was raising hell about Earl
Warrens Supreme court
mollycoddling criminals
(theres a word worthy of Spiro
himself)? All the ol right
wingers were just jumping up
and down about turning
murderers loose on the street
because some poor, beleaguered
cop had failed to observe a
minor technicality, like
refraining from beating the guy
over the head while he signed a
confession.
Mapp, Mallory, Escobedo all
landmarks from that same
commie court that brought you
desegregation. But what all the
salivating hardhats dont realize
is that those provisions are more
likely to help Joe Citizen from
being railroaded to jail than to
spring Charlie Criminal.
Some facts, law n order fans:
Court rules do not cause
crime. People do not commit
crimes because of decisions
restricting police questioning or
because they think they might
not be convicted. Ramsey
Clark, Deputy Atty. Gen., 1965.
The McNabb-Mallory rule
which excludes all testimony
elicited during a period of
unreasonable dely before trial) is
of importance in less than 5 per

Student Publications
Business Staff
S
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82. 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
H9V-J (Kj.:* ,-t ir.OUi > jin
To reach Circulation Pepartm?nt,
call: 392-1619

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief

Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

Ken McKinnon
News Editor

JOHN PARKER

cent of our criminal cases.
Oliver Gasch, former U.S.
Attorney, 1963.
After McNabb-Mallory the
police in the District of
Columbia were making better
cases by carrying on more
extensive investigations prior to
the arrest of suspect.
Commissioners Committee on
Police Arrests for Investigation,
1962.
Concerning the Miranda
decision (holding that unless
certain safeguards are observed,
a confession will not be valid):
The murder of Patrolman
James T. Morrow resulted in
Philadelphia police coming up
with three separate solutions to
the crime. They obtained
confessions from three totally
unconnected individuals, two of
who were tried years apart. In
each trial an innocent person
was convicted. Edward D.
Radin, The Innocents, 1964.
Gideon V. Wainright, (right to
have a lawyer): Innocent
persons are sometimes even
often arrested. The need for
counsel is equally great for the
innocent as well as for the
guilty. There is coercion in the
place of interrogation; the
absense of a friendly face. It is
not unheard of for friendless and
desperate people to confess
under such circumstances, even
though they are innocent.
Harris B. Steinberg, New York
Criminal Attorney, 1961.
Ok, court decisions do not
cause crime. Wiretapping the
NAACP does not fight it. What
are the answers?
Legalize and tax gambling.
Its the profits from illegal
gambling that finances organized
crime, according to Edwyn
Silberling, former New York
Assistant D.A. People are going
to gamble, period. By making it
$ * der to presejyeihe
Victorian conscience you merely
drive it underground, making it a

* Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor

Loretta Tennant
News Editor

feeding ground for all kinds of
undesirable undergrowth. Why
not make it legit and clean it up,
then tax the hell out of it like all
other luxuries? Build schools,
not Mafia palaces.
Legalize prostitution,
marijuana, and pornography. In
short, do away with crimes
without victims. They are the
province of the clergy. J. Edgar
has yet to save a soul.
Spend money on cops. Get
the rednecks, sadists, and
authority-crazed nuts away from
the clubs and guns. A decent
salary would be a first step
toward making law enforcement
a respected career, along with
improving the general
intelligence of a not-too-bright
group of crime-stoppers. When
you need to beat confessions out
of people you are not Sherlock
Holmes.
Spend money on
rehabilitation of Juvenile
Delinquents. As far back as 1965
the Congressional Record
reported that 40 per cent of all
arrests for serious crimes
involved people under 18. Only
about 9% receive
institutionalization, which in
most cases means detention and
abuse rather than rehabilitation.
* *
Bitter pill to swallow, law n
order fans. Its going to take
some gumption to admit that
dirty pictures and grass are not
responsible for our soaring
crime rate. Its going to take
some serious re-evaluation of
what is actually a crime and
what is not. And then its going
to take some serious cash. Not
for mace and cattle prods, but
for better police and modem
rehabilitation centers.
And after all that,.if J. Edgar
thinks we can nail a few hundred
criminals by wiretapping
somebodys what the
have



Parties Dominate

Even though last weeks
Student Senate elections lacked
the drama and firework's of the
spring general elections, a few
definite conclusions can be
drawn from them.
Focus Partys solid victory
(Focus won 27 seats of the 40,
Student Freedom took seven
and independent candidates six)
further illustrates the power of
the block vote. From that we
must conclude that the key to
electorial success still lies with
the Greeks with their money and
ready-made organization.
THE 2,700-ODD votes cast
last Wednesday were a few
hundred more than the previous
year, but still far short of the
7,500 cast in recent spring
presidential elections. No matter
how you look at it, those figures
are terribly sad compared to the
almost 20,000 students entitled
to vote.
Os those few who do vote, the
majority are Greeks who tend to
vote along the party line
adopted by their respective
house politicos. House treasuries
still provide the vast majority of
party funds (though this is much
less a factor in the home-made
style fall campaigns). The
channels of quick
communication which exist in
fraternity and sorority houses
have yet to be matched in any
independent organization.
This situation, of course,
serves only to enhance the
influence of UFs self-styled
political bosses.
THE OUT-OF-PROPORTION
strength of the Greeks is
permitted only because of the
general apathy of John Q.
Student.

Boycott Mall
For POW Stand

Joe Lichter, the president of
the Gainesville Mall Association,
refused last week to allow
members of the Air Force ROTC
unit to collect signatures on Mall
property tor petitions to North
Vietnam requesting humane
treatment of American POWS.
Then he threatened to
withdraw all advertising from
the news media which
discovered the facts if that
media made it public.
SOME AMERICAN prisoners
have been rotting in the Hanoi
Hilton for almost eight years.
There is little any of us can do,
but requesting permission to
collect signatures on petitions is
apparently asking too much of
the Gainesville Mall Association
to do for American Pows.
It might interfere with
business.
Oh, the Mall Association is
patriotic in its way. It is the first
to decorate its stores for the
Fourth of July, sometime in
mid-June, to remind us that
buying from its stores is
patriotic.
These stores are first to
remind us they stand four square
behind God, motherhood, apple
pie, and free enterprise.
THE PRAISE those marching
off to war and condemn hippies,

I KEN
DRIGGS
Student Freedom Party put
on a strong grass roots push the
week prior to the election and
their efforts caused a lot of
bated breath in some parts of
the Focus camp.
But come elections day, those
same people slipped back into
their historic apathetic ways and
Student Freedom struggled by
with only seven victories. (This
compared with the six won by
independent candidates who
enjoyed no party backing).
Student Freedoms sweep of
the three Senate seats in
freshman and sophomore
dominated Murphree Area may
indicate some hope for their
political style in the future,
however.
If you are willing to place any
stock in history, Focus Party
will give way to new political
affiliations among the Greeks by
spring. Few political parties
carry over from year to year.
BUT UNLESS independent
students choose to involve
themselves much more than in
the past, those new political
parties will represent, once
again, Greeks running politics.
By the way, only 2,700 of
you out there have honestly
given yourselves the right to
gripe. If you didnt vote and find
yourself complaining about
Student Government in the next
few months, youve not been
fair to yourself or to the student
leaders you choose to criticize.

, .mini nu n I I
' V ; XJ.v jKSf
FRED ls|
[|{ vollrathJ
\'
commies, perverts, and hang the
flag out on the right days.
Good for business, you know.
But, asking them to let ROTC
cadets collect signatures
requesting humane treatment of
American POWs is asking too
much of them.
I am ashamed and sick.
Business does not go on as
usual for hundreds of POWs and
their wives and children.
I can understand that the
merchants in the Mall believe
that petition gathering by one
group might set a precedent.
TOO BAD.
Young Americans for
Freedom, the nations largest
rightwing student organization,
hopes to convince the Mall
Association of the error of its
ways.
Young Americans for
Freedom urges citizens of
Gainesville who care about our
men in Hanoi to boycott Matt
Merchants until they have a
change of heart or respond ~to
the only thing they seem to care
about, the loss of a dollar.

I 1
\ v vkO'- .x #; ; s-\ -*>7'
...
~~hiii.ii
READERS FORUM
7T7' ttt "'. 1 cSsf'

Mor* Classics
MR. EDITOR:
Normally I agree with
Alligator editorials. But after
reading the inappropriately
titled Grow Up, I felt it was
my duty to vigorously protest.
I strongly feel that one should
be able to listen to whatever
kind of music he wishes. You
supposedly defend that right,
but instead suggest that
everybody should listen to hard
rock all the time. There is
entirely too much of that junk
around already. And the
alternative to it is
country-western music, which,
in my opinion, is even worse.
Contrary to what you say, no
other station in the area plays
the type of music on Radio
Center. I happen to greatly
enjoy the type of music which
you put down (and I happen to
be under twenty-one). Though I
am in a small minority, I feel
that those who do enjoy relaxing
music should have the
opportunity to hear it if they
wish; for WRUF-FM is the only
radio station around here that
plays that kind of music.
In fact, my suggestions for
improvement of the station are
to have more, not less
Mantovani, Mozart, and
Broadway!
LEE HUDSON
Educational Radio
MR. EDITOR:
t
The UF student body receives
so little exposure to music
culture (i.e., the orchestra,
opera, light musicals) that
replacing the classical music
programs from WRUF-FM
would be doing an injustice to
the meaning of education. The
rationale of the Editorial Board
seems in opposition to their
commonly heard cry of
toleration for all viewpoints.
They do not approve of the
programming from Radio Center
thus it should be completely
replaced with their idea of
student-oriented music.
Most of the students at the
UF will graduate and enter
professions in which even a
passing familiarity with classical
music will never be a handicap.
Ask anyone who has ever

attended a meeting of
professional people how many
informal discussions he
overheard on hard rock?
Perhaps a compromise in the
programming would be more in
order. Include more folk, hard
rock and progressive jazz yet
preserve the basic Radio Center
programming format. The
classical music could be replaced
on Friday night, for example,
with more contemporary sounds
which could be used as
background music at parties and
such.
A student attends college to
broaden his knowledge, not to
narrow it by studying only that
which he considers important.
The students receive little
enough exposure to fine art
culture- do not reduce it
further.
Perhaps it is time the Alligator
editors grow up and stop trying
to impose their ideas on all the
students. What is more
student-oriented than attempts
at educating students?
FRANK F. DONIVAN
Homecoming
MR. EDITOR;
Miss Hougland comes across
as being very cute in her
reference to Goofy Uffie and the
Fat Boys football team; very
cute but not very perceptive.
She is correct in stating that
everyone needs a little
relaxation. And this is all that
she is correct in.
When Steve Uhlfelder plays
football it costs this university
nothing. When the kids all play
Homecoming it costs the
university $25,000. Do you see
any difference Miss Hougland?
BRUCE SCHWACK
Kappa Sig
MR. EDITOR:
In regard to the article in last
weeks Alligator, concerning the
suspension of Kappa Sigmas
Charter, we feel there were
certain shortcomings made in
presenting the facts.
Firstly, the blacks were not a
factor in the closing of the house
this quarter. The blacks at
formal rush were not UF
students, and, had Chris
Tompkins, Kappa Sigma
comptroller, asked them to

Wednesday, October 21.1970. The Florida Alligator,

leave, he would have had that
right.
Secondly, we find it hard to
believe that the readers of the
Alligator are seething with
righteous indignation over the
fact that us fratty boys did
not get our carpeting.
What IS important is the
moral destruction in this house
of those ideals of brotherhood
that the fraternity concept is
founded upon. The brothers
who returned to work for the
house this fall still cling to those
beliefs. But others were content
to indulge in back-stabbing
tactics, power politics, and
personal vendettas.
Clandestine meetings were
held by certain brothers living
outside the fraternity house with
Comptroller Chris Tompkins and
Alumnus Advisor, Dr. Shaw
Grigsby giving full support.
These meetings paved the way
for the surprise visit by National
President Horton F. Early and
the following coup, in which the
charter was suspended, the
officers dismissed, and a puppet
government installed.
At this moment, we here at
Kappa Sigma fraternity house
await the decision on our
character and right to remain
members of this illustrious
national organization.
Should the students on this
campus ever view the typical
Kappa Sigma strutting across
campus, sporting his neatly
pressed Gant Shirt, closely
cropped hair, gold cup socks,
and his I Like Spiro button,
they will know that we have lost
the battle.
TERRENCE J. WATTERSON, 3BA
DENNIS SILVERMAN, 3JM
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Bs typed, signed,
double-spaced and not oxossd
300 words.
Not bo signed with a
pseudonym.
- 0 Hava addresses and
tslaphona numbers of writers.
Names wiH be withhold only if
writer shows Just causa. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
letters for spaoo.
Writers may submit longer
sways, columns or letters to be
considered for use as "Speaking
Out" columns. 'Any writer
interested in tUDminifiQ a rapivar
column is asked to contact the
editor and be prepared to diow
samples of Ms work.

Page 9



I, Tha Florida AlMflator. Wadnesday, October 21,1970

Page 10

GIRLS, do you have headaches this exciting remedy...
from not knowing JpL.. ..Jj;-:-,.,
what to wear?....
%**%*, PHOTOS COPE-SURRENCY


' if
FIGURE FAIR
Trisha has that lovely look of elegance when she wears the 3
piece Nylon Crepe-set negUee set in blue trimmed in beige lace
at the neck and sleeve cuffs. The gown also has the trim of lace
at the neck and down the front. The bikini to match of self
material, price 20.00. sizes pet. small & medium.
wtfKKt BMHMWS
41$$* imm
i5Sk
MMliNir A
miN)gS j^
ML r -' ''
tj Wm
jpl f
fek Bhtfe v
mawam*

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JMr .jjM

* *.
Ofl^
' v .'jjlsf
**
Vj^p

WILSONS
-
wjgjlK 1L
ft Charles Casey wears a corduroy weekender by H-I-S. Flagged
pockets and the fashion right belt are all buttoned, keeping the
lines grim and neat.
Flare slcaks that should be in every wardrobe. Exciting
because the fit and styling is typically Farah. In Wilsons Mens
I shop. Street floor.
i||ss
WM
if.
, " 4i
H
L.l
fl / >s : I



Hw
SILVERMANS
This navy crepe dress with a colorful sleeveless plaid coat can
be a great addition to fashion wardrobe. The coat buttons up
the front and has a groovy belt. The coat can co-ordinate with
slacks and other tops. Model Karen.
;
* ... m
'
. || v *% Snj ffl BSb
I |B W |
- lir f : jjjkjU .£
pppfc
SUSAN SCOTT %
Come in and put us on Modeled by Judy
* *

% %

|r a T
SEARS
THE GREATEST GEAR FOR MESSIN AROUND! Wide leg
frflna teamed up with cotton knit tops add a pea-jacket on
chilly days for the gung-ho look. Modeled by Vivian for Sears
Junior Bazaar.

41
t
j| I
li::* K :9 ; §1 j ji§!.
i§!. ji§!. J I
1 II H| 19 H

B
MAAS BROTHERS
Black is back in this Import from England. The button front
midi can be dressed up or down wahtever the occasion. With
matching pants this sensational ensemble can be found in our
Jr. Terrace dept.

V£ fix; o *.-''
M-Jm.
JHbi
v
* x.'' ffiEP gaag^v.-x N > .* jt
mv tI ... lip f flttll/ |
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viaj^PPIIMKtBiHWmBSWfe
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tl'£*? \>~- S'-, :- >/ .'.' i-y-- .: -- in ~ai ,
% v .v #s * li
.*:i%h >
' ..- .! ..,; " ,. c-
BELK LINDSEY
Jackie models latest from Bobby Brooks The Indian print
fashion skirt and complementary volero vest.

I
HE H^HH^pKHEHEjj^Ha3|p|p :
Mp:> GjaFs*>- v .-. ...,
'US
S-.viik.
COLONY SHOPS
How about this smart burgundy knit Sharon wears with black
heels by Jama di Roma.

Wednesday, October 21,1970, Ths Florida AlUtor,

fpio THESE INTf6tI£NTS: I 7]
1 1 Hi SUSAw SCOTT I IV|4As Q#OTH£R& iFr. U)n.Spw2sl
I Iff. Scut's 1 ***** in.Fiw^f^AHy
ll^^ |||| 1 1 FT* COtoMV *H* I SILUE^V>AMS

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
RCA portable stereo 6 speaker S7O
call Jim Stephens 376-4734,
392-7703 leave message (A-st-20-p)
Cassette player recorder Am FM 75
wt. Amp. 21 heavy tapes 2 musical
Instrument speakers 2ftx4ft hand
crafted Ph. 373-2756 after 6:00
(A-st-19-p)
I WASN'T A i
fES^£^jM3|
I MMMxIfHXk I fl ADM 1.50
I N*o# u4*. IS AVm.M.W
I PENTHOUSE 2 I HANG UP
Mention tMi ad for tpoeW Mriy bird prieo of 35 cams tvwy
nito before 7 PJW. and SM. & Sun. Matinee*. Regular Price-
MAO Penthouee number 2 $1.50 Pen thou number 3

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if mote
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add*s.2s. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Daodfim -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

'"f
NAME DATE DATECLASSIFICATION
CLASSIFICATION DATECLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN
far sale (conwcutw.) STUDENT.! PHONE
u n 1 day
for rent U
q wanted O ays ADDRESS -f" l
n help warned O 3 days (*lO% discount)
D autos D 4 days (*lO% discount) C |jy STATE ZIE
n personal n 5 days and over
_ . (*20% discount)
lost-found i 0-
o ***** WORDING
t

FOR SA LE
STUDENT SPECIAL clean, adjust,
lubricate & install New Ribbon on
your portable standard typewriter
then guarantee It .for 30 days all for
JUST $14,501 Limited time only. JR
Office Furniture & Equip. Co., 620
S. Main St., Phone 376-1146.
(A-24t-13-c)
ADORABLE CHIHUAHUA puppies.
5 weeks old $25 each call 372-1790
after 5:00 (A-st-19-p)
Honda SSO 1967 new tags, new
helmet. S9O 378-5105 or 372-2900
student (A-st-21-p)
1969 Yamaha 250 DTI enduro 2000
miles excellent condition 1240 SW
14th St 378-5279 S6OO student
(A-4t-21-p)
8-track TAPE CARTRIDGES Save
ss. 2 of your albums recorded for
less than $3 Inc tape per album
pick-up delivery 378-5916 4-8 PM
(A-st-21-p)
Craig 4 and 8 track car stereo, 25
tapes, 4 speakers, and home
converter. Mu. sell at once SBO or
best offer ca. Dan 373-2271
(A~3t-22-p)
TRIUMPH 250 trophy model 1968
good condition $425.00 5500 miles
also Honda 90 scrambler 1967
SIIO.OO Phone 376-5798 (A-3t-22-p)

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 21,1970

Page 12

FOR SA LE
DON'T merely brighten your carpets
... Blue Lustre them eliminate
rapid resolllng. Rent electric
shampooer SI.OO. Electric shampooer
now available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-tfC)
FREE GUITAR LESSON meet Bob
Zuber, teacher, performer, and friend
here for 3 years. Finger style
specialist Call soon 378-3538
(A-St-23-p)
4 Fla. Tenn. football tickets call
376-9588 after 6 PM (A-3t-23-p)
Left-handed guitarists for sale a 3
month old custom made left-handed
gretsch tennesean substantial price
reduction call 372-1031 after 5
(A-3t-23-p)
United Audio Dual 1009 turntable
with Shure super-track cartridge plus
extra supertrackabllity stylus
SIIO.OO or best offer phone
373-2871 (A-3t-23-p)
New Akal Tape recorder. Makes 8
track cartridges. 16 cart, and tapes.
$375 or make offer. Call 373-3537
ask for Pat (A-4t-23-p)
Two NEW 40 watt Pioneer Spkrs 12
woofer 8 ohms $175 or best offer
walnut cabinets. 373-3537
(A-3t-23-p)
Bob cats, coons, skunks, ferrets,
squirrels, monkeys, parrots, hawks,
ducks, foxes, snakes, turtles, for sale,
trade or we will buy call 475-2546 or
475-2181 local. (A-10t-6-p)
Scuba gear, complete outfit, US
divers tank with j-value, callpso
regulator backpack, wetsuit, fins,
mask and knife $125 phone
378-7279 Jim (A-lt-23-p)
Airline solid state tape recorder full
size speaker In cover portable with
mikes looks great perfect new 265
now 75 Jean 378-0665 anytime
(A-2t-23-p)
Schwinn racer 3 speed 9 months old
with baskets and lock-cost $76.00
new will sell for $50.00 378-8936
(A-lt-23-p)
Girls bicycle for sale her name Is
Clarabelle used, 24 baby blue will
sell for sls. Call or come by: Ellen
378-2878, Landmark Apt. number
62. (A-lt-23-p)
Beautiful Irish Setter puppy female 7
months AKC all shots Wormed call
373-3435 after 6:30 PM (A-st-123-p)
1969 KAW Mach 111 500 cc excellent
condition with 1970 wiring kit good
miles $760.00 Ph. Tom Shires
462-2082 (A-10t-18-p)

| see PHIL j
I at Gator Growl j
j tryouts. Tuesday, j

To- Be VWng, Gifted, md Black
The J.Wayne Reitz Union ia bringing TO BE YOUNG,
GIFTED, AND BLACK to the University of Florida. The
play is the work of Lorraine Hansberry, who also wrote
RAISIN IN THE SUN. James Baldwin hiu said of the play,
Never before, in the history of the American theatre, had so
much of the truth of black peoples lives been seen on the
Stge November 5,1970
8:30 p.m.
University Auditorium
tickets go on sale on Oct. 26 at 12:00 noon at the Reitz
W Union Box QIIMUHO nd 02.50 for students 02.00 and W M
53.50 .or non^pf

FOR SALE
YAHAMA ENDURO 1970 250 great
woods or st high fender trail sprocket
bullet tailllte extras $650 firm.
DAVE 376-7146 after 5 PM
(A-3t-22-p)
BSA 650+ custom chopper w/class.
New engln. Xlnt condition. Lots of
chrome guaranteed to eat stock
machines. $650 also have 70 ossa
stilletto 5 dirt bike 250 cc very fast
Ph 378-7903 FOR RENT
Sublet beautiful 2-bdr 2-bath Point
West apt Jan 1. Move In Dec 15. Call
376-4219 or 372-3126. (B-st-20-p)
For rent or sale 12x60 mobile home
central air &. heat, two bedroom, two
baths, carpeting real nice call
373-1706 (B*3t-22-p)
Room two blocks from campus Jr.
Sr. Grads, only S3BO + V* util, for
remainder of school year Ph.
378-8390 ask for Art (B-3t-21-p)
APT-furnished, alr-cond: couple only
no pets, children. Lease Nov. I thru
August. Near Unlv. P.O. on 3rd Ave.
Call Coy Thomas 372-9569.
(B-3t-23-p)
roomate needed 3 br house near sin
city private room 50 mo privacy and
good liberal people call dave & norm
378-9057 late after 10 such a deal
(B-3t-23-p)
WANTED
Wanted Now! 2 Male Roommates
Landmark Apt number 119,47.50 A
Month Call 378-5946, Ask for John
or Wayne. Ac, Heated, pool.
Dishwasher (C-st-19-p)
1 female roommate to share 2
bedroom apt. for winter quarter.
Village Park number 74 Call
373-3758 or come by. 48.00/mo. +
utilities. (C-3t-21-p)
Wanted Now 1 Female Roommate
for Landmark Apt. 120, 47.50 a
month Call 373-3756, Ask for Joan
or Jean AC, Heated, pool, dishwasher
(C-st-19-p)
Male roommate wanted starting
winter quarter. Call 392-0470 until 5.
Trailer located at mobiler trailer park
2925 S.W. 28 Pi. (old Archer rd.)
(C-3t-19-p)

WANTED
Female roommate for La Mancha
apt. Own bedroom availably Nov I or
sooner really good people please call
378*9448 Oct. rent paid (C-3t-21-p)
Wanted: 1 or 2 female roommates for
THE PLACE. 85. Dollars each month
Includes utilities. You have own
bedroom Call 378-2911 now
(C-3t-2 1-p)
EX MUSICIANS! Got a used amp
you want to sell? Call 372-1774
(C-2t-22-p)
Listeners wanted: Will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Susan between 8
and 5 for appointment. 392-2049
(C-10t-22-p)
Female roomate Wanted. $57 month
plus ft utilities. Conveniently located
across from Tlgert Hall. Call
373-1108. (C-3t-21-p)
NEED MONEY? I need student
tickets to auburn game PHONE
378-0495 (C-st-22-p) __
Motion picture to be filmed in
central Fla. need 300 people all types
Info write C.O.L.E. P.O. Box 364
Sliver Spr. FI. 32688 (C-2t-23-p)
Roommate wanted to share two
bedroom house near mall own
bedroom. SSO per month plus
utilities 805 N.W. 33rd Ave 376-5774
(C-lt-23-p)
Wanted ride for two to Knoxville this
weekend, up Frl night, back Sun.
Happy to share driving and expenses.
Call evenings 378-3803 (C-lt-123-p)
help wanted
Stutterers wanted for an auditory
feedback study. Will pay you SB.OO
please call Michelle Jensen Evenings
378-0104 Days 392-2046
(E-10t-15-p)
HONDA MECHANIC to work
afternoons & evenings. Stop by and
see Steve at the CYCLE WORKS
1220 S. Main (E-3t-21-p)
Unusual Part Time Job Male Jr. or Sr.
Work 12 hrs. Per week. $50.00 salary
plus borjs. Average SIOO.OO per
week. S*e Mr. Ashley, Holiday Inn
Midtown, Thursday, Oct. 22, at
12:30 or 1:30, only.
AUTOS
Volvo, 6 mo. old, blue, $2400. Call
372-0947 or 392-1479. (G-st-22-p)
1967 GTX, Plymouth. Top notch
custom street car. Candy-apple,
metal-flake paint. Will trade for VW
or Porsche. Phone 376-7113.
(G-st-19-p)
LARGEST STOCK of USED
IMPORTS In Nth. CENTRAL
FLORIDA! HARFRED AUTO
IMPORTS, 1946 N. Main 378-7085.
(G-tfc)
_ ~ j v
66 GTO 389 3 2s 4 speed 49000
miles Mag wheels & new tires very
quick seeing Is believing call Ron
372-4161 309 SW 16 Ave apt 253
(G-4t-20-p)
1968 MG midget great condition
drives and looks like a new car Inside
and out. Tapedeck and road lamps
included phone 373-2587 to see car
(G-3t-22-p)
70 Charger RT, 440-6 brl, 4 spd, disc
brks, ps, 4:10 gear, blue with blk
vinyl rs, blk Int., loaded with extras,
exc. cond, list was S4BOO, will sell for
$3450. Call 392-7714 (G-st-21-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
1968 Opel kadet new clutch; fresh
tires: over 30 mpg; fair condition:
SBOO 373-3180 ask for Dan
(G-3t-22-p)
66 Corvair 3 speed, runs great, new
paint Job S4OO call 378-8528
(G-4t-23-p)
1956 Chevy 4 dr. real good condition
6 cyl. automatic must sell $250.00
LaMancha Apts. Apt. number 3 see
Rod or call 378-0649 (G-4t-21-p)
Bug Eye Sprite-Buy one get one free.
One Just painted to drive. One for
Darts. S4OO. Call Claudia Schilling 8
to 5 392-2886, After 5 376-4602
(G-st-23-p)

r STCAK SHftKC
I Student Special
(With The Coupon) |
OOr Regular 93< Steakburger i
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
I SI.OB Value Only 90{ lus tax |
i Steak n Shake 1
IJ6W ____________ JGqinesville a j
OiASS IS OUR Bll W0&
CARS TRUCKS BUSES
SKOAL ATTENTION TO INSUMNCE CUUMS
IMBMBIATI WSTAAAATIOM WMi BTIMATIS ftCK-CS A UVEW
I 376-2558 I
P MO AMSWK CAU IBWPtHCK jWMBI
111 HW. 49T.. lAIT WH AX.L PPOT, f*. SOX is 4 941H8V1U.1
r Todays |
more for your money meal I
moisorrs
CAFETERIA I
WEDNESDAYS I
| SAVORY BEEF STEW | I
i! r 79< II
§ j THURSDAYS FEATURE j | I
| PORK CUTLET PARMESAN) I
1 I WITH OOA V I
| SPAGHETTI 7/>
LUNCH: tl HI 2 SUPPER:4:3OW 8 FREE PARKING I
moisons I
COFETERIfI beyond comparison!
2620 N .W. 13th Street in the Gainesville

, Xv!vX.l /Xv!v!v!vXv f* .v.v.v...v.v.v
AUTOS
67-MGB new in 68, new transmission
new batteries, good condition 32000
ml. Need money now, reflects
reasonable price slls. call 378-3972
Pax (G-st-23-p)
Y Buy a new car when you can get an
almost new one for V* the price 68
DART only 19150 ml exel. cond best
offer $1195 Gregg 373-1162
(G-st-23-p)
PERSONAL
LILAH SINGS ROCK 1120 S. W.
FIRST AVENUE SEEK (J-2t-24-p)

Wednesday, October 21,1970, The Florida Alligator,

t e,e_e_e_JA^W.V W^V /tfWVMWWVI#WMWiftf|
' ! §jMila mm JA ! VAV.'
PERSONAL
Coeds Facial Hair lemused'ww
fast tow cost gentle hair FWffiap
Edmund Dwyer elect rotogtat 102 W,
2nd Ave. Call 372-0039 for appC.
(3-32t-137-p)
STEVE CARES about your HONDA
see him at the CYCLE WORKS 1220
S Main open 3 until 8 p.m. Better
service for lessll! (J-st-21-p)
Words spoken In the softness of the
moon are easily forgotten under the
harshness of the sun Love
Anyone (J-lt-23-p)
Do you know local, state, or national
people that you would like to hear
speak on campus? The union
program office needs Interested
students to run a speaker series. Call
392-1655 (J-3t-22-p)
Is New Delhi Delicatessen really
going to start a free delivery soon?
Could you dig It? Can you dig It? I
mean, like Its really too much 11
(J-lt-23-p)
FREE GUITAR LESSON meet Bob
Zuber, teacher, performer and friend
here for 3 years. Finger style
specialist Call soon 378-3538
(J-st-23-p)
Samson tutors will now meet with
Pat Quigley Wed. nltes, 7:30 In Reitz
Union room 357. Meetings no longer
at Pats house (J-lt-23-c)
The fat-cats take care of Claude.
Askew needs your help! Send
contributions to Askew-Adams
Campaign Fund, PO Box 223,
Gainesville, or call 373-1427 for
Information (Paid for by Students for
Askew) (J-st-21-p)
LD-The time draws nearer. Boy are
you gonna be suprlsed. I love you
more than I did yesterday.
Countdown zero minus 5 Franl
(J-st-23-p)
LOST & FOUND
Pair of gold rim glasses, octagonal
frame. If not broken I could really
eppraHtq their return. Call
372- after 7 pm (L-St-19-p)
l I I I Kl IK !
Lost contact lenses In white plastic
case. Bring to room 236 of Infirmary
from 8-5 or call Jere In evenings at
378-5750. (L-St-22-p)
Tommy P. I have your bus pass. Call
378-9376 after 5 ask for Bob
(L-3t-21-p)
LOST: Gold watch on leather band
left In Tlgert mens room on ground
floor Oct. 9 PLEASE call Bruce
373- (L-st-22-p)
Lost: wire frame glasses in green case.
Call 392-9638. Reward (L-2t-22-p)
Lost: Dark rimmed glasses In black
case Lost between Murphee and
Tolbert areas Please Return Call
Doug at 392-8133 (L-3t-23-p)
FOUND: dark rimmed womans
glasses In purple case on lawn In front
of Unlv. Apts. South, 1829 NW 2nd
Ave. Pick up at lost A found, JWR
Union (L-3t-23-p)

HHv
( I I.D.'S CHECKED 3fl| f W
11#%/ I MifEi
Bnypiii tJii mr ss! iHHjBBM[iMp m
; : M- W-r, /\
:''V. -; : '' B

Page 13

SERVICES
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now I Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
W SERVICE ALL IMPORTS.
Factory trained mechanics,
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS. 506 E.
Unlv. 372-4373. (M-tfc)
HORSES BOARDED sleepy hollow
horse farm complete care finest
facilities new barn pasture trails &
ring close to unlv. Ph 373-1059
(M-st-22-p)
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists
trained to type theses, dissertations,
textbooks, manuscripts, etc. 1405
NW 13th St,, IBM Bldg., Rm,. 206,
Phone 376-7160. (M-15t-10-p)
We're wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own wetting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
Yoga classes small groups weeknlghts
for more Info call Randl 373-1242
(M-3t-23-p)
I Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
Call 373-1984, 9-5. (M-st-f)
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Page 14

The Florida Alligator. Wedneedey, October 21,1970

WHAT'S HAPPENING

SINGING ABOUT LIFE: The
group that brought the sun to
the plaza is back for a Life
Celebration. There will be
folk-singing and a general
get-together Oct. 24 at 8 p.m. at
the Catholic Student Center.
DIG THIS: The Florida
Speleological Society (caving
chib for the uninitiated) will
meet tonight at 7 p.m. in room
347 of Reitz Union. Visitors are
welcome.
MEAL TICKETS: Tickets to the
Mortar Board-Savant banquet to
be held Oct. 30 are on sale now
in rooms 303 of the Union from
2 to 5 pm Student tickets are
$3.25 and non-student are
$5.25.
Tickets to the Florida Blue
Key banquet to be held the same
evening are also on sale in room
303 from 2 to 5 pm at $6 per
ticket.
RECREATION RALLY: The
Florida Student Movement is

UF Fraternity Hazing:
A Thing Os The Past?

Beer drinking may remain
part of traditional fraternity life
forever, but the old hazing
philosophies of paddling and
forcing pledges to perform
subservient tasks are fading at
the University of Florida.
OVER THE past several years
many fraternities on campus
have adopted lenient pledging
policies. Several of the social
organizations have completely
eliminated pledging as a grueling
endurance test during the fall
quarter.
The new freshmen are more
sophisticated and more mature.
If you dont keep up with the
times, says Pi Lambda Phi
pledgemaster Charles Stampelos,
you are going to be in bad
shape.
Pi Lam adopted its new
pledging philosophy this quarter.

sponsoring a rally Oct. 25 at
7:30 p.m. in McCarty
Auditorium for all people
interested in making banners,
putting on skits and helping to
organize for the Oct. 31
moratorium.
WATERED COLORS: A
watercolor display by
P. M. Torraca, professor
emeritus of architecture at UF,
will continue through Oct. 22 in
Building C of the Architecture
and Fine Arts Building.
ROOM FOR ALL?: Dr. Richard
Anderson of the psycology
department and Dr. Seymour
Block of chemical engineering
will debate the problem of
overpopulation Oct. 21 at 8:15
pm in rooms 122 and 123 of
the Union. The debate is
sponsored by Zero Population
Growth.
AN ALIEN CRICKET: The UF
International Cricket Team will
play the Powerful Esquire
Rebels from Freeport, Grand

Stampelos, a junior, calls it a
radical change.
PLEDGES DO NOT have to
take orders from fraternity
brothers. They dont have to
shine brothers shoes, get road
tripped into the Georgia hills or
perform other degrading duties
often required in the past.
Stampelos said many
fraternities throughout the
nation were having grave
problems.
Delta Upsilon Secretary Tom
Kennedy, a junior, says his
fraternity has frowned upon
subservient pledging
requirements since its beginning
in 1834. He said pledges are
asked only to participate in
housekeeping duties and donate
some of their time to the
fraternity.
WE PLEDGE individual
scholarship and personal

by Maryanne Gillis

Bahama Oct. 24 and 25 at 10
am on Alice Field.
A GOOD BOOK ON A RAINY
EVENING: The Friends of the
Gainesville Public Library will
hold a bargain bode bazaar
beginning today from 8 a.m. to
9 pm and continuing through
Oct. 24 from 9 am to 6 p.m.
The sale will be held at Ruddys
on the south side of the square.
All proceeds from the sale will
go to purchase new books for
the Gainesville Public Library.
OVER THE ROLLING WAVES:
The Gator Sail Club is
chartering a flotilla of yachts for
a four-day Thanksgiving break
cruise to the Bahamas* Twenty
males and an equal number of
females are needed. The quota is
now short 10 girls. Any coeds
interested should call Vilma
Snyder at 392-7609 or Rik at
392-9319. For those already
signed up for the cruise, there
will be a shakedown sail and
beach party in Clearwater Oct.
24. Fee is $5. Pay Vilma.

development to our pledges,
Kennedy said. The founding
brothers of Delta Upsilon felt
secret societies were tearing
down the people that fraternities
were really designed to help.

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4821 N.W. 6th St. 376-4595



|Few Racial Disturbances
Reported At State Schools

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
I few deplorable incidents
I involving violence and bomb
threats growing out of racial
conflicts were reported by
I Education Commissioner Floyd
I Christian Tuesday but for the
most part school desegregation
was operating smoothly in
I most of Florida.
DISTURBANCES
INCLUDED a bomb threat in
Gadsden County (Quincy) in
north Florida and the dropping
I of a smoke bomb at Rockledge
I High in Brevard County during a
I pep rally in the school gym.
Classes resumed at Rockledge
Monday after two black youths
and a white student were
suspended.
Strong security measures were
imposed, including a new fence
around the campus and

Dick Gregory: Use Dignity,
Moral Force ForChange

ATLANTA (UPI) Dick
Gregory, comedian and civil
rights activitst, challenged
I Georgia Tech students Monday
night to work for a change in
America using dignity and moral
force rather than dynamite and
violence.
AMERICA IS SICK, the black
comedian said, but if you bk>wr
up a mental hospital and kill all
the people inside, that makes
you sicker than the people you
killed.
He reminded the
predominantly white
standing-room only audience
that the older generation is

Heading home? If youre under 22, you can qualify
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Identification showing proof of age and you II get
your ticket for 25% off regular rates. There s no place
like home and no better way to get there than on
Shawnee where you don't have to pay to fly for
I For reservation information see your travel agent or
call Shawnee Airlines in Gainesville, 378-1663.
A BE.*..
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policemen in plain clothes
patrolling the gates.
THE INCIDENT erupted after
a black cheerleader was given a
failing grade in mathematics.
Approximately 200 students
were absent when classes
resumed.
Christian said 500 black
students were continuing a
boycott of classes that began in
Gulf County six weeks ago when
a blade neighborhood school was
closed and the students assigned
to a previouly all-white school.
BUT CHRISTIAN SAID
although there is no sign of
immediate settlement
discussions of the problem are
underway between black leaders
and the courts which approved
the integration plan.
A total of 47 counties have
been approved for a share of $7
million in federal desegregation

reacting with fear, mans most
basic right, toward the moral
responsibility young people have
faced them with.
American students are the
new niggers to a society which
is more interested in property
rights than human values and
we old fools know where
youre at, and were scared, he
said.
DRAWING AN ANALOGY
between the 1770 s and 1970,
Gregory said Kent state may be
the shot heard round the
world. Now young people must
change the society brought

funds including Manatee
County, where Gov. Claude Kirk
once took over the school
system to try to halt massive
forced busing of students.
Manatee will receive $70,000,
Christian said.
Meanwhile, the cabinet
approved a land swap between
the state internal improvement
trust fund and board of regents
to provide for future expansion
of Florida State University.
THE TRADE INVOLVED
land isolated from the campus
and other state land adjacent to
the grounds and suitable for a
university building.
In an unusual action, the
cabinet offered a $5,000 reward
for information leading to arrest
of persons that are telephoning
false bomb threats to state
buildings.

about by us old fools.
The founding fathers ignored
the Declaration of Independence
and the Constitution to enslave
Negroes and kill the Indians.
You young people have got a
job to do, he said, using quips
and barbs to make his point.

This is what
we have against
blades.
A shaver that shaves as close or closer than
the new platinum and chromium blades.
99 men tested our Norelco Tripleheader
35T against these new blades. Each shaved
one side of his face with a blade and the
other with the Tripleheader. Our three float floating
ing floating heads followed the curves of their faces.
And our eighteen rotary blades shaved in
every direction at once (thats the way
beards grow).
Blades cant do all this. Theyre straight.
And thats why seven out of ten men said
the Tripleheader shaved them as close or
closer than the new blades.
Whats more, the Tripleheader has a
pop-out trimmer. So you
get your side sideburns
burns sideburns straight
gg| | tp|l| and even for a
pHHIilf Now what blade can
compete with that?

The Noreko Tripleheaders
Tbu cant get any closer
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I about renting an apartment? I
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Wm limA Youll look good in these Bond
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uuright slacks
The Luright; Place To Go In Gainesville
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Wedneedey, October 21,1970, The Floride Alligetor,

This is what
we have against
other recnargeables.
A rechargeable that gives up to twice as
many shaves per charge as any other re rechargeable.
chargeable. rechargeable.
Our Rechargeable Tripleheader 45CT has
all the features of our regular Tripleheader.
It has three Microgroove floating heads.
And eighteen rotary blades that continu continuously
ously continuously sharpen themselves to cut down on
bothersome blade replacement. And a hid hidden
den hidden pop-up trimmer for neat sideburns and
mustaches.
It also has some special features all its
own. A Shave Counter that automatically
counts your shaves and tells you when to
recharge. A Charge Indicator that lights up
when its recharging. And, of course, the
Rechargeable can
shave with or
without a cord.
Now what re rechargeable
chargeable rechargeable can com compete
pete compete with that?

Page 15



Page 16

, fh*Florida Alligator, Wadnasday, October 21,1970

You Too Can Study In Poland

By DAVE MANKIN
Alligator Writer
An expense-paid educational
research and study program in
Poland? Da!
The Center for Polish Studies
and Culture in Orchard Lake,
Michigan; has announced that
The Institute of International
Studies may now use
UJS.-owned Polish currencies to
aid programs in Poland intended

HC Computer Selections
To Be Released Thursday

Results of the random
computer selection for
Homecoming gu&t tickets will
be released Thursday, according
to Art Wroble, secretary of
athletics.
Were waiting until Thursday
because were double checking
all the proofs to see that all the
numbers are correct so people
who should get a ticket, get
one, Wroble said.
According to Wroble, there

Army Puts 3 On Stand

FT. HOOD, Tex. (UPI) The
Army, calling only three
witnesses who said they saw S.
Sgt. David Mitchell aim and fire
his combat rifle into a ditch
filled with Vietnamese civilians,
abruptly ended its case Tuesday
in the first My Lai massacre
court-martial.
Capt. Michael Swan, the
prosecuting attorney, announced
at 1:02 p.m. he had finished his
case against Mitchell, 30, of St.
Francisville, La.
MITCHELL'S ATTORNEY,
Ossie Brown, obviously surprised
at the fast ending of the Armys
testimony, told the military
court he would begin defense
testimony Wednesday.
The Army called three
witnesses who served in
Mitchells platoon at the-time of
the alleged massacre at My Lai
March 16, 1968, when U.S.
troops reportedly killed more
than 100 Vietnamese men,
women and children.
Four other prosecution
witnesses were blocked from
testifying because they had
previously appeared before a
congressional subcommittee in
join the fun!
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky young and old some just for the fun
of it others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from taster flying trips to out-of-town
cvsfomnrs
TRY A LESSON
jlfSt $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease Came visit us today
13782846]
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
mggg Waldo Road
a'

to benefit American institutions
of higher education.
THIS WOULD- include
teachers, prospective teachers,
and certain categories of
students in foreign language and
area studies, to name a few
eligible recipients.
Funds became available
through sales of American
surplus agricultural commodities
in Poland, and the subsequent
accumulation of U.S.-owned

were over 3,000 applicants for
the less than 1300 tickets.
The students selected can pick
up their ticket Oct. 26th or
27th. They are to go to the gate
13 tickets windows, with $7 and
the fee card and season ticket
between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. on
those dates.
Students wanting bloc seating
should give the bloc chairman
their cards along with $7 and the
chairman will get the tickets.

secret testimony not yet made
public.
GREGORY OLSEN, a
Portland, Ore., college student
who served with Mitchell,
testified Tuesday he saw the
Louisiana soldier aim his rifle
into a ditch filled with dead and
wounded Vietnamese men,
women and children.
At that time, I heard Ml 6
rifle shots, said Olsen, the third
and final witness in the Armys
attempt to prove that Mitchell
Improve
your Shooting Skills
At
Gainesville
Skeet A Trap Club
Municipal Airport
Off Waldo Road
A
shotguns only

JOHNNY WINTER
BACKED BY
THE M c COYS
WITH
THE POWER

LIVE
AT THE SUBURBIA DRIVE-IN
SATURDAY- OCTOBER 24-8:00PM
Tickets are $3.00 in advance and $3.50 at the gate
Tickets are available at the SPANISH MAIN, ALTMAN STEREO,
DEMIANS, RECORDSVILLE IN THE MALL, and MUNtZ STEREO

foreign currencies. In
compliance with Polish laws and
currency regulations, the United
States may use the excess
foreign currencies for
educational purposes in the host
country as appropriated by
Congress.
Among the many
opportunities included in the
funded educational program are
faculty team projects, summer
seminars for teachers, centers for
advanced language study,

All tickets not picked up by
Tuesday, will be given to those
students on an alternate list,
Wroble said.
Wroble said that no
exceptions to the procedure will
be made. Positive proof of
identification will be required to
acquire the tickets.
Results of the selection will
be published in the Alligator
Thursday.

assaulted with intent to murder
30 Vietnamese civilians.
But unlike two earlier
witnesses, Olsen said he could
not be sure Mitchell actually
fired into the ditch lined with
dead and injured.
Mitchell is the first of 17
persons charged or under
investigation in the alleged
massacre. Brown, his attorney,
said he expected the prosecution
to call at least nine witnesses.
ROD-REEL & GUN SHOP
WE FIXTRADESELL
ARCHERYvPISHING -HUNTING
I 378-1696 1
1223 E. UNIVERSITY AVE.

individual doctoral dissertation
research and comparative
education studies.
TYPICAL COSTS to be paid
with the funds include travel
expenses, tuition and other
academic fees abroad,
instructional materials, living;
costs, and artifacts available
abroad.
Deadline for filing
applications by an individual
graduate student or for faculty
projects is today, Oct. 20.

ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
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I
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However, applications for group
projects may be filed by Oct. 27.
Further information may be
obtained by contacting the
Center for Polish Studies and
Culture, Saint Marys College,
Orchard Lake, Michigan 48033
(phone 313-682-1885), or Chief,
Fellowships and Overseas
Projects Branch, Institute of
International Studies, U.S.
Office of Education, Washington
D.C. 20202 (phone
202-962-6035).



Askew Left
In Accent 71
With three of four candidates
invited to appear in Accent *7ls
debate, scheduled for Oct. 22,
having pulled out, only Reubin
Askew, Democratic nominee for
governor, will speak to UF
students.
The state senator from
Pensacola will give a speech, and
will answer questions from the
audience, Executive Chairman of
Accent, Ed Boze said.
" \
ACCENT OFFICIALS learned
Friday, Gov. Claude Kirk,
Republican nominee for
governor, has not been able to
alter his schedule and could not
come.
Askew, a former UF student,
is scheduled to speak at 5:45
p.m. Oct. 22 in the University
Auditorium.
The other debate, between
nominees for UJS. Senate,
William C. Cramer and Lawton
Chiles, was scrapped when
Cramer said he had a previous
engagement and could not come.
When Chiles was informed by
Accent officials of Cramers pull
out, he also dropped the UF
debate from his schedule.
Nixon, Kirk
To Campaign
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Republican Gov. Claude Kirk,
whose relationship with the
White House is less than cozy,
said Wednesday that he will be
with President Nixon
throughout Nixons Oct. 27-28
campaign swing aimed primarily
at capturing a second Florida
Senate seat for the party.
Theres going to be a
cheering, speaking of tongues
and a laying on of hands, Kirk
told a news conference following
the White House announcement
of the Presidents impending
trip.
jHb
u
111 JOHNSTON
111 IHOTOCMINV
Help, we need time
too.
j Don't wait until the last
I minute for Christmas
portraits. See us now.
I December 4th Is the last day
of classes.
I OAO/ Discount on
I /U A student portrait
I w/u si tt inis.
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1915 N.W. 13th Street
I Directly across from
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Lindsey
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Use this chance to save on a new suit for
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Wadnaaday, Octobar 21,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator

PICKED ORANGE AND BLUE OVER FSU
Cheney Wanted To Play For Gators

By DOUG KEITH
Alligator Sports Writer
When Andrew Cheney
finished at Suwanee High School
in Live Oak he could have gone
just about anywhere and played
either basketball or football.
But there wasnt any doubt
where he wanted to go. He
wanted to play football and he
wanted to wear orange and blue
doing it.
AN ALL-STATE performer in
basketball, Andy received seven
offers to play basketball and was
courted heavily by Auburn and
FSU to play football. They were
wasting time though, Id always
wanted to go to Florida and
after my senior year I knew it
was football I wanted to play.
Somewhat lost in the glimmer
of Carlos Alvarez his sophomore
year, the super quick Cheney
nevertheless performed well
enough at his wide receiver
position to earn honors on the
All-SEC sophomore squad. He
caught 37 passes for a total of
518 yards before being cut down
with a knee iigury in the Miami
game an injury which forced
him to miss the Gator Bowl
game against Tennessees
Volunteers.
Despite this outstanding

| Intramurals I
Mmmmmmmmmmmmm by Harvey Spooner J
The current standings of the Women's Volleyball Tournament show
Weaver and Graham tied for the lead with 40 points in the Orange
League and a three-way tie between Mallory, Broward I, and the
Broward Nifties in the Blue League.
In both leagues, however, the teams are so close that any team
could wind up in front. Mallory plays both Broward I and the Nifties
during this weeks action.
WITH PROGRESS tests underway, captains should make a special
effort to make sure to get their teams on the courts by the scheduled
starting times.
Girls! Do you feel the need to blow off some steam? Then blow it
into a whistle and be a basketball official for Womens Intramurals.
The pay is $1.50 per game and the experience is very rewarding. If
interested, you are asked to attend a clinic conducted by Donna
Deutsh Thursday at 7:00 p.m. in Norman Gym.
In Independent Mens action, bracket leaders include the Flea
Circus, the Wild Bunch, Baptist Student Union, First Rocks, the
Dolphins,the Mothers, the Possiums, French Quarter 22, and Newell
Entomology.
In dorm football, East Campus, Jennings 5, Towers 10, Yulee 4,
Reid 2 and Reid 4 have all made it to the finals. Henderson and
Crandell lead their respective brackets in Graham area. In Murphree
area, Murphree B, Buck D, Staff, and Murphree H and Buck E have all
reached the playoffs.
Tolbert Area finalists include Staff, South 3, South 4, and Tolbert
3. In Hume, Bristol, Keppel and Little all have fine records.
| PHJLwillsee"l
j Johnny Winter j
j at the Suburbia j
j on Saturday, j

. . r * ..... ... , ............. ..... /v . *v

r
showing hislimjWur, the winter
and spring wens an agonizing
time for him. He was hobbling
around in a cast while Willie
Jackson was stealing his job in
spring practice.
BUT FIERCE competitor that
he is, Andy came back strong in
fall practice and is now sharing
the split-end duty with Jackson.
With the knee fully healed
ajijfc'
A iH
Jr* iy£
ANDY CHENEY
... has three handicap

and having proved himself to the
new coaching staff, Cheney feels
closer to the new coaches and
the new system they instituted.
At first I wasnt sure. I hated
losing our assistant coaches. But
Coach Dickey has one of the
greatest football minds Ive ever
seen. Hes the greatest coach Ive
played under.
IN THE FALL, football
players don't have much spare
time, so what leisure time is
available Cheney spends relaxing.
When time permits, golf is
another pastime for him. After
hearing his other
accomplishments on the athletic
field, it wasnt surprising to learn
that Andy sports a three
handicap on the links.
The lure of competition leads
Andy to think hed like to go to
law school although the extra
three years of school arent very
inviting.
BUT LAW school is a long
way off and this week hes got
Tennessee on his mind.
Im looking forward to it
more than any game Ive ever
played. I'd rather play the
Guns Guns Guns
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\ Ph. 373-1665
irwincwwe.^c.-.-i-.-.wrtv.-.v.v.-.-.-.v.v.-.vJ

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flotuia quarterly
*1 _ . we only did it for you ~4~ X- j;

Marty Perl mutter
Executive Sports Editor

Page 18

Tennessee, the Aubums, the
Georgias than teams like
Richmond. You know theyll be
tough, so you play much better.
When you win, youve done
something.

Hail to the Shes!
(The Super Shcf)
£//' '. '' mB
/ ' V
WMgKK^m^
The Head of the
Burger Chef Family
up the street
715 N.W. 13th St.Wfififl
Burger Chef and rAiiiuRGEIIS 1
goes all out 1412 N. MAIN ST. TTT -r T

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 21,1970

Phil Pettijohn
Sports Editor

Although the odds favor.
Tennessee, Cheney feels the
Gators have a good chance to
win. I think itll be the team
that has the best day. Itll be a
helluva game .**

Weve
got you
covered.
So make your move. Pick up
our new cover soon to
appear at bookstores and
make it a constant companion
these autumn evenings. Prop
up your feet and relax your
mind with the 20 page
portfolio of drawings by UF
artist Leonard Kesl. Or, think
of someone you know who'd
like the poems and
photographs by UF students
alive and strong in this issue
and send a Quarterly to him.
Make your move down to a
bookstore to pick up a
Quarterly.



Santa Claus Might Be Gator Fan

By CHUCK KELLER
Alligator Sports Writer
Santa Claus might be a Gator
football fan.
Hes had enough
opportunities, coming down the
chimney of Kappa Alphas
temporary fraternity house at
Northwest 17th St. across from
the Murphree dorm area.
For on the mantel are 11
scores of UF losses and wins
dating back to 1928.
The earliest score is Floridas
26-6 rout over rival Georgia.
There are burnt and carved
memories of the 55-0 tromp
over Georgia Tech and the 20-0
shellacking at the hands of
Alabama in 1930.
Most of the scores involved
battles with Georgia and Georgia
Tech. Although few scores have
years attributed to them, a
check with a collection of Gator
scores shows the inscriptions on
the once mahogany-stained
mantle date to 1928, 29, 3O,
34,35,37 and 49.

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All interested dancers should
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KAS CHIMNEY MANTEL TELLS STORY

Mrs. Jessie Fogle, owner of
the 22-room building since
1939, said the majority of the
scores came from students who
lived in the rooming house when
it was known as Florida Hall
from 1926-35.
From the 1926 completion of
the building, non-athlete
students lived in Florida Hall
until the UF athletic department
leased it for varsity football
quarters during the 1936-37
school sessions.
Coach Josh Cody was
beginning his First years at the
Gator helm.
Mrs. Fogle, before purchasing
Florida Hall, leased out rooms in
a boarding house across the
street from the present KA
residence. She housed the
freshman football team and fed
both the baby Gator and varsity
squady on another agreement
with the UF athletic
department.
A Florida professor came
over to our dining room one day
and made the remark that he

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had put the 1928 score on the
mantel when he lived there as a
student, said Miss Wilhelmina
Fogle, who as a young girl
helped her mother with the
boarding house chores.
The new athlete residents
nicknamed their home Gator
Hole, which was soon to renew
the tradition of searing
important scores on the mantel
with a poker iron.
They used to heat the pokers
- the room used to be heated by
coal in the Fire place, said Mrs.
Fogles son, John, a local
insuranceman.
The players at the Gator
Hole included back Walter.
Mayberry, one of the top Gator
runners in history; end Floyd
Christian, present state
superintendent of public
instruction; guard Julian Lane,
ex-mayor of Tampa and John
McCarty, brother of fellow
student Dan, destined to become
a Florida governor.
When we moved there, the
mantel was so scarred up, said
Mrs. Fogle. I started thinking
that I might redo it.
But a worker, while
remodeling the house after Mrs.
Fogle bought it, persuaded her
not to touch the football
hieroglyphics.
Very little has been done to
the mantel since then. Only
recently was the mantel painted
for the first time.
After adding a kitchen in
1940, Mrs. Fogle continued
housing students in the boarding
house that was renamed
University Lodge.
The football squad moved in
1938 to the Gator Club, a
$45,000 house contributed by
Gator booster Miss Georgia
Seagle.
In addition to KA, Delta Chi
and Lambda Chi Alpha have
seen the mantel as a fraternity
conversation piece.

When we First moved here
(summer of 1968) it was a
conversation piece, but its not
really anymore, said KA Ben
Latham, 4BA. It was unique
because weve never had scores
on our mantel piece before, he
quipped.
KAs maid Ternpie Mae Jones
said she had heard many people
comment about the mantel since

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Wednesday, October 21,1970, The Florida Alligator,

she began working at the
boarding house in 1949.
Those were the good old
years for the Gators, she said.
Someday the football
department might like to have
the mantel, if the house is ever
tom down, Mrs. Fogel offered.
The department might get
competition from Santa Claus.

Page 19



Page 20

l, Th* Florida Alligator, Wadnasday, October 21,1970

Doug Knotts Heads Home

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator News Editor
Another of those Gator
coaches who will return to
Knoxville, Tenn. Saturday is
defensive coordinator Doug
Knotts, who has done here what
he did for a number of years at
the University of Tennessee
produced a good, sound defense.
Knotts first team defense at
UF has allowed but one
touchdown in the last three
games.
THEY REACHED their peak
last week, stopping the
Richmond Spiders for four
downs inside their own three
yard line and chalking up the
only shutout since a Ray
Graves-coached team blanked
Tulane in the fourth game of the
1967 season.
After the 38-27 win over FSU
two weeks ago, Knotts said he
thought his first team defense
had had a near-perfect game.
If Harvin Clarks punt return
for a touchdown had not been
called back, we wouldve had a
great day, Knotts said then.
EXCEPT FOR fullback James
Jarretts games-first touchdown,
FSU did not tally another score
on the complete first team of
Gator defenders.
Knotts, head coach Doug
Dickeys defensive chief at
Tennessee since 1965, said he
has been looking forward to this
game for a long time.
He said he doesnt expect the
Volunteers to do anything
different offensively than they
have done all year.
WHAT FOR? Theyve been
successful, and have won, with
what theyve been doing, so why
should they change anything,
Knotts said.
Knotts, producer of Vol
All-American defenders the likes
of A1 Dorsey, Steve Kiner, Paul
Naumoff and Jack Reynolds,
said to call the Tennessee
rushing game great.
Tennessee head coach Bill
Battle counters with runners

LET RO-MO
TURN ON THE
LIGHTS !
FLASH EQUIPMENT
AT

Kk
CURT WATSQN
... Gators must stop him
Curt Watson and Don McCleary,
both high in the SEC for most
yards rushing.
IF WE CAN stop their
running game, then I think we
will stop their passing game,
Knotts said.
Knotts said he would make no
changes in his lineup for the
regionally televised game.
Jack Bums and John Silman
both graded out equally at the
monsterman position in the
Richmond game, Knotts said.
Well just have to wait and see
this week who will start there.
Senior Bums had started 24
straight games for the Gators,
but lost out to Silman, after the
latter graded out on the films
better than Bums in the FSU
game.
KNOTTS MAY also have Eddy
Moore, a starter at the defensive
tackle until he injured an ankle
in the N.C. State game, and
monsterman Doug Sorenson,
who strained a knee in the
Alabama disaster, back in his
lineup this week.
But they wont start,
Knotts said. We have too many
people who have been playing
good ball for us now.
Knotts will also have Danny
Williams and Alan Cole,
dependable defensive tackles all
year, but out with injuries last

week, back with the squad this
week.
Gator Shorts Offensive
head Jimmy Dunn said the
reason for working out at
full-speed, rather than in shorts
like they did Tuesday last week,
was because of the offense
needed to look at the Tennessee
style of defense on a full-speed,
more-game-like situation.

if
A man signs his name.
Is there a better known signature than Mr. Hancock's? ...
the first and largest on the Declaration of Independence. His
name has become the generic term for "signature." (Put your
John Hancock on the dotted line.)
Naturally, we have a personal pride in our own signature,
"Stock's", and what it means in terms of quality, service, and
value.
But, we give equal recognition and sincere gratification to the
names and signatures of those world-acknowledged leaders
whom we have chosen as they have selected us to offer to
you the finest in men's apparel.
When you come to Stock's to exchange your dollars for
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