Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
> < *-y\ im*
-- Jlilf ^^' &.; .? jg
PHIL COPE
FREE VEGETARIANS DELIGHT
It was free food for all comers last night as the Candlepeople served
a vegetarian's delight of a meal at the Methodist University Center.
Salads, vegetables and no food with processed white sugar or
preservatives comprised the menu, and we venture to say there were
no hungry vegetarians in Gainesville before Ravi Shankar's
performance.
O'Connell Hosts
State Wagerers

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Writer*
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell will host five
members of the Parimutuel
Wagering Division of the State
Department of Business
Regulation and five
representatives of the harness
racing and jai-alai industries for
dinner and the UF-Richmond
game.
UF RECEIVES $157,000
annually for use as athletic
scholarships from the betting
business. Over the past 21 years
UF has received, in excess of $3
million in scholarship subsidies
from racing and jai-alai betting.
The betting industries are
authorized to have one extra day
of betting each year is they
wish, said Dean Fred Cantrell
. lllilTnstde
Mmmmmmr
ALLIGATOR REPORTER
Lee Hinnant completes his
five-part study of the
University Senate page 2
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 15
i Letters 9
Movies 12
Page of Record 10
Sports 17
Whats Happening 6
'aaa *. k,\ v* xu ft cW v*v* i. /#/// v

of University Relations and
Development.
The proceeds are turned over
to the Board of Regents, who in
turn allocate the money to the
state universities, Cantrell said.
THE ORIGINAL intent of the
legislation was to provide funds
for the athletic department at
UF, according to Rae O.
Weimer, special presidential
assistant.
Then FSU started a football
team, and So on. The money is
now distributed to state
universities for scholarships,
Weimer said.
OConnell was the first
university president to officially
recognize the support given to
higher education by the legal
gambling industry.
The representatives will be
OConnells guests for lunch on
Saturday, then will join him in
the presidential box at Florida
Field for the game.
A RECEPTION in their honor
will be held at the presidents
home in the evening to conclude
the festivities.
In the early fifties when the
legislature set up the program
these charity days were set up so
that both the business and the
states portion went to higher
education, George Okell, a
jai-alai fronton manager said.
These charity days are
optional and it is up to the
individual firm as to whether
they operate on these days,
Okell said.
ft '*.*rt.****i*\\<\+*f f *.***,*<*,."#&?,****

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 63, No. 20

RIOT CAMERA
'Police Tool' Bought

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Managing Editor
UF has ordered a $1,500 film
camera, to be used as a police
tool in the event of
demonstrations, according to
Vice President for Business
Affairs William Elmore.
The camera is similar to one
which has been used successfully
on other. campuses, such as
Florida State, he said.
IT IS NOTHING more than
a police tool. We have had
similar ones* available from the
City of Gainesville for a long
time, he said.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said he first learned of
the purchase order Wednesday at
an Administrative Council
meeting.
I didnt know about it until
(Student Body President) Steve
Uhlfelder mentioned it,
OConnell said Thursday.
UHLFELDER SAID he
learned of the order through a
friend in a position to know.
Students should be
consulted before a thing like this
is done. It could ruin someones
whole life.
Uhlfelder said aside from
being upset about the purchase

Cramer-Chiles Debate Off

By CARLOS LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Congressman William C.
Cramer, R-Fla., and State Sen.
Lawton Chiles will not be at the
Accent 7l debate at UF Oct.
22.
Cramer, Republican party
nominee for the senate seat
being vacated by retiring Sen.
Spessard Holland, announced
Tuesday he will not come to the
debate because of a previous
engagement.
WHEN CHILES was informed
of Cramers decision, he decided
not to show up either. But he
will come if Cramer comes,
Bob Benin, public relations
chairman for Accent, said.
So far in the campaign there
have been no debates between
the candidates for senator or
governor. The campaign
schedules of Republican party
candidates Cramer and Gov.
Claude Kirk have not included a
debate with their opponents,
Chiles or Ruebin Askew.
The same schedule, as
reported by the St. Petersburg
Times, does not project a debate
for the future.
THE SCHEDULE on the
Democratic side has allowed for
debates by the candidates, and
both Chiles and Askew have
agreed to as many debates as
possible. Accents debate was
included in these schedules.
Even a public forum in
Republican-stron area of
Orlando was cancelled because
Kirk declined to appear.
The closest the candidates

University of Florida, Gainesville

of the camera itself, it really
bugs me how we had to find out
about it.
IM WORRIED about the
general feeling across the
country. People are reacting to
things they dont have to, and
sometimes the reaction causes
the things they were worried
about.
Uhlfelder said he thinks
people are going to have to try
to understand each other and,
unfortunately, the people in the
positions of authority dont.
He said such things as the
police-student liason committee
which was recently set up should
be used before a thing like this is
enacted.
BUT JUST THINK, we
could start advertising: Come to
UF and be a star.
In the event the camera is
used, the film could be used as
evidence, according to both
OConnell and Elmore.
It would be determined by
circumstances. Anything in the
way of public record can be
subpoenaed, OConnell said.
HE SAID HE realized the
presence of cameras sometimes
created larger disturbances.
However, the news media
will be there anyway. The

come to a debate will be when
Lt. Gov. Ray Osborne and Tom
Adams, Kirks and Askews
runningmates will debate in St.
Petersburg. No date has been set
for this confrontation.
EVEN THOUGH Cramers
schedule does not allow for a
debate, it seems he considered
UF as the place to meet the
walking senator, and there is
plenty of indication he was given
notice far in advance of the
debate date.
Rodney Margol, Accent
speakers chairman said all
candidates seeking major office
were told of the debate in UF as
far back as last July.
Letters were sent on July 14
to every candidate running for
office (U.S. Senator and
governor), he said. The letter
asked the candidates to set time
in their schedule for the debate.
ON SEPT. 13, after the
primaries, another letter was
sent to the runoff contenders,
and a phone call was made to
their schedule directors, Margol
said.
The winners of the
Democratic party runoff, Askew
and Chiles, accepted an
invitation to meet their
opponents at UF.
On Oct. 6, Cramer
committed himself to come to
the debate if Congress was not in
session, Margol said. On Oct.
8, Congress adjourned, and on
Oct. 9, when we called again,
Cramer (definitely committed
himself (to appear at the
debate).

Friday, October 16, 1970

television cameras, and the
Alligator, will be taking pictures.
I dont think our one camera
will make any difference,
OConnell said.
Special Assistant to the
President Rae O. Weimer said
any pictures could be
subpoenaed as evidence, even
those taken by the media.
OCONNELL SAID if there
were a disruptive event on
campus, his primary concern
would be evidence for UFs use.
Elmore said a disruptive
event would have to be defined
by the universitys Disruption
Policy.
Other recent purchases
include two wigs, to be used by
the policeman assigned to the
special drug task force, Elmore
said.
THEY ARE NOT going to
be used on campus, he said.
They were purchased for that
special drug unit.
Uhlfelder said he had also
heard that a double order of
mace had been purchased, but
Elmore denied it.
We havent bought any mace
since last May. We bought 24
cannisters then. We only used
13, and still have 11 left.

life r . is
i*
;; c Mg &£& y
LAWTON CHILES
... Debate off with Cramer
THEN, ON OCT. 12, Cramer
was called again to tell him of
the arrangements and we were
told he (Cramer) could not come
because of a previous
engagement
There is no word as yet if
Kirk will appear at the Accent
debate.
Ed Boze, Accent executive
chairman, said Kirk has been
contacted several times, but has
not given a definite answer on
his appearance at the debate.
A TELEGRAM sent by the
Kirk headquarters in Tallahassee
says the governor has a previous
engagement but is trying to
alter it.
Definitely, this is not
Accents fault, Margol said.
But by the gross negligence of
Congressman Cramer this debate
has been cancelled.
* *>.% *,*<*;+A.



Study Os Senate Forthcoming

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the fifth and last of a series
concerning attempts to reform
die University Senate.)
By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs Constitution Committee
will soon undertake once again a
major, formal and
institutionalized study similar
to studies of 1963 and 1968-69
of the structure of the
University Senate, with a view
toward a possible restructuring
of that body.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell last week called on
the committee to give first and
urgent priority to such a study.
DR. ALEX G. Smith,
professor of physics and newly
appointed chairman of the
1970-71 Constitution
Committee, said Wednesday
although no date had been set,
the committee would meet and
begin to hold hearings on the
subject of senate reform this
quarter.
What is likely to result from
this latest formal study of the
senate structure?
In arriving at an answer there
must be consideration of several
factors, among them: events that
have occured since a senate vote
of November 1969 ended the
most recent previous attempt at
senate reform; the membership
of the committee which may
make recommendations for
change; and obstacles which will
be met in die final consideration
by the senate of any reform
proposal.
SEVERAL EVENTS, since
November of last year stand out
which cause many faculty and
deans, who want reform to
believe chances for reform are
better now than last year.
For one thing, student
interest and desire for reform is
probably stronger now than it
was then. Student Government
interest has been shown by the
placing of referendum questions
concerning University Senate on
the ballot for Student Senate
elections Wednesday, and by the
boycott called by Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder of the
Sunday, October 4 Presidential
Retreat.
Student interest generally has
possibly been heightened by
these initiatives by SG, as well as
by reportage of such incidents as
last months refusal by the
College of Education faculty to

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. THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of'trie-
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is glvfn to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insfrciun.

elect associate and assistant
professors to the senate.
ANOTHER FACTOR which
the reformers feel has
strengthened their case is the
survey conducted by last years
Constitution Committee, the
results of which show
considerable feeling among
faculty as a whole for reform of
the senate.
For example, 65 per cent of
the faculty responding to the
survey favored a senate of 300
members or less, while 67 per
cent favored a predominantly or
wholly elected senate. Less than
20 per cent favored no change in
senate membership.
The senate now has officially
573 members, of which 50 are
elected.
SMITH, CHAIRMAN of this
years constitution committee,
said the survey will be studied
by the committee in its
evaluation to begin shortly.
Another and possibly the
most important factor since
November 1969, according to
several deans and faculty who
were contacted by The Alligator,
has been increased discussion of
and sentiment for senate reform
among the faculty at large.
The survey conducted by the
constitution committee
expressed that sentiment of the
majority of the faculty. The
Presidential Retreat, at which
administrators, deans and
faculty spoke overwhelmingly
for senate reform, and .the
refusal of the College of
Education to elect members to
the senate, were refelctions t>f
this.
ANOTHER INDICATION of
the feeling of many faculty
members came Wednesday when
the College of Arts and Sciences
faculty passed a resolution
requesting the senate to
such reapportion reapportionment
ment reapportionment as will make it fully
representative of the whole
faculty of UF.
All of these things lend
optimism to those persons who
favor senate reform. Dr. Charles
F. Eno, chairman of last years
committee, expressed guarded
optimism, and pointed to other
senate reforms of recent years:
the provision of 1963 for 50
elected faculty members, and
the decision of February 1969
to allow five SG representatives
to sit in the senate and also to
allow press observers and
student attendance at senate
meetings.

Dr* Manning J. Dauer,
chairman of the political science
department and a member of
both last years and this years
Constitution Committees, said
he expected OConnells letter of
last week to Smith urging
consideration of senate reform
will be seriously weighed by
the senate I certainly hope
so.
DEAN ROBERT F.
Lanzillotti of the College of
Business Administration
expressed optimism for senate
reform if it is given a full-dress
debate in the senate, and if
people who feel strongly about
reform are given a chance to
debate it and put defenders of
the status quo on the defensive.
Dean Herman E. Spivey of the
College of Arts and Sciences
seemed most optimistic, saying
he would be astonished if
some type of reform did not
occur.
Dr. Parker Small, chairman of
the microbiology department, a
member of last years
Constitution Committee as well
as this years, said he was very
optimistic for senate reform
this time.
BUT, HE added, I was
optimistic last year.
A second factor which has to
be considered jn evaluating,what
reform may occur is the
membership of this years
committee.
Understandably, most
members of the committee are
unwilling to state their personal
opinions concerning senate
reform at this time.
EIGHT OF the committees
13 members were members of
last years Constitution
Committee which unanimously
recommended a senate in which
all 200 faculty members would
be elected from faculty ranks of
assistant professor or above. The
recommendation also provided
for administrator members and
10 student members.
Any proposal for reform
which may come from this
years committee, however, is
for several reasons almost certain
to be less far-reaching than the
proposal of last year.
For one thing according to
one member of the committee
who wished not to be identified
by name persons who have
been opposed to extensive
reform in the past have been
placed on this years committee.
THIS SOURCE said that last

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years committee consisted
entirely of persons fairly
sympathetic to reform. No
member of the conservatives
within the senate was
representated on the committee.
As a result, the proposal of the
committee proved to be far too
radical for the majority of the
senate*
A body of opinion within
the senate, this person said, felt
that to circumvent another such
occurance this year, persons less
favorable to reform as well as
reformers should be placed on
this years committee. By that
strategy, according to the
theory, any proposal finally
passed by the committee might
be moderate enough to be
acceptable to the senate as a
whole.
But this source added, and
another committee member
agreed, that such a strategy
could also result in a deadlock
of the committee.
ONE COMMITTEE member
- not a member of last years
Constitution Committee who
did not hesitate to express
himself was Dr. John A.
Greenman, professor of
agricultural economics.
Those who want reform of
the senate are often quick to
charge self-interest on the part
of its defenders within the
senate. But Greenman seemed
convinced of the merit of the
arguments he put forward in
defense of the present senate
membership.
Calling hi mself a
pragmatist, Greenman said
simply of the senate, It works..
I THINK weve got a
workable outfit at this time, he
said. I will suggest that the
committee take a look at
universities where there are
highly representative senates, to
see what has happened there.
Greenman indicated he felt
those senates may be conducive
to campus disruptions. We
havent had any disruptions
here, he said.
. GREENMAN ALSO defended
the heavy proportion of full
professors in the senate.
They (full professors) have
the maturity, the experience,
and are deeply interested in
what happens at the university.
Many associate and assistant
professors are, in effect,
transients. Os course, there are
some very good and concerned
men within the ranks of
associate and assistant professors

!. The Florida Alligator. Friday. October 16, i 970

Page 2

at this university. But in time
these will become full professors
anyway.
Greenman indicated the
University Senate at UF had
been successfully and fairly
conducting university business
for almost 40 years, and
therefore any proposal to change
the senate should be carefully
considered.
BUT, HE added cheerfully
Ill be listening (to the
arguments of the reformers).
And if they can convince me Im
wrong Ill go along.
Another committee member,
Small, said of the committees
membership, Everyone on the
committee is willing to consider
some! changes.
Besides the more balanced
membership of this years
committee, another reason that
a proposal for reform this time is
not likely to be so far-reaching
as last years proposal is that the
committee will remember the
extent of senate opposition to
that proposal, Smith, the
committee chairman, said.
HE ADDED THAT the
hearings which the committee
will hold on the question of
senate reform will strongly
influence the final
recommendations of the
committee.
Finally, the ultimate outcome
of this latest study of the senate
will depend partly on the
difficulties which any proposal
for reform will face in passing a
vote of the full senate.
The specific difficulties are
two in number, according to
persons who want senate reform.
The first is the natural difficulty
of getting any organization to
reapportion itself. The second
difficulty is the fact that any
reform proposal must pass the
senate by a two-thirds vote to
become legally effective.
LAW PROFESSOR Michael
W. Gordon said at the
Presidential Retreat the
difficulty in reforming the
senate lay in the lack of a
judicial body at UF.
We need a judicial body
which can instruct the legislature
to do what it is recalcitrant to
do. In the absence of a judicial
body, I suggested to OConnell
(at the retreat) that the burden
fell on him or on the Board of
Regents to act in this capacity,
Gordon told The Alligator.
He said he hoped the senate
(SEE 'SENATE' PAGE 3)



{?>>; MW.VA AWAV^iW.WA%WtVAV t V.V.V.WA .VM >>XW>XOfI^
Senate Study...


pROM PAGE TWoT
would consider OConnells
letter of last week urging
consideration of senate reform
"as a final request to have
change come from within the
senate. v
IF THE senate fails to
reapportion itself, OConnell will
be in a difficult position,
Gordon said.
OConnell would then have to
decide whether or not to force
the senate to reform itself, he
said.
Gordon pointed out that on
the national level, state
legislators failed to reapportion
themselves and the U.S.
Supreme Court had to step in to
force them to do so.
l THINK ON the basis of the
(UF) senates history, it has
shown an unwillingness to make
the kind of changes that are
necessary, the law professor
said.
Gordon finished by saying he
felt a campus-wide constitution
convention should meet to
decide "who is going to govern
the university.
Another person, who
regularly attends senate meetings
and who preferred not to be
identified, said it more bluntly:
"THERE AINT no way to
get an organization to vote itself
out of existence.

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But to meet the demands of
the reformers, the senate must
vote itself at least partially out
of existence.
Constitution Committee
member Dauer pointed up the
second difficulty any reform
proposal will face in passing the
senate: by provision of the UF
Constitution, any constitutional
amendment such as a reform
of senate membership would be
must pass the senate by
two-thirds vote.
THE VOTE OF last
November saw 114 against, 78
for, a predominantly elected
senate.
Reformers are apparently
hoping that the more
favorable situation which has
evolved since November 1969,
including OConnells implicit
recommendation for senate
reform, combined with a more
moderate proposal from this
years Constitution Committee,
will allow passage in the senate.
Constitution Committee
Chairman Smith has said the
hearings set for an indefinite
time later in this quarter will be
open to faculty, administrators,
and students.
For the time being, the
question of senate reform is left
to the Constitution Committee
and to those who appear
before it.

York: DDT Charges Weak

DR. E. T. YORK
... charges against DDT unfair

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: Aarons work is currently on display at the
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By MURIEL EVERTON
Alligator Writer
Most of the charges against
DDT will not stand up under the
light of objective, scientific
scrutiny, according to Dr.
E.T. York, Jr., provost for
agriculture at UF.
IN A STATEMENT on
ecology, York said the decision
on enviommental issues such as
DDT should be chosen by asking
whether the risks or potential
dangers outweigh the benefits
from following a certain course
of action. In making these
decisions, he said, emotionalism
must be separated from the cold
hard facts that should serve as
the basis for the decisions.
The pesticide problem arises

Friday, October 16, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

. s
AARON, A LOCAL artist, began doing his
wood carvings about two years ago at age 81. :
Since then he has had shows all over the state, £
has received publicity in several Florida !;
newspapers. |
Last year he received national recognition with £
an article in Ebony Magazine. £

from improper usage, York said.
l am appalled at the manner in
which supposedly reputable
scientists have accepted the
flimsiest sort of evidence as a
basis for joining the anti-DDT
bandwagon.
"The solution to ecology
problems is not to declare a
moratorium on scientific
exploration and the
development of improved
technology, York said.
Instead, the answer is to turn
out energies and intellect to the
task of eliminating the problems
which grow out of mankinds
ability and desire to overcome
the limitations of his
environment.

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 16, 1970

1920 GradTo BecomeOldGvard

By DAN MCDONALD
Aligator Writer
Hes 73 now... mentally alert
as ever. . physically active
except a heart attack 20-years
ago keeps him from hunting or
fishing anymore.
The University Alumni
Association will initiate him into
the Old Guards today. The Old
Guards are alumni out of school
for 50 years.
CLASS OF 1920: Hart
Robert Stringfellow, B.S. civil
engineering. Yesterday bom
1897 in Gainesville. Today
retired father of four.
Tomorrow?
I have no major goals
planned now. I do nothing but
enjoy life. What about jhe
honor of being an Old Guard.
Well its not an honor that you
had to work for. Os course Im
pleased, but all we had to do was
stand around and wait.
The waiting, by his own
admission, stretched from the
horse and buggy days to the
space age. The waiting saw
businessman H. R. Stringfellow
ruined by the automobile, and
the start of the Stringfellow
Supply Co., today run by sons.
The waiting in a word, saw
change.
EVERYTHING IS different
today the school, the town,
the people. Everything.
The difference in the school?
When I was a student everyone
knew everyone else. The
teachers knew all the students
and we knew all of them. It was

Skit Tapes Can Be Picked Up

Organizations that turned in
tapes for Gator Growl skits
should pick up those tapes today
at the Growl office, along with
the suggestion and information
sheets.

GET THAT FOOTBALL
ACTION ON FILM
WITH A LONG
LBS FOR YOUR
CAMERA FROM
ROMO CAMERA SHOP
A A 1232 WEST
ig|kiTk UNIVERSITY
T 376-7657
*? A r *

% mlh jL
M H1- fPlll& yb' 1 fk
B. J|:
iKl
A Bp;
H; ** Bk. *§ K.-
m -mb
B b£B&
H. R. STRINGFELLOW PH,L COPE
... remembers when."

a friendly atmosphere. You
couldnt walk around without
talking to someone.
The townspeople also were
different. They used to get along
with the students. They would
invite the boys to their homes
for refreshments, and they knew
them all by name too.
IN 1920, the graduating class

The suggestion sheet contains
comments from the Growl staff.
The information sheet contains
facts about props, lighting, stage
settings and judging.

was 65 students. Total school
enrollment was 309. There were
19 university buildings. The
football team had a 6-3 record
and there were no women
students.
Recreation? Well of course
we couldnt get around back
then, so we settled for hunting
and fishing. We also would do a

Final tryouts will be 8 p.m.,
Tuesday, at the athletic field
track. Five skits will be chosen
as finalists from the 15
performing. Admission is free.

Grdim\Sih .Mtot KnifliLt filtop.
SEE THE NEW
ASTROLIGHT
DO-I^OURSELM(ff
*795
SAVE 50% OFF ON VF
MERCHANDISE J
FLORIDIAN FORGE
EVERYTHING IN WROUGHT IRON. IF WE DONT
HAVE IT, WE WILL MAKE IT
RAILINGS GARDEN GATES d DIVIDERS 207 s. . I*-

>9
thing called pop-calling. A bunch
of students would get together
and go in groups to various town
peoples homes. Wed visit three
or four places a night.
THERE WERE then, as now,
clubs on campus. Hart
Stringfellow was president of the
Gainesville Club in 1917. A
member of Kappa Alpha
fraternity, and president of a
thing called the Serpent Ribbon
Society from 1919-1920.
After four years at UF,
interupted by a six month stint
in the Army, it was time to go
into business: the grain business.
My father had a grain business,
so I learned the trade from him.
It was all right until automobiles
replaced horses.
Run out of business by the
car. The continuing booming
growth of the university and the
town all around. What do you
do?
I STARTED A supply
company. I knew something
about construction from my
Its Buggy
There are 2,250 species of
cockroaches, and some species
have been in existence for 250
million years.

Folk MASS f I
Sunday, Oct. 18th
Voly Trinity Episcopal Churchy! \Z7
116 N.E. Ist 5 1 (A'urstrt/

engineering background.
A wholesale hardware and
building company. More
successful than grain.
Today, hes retired. Sons now
run the family business.
AND ITS BEEN a long good
life in Gainesville. Its living
from the time of horse buggies
to lunar modules. And what is
the biggest change from 1920 to
1970?
People. Its really a shame,
but they dont seem to take time
to feel for others. Everyone is in
a rush. If they can get by
without any bother, they will.
Oh modern technology is
great, and putting a man on the
moon is a fantastic achievement.
But the change that most
astounds me is all around. Its
you and me. Weve changed.
Hart Robert Stringfellow:
class of 2O. One of 50 coming
for the celebration.
One of the Old Guards.
UNITARIAN- UNIVERSALIST
FELLOWSHIP
2814 NW 43rd Street
SPEAKER: RICHARD HIERS
THE ETHICS OF A CLOSED
SOCIETY
SERVICES AT 10:30 AM SUNDAY
FOR TRANSPORTATION
ASSISTANCE OR
Information: 376-1174



U.S. Exhibit At Mall

A Know How U.S.A.
exhibit depicting the know
how of early America and
comparing it to the know how
of various modem industries as
related to their products, will be
shown at the Gainesville Mall
beginning 10 a.m. Monday.
THE EXHIBIT includes 22
illuminated displays and was
created in cooperation with the
U. S. Department of Commerce.
Four of the displays depict
various duties and services of the
commerce department. One of
these will be the department's
Population Clock which

Eat For Gator Nursery

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has issued a resolution
proclaiming Saturday Baby
Gator Nursery Day.
O'Connell's resolution is in
support of a boxed chicken
dinner to be held Saturday
before the Richmond game on
Tolbert Green, in order to raise
needed funds to expand the
nurserys facilities.
Dates Listed Fer
Football Tickets
Student tickets for the
Tennessee game will be on sale
Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 19
and 20, from 2 to 8 p.m. They
can be purchased at the Gate 13
windows, on a first come first
served basis.
Ticket windows for the
Richmond game will be open
Saturday morning from 10 a.m.
until halftime.
Only those students who have
previously made arrangements
through Student Government
will be served.
You must pick up written
permission from SG prior to 5
p.m. today.
-
Easy park right in front!
'"BRl/SMk
BUCKET
112 SW 34th St. 376-2431

shows the population change of
the country including each birth,
death, arrival of each immigrant
and departure of each emigrant.
The other commerce
department exhibits contain
information telling how weather
is forecast through the use of
satellites and show early
hand-crafted patent models and
materials which are the
predecessors of modern
products.
THE REMAINDER of the
exhibits are individually
sponsored by industrial
organizations.
Through the use of sequential

THE RESOLUTION read
the UF supports the Baby
Gator Nursery and its concept,
and its efforts to gain support
and proper funding.
The boxed chicken dinner will
cost $1.50, and will include
baked beans, cloe slaw, rolls and
a turnover.
Tickets will be available at the
event.

Helo, Im Johnny Cash.
I want to tel you about
the sound of the Hohner
harmonica.
, : pg&
Archio
l t>s a sound thats as much a
p ar t 0 f America as the lonesome
m-' wail of a freight train in the night.
A sound that was first heard
back in the 1850s when Hohner
harmonicas soothed restless
mountain men, homesick sailors
and weary plantation workers.
During the Civil War,
sound was Johnny Reb playing
Dixie at Shiloh and Lookout Mountain. While across the lines
Union soldiers played John Browns Body.
Cowboys broke the prairie stillness with Hohners. Railroad
men kept them in their overalls as the great iron beast pushed west.
Wichita, Pocatello, Sacramento.
The sound went with boatmen up from New Orleans.
Lumberjacks in Coos Bay. Miners in Cripple Creek. Farmers in
Dyess, the little town in Arkansas where I grew up.
I remember hearing it back then. Good times or bad, the
humble harmonica has been in Americas hip pocket as we grew up.
And its still there today.
iIBH Because its a sound thats simple and
true. Happy and sad. A reflection of life,
Ifcl a 11| past and present.
so naturally with any kind of music. Blues,
B 1 Rot k In fact H \v >
160 different kinds of harmonicas, from an
inch and a half to two feet long. Popular
models come in all different keys. Theres even
a neck holder so you can play harmonica and guitar at the same
time. Me? I use the good old Marine Band for songs like
Orange Blossom Special. It gives me just the sound I want.
Pure and honest.
Ycwucanget the same sound I dp by getting a Hohner
harmoftksa today your campfk bookstore
M. Hohner, Inc., Hicksville, N.Y. 11802

lighting, projectors, art and
artifacts, they show the
step-by-step know- how
involved in the design and
manufacture of the well-known
products.
Know How U.S.A. will tour
the nation for five years. Placed
on displays in 36 specially
selected, major enclosed
shopping centers each year, it is
anticipated that the display will
be visited by more than
25-million Americans.
Viewing of the display, which
will be in Gainesville through
Oct. 31, is free to the public.

O'CONNELL, Gainesville
Mayor Perry McGriff and UF
Athletic Director Ray Graves
will be among those attending.
The Albatross, a local rock
band, will play. Gator Band and
UF cheerleaders are expected to
attend.
WUWU radio station will
broadcast the event from 11
ajm. until game time.

UPD Officer Honered
Patrolman J. E. Hogan, a nine-year police veteran, has been
selected the University Police Departments Officer of The
Month.
Hogan had been named for his outstanding service record
while on duty at the UF Medical Center.
He is the fifth recipient of the Officer of The Month award
since its inception last May. Before joining the police force he
was a farmer for over 30 years.
Hogan received a plaque for his reliability, efficiency and
courtesy in the execution of his duties.
A FREE TICKET
to RAINBOW SPRINGS
WITH EACH LARGE (35{)
ORDER OF FRENCH FRIES
/vv
201 N.W. 12 13th jwcjonajn
GYPSY IN YOUR SOUL
Wear rings on your toes, Let your hair
stream out behind you. Feel wonderfully
wiki in this long Indian print peasant
dress. Sweeping down to your toes,
waisted empire-high and sleeved in a de delicious
licious delicious little puff. From our ethnic col collection,
lection, collection, many multi-colors, S-M-L, 18.00.
Junior Dresses.
4fam 3/tctAeM
GAINESVILLE MALL

Friday, October 16, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 16, 1970

UF Students May Receive Discounts

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students may soon be
paying lower prices in
Gainesville stores.
LEE SCHWARTZ, Student
Government secretary of
consumer affairs, announced
Monday the student discount,
long a dream of UF students,
may soon become a reality.
Next week the Student

WHAT'S HAPPENING!

THE AGE OF THE
MOVEABLE STUDENT: The
Florida Student Movement will
meet at the Reitz Union Sunday
at 7:30 p.m.
INSTEAD OF THE GARAGE:
The Friends of the Gainesville
Public Library are collecting
books for their annual book sale
to be held Oct. 21-24. Donations
of books, art reproductions and
old phonograph records may be
taken to the service entrance at
the Library on E. University
Avenue.-
GIRLS WANTED: The Gator
Sail Club is chartering a flotilla
of yachts for a four-day
Thanksgiving break cruise to the
Bahamas. Twenty males and an
equal number of females are
needed. The quota is now short
10 people. Any coeds interested
should call Vilma Snyder at
392-7609 or Rik at 392-9319.
For those already signed up for
the cruise, there will be a
shakedown sail and beach party
in Clearwater Oct. 24. Fee is five
dollars. Pay Vilma.
BLUE, BLUE, MY KEY IS
BLUE: Applications for
membership in Florida Blue Key
are now available. They may be
picked up in the offices of the
dean of the various colleges or at
the Union Information Desk or
the Student Activities Desk.
They must be turned in to
room 312 of the Union no later
Powerful
Deal.
The new Citroen is its own high*
powered salesman. Standard power
includes: the stopping power of
front inboard disc brakes. The last lasting
ing lasting power of functional design. The
power of Citroens Constant Level
Ride System. The going power of
a "hemi engine. Now let Citroen
demonstrate its selling power. Take
a test drive.
Citroen
WE KNOW THE VALUE OF
CARS, YOU KNOW THE
VALUE OF SERVICE
EDS
MEHARI CITROEN
4308 NW 13TH ST
GAINESVILLE. FLA

Discount Committee headed by
Bob Berrin, will meet to discuss
and formulate plans for the
money-saving program.
Department stores, movie
theaters, and various small
businesses will later be visited by
the committee.
Were going to go to every
business which will agree to help
students save money, Schwartz
said.
SOME PEOPLE have found

than 5 pjn. Oct. 23. An active
member of Blue Key must sign
each application. A member will
be on hand each day between 2
pjn. and 5 p.m. in room 312 of
the Union.
BUILDING THE LEADERS OF
TOMORROW: There will be a
leadership training class tonight
at 7 p.m. in room 349 of the
Union. The class is sponsored by
College Life, who will meet
Sunday Oct. 18 at 9:13 p.m. in
the Graham Recreation Room.
AND FOR THE LOUDEST
GROWL: Gator Growl skit
tryouts will be Oct. 20 at 8 pjn.
at the track field.
WHATEVER: Delta Sigma Pi
will meet Oct. 19 at 7 pjn. in
room 346 of the Union.
FOR THOSE WITH A
DRAMATIC FLAIR: Tryouts
for An Evening of One-Acts
will be held Oct. 19 and 20 at 7
p.m. in the Art and Architecture
building rooms 4C, BC, 14C, and
16C. To be produced are
Gallows Humor,** The
Elephant Calf, and Red
Cross.
ESQUIRE REVELS: The
Cricket Club will practice Oct.
17 at 9 a.m. at Alice Field in
preparation to meet the
powerful Esquire Rebels from
Freeport, Grand Bahamas on
Oct. 24 and 25.

8 N.W. 16th Ave.

that prices are high in Gainesville
and because of that, they buy
most of their clothing and other
necessities back home where
they might be cheaper. If theyre
given a discount, then theyll
buy here in Gainesville, he said.
As an example when the
discount plan is finalized, a
student may be able to buy a
$lO pair of pants for only $7, or
a SSO watch for about $35.
Were going to try to save
the student from 10 to 40 per
cent, Schwartz said.

VETS ELECT: The UF Veterans
Club will meet at 7:30 pjn.
today in room 150 C of the
Union. Election of officers and
bloc seating will be discussed.
EAG WORKERS: The
Environmental Action Group
needs workers to go
door-to-door sponsoring two of
the amendments which will
appear on the ballot Nov. 3.
Workers are also needed in the
secretarial pool, aluminum can
drive, and newspaper recycling
committee.
APPLY NOW: Savant
applications are now available at
the Union Student Activities
Desk. Applications must be
turned in to the desk by Oct. 19
to be considered for fall tapping.
MUSICAL MALES: Phi Mu
Alpha Sinfonia, professional
music fraternity for men will
have a rush smoker tonight at
7:30 pjn. in room 123 of the
Union.
Revolution Now
Can Jesus of
Nazareth Revolutionize
your life?
Find Out...
COLLEGE LIFE
Graham Area Rec. Room
9:15 Sunday Night.

STUDENTS WILL be asked
to show their ID cards and
brown fee cards when making
discount purchases.
This isnt an attempt to
blackmail local merchants, he
said. We just want them to take
part in the system.

UNION DANCE
POWE^^^p
Swing around!
to
Budget Rent a Cap /\
of Gainesville
376-1245 ~v |PI3P
Free pickup and
delivery anywhere I A gs
in Alachua County I |
1 GAINESVILLE/JACKSONVILLE I /
I ONE WAY SPECIAL I /
I *ISOO FLAT AIE I \\ \\
INCLUDES GAS A AIR CONDITIONING! ||
I 3 HOURS, 100 MILES 1 \\ 1
M
Budqet Weent
BentaCap Better Cars
iMH For Less.

A booklet listing the
discounts at local businesses will
be published by SG once the list
is compiled. Schwartz said
restaurants and quick service
food stores will probably not
agree to the discount plan
because of their small profit
margin.



UF Beats The Blahs
With Unusual Courses

By BEV CHEUVRONT
Alligator Writer
Are you tired of the same old
academic grind? Fed up with dry
courses like statistics, chemistry,
and French? 5
SEEK AND YE shall find
the University Catalog is packed
with unusual courses to liven up
your schedule.
Attuned to the Aquarian Age,
the Department of Agriculture
offers many selections to flower
children. Weed Identification
and Local Flora are only two
possibilities.
If you ever wanted to raise
hemp, Fiber Crops will teach
you how.
OR YOU CAN spend a
quarter studying Orchidology,
the science of growing orchids.
Management of Southern
Turfgrasses and its sequence
Physiology of Closely Clipped
Grasses will give you something
to do for two more quarters.
Try scheduling Flavor
Chemistry in around noon.
Frozen Water
Less than one-tenth of one
per cent of the earth's water is
available for human needs and
about 75 per cent of ah fresh
water is frozen in the polar
icecaps of the Arctic and
Antarctic, according to a water
company executive.
Americans use more than 400
billion gallons of tap water daily
which is 57 per cent of all that is
available, says John G. Scott,
president of the Mountain
Valley Water Co. In about a
quarter of a century however,
the nation may need 900 billion
gallons daily, more than todays
total supply.

YOUR MOVE...
PPG INDUSTRIES REPRESENTATIVES WILL INTERVIEW
ON OCTOBER 2223,1970
V sEfB
One of life's biggest deci- career openings, we feel we
sions selecting the com- can offer opportunities ri rihk
hk rihk I pany that will afford you valed by few. Come in and
//§ \ opportunity to realize your talk with our representative
Mfm \ career objectives! -he is interested in you
nr m \ and your future.
Mm \ PPG Industries is a Company equal opportunity cmploycr
j/sw am \ that provides such an en enfif
fif enfif rid vironment. We invite you to
iii iiiiiiiiiiilllilill''li?fil e invest 30 minutes of your
time to explore the challeng- H
ing career opportunities in Wj "j P
Chemicals, Coatings & Res- JB
ins. Fiber Glass and Glass.
Because of the diversity of
our products, locations, and INDUSTRIES

CHILDRENS Literature
(Kiddie Lit.) and Business
Communications (letter writing)
are ideal for the summer months
when its too hot to work.
A Swahili course will really

KINGS CURB COUPON "*|
B
U Yin Hamburger Platter C
I MING S and reg. Pepsi on,y jj|
1 llO vaiu 85< I
U IJ Check for Kings Royal Treats
U Big savings everyday Both locations U

pep up the conversation at your
next cocktail party.
And if your sense of humor
runs to puns, take
Contemporary Affairs. Or even
better Applied Anatomy.

Wright Flares
BTfjBBL Are For
Loo t,n S
§Bc- : S;S BarfE**?
k v'.S I
IlllilWy These solid flannel flares
1 by Wright look great and fit
!§' the way you want them to. And
youll stay looking good thanks to
ff? r .f B the Everpressed fabric of 50%
f| :| B Dacron* polyester, 25% Orion
*% B and 25% Rayon. Young mens
H B sizes 29-38 The University Shop has over
Mom 3,000 carefully selected pairs to choose
W rn from. All in the season's best colors.
uuniQht. slacks
The UjnlQhC Place To Go In Gainesville
HI S?r Hi
Pnhiersitjr J^lfop
1620 W. University University Plaza
HailtotheShef!
(The Super Shcf)
I \\> ZI \d ; \
is there a burger
any larger?
right up the street at
715 N.W. 13th St.
an 1412 N. MAIN ST.
Burger Chef jJ?a*wMW jji
goes all out *A\\rttL ,//
to please the
student.

Friday, October 16. 1970, The Florida AMptor.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 16, 1970

EDITORIAL
Grow Up
Five days a week, between the hours of 7 and
approximately 10:30 p.m., WRUF-FM radio features a
program of music called Radio Center.
Programming includes such titles as: Landmarks in Music
(strictly classical), Melody Before Mozart, Composers from
A-Z (more classics) and the Orchestra. Also included are
show tunes from Broadway and intermittent spurts of
progressive music.
This program, selected by supervisor Dr. Mickie
Edwardson, is indicative of a by-gone era. With exception to
the token progressive spots, the wishes of the students, who
help operate the station, are ignored.
In Wednesdays referendum, students expressed a desire
to make WRUF-FM more student orientated. Station
Director, Ken Small has said that he is unclear as to what
more student-orientated means, and that someone will
probably come to tell us.
We would like to take the initiative and propose the
following changes:
Eliminate the Radio Center block of programming
altogether or move it from its current prime time location
to earlier in the afternoon.
In the place of Radio Center institute a program of
strictly progressive music (hard rock, underground, folk,
folk rock, jazz, etc.) beginning at 4 p.m. and lasting until
signoff.
At present, progressive music is aired beginning at 12:30
a.m. til signoff. The shows format is produced and
controlled by students and despite the late hour is
completely sold out with advertisements.
It is this type of progressive programming that,
broadcasting industrys two prime trade magazines,
Broadcasting and Variety have labeled as the fastest
growing segment of their profession today.
It has reached such a peak, that the Columbia
Broadcastings flagship station, WCBS in New York, is now
playing this kind of music 24 hours a day. ABCs seven
owned and operated stations have also adapted a smiliar
progressive music format.
Instead of updating their programming as have these
major stations, WRUF-FM continues programming what one
person referred to as a sea of Mantovani and the Musak
syndrome.
We seriously wonder how many people are interested in
listening to Radio Centers Music and Memories notable
recordings from the first 40 years of the century.
The station has argued that they try to please a wide
variety of listeners with Radio Center and that student
interest has picked up in the program. Yet last week one
student announcer on the show said he thought were
programming for vegetables.
As far as pleasing local listeners, we suggest that since the
station is a part of UF, its primary target should be
students. The station can program for local residents in
daytime hours or early afternoons.
During the night, the station is now competing with six
North Florida stations with transmitters in Ocala, Orlando
and Jacksonville, as these stations are playing the Radio
Center type of music.
The students on the other hand have no alternative to
listen to their kind of music aside from WGGG which tends
to be a blend of the so called bubble-gum music,
commercials and very little progressive sounds.
We feel its time for WRUF-FM to grow up and begin
programming first for the students and the local residents
later.
Buy A Dinner
There will be a boxed chicken dinner on the Tolbert
Green Saturday to raise money for the Baby Gator Nursery
before the Richmond game.
The nursery needs money to double its facilities to care
for 60 youngsters instead of the 30 they presently
accomodate.
The nursery has the opportunity to expand its facilities at
the University Methodist Church. They have the personnel
needed to care for more children.
Now they need money for more educational equipment,
beds, and play equipment. They need $350.
The dinner Saturday is a chance to raise that money.
Dinners are being sold for $1.50 each. They are well
worth the price.
We support this effort to raise money for the nursery. It
provides a valuable service to UF married students.
Buy a dinner before the game and youll be getting a
good meal. Youll also be helping a kid.

, ..." i !'
,|f 'Hi,
(l 7 OKfMCKTD Hi i

No More Retaliation

When somebody takes a swipe
at me in print, the temptation is
to warm up my foreign-crafted
four-speed fuel-injected Olympia
Portable and really do a job on
them in the next days Alligator.
As a matter of fact, I used to
do just that last year when
someone got cute and decided
that: (< well damn, if he can say
that about and get
away with it!!!
The net result generally was
some nifty verbal stunt flying
and a rather generous dose of
overkill.
AND I came off like the big
bully that I was.
So I decided this year that I
would hold my knavish tongue
when the angry court jousters
took the held to teach me some
new tricks about an old game' It
would be hard, I knew, but this
year I would be above that sort
of thing.
1 am not.
One guy that really set me off
came up with a new twist.
People have taken issue with me
before, but no one has ever
claimed that I do poorly that
which I do (whatever it is). He
said he couldnt understand why
1 was given space in a college
daily, such was the lack of skill I
demonstrated in my craft.
He also said something like
this:
IT WOULD be easy to
question Mr. Parkers beliefs in
criticizing his column, but to
these he is entitled.
If that is an example of the
type of construction he
considers exemplary, then it is
not at all difficult to understand
why he finds my prose so
unpalatable.
* e
Another letter from a fellow
law student commented that it
seemed ironic for the Alligator

JOHN PARKER
-

to call for responsibility on one
hand, and to print my column
on the other. He said that my
lashing out at Southern Baptist
teddy bears was bigoted and
that he was looking forward to
another quarter of Alligator
irrationality and journalistic
irresponsibility.
V
I HARDLY know what to
say. It seems like everyone and
his second cousin (including
Spiro Agnew) has a crystal clear
conception of such abstract
ideas as journalistic
responsibility. I dont. I feel a
little uneasy having to point out
to my learned collegue (they
teach us to say stuff like that at
law school) that the framers of
the constitution and the
Supreme Court justices for the
past few years have gone to great
pains to assure people like me
the right to lash out at Southern
Baptist teddy bears. They must
have gone to that trouble for
some reason, dont you think?
Id just like to see that all that
squabble over the first
amendment isnt wasted.
Admirable of me, is it not?
Lately Ive been getting flak
from the home front. Bruce
Alper, a sort of muddle-headed,
21 year-old middle-aged
student-patriot, devoted almost
a full column to quaint little
idiocies about me (which is very
flattering of course.) And Ralph
Glatfelter, who is really a fairly
clever fellow and should know
better, accused me of having
nothing better to do than to
blast fraternities.
WELL, BRUCE hardly needs
comment. His critique begins in
silliness (Rumor has it these
days that John Parker wears a
Spiro T. Agnew watch with the

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement
Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor
Loretta Tennant
News Editor


hands set to go backwards...)
and degenerates into outright
confusion (Mr. Parker cant
stand to see a girl that wont join
his aspiring radical
entourage...). Bruce makes me
seem like a Gainesville version of
Charles Manson. But I think I
waste my time trying to figure
out the finer points of Bruces
diatribe, and the likely (and
most appropriate) response is:
Well, oh yeah?
#
Now, about Ralph. I really
dont know whats come over
the lad. In one sweeping column
he pretty well dismisses the
entire world as being pretty
darned hopeless. I offer some
usefull statistics, however, that
may help him out of his
manic-depression: last year I
wrote some 24 columns, of these
two were devoted to Greeks. So
far this year I have published 10,
one about sorority girls.
BUT MORE than that, Im a
little worried about Ralph. He
says that college educates you so
that youll perform meaningless
work for a faceless company,
grinding out worthless paper.
What else does college train you
for? I dont know. I dont care.
Its futile. Wow. I just hope he
feels better in the morning.
* *
Ok, faithful readers. Youve
suffered through another
retaliation session. It wont
happen again. I'm going to put
my hot little Olympia in the
shop for a tune-up and ribbon
change. And hopefully no one
will try anymore messy
character assassinations while
shes on the rack.



Right Wing Drivel

Since coming to this
university in the Fall of 4 66, I
have read the asinine drivel of
many right-wing idiots in The
Florida Alligator. The list is
fairly long: Wayne Boynton,
Steve Rushing, Jimmey Bailey,
the comedy team of Harold
Aldrich and Dave Doucette,
Teddy Bear Remley, Freddie
Bear Vollrath, and assorted
cretins who attempted to justify
war, racism, and other
conservative ideals.
However, it is now apparent
that Bruce David Alper (He
dropped the middle name this
year; hes a columnist now, you
know) is the No. 1 right-wing
idiot of the last half-decade at
UF, possibly of all time.
BRUCIE *S column of
October 13 was the most
repulsive bit of garbage the
Alligator has printed recently.
The opening line is a non-classic:
This week Bruce Alper strikes
back against those who
butchered the truth ... Poor
Baby Brucie, alias Crusader
Babbitt, mades an ass of himself
for the umpteenth time by
whimperingly explaining how
nasty Mr. Flood and Mr. Parker
were when they pointed out the
latest Alper idiocies. Bruce
should know by now that such
vendettas, with each person
denouncing the person who
denounced him, ad infinitum
and ad nauseaum, are a waste of
time and newspaper space; when
someone attacks your position,
then you should let readers
peruse both opinions not an
endless series of replies and
counter-attacks and draw their
conclusions at that point. When
you seriously open a column as
Bruce Alper did on Oct. 13, you
force readers to laugh at you,
not with you.
Some other phrases were
virtually unbelievable: You
know who you are, you rascal;
you will drown in your own
hypocritical rhetoric; others
who have indulged in hurling
malicious epithets at me, etc.,
etc., etc. Such quaint offerings
remind one of Snidely Whiplash
of the Bull winkle Show. I am
amazed that a university student
would use such phrases in a
column.
Also, Bruce accused John
Flood of using his tongue,
even though Mr. Flood
expressed his views in a letter to
the editor. I would like to read
Bruces explanation of how one
can type with ones mouth.
BRUCIE WROTE (hopefully,
not with his mouth, which
presently contains his foot) of
the lefts more moderate
elements which must be
accepted as patriotic. Just who
the hell are you, Bruce D. Alper,
to tell me who is patriotic and
who isnt. Thats damned white

Alligator Staff
Denise Valiant* Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
Steve Strang Craig Goidwyn
Assistant Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

"" 1 11 u "***mm!*m

DAVE
1 MILLER
of you. Perhaps you missed Bill
Mauldins cartoon (St.
Petersburg Times, Oct. 12)
depicting an American with a
flag covering his head, while
another American explains that
its a flag, not a blindfold.
But, then again, Brucie is like
Bobby Williams, that towering
unintellect, who commends the
Young Americans for Fascism
for agreeing with a man who
screams about firing professors
and expelling students left and
right ... all in the name of
freedom. The only freedom
such people want is that of a
police state.
Brucie D. Alper, like so many
other pseudo-patriots, desires an
unswerving, unquestioning
devotion to a police state. As a
matter of fact, he recently wrote
that ROTC, the training ground
for William Calleys and David
Mitchells and Ernest Medians,
preserves our liberty.
THIS INCREDIBLE lie is
nowhere backed up by facts on
the part of Brucie. Moreover, if
he is of this opinion, I demand
that he fight for Uncle Sam and
Uncle Strom in Vietnam (or is it
Cambodia?) Instead, he uses his
wealth and his student
deferment to go to school,
while urging that other young
men lose their lives while he
prepares for law school.
A real gutless wonder this
Bruce D. Alper; he should either
put up or shut up. If you defend
the war, then fight it: Vietnam,
Love It Or Leave It. But
Brucies perfectly willing to let
others die for him, as he dreams
of ROTC preserving liberty, just
like the cops in Chicago, the
National Guard in Kent, and the
highway patrol in Augusta.
Lastly, Brucie D.s personal
references to John Parker, the
Alligators most able columnist,
and his attempts at humor were
rather infantile and in keeping
with the rest of the column.
His attempt to label Mr. Parker
as a radical is quite absurd,
but everything Brucie D. writes
is absurd. Why should he be
logical all of a sudden?
I shall close by making one
request to the editors of the
Alligator: Please end the habit of
printing replies to replies to
replies! to replies; when one
man writes and another criticizes
in print, that should be it. Please
spare readers the anguish of
encountering replies of Bruce D.
Alper, because his original
columns are bad enough.

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| READERS FORUM |
'

Leaflet Lifters
MR. EDITOR:
This is an open letter to the
leaflet lifters who apparently
think it is their right and duty to
suppress the freedoms of speech
and assembly of a minority
group on this campus.
Apparently regarding the act
as patriotic and democratic, you
have removed leaflets
announcing two meetings of the
Florida Student Movement. On
Monday night, Oct. 12,
approximately 600 leaflets
pertaining to the anti-war
moratorium organizational
meeting were distributed around
the campus. By 10 A.M. on
Tuesday, I noticed that about
three-fourths of the leaflets had
been removed. You fairly
successfully abridged our
freedom of speech and assembly.
It never ceases to amaze me
that the people who find
selective repression acceptable
and justifiable are almost
invariably the first to trot out
their long list of constitutionally
guaranteed rights when their
type of democracy is challenged.
However, a long list of
guaranteed freedoms is
meaningless unless the people
and government accord them to
all. The Russians have more
freedoms than any other
peoples, if you examine their list
of guaranteed freedoms.
Another point I would like to
make is that the United States as
a democracy will not be judged
by how many rights and
freedoms the majority retains.
The quality of American
democracy will be determined
by the manner in which
minorities are treated by the
majority. A successful
democracy is tolerant of
minorities, in that all the

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1619

channels to power and the
freedoms and rights retained by
the majority are also granted to
the minorities.
So to you, Bobby Williams,
and your ilk who cannot
conceive of any type of
repression in this country, I
offer the suggestion that you
refrain from removing leaflets
(political repression) long
enough to accompany Donald
Dixon into Gainesvilles ghetto
to witness large-scale economic,
social and political repression in
your own backyard.
FREDERICK REPLOGLE, (4FY)
Letters
MR. EDITOR:
It seems that there is a great
deal of hostility toward the left
wing-liberal-radical factions on
this campus as evidenced by
some letters printed in this
column this week. One Mr.
Williams called Tom Slade a
dynamic and responsible
speaker (who) knows what
freedom and America are all
about. Another writer called
the chairman of the philosophy
department a sick man for
asking for an honest inquiry into
the reassignment of Bob
Canney.
My first impression was that
the letters were switched and
what these two writers meant
was that Slade was a sick man
and our philosophy chairman
knew what freedom was about.
But unbelievable as it might
seem someone had the stupidity
to say Tom Slade knows what
freedom and America are all
about.
What has Mr. Slade said and
done about the Black people of
this state? Why are there only
300 black people on this
campus? Is the black population
of this state less than one'
per cent? Is that freedom, Mt.
Slade? Where are the rights
guaranteed under the First
Amendment for Bob Canney?
Why is a man who speaks out
against the present powers-to-be
immediately relieved of his job?
And people talk about relieving
convicted felons of their jobs.
How many felons did Florida
and the other Southern states
create in the fifties and sixties
when people attempted to help
black people get equal rights
which they were supposed to

Friday, October 16, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

1 filll

have received one hundred years
ago, when slavery ended?
It is the epitomy of
hypocracy when people pervert
the meaning of freedom. Wake
up all you complacent, Goddam
right wingers, King George is
beginning to take up residence in
the White House!
A. S. ILKSON
Goofy Uffio
MR. EDITOR:
I read a funny article in The
Alligator on Tuesday. It was
about Intramurals, in particular,
the team named Fat Boys.
The thing that I found so hard
to believe was the references
made to certain players on the
team. Right there in black and
white was the name Goofy
Uffie. Surely this cant mean
that our own little hard-working,
anti-war, student body president
actually endulges in recreation!!!
I would like to think that he
could find something more
relevant to do with his time.
Like, lets make this
university less athletically
orientated. Maybe Ive missed
the point somewhere along the
line. Maybe it would be more
relevant to have a moratorium
on Homecoming day???? Isnt it
horrible that those crummy
apathetic students want to have
a Homecoming? That they, too,
want some recreation? Tsk. Tsk.
SANDY HOUGLAND (2UC)
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Bt typed, signed,
double speced and not exceed
300 words.
. 9 Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
9 Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if
writer shows Just causa. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
lettenrfor space.
Writers may submit longer
essays, columns or letters to be
considered for use as "Speaking
Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular
column is asked to contact the
editor and be prepared to diow
samples of his work.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 16, 1970

Notices for Page of Record must be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. the previous Wednesday.

MID-TERMS SCHEDULED
All students are expected to
report for the following tests
and to bring No. 2 lead pencils.
They will be required to use
Social Security numbers.
CSS 111 MIDTERM
The mid-term examination for
CSS 11 will be given Tuesday,
Oct. 20, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A report to Bryan
Hall 120 or 201 ;B to Little 101
or 109; C to Architecture and
Fine Arts 4,8, 14, 16, 213 or
219; D-E to Little 113, 121 or
125; F to Little 201, 203, 205
or 207; G to Little 213, 215,
217, 219 or 221; H to Little
223, 225, 227, 233, 235 or 239.
Others report as follows: l-L
to Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117, 118 or 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110 or
112; P-Q to Floyd 104, 106, or
109; R to Flint 101,102,110 or
112; S to Walker Auditorium;
T-V to Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18
or 20; W-Z to Walker
Auditorium.
CSS 112 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CSS 112 will be given Tuesday,
Oct. 20, at 7 p.m. in Peabody
201,202, 205, 208 and 209.
CSS 115 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CSS 115 will be given Tuesday,
Oct. 20, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101, 102, 112,
or 114.
CLC 141, 14X, CLC 144
MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CLC (including 14X) and CLC
144 will be given Thursday,
Oct. 22, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A report to Bryan
Hall 120 or 201; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Architecture
and Fine Arts 4,8, 14, 16,
213 or 219; D-E to Little 113,
121 or 125; F to Little 201,
203, 205 or 207; G to Little
213, 215, 217, 219 or 221; H

Low Interest Rates Still Available
Interest oo Credit Union loans never exceeds per month on unpaid balance
Reduced jates available for new car loans, FHA title I Home Improvement
Call 392-0393 for monthly payment data for any type loan.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION'

to Little 223, 225, 227, 233,
235 or 239.
Others report as follows:
l-L to Matherly 2,3,4,5,6, 7,
8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13,14 or 16;
M to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
111, 113, 115, 116, 117, 118
or 119; N-0 to Anderson 104,
110, or 112; P-Q to Floyd
104,106, or 109;
R to Flint 101,102,110 or 112;
S to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 142, 14Y, CLC 145
MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CLC 142 (including 14Y) and
CLC 145 will be given Thursday,
Oct. 22, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z report to Peabody 101,
102,112 or 114.
CHN 251 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CHN 251 will be given
Wednesday, Oct. 21, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A report to Bryan
Hall 120 or 201; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Architecture
and Fine Arts 4,8, 14, 16,
213 or 219; D-E to Little 113,
121 or 125; F to Little 210,
203, 205 or 2G7; G to Little
213,215, 217, 219 or 221; H
to Little 223, 225, 227, 233,
235 or 239.
Others report as follows:
l-L to Matherly 2,3, 4, 5,6, 7,
8,9, 10, 11, 12, 13,14 or 16;
M to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
111, 113, 115, 116, 117, 118
or 119; N-0 to Anderson 104,
110 or 112; P-Q to Floyd 104,
106, or 109; R to Flint 101,
102, 110, or 112; S to Walker
Auditorium; T-V to Anderson,
2,3, 4,7, 18, or 20; W-Z to
Walker Auditorium.
CHN 252 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CHN 252 will be given
Wednesday, Oct. 21 at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101, 102, 112
or 114.

Pane of Record

Formerly Orange and Blue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
for the publication of official University notices and public events by
the Division of Information Services and the Public Functions Office.

DEC GRADUATES
Students planning to graduate
in December should have
already received information
from the Registrar's Office.
Students not receiving this
information should report to
Room 40, Tigert Hall no later
than Friday, Oct. 16.
GRADUATE RECORD
EXAMINATION
THE GRADUATE RECORD
EXAMINATION
The Graduate Record
Examination will be given at
8:45 a.m. on Sat., Oct. 24, in
Walker Auditorium.
REMOVAL OF "I" GRADES
DEADLINE
Friday, Oct. 16 at 4 p.m. is the
deadline for removing of "I"
grades for candidates for
graduate degrees to be conferred
at the end of the fall quarter.
SOCIAL SECURITY
MATCHING CONTRI CONTRIBUTIONS
BUTIONS CONTRIBUTIONS
Social Security matching
contributions for employers
will increase from 4.8 per cent
to 5.2 per cent on Jan. 1,
1971.
Therefore, on contract and
grants budget worksheets, it
will be necessary to compute
Fringe Benefits (in the Salary
Category) at 9.2 per cent (4.0
per cent for State Retirement
and 5.2 per cent for Social
Security) of non-academic
(Career-Service) salaries.
The rate for academic
employees under Teacher
Retirement remains at 6.25 per
cent.
PUBLICATIONS SEMINAR
Publications Seminar sponsored
by the Dept, of Publications will
be held in the Reitz Union
Auditorium, Wednesday,
October 21 at 1:30 p.m.
Everyone is invited.
UNION BOX OFFICE
"PASSACAGLIA", Gen. Public
$.75; U. of F. Students, $.25

university calendar

Friday, Oct. 16
Seminole Picture taking, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Union Movie, "Dr. Strangelove,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00,
10:30 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
U of F Veterans Club; Election
of Officers, 150-C Union,
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Florida Players, "Passacaglia,"
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Union Dance, "Power", Union
Ballroom 8:30 12:30 p.m.
Fellowship Christian Athletes,
Speaker: David Holt, Plaza,
2:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 17
Mayor's Council, Box Chicken
Dinner, benefit Baby Gator
Nursery $1.50 ea., Tolbert
Area Green, 11:00 1:00
p.m.
Football, University of Florida
vs. Richmond, Florida Field,
2:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Dr. Strangelove,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00,
10:30 p.m.
Florida Players, "Passacaglia",
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 18
Florida Blue Key Homecoming
Sweetheart Concert F inals,
Constans Theatre, 5:00 p.m.
Union Double Feature,
"Frankenstein" & 'The Bride
of Frankenstein", Union
Aud.. 6:00, 7:30, 9:00,
10:30 p.m.
U of F Duplicate Bridge Club,
150 C&D, 6:30 p.m.
College Life, Graham Area.
Recreation Room Union,
9:13 p.m.

Notices for the University Calendar
may be submitted to the Student
Activities desk, third floor of Reitz
Union or mailed to the Public Func Functions
tions Functions Office, G-72, Reitz Union. Dead Deadline
line Deadline for the Tuesday Alligator is the
previous Friday at noon; for the
Friday Alligator, the previous Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday at noon.

Monday, Oct. 19
Seminole Picture Taking, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
361 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Florida Players tryouts for
"One-acts", AFA Bldg.,
Rooms 4c, Bc, 14c, 16c, 7:00
p.m.
Block and Bridle Club Meeting,
Speaker: Mr. Rodebaugh, 349
Union, 7:30-10:00 p.m.
Pi Mu Epsilon Mathematics Club
Meeting, 355 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Science Fiction Club Meeting,
356 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, Weil Bldg., Room
525, 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 20
>
Seminole Picture Taking, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Pi Lambda Theta Dutch Treat
Dinner, Guest Speakers: City
Commissioners, Neil Butler &
Courtland Collier: 'The
Women & Practical Politics,"
Union Cafeteria, 5:30 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, Union 355,
7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C 4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
U of F Duplicate Bridge Club,
Room 150 C&D, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 362
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Reception for University Dames,
President's home, 7:30-9:30
p.m.
Yoga lessons, Union 233, 8:00
p.m.
Young Republicans Meeting,
361 Union, 8:00 p?m.
Florida Woodwind Quartet,
Union Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Accent '7l Forum, Speaker:
Robert Canney, University
Aud., 8:30 p.m.



3 Share Nobel Prize For Medicine

STOCKHOLM (UPI) The
Nobel Prize for Medicine was
awarded jointly today to an
American, British and Swedish
scientist for nerve research that
could lead to remedies for
nervous and mental
disturbances.
THE $78,400 prize was
divided among Prof. Julius
Axelrod of the National
Institute of Mental Health at
Bethesda, Md. Sir Bernard Katz
of Britain, now a guest lecturer
at the University of California at
Berkeley, and Prof. Ulf von
Euler of Sweden.
It was the fifth consecutive
Waited: Two
Incoherent Veeps
WASHINGTON (UPI) As
Congress was nearing its recess
Wednesday, two House members
proposed a constitutional
amendment: The republic
should have two vice presidents,
they said, one to raise money for
each of the major parties.
Reps. John H. Dent, D-Pa.,
and Wayne L. Hayes, D-Ohio,
said their proposal was as
serious as Vice President
Agnews attention to his
constitutional duties has been.
Agnew, they said, has
presided over the Senate for 14
hours and 50 minutes out of the
1,167 hours and 32 minutes the
Senate met so far this session.
They added one qualification
to their proposal no one
would be eligible for the vice
presidency who speaks in terms
other than those without
meaning.
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year an American has won or
shared the Nobel Prize for
Medicine.
The award by the Nobel
Committee of the Royal
Caroline Institute said the men
were honored for their
discoveries concerning the
humoral transmitters in the
nerve terminals and the
mechanisms for their storage
release and inactivation.
TRANSLATED INTO
laymens English it meant their
studies had explained the
mechanism guiding the
transmission of impulses
between the nerve cells in the

CHAPTER 1
1 On the first day which was called Monday,
Dub created his free beer blast (from 9-10 PM)
2 On the second day which was called Tuesday,
Dub created his fabulous gameroom filled with
pool and foosball tables.
3 On the third day Dub decreed that Ladies
drinks should be only 11 cents (5-9 PM) every night
of the week.

Dub Created the Swingest Night Spot
* .-'*7- j f -- ; ; -- i-w..-- - ~
In Town because ~~
S x ,v
THE DEVIL MADE HIM DO IT.

human body.
Prof. Bengt Gustafsson, the
new secretary of the Caroline
Institute, said the three
scientists discoveries have
greatly stimulated the search for
remedies against nervous and
mental disturbances.
Gustafsson said the three have
been working independently of
each other but their discoveries
have all contributed in solving
principal questions concerning
the neurotransmitters, their
storage, release and
inactivation.
THE NEUROTRAN NEUROTRANSMITTERS
SMITTERS NEUROTRANSMITTERS are the substances

which transmit chemical signals
between the nerve cells.
Sir Bernards discoveries
concern the mechanism for the
release of these transmitters and
are considered fundamental to
the understanding of what is
going on in the cells.
Von Euler discovered that a
substance called noradrenaline
serves as neurotransmitter at the
nerve terminals in the
sympathetic nervous sytem in
the human body.
Axelrods discoveries concern
the mechanism which regulate
the formation of noradrenaline.

4 O n the fourth day which was called Thursday,
Dub created (what was later to be called
internationally famous) MINI-SKIRT-NITE.
5 On the fifth and sixth days called Friday and
Saturday, as on all the preceeding days, Dub
collected beautiful topless dancers and nationally
famous bands to play for him and his friends
(known as customers).
6 Ajad on the seventh day Dub rested as does all
Gainesville on Sunday.

Friday, October 16, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
For information call
CASSELS
M THE AIR
378-2646

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
AKC German Shepherd pups 3 mo.
old black and tan $75 pure black
SIOO excellent pedigreed call
372-7016 or 392-0243. All shots and
wormed (A-st-16-p)
4970 Mobile Home S3BOO Nothing
Down Mr. Olln 964 5606 Starke Fla
(A-st-16-p)
Conn alto saxophone with case, two
mouth pieces and strap. S9O. or best
offer. Ph 378-0477 call after 6:00 PM
(A-st-16-p)
EB2C Gibson Bass Guitar and Fender
Bassman Amplifier. $450 or Best
Offer 378-0477. (A-st-16-p)
$350 value, panosonic stereo
components asking S2OO Call
372-7855 after 4PM
Desperate!l! (A-4t-16-p)
Need $$ cassette recorder with tapes
SSO HONDA 450 3000 miles new
last spring $750 Call 376-1429 after
5 PM (A-st-16-p)
Young attractive girl who is tired of
holding her own is seeking a new grip
on life Call 378-0441 (A-3t-18-p)

Its happening jL
at the Rat!
At the Rat... I
You can rock out to the latest
groups, dancing almost nightly 'Y~(i
You have the chance to meet
j someone new, after that, who knows.
! And unescorted girls are \
! always welcome \
Advertise
its good business

Weve
I I 9ot V u
I Wllf I tovered
m B So make your move. Pick up
B our new cover soon to
_ appear at bookstores and
I B make
B autumn Prop
v. B relax your
B the page
B portfolio of drawings by UF
_ B artist Leonard Kesl. 0r f think
B someone you know
:'-/' f B photographs by UF students ~
I I a,ive an d strong
B ~ **^B B a Quarterly to
W 1888 B Make your move down to a
B bookstore to pick up a
Quarterly.
florida quarterly
lr we only did it for you
iwM> I MMM* . " '-i .; yi-, _ :' __

FOR SALE
1969 KAW Mach 111 500 cc excellent
condition with 1970 wiring kit good
miles $760.00 Ph. Tom Shires
462-2082 (A-10t-18-p)
AR 2-a spkrs S2OO Fisher 500-TX
amp S3OO Garrard SL6S-S3O
372-7694 (A-3t*l-p)
"NEVER used anything like It, say
users of Blue Lustre for cleaning
carpets. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Electric upholstery shampooers also
available. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-ts-c)
Kawaskl 500 (red) 70 1300 ml. $950.
call 373-3567 (A-2t-20-p)
Sale Baby furniture, chair &
ottoman, men's, womens, childrens
clothing, lawn mower, misc. galore.
Call 378-5486 or 372-0951
(A-2t-20-p)
FREE or cheap 1963 Triumph
spitfire parts: engine, transmission,
roll bar, headers, miscellaneous parts
your price. Steve 373-2912
(A-3t-20-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 16, 1970

FOR SALE
Bike for sale. Girls German Racer:
2-speed, 3 wks old, 26 in. Paid S9O,
will sell for best offer. Call Margie
373-3933 after 2pm (A-lt-20-p)
Bicycle For Sale English Racer 3
Speed Sears. Hand Brakes. Asking
$40.00 Call Between 5-7. 378-6376
(A-lt-20-p)
1967 Fleetwood, 12x60, 3BR, iVi
bath. Air Cond., partly furnished on
lot no. 42 in Pine Hurst. Excellent
Cond. $4995. 378-3516 (A-st-18-p)
Cassette player recorder Am FM 75
wt. Amp. 21 heavy tapes 2 musical
instrument speakers 2ftx4ft hand
crafted Ph. 373-2756 after 6:00
(A-st-19-p)
Yamaha guitar and case. 2 wks. old.
$65 376-5212 (A-2t-19-p)
ADORABLE CHIHUAHUA puppies.
5 weeks old $25 each call 372-1790
after 5:00 (A-st-19-p)
RCA portable stereo 6 speaker S7O
call Jim Stephens 376-4734,
392-7703 leave message (A-st-20-p)
STUDENT SPECIAL clean, adjust,
lubricate & install New Ribbon on
your portable standard typewriter
then guarantee It .for 30 days all for
JUST $14.50! Limited time only. JR
Office Furniture & Equip. Co., 620
S. Main St., Phone 376-1146.
(A-24M3-C)
Sofa sl2, bed sls, electric
broom $6. Phone 378-5794
(A-3MB-P)
1970 BSA 650 thunderbolt bright
red 2 helmets luggage rack MUST
SACRIFICE $950 Bob 373-1242
(A-st-16-p)
8-track car tape deck w/4 speakers 9
months old. SSO Firm S6O/w 10
heavy tapes. Call 373-2520 ask for
Bishop (A-st-16-p)
SONY 230 tape recorder; Almost
new; Perfect cond.; Accessories
included; $175.00; Call Steve Lewis,
376-9450 (A-3t-18-p)
1969 Honda 50 470 actual ml, elec,
start, excel cond, helmet & bookrack
incl. $l5O cash 373-2877 (A-3t-18-p)
150 Honda road cycle needs a little
work 2 helmets S9O 373-2520 call
between 5 and 7 also Bell & Howel
auto load 16 movie camera $45
Steve, 373-2520 (A-st-16-p)
BAR, handmade Mexican handwood
w two leather covered stools. 2
shelves & built In wlnerack 54" x 41"
deep. Must see It $l9O. 378-9577
after 1 (A-3t-18-p)
SEIKO SPORTSMATIC 5
Self-winding; Day-Date; a beautiful
black face with sllvercase and band.
S3O Call Dave 376-0739 (A-st-18-p)
67 triumph 500 cc very clean very
quick extra seat, bars, fenders, meg.
pipes will sell for $599 Call 373-2911
(A-st-18-p)

FOR RENT
Joining Peace Corps female
roomate needed, Vi blk. from
campus, pool, A/C, $55/month plus
utilities. Call 373-3827 or come by.
(B-3t-20-p)
Available immediately due to
cancllation. 1 BR AC furn apt
$l2O/yr lease. $l3O 6 mo lease Ph
373-3074 (B-3t-18-p)
Sublet beautiful 2-bdr 2-bath Point
West apt Jan 1. Move In Dec 15. Call
376-4219 or 372-3126. (B-st-20-p)

Peter Sellers George C. Scott
-C Dr. Strangelove %
on How I Learned To Stop Worryini Anri Love Tbi Bonk
hot-line
1 comedy
I
This Friday & Sat. Union Aud.
advance tickets on sale at 2nd floor box office Friday from
12:30 4:30 for all weekend showings
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Doadlino -3&0 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

J#' I I M
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME< DATE
n for sale ( consuti,.) STUDENT # PHONE
torrent q 1 day |; '- [ 'JI
q wanted 2 days ADDRESS C S f |
helpwahted D 3 days (*lO% discount)
autos O 4 days (*lO% discount) c|T y STATE ZIR
personal q 5 days and over
D lost-found (*20% discount) I j
services WORDING
1 1 I I l I I I I I I I I l I I I I I II I Mil I I I I I I I I I I II
2l I I I I I I I I I I M l IMF
3l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
4i 11 1 11 11 11 11 1 11 ii 11 11 11 n 11 11 11 rrn~

S HOTSTffI color
BETWEEN THEIR LEGS
"THE SAVAGE SEVEM~



GATOH classifieds

, WANTED
Male roommate wanted to share 1
bdr apt. -ac, carpet, pool 62.50 per
mth 1 full month + rest of Oct. free.
Lease runs to June, call 378-4423
(C-SMO-P)
MALE ROOMMATE to share
2-bedroom apt with 3 other students
rent $47.50 + 1/4 utilities. Come by
716 SW 16 Ave apt 315 Unlv.
Gardens (C-2t-20-p)
Wanted Now 1 Female Roommate
for Landmark Apt. 120, 47.50 a
month Call 373-3756, Ask for Joan
or Jean AC, Heated, pool, dishwasher
(C-st-19-p)
Wanted Now! 2 Male Roommates
Landmark Apt number 119, 47.50 A
Month Call 378-5946, Ask for John
or Wayne. Ac, Heated, pool.
Dishwasher (C-st-19-p) ___
adm 1 no
N.Mf. 13th St Pb 372-t2l __ lAI
Across From TM Mall PENTHOUSE 3
SliWlrfftA "lAOM 1.50
N On* U4a- tdni.ll,n
PENTHOUSE 2 HANG UP
a9 AOM 100
Mention this ad (or specie! early bird price of 35 cents every
nite before 7 P.M. and Sat. & Sun. Matinees. Regular Price
Sl.oo Penthouse number 2 SI .50 Penthouse number 3
1
rjmmm
I J- V * \ -/ r ,'

r i
Todays
more for your money meal
moisons
CAFETERIA
I------ 1
FRIDAY'S FEATURE
Morrison's Famous
f ROAST TURKEY 11
I I With Mashed Potatoes I §
st I Dressing, Gravy I >
B | and Cranberry Sauce |
i 2 -j
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING j
Lmoisons
CAFETERIA beyond comparison I
2(i20 N.W. 13th Stieet m the Gainesville Mall
' * ** to

Friday, October 16, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

WANTED
2 Roommates for 2brm house A/C
cable tv SSO/mo Ist & last mos. plus
1/3 utilities Upperclass or Graduate
preferred 1948 NW 4 St 376-9520
(C-2t-19-p)
Lost folder containing all U. of F.
Identification. If found please call
Brenda Rifkin 107 Hume Hall
392-8662. Please! (C-lt-20-p)
Male roommate wanted starting
winter quarter. Call 392-0470 until 5.
Trailer located at mobiler trailer park
2925 S.W. 28 PI. (old Archer rd.)
(C-3t-19-p)
Hip girl to live In modern house with
2 acres In SE need car cook, light
clean own room $25 + V 2 util
373-3381 (C-st-17-p)
HELP WANTED
Part time waitress or male help over
21 apply Pizza Inn 316 SW 16th Ave
Phone 372-4403 (E-lt-20-p)
Doctoral student needs part time
secretary to take dictation and type
in my home typewriter furnished
2.00 per hour call 378-2823
Stutterers wanted for an auditory
feedback study. Will pay you SB.OO
please call Michelle Jensen Evenings
378-0104 Days 392-2046
(E-10t-15-p)
medical TECHNICIAN OR
TECHNOLOGIST: Background In
histology. To be trained In electron
microscopy. Excellent position for
part-time student or student spouse.
Term appointment 2Vi years. Salary
$6,548-$8,098 depending upon
qualifications. Equal Opportunity
employer. Write Chief, Personnel
Division, VA Hospital, Lake City,
Florida 32055. (E-7t-13-p)
~
Cartoonist wanted for Alligator
experience helpful see Steve Strang
after 3PM room 365 Union 392-1686
(E-tfc)
If you want to make good money
(SSO or more per week), part time,
without selling, call 378-4793 after
SPM (E-4t-19-p)
we are looking for special people
who want to make SSOO mo part
time. We represent an exciting
company with a AAA D&B rating.
Attend a meeting at 2933 NE 13 Dr
Fri at 7:30 pm to find out
particulars. (E-2t-19-p)
Male help wanted lull time or
part time. Immediate openings
full time or part time counter
men. Must have person who will
be available thru xmas break.
Apply 2 pm. to 5 pm. Thursday
Oct. 15 and Friday Oct. 16.
Arbys 1405 SW 13th Street.
(E-2t-19-p)
*
aaaaaaaaa a aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.aaa.a
AUTOS
67 Corvette conv. Full power, air,
auto. Good shape. Asking S3IOO.
Call 372-9283. Ask for Boyd.
(G-3t-19-p)
1967 GTX, Plymouth. Top notch
custom street car. Candy-apple,
metal-flake paint. Will trade for VW
or Porsche. Phone 376-7113.
(G-st-19-p)

AUTOS
#
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.a.....a*..aa.a
a#*#* a a a a aaaaa
1967 Mustang Convertible 289 cl V 8
wide oval tires 4 speed transmission
excellent condition Phone 378-8884
student 2157 NW 9th Ave.
(G-4t-17-p)

lEMpt
MM at the rat
OCT. 21, 22, 23, 24 TWO SHOWS NIGHTLY
8:00$ 10:30 PM $2 p ef p erson
Provided by SGP

jSffl inTHMHC^'I
TALK ABOUT CAMPUS UNBEST I
THIS UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT IS REALLY ASKING FOR IT.
mmEm? : -v" x
Jill
>§jg jr v f{ H a \ m
llilfl {il w w A i&&~ I M i
l.'gy/ m&m?/ : x x
Starring
ANTHONY QUINN ANN-MARGRET- GARY LOCKWOOD
Mus< bv BARRY 06 VORZON and PERRY 80TKIN. JR. Produced and o*reced by STAN LEY IE R Co*or 1 luear ifwe!tntHiiiea>>el I
| Par aing^G* ran j | j
FEATURE AT . (YOU MUST SEE IT FROM THE START!)
2:08 3:57 5:46 7:37 9:31
/IH3W!BÂ¥MLp lK TALE OF
I ~ OPPORTUNISM AND
HHltifiliffl IMMORALITY."
Leonard CBS-TV
\ The butler did it...to everyone!
. tmmMKs -
| The Countess | Her Son
' AM 7w&\, -y/M^L
| Her Daughter 11 Her Daughter-in-Law |
FEATURE AT. . 1:39
Angela Lansbury Michael York
Something for Everyone
...a comedy of evil. (g

Page 13

AUTOS
aaaaaaaoaaaaoaoooooooooaoaaaaooaatfaa
a a*a*a"a"a*a a aaaaaaaaaaaa.aaaaaaa.a.
66 GTO 389 3 2s 4 speed 49000
miles Mag wheels & new tires very
quick seeing is believing call Ron
372-4161 309 SW 16 Ave apt 253
(G-4t-20-p)

CAREER I
. ... I
Due to New Store Expansion I
and Rapid Promotions We
Have Openings for
-MEAT CUTTERS I
-STOCK CLERKS I
-MEAT APPRENTICES!
-PRODUCE CLERKS I
- CHECKERS I
Full time and part time
Excellent wage rates and
liberal fringe benefit program
provided.
APPLY In Person To
David Allagood At The
BIG STAR I
3736 Newberry Rd. I
Gainesville, Fla.
Oct. 8,9, &il thru 16!
BAM- 6PM
In / tfutti itfipni lamt \ fnifjttxrt H



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
1965 Olds Cutlass convertible, sharp,
loaded, must sell at $875, phone
378-6818 (G-3t-20-p)
68 MGB 16700 ml. top condition
$1645 1002 W. University 376-8941
Mike Austin (G-3t-20-p)
65 VW bus converted to camper good
shape and many miles to give we
must part asking 900 373-2630 pass
word can only afford one ad thank
you (G-lt-20-p)
65 Mustang, 6 cyl., 3 speed, new
tires. 376-2184; after 5. Reasonable
price. (G-3t-18-p)
Classic 1959 Jaguar XKISO Hdtp.
wire wheels, good tires, looks good,
runs but needs some work. $350 or
best offer 376-2708 (G-4t-18-p)
67 VW bug sacrifice $1,025
378-3196 (G-3t-18-p)
LARGEST STOCK of USED
IMPORTS in Nth. CENTRAL
FLO RIDAI HARFRED AUTO
IMPORTS, 1946 N. Main 378-7085.
(G-tfc)
JACKSONVILLE
CIVIC AUDITORIUM
SATURDAY, OCT. 318:30 PJM.
[bank master
VME RICARD PRICES charge!
3.50-4.50-5.50
Tickets now op Sal* Jax Chile
AuditoriumHemming Park
Ticket Office and Coliseum
Reservations Accepted
Phone Auditorium 354-2041
Mall orders accepted. Send check
or money order to Jax Civic
Auditorium, Jacksonville, Fla.
and enclose self-addressed,
stamped envelope.

ou ust He 18) earn of |[| Bli JBT Mwj M
ige to Enter & Prove it! I HW : ||

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, October 16, 1970

Page 14

AUTOS
65 Mustang, 6 cyl., 3 speed, new
tires. 376-2184; after 5. Reasonable
price. (G-3t-18-p)
Dodge Dart, 1967, V-8, automatic,
sports coupe, 39,000 ml., excellent
condition. SBSO. Hardtop. Call
Linda, 376-6415, leave name, phone
(G-3t-18-p)
FOR SALE 62 olds super 88-V8 new.
tires-just tuned-rest in good
condition-$325 or best offer Call Bob
after 8. 376-5981 (G-st-16-p)
Hansel: Meet me in the Mlcanopy
Forest, and we will go find the
Gingerbread House .... I love you,
Gretel. (J-lt-20-p)
America, love It or leave It I
Potential radical needs SSOO to split
so put your money where your
mouth is. Richard Klnkead 392-7529
(J-2t-19-p)
Coeds Facial Hair removed forevet.
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrologist 102 NW r
2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
O - hi y 11
SINGLE STUDENTSI Meet more
members of the opposite sex through
NDS. All dates in Gainesville. Most
dates with U.F. students. For free
details write: Nationwide Dating
Service, P.O. Box 77346, Atlanta,
GA 30309. (J-10t-13-p)
BABY FERRETS, tame and lovable
pets, black and cream with black
masks only S2O 376-0968 evenings
(J-2t-20-p)
Congradulat ions; new phi mu
pledges! Welcome to our bond of
L.H.T. may you find happiness In It.
Love in our bond; your sisters.
(J-lt-20-p)
BAB wanting you just as you are;
Realizing there is only one you;
Knowing I could never forget you.
Happy Ist. LOVE KKH (J-lt-20-p)
"Sing we for love and Idleness,
naught else is worth the having.
Ezra Pound. Food for thought! New
Delhi Dell 706 W University
(J-lt-20-p)
A unique and unusual gift I* a
handmade gold or silver ring.
Original design or your own
private symbol. Reasonably
priced. 373-1947. (J-st-15-p)

LOST <& FOUND
LOST: Glasses in red case, in Bryan
120 sometime after 4th on Frl. Oct.
9 Please return! Call 392-9312, Sand!
(L-3t-18-p)
HELP! Lost all U. of F. Ids.
Including drivers licence. If found
please call Millie Fleming 103 Hume
2-8666 reward offered! (L-2t-18-p)
LOST: Blue crushed leather wallet
reward offered for return please
contact Sherry Lane 392-9240 lost
around hub or union (L-3t-20-p)
Pair of gold rim glasses, octagonal
frame. If not broken I could really
appreciate their return. Call
372-5774 after 7 pm (L-st-19-p)
SERVICES
we SERVICE ALL IMPORTS.
Factory trained mechanics.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS. 506 E.
Unlv. 372-4373. (M-tfc)
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists
trained to type theses, dissertations,
textbooks, manuscripts, etc. 1405
NW 13th St., IBM Bldg., Rm,. 206,
Phone 376-7160. (M-15t-10-p)
HOME MADE CAKES cakes baked &
decorated for any occasion home
or office parties shower Birthday
etc. Call 376-9550 (M-3t-16-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Nowl Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own welting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
We will professionally plastic
laminate any newspaper article or
photo for $1.50. You pay only after
receiving your work, cut out article
carefully, leaving a margin of about Vi
Inch, and send to Gator Laminating
service. P.O Box 12949 Gainesville
Fla 32601. (M-2t-19-p)
: x-xvx : : : x*x'xvx-x-: : x\vx-x-x*x-xvxvx
X-.vXv.v.-.v.v.-.y.v.v.-.w.w.v.v.x.X-X-X X-.vXv.v.-.v.v.-.y.v.v.-.w.w.v.v.x.X-X-X---
-- X-.vXv.v.-.v.v.-.y.v.v.-.w.w.v.v.x.X-X-X---
j
SUNDAY FILM CLASSIC
Hi
HI
- I|
eUB^^^rF{7^i3rMHHHBiHHBHi
Double Feature Double Horrible Frankenstein &The
Bride of Frankenstein Sunday, Oct. 18 6:00, 7:30, 9:00,
10:30 Union Aud. 50 cents for both films buy your
advance tickets today at 2nd floor union box office from
12:304:30
.ii SPECIAL BATES FOB FLORIDA RESIDENTS
j|H|r On The World Famous
AmjK GLASS BOTTOM BOATS at
Springe
fSfjlwTV | 1
Come see how
, \
Lotibmbh( USni
LaaufJjajlZJ GAINESVILLE will never J
""" ** ' >utlt% FORGET 'T~ :
Shows HCMf GEORGE
5L : MBP scott n\ :
2:00 4th ac
5:10 I SMASH
6:20 GP J WEEK PATTON
r^.
FiiyH Special Adu,ts $125 * Day jgjfc:
Shows AT A JIM DANDY COMEDY!
l : o2 OTtITTTITTn GODfR[Y /' a!
3:30 nun IIH Iti CAMBRIDGE // /.
5-30 kllTmiTill Raymond "J
7 3 Q [JyJjJjlJI ST IACOIKS
Q. OQ COLOR 0, n.u* Untied Artists { [it] J
#ooooooooe
*. m ,* .*.**. w '- #*#* 1 *4-ro#A *' * ** *' *'* .' . P*O



The Florida Alligator
j.%v*v.v*v*v # X # !vXvXvXvXv! XvXyXvXv****** #

'CottonComes To Gainesville

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
A TV REVIEW: Im sitting
with these dudes who are
promoting a Johnny Winter
concert at the Suburbia Drive-In
and were talking about the
problems of putting on a show
and how Gainesville needs some
independent promoting and
things like that when my eye
catches the unmistakable outline
of a cannabis sativa plant on
television.
Obviously its a know your
drugs number for the
community but it is still a little
shock so I casually stroll over to
my ugly end table, slide open
the drawer to check if my
Gideon is in place and finding
that it is, slump happily into my
seat. But the show goes on. A
hefty police officer is pointing
to a display board that contains
a varied assortment of fat joints
and neat roaches, terminology
supplied by G.P.D.
THE UNION. Coming off
Juliet of the Spirits the Union
hangs in there with a Stanley
Kubrick classic, Dr. Stangelove. I
have actually spoken to three
people this week who have not
seen Strangelove. Not seen
Strangelove? But thats absurd.
Right you are. Who could afford
to miss Peter Sellers playing a

ALTMAN STEREO SYSTEMS
High Quality Component Systems Opn loa.m-9p.m. (79 p.m. Home game hours)
At 807 W. University Ave. Presents:
aHR 2&fcjH
11 imhw 1 SELECTOR
-- = suwt SPCftKfftf AS m **
/>'t yr *^ l jKgjl 9 |y
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British squadron leader, an
American president and a
German scientist, all in the same
movie? From the man who gave
you 2001, Fri & Sat. at the
Union.
FLORIDA. The Florida brings
what promises to be the best
new movie in town, Cotton
Comes to Harlem. Cotton is a
black production from top to
bottom. It was written by an
expatiate black novelist some
have compared to Simenon. The
director is the incomparable
Ossie Davis and tne movie
features, Raymond St. Jacques,
Godfrey Cambridge and Calvin
Lockhart who was so good as
the gangster in Joanna. The
movie is a funky comedy about
two off-beat detectives and a
fraudulent fleecer of the
faithful. Could be a biggie.
PLAZA. The Plaza brings us a
mixed bill. Something For Every

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Friday, Octobar 16, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

One, stars Angela Lansbury and
Michael York and purportedly
deals in byzantine family
relationships. Supposed to be
funny, heavy and bizarre.
The other feature is RPM
which stands for, are you ready,
Revolutions Per Minute. Stanley
Kramer directed it and he also
did Guess Who is Coming to
Dinner? Guess how good a story
about an aging hip academic
(Anthony Quinn) who gets to be
president of a university when
the students take over because
Che and Eldridge (their first and
second choices) are not available
but who keeps balling his
student-chick (Ann-Margaret!)
and doing other unconventional
things, could be.
FLORIDA. Patton endures
and House of Dark Shadows,
two hours of Dark Shadows with
Barnabas the Vampire, who
never has to beat an unnatural

GREG JONES
Entertainment Editor

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acts bust, drives the Love Bug
out.
MUSIC. Power comes to the
people this Friday night at the
Union. Johnny Winter is
scheduled Oct. 24 at 8:00 PM at
the Suburbia.

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Page 15

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Page 16

i, Tlm Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 16, 1970

a country to have ~
a great writer is like
having another
government. That is why
no regime has ever loved
great writers, only minor
ones.
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
(t The First Circle
By QREG JONES
Alligator Entartainmant Editor
1 first read Aleksandr
Solzhenitsyn while working at a
bookstore. I should not say read
because it was more than that; I
was inexderably drawn into
The First Circle to the
exclusion of all else save
persistant customers who after a
couple of polite excuse mes
would nudge me sharply in the
ribs. Only then would I return
from the humane prison camp
of the zeks to the humane
entreaties of the customer.
For a country to have a great
writer is like having another
government. That is why no
regime has ever loved great
writers, only minor ones,
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn said in
The First Cide.
THE FIRST CIRCLE took
its title from Dante's first circle
of hell and dealt with a prison
camp on the outskirts of
Moscow that held political
prisoners of considerable
academic ability. The prisoners
existed in a limbo between
maximum imprisonment and
minimal freedom. They were
prison elite, their prison more
like a factory which they
couldn't leave. There they
worked on various projects for
the state, primarily a system for
identifying voices of people
considered politically
questionable.
I read Cancer Ward while
teaching school one spring,
Cancer Ward continued
Solzhenitsyn's defense of
individual freedom through
incredible characterizations.

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A Nobel In The Life Os

That was his method. His
statements were made through
the fascinating portraits he
wrote of his Russian
countrymen.
CANCER WARD was a
microcosm of all Russia and
took place in a hospital ward for
cancer patients. The disease that
afflicted the patients was like
the government that predestined
their lives, unwanted, cruely
arbitrary, destructive of life. His
protagonist in Cancer Ward
like First Circle was a man
from where ninty-nine men
weep and one laughs, the
political prisons of the Soviet
Union.
Through the lives of his
characters one learns about
Russia, Stalin and Solzhenitsyn
himself. He too was a
mathematics expert, confined to
a zek camp like the hero of first
circle, he too languished in
political exile with a fierce
stomach cancer like Kostoglotive
in Cancer Ward, he too survived
the living death of the camps in
Siberia like Denisovich in A
Day In The Life...
All Solzhenitsyns characters
have come to no good because
of the central inescapable fact of
their lifetimes, Stalin. Their
stories are their struggles
maintain dignity and redefine
freedom under hostile
circumstances.
Already the house writers in
the Soviet Union are mounting a
campaign to further vilify one of
the great writers of our time.
The Soviet Union has told him,
much like your president
O'Connell might tell you, if you
dont like it here go to the west.
But he wont He has been
expelled from the Soviet writers
association much like Tom Slade
would expel Canney or Megill or
any of his fantasies.
He is not allowed to publish.
But he has won the Nobel Prize
and told the truth as he sees it
and refuses to be compromised
by the lies and expediencies of
the moment.
DO NOT think he is a tool of

the west. He is a man of his
revolution as much as an
American is of the American
Revolution. Were he American,
Spiro Agnew wbuld hate him,
this campus would not employ
him.

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The paradox of Russia has
agonized great writers into
existence in the past and
Solzhenitsyn continues in the
line of Turgenev, Dostoevsky
and Tolstoy. But he is not for
the classics shelf, and he is more

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compelling than just another
title on a complete bookshelf.
He needs to, be read to
understand Russia, people and
America a little better. He needs
to be read because he can put
life on a page.



I The
I Florida
I Alligator

| IN UNEVENTFUL PRACTICES mwwwi
I Gators Brace For Spiders

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator News Editor
Its been a very uneventful
1 week of practice for the Gators.
Except for an injury to
l| starting center David Peek, a
I couple of minor changes in the
I offensive and defensive
I alignments and a change in
practice schedules, the Gators
I look like the same team
I Thursday that they looked like
I when they completed their
1 preparations for the Florida
I State Seminoles last Thursday.
THE TEAM was relaxed and
I spirited as both the defense
I and offense ran through play
I recognition drills in preparation
I for their sixth game of the year
I against the Richmond Spiders
I here Saturday.
Peek, who moved from
I offensive tackle to center three
I weeks ago to replace injured
I Richard Kensler, hurt his knee in
I practice Wednesday and will
I miss the Richmond game and
I the game with Tennessee a week
I from Saturday in Knoxville.
Tampa Jesuits Greg Horlow,
I who isnt even listed on the
I Gator roster and has hardly
I played this season, got the nod
I from head coach Doug Dickey

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DAVID PEEK
... will miss Richmond
to start in Peeks place. Harlow
is a sophomore.
ALSO TO miss Saturdays
game are defensive tackle Eddy
Moore, who hurt an ankle in the
North Carolina State game two
weeks ago, fullback Mike Rich,
who will be out indefinitely with
fractured ribs, and monsterman
Doug Sorenson, who strained a
knee in the Gators loss to
Alabama.
Dickey, who has shown in his
first five games as UF head
coach he is not one to put his
opponent to shame by running
up the score, is not expected to
do anything of the sort against
an injured Spider team Saturday.

It is rumored that Dickey will
show as little as possible to keep
Tennessee scouts in the dark.
Theyll be no running the
score up, offensive coordinator
Jimmy Dunn said after practice
Thursday. If we jump out in
front early, well play alot of
players. We never, never run the
score up.
Gator Shorts Somebody
working in the field crew at
Florida Field goofed Thursday,
or just had their mind on
revenge. The scoreboard in the
north end zone had Auburn
instead of Richmond over the
visitors score box ... Dunn,
offensive backfield coach Lindy
Infante and offensive linecoach
Bill Fulcher took on three team
managers in a touch football
game on Florida Field after
Thursdays practice. Fulchers
first pass was intercepted.
Numero Uno
Kyle Rote, now a sports
telecaster, was the No. 1 bonus
pick of the New York Football
Giants in 1951. v

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Friday, October 16, Tha Florida AMfetor,

Page 17



Page 18

Th# Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 16, 1970

IW M :^ai

Robinson Robbed Reds
Os World Series Victory

The Baltimore Orioles acted
like woodpeckers, but really
were machine destroyers as they
defeated the Cincinnati Reds in
five games and took, the 1970
World Series.
Baltimore, by winning
Thursdays game 9-3, finished
the Red Machine for 1970.
With mine sweeper, or
actually baseball sweeper Brooks
Robinson at third base for the
Orioles, the Reds had little
chance in the Series.
Four times in the first three
games, Brooks robbed the Reds
of extra base hits by diving,
lunging, and thrashing to reach
the balls and then throw the
runner out.
JOHNNY BENCH, the
National League home run and
runs batted in champ for the
Reds, was robbed twice in one
game of hits by diving catches
by Robinson.
When Robinson came to the
plate, Bench told him the next
one would go over his head.
That was the only way the Reds
got one past the golden glove.
But Robinson was not only
good on the field. He collected
nine hits during the series to t tie
die World Series record last
accomplished when Bobby
Richardson did it for the New
York Yankees.
BALTIMORES pitching was
far superior to the Reds during
the Series also. But then, doesnt
good pitching beat good hitting?
In 1963, the Los Angeles
Dodgers swept the Yankees in
four games behind the arm of
Sandy Koufax, who won twice;
Don Drysdale, who shut the
Yanks out in the third game;
John Podres and Ron
Perranoski. The Yankees had
Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris,
Elston Howard, and Joe

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Pepitone on the team all
power-hitters.
Then in 1966, the Orioles
swept the Dodgers behind good
pitching, which just further
proves the point. The Dodgers
that year, admittedly, didnt
have the greatest power and lost
two 1-0 games.
THE REDS top pitcher,
lefthander Jim Merritt, who won
20 games this season, came up
with a sore elbow and was
bombed in his only performance
Thursday.
With a three run lead, Merritt
served up a home run pitch to
Frank Robinson with a man on
base to close the gap. Three
pitchers later, and many runs
later, Ray Washburn began
warming up in the Reds bullpen.
And when he warms up, the
game is lost.
1 picked Cincinnati to win the
Series this year, but after
Baltimore won the first two
games by close margins and then
completely dominated the third,
I wanted Baltimore to win to
end my misery.
CINCINNATI during the year
was powerful, being out of first
place only a few days and that at
the beginning of the season. 1
thought they would carry their
feeling of being No. 1 into the
Series. But Baltimore was on a
winning streak at the close of
the season that didnt end until
the fourth game of the Series, 17
in a row all counted.
As for the most valuable
player in the Series, and the free
car that Sports magazine gives to
that player, it has to go to
Brooks Robinson.

Birds Clinch Series

BALTIMORE (UPI) The
Baltimore Orioles, blasting six
pitchers for 15 hits, stormed to
,baseball's world championship
today by drubbing the
Cincinnati Reds, 9-3, to win the
World Series, four games to one.
Southpaw Mike Cuellar
pitched a six-hitter to win the
title game, giving up all three
Cincinnati runs in the first
inning and then shutting out the
National League champions the
rest of the way.
HOME RUNS by Frank
Robinson and Merv Rettenmund
paced the Orioles assault on a
hapless parade of Red pitchers.
Fittingly, Brooks Robinson, who
was voted the most valuable
player of the series, came up
with still one more spectacular

Even with the pressure of
winning the game on his mind,
in the ninth inning, Robinson
robbed Bench of a line shot
down the third base line to retire
the Red catcher again.
Plus the game had to end with
Robinson handling the ball. Pat
Corrales hit a grounder to third
and Robinson picked it up,
threw it to Boog Powell at first
and the Orioles were the World
Champions.

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play in the ninth inning.
The Orioles had added two
runs in the last half of the eighth
inning against reliever Ray
Washburn for their final margin.
Then Johnny Bench, leading
off the Reds ninth, drove a low
line drive to Brooks left. The
Orioles brilliant third baseman
left his feet for a diving catch.
Cuellar then struck out Lee May
for the second out. The final out
of the series was, again fittingly,
a ground ball hit by pinch- hitter
Pat Corrales to the irrepressible
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Brooks Robinson, who scooped
it up and threw to Boog Powell
for the final out.
CUELLAR, AFTER his
first-inning trouble, held the
Reds without a hit for the next
five frames.
Meanwhile, the Orioles
blasted Cincinnatis dazed
pitching corps for two runs in
each of the first three innings
and added a seventh run in the
fifth inning when Rettermund
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PRESSURE FORCED QUITTING
Fans Bothered Tate

MIAMI (UPI) Charlie Tate
revealed today he quit the head
coaching job at the University of
Miami because of excessive fan
pressure on his players and
obscene calls to his home were
more than I bargained for.
Tate, in a telephone interview
with Miami News reporter
Charlie Nobles, said his sudden
decision to quit after taking a
31-21 whipping from Georgia
Tech was pretty tough on us.
I FEEL better about things
as each day goes by. Im trying
to get my thoughts collected.
But overall, I think what I did,
Id do it again today, Tate said.
Tate was reached in Aiken,
S. C., where he is playing golf
and visiting relatives.
Tate, who took command of
the Hurricanes in 1963, said he
felt the pressure on his players
to win so he could get a new
contract was unfair.
ITS TOUGH enough just to
line up and play without forcing

Birds Rout Reds Pitchina

slashed a home run to right field.
Brooks, who was l-for-5 in
the game while setting one series
record and tying two others, got
a standing ovation from the
45,341 fans as he was called out
on strikes in his final time at bat
- although pitcher Mike Cuellar
and Dave Johnson, Paul Blair,
Frank Robinson, Boog Powell
and Merv Rettenmund shared
the final game spotlight.
The Cincinnati pitching staff,
bogged down with sore-armed
hurlers, simply couldnt contain
the Orioles, who collected two
homers, two doubles and 11
singles to turn the tense title
game into a rout.
Cincinnati manager Sparky
Anderson gambled on starter Jim
Merritt and had to come in with
five relievers. Os the six, only
rookie Milt Wilcox pitched well
in a 1 2-3 inning stint and he was
taken out for a pinch-hitter after
being hit on the side by a Frank

Tennis, Basketball
Tryouts Scheduled

Any freshman student
interested in trying out for the
freshman basketball team should
report to Florida Gym at 6 p.m.
today as coach Tommy Bartlett is
looking for additions to his first
year squad.
Details on eligibility and other
requirements will be explained
at the session. Those interested
to try out should bring their

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CHARLIE TATE
Fans Forced Quitting
the kids to win to save the
coachs job, said Tate, whose
contract was to have expired at
the end of this season.
I didnt want any part of
that situation, and it was a
situation I just didnt have that
much control over. I wanted the
kids to go ahead and get some
fun out of the game ... and not

Robinson liner.
JOHNSON AND Blair each
collected three hits while Frank
Robinson, Powell and
Rettenmund added two each.
Cuellar was rocked for three
runs and four hits in the first
inning hes noted for having
problems in the early going
but he settled down and pitched
a six-hitter.
Cincinnati, outhomered by
the Orioles 10-5 during the
series, again failed to display the
power that won it the nickname
the Big Red Machine. Tony
Perez, a .317 hitter during the
regular season with 40 homers
and 129 RBIs, was the biggest
offender. He was 0-for-4 in the
game although Mark Belanger
leaped to snare one of his liners
and went 1-for-19 in the
series.
But, in the final analysis,
Cincinnati just didnt have the
pitching to compete with
Baltimore.
Merritt, the clubs only
20-game winner, has been
bothered with tendonitis and

own shoes and shorts.
** *
Men interested in trying out
for the UF tennis team are asked
to report to the varsity tennis
courts Monday, Oct. 19 or
Tuesday Oct. 20 between 5 and
5:30 p.m.
Coach Bill Potter wants to
bolster his squad for the long 29
match season.

worry about people like
myself, Tate said.
Tate said he was equally
disturbed by a rash of obscene
calls to his home many of
which were answered by his
family.
FOR THE fans to be on my
back is one thing, Tate said,
but to involve my family is
another. I cant stomach it. I
thought if this is what its all
about, I better take some time
to think whether its worth
it.
Tate also acknowledged he
simply couldnt bring himself to
change his philosophy of
conservative football -a
philosophy that earned him a
winning record just to benefit
the fans.
I just couldnt go out and
throw a bomb on every down to
please everyone, he said.
Youve got to have a
balanced attack. Thats the way
I was taught and thats what I
believe.

Anderson decided to take a
chance on him in this game only
because Jim McGlothlin, his
second game starter, also has
arm problems now.
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sff?i!SSStfWWsSaSftW^
| Woman Golfers |
| To Face Rollins I

The womans golf team
I I open their 1970-71 season
tomorrow in Orlando when
they face Rollins College at
the A1 Hambra Country Club
beginning at 1 p.m.
Coach Mimi Ryan will start
three seniors and one
freshman in the first of eight
if home-and-home matches this
| year.
Suzanne Jackson from La
Grange, Ga. will be making
her debut for the Gators
amidst seniors Cindy Meyers,

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Friday, October 16, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

a
Ormond Beach, Fla., Linda $
Parker, Gadsden, Ala. and §
Tammy Bowman from $
Jacksonville.
I THINK we have the best §
team in the state, Coach £
Ryan said on the eve of the
opening match. We dont
have one girl among our top
five that cant beat any other
girl in the state.
The Gators will host the jij
1971 Florida Womans
Inter-collegiate Tournament
April 23 and 24.

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Octobar 16, 1970

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(HNII ) I The Harmon Football Forecast ( (mffM
\ \ I IOHIO STATE 6NEBRASKA 11AIR FORCE 16 MISSOURI \ /
' I 2TEXAS 7MICHIGAN 12 STANFORD 17 ALABAMA \ I 2||
v r'k Hi I 3NOTRE DAME BCOLORADO 13SOUTHERN CAL 18 L.S.U, ) / =ls^^^^Eg
V l I 4Mississippi 9 Arkansas 14 Arizona state 19 texas tech 4 /
\ \ I SAUBURN 10 TENNESSEE 15 HOUSTON 20 GEORGIA TECH
I Saturday, Oct. 17 Major Colleges This week for the first time in their I 111 M-
I Arizona state 44 Brigham Young 7 history, the Tigers of Missouri meet the
I Boston u 26 So?y rgi crolr h 13 Fighting Irish of Notre Dame. Coming just a ||hE
I cindn n nat? reen 35 \Sita tate 2 ? week after the tou 9 hie w th Nebraska, it'll
Ip I Citadel 23 Buckneii 17 be a bit rougher for 16th-ranked Missouri.
I Dartmouth 42 Brown 0 18 *o The Irish were able to breathe lightly all day
Dayton n 20 BuS if Saturday as they whomped Army. Notre
Delaware 25 Rutgers 6 Dame, rated 3rd, is favored in this one by
1 Duke 24 No. Carolina State 13 -o
El Paso 20 Colorado State 14 U-
Florida state ll Memphis' 1 state 21 The Southwest Conference's annual
I S orgi ll Vanderbilt io contributions to football supremacy,
I Harvard 28 Cornell 27 . ._ , .;
Houston 27 Oregon state 17 2nd-ranked Texas and 9th-ranked Arkansas,
Kansas state 25 !owa'state 16 both have the day off. Arizona State, No.
Louisville ll Marshau* 1 14 wHI 1)9 a hu 9 e 37-point winner over
I tr.Miemi, Fla. 17 Tampa is out-classed Brigham Young, while the Air
HOURS I Michigan hlo) Is state 6 Force, rated 11th, will clobber Navy by 36 HQMPJ
B Mississippi 45 Southern Mississippi 7 rv-kintc w
Nebraska 29 Kansas 7 F JU,r,ts
I N e rth M r xico state 24 ti w Mexico 23 Another of the big powers looks to have a
5:00pm1:00am Sun -Thur I North Texas" 13 22 west ne Texas 14 fairly easy afternoon, but in the Big Ten, 5:00pm1:00 am Sun-Thur
KTame 0 SCri" u never knows. The Alma Mater of the
s:oopm2:ooam Fri & Sat I Oregon' 8 6 33 Idaho 65018 10 grandfather who writes this column 5:00 pm2:ooam Fri & Sat
Pacific 21 Santa Clara 8 Minnesota faces a bit of a bear-cut in No.
DOMINOS I SITES' syracus'e 7 1-ranked Ohio- State. The Bucks will DOMINOS
I g ff tt 14 8 humble the Gophers by 21 points. What a ' UV ,T,,I,V/ J
I Saif Diego state lan'Jose stare !5 cr V from the days of Bernie Bierman and '-
t/N UAN I southern m'nois 28 SSfcarona 12 champions! Enuf flag-waving for AMIJAI IM^FMFMTV
IUI I lit? I ?sr 2? S ngtonState Gopher-land, Harmon! AllllvUll vCFI Ul I
Tennessee 24 Alabama 23 Auburn gets tougher and tougher everv
I Texas Tech 22 Mississippi state i 6 week, but this Saturday the sth-ranked am M me m
ull3l3Cj I I Effik II caMfornia Michian ll Tigers will have to sharpen their claws. ill il AfC
I {/,; ni> | i n ' in,! 2 ? Georgia Tech, smarting after its loss of the JMLf iQIW^B
I v.p.i. 17 Tuisa 14 season, is ready to upset anybody ... and
I Wake Forest 21 Clemson 15 A u
\ \ JA I west Virginia 20 Pittsburgh io Auburn happens to be in the way. The
|r MX MM I *J!e 8m & MB,y I? Columbia is Ti 9 er s are favored by 17, but ... fm Mm* mmm am
mm I Other Games South and Southwest With a power quotient of 114.9, the K / /MM mu
I Abilene Christian 21 Lamar Tech 7 Mississippi Rebels are now ranked 4th in the
VI | Appalachian 27 Catawba 19 a . ......
IH IM A I Arkansas Tech 21 state college Ark. 6 nation. And Southern Mississippi wont be
111 I 11 I carson-Newman 22 fio',"'" 20 able to do much about lowering that rating.
,11 I coast 6 Guard IS SSnarn, renn. ll Mississippi to win by 38 points. Michigan,
II ~iL I Delta state 22 Mississippi college 13 no. 7 this week, will dampen Michigan State U** #* I
Mourn I isssr I? Krr 8 % Micfpr \andwirh
I lfila 6 b?th Ke citv Cky ll Eastern Michigan 17 Facing west, Stanfords Indians pow-pow Jlwl JUIIUIf III!
I Florence 24 Henderson 13 with Washington State, and Southern Cal
Florida A&M 27 Morris Brown 6 ..... . .. §
_ I Hampden-sydney 20 western Maryland o hosts Washington. Stanford ranks 12th, the
Visit . | Lenoir-Rhyne 22 Guifford 5 A&M 17 Trojans, 13th. The Huskies will lose to At |Kjh4A|> f AlUlfltf
Dann c DaII I MUMS !.,. i PeaY IS southern Cal by 1 7, and Washington State Ul UCIIUI vUUnilf
RfIUIJ 3 I#CII I Minsaps 16 Emory & Henry 7 will have to dig out from a 28-point barrage m
I Morehead 27 Fairmont 1 c 3
No. Carolina Central 20 Winston-Salem 6 Trom otantord.
1515 SW 13th St I NwiSiS Io Pensacota w 10th-rated Tennessee is favored by just
STKkan. it Arungfon AM&N one point over 17,h-ranked Alabama. fTI ||A 4
I Trinity A& 23 !e Losiana 22 In the Big Eight, Nebraska's 6th-ranked all ILL 11 Vi I
+ .. me Mi. I X-y c* It i ac l!? n^i! le 5 Cornhuskers will crumble the Jayhawks of
Sooting f 75 Delivery I west Va. Tech 17 Concord 7 Kansas by 22 points, and Colorado, No. 8,
Western Kentucky 28 Tennessee? Tech Should hand Oklahoma its third lOSS of the
Wofford 38 Newberry 0 season.
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