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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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TOM KENNEDY
DIRTY POLITICS?
A clean vote is a fair vote. Or so this seems to be the philosophy of
the Student Government official who decided the best place for
students to vote in Corry Village was the laundry. At least, thisvballot
machine cannot be stuffed in a washer.

University College Reform
Accepted By Committee

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writar
UF Curriculum Committee
adopted a proposal Wednesday
afternoon for the reorganization
of general education at UF and
the establishment of a new
University College.
The proposal, introduced by
Dr. H. J. Doherty, Jr. of UC,
outlines a four-year general
education program with a
variety of courses that will fill
general education requirements.
THE COLLEGE will enroll all
freshmen and others who have
not yet been admitted to an
upper division college.
Students may move to the
upper division college of their
choice upon the completion of
their freshman year (42 quarter
hours) if they meet the
admission requirements
prescribed by the college in
question.
A Council of General Studies

Senate Majority Favors Reform

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This m
Ae fourth A a aeries concerning
attempts to reform the
By LEE HfMMANT
ANtgacor Staff Wrtor
The University Senate vote of
XT ov. 1969 expressing itself
against approval of the idea of a
predominantly elected senate,
was apparently a landmark in
two very different ways in the
continuing conflict concerning
Ae structure of Ae senate.
Most obviously, Ae vote was
a victory for Ae opponents of a
restructured senate. It nullified
the discussions and
of # .various.

will be created to approve all
curriculum changes, to
carefully scrutinize and
evaluate all UC courses, to
oversee the quality of teaching
in UC, and to encourage
constant concern for the
re-evaluation of methods by
which general education goals
are achieved.
lllliiiiliiiilllli
GRAND JURY indicts
Terry O. Grubb on a charge
of first-degree murder in the
jail hanging page 2
i ClanMedt 16
Editorial* 8
Entertainment 18
Latter* 9
Movies 16
Sports...... 22

proposals for reform of Ae
senate which the Constitution
Committee had been carrying on
for several months in its
evaluation of the senate
structure.
THE WORK OF the
committee had dimaxed wiA its
approval of proposals for reform
of the senate, Ae major one of
which was that Ae senate
faculty membership be entirely
elected.
But Ae specific proposals of
Ae committee never reached Ae
floor of Ae senate. That body
was first asked to express its
approval or disapproval of Ae
idea of a predominantly elected
senate. The vote of disfavor
which.'followed suddenly

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 63, No. 19 University of Florida, Gainesville Thursday, October 15, 1970

SENATE RACES

Focus Wins Majority

Focus party swept the
Student Senate elections
Wednesday winning 27 of 40
seats up for election.
Student Freedom party won
seven seats including all three
seats from Murphree Area.
SIX INDEPENDENT
candidates won seats in the
election.
Senators elected from
off-campus areas include two
from Student Freedom party,
and 21 from Focus party.
Senators from Student
Freedom party are Mack Tyner
and Jim Teller.
FOCUS PARTY senators are
Sharon Friedman, Dottie
Hamblin, Jim Gundry, Howell
W. Melton, Ellen Corenswett,
Steve Rokeach, Mona Floyd,
Martha Snedaker, Will Corbin,

IT WAS amended by the
committee that the council
consider proposals for a
four-year degree program in
general education.
The Council should also be
responsible for the continued
study of the formation of an
experimental college.
A more liberal program of
advanced placement and credit
by examination shall also be
established by the Council.
THE COUNCIL will consist of
UC deanchairman, vice
president of academic affairs,
one faculty member from each
undergraduate upper division
college, and four students
(appointed by UF president for
one-year terms).
The proposal also states that a
four-year individual counseling
service be provided for all
students upon admission.
Counseling services could be
(SEE 'INDIVIDUAL' PAGE 2)

rendered irrelevant Ae specific
proposals of the committee.
So the senate vote brought to
an uneventful end the formal
discussions of senate reform
dating back to Ae Action
Conference's task force on
governance committee in Ae
spring of 1968. Officially, the
long-standing challenge to the
prevailing structure of Ae senate
was dead, at least temporarily.
IN FACT, SEVERAL events
inAcate Aat the Nov. 1969
vote, far from ending attempts
at senate reform, gave the
reformers new impetus.
For one Aing, immediately
after Ae vote at that November
meeting, UF President Stephen
C. O-ConnclLwpressed fltfhpp*,,

Ken Anderson, Ralph Nobo,
Stewart Hershey, and Dave
Jackson.
Other Focus party senators
are David Perryman, Rocky
Draud, Clint Davis, Antoinette
Simms, Steve Baker, Mona
Couts, Gwyendolyn Francis, and
Bob Berrin.
SENATE SEATS from


Turnout Too Light
For Amendment OK

By STEVE STRANG
Assistant Assignments Editor
Fewer than 3,000 students
turned out to vote in the
Student Government elections
Wednesday, far short of the
one-fourth quorum needed to
pass two proposed constitutional
amendments on the ballot.
Honor Court Chancellor Dan
Stephens did not know the exact

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p'
SHANKAR TONIGHT
Ravi Shankar, "India's virtuoso of tha sitar," will appear tonight at
8:15 pjn. in Florida Gym. Shankar is said to ba tha parson largely
resoonsible for tha revival of tha sitar. an ancient classical instrument,
and for tha great surge in tha popularity of Indian ciawicai music in
tha west Tickets can ba purchased at tha door for sl, $1.50 and $2
for UF students and $1.50, $2 and $2.50 for the gwieral public.

that Ae issue of a restructured
senate would not die and that
senators would continue to
consider Ae idea.
The vote also encouraged Dr.
Charles F. Eno and members of
his constitution committee to go
ahead wiA a survey to obtain
opinions of all faculty members
cm Ae issue of senate reform.
Results of the survey were
tabulated and presented as an
information item on Ae agenda
for the June 1970 senate
meeting.
DISSATISFACTION within
Ae College of Education was
Aown earlier this monA when
associate and assistant professors
refused to elect Aeir portion of
Ae 50, elected fecul& members

Murphree Area were all won by
Student Freedom party
candidates. They are Robert
Browning, Rory Rohan, and Art
Thibodeau.
Hume and Graham Area
senate seats were won by two
independent candidates Lori
Lazarus and Bob Weiss and by
(SEE 'SENATE' PAGE 2)

number of students who voted
last night, but said the number
was 2,660, give or take 10 or
15.
STUDENTS APPROVED two
proposed amendments to the
Student Government
Constitution both by votes of
nine to one.
However, because 25 per cent
of the student body did not
(SEE 'ELECTION'PAGE 2)

who may sit in the senate. A
statement of the facility
expressed a lack of confidence
in the university senate... that
body ie not democratically
constituted.* 1
Sharp said sympathy for a
restructured senate has always
been widespread in the College
of Education, with full
professors as well as associates
and assistant professors favoring
reform.
Eno, professor of soils and
chairman of the 1969
constitution committee, spoke of
an increasing favorable attitude
within the College of Agriculture
faculty toward the goals of
(SEE 'DEANS' PAGE 10)
** :*:*.'*>*.*. it t, i



* The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Octobar 15, 1970

Page 2

Bjfl v vT#t j Jjf vI Jm v, t
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|| : TOM KENNEDY
EENIE-MEENIE-MINIE-MO

These UF coeds are vying for the title of
homecoming queen. BOTTOM ROW left to right:
Vicki Hill, Daryl Stillman, Jan Unwin, Sharon
Diefenbaugh, Kathy Doane, Gwen Jones, Linda
Comparato, Sharon Strickland, Catherine Lowe,
Lovetta Kidd, Joan Schwantes, Janet Wemple,

Jury Indicts Grubb For Jail Murder

A grand jury issued an
indictment Wednesday against
Terry 0. Grubb, 18, for the
murder of William Martin
Baugher who was found dead,
hanging in his county jail cell on
Sept. 22.
The 18-member jury filed into
a county courtroom at 5:40
p.m. after having met for three
days. Judge John Crews read the
bill of indictment against Grubb,
which called for a charge of first
degree murder.
GRUBB, JAILED on charges
of auto theft and robbery, was
one of three prisoners who
shared a cell in the county jail
with Baugher at the time of his
death.
Sheriffs office spokesmen
tentatively had termed Baughers
death a suicide, but subsequent
investigations and testimonies by
prisoners and jail officials before
the grand jury, resulted in the
murder indictment.
Baugher had been in jail for
more than four months on a

Individual Counseling
Service Considered

PAGE oN^|
used at the discretion of the
student.
In some fields of study it may
be desirable that general
education requirements be
spread over four years, while in
others it may be important that
general education requirements
be completed within the first

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
WyMtiU&k

charge of possession of
marijuana, but was optimistic
about being released prior to the
Sept. 22 incident that claimed
his life, according to his lawyer,
Michael Bryant.
SHERIFFS OFFICE
Inspector Ron Stanley said that
Grubb is not a Gainesville
resident, his home being in Ohio.
A county jailer discovered the
hanging body of Baugher at
approximately 4 aun. on Sept.
22, having been informed of a
hanging by a jail trustee.
Ronald Hinson, the jailer, said
he found Baughers hanging
body with his feet flat on the
ground.
HINSON SAID that the other
three men in Baughers cell were
awake when he came to cut
down the body, suspended from
a sheet tied above the cell door
and wrapped around his neck.
Hinson questioned the three
prisoners about the death, asking
them why they did not notify
him.

two years, according to the
proposal.
UC will be responsible for
providing variant and
alternative courses for the
special needs of. students
following different courses of
study, according to the
proposal.
The proposal will be
submitted to the < University
Senate for approval.

Connie Wheeler and Marion Cohen. TOP ROW left
to right: Cindy Seago, Sharyn Keller, Nancy
Atherton, Toni Simms, Mary Weiss, Linda Burr,
Maria Junquera, Elly Kuyphers, Marlene Scheneider,
Marilyn Davis, Jan Barger, Cindy Latham, Rhonda
Fosha, Patty Moody and Kathy Doland.

Grubb answered back, Its
his (Baughers) business.
GRUBB WILL BE arraigned
in court on the next plea day
according to Inspector Stanley.
No date has yet been set for
that.
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Baugher,
parents of the 25-year-old
victim, were reached for
comment late Wednesday at
their Liberty, Mo. home.
Its just something I find

Old Guard Musters Here

By DAVE MANKIN
Alligator Writer
The Grand Old Guard, an
exclusive group of 50-year UF
alumni, will induct attending
members of the Class of 1920
during a banquet at the Reitz
Union on Oct. 16.
The banquet is part of a
special two-day campus program
sponsored by the UF Alumni
Association.
In addition to the golden
anniversary alumni, outstanding
new students will also be
honored by the association.
Thirty-seven Alumni
Association scholars, their
parents and local club presidents
will attend a luncheon in the
Union on Oct. 17. At that time,
the winner of a SIOOO Alumni
Association scholarship for
exceptional performance as a
freshman will be announced.
After the UF-Richmond game
later in the afternoon, all
Alumni Association officials are
invited to an open house at the
home of Ray and Opal Graves.
Later, the associations
Executive Council will meet to
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
lsm ns 5 mins

Senate Outcome

PAGE
one Focus candidate, Bill
Watson.
THE TWO senate seats from
Broward and Rawlings were won
by independent candidate
Wendy Nedbor and Focus party
candidate Kay McGucken.
Tolbert Area senate seats were
won by Clarence Martin,
Student Freedom party, and
David Cardwell, independent
candidate.
TWIN TOWERS seats were
won by Susan Baughman,
independent candidate, and

Election Results

vote, the constitution cannot be
changed.
The results of the other
referendum questions are:
Students favored a
University Senate whose entire
faculty membership is elective,
regardless of academic rank by a

hard to talk about... something
you never expect to go
through, said Mrs. Baugher.
Mrs. Baugher said that she and
her husband might come to
the trial, that date remaining to
be set.
The grand jury investigated
Baughers death on the baas of
evidence received by the state
attorneys office, the sheriffs
office, and accounts of the death
reported in The Alligator.

discuss the progress of their
1970 Annual Giving Program,
upcoming projects and plans for
the remainder of the year.
We look forward to the
Grand Old Guard returning to
their alma mater and to seeing
the reactions of the Class of
1920 to all the changes on
campus, Assistant Director of
Alumni Services Robert Kazaros
said.
Page Os Record
Deadlines Set
Do you have information
or articles for the Page of
Record or the University
Activities Calendar?
Bring it to the Reitz
Union, the student activities
desk, third floor, or the
Public Functions Office,
ground floor, 392-1647.
The deadline for the
Tuesdays Page of Record is
the previous Friday at noon,
and for Fridays article, the
deadline is noon on the
previous Wednesday.

ACY ,IUC SERVICE RSI
PARTS nVI
__ ACCESSORIES I^l
CAMPUS REP
MILLER-BROWN motors
4222 N. W. 13TH ST. 376-4552

Linda Mims, Student Freedom
party.
Focus Party candidate
Coldeen Dunbar won the senate
seat from Jennings Area.
Pete Hobbs, Focus party, won
the senate seat from Yulee Area
JAMES LOTT, Focus party,
won election from Flavet 111.
Independent candidate Ben
Wardlaw won the seat from
Diamond-Schuct Villages.
Bill Crockett, Focus party,
won election from Corry Village'
Official election results are
posted in the student activities
center on the third floor of the
Reitz Union.

vote of five to two.
Students favored a
University Senate with increased
student representation with full
voting priveleges by a vote of
nine to one.
Students favored abolishing
departmental testing as it now
exists in UC by a margin of three
to one.
Students rejected retaining
the present UC system by a vote
of approximately seven to
four.
Students also rejected
abolishing UC and spreading the
requirements over four years by
a vote of seven to four.
Students rejected by less
than a hundred votes the
proposal concerning retaining
UC, but spreading the general
education requirements over
four years.
Students favored spending
sufficient funds to maintain
Lake Wauburg by a vote of four
to one.
Students rejected spending
$124,000 of SG funds to
develop Lake Wauburg by a vote
of three to one.
Students rejected SGs
spending no money on Lake
Wauburg and its immediate
closure by a vote of almost four
to one.
STUDENTS FAVORED
making the programing of
WRUF-FM more student
oriented.
The results of the
referendums voted on by the
faculty were not available last
night.
{Ticket Pickup
i On Saturday I

Ticket windows for the j
* Richmond game will be open :
; Saturday morning from 10 :
j a. m. until halftime. Only :
: those students who have \
: previously made :
: arrangements through :
: Student Government will be :
: honored. You must pick up :
: written permission from SG :
: prior to 5 p.m. Friday. j
* .................



Conduct Code Nears Approval

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs new Student Code of
Conduct, laws regarding the
rights and behavior of students,
may be nearing the end of its
year-long road to approval.
The document, under UF
President Stephen C. OConnells
study since approval by the
University Senate earlier this
year, is expected to be discussed
at the Oct. 29 meeting of the
faculty policy-making body.
LESTER HALE,
vice-president of student affairs,
said OConnell has been giving
the document his very careful
and conscientious observation.
It will probably be on the
agenda at the next University
Senate meeting, Hale said.
Dr. Ernest Bartley, professor
of political science, said the new
code technically, went to the
presidentss office after the
University Senate approved it in
June. Bartley was chairman of
the Student Affairs Committee
at the time of approval.
I have no reason to assume
that he (OConnell) would not
approve something that the
University Senate has acted
upon, Bartley said.
BARTLEY, who formulated
several ammendments in the new
document, said OConnell will
probably make some suggestions
in phraseology.
I imagine President
OConnell will want to improve
the language somewhat, he
said.
Basically, the new code is the
same student code of conduct
printed in the 1969 Student
Handbook with revisions. The
main difference is a lessening
and restricting of UF authority
in off-campus activities.
LAWS now read that anyone
specifically impeding or
interfering with the rights of
others to enter, use, or leave any
campus facility, service or
scheduled activity will be liable
for appropriate disciplinary
action.
The former proposal read that
anyone obstructing the normal
processes and activities essential
to the functions of the
university community would
be liable.
Another point revised reads
that deliberate interference with
academic freedom and freedom
of speech of any member or
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
. *
W *Wy i' 1
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For information call
CASSILS
IN THE AIR

|| IN DEPTH H
guest of the University will
mean possible prosecution.
ORIGINALLY the code said
that only deliberate
interference with the rights of
others would constitute an
offense.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder said the code now
awaiting OConnells approval is
far from perfect but much
better than the old one.
Uhlfelder indicated concern
over the length of time the code
has been in OConnells office.
A lot of time and effort was
put into that code, he said. I
think its wrong that any action,
either pro or con, hasnt been
taken on it.
ID like to see it approved so
we can begin work on a new
one, Uhlfelder said.
But, Uhlfelder expressed some
satisfaction with the new code.

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Its a lot less vague than the
old code and restricts UF
authority in off-campus
activities, he said.
A chance of double jeopardy
existed in the old student code
of conduct. A student could be
tried for an offense by both
university and Gainesville
authorities.
THE new code restricts the
chances of double jeopardy by
lessening UF jurisdiction,
Uhlfelder said.
Under section ten of the new
code, a student who fails to
appear before the Student

Picture Refunds Available

The Seminole office has a message for students
who paid $1.50 to have their pictures in the
1969-70 Seminole but whose photographs did not
appear in the annual.
The message is: If you want it, here it is, come
and get it. But you better hurry because refunds
that are not claimed within a week will be returned
to the Finance and Accounting office and then will
not be obtainable.
THE REFUNDS may be picked up at Room 330

Conduct Committee when
notified to do so would be
charged with an offense and
given due process of law. The
clause used to read that a
student failing to appear would
face immediate suspension.
The new code of conduct was
approved by the University
Senate this summer following
approval by the Student Affairs
Committee and Student Senate.
The documents future has been
lying in OConnells hands ever
since.
OCONNELL, as president of

Thuraday, Octobar 15, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

of the Reitz Union.
Students who have not retrieved their refunds are
Larry White, Bill Lindner, Mark Rosenberg, Edward
Wood, Mike Sullivan, Bob Roepnack, Rocky
Thornhill.
Susan Arnold, Mike Crews, Tom Colmenares,
Kathleen Dolan, Barbara Ardin, Bartlett Nunn, Tom
Todd, William Robinson, Doug Smith, Peggy Eaton,
Jan: Berkey, Alan Harris, John Schmidt, Jo Webb
and Donna Price.

the University Senate, has veto
power over the body.
This summer, when the
document was given to him for
approval, OConnell told Bartley
and his committee he had not
yet had full opportunity to
study the new documer / but if
he had any differences, he
would send it back to them with
his grievances.
Until the revised code is
officially adopted by the
university, the present
regulations as they appear in the
1969 issue of the Student
handbook will remain in effect.

Page 3



r: sr | V W V 1 ' 1
i, The Florida Affigator, Thursday, October 15, 1970

Page 4

Employment Program
For Student Job Seekers

By DAVID SPICER
Alligator Writer
Student jobs are still available at UF.
Director of Student Financial Aid I. Douglas
Turner, said he is confident he can place 100 more
students in jobs this quarter. There are already
7,000-9,000 students working at UF.
THE MAJORITY of the students are employed
through the College Work Study Program, which
receives its money on an 80-20 per cent,
federal-to-state funds ratio. This program is designed
to give jobs to students in financial need.
Other Personnel Services (OPS) is the other
employment program at UF and it placed about
1,400 people this fall. Last year OPS gave jobs to
1,800 students but the funds for this year provided

UF Rathskeller Offers
Campus Entertainment

By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
AMprtor Writer
Beer. Sandwiches.
Entertainment.
The UF Rathskeller offers all
these.
The Rathskeller is the only
place on campus which serves
beer and admits university
students of any age.
Students do not have to be
members to use the Rathskeller.
Mike Brown, assistant manager
of the Rathskeller said, neither
having a membership card nor
being over 21 is necessary for
entering the Rathskeller.
MEMBERSHIP cards entitle
holders to enter free when the
Rat sponsors a show. Any
student or faculty member who
is 21 can purchase membership
for $1.50 per year.
Membership funds are
needed to maintain our license
as a private dub and to renew
beverage licenses, Brown said.
In order to legally serve beer
while admitting minors, the
Rathskeller must be registered
through the UF Faculty Club

to
t, -06. f$ r$ .dnc
Dominos Pizza
Two Free Cokes
with every Pizza ordered
376-2 W Htp DBIVIRY 376-2,4071

and present a membership
roster.
WE NEED student support,
Brown said, both as members
and through use of our
facilities.
The Rathskeller can seat 300
and has banquet facilities
available. Classes, seminar
groups, graduate departments
and organizations are welcome
to hold meetings in a section of
the room.
The Rathskeller is regularly
open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
daily, and later by reservation.
In cooperation with the main
cafeteria, it is used during
regular serving hours and for
special spaghetti dinners.
Friday and Saturday nights
students can have sandwiches
and popcorn, watch featured
entertainment and enjoy beer.
The Rathskeller serves soft
drinks, too.
£ I
I GATOR ADS |
I SELL! I
V i*i
V A
W. .*.VAV.V.V.V. .V.*. .V;fr.*.V.*.V.W.V>R

by the state were, according to Turner, drastically
reduced.
OPS allotments are given to various departments
at UF to hire employes for heavy work load periods.
WE ARE IN good shape financially on the
work-study program right now and the prospects for
next year look even better, Turner stated.
Students may not be able to get exactly what
they want right now but if they, sign up soon they
have an excellent chance of getting into a
work-study program for next year.
The deadline for applying for the program is Feb.
28,1971.
Only full-time students are considered for this
program and the student should be one in good
academic standing and whose parents have a
moderate income, Turner concluded.

Correction
Applications for
membership in Florida Blue
Key are to be turned in no
later than 5 p.m. Oct. 26 in
room 312 of the Reitz Union,
instead of Oct. 16 as reported
yesterday in The Alligator.
We apologize for this mistake.

STOP
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v,v,

Music Academy Scene
I Os Joan Kennedy Concert I
I 1
j: PHILADELPHIA (UPI) Mrs. Joan Kennedy, with her A
>: senator husband watching and listening from a nearby box, A
$ made what was billed her world piano concert debut Tuesday a
i night on behalf of the Democratic gubernatorial candidate i n §
5 Pennsylvania. :j:
S Mrs. Kennedy, dressed in a grey evenmg gown, walked onto :
I the stage twice at the Academy of Music. The first time she
§ played the andante movement from Mozarts Concerto No. 21,
| better known as the theme from the movie Elvira Madigan
| and the second time she performed a number from Deussys j:
Arabesque. $
When her final piece was finished, she walked off the stage
returned for three enthusiastic encores from a near-capacity :j:
crowd.
:A :
,

UNION DANCE



w>>>>Xv>Xv>>; v v*'Yy.v. .v.v.vAy
1 Coggins j
iOn Dialogue j
W. J. Coggins, Director of
: the UF infirmary, will be the
j: guest speaker on WRUFs
: Dialogue tonight. The
: program begins at 11:05. He
: will answer questions
: concerning all aspects of the
j infirmarys services including
the recent policy of charging
: for after hours visits. J
: Many students have been J
: questioning this policy. This
program gives them a chance §
to have their questions :|i
answered.
Dialogue is also in need of :!
interested persons to work on :ji
i; the staff. Please contact Steve :
: Slutzah at 373-2687. ji

Students Discuss
Faith In Christ
By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Writer
Were excited about Jesus Christ and telling others about Him,
Clyde Wiley, student leader of Inter-Varsity, said.
Inter-Varsity is a group of UF students who meet together to
discuss their faith in Christ and to tell others what they believe.
INTER-VARSITY wants to give students what they feel is an
accurate view of Christ.
We want to challenge students with the opportunity to find out
more about Christ, Wiley said.
This is done through meetings where a guest speaker or a panel
presents Christ and His claims to students and then each individual
can decide for himself.
WE KNOW JESUS Christ personally and feel ignorance is a big
enemy of Christianity. People reject false impressions they have of
Christianity, Wiley said.
Few students know anything about the Bible, except what they
learn in humanities class, he said. So Inter-Varsity sponsors
exploratory Bible studies for those who are interested in learning.
Small rap groups meet once a week for discussion and more in
depth Bible study. There are 11 groups at UF this year, Barbara
Young, a student member, said.
INTER-VARSITY concentrates on the Christian growing in
knowledge of Christ, Wiley said.
Inter-Varsity was formed during a revival in England in 1870 where
need for a campus ministry was felt. It has now spread to 70 countries
and is affiliated with the International Fellowship of Evangelical
Students.
In the United States, Inter-Varsity has staff members on most
major college campuses.
UFs Inter-Varsity will discuss Christ and the religious society of
His time at a conference at Lake Swan near Melrose Oct. 23-25.
The worlds largest missionary convention is sponsored by
Inter-Varsity once every three years at the University of Illinois.
12,000 students are expected this year from Dec. 27 to Jan. 1.

Step
WORRY ABOUT WEIGHT?
Why not try our Beef Vegetables
or Chicken Chow Mein...
...Very Delicious, but not
fattening.
PRICE RANGE $1.50-$2.45
Open 5-9 pm. Daily
2409 SW 13th St. 372-6801
winininiin-***
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Band Features Music Extravaganza

By JEANINE HUTTO
Alligator Writer
Saturday is Band Day at Florida Field.
Three thousand bandsmen will be at the Florida-Richmond game
during the halftime show. The show will be a musical extravaganza
with 50,000 voices singing Auld Lang Syne.
THIRTY-FIVE visiting high school bands will come to UF for the
event.
In its portion of the halftime show, the Gator Band will salute the
alumni in jocular fashion with an appropriate drill and the music
Hey! Big Spender. The Gator Band combined with the massed high
school bands will play from the south bleachers.
Winter Haven High School, the largest visiting band, is sending a
group of 159 students. The smallest band is Crystal River, with 26
members.
Renowned band composer Harold Walters, director of publications
for the Rubank Music Company, will act as guest conductor for the
occasion.

Revolution Now
Can Jesus of
Nazareth Revolutionize
i
your life?
Find Out...
COLLEGE LIFE
Graham Area Rec. Room
9:15 Sunday Night.

I l
I FLORIDA GYM 8:15 PM I j
| GENERAL PUBLIC $1.50-$2-$2.50

I Tickets on sale at: JWRU Box Office I
I AN SGP Production
iSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS3SSSSS^SS

RICHMOND GAME

Walters, a tuba soloist with the United States Army Band, has
published nearly a thousand numbers for band and instrumental
ensembles.
The visiting bands besides Winter Haven include Columbia High of
Lake City, Satellite Beach; North Shore High of West Palm Beach;
Hernando High of Brooksville; Rockledge; Aubumdale; Femandina
Beach; Santa Fe; Kathleen: Palmetto: Oviedo: Groveland; Lyman of
Longwood; Bradford of Starke; Dunnellon; Williston; and Jones High
of Orlando.
P.K. Yonge High; Leto High of Tampa; Fletcher High of
Jacksonville; North High, Fort Myers; Hawthorne; DeLand; Crystal
River; Chiefland; Frostproof; Glade Central High of Belle Glade;
Ocoee, Suwannee High of Live Oak; Leesburg; Lake Placid; South
High of Palatka, Washington High of Pensacola, and Seminole will
attend.
TO FLY LIKE A BIRD
f a I
3'
.
1 V v If -| / r ,' yy,\
has bean Man's dream since the beginning of Time. Soaring is the art
form of flying. If you are interested in learning to soar, or already know
how and would like to fly in the Gainesville area, contact John Rubino
373-4354. I sincerely want to make soaring available as cheaply as possible
to everyone from sorority pledge to areospace major. The only sin In
growing old is regretting something while you're young. Learn now.

Thursday, October 15, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, Oetobar 15, 1970

RAs Face Students Many Problems

ByCARLCRAWFORD
Alligator Writer
Its 12 p.m., and a coed has
received the traditional birthday
ponding. Going back to her
room, she realizes that the key is
Candlepeople
Hold 'Feast'
By ELI MOSS
Alligator Writer
A free vegetarian dinner,
presented by the Candlepeople,
will be held today at 5 p.m. in
the University Methodist
Church, just west of 13th St. on
University Ave.
Ravi Shankar, who will be
performing here tonight, was
invited to the feast but will
probably not be able to come
since he wont arrive until 7 p.m.
Earlier this afternoon, there
will be free cooking lessons at
the church. At 12 pjn. there will
be a demonstration on making
bread and at 2 p jn. there will be
a lesson on cooking vegetables.
The Candlepeople who
organized the feast tonight are
a group of vegetarians who live
in the woods and make and sell
candles.
The Candlepeople also
operate the Hogtown Food
Co-op, which is based in Hie
Great Southern Leather Co. on
University Ave.
One of the Candlepeople, who
wished to remain unnamed,
stated the purpose of the co-op
is to turn people on to natural
foods. Anyone who wants to
join the co-op is invited to leave
their name at Southern Leather.
In addition to Hogtown Food
Co-op, food for tonight's dinner
will be donated by Mother
Earth, Produce Comer, Farmers
Mart, Pantry Pride, and
Winn-Dixie.

FOR THE FIRST
TIME...
SEE
THE GATORS!
BINOCULARS
FROM $19.95
376-7657

INSPECTING. POLICING. ADVISING

inside, shes outside, and the
door is locked. Her roommate is
out, and shes got to get in.
Or,
AFTER getting Ds on the
progs, his girl has decided to
iijt
'' Ipffl
... collects SIO,OOO
dnlanrs Gifted
The Danfort Foundation
announced Sunday that
David Chalmers, UF history
professor, is one of 10 college
and university teachers, to
receive national recognition
for outstanding and gifted
teaching.
The presentation was made
at a dinner in the St. Regis
Hotel, in New York City. The
awards are designed to
recognize gifted teachers and
to encourage greater public
understanding of the art and
importance of teaching.
They cany a grant of
SIO,OOO to each recipient to
be used in furthering his
academic career and interests.
Chalmers, a graduate of
Swarthmore College and the
University of Rochester, has
been a Fulbright Lecturer, a
member of the Selection
Board for Southeast Asia, a
Peace Corps lecturer, and has
contributed a chapter to
Main Problems in American
History II.

date somebody else, his bike has
been stolen and hes run out of
money, a student decides he
needs to talk to somebody, or he
will crack up.
These arent the only
difficulties Resident Advisors
(RA) are instrumental in
working out, but they do
represent the wide range of
problems the average RA must
deal with.
Law student Ira Hatch is a
Graham area RA and he has
definite thoughts as to what an
RA is and what he does.
AN RA is generally available
to handle problems in the area
and to make inspections for
clean dorms, Hatch said.
Besides inspection trips,
Hatch says the RA has three
basic functions, dorm
administration, programming
and communication.
Administration, Hatch
explained, involves
communication to the kids from
the administration, making
rosters, taking kids to the
infirmary when theyre sick, any
problems they might have.
HATCH said enforcement of
housing policies was one
administrative duty.
Programming involves setting
up activities that students in the
dorms would take part in.
Hatch explained that
communication involved
Oxygen Helps
Oxygen is an important factor
in wound healing, and studies by
Dr. Thomas K. Hunt, Associate
Professor of surgery at the
University of California, San
Francisco, show the rate at
which a wound heals can be
controlled by the amount of
oxygen reaching the injured
area.

m m h §
HM WMjB < Hj jV W3rn 0
(jJMJf
FALL CLEARANCE SALE
AT BOTH OUR CAMPUS AND MALL STORES
BLOUSES DRESSES ALL
SHIRTS PANTSUITS AT
SHELLS VESTS 1 /
Sleeveless, Short, & Long Sleeves /
PANTS LINGERIE '3
. SKIRTS HANDBAGS

Letting the counselors and
administration know what the
kids are thinking and vice versa.
AN RA, according to Hatch,
works about twenty hours a
week. We spend about 10 hours
advising and 10 hours settingup
programs.
The salary is $l3O a month,
which includes thirty for the
apartment and utilities.
Some of the more common
problems an RA faces are
academic. These include student

Motherly Air Ready 1971
The proposed air conditioning for Matherly Hall will be completed
in the spring of 1971 at a cost of $488,390.
DRAKE Construction Co. of Ocala was the low bidder for
additions and renovations to Matherly Hall which houses UFs College
of Business Administration.
The construction is supported by a grant of $289,378 from the
U.S. Office of Education and state revenue certificates from the 1967
bond issue.
ALL EXISTING instructional and administrative spaces will be air
conditioned and an elevator tower will be constructed.
Exit facilities will be updated and fire-resistant doors will be
installed at several points in the budding.
A FREE TICKET
to RAINBOW SPRINGS
WITH EACH LARGE (35*)
ORDER OF FRENCH FRIES
m
201 N.W. 12 13th |McjoiUjcrs

concern about grades, prog
results or having a studying
problem.
CONDUCT is a problem we
usually just come up on, Hatch
said.
I dont like the conduct
area -1 dont like being a
policeman.
In Graham area, Hatch works
two floors, about 125 students.
He said that the RAs are
supposed to learn the names of
the students on their floor.



1
GAINESVILLE SHOPPERS:

jfp' i
Now Publix Lowers
your cost of living
with our new

Its true! PUBLIX has lowered prices in all our
Gainesville stores, while all around us the cost of
living is soaring.
Unbelievable? Not really, when you see how
weve done it.
Weve cut out limited specials with their restric restrictions
tions restrictions of time, quantity and other purchases. Our
new thrifty prices are in effect on every item,
every day. (In addition to everyday low thrifty
pricing, whenever our buyers can make extraordi extraordinary
nary extraordinary savings we'll pass those savings on to you
as Bonus Buys.)

% g§ PUBLIX

Weve changed to single unit pricing. No more
2 for or 3 for" pricing. Every item is clearly
marked with its own thrifty price. You know
exactly what youll pay for everything you buy.
And youll still get S&H Green Stamps! None of
the so-called discounters offer low prices PLUS
trading stamps. PUBLIX does. Its our way of say saying
ing saying thanks for letting us serve you.
Cmon in today and start lowering your cost of
living. Save on our new thrifty prices at PUBLIX,
where shopping is a pleasure.

Thuiaday, Octobar 15,1970, Tha Florida AMgatar,

Page 7



Page 8

EDITORIAL
Jail Bail
The responsibility for maintaining the county jail is one
that involves a dual relationship between the sheriff and the
Alachua County Commission.
Sheriff Joe Crevasse is directly responsible for the
functions at the jail and carries the additional role of
making improvement requests to the county commissioners,
when he chooses.
The county commissioners must approve any fiscal
outlay for the jail, but they can also take the initiative to
call for improvements when they choose.
While a new grand jury has been investigating the death
on Sept. 22 of county jail prisoner William Baugher, it has
also taken the liberty to dig into the county jail itself.
Florida Division of Corrections (FDC) Inspector R. B.
Gramling appeared before the jury on Tuesday.
Undoubtedly he was there to relate the findings he has
recorded from his inspections of Alachua County Jail.
The grand jury recessed Tuesday to go to the jail to see
for itself.
The overcrowding, unbearable heat, lack of medical and
recreation facilities certainly could not be hidden from it.
The reports of the FDC have been filed as early as
February of this year. Each report has suggested county
action in areas of the jail it deemed deficient.
And since February, the sheriff and the county
commission have chosen to wait.
But the grand jury is exhibiting some real initiative of its
own. In its investigation the jury must have wondered what
has been done by the county to correct the problems that
have blatantly existed in the jail.
At Tuesdays county commission meeting, while the
grand jury was scrutinizing conditions at the jail, the
commissioners called for a special study group to review all
facets of the countys judicial system.
On Feb. 19, 1969, the Gainesville Sun quoted County
Commissioner Sidney Martin as saying, The board of
commissioners wants a good jail with the maximum in
security and inmate treatment. Martin closed his remarks
saying, Whatever money it takes, we will find it.
$
Twenty months have passed.
During the commissions move for sweeping reforms at
Tuesdays meeting Martin said, If the money is the cure,
then lets correct it with money.
The citizens of this county should hold Martin to his
statement this time.
Twenty months is a long time.
j u Hi
U
Save the country! Save the country!

C The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Octobsr 15, 1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

Hi, Mr. and Mrs. America, Spiro Agnew here again ...
Really Bugged Out
Over Phone Taps

Attorney General John
Mitchell has in recent weeks
announced that crime is
continuing to increase and that
police wire tapping is up 300 per
cent.
I was wondering if perhaps
thieves were turning to stealing
wire taps, what could be
responsible for the parallel
increases.
I GOT the answer from an
underpaid F. 8.1. technician who
as 1 interviewed him was
assembling a high-powered
concealed transmitter to go into
Martha Mitchell's padded bra.
John will be able to monitor
in New York what Martha is
blabbing in San Francisco, said
Alex G. Bull. Os course we had
a lot to work with ...
Os course if she leans too far
over a punch bowl with it on she
may well electrocute the entire
Washington diplomatic corps.
I tried to get back to wire
taps.
Yeah, theyve been quite a
problem, said Bull. We were
going to bug the phone of the
Student Mobilization
Committee. But when we got
there we sou n d out it had
been disconnected of all
their unpaid long distance calls.

Alligator Staff
Deniw Valiants ___ Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Edjtor
Stw#Swn Craig Gokhwyn
Assistant Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
rss £r* v F,wid *> ,ndw -- <-
zr** s,ud -'
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of tha art
I of th. wn,.r f ,h. article and no, those of

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

III" l-i""i 111
-
REG CROWDER
I 1
- - II U.I..J

IMPERIALIST pig phone
company, I muttered.
So we paid their bill, said
Bull.
I guess you were in business
again.
No, the phone company
demanded a S3OO deposit and
that a responsible person
co-sign the installation
application.
The accounting office said
wed have to put it down as our
own phone if we did that and
the $350 fee was out of line.
The only financially acceptable
alternative was to buy S.M.C. a
WATS (Wide Area Telephone
Service) line as an economy
measure. So we did.
Clever, I thought.
Well sir, we signed for the
WATS line. But the phone
company said it would take six
months to get a crew out to the
SM.C. office.
J. EDGAR was furious that
his offensive on crime could be
so thwarted. He swung a little

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Loretta Tennant
News Editor

- -J- : u
Iks HayoT.
Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Cali: 392*1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1619
; ___

weight and got two pay phones
installed in the hallway outside
the S.M.C. office. Every morning
two agents left a roll of dimes
there.
You never got the phone?
Well, we did get it in. But it
doesnt work half the time. We
keep getting so much noise on
the line that neither they nor us
can hear anything. And when it
does work we keep getting
wrong numbers.
One call to Los Angeles
ended up in Boston. The quality
wasnt very good and the first
thing we knew wed raided the
Daughters of the American
Revolution. Hell, nobody calls a
tea party a tea party any more.
How could we know? ..
So why the crime increase?
Our wiretap men are
cracking up. One dropped out
on grass.
Marijuana?
Oh goodness no. He grazes
on the White House lawn.



READERS FORUM

Christian Prejudice
MR. EDITOR:
Having returned to school just
recently, and with somewhat
limited funds, I was inspired by
the idea of finding work and
accordingly kept a strict and
increasingly desperate watch
over the classified section of the
Gainesville Sun. Much to my
happy surprise, after reading and
re-reading hundreds of ads to
which I was sure I could have no
meaningful relation, I chanced
upon the following: Teachers
helpers, bus drivers and office
workers needed. For more
information dial Further
investigation revealed the source
of this ad to be the Christian
Heritage School.
Os course the consideration
that was a name like Goldberg I
was not apt to be mistaken for
any upstanding Christian did
occur to me, but the almost
naively innocence wording of
the ad coupled with an equally
innocent phone call indicated
that clearly, this was not to be
an issue.
SO I thought.
A few days later, my wife and
I (her name is Christina) drove
over to the schools office with
the intention of filling out
applications. Tina was interested
in a position as office worker; I
sought work with the children.
We walked into a small and
quietly busy office and were
mechanically handed the
required forms. When I reached
the middle of the single page of
rather typical questions, I was
taken by surprise, for suddenly I
was confronted with the
following: Have you personal
assurance that you are a bom
again Christian? Why?
Naturally I was caught
somewhat off balance, feeling
sufficiently inadequate about
explaining how I had been
assured that I was a bom again
Christian when I was having the
most difficult time remembering
when it was I was first bom a
Christian.
After some brief reflecting
about the possible relevance of
reincarnation to this question, I
turned the application over, to
find: Give three references who
are qualified to speak of your
home background, Christian
life, training, and experience.
I BEGAN TO catch on. As
innocently as I could, I said to
the woman who had given us the
applications, Excuse me, Im
having some difficulty here.
These questions seem to imply
that one has to be Christian to
work here.. She nodded in the
affirmative. I said I understood,
and we left. On the way home I
decided that historically
speaking, Christianity probably
has not been a relevant factor in
the evolution of secretarial skills,
and that the only possible
explanation for what had taken
place at the Christian Heritage
School was that there was in
effect there a rather unsubtle
policy of discrimination against
non-Christians.
There will be other ads in the
* Sun, and I am not bothered
nearly so much by the prospect
of having to continue my search

for employment as I am
bothered by knowing that the
people in charge of that school
are people who apparently
accept and work under
conditions which prevent the
employing of non-Christians.
The bothersome aspect about
this is that these same people are
in a position to reproduce the
fact of their narrow-mindedness
in the minds of nursery school
and elementary school children.
I am not claiming that the
students at this school are
openly instructed in
discrimination against
non-Christians. But I am
suggesting that the type of
attitude that dictates such
discrimination has to have its
effect in the classroom. In
accepting employment under
such conditions, the teachers,
office workers and bus drivers of
the Christian Heritage school
condone them. They identify
themselves necessarily with a
system that is openly
discriminatory. It is by virtue of
their refusal to oppose this
system that the system can
function. The parents of the
children who attend The
Christian Heritage School must
decide whether or not one of the
qualities of a bom again
Christian is prejudice, or even at
least, the passive acceptance of
prejudice.
Certainly they cannot feel
secure in the fact that if Jesus
Himself returned tomorrow, he
could not get a job at the
Christian Heritage School.
PHIL GOLDBERG (4AS)
Victory Edition
i
MR. EDITOR:
At the union Saturday I saw a
stack of The Florida Alligator
newspapers. I knew that The
Alligator isnt published on
Saturday but I saw the headline,
Special Gator Victory
Edition, so I picked one up. I
read the articles expecting the
usual excellent news reporting
and editorializing. Instead I
found filthy, slanderous fiction
disguised as sports news.
These four pages of trash
exhibited a total lack of mental
ability and a complete disregard
for what ever standards a
competant journalist is supposed
to observe.
This was an outrage and an
insult to the entire university
community. I wonder if there
arent laws against this sort of
thing since there was no attempt
to identify this as fiction or
satire.
If this was intended as a joke,
it wasnt funny. I hope that you
intend to retract the entire
edition. And I sincerely hope
this was softie insane hoax
perpetuated by some unknown
source. But this is a long shot.
At any rate I dont feel that this
is anything to be taken lightly
and should be recognized as the
vicious, callous attack on the
athletes of this state.
GARY MOREHOUSE (2UQ
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Gee whiz,
Grey. We didnt do it, really we
didnt. The evidence points to
those baddies at FSU. It is
currently being investigated.)

>"* '' s *
Academics Before Athletics

Floridas Board of Regents,
acting on a request from Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelder,
are going to take a good, hard
look at athletics and its role in
the state university system.
Thank goodness!
At Florida, athletics is king
and football is the crown prince;
education is often the court
jester in our own odd sense of
priorities.
This year $3 million will pour
into that gigantic athletic house.
For it, Gator fans will receive
some afternoons of joyous
enthusiasm, (like last Saturday
in Tallahassee), a new set of
athletic heroes and precious
little money added for
education. The total donations
from alumni I doubt will
approach that $3 million
price-tag.
BUT SUPPORTERS of
athletics are quick to shout
intangibles as justification.
My father tells me it is the
only connection some alumni
will ever have with the
university. Big deal, I say, unless
they're giving money for
educational facilities and not
ear-marked for more
comfortable living for jocks.
But theyll be more inclined
to support the university and
educational taxes at the polls if
they dig the football team, he
says. 1 find that one hard to
swallow.
SO THERES school pride
and all that rot...
The classic image of college
athletics as a source of student
pride in a team they respected
and knew died a long time ago at
UF. That was when the Gators
became a gridiron version of
General Motors.
Ray Graves, Doug Dickey and
a supporting cast of hundreds
surely are dedicated to athletics.
They believe in its values to the
university and are dedicated to
further excellence in athletics.
Perhaps their success has been
so dazzling that it's left them
blind. They can't seem to realize
that their ever increasing

professionalism in the desire for
success is killing sports in the
classic sense.
HOSTILITY to full
scholarship football players and
what they stand for has never
been so prevalent at the
university as now. That
animosity is not 100 percent
based on misunderstanding and
rumor. Jock favoritism exists at
most levels of the university.,
period. One need only listen to
the boasts of those very football
players to wonder.
To a lot of students it seems a
bit immoral to give a full
scholarship to a football player
whose father earns $20,000 a
year. Certainly no one can cry
that the poor kid isnt going to
get to college unless big brother
gives him a financial hand.
Dean Roy Mitchell (I call him
dean because the magnitude of
his job warrents the title)
wonders why $157,000 of race
track funds go to athletics when
his office barely has enough
money to keep a secretary to
answer the needs of what few
black students the university
has.
IN THE midst of all this,
Florida enjoyed its best year
ever in football last year.
Consequently, it was their best
year ever at the cash register, all
those greenbacks came rolling in.
But somehow they ended up
$70,000 in the red. If all that
success brings a net loss, how
then can it be justified? Or
better yet, how can that kind of
a program afford to be
continued?
(In the midst of these losses
some Gator coaches are getting
rich off endorsements, fringe
benefits and investments made

Thursday. October 15, 1970. The Florida M^lw.

possible by their created public
news.)
More money needed,
everybodys tickets go up, and a
student admission fee is
introduced stepped on again.
(Though I must admit me got
stepped on in a much more
considerate manner than the
students got stepped on at FSU.)
New coach needed, we get
Dougie Dickey along with a lot
of bad publicity and a not so
dean bill of health from the
NCAA. But winning football
builds sportsmanship. Right?
Because athletics builds men!
And patriotic men (with
crewcuts) at that.
THERE WAS a place for
athletics on the university
campus at one time.
Somehow, somewhere,
sometime, the desire for
continued success in all athletics
managed to bury the initial
ideals of athletic competition
and replaced it with something a
bit less pure. Progressively less
pure with each succeeding
season. The ideal of a university
as a center of LEARNING has
been a bit tarnished too.
The Regents have both the
power and, hopefully after their
study, the desire to bring
athletics back to reason. Success
in athletics certainly is a goal to
be sought, but only if the price
is reasonable. That price must be
in individual effort and desire,
not millions of dollars.
I FOR one, would like to
suggest a return to
non-scholarship athletics. But,
like most, I'd be delighted with
something considerably short of
that as long as it could steer
athletics into financial and
ethical reason.
As for selling the university to
its alumni and the state voter,
lets try pushing our numerous
academic achievements. That's
what were here for, isn't it?
Wefi, isnt it?
Sometimes you get a long
pause after asking that
question...

Page 9



I, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 15, 1970

Page 10

PAGE OHE*I
senate reform. That colleges
faculty has been cited by some
reformers as the faculty least
likely to approve reform
because, with 25 per cent
representation in the senate
now, it benefits most from the
present system.
ENO ADDED THAT Institute
of Food and Agricultural
Sciences Provost E. T. York Jr.,
was sympathetic to senate
reform.
Spivey, calling himself
optimistic that senate reform
will pass and hopeful that it will
pass by the end of the year,
expressed best his belief and that
of others that the university
faculty as a whole has become
more favorable to the idea of
senate reform.
Since November a great
many senators themselves and a
great many faculty members not
in the senate feel it (the question
of restructuring the senate)
didnt get a fair debate and
consideration.
THE FEELING is it should
be reconsidered and that now is
the time to do it.
Spivey pointed to the
Presidential Retreat of Oct. 4 as
the culmination of the
dissatisfaction among faculty
and deans which had been
building since November. He
called the sentiment expressed
for senate reform at the retreat
overwhelming.
OConnell himself cited the
clear consensus for senate
reform of persons at the retreat
in his statement of last week
urging this years constitution
committee to consider proposals
for restructuring the senate.
IN A STATEMENT last week
Concert Tickets
On Sale Thursday
Concert fans, dont fret.
Student Government
Productions is giving you
another chance.
Season tickets for the
1970-71 Concert Series are being
offered in a second subscription
sale through Oct. 31.
TICKETS WILL GO on sale in
the gym office immediately after
the Oct. 15 performance of
Ravi Shankar. Subscriptions
are also being offered Monday
through Friday 12 to 4:30 p.m.
at the Reitz Union box office.
Purchase of a season ticket
guarantees a reserved seat for
these four remaining SG
productions: 1776 (Jan. 30),
The National Ballet (Feb. 21),
Malcom Frager (Feb. 28), and
Phyllis Curtin (April 18).
A reserved seat in section A
of the Florida gym will cost $ 11
for the general public and $8 for
students. \
J F*I IH d

Deans Express Senatorial Views

urging this year's constitution
committee to consider a
restructuring of the senate,
OConnell indicated that the
committee should evaluate the
results of the survey.
Those results show the faculty
as a whole in opposition to the
senates vote of last November
against a predominantly elected
senate. The results also indicate
the sympathy of a majority
within the senate itself toward
some reforms.
Sixty-one per cent of the total
respondents to the poll favored a
predominantly or wholly elected
senate. Less than 20 per cent
favored no change at all in the
senate membership. Within the
senate, 41 per cent of the full
professors favored a
predominantly or wholly elected
senate, and 47 per cent of the
entire senate membership was
favorable.
MORE THAN HALF of the
full professors in the senate
voted for a senate which would
have a ratio of full professors to
professors of all other ranks of
2:1 or less. The ratio of full
professors to all other ranks
(associate and assistant
professors) is now 10:1 in the
senate.
A senate of 300 members or
less was favored by 51 per cent
of the full professors. The
faculty as a whole voted 65 per
cent for such a senate. The
senate now has 573 members,
including 475 full professors.
Fifty-seven per cent of the
senators responding to the poll
favored student membership in
the senate. Fifty per cent of the

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entire faculty favored a senate
with 5 per cent or more student
membership.
OCONNELLS indication of
favor toward senate reform and
the survey whose results tend to f
strengthen the arguments of
reformers were two results from
the senate vote of Nov. 1969.
According to statements of
deans and faculty members of
various colleges this week, a
third and possibly most
important result of the senate
vote against a predominantly
elected senate was the impetus it
gave to a further discussion of
senate reform.
Dean Robert F. Lanzillotti of
the College of Business
Administration told of the
reformers expectations in Nov.
1969 and their reaction to the
senate vote.
Some (dean and faculty
reformers) thought it (the
motion to express approval of a
majority elected senate) would
go through easily. After it didnt
they spoke out.
THE BUSINESS
administration dean, who favors
greater participation of
professors of assistant and
associate ranks in the senate,
said he was personally very
surprised at the vote last
November.
Some of us (Deans) who
were new here had not had an
opportunity to express
ourselves, Lanzillotti said. He
became dean of the College of
Business Administration in Sept.
1969.
Acting Dean Herman E.
Spivey of the College of Arts
and Sciences, who became dean

in Jan. 1970, has expressed favor
toward senate reform.
DEAN BERT L. SHARP of
the College of Education and
Acting Dean E.L. Hunt of the
College of Law have also stated
they favor senate reform,
although Hunt added he has not
been outspoken on the
subject.
Lanzillottis comment that
discussion among the faculty of

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the College of Business
Administration concerning
senate reform had intensified
since Nov. 1969 was echoed by
deans and faculty members of
other colleges.
Spivey cited an accelerated
discussion both in amount and
in intensity within informal
groups among the arts and
sciences faculty. Spivey said
many full professors in the
college favored senate reform.



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Thursday, October 15,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thunday, Ootobar 15, 1970

A Cry For Help

Others Unheeded
By SUE CUSTODE
A a f f isi-ia
Alligator own vyrnsr
All of us mist have experienced in our lives moments so black, so
full of woe and misery that suicide seemed the only escape.
Fortunately though, the great majority of us realize that bad times
will pass and we cope with our problems as best we can.
BUT FOR SOME, the emotional stress is too great to bear. These
people are the ones who attempt suicide.
Here at the UF, there have been three confirmed suicide attempts
since this September.
In one case, a man visiting friends living at Diamond Village went to
Shands Teaching Hospital early in September and asked what would
happen to a person who took massive doses of thorzine and Stellazine
(tranquilizers).
HE WAS TOLD that death was possible.
A few minutes later the man returned to the emergency room at
the hospital and said hed taken the drugs. Luckily, his life was saved.
Later in September a coed was taken to Shands Teaching Hospital
for treatment for an overdose of Sominex and phenaphen
(depressants). She had a fight with her boyfriend. Her life, too, was
saved.
A THIRD CASE involved a coed living in Hume Hall. A report on
her attempted suicide was not filed with the University Police
Department, but a student advisor in the dorm confirmed that a
suicide attempt had occurred.
Information available is sketchy, but it is known the girl took an
overdose of Anacin and Midol.
And in this case a life was saved, too.
In February of this year a coed who had boyfriend trouble took
overdoses of both dorine and emperin.
SHE DIED.
There are three {daces for students at the UF to seek help in times
of emotional or mental stress.
The mental health section of the Infirmary staffs three
psychiatrists: Drs. J. I. Dela Torre, C. A. Yozgat and Stewart Cahoon.
STUDENTS MAY go to the office where they fill out applications
and schedule forms so they may be set up for an interview session?
The first interview is usually with someone other than one ofjke
psychiatrists so that information may be gathered to decide wiffih
would be the best step for the student to take next.
The Office of Student Development, room 128 Tigert, also offers
counseling to those who seek it.
A third source of aid is the Counseling Center in room 311 Little
Hall.
LT. GENE WATSON of the University Police said the best thing to
do if you know someone who has attempted or plans to attempt
suicide is to call the campus police or city police if they are closer.
Watson said officers can intervene and prevent the suicide attempt,
or, if it has already taken (dace, they can transport the person to a
place where they can receive medical aid the quickest.
He said of suicide attempts on campus, Its not a frequent
situation, but its always a present one. tt:

By CHRIS LANE
a 111 liiattea
ANipnOi 9UVT vviinev
A ringing phone breaks the
stillness of the night.
The faint, helpless voice on
the other end says, Im going to
kill myself. And the Suicide
and Crisis Intervention Center
springs into action.
THE CENTER, located at 808
S.W. 4th Ave., is staffed around
the dock to provide help for UF
students and local residents in a
crisis.
Reasons for committing
suicide vary. But, Joyce Rowe,
associate director, said people
kill themselves simply because
they want to stop living.
They feel that life is no
longer worth living. That its too
much of a hassle. But many
times they make a suicidal
attempt that is really a cry for
help, she said.
FACTORS CONTRIBUTING
to suicidal tendencies include
pressures to succeed
academically, unwanted
pregnancies, and emotional
stress. Also prompting a person
to take his life are social, peer
and parental pressures and
financial worry.
Two seperate phone lines are
manned at all times for public
use. The hot line (3764447)
offers advice to junior and senior
high school students and the
crisis line (3764444) is for
student and adult situations.

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When a person calls, we
don't argue with them, Miss
Rowe said. They really dont
conceive of ending then life on a
permanent basis.
IF A PERSON is in such
condition to require face-to-face
contact, then a male rad female
CARE team is dispatched.
The name CARE is an acronym
for its four functions:
Contact the individual
facing a crisis.
Assess the individuals
situation.
Relieve the individual
facing a crisis.
Engage the person in some
organization where he can
receive help or motivate his own
resources so he can help himself.
CARE teams are run on a
24-hour basis.
THE CENTER is operated on
a grant from the National
Institute of Mental Health.
Except for a small
administrating staff, the
majority of workers are
volunteers. About 50 per cent of
the volunteers are UF students.
Before working in the center,
volunteers are trained in crisis
theory and therapy, suicidology,
drugs and alcoholism.
A RECENT CORNELL
University study showed suicide
to be the number one killer
among college age students.
Auto accidents are ranked
number one among the general
population, but it is unknown

how many of those are really
suicides.
The same study showed that
many more students fad in their
attempt to commit suicide than
succeed.
Miss Rowe said more men
commit suicide, but, more
women attempt it.
MEN NORMALLY use a
firearm or some type of
explosive while women usually
take an overdose of some drug,
die said.
Another function of the
center is to provide
psychological autopsies to
determine whether the death
was a suicide and not an
accident or homicide.
Miss Rowe referred to the
recent death of former rock
singer Janis Joplin. Her death
could have been suicide. Did she
die intentionally or did she just
get hold of some bad stuff?
So far this year, the center has
helped 750 people in a crisis
situation in addition to
intervening in 115 suicide
attempts. Eight deaths are
presently classified as suicides in
Alachua county.



, | i f V '. *, v >. A If- o $ # 3 #"
BSU To Open
Student Center
By KATHY ROBERTS
A Mt *
vvriTtf
A Black History and Cultural Center is being planned by the Black
Student Union (BSU) according to a statement released Monday by
the BSU Minister of Information.
Support for the center is being drawn from all segments of the
university community, and Vice President (of Student Affairs) Lester
Hale has expressed a great interest in the proposed project, according
to the statement.
BLACK STUDENTS are in need of such a gathering place because
the university lacks any relevant means of social endeavor for the
black students, die statement read.
The purpose of the center is not to segregate die black students
from the rest of the student body, but instead it is intended to serve
as a means of communications between the different nationalities on
campus.
It will give the blade students a chance to come together and
discuss issues concerning them. It will give other segments of the
community a chance to become aware of the balck mans heritage and
why he addresses himself to the peculiar problems of American
Society.
IN SHORT, it will seek to create an environment for the
understanding and free exchange of ideas, the statement read.
When completed, the proposed center will consist of a browsing
library, cinema room for the purpose of showing slides and films, a
recreation hall, and a study room.
Possible locations for the center are the Reitz Union, the band
room when vacated, and the old case in Jennings Hall.
Any renovations needed wffl be done by volunteer students in die
College of Fine Arts and Architecture.
OJC., straight intro. Let's see now...
Several Blacklite-years ago I fed my head the Experience and...
ah, Puff Puff!
Well, you know (drops). OFF
Orange and Purple waves to fly, but No more Gods! beneath my
sky
* &
Remember this from me:
for our head to be FREE
lay together beneath the sea
and when you know youre not dead
Always, play Hendrix with your head.
Think die next world will be...
FUN
Im Bob.
PURPLE HAZE
And no other hand wifl Ever Do,
No other hand.
I bathed in an Endless Summer Trip and
you know, my mind is still waiting for a lift r
from reading all those walls in the caves
in the Heads and smelling the deepAcidfryed
ancient temples Ruins
(0 Lordie, what Could they Do with His
guitar; his Love) think-mumbles incoherently?
and now you, ah, say you cant
see the bag I'm in... well, ah...
LOVfrSfSt Rfe&! V I
v v
You know what I am talking about!
and now the Electric VooDoo Chile has Left
the third stone from the sun and tears fall
and bum the garden green
(My house is, oh, such a SAD mile from here)
All because someone misplaced the stars
I swallowed an er,
Butterfly, once.
"hat music, mLowe? PUFF FUFF,
they probably heard IT by this time.

§
' 1 fre aaet gjgrg
| had this hangup
I was repressed-
Even my ox-fords pinched.
Then I met otq Red
' @iq Red was what he vuas
e*Q Red. And So unabashedly
ualy, he was beautiful.
I duq him.
VJe wrote with abandon, l/dith I
biq bold strokes. Vie wrote endlessly
(Well, he is refutable.)
hands, even my pinched text text
I i berated. Freedom at last
M Mm M
mm m m
\o\ U^JUjrrr^
\o\ k I ono nsrfl 73.dK> Ail 1 I
" fIR gut now I'm hung up
II on 3iq Bed (If Y I'fe-,
W io Give someone a beaowui
Ml M hanqup, Biq Red only
H costs -five bucks.)
_ ___ au COB wOMiN. RPiu-S with 4 cocoas INI CAMPUS STORES AND I
$5 fieXs VERSION. SAME PRICE. DON'T YOU KNOW SOME BOOT WORTH IT?
C r. * V wvot.hi.u&A
-
|

Thursday, October 15,1970, The Florida Allifator,

Page 13



Page 14

rCHUCK O | fJOU Ndl
j I M LB J
tPirnrrwrFwnnih HVfsrmvfflffl^^^
COMPARE! Wf-vf COMPARE! Wtt
Fish Sticks *"**" 75 c 71 2* Coffee Rich * 24c 25< i<
Wintree Deviled Crabs ra 99< $lO9 io Rice Verdi, Pilaf, Medley -££££ 38c 39* i<
Mrs. Paul Crablets 73c 4 Birdseye Green Beans 43c < i
Downy Flake Hot Slices 48c 49 i* Birdseye Mixed Vegs 43c < i*
Swanson T-V Dinners 63c 67* 4 Libby BrusselSprouts -*~ 32c m<
Chicken Chow Mein 77c B i< 4 < Libby Broccoli Spears 28c 29* 1*
Patio Enchilada Dinner TtS? 59< 65* 6* Libby Mixed Vegs mozsN. i*oz. 23* 2*
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I asst meat pimners I Southland Blackeye Peas FIOJL 48c 51< 3<
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Thursday, October 15, 1970, The Florida Alligator

Page 15



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New Kustom 200 watt amp. with rev,
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Conn alto saxophone with case, two
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EB2C jGibson Bass Guitar and Fender
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$350 value, panosonlc stereo
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1969 Honda 50 470 actual ml, elec,
start, excel cond, helmet & bookrack
Incl. $l5O cash 373-2877 (A-3t-18-p)
SEIKO SPORTSMATIC 5
Self-winding; Day-Date; a beautiful
black face with sllvercase and band.
S3O Call Dave 376-0739 (A-st-18-p)
67 triumph 500 cc very clean very
quick extra seat, bars, fenders, meg.
pipes will sell for $599 Call 373-2911
(A-st-18-p) -t
ust sell 1968 VW excellent
condition call 376-6683 after 5:00
Glenn Springs Apt. G 4 Jerry Wei born
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150 Honda road cycle needs a little
work 2 helmets S9O 373-2520 call
between 5 and 7 also Bell & Howel
auto load 16 movie camera $45
Steve, 373-2520 (A-5M6-P)
BAR, handmade Mexican handwood
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after 1 (A-3t-18-p)
Young attractive girl who Is tired of
holding her own Is seeking a new grip
on life Call 378-0441 (A-3t-18-p)
1969 KAW Mach 111 500 cc excellent
condition with 1970 wiring kit good
miles $760.00 Ph. Tom Shires
462-2082 (A-10t-18-p)
AR 2-a spkrs S2OO Fisher 500-TX
amp S3OO Garrard SL6S-S3O
372-7694 (A-3t-18-p)
1967 Fleetwood, 12x60, 3BR, IV*
bath. Air Cond., partly furnished on
lot no. 42 In Pine Hurst. Excellent
Cond. $4995. 378-3516 (A-st-18-p)
Triumph 250 trophy model 1968
good condition $450.00 5500 miles
also Honda 90 scrambler 1967
SIIO.OO Phone 376-5798 (A-3t-19-p)
1965 MG 1100 sedan runs well looks
hideous must sell this week best
offer. 376-7383. (A-4t-19-p)
SPOTS before your eyes on your
new carpet remove them with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Electric upholstery shampooer now
available (A-tfc)
Cassette player recorder Am FM 75
wt. Amp. 21 heavy tapes 2 musical
Instrument speakers 2ftx4ft hand
crafted Ph. 373-2756 after 6:00
(A-5M9-P)
Yamaha guitar and case. 2 wks. old.
$65 376-5212 (A-2t-19-p)
ADORABLE CHIHUAHUA puppies.
5 weeks old $25 each call 372-1790
after s*oo (A-st-19-p)

** lE*ara RENT
IV*VyAV*VAV.V#VV* fVVV#y VV
Available Immediately due to
cancllatlon. 1 BR AC furn apt
$l2O/yr lease. $l3O 6 mo lease Ph
373-3074 (B-3t-18-p)
WANTED
Male roommate wanted starting
winter quarter. Call 392-0470 until 5.
Trailer located at mobiler trailer park
2925 S.W. 28 PI. (old Archer rd.)
(C-3t-19-p)
2 Roommates for 2brm house A/C
cable tv SSO/mo Ist & last mos. plus
1/3 utilities Upperclass or Graduate
preferred 1948 NW 4 St 376-9520
(C-2t-19-p)
Wanted Now 1 Female Roommate
for Landmark Apt. 120, 47.50 a
month Call 373-3756, Ask for Joan
or Jean AC, Heated, pool, dishwasher
(C-st-19-p)
Wanted Now I 2 Male Roommates
Landmark Apt number 119, 47.50 A
Month Call 378-5946, Ask for John
or Wayne. Ac, Heated, pool,
Dishwasher (C-st-19-p)
1 Female roomate for La Mancha
apt. Free rent for Oct. Call 378-9824.
(C-2t-18-p)
A deal need one girl to share
2-bedroom mount vernon apt. 57
with two other girls. Oct. rent freel
52.50/mo. 378-9937 or 376-9759
Call after 4. (C-2t-18-p)
Female roommate over 21 to share 2
bedroom Point West Apt AC carpet,
pool, dishwasher. sloo/mo. plus
utilities. 373-2370 (C-st-15-p)
Wanted Immediately 1 female
roommate, SBS a month + deposits
or 2 at $52.50 a month + deposits.
Village Park. Phone 372-1560 after
2pm. (C-st-15-p)
Hip girl to live In modern house with
2 acres In SE need car cook, light
clean own room $25 + V* util.
373-3381 (C-5M7-P)

IOWS NIGHTLY
er Person

| Todays |
I more for your money meal I
at moisows I
I CRFETERIR I
I iThursdayT Feature"] I
I I PORK CUTLET PARMESANI I
WITH OOA S a
I | I SPAGHETTI WW\ J § I
I §1 FRIDAY'S FEATURE IS I
I I Morrison's famous {k!|l a I 5
1 | ROAST TURKEY O ZC< 3
WITH I
! MASHED POTATOES. I
DRESSING. GRAVY.
! ANDCRANBERRYSAUCE^
I LUNCH: till 2 SUPPER:4:3OtiI 8-FREE PARKING I
I mORRISOITS I
I CRFETERIR ..beyond comparison! I
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 15,1970

Page 16

help wanted
MEDICAL TECHNICIAN OR
TECHNOLOGIST: Background In
histology. To be trained in electron
microscopy. Excellent position for
part-time student or student spouse.
Term appointment 2V* years. Salary
$6,548-$8,098 depending upon
qualifications. Equal Opportunity
employer. Write Chief, Personnel
Division, VA Hospital, Lake City,
Florida 32055. (E-7t-13-p)
Male help wanted full time or
part time. Immediate openings
full time or part time counter
men. Must have person who will
be available thru xmas break.
Apply 2 pm. ter 5 pm. Thursday
Oct. 15 and Friday Oct. 16.
Arbys 1405 SW 13th Street.
(E-2t-19-p)
If you want to make good money
(SSO or more per week), part time,
without selling, call 378-4793 after
SPM (E-4t-19-p)
We are looking for special people
who want to make SSOO mo part
time. We represent an exciting
company with a AAA D&B rating.
Attend a meeting at 2933 NE 13 Dr
Fri at 7:30 pm to find out
particulars. (E-2t-19-p)
EARN EXTRA MONEYI We need on
campus representatives, to sell
quality receivers, speakers, tape
recorders, record changers, &
cartridges at discounts. Write to: Jeff
Johnson National Direct Sales Co.
Suite 111 Hopkins, Minnesota 55343
(E-3t-17-p)
Cartoonist wanted for Alligator
experience helpful see Steve Strang
after 3PM room 365 Union 392-1686
(E-tfc)
GROOVY CHICKS NOW BEING
INTERVIEWED by local ad agency
for modeling and/or public contact
work at manufacturers* trade shows.
Have fun and earn good bread at the
same time! Must be young, attractive,
personable, articulate, and enjoy
meeting the public. Expense paid
travel for some assignments. Call
376-4656 for appointment.
(E-st-15-p)

autos
67 VW bug sacrifice $1,025
378-3196 (G-3t-18-p)

KT Peter Sellers George J. Scott
' Sway Kubricks | v
-f Dr. Strangelove >
irHswl LssrnsfTsStspWinTiai WLmTfcsifc r*^Sk
the hot-line I
m comedy
This Friday & Sat. Union Aud.
advance tickets on sale at 2nd floor box office Friday from
12:30 4:30 for all weekend showings

./ ** ;|^j|d
I $ jil >| *j| j^^BPfBBB^:MB
I MM*|h I R 1 AOM 150 I
C I No On* Un4or 1 Admitted I
Mention this ad for special early bird price of 35 cents every
nite before 7 PM. and Sat. & Sun. Matinees. Regular Price
SI.OO Penthouse number 2 $1.50 Penthouse number 3
E|jijjnj NOW AT...
IFTTm
TllTerichse^^
STARTS FRIDAY!
CONRAD THE BUTLER- I^Br'
HE DID IT TO i §(
The Countess- Her Son-
Her Daughter Her Bl|Bl^MiS^^
- Daughter-in-Law B
MlPiiiffiM
l|^
Angela Lartsbury
for Everyone JBB^^^^^B
the basic black comedy
ANATIONAL GENERAL PICTURESRELEASE \ , . '
INF ma: ,e nte rfh ms presentation ,. V> C.; /' (.-iv .*' \--t'>..**.
,nCCXOR [r] 4£&
"LAST DAY
TELL ME YOU LOVE
JUNNIE MOON Sg^Eg

autos
65 Mustang, 6 cyl., 3 s P ee tires. 376-2184; after 5. Reasonable
price. (G-3t-18-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

autos
T R4 A IRS 1966 Very aood
mechanically; Interior not so good.
Son at 392-1372 or 372-6589.
(G-3t-16-p)
1967 Mustang Convertible 289 d V 8
wide oval tires 4 speed transmission
excellent condition Phone 378-8884
student 2157 NW 9th Ave.
(G-4M7-P)
SUCH A DEAL! Metallic blue 66
Corvalrwell serviced, 3-speed
dependable transportation. Sporty
yet economical. Asking 600
373-1507 (G-st-15-p)
LARGEST STOCK Os USED
IMPORTS In Nth. CENTRAL
FLORIDA! HARFRED AUTO
IMPORTS, 1946 N. Main 378-7085.
(G-tfc)
FOR SALE 62' olds super 88-V8 new
tires-Just tuned-rest In good
condition-$325 or best offer Call Bob
after 8. 376-5981 (G-st-16-p)
Classic 1959 Jaguar XKISO Hdtp.
wire wheels, good tires, looks good,
runs but needs some work. $350 or
best offer 376-2708 (G-4t-18-p)
Dodge Dart, 1967, V-8, automatic,
sports coupe, 39,000 ml., excellent
condition. SBSO. Hardtop. Call
Linda, 376-6415, leave name, phone
(G-3t-18-p)
67 Corvette conv. Full power, air,
auto. Good shape. Asking S3IOO.
Call 372-9283. Ask for Boyd.
(G-3t-19-p)
1967 GTX, Plymouth. Top notch
custom street car. Candy-apple,
metal-flake paint. Will trade for VW
or Porsche. Phone 376-7113.
(G-st-19-p)
PERSONAL
Jan: Thanks for the most fantastic,
crazy, mixed-up weekend. Wouldnt
trade It for anything, except a longer
weekend. Luv, Andy (J-lt-19-p)
Never change when love has found
Its home-Propertlus, New Delhi
Delicatessen, 706 W. Univ. We want
to sell you a sandwich!!!! (J-lt-19-p)
SI MU LEV! Anl ohevet et Batzalel
(vehu ohev ohti). Bekleetz habah
bearetz. Lynn (J-lt-19-p)
America, love It or leave It!
Potential radical needs SSOO to split
so put your money where your
mouth Is. Richard Klnkead 392-7529
(J-2t-19-p)
SINGLE STUDENTS! Meet more
members of the opposite sex through
NDS. All dates In Gainesville. Most
dates with U.F. students. For free
details write: Nationwide Dating
Service, P.O. Box 77346, Atlanta,
GA 30309. (J-lOt-13-p)
Stutterers wanted for an auditory
feedback study. Will pay you SB.OO
please call Michelle Jensen Evenings:
378-0104 Days: 392-2046
(J-10t-15-p)
A unique and unusual gift Is a
handmade gold or silver ring.
Original design or your own
private symbol. Reasonably
priced. 373-1947. (J-st-15-p)
CAREER I
OPPORTUNITIES I
Due to New Store Expansion I
and Rapid Promotions We I
Have Openings for 1
-MEAT CUTTERS I
-STOCK CLERKS 1
-MEAT APPRENTICES!
-PRODUCE CLERKS |
-CHECKERS I
Full time aiid part time B
Excellent wage rates and fl
liberal fringe benefit program I
provided.
APPLY In Person To I
David AUagood At The H
BIG STAR I
3736 Newberry Rd. I
Catenae, Fh.
Oct. 8,9, ft 12 thru 16*
8 AM 6 PM I

PE RSONA L
Racial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrologlst 102 NW
2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
Pat B. Super Happy Birthday to a
very cherished friend. Being 18 is lots
of fun and Daytona wont be the
same. Luv ya, Jim + TX (J-lt-18-p)
LOST St POUND
LOST: Glasses in red case. In Bryan
120 sometime after 4th on Fri. Oct.
9 Please return! Call 392-9312, Sandl
(L-3t-18-p)
HELP! Lost all U. of F. Ids,
including drivers licence. If found
please call Millie Fleming 103 Hume
2-8666 reward offered I (L-2t-18-p)
Pair of gold rim glasses, octagonal
frame. If not broken I could really
appreciate their return. Call
372-5774 after 7 pm (L-st-19-p)
LOST: One notebook and psyche
textbook. Help! Im lost without It!
Please search! Reward offered.
Contact Carleen 373-1228.
(L-3t-16-p)
FOUND: Black & brown mutt,
female Was advertised In lost column.
1103 SW 7th Ave. 373-3061
(l-3t-16-nc)
Found: Bishop Moore High School
ring found outside of Anderson call
372-6832 after five. (l-3t-26-no)

/\ If A \ Straight from the
\j\y \s\ Beachcomber in Uavtona" j
\ Friday in Saturday
s \ \*\ October 16-17
\>
j \\ 11 $1 per person
U 2 BAHDS AT THt RAT
A Student Government Production

ou Must He 18 Years of |j!|s l|j nU"
to Enter & Prove it! lu!' W W | flLtip

rsaay, October 1 5>, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now! Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
We SERVICE ALL IMPORTS.
Factory trained mechanics.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS. 506 E.
Unlv. 372-4373. (M-tfc)
We will professionally plastic
laminate any newsoaoer article or
photo for $1.50. You pay only after
receiving your work, cut out article
carefully, leaving a margin of about Vi
Inch, and send to Gator Laminating
service. P.O Box 12949 Gainesville
Fla 32601. (M-2t-19-p)
Rubys Alterations apt. 217-100 N.E.
Bth Ave Gainesville, Florida
376-8506 Mrs. Ruby Mills.
(M-st-15-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
373-1984, 9-5. (M-10t-9-p)
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists
trained to type theses, dissertations,
textbooks, manuscripts, etc. 1405
NW 13th St., IBM Bldg., Rm,. 206,
Phone 376-7160. (M-15t-10-p)

Page 17

Its happening jL
at the Hat! (LnrS
At the Rat... I
You can rock out to the latest
groups, dancing almost nightly It/
You have the chance to meet
someone new, after that, who knows.
And unescorted girls are D
! always welcome
jgOQQQESXXXSDCODCXXXXXSCBSSSSXEEBSEDEXSSSEEEEI
SPECIAL RATES FOR FLORIDA RESIDENTS
jfHV On Th* World Famous
GLASS BOTTOM BOATS of
ISulklftadL 11 last \
r o. w. ?m it. vyi day a bug A
l Starts V "Jungle )
TOMORROW y l
Comese^how
the vampires do it.
10000011 0000100000101000
niMMmiMiKcin.il Ontr 8:20
i" ~_" _ 1
WORWiWWR
htsaom -JK J
i wftn i
SAMUEL GOLDWYN. JR. presents
:: GODFREY RAYMOND CALVIN
jCAMBRIDGE- St JACQUES-LOCKHAfi?
_J : PACE : OSSIE DAVIS n, e, ** r ** s J



The
Florida
Alligator

The Yardbirds, Then And Now

By WARD BRISICK
Alligator Entartainmant Writer
The car screeches to a halt.
You jump out and run into the
crowd pushing and cutting into
the fine leading to the
auditorium gates. The crowd is
surging with excitement.
The Shire 11s! someone
screams. The Shirells, can you
imagine, one whole hour of
do-lan-do4ang-do4ang.
Its too much, shouts
another. The tension is
mounting.
You cant wait for them to
waltz out on the stage glittering
and smiling. You know youll
just pass out on the spot.
THE DOORS open. Trying
not to lose cool and run to the
front you slowly waddle in as
those ahead of you file down the
aisles to the stage front. Great,
youre exactly 13 feet, seven
inches from the stage.
You rush as someone behind
you screams, The Shirells, its
them, theyre on the stage! Oh
my God, you flash, and jolt your
attention to the figure on stage.
An announcer approaches the
microphone.
Hello everybody, I would
now like to introduce the man
who made this all happen, the
man from WWWW Wha Radio,
Mr. Barry Blast! Kinetic energy
breaks irfto screams and squeals.
Hi kids, and welcome to the
First Annual Wha Radio
Teenarama Show. As you know
the fantastic Shirells (screams)
will be live and on stage a little
later, but first wed like to warm
you up a little with some sounds
from an up-and-coming group
whos new release has been
featured this week on Whas
Big Ten, Englands own
Yardbirds!
A FIGURE walks out to
screams from the over-anxious
crowd. As he walks into the
stagelight four more figures
appear on stage. The cheering
dies and breaks into a hum of
half-laughter, half dis-belief as
the group takes the stage. A
shock wave hits as comments
telegraph through the audience.
The lead guitarist plugs in his hip
level guitar. He is dressed in a
red velvet suit with patent
leather pumps. Black layers of
hair fall to his shoulder length.
Giggels circulate the audience.
Look at their hair; they look
like a bunch of girls. Do you
believe that guy's pants? They
look like they're painted on.
The group smiles through it
all and quickly ready themselves

Zappa Sarcasm Dynamite At FSU

By KEN DRIGGS
Alligator Cormpondowt
Last Friday night Tallahassee
endured another exhibition of
Zappa supreme.
Frank Zappa and his
at-t ime s-dull-at-times-fantastic
Mothers of Invention teamed
with the Allman Brothers for
that concert sponsored by
Student Government at Florida
State University.
-Jr ZAPPA FREQUENTLY

"iPWyfffTttWPWITWHITBffffWWWwSTO
^K'Xv^B*^^BX i^Hv)*^K a i !v^^'^B|!v^Kv!'^Ml^v^v!^V!^^E*^vims^v^^Kvl'i^v!\^K'X^B''! i, l

for concert. The audience, still
in dis-belief, seems as if it cant
really comprehend exactly what
is happening.
The guitarist tunes. The hum
dies down. With back to the
audience he bangs out a short
blues introduction to put the
final hush over the crowd. He
whirls and stops. The crowd is
silent. He stands there grinning
impishly for he knows that every
single ear is waiting for him to
spare it no mercy. He tucks his
chin in at his bassist, who is
leaned back and ready to go, and
cuts loose.
THE STAGE explodes. He is
all over his guitar. Screeches and
sharp wails cut from his amps.
The drummer flails wildly as the
singer whines on his harmonica
and shouts some twelve bars
lyrics into the microphone. The
crowd come to their feet.
You are now standing in the
middle of a hysterical frenzy of
raving mad teenyboppers. Some
cant look; the singers pants are
too much for their little minds.
Some whirl and run up the
aisles; the drummers hair is
down to his mid-back! What is
happening? People are out of
control. It is just too much for
them to handle
You bolt and run as fast as
you can leaving the bizarre scene
in the distance.
My God, the Yardbirds,
you think. You cant put your
finger on it but you know that
this is 1963 and you are a sane,
normal ninth grader and that
everythings going to be all right.
LITTLE DID you know that
you were going to have
flashbacks of the concert. Only
this time you would enjoy the
happenings. In fact you would

displayed his uncommon ability
on the electric guitar while the
music he prepares for the
Mothers ranges from very good
to very dull.
The Mothers opened with an
oath to uphold Floridas laws
concerning Jim Morrison -style -styleperformances,
performances, -styleperformances, but the oath itself
somehow came out obscene.
THE OBJECT OF their
sarcasm ranged up and down
society. Taken out of context
the Mothers can only be termed

M y *r jff Ate ft :
juu *< lk E&fcKz t
JEFF BECK, JIMMY PAGE AND ERIC CLAPTON
... perform on two-record set

anticipate them and even buy
the record of the music played.
Maybe because it was now 1970
and things had changed and had
been accepted Or maybe
because the now had caught
up with you.
Ahhh, the Led Zeppelin,
theyre so good.
I like Jeff Becks Group
better. The age of the British
Hype Group had begun. Not
that there is anything wrong
with this music. Its just that it
soon became boring and a wave
of boring heavy music was to
follow. This can be related to
the fact that none of these
groups are doing anything that
the Yardbirds didnt do six or
seven years ago.
The problem then was the
great experimental nature of the
Yardbirds work made it a little
too progressive for the radio
listeners. The absence of
underground and FM radio made
it almost impossible to expose
the Yardbirds to the record
buying public, so, like many
other great groups the Yardbirds
split because they were too good
for their time in space and their
concerts were panic-striken
back-up gigs like with the
Shirells.
SINCE MANY listeners have
recently tuned to heavy blues
as it may be called, Epic Records
has newly released a collection
of the Yardbirds work in a two
record set titled The Yardbirds,
featuring performances by Jeff
Beck, Eric Clapton, and Jimmy
Page. This set brings you the
Yardbirds at their best. It is also
at their most complete as some
of the cuts are on record for the
first time.
The performances of Beck,

gross, but taken in concert they
are terribly funny.
The audience, a mixed group
at first, but mostly freaks by the
end of the concert, seemed
disinterested in the pure music
portion of the show.
But when lyrics or emitted
sounds came again, all paid close
attention. IL
One of the big
disappointments of the show
had to be the Allman Brothers,
or rather lack of them. Tully
Gym officials turned on the

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 15, 1970

Page 18

Clapton, and Page are themselves
enough to make the album
priceless. These fellows have
never been known to be in a
band of lesser merit than
themselves and their fellow
Yardbirds are no exception. The
three guitarists took turns
playing lead for bassist Chris
Dreja, Paul Samwe 11-Smith, and
Jim McCarty in backing up
Keith Relf, the exciting singer
and harpist whos voice was a
Yardbirds trademark.
Since all the members had
.< ft ftgreat
great ftgreat credentials the band did
away with the
front-man-back-up routine and
got down to some serious blues
with a few innovations invented
and still credited to the
Yardbirds.
Eric Slowhand Clapton
graced the first Yardbirds lineup
of 1962. The man who
influenced and led many more
to great heights in free form solo
can be heard at his best on the
new album. I Aint Got You is
very typically Clapton.
ONE CAN, however, see this
early musician before complete
development in some of his
rhythmic moves. His flaws are
harder to spot in I Wish You
Would an up-tempo blues tune
featuring Keith Relf on voice
and incredible mouth harp.
Clapton set the early standard
in blues with his unique phrasing
and blue sound. The rest is
history as he climbed to the top
of the rock world.
Since the Yardbirds did their
best things while Jeff Beck was
their lead guitarist it is only
logical that the best cuts on the
album feature Beck.
Beck is the live guitarist. The
audiences reaction to him is an

lights and ended their show after
only five numbers, something
less than an hour of the heavy
Allman sound. v
Apparently the measure was
deemed necessary to get the
crowd to clear the isles and
wallrwav*
BUT EVEN THAT brief span,
ended by a 20 minute version of
Tied to the Whipping Post was
spectacular. One has to be
impressed with the weight of
their music, it leaves the
sensation of liquid oxygen in

GREG JONES
Entertainment Editor

essential part of his total
performance. He needs the
crowd behind him to play and
when he sees that they are with
him he really plays. His best
work on the album is in his own
Jeffs Boogie, This tune is
typically Beck. He is the king of
the hot-dog musicians.
I to his rhythmic almost
cute delivery one can picture
him on stage grinning as if to
say, Did you like that one?
Wait until you hear this one.
Another cut of his is the
infamous Train Kept A
Rollin also known as Stroll
on. This was the tune they
performed in their brief
appearance in Antonionis
Blow-Up. Beck just plays
clean rock-and-roll. The blues is
secondary here. He cant be very
blue if hes playing that flash.
PAGE IS of course, Page. He
is electric, reverb, hype-flash, he
was the same then as he is now.
You can pick him out easily as
he comes on the heaviest of the
three. On one tune called Got
to Hurry, you can distinctly
hear Becks lead played to a blue
Page counter rhythm.
Many of his cuts sound
exactly like his work with Led
Zeppelin. In fact he performs a
number on the album now used
by Zeppelin in concert, White
Summer. This number is one of
the first examples of Eastern
rhythm played by a Western
rock musician on record. The
Yardbirds were into Indian
theory long before the Beatles
recorded Revolver.
With these three fine guitarists
around it would seem impossible
for anyone else to get a note in.
They are great on all of their
sides, but the man who shows he
is long over due for recognition
is Keith Relf. He sings all the
numbers and plays a fantastic
harp on Little Games, The
Train Kept A Rollin, and does
an untouchable vocal in I Aint
Done Wrong, his own
composition.
The timelessness of this album
will surprise and delight the
listener. It is almost impossible
to believe that we were twisting
while the Yardbirds were being
so mean and nasty. All the cuts
were taped in either 1962, 63,
or *64, yet I would venture to
say that they capture the mood
and excitement of 1970*s music
better than it does itself.

your lungs and rocks on your
shoulders.
The Brother's music is a
unified and deadly serious. It
draws the very energy out of an
audience.
With two albums under their
belt, The Allman Brothers are
more than just a popular
regional band. They seem to be
the heirs apparent to Blind
Faith. Their music is very
similar.



ffteM In
ny advertised item, please requ e.tarain *-
chock Quantity Right* loMrvod. limit 2 lags Plea*
P Mimm Natural or Sweetened Special!
**--*-.
Jl&dfi,j*am.tAt&tcAe*o(. mnu s. crawford pk * vv Brand Frow HPPHpHHHflp^HHjjjH^pp^l
fjfcr \l a A&PFrown French 4tlw | 1 jKC^Tf^jiH
K J PJV- Apricot ClotlnlSporVkAAP) GreM BMIIS Kellogg', Serial!
| 1 l*pk*.A*PcroamchooM POD TdrfS ......... 2 e?*79* m
pjP* j cup ceneiy cut celery g 90s. (|OO *" 4 *' 19 K;i |
1 con A&P Milk, chiliad 8 Juico Pock Crushed, Chunk or Sliced Spociali V
rdtuMppad. AiPrond Dole Pineapple..... *£ 39* OYRt 0 Y Rt VM Jfl
mfrmfOTrfmT^rfd mmmbdmmmmdmix wrtnvdtfmjft A Special! J
£ 49* Pint apple Juice .....*ar 39* v *T
. . *tV
> > . * < \ > r -* .- V .: v
* *' I£3feSWRi JK, -v-r 3JJ 1 * .--&*?, 4 ** * ?V
: -' y H *y^.
: /,.
: 911'fjiflij |}tkl^H
this HRS ji I
/41 On ABVanotioiGortwr'.SUamod ! i I m nmmm. - 97% Caffein Free e-i.
BaSiy Food ............... 9* Ann Page Halloween Candy! UtMGMnn r
Lysd Disinfectant.. 63* Towels (if'
IfSejEftajfcMaJ# C Spray Disinfectant. 7 <£- 95* candy corn ! 35' Pound fykes. 'SSMsS*
Mm m i l^ lDi, :'7: n ; ,oiU, o ' ~ candypumpkins .."c m* Jane Porker large Golden or Sugared Spociali
t l Cleaner JELLY BEANS __ 'if 29* CakeDOMltS .....' '*l*' 49*
ml ( CANDY POPS 79* jta"*si-si s^ c '|
Bleach ju 29 I French R 0115........ 27*
/&hhhh£n AHOY PINK LIQUID EXTRA SPECIAL!
Detergent 3s. 89* iTjVnV
# In ANTISEPTIC W i 1 "jM
Listerine ........... Bottle 79* : MM I
jp!§9| JANE PARKER DELICIOUS EXTRA SPECIAL! I II
Apple Pies >£ 39* ijWi^Ka^
Farm Fresh Fruits & Vegetables! BWk\ \ | )
Thi> Ceupnn When Yeu Buy Jw With Thit Coupon When You Buy
RED DELICIOUS OR JONATHAN SPECIAL! lULUyiH 1 IVORY LIQUID I I hestea I
ADDI PC 7 ARv I |||||4 For 1 C BOXES ,h OF r *" ' Ij! I Wh.. r H . jf
Bartlett Pears 28* - V^lMM r WHEATIES 1 | US. . 1
Yaowfcpo CoworShtap HDD KDTII I7FD W##d f ,d f ' S Au u Hn# ~lb *"9 osl Qfl C u '"' B,d 8 ,d h U ' 18 I>7 j Cu M n Hn* Ort. t. Iff. Jg
Bananas *.lo* fertilizer A&P FERTILIZtK.
SchlitZ I Sms4 A
rwneiunwii em ..me inw.iim re i
tm Plaid Stamp A. beer 6£*i m
L ata vot maiiitiasimhsimiim
Here, ) 7 free.copy VJ *.,o;- ***'"""
DOW* W jl|isiw *l" *** iOmSpray*c2: 79* mm
1 eCoepongoaUUwOsl II ISIFFO 2 Cnunge nto. thru Osl U 10-17/0
Mi IVtW. -lisa iwmtwjaMiiitMwi>l indwfciwiaWiniimal
mi i*^>,o W^x
Thursday, October 15, 1970, The Florida Alligator

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator. Thundoy, October 19. Wf

Checked prices" means Winn-Dixie is constantly examining prices in
derto give you the lowest possible prices in the South. That means you
get lower regular prices and week-long specials. Once you check
Winn-Dixie prices, youll cross other stores off your list.
i ( rAECEE
HALLOWEEN CANDY vUmC Bpl
I | I limit lof your chain with $5.00 or liter* purchase excluding cigarettes.
Tarts wco. 9 C Toffy Rolls < 59 c _3 maxweuhouss l
Sticks SS 69 e Mints St 39* COFFEE 69*
PARTY MACH BUTTERSCOTCH ML3? A ~ JEJIIaBI M
Pops S? 79 c Disks .. 'S? 79 c BEHiffll.4 a^B
Kisses .... 79 c Butter 69 c SAVE i-lb.
SOLID CHOCOLATE TOFFS BUBBLE A Jww 4% .41 *> CAM
Pumpkins VS 89* Gum 59 e A 34
Treats ',?£ 79* Bars £ 79 0 ...
Quantity Right* Ruiarvad
WIHN OUOI stows, IMC. -comiOHT- two SAVE 7c... THRIFTY MAID SLICED OR CRUSHED
fi r\ I >a. SAVE 10c... DEEP SOUTH KOSHER DIU OERKIN
KRAFT save 11. Pineapple .. ** 18' Pickles 49'
KKArT a a a lAVI lie CRACKIN GOOD SOUPS CHIU
(limit two plaaia with 55.00 or mora purchaM axe. Cigarettes.) SAVE Sc ... JOAN-OF-ARC KIDNEY
BB A VAIIU AIC E M Crackers ... ~ 25' Beans ... -14'
I VIA T UNNAIjE D 1 Cooking Oil 68' Pancake Mix sr 33 c
-n-*-mmom- ILA RSS3C7. .sr 28' t7asl Bags 39'
MAYONNAISE a 38 c O u ; ITW M Tomatoes .3 ss 88' Detergent.. r 48'
PUNCH SAVE 19c
DELMONTE SAVES. SCOTT ASSORTED PAPER SAVE 17c
Sweet Peass s l Towels 3 = S I OO fS3M\ R
Corn 4ss *l Napkins .. 3 *l WSaMt Wvill I 881
Gr. Beans .5 ss s l Soups .... 8 *1 00
Chili 4 s l Foil 4 £ s l |pP^
COOKING OIL THRIFTY MAID AU FLAVORS FRUIT
K WESSON 00, R*. ....,,DRINKS A A
BBL DIXIE DARLING SANDWICH BB jj
Fiky Rons.... 4 i BB BBT Bread 4^*1 00 jpfef JBJw
A --.nil MedrEisT.t .79<1 4 |#||
THRIFTY MAID 7 ARROW, WHITE OR ASSORTED KLEENEX ROUTtQUE SAVE I*< SFRAY SAVE 2 U
Prune Plums ..4 W *l Paper Towels .4= *l Facial Tissue .. 4SS *1 00 "409" Cleaner .sr 58*
ARMOUR VIENNA DELMONTE SAVE 17c HEINZ SWEETHEART SAVE 15c
Sausage .V'f ...4Si *l P'apple Juice ..3 a *l Ketchup n't .... 49* Fabric Softener. !f 78*
FT EVAPORATED TOASTEM MY-T-FINE CALO SAVE 20c
Skim Milk .; k .... 10* Pop-Up5..3% *1 00 Pudding .7.*...2 *l Cat Food 7S *l
water *T""n ............ inmnmy^^yMMniitininYj^yMif..........-^
All Detergent 89' B3IJ
ADVANCED KEIKLER nrTw^.T. 1 ,. i onttr amow
An Deteraent 225; IT $ 2 45 i|Pf -.trm BB -.tjt!!! ifl 'Mai -zr i
i^^^mnrmmftniTffTnllllVmTmiiMnmnnTmTnTtntiwTTiTTiii>uiii.u.ijwSSTmi
FRRNCH HAMRUROER RLACKRURN MADE COMSTOCK Ftf MX DOLE SOU
Seasoning ... 33*-Syrup Si! 69* Peach 5- 49* Juice .Ts 41 e P apple Juice .a: 43*
Vfme MOD OAWNF. MUSHROOM COMSTOCK FM MIX ORSIN OUNT . STY. COMSTOCK MACXSSRW
Syrup r 77* Steak Sauce Vis 10* Strawberry.. S- 63* WK. Corn .... '£ 29* Pie Mix 53*
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.



PRICES, SO YOU ttfasr
PUR OKK-OUTS^p
i mi, WHOLE ib 55
W:D BRAND MUD DAISY STYLE CHEDDAR
B Cheese 79 c
scar MAYER'S ALL MEAT FRESH PORK "FINE FOR Bor-B-Que" PALMETTO FARMS
Wieners 79 c Boston Butts . 59 c Pirn. Cheese 69 c
IRNOW CHIPPED BEEF, HAM OR USDA CHOICE BEEF W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE NATURALLY AGED BREAKSTONE CALIFORNIA STYLE COTTAGE
Corned Beef 3- o *1 00 Chuck Steak ..79* __ Cheese cS 35*
PoPELAND All MEAT USDA CHOICE BEEF TOP ROUND STEAK OR KRAFT'S CRACKER BARREL MELLOW
Franks 8? 49* London Broil .. .. 5 1 39 %TL A If | |iq Stick Cheese 69*
Roll Sausage . 69 c Sh'lder Roast ... s l l9 fcP B Biscuits ?23*
Baking Hens .. 45* Round Steak.... 99* "youcho.-- T Yogurt 4£B *l
fish Sticks .... 5S 89* Steakettes 89* rJL?*}* yW
Bu CK FROZEN TURBOT WHITE TENDER SLICED I "PUNK JI tAK % NBKWW.
fish Fillets.... . 59* Beef Liver .... .. 49* SIRLOIN STEAK i>
fishcakes .. 38? *l
TOMATOES ilgfi Pork Chops.. 79*
(Met .2 S 49' A | Cnii.n D!k /Qc
Frr-y i%iivap i
fc*""*"?* M H _ ______ ASTOR DELICIOUS ORANGE
PP.S 5 LI FMEN SPECIALS JUICE
SAVE CAMPBELLS FROZEN CLAM |
I Chowder . . 25 c
BRifty maid delicious ... save 18c JfL
I H iF I Ts|Sr Potatoes .. 29 c frohv lIM WV
I % ffifsw LI f 6-0,.
d HBp Juice 2 ?. 99 havor^** 1 CANS
P|W(3UB.BAG33c) THRIFTY MAID TASTE O'SEA SAVE 17c ... BIRDSEYE SPEARS
fnions 5 & 49* Orange Drink 2 89* Perch Dinners .. is 39* Broccoli 3~. *1 ##
r BAG RUSSET BAKING ASTOR INSTANT SAVE 10c BYRON'S SANDWICHES ASTOR CUT CORN, PEAS A CARROTS, CHOPPED SPINACH k
lotatoes .... 10 ... 69* Potatoes 2 88. 69* Bar-B-Que 1 r 99* Green Peas ... 5-te *1 #0
SWEET SOFT FLEISCHMANN'S SAVE lOc. . HOWARD JOHNSON '? DIXIANA FRENCH STYLE OR REGULAR CUT
lotabqgas 29< Green Beans .. 5 its s l
Softener SS M 3 Spray .. 63*
IfiS Acr P> I wttjiSjlf Turkey ooooimiuoct.ii I I mL GIANT
Wmm ji ** *TTir' ll :Bhp " j iibbf h,.iiw i am urgnT o. /y
SOAP " SUNSHINE KRISPY t NABISCO GRAHAM "Your Om>K6 WISK(PH 4c) GREEN GIANT
F 9 Food .... a! 10* Phase 111 2ES 49* Crackers 43* Cleaner r 1 Corn -JT 29*
P CH A ATM SOAP LUX LIQUID (11-.. 3Sc) (22 63c, DRIVE (R. a Si J7c> (Gi. B*cl BREEZE (Uct* ***>
c.; 10 c Lifebouy ... 2 45* Detergent... 85* Detergent... M- 9 Detergent,,, 93*
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.

Thursday, October 15, 1970, The Florida Alligator

Page 21



The
Florida
Alligator

Knotts Not Preparing For Homecoming

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Sports Editor
UFs defensive coordinator
Doug Knotts said yesterday to
say that he is not looking past
Richmond to Tennessee, that
the position changes within his
Gator defensive alignment were
not to prepare for his, and other
Gator coaches, homecoming in
Knoxville a week from Saturday.
On Tuesday, Knotts moved
middle linebacker Mike Kelley
to the SAM (strong side
linebacker) position and John
Silman up from second team to
the monsterman spot, placing
three-year starter Jack Bums of
Tampa on the second team in
that position.
GARY PETERSON, the SAM
starter for the Gators first five
games, was moved to backup
Eric Taggart at middle
linebacker.
Its not that Burns and
Peterson are playing poorly,
Knotts said. It's just that
Silman and Taggart graded out
better and deserve to play.
Knotts said that Kelley was

Sebring To Come Alive
For Grand Prix Oct. 24

By REG CROWDER
Alligator Staff Writer
SE BRING As the
Automobile Racing Club of
Florida prepares for the L&M
Grand Prix Oct. 24, word is out
that last years pole car will be
back.
Jes Stevens of Miami,
new owner of the
Chevy-powered Eagle chassis,
hopes to have better luck than
the hardwares previous owner.
Last year the cigaret
companys bid for the youth
market through race sponsorship
saw Californian Swede Savage
grab the pole position in the
Eagle birdcage powered then by
a Plymouth engine.
SAVAGE TqOK the lead
position after qualifying at the
last minute. He toured the 2.2
mile Sebring grand prix circuit
join the fun!
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All ovor America people are taking to the
sky young and old some just tor the fun
of it others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
Customers
TRY A LESSON
just $5 That s all it costs for our Special]
Int r o'duc to' v Might Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modem low wing and total
flying ease Come visa us today
1378 26461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
mnrm Waldo Road
VMfCoil*

5 fsSB 1 <
BBt- >^^B. Bfiw

the logical move to the SAM
position.
Kelley, Taggart, Buchanan
(weak side linebacker Rich) and
Taggart have all graded out well
enough to start, Knotts said.
Kelley played at the SAM spot
at the beginning of the season so
he knows the position, while
Taggart is better suited for the
MIKE (middle linebacker)
position, anyway.
IT APPEARED AT first that
Mr y rmz
- i
Jf
DOUG KNOTTS
... not looking to Tennessee

with a time of 1:04.2. That
figures out to an average speed
of 123.36 miles per hour in his
formula A car.
The last minute challenge
promised quite a duel as Savage
edged Mario Andretti who lost
the pole by four tenths of a
second.
Savages mount developed
clutch trouble in the warm up
and was forced out of

/.\v.v.s.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.:.y.v.-.v.v.>:.s-.y.;.v.v.;.;.v.v>v.v.v.v.;.v.:.;.v.v.v.v.:.v.v.,
j: g
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY
'Jt* v £
: Chock full o Pecans and iced £
I; | $ with creamy Chocolate Fudge
' ? .Fudge Brownies
K* rrw. 6"39<
ir* Tasty 1-lb. Caramel :
*ppl Brd I
j 59< |||
Free-rye or
FRENCH BREAD
W/ANY PURCHASE OF $1.25 $
: OR MORE BAKERY ITEMS
i Mnmmmmm-m DANISH 1
j dk BAKERY J
Gainesville Mall
l Special Orders Call 372-3885
j ~ 1
IrX'WXWiWX'XWXWXWKrXitAV.V.V.ViViV .y

Knotts and head coach Doug
Dickey who moved wideout
receiver Willie Jackson to
tailback and Tommy Durrance
to fullback on Monday, were
looking past Richmond (1-4) to
Floridas grudge game with
Tennessee next week.
Not true, says Knotts.
Taggart has been steady at
the position since he took over
and we try to keep the
competition for positions as
strong as we can, Knotts said.
Were no longer moving people
out of desparation. Were in a
healthy situation now. Knotts
said that he and his defensive
assistants like it much better
when a player wants it.
IF A PLAYER thinks hes
got it made in his position, then
were going to have problems.
Asked if he was looking
forward to the Tennessee game,
Knotts said to ask me about
that Sunday.
Gator Shorts Dickey
worked the Gators out in pads
yesterday for the first time this
week. He said that he worked
the team out in shorts on
Monday and Tuesday to

competition early in the race.
The car has been reworked
and given a Frank
Schmidt-prepared fuel injection
Chevy engine. It will be painted
red, white and blue for the L&M
this year.
Action starts Oct. 24 with
practice and qualifying. The
race, which is the finale of the
L&M series, starts at 4 p.m. Oct.
25.

Page 22

increase overall speed and
reaction. Dickey said that the

T-Bone LEAN FRESHES
|| ,7. ib beef UND J
B N.Y. Strip Porterhouse 3lbs
1.09 each n 7 n
$1.27 lb.
A J
I I I Is Now Fully I [ I
|HI V ACgSSIBLE I I
HATES'
Meal Market
23rd §lva. Construction is now nearing temptation. Come in and fooit us over
ARCHHRDAT 34st 371.7710 OPEN OPEN-23rd
23rd OPEN-23rd UVD. AT N. MAIN ST 371-2040 9 to 7 Mon-Sat.
Ca££ea£ <&n#i I
Red Star Special 1
Evening meal only 4:30-8:00 pm
I
iQj, pastry |Q salad I
O Vspecials Plus The Student Favorite!!! I
Complete I
Jleal 9j&jCTV7, |
onKr P H:OO am I2:(fflpm I
BHH
mmmm
J. |ilf5;s!;:!::5lls
Hullll l l l l l
HOURS Located Conveniently HOURS
6:45 a.m. 12:00 p.m. Across From Murphree Area 6:45 *.m.12:00 p m I

KEN McKINNON
Sports Editor

l. The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, October 16, 1970

Gators are still a tad short on
overall speed.



fV'f Sar iw jf. | 184^.
'gf l £ : f ?Jr 1 :-. --y ';..? *Msm
f t h 1 1 s&ir
W* jkkjm
Iphk ' i£r .L tg% i^r
i 'WfS, ,& 4j|ti >'W'lit'
if vPw 4K
HR
jBF 1 -, -j-iif'Tifimi i#r' g^^WrRx yg&aga-ra&^w
so- jfi m z
./i8 JTM.jAtaflaM^Wtl^W
Hr yw > -ii A Hj; mbjf,, iv/v#£->,. t ;. > s*
HHyH|; jF m mi .ip|ill|yMggj§^ f::
I n^
r s

1 Jim Yancey was the hero in Saturday's solid
Gator victory over the FSU Seminoies, even though
he only caught two passes in the game. From left to
right above, Yancey caught the pass from
quarterback John Reaves and is pulling away from
the only man that touched him on the 81 yard

|illllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiumiiiiiiiiiiimiitmiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiviiiiiiiiiiiillilllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiillillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii[iy
Intramurals J

E Hail to Womens Liberation! After so many years
of sexual discrimination from past intramural
writers, the Silver Spoon will be giving the girls the
coverage they so enticingly deserve. Jenny Scrivner
who is in charge of womens publicity will be
supplying the information and color of this years
womens program.
There will be a change in times for the womens
volleyball games. Starting Tuesday, Oct. 20, the
Orange League will play at 5:15 and the Blue
League at 4:30 every Tuesday and Thursday
afternoons.
I THIS YEAR'S turnout is the biggest anyone can
remember for Women's Intramurals. The
competition is stiffer and there promises to be more
fun for aU the girls who participate.
I Mallory looks awfully strong in the Blue League
and the Beanie Bearers of Graham look pretty
formidable in the Orange League. Personally, any
team called the Beanie Bearers would have to be
formidable.
So this year the women will have their say in my

Powerful
DeaL
new Citroen is its own high highpowered
powered highpowered salesman. Standard power
includes: the stopping power of
front inboard disc brakes. The last lastjng
jng lastjng power of functional design. The
D^ er o f Citroen's Constant Level
mae System. The going power of
jj. hemi engine. Now lei Citroen
demonstrate its selling power. Take
drive.
Citroen
WE KNOW THE VALUE OF
CARS, YOU KNOW THE
VALUE OF SERVICE
mehaJ ? Citroen
4308 NW 13TH ST
GAINESVILLE. FLA
PATRONIZE |
GATOR |
ADVERTISERS I

i
i
BIG JIM YANCEY MOVES OUT

I gg
i
Domino s Pizza
I Two Free Cokes
with every Pizza ordered
376-24*7 FREE DELIVERY 376-24*7

scoring play, the Seminole's John Montgomery, and
then races Montgomery and Robert Ashmore(2B) to
the end zone. The final result is seen in the photo at
the right as tight end Yancey is met by happy
linemates Fred Abbott (58), Donny Williams (60),
David Peek (56) and split end Willie Jackson (22).

column. After all what do you want Good
grammar or good taste?
* *
IN THE MEN'S fraternity division, the
tournament favorite Sigma Chis mauled a hapless
Lambda Chi Alpha team despite the efforts of
Randy Chastein of the Lambdas. The spiking of
Frank Saier and Gary Keller and the all-around play
of Rock Thome led the Sigs to a 154, 15-6
victory.
Hard nosed spiking by Dennis Young and Craig
led the TEPs to a 15-7, 154 win over Phi
Kappa Tau. This appears to be the quickest
defensive team the TEPs have fielded in several
years.
Pi Lambda Phi is expected to pose some threat to
the Sigma Chi domination within the bracket and
they demonstrated their ability in a quick 15-1,
15-8 trashing of FIJI. Pi Kappa Alpha scuttled ATO
154, 15-6 on the strong play of F. Shore. The
ATOs were helpless even with the presence of 6B
giant Dan Boe from the basketball squad.

The Bomb Strikes Again

Wtt/UKMi

-4 apr v.^HB
*P|rjt FpIS r
-y7// -'
s \'# i f *' v f *.

->' < ~x ,r r ',:.. v f L
IUF.^m
"T\ s jSf
1 Photos By Phil Bannister
s <£ N v £ a A %._ *- o*s v f v -TA- s *Ui * 'sbidi***'
r ...^i^. 1 :V< £:.. > .a*. %. jB9
4' : SHi ,jss& t| £ iggpHV' ¥\ v>: : >.f--
UK
Cage Tryout Tonight
Basketball Coach Tommy Bartlett is looking for additions to this
years freshmen basketball squad. Any freshmen student interested in
trying out should report to Florida Gym at 6 p. m. today.
Those who wish to try out should bring their own shoes and shorts.
Two separate sessions will be held, one today and another Friday.
Reporting time both days is 6 p jn.
Details on eligibility and other requirements will be explained at
the session.
i^vV^|
NEW BOOK
BEST SELLERS IN PAPER BACK:
PUZO: THE GODFATHER
SUSANN: THE LOVE MACHINE
CRICHTON: THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN
HELLER: CATCH 22
HAILEY: AIRPORT
PETER: THE PETER PRINCIPLE
MARTIN: JENNIE
EHRLICH: THE POPULATION BOMB
WHITE: THE MAKING OF THE PRESIDENT. 1968
GINOTT: BETWEEN PARENT & CHILD
store hoars Bam Bpm Sat. 9am- 12oooa
C CAMPUS SHOP A BOOKSTORE
!5 B .... located in the Hub

Thunday, October 15, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 23



Page 24

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 15, 1970

Taggert 3rd Team To Signal Caller

<4 m mmm m %
jam
jffi
MP
Pr -JJ
|
H|l isl
IK
# jtfm
s£%
ERICTAGGERT
... deserved start
Red Machine
Defeats Os
To Stay Alive
1
BALTIMORE (UPI) A
three-run home run in the eighth
inning by Lee May and brilliant
relief pitching by Clay Carroll
kept the Cincinnati Reds alive in
the World Series Wednesday
with a 6-5 victory over the
Baltimore Orioles in the fourth
game.
The Reds win left the Orioles
leading the series, 3-1, and still
needing only one more victory
to wrap up baseballs world
championship with the fifth
game coming up today.
CARROLL, RELIEVING
Reds starter Gary Nolan in the
sixth inning, allowed the Orioles
only one hit over the last 3 2-3
innings to gain the victory.
He had to get the final out of
the game twice. With two out in
the ninth, pinch-hitter Merv
Rettenmund of the Orioles hit a
sharp grounder to third baseman
Tony Perez and was safe at first
when Perez throw pulled first
baseman Lee May off the bag so
that he dropped the ball when
he collided with
Rettenmund. But Carroll then
fanned Don Buford to gain the
Reds first win of the series.
MAYS HOMER and Carrolls
pitching overshadowed another
brilliant performance by
Baltimores Brooks Robinson,
who had a homer and three
singles in four at-bats.
May connected on the first
pitch served him by Orioles
reliever Eddie Watt, driving it
into the left field stands over the
360-foot sign.
CINCINNATI manager
Sparky Anderson said he would
start either Jim Merritt, Milt
Wilcox or Wayne Granger today
but he said it would probably be
20-game winner Merritt, who
had been unable to pitch in u
aeries so far because of a sore
aim.
Merritt says his arm is
ok, Anderson said. But Ill
have to check on that. All I want
to do is get enough pitchers out
there to go nine innings.
ROD-REEL & GUN SHOP
WE FIX-TRADE-SELL
ARCHERY-FISHING-HUNTING
I 378-1696 I
1223 E. UNIVERSITY AVE.
' 1

By PHIL PETTI JOHN
Alligator Sports Writer
Two weeks ago Eric Taggert
was an offensive guard for the
UF who spent his afternoons
working on the third team.
Today he is the Gators
defensive signal caller.
Taggert, a 6-1, 212 pounder
from Decatur, Ga. has been the
UFs (4-1) starting Mike, or
middle linebacker, for only two
games.
When injured defensive
captain Mike Kelley returned to
full speed from a bruised
shoulder the coaches felt
Taggerts performance against
North Carolina State (two
interceptions and a touchdown
in the Gators 14-6 win) and
Florida State last week deserved
a starting role.
KELLEY WAS moved to
outside linebacker on the strong
side, where he started the
season, and Taggert took over
the middle linebacker spot, and
its signal calling responsibility.
The signals all come from the
bench, but Taggert relays them

PRE-SEASON BICYCLE I 8L IL Y^Nm
sale! V :
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MIDDLE LINEBACKER ERIC

and can change the alignment if
the situation warrants.
He is a natural linebacker,
said linebacker coach George
McKinney. He reads the play
well, and although isnt fast, he
has quick enough feet to be in
the right place.
TAGGERT WAS a middle
linebacker in the spring but was
moved to the offensive line
when injuries created a depth
problem there.
But when UFs original
starting middle linebacker was
moved to offense, and Kelley
was hurt, only Eddy Moore
remained at the position.
We knew Moore was prone
to injury so I looked for another
linebacker, defensive
coordinator Doug Knotts said.
Knotts found Taggert in a
tackling drill.
THAT IS one of his
attributes, said Knotts. He is a
good tackier, has fair speed
inside the 20 yards needed to
cover receivers, and he uses good
leverage on blockers. He is smart

MIKE KELLEY
... moved to outside
enough to be in the right
position.
Being in position payed off
for Taggert against N.C. State.
He was in the right zone to pick
off a Wolfpack aerial.
UFs coaches will be hoping
he does the same against the
University of Richmond (1-4) on
Saturday.
The Spiders dont have much
of a running game, but they do

have All-Southern quarterback
Charlie Richards who was last
seasons fifth leading passer in
the nation with 2,665 yards.
RICHARDS HAS 821 yards
in five games this season, most
to flanker Jerry Haynes (23
receptions for 302 yards), and
split end Jim Livesay who has 20
catches for 233 yards.
They have a fine passing
game, but since they played
West Virginia they have had an
injury problem, linebacker
coach McKinney said.
Knotts, who coached
All-American linebacker Jack
Reynolds at Tennessee, is just
beginning to teach Taggert the
fine points of the position.
McKinney adds that Taggert is
a natural at the position and uses
instinct to do the good job he
has done so far.
But dont build him up too
big, McKinney said, he has
just come on with little
experience at the position and
taken over the starting position
with a real solid, consistent job.