Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Vol. 63, No. 17

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Homework for an encounter course? Anatomy?
Wrestling? Or just a relaxing interlude to the

Frosh Council Abolished

By KATHY ROBERTS.
Alligator Writer
After being termed
ineffective by the Student
Senate last Tuesday, the
Freshmen Council has been
abolished.
Consisting of 33 students
elected in the dorm areas, the
council was formed last fall to
further communication between
senate, Student Government,
and UF freshmen.
However, according to Henry
Sol a res, student body vice
president, the council didnt
accomplish anything. But the
senate will re-evaluate the whole
Freshman Council concept, he
said.
President ..of last years
Freshmen. Council, Jeffery
Crane, said, I found the council
fairly irrelevant because it had

University Senate: 40-Year Controversy

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the
second in a series concerning
attempts to reform the
University Senate.)
By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
In the depression years of the
1930*5, a University Senate was
created to act as the legislative
body of the university by the
first UF constitution, which was
- The senate consisted of all full
professors and administrators
with rank of academic dean or
above, according to Dr. Manning
J. Dauer, chairman of the
political science department, and
almost an institution himself at
UF.
FOR ALMOST 30 years the
senate membership sat relatively
*ift *v \ t m m

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

LIFE'S TOUCHING MOMENTS

very little legislative power.
Mainly, we just served as
informing the senate and cabinet
of freshmen ideas.
Another reason Crane gave for
the council demise was lack of
some serious goal ... when
people realize this, they stop
coming to meetings, he said.
Crane added, though, that if
the council was restructured it
could definitely serve a positive
purpose. It could possibly be
structured into the senate, he
said, with two or three
members speaking at the senate
for the council ... kind of like
a lobby group.
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale said he didnt
know the reasoning behind the
dissolution. but called it
unfortunate.
With all our needs for
understanding we shouldnt

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IN DEPTH

unchallenged and undisturbed.
But the protest decade of the
I%os saw the beginning of
formal, institutionalized efforts
to restructure the senate such as
had been unknown in the more
complacent proceeding years.
In 1963, the first of several
formal attempts to restructure
the senate in recent years was
made by the Universitys
Constitution Committee,
according to Dauer. The
chairman of the political science
department, who was a member
of the committee, said the

PHIL COPE

academic strain?
There is definitely more to college than classes.

University of Florida, Gainesville

reduce the sources of
communication. I was glad when
the council was created because
the freshmen could be
represented. We should find out
why it didnt work and then
improve it, Hale said.
lilllte-iife
Iff The G&tor
A 39-YEAR-OLD UF
student tells about dining
with Pres. Thieu of
South Vietnam page 2
Index
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 10
Letters 9
Movies 12
Page of Record 11
Sports 14

department proposed then that
all faculty members of the
senate be elected.
Six years later essentially the
same proposal was made again
when the constitution
committee of 1969
recommended that all facrlty
members of the senate be
elected with the exception of six
members, not necessarily
faculty, to be appointed by the
university president.
The result of the 1963
proposal, Dauer said, was a
compromise in which 50
*- + firm** a ?.>-

STRICTLY PUNITIVE
Funding Woes
Cited In Jails

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
The citizens of this state just
dont have the right attitude
about the purpose of prisons and
jails, James A. Bax, Floridas
secretary of health and
rehabilitative services,said
Monday.
Bax discussed the tendency of
people to think of the purpose
of prisons as being strictly
punitive in nature.
THE CITIZENS of Florida,
according to Bax, are not all
willing to fund improvements in
prisons and jails because many
of them feel a prisoner gets just
what he deserves.
Finding fault in that argument
Bax said, Our prison system
contends with different types of
people... we should not treat
them all the same.
Enumerating on that point
Bax said one of the most
pressing problems facing jails is
the terrible overcrowding.
YOU CAN HAVE the most
modern prison, the cleanest, the
best equipped facility around,
but if its overcrowded, nothing
else can really be effective, Bax
said.
Recent investigations into
conditions of the Alachua
County Jail drew comment from
Bax. That jail is not as bad as
some, said Bax, but its
problems should not be
overlooked.
Monday the grand jury began
investigating the Sept. 22 death
of William Baugher in the
Alachua County Jail and can
really be the most effective
force of all, according to Bax,
for initiating reform into the jail.
ALACHUA COUNTY Sheriff
Joe Crevasse realized the need

members from ranks of associate
and assistant professors were to
be elected to take their places in
the senate alongside the full
professors. That agreement was
incorporated into the 1964 UF
constitution. It was the first
change in senate membership
since that bodys creation.
THE NEXT major,
institutional proposal for change
came from the Action
Conference of 1968. Stephen C.
OConnell became UF president
in the fall of 1967, and in the
spring of 1968 the conference, a
special body of faculty,
administrators and students to
study specific university
problems and make
recommendations, was created.
The proposal of the Task
Force on Governance of the ;
University, an Action

Tuesday, October 13, 1970

for a new jail facility but said,
Were going to have to do the
best we can with what weve
got.
Crevasse expressed hope the
state might build a regional
jail in Alachua County in the
next 18-24 months.
Baxs office, which will make
the decision as to where the
regional jail will be put, has not
yet begun to study the different
areas, according to Bax.
CREVASSE said that he has
not pushed for a new jail funded
by the county because of the
possibility of getting the
regional jail.
Bax explained, however, that
it would be optimistic to think
that any concrete plans
regarding where the jail will go
(SEE 'BAX' PAGE 4)
{ MR
Ifc,
Our prison system
contends with different
types of people. .. We
should not treat them all
the same.
James Bax

Conference committee, was
approved by the conference in
fall 1968.
From there it went to the
senate, where it was submitted
to the constitution committee.
That committee began hearings
concerning the possible
reapportionment of the senate in
the winter of 1969, according to
Dr. Charles F. Eno, professor of
soils, who chaired the
committee.
THE TASK Force proposal
recommended the abolition of
the University Senate in favor of
a Faculty Senate, composed
exclusively of faculty members.
The Administrative Council,
currently included in the senate,
would be a separate governing
body. The senate's power to
(SEE 'SENATE* PAGE 3)
* i M'd A. *" <



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator Tuesday, October. 13. T 970

Freshman Veteran Dines With Thieu

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Committee To Study Fee Allocations

By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Staff Writer
A committee has been
appointed by Student Body
President Steven Uhlfelder to
make investigation into and
recommendations for the
allocation of student activity
fees to the various agencies
which receive portions of the
funds.
The committee, composed of
five students who arent
associated with student
government, will meet with
representatives of the Infirmary,
the Athletic Department,
Student Government, Student
Publications and the Reitz
Union.
THE AGENCY
representatives will discuss with
the committee their budgets
they now have and what they

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
nolidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

expect their financial needs will
be next year.
Here is how the $32.50
activity fee was allocated last
year: Infirmary, sl3; Student
Government, $4.97; Reitz
Union, $9 ; Student Publications,
$1.58; Athletic Department,
$3.75 and fee reserves, 20 cents.
These agencies must make
preliminary budget proposals to
President Stephen C. OConnell
by Jan. 1. Final decisions on
how much each agency will
receive is decided by OConnell
in March.
THE COMMITTEE will study
the preliminary proposal of each
agency and will ask them to
justify the amount they ask and
whether their needs will be met
if they receive what they ask.
Before the final decisions are
made in March, the investigating
committee will compile their
findings in a report to Uhlfelder

By ANNE B. FREEDMAN
Alligator Feature Editor
When President Thieu of
South Vietnam invited Lt.
Cmdr. Gordon Gray, now a
39-year-old UF freshman, to a
beach party a year and a half
ago, he declined.
I figured it was Thieus
vacation and he really didnt
want an awkward Westerner
along, Gray recalled.
BUT JUST before noon, a
military aide knocked on the
sleepy officers door.
I dont know how it is in
your country, the aide said to
Gray, but when our President
invites you to a party you dont
i say no.
j Gray quickly donned his
swimsuit and headed for the
beach.
THE TALL, well-built,
dark-haired career naval officer
dropped out of high school in
Ocala at age 17 to see the
world through the Navy.
When he retired Aug. 1, after
serving his final shore duty in
Jacksonville, he moved to his
northeast section home in
Gainesville with his wife and
daughter to start his studies in
University College.
Why at age 39 did Gray
decide to begin his education
anew?
I always wanted to go to
college and Florida is just 30
miles from my hometown in
Ocala.
HE PLANS on majoring in
journalism, an interest he
developed in the Navy after
writing two textbooks from
scratch, and several articles.
Gray stretched out on a
comfortable living room chair,
took a sip of beer, and crossed
his legs, deliberately pointing his
toe at the reporter.
See how my toe is pointed,

who will have the statistics and
recommendations of the
committee at hand for the
March meeting.
According to committee
chairman Ralph Glatfelter, the
committee will make one of the
following three recommenda recommendations:
tions: recommendations: that the present $32.50
fee be allocated differently, that
there be a reduction in the fee or
that the fee be increased. The
last recommendation would
mean an increase in the tuition
fee.
GLATFELTER SAID he feels
a tuition increase will be made in
the future and if this is so, he

he said. This is the worst insult
you could give a Vietnamese.
He explained that the
Vietnamese have a body
hierarchy, and the higher the
part, the more important. An
honored guest, for example, is
served the head of the chicken,
a supreme compliment even
though it tastes terrible.
GRAY SPENT one year
in-country on active duty in
Vietnam. For seven months he
served as an American naval
adviser to a Vietnamese patrol
craft escort leading what he
called a Spartan life with
almost no contact with other
Americans.
You get used to going
without a bath for 10 to 14
days, he said, explaining that
the water was carefully rationed.
The food was ample and
supplemented with Navy
B-rations but he lost about 50
pounds.
As soon as we docked I ran
ashore looking for an American
with a hot shower, clean linen
and decent food.
It was during the spring phase,
of his sea tour that Grays ship
was told it would be hosting
Thieu and his company for a
fishing holiday.
WHEN THIEU learned that
Gray was aboard he invited him
to dinner.
They came with linens,
provisions and crystal and set an
eight-course meal on the top
deck, Gray said. Thieu
insisted I sit on his right an
honored place.
It was a safe harbor and a
beautiful night, he said. The
kind of night you wanted to
pluck a star from the sky
because they seemed so close.
Dinner conversation consisted
of normal chit-chat. He told me

wants to be sure the activity fee
is increased also.
OConnell, in an Oct. 8 letter
to Uhlfelder, said that while
student government has no
authority over the budgets of
agencies other than its own and
that of Student Publications, I
believe consideration of the
needs of all agencies by Student
Government will give each
agency a healthy opportunity to
show their financial needs, and
the alternatives which must be
considered if they are not met.
I therefore urge each agency
to give the proposed Student
Government committee the

University of Florida Music Department
and J. Wayne Reitz Union
present
THE TUESDAY EVENING
t
CONCERT SERIES
CHAMBER MUSIC
BEETHOVEN
BICENTENNIAL CONCERT
Reitz Union Ballroom
Tuesday, October 13, 1970
1 1 8:15 p.m.

he was a fishing buff and I told
him about my golf.
I THINK Thieu really
welcomed the chance to talk to
an American about non-political
things and we just hit it off;
two guys just liking each other.
Gray said that Thieu told him
that when he was younger he
never had the interest or time to
spend on fishing he does now.
He said he was too busy
chasing the girls.
Gray described Thieu as a
pint-sized LBJ intelligent,
quick, dynamic.
BUT THIEUS English isnt as
polished as it appears on
television. He reads those
statements, Gray said. He
does make himself understood
quite well, however.
Grays studies at UF keep him
up close to 2 a.m. every night.
Hes carrying 15 hours including
comprehensive English,
institutions, logic, physical
science and cybernetics and
society.
His years of traveling give
Gray an advantage in some
courses, he says, but after being
away from school for so long, he
isnt sure how to study for tests.
When my physical science
teacher talks about the stars at
the North Pole well hell, Ive
been there to see them.
AND HIS travels to various
countries have made him
familiar with their economies
and traditions -a help in
institutions.
At the end of the fishing
holiday, Thieu and Gray parted
good friends. He later received
an invitation to the palace but
declined.
It was near the end of my
tour and you never know when
something might go wrong-like
pointing your toe at someone
accidentally.

fullest cooperation in its work.
THE COMMITTEE
investigations and hearings will
be conducted for five weeks
beginning next week. Anyone
interested is invited to attend
the hearings.
Members of the committee
will be Glatfelter, Don
Middlebrooks, Harvey Alper,
Sue Jacobs and Faith Tulino.
Uhlfelder said he feels all the
members are knowledgeable
about matters the committee
will be considering and that they
will produce a report that will be
helpful in proposing allocations
of the activity fee.



Senate Needs Changes, But How?

ONe|J
make regulations affecting
students would be transferred
to the Student Senate.
A fourth governing body, the
Conference Council, was
proposed to convene on special
occasions in the event of the
presidents veto over certain
legislation passed by the Faculty
Senate or the Student Senate.
The council membership was to
be composed of an equal
number of representatives from
the administration, Faculty
Senate and Student Seriate.
The task force committee
further recommended the
faculty senate be composed of
150 elected members in the
ranks of assistant professor or
above. Each colleges
representation in the senate
would be determined by two
combined factors: the
proportion of its faculty in ranks
of assistant professor and above
in relation to the university
total, and the proportion of its
student enrollment in relation to
the university total.
FINALLY, THE faculty
would elect from its membership
its presiding officer. Then, as
now, the university president
served as presiding officer.
The task force proposal was
obviously a revolutionary
proposal in terms of the senate
membership structure prevailing
then and now.
The senate was to be fully
elective in contrast to a senate
in which less than 10 per cent of
the membership was elected.
Associate and assistant
professors would be as equally
eligible as full professors for
election. Membership was to be
reduced from almost 600 to 150
members.
And the proposal for a
colleges representation in the
senate to be based partly on its
student enrollment in relation to
total university enrollment the
only proposal over which a few
members of the committee
dissented would have greatly
altered the proportion of
representation of some colleges
in the senate.
I DONT think any of us
truly believed our plan would be
adopted by the senate, Prof.
Ruth McQuown, reflected last
week. Miss McQuown chaired
the committee, and is on the
political science faculty.
We saw it as more of a
dramatic kind of thing to point
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up what a better apportionment
might be, she said.
Dr. Max E. Tyler, chairman of
the bacteriology department and
a member of the Action
Conference, submitted his own
report after the Task Force
proposal had passed the
conference and was forwarded
to the Constitution Committee.
Tyler protested the proposed
elimination from the senate of
administrators and the lack of
provision for student
membership, and recommended
that students should have a
voting voice in the senate at
least on those matters directly
affecting them.
THE TASK Force on
Governance proposal and the
report by Tyler were among the
documents considered by the
Constitution Committee when it
evaluated the senate structure.
Also considered was a
resolution submitted by Student
Government in May 1969, which
would have provided for greater
legislative power for the Student
Senate.
Considering these and other
proposals, the Constitution
Committee continued to meet
through the winter and spring of
1969.
In June 1969, the committee
gave unanimous approval to
submit proposed contitutional
amendments to the senate
concerning its restructuring.
THE COMMITTEE
recommended that the senate be
composed of 200 faculty
members, all elected from the
ranks of assistant professor and
above, ex-officio members, six
members specially appointed by
the president and 10 student
members.
Ex-officio members were to
be the president, vice presidents,
provosts and academic deans.
All members would be full

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THE FIRST FIFTY YEARS: The Story of the NFL.
McGinnes: THE SELLING OF THE PRESIDENT
1968, now in paperback.
Milne: ALL POOH AND OTHER WORKS, in both
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BALLANTINES ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF
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Springfield: MANS GOD & GODS MAN.
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members, with the right to
introduce legislation and to vote.
$o the committees proposal
maintained the Action
Conference Task Force
recommendation for a senate
with all faculty members elected
from ranks of assistant professor
or above. But the committee
also sought to include
administrators and student
representatives in the new
senate.
ANOTHER constitutional
amendment offered by the
committee suggested that the
senate seek consultation with
the student senate on matters
directly affecting students.
The proposals were placed as
an action item on the senate
agenda for its September 1969
meeting, but the senate failed to
vote at that time.
A special meeting was called
for November 25, 1969 to vote
on the amendments.
At the meeting Eno, the
committee chairman, proposed
that before the senate vote on
the amendments it should
express itself on the idea of a
predominantly elected senate.
IF THE senate did not vote
favorably on that idea there
would be no need to consider
the amendments in detail, Eno
explained.
A vote was taken. The senate
count was 114 against, 78 for, a
senate in which a majority of
members would be elected.
One hundred fifty-six of the
475 full professors who are
automatically members of the
senate were present at the
meeting which voted down a
majority elected senate.
Thirty-one of the 50 elected
associate and assistant professors
were present.
Three times within a period of

six or seven years formal, major
efforts of faculty and
administrators, acting through
institutionalized bodies and
procedures, has proposed a
University Senate with fully

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Tuaeday/October 13,1§70, The Florida Alligator,

elected faculty membership. But
on the two different occasions at
which the matter was finally
considered, opposition in the
senate proved itself stronger
than the proponents.

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator,Tuwday, Ooto har 13,1970

Referendum Terms
Unclear To WRUF
'
A referendum on Wednesdays election ballot that would make
changes in the programming of WRUF-FM to make it more
student-oriented, is undear to Station Director Kenneth Small.
No one has ever told me what is meant by student-oriented,
Small said Monday. I guess it means more hard rock music, but Im
not sure.
WE ALREADY have 17 hours a week of underground music,
Small added. We also have folk music and pop concerts at various
times, and we plan to add five more hours of rock starting next
month.
Small sees the problem as to what is meant by student-oriented. He
pointed out the different musical tastes of students and feels WRUF is
trying to please the majority.
Many people dont realize we serve graduate students, commuters,
and the general public as well as the campus, Small said. Our license
says we are a general service station, and we transmit a radius of
35-miles.
SMALL SAID the 120 broadcasting hours of the station could be
broken down as follows:
49 hours ofmiddle of the road (Show tunes, standards).
29-hours of classical music.
12 hours of pop concert
4 of folk music.
17 hours of rock, blues and soul.
10 hours of talking (news and weather).
What change will the referendum have on the stations
programming?
Well if its passed, I dont really know, Smith said. I guess then
someone will come and tell me what is meant by student-oriented.

Bax Lists Penal Problems
r

PAGE ONE^I
could be completed anytime
under two years.
Bax regarded misdirected
purpose as a consistent problem
in almost every jail facility in the
state.
SOME PEOPLES only crime
is that theyre mentally ill, said
Bax. Its not right to put these
people in a jail for punitive
action instead of rehabilitation.
That problem is being
alleviated to some degree
through the opening of
community health programs that
deal with mental health
problems of persons who
cannot be held fully responsible
for their actions.
Bax said the rehabilitative
responsibility in penal
institutions has not been utilized
to its full potential.
SOME OF that responsibility
also belongs to the average
citizen, Bax said. These
people have to realize that every
man in a cell will someday be
somebodys next-door
neighbor.
An attitude of this nature is
totally necessary before even
the finest prisoner rehabilitation

<: PAID POLITICAL
TAKE A LOOK AROUND
$313,000
IS A LOT of money to spend. Your Student
Senate will spend that much this year.
GET CONCERNED, WE DID
Focus Party Candidates
MURPHEE : Scott Langston 392-7177 HUME : william Watson 392-8789
Gary Schweitzer 392-7219 GRAHAM : Kay Barger 392-8582
David Hecht 392-7027 Jeff Whits 392-8860
RAWLINGS : Kay McGuckan 392-9782 TOLBERT : Ted Brown 392-8065
BROWARD : Cindi Lwiy 3924(384 ieiJklllll e Nunn 392 7 9
TOWERS: Jim Richards 392-7493 JENNINGS :Coltoan Dunbar 392-9330
YULEE : Pats Hobbs 392-8873
WE TRY TO REACH EVERYONE BUT CANT, IF YOU
HAVE ANY OUESTIONS OR GRIPES, PLEASE CALL
PAID POLITICAL

programs can be effective, Bax
said.
We must consider four types
of people in our prisons. There
are men who commit crimes
against themselves, property,
others or who are just mentally
ill, Bax said, and this must be

Wednesday Special
slflO OFF
Family Size Pizzas (No Plains)
4:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M.
Live Music Wed thru Sat.
HAPPY HOUR 9:00 10:00
Monday thru Thursday
Beer SI.OO pitcher
Minnas**
3510 SW 13h ST Jim
Open 4 P.M. Daily
* 372-338? mgggggi

Vista Needs 6 Book Collectors

Vista volunteers are looking for five men and a
woman to collect magazines and books and
distribute them to prisoners in the Alachua
County Jail library.
The volunteers will work every day for a week.

Unions Meet
At Ga. Tech
Four students and five Reitz
Union staff members will attend
a conference of the Association
of College Unions International
(ACUI) Oct. 18-20 at the
Georgia Tech student union in
Atlanta.
The purpose of the
conference, according to Mrs.
Pat ONeil, program director for
the Union, is to meet annually
by region and compare notes,
and be able to develop a working
relationship with our
counterparts in other unions
across the country.

taken into consideration when
any effort is made to help these
men.
PEOPLE CHARGED with
possession of marijuana should
not be in the jails according to
Bax, because they can more
usefully be rehabilitated in a
counseling atmosphere.

INSURED
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AGAINST
Loss of ring by
theft, robbery,
burglary, or fire
i Loss of stone from
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Shirts Permanent Press to end
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Levi's popular dress jeans, rugged
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Carefree because they're Levi's
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BELK LINDSEY
The Gainesville Shopping Center

During this time they will collect books from
available sources and take them to the jail. \
Interested donors should call Miss Linda Evans
at the Vista volunteers office, 376-6515, and
leave their name far an appointment.



U C Discussed
On Dialogue
By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Staff Writer
*
A forum discussing the pros
and cons of University College
(UC) will be presented by
WRUF radio 850 in cooperation
with Florida Blue Key beginning
at 11:05 p.m. Tuesday.
The forum, part of a public
affairs series entitled
Dialogue, will feature Dr.
Franklin Doty, dean of UC.
Efforts are also being made to
contact Dr. Frederick Conner,
vice president of academic
affairs, or someone on his staff,
to be a guest.
808 MOORE of FBK said the
forum is just another way how
Dialogue is attempting to inform
students and members of the
university community of
important UF issues.
Questions pertaining to the
present UC system will be on the
Oct. 14 student elections ballot.
The program will attempt to
inform the student of the
benefits and faults -of the
system.
Hopefully the student, after
listening to this program, will be
able to go into the voting booth
and cast an intelligent vote on
whether to change, abolish or
leave the present UC system
alone, Moore said.
OTHER POINTS of reference
pertaining to the ballot will also
be discussed.
Students can call the station
and discuss their views on the air
for or against UC.
Moore said the broadcast will
provide outspoken students an
excellent opportunity to air
their views. Students with
definite ideas on the subject
should call and make their views
known, he said.
Telephone lines 392-0772 and
73 will be manned during the
two hour program.
Paint in Oils
Instruction by Hope White
$6.00 for 6 two-hour sessions
Tuesday evenings starting
Oct. 13 7:00-9:00 pm room
C-4, Union register at the first
lesson or in room 310 of the
Union sponsored by. the JWR
Union.
mm 2 1

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"Serving Gator Country Since 1933"

Tuesday, OvtdNftr 13; 1870, Tha FterttrAMfetar,

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 13,1870

, AVA MVA AVAv.v/.v.v*ww. .v.vAv.y.Y*w.v.:.:.:.:.:.x.:i
fOrange & Blue Goesf
j To FSU By Train
j*: By DOUG KEITH
Alligator Writer
** \
v Ive discovered theres only one way to go to an out of town
£ football game on a special train full of Gator fans. £
£ SCL-RR ran a Florida Football Special to Tally from j:
£ Jacksonville Saturday and 2,000 orange and blue clad Gator j:
: supporters made it a memorable experience. j:
£ DECKED OUT in every imaginable Gator garb from freaky j:
j: orange and blue sunglasses to a straw hat with a foot long j:
j: stuffed alligator on top, the Gator fanatics piled on the train at £
ij 9 am. and were off for a day of football, booze, fried £
j: chicken, poker games and goodnatured harassment of a handfull £
: of FSCW supporters who dared to ride the train to the game. $
: The mood of the trip was apparent from the very outset with £
j: the train just barely rolling out of the station, an old red-faced jj:
J: Gator alumni came shuffling down the aisle, drink in hand, iji
:> shouting, All you FSU people go to car number zero and pick
j: up your white socks and crying towels. ij:
j: The sll price for the ticket included free set ups, and the ij:
j: bar cars looked more like cattle cars as the thirsty fans were ij:
j: gettin ready to see J.R. and company wreak havoc.
ji I TOOK A short tour from the front of the train to the rear £
j: car (someone had put a sign in the rear car which read End £
ij Zone- Carlos Alvarez lives here) and the spirit seemed to £
: increase with each new car. There was only one quiet couple on £
ij the whole train -he was wearing orange and blue, she was £
ij: wearing garnet and gold; ij:
ij; Go Gators signs were up everywhere and people stood in ij:
ij: small groups in the aisles talking football and politics. I ij:
jj: overheard one fan say to another, The only thing better than ij
ij: beating FSU is sex. There was a strong air of optimism among ij:
£ the crowd as many people were saying they thought J.R. would ij
£ hit the grove after four less than spectacular previous games. He 5;
£ DID. $
| As the train drew closer to Tallahasee, the tension and j:
£ excitement mounted and Go Gators and Eat em up Gators ji
£ cheers were shouted louder and longer. j:
j The train was parked right next to the stadium and the Tipsy ji
£ Two Thousand literally poured off the train and into the ji
£ antiquated stadium. What happened in the next four hours can ji
ij: only be described as euphoria. We were fantastic and FSCW was j:
£ about as sharp as a marble. ij
ij: I dont remember the ride back. ij
fe*y.>y.:*>wosw.y.yAYA .v.v.v.vMWAvwi AWkwV

EAG To Start Collecting
Cans For Reclamation

By CARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Staff Writ*
An aluminum can reclamation drive is the
Environmental Action Groups (EAG) first fund
raising project this year.
THE PROJECT this month is collection of cans
for reclamation, Hal Barcey Student Government
secretary of environmental affairs, said.
Starting Oct. 28, there will be 100 bins for the
collection of aluminum cans."
The EAG will sell the cans for one half cent. The
profits will be used for environmental projects on
campus.
Another EAG project, scheduled for Nov. 2-8 will
be handled by the Delta Chi fraternity. The

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
VOTE
FOCUS
OFF-CAMPUS
xA BO* BERMN
. JHMI Vl OWEN BOTSCH
j O ELLEN COSENSWET
STEVE ROKEACH
a// experienced, all ready to work
FOCUS DOES MORE THAN PROMISE!
SENATORS FROM FOCUS PARTY HAVE ORGANIZED
resolutions against mass testing
a voter registration drive, on and off campus
a draft counseling service
ea drive against the Athletic Association ticket policy
THESE CANDIDATES WILL GIVE YOU MORE BECAUSE
YOU DEMAND MORE.
PO. FOR BY MEMBERS OF FOCUS PARTY
f PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT -j

fraternity will be selling bumper stickers reading
*Support Your Local Tree.*
BARCEY SAID profits from this sale will go
toward the establishment of a Rachel Carson
Reading Room in the UF library.
Other EAG projects include:
Collection of newspapers for reclamation.
Pennies for pollution, a campaign where
students are asked to set aside, in Pepsi Cola cans,
pennies that volunteers will collect.
BARCEY SAID, We will also encourage people to
get pollution control devices, and we hope to have
phosphate charts placed in many of the area stores.
Money collected for the campaign will also be
used to educate and lobby on behalf of
environmental concern, Barcey said.

SAVANT, MORTAR BOARD
Women Host HC Banquet

By TERRY VENTO
Alligator Writer
Savant and Mortar Board,
womens honorary scholastic
and service organizations, are
hostessing a homecoming
banquet Oct. 30, at 5:15
p.m. in the Union Ballroom.
Members of Savant, Mortar
Board, their alumnae, special
invited guests, faculty, woman
civic leaders and wives of Blue
Key dignitaries will be attending
the events.
Mary Brooks, director of the
U.S. Mint, is scheduled to be the
guest speaker. Mrs. Brooks,
appointed by President Nixon, is
in charge of the supply of coins
needed daily for commerce, as
well as the operation of Fort
Knox, Kentucky, the site of the
U.S. gold deposit. From 1964 to
1969, Mrs. Brooks served as an
Idaho state senator.
During the banquet, Savant
will be recognizing honorary
members, chosen statewide from
among women leaders associated
with UF. The Dean Brady
Award will also be presented to
the UF Coed of the Year. Mama
Brady, former dean of women,
will be toastmistress.
Crusaders Crushed
Saladin, the Saracen chief,
conquered the Crusaders in the
Holy Land in 1187.

Members of Savant and
Mortar Board will model the
latest styles donated by

I FlouncUr Fillet
1 ~ w ALL YOU CAN EAT!
Including
I French Fries 1175
Hush Puppies Pirates' Slaw
I PIRATES COVE LOBSTER HOUSE
I -SEAFOOD FRESH FROM THE SEA
SERVING DAILY FROM 5 P.M.
OCALA GAINESVILLE
HWY. 301.441 OPEN SUNDAY 5-10
3500 S. W. 13th ST.
of ON BIVANS ARM LAKE
I PHONE 422.6556 PHONi 378-2931
\Co£ea£ I
I* Red Star Special 1
I Evening meet only 4:30-8:00 pm
I 1 Ojk P asfr Y IQ salad I
I specials Ijf > specials I
I GREEN SUM I
**************** I
I Plus The Student Favorite!!! I
I Complete ag I
I Meal I
I only P 11:00 am-12:00 pm I
_CgFFEESHOP_ CAFETERIA UMDI I
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I i mm iwi I
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MB
HOURS Located Conveniently HOURS
Across From MurphreeArea 6:45 *.m.12:00 p.m.l

Silvermans, said Assistant
General Chairman of
Homecoming Barbara Griffin.



Debate Team
Places Thiol
The UF debate team placed
third out of 34 teams in the
University of Kentucky
Invitational Debate Tournament
in Lexington on Oct. 10-11.
The UF team, consisting of
David Beers and Paul Rosenthal,
beat Emory in the quarter-finals,
but lost to Middle Tennessee
State University in the
semi-finals, to place third.
In individual awards Beers was
the fifth place speaker, while
Rosenthal placed seventh in the
tournament. Their topic of
debate was Result: That the
Federal Government Should
Adopt a Program of Cumpulsory
Wage and Price Controls.
It is the same topic used for
,all debates this year.
UF will host the Gator
Invitational Debate Tournament,
Jr. on Oct. 23-24.
Players Open
1970-71 Season
By WARDBRISICK
Alligator Entertainment Writer
The Florida Players, UFs own
performing theatre group will
open the 1970-71 season with
their initial production, a
Readers Theatre presentation of
James Paul Deys work,
Passacaglia.
The Readers Theatre is a
form of theatric performance
whereby the word is the
foremost tool of the dramatist
and overall action is kept to a
minimum.
Under the direction of drama
professor Richard Green the
all-student cast will present the
play on October 16 and 17. in
the H.P. Constans Theatre
adjacent to the Reitz
Unio Passacaglia examines
with humor the younger
generations desire for a better
world frustrated by their
inability to totally relinquish the
one in which they dwell.
Tickets for this weekends
performances will be sold on a
general admission basis for 25
cents. Curtain is at 8 p.m.
THE CAST for the
production includes:
Andrew Banker Johnmary
Janice Sizemore Mary Jones
Jack Farrell John Jones
Weida Tucker Maid Jones
BetiSechen .Maryjohn
Susan Owens Mary Smith
JoqueSoskis John Smith
Marilyn Wall Maid Smith
Turn The Page
WASHINGTON (UPI) Rep.
George Andrews, D-Ala.,
opposing giving congressional
page boy jobs to college
students:
Whoever heard of page men?
God help us if they act in
Congress like they act on college
campuses.

fr I a4-41 t > f >. *
campus imeviews
NOVEMBER 5,1970
\\ \ \ jl I J " '
WCDLIKC TO TaLK TO YOU aBOUT
... career opportunities that match your interests and education
... our long-established management training program
... our diverse and growing corporation
... our nationwide facilities
... our corporate philosophy of caring about people
Nows the time to sign up at your placement office for an interview with the Bethlehem Steel Loop
Course recruiter. This could be the start of something big!
And just what IS the Bethlehem Steel Loop Course? Its our management development pro program
gram program for graduates with bachelors or advanced degrees.
Bethlehem loopers spend four weeks at our home offices in Bethlehem, Pa. Then they report
to the appropriate plants or departments for their first assignments. From there, anything is possible.
Where would YOU fit into the Loop Course? Check your degree or the one most similar to it:

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING-Engineering or %e %e---chanical
--chanical %e---chanical maintenance departments of steel plants, fabri fabricating
cating fabricating works, mining operations, and shipyards. Fuel
and combustion departments. Supervision of production
operations. Marine engineering assignments in Ship Shipbuilding
building Shipbuilding Department. Also: Sales or Research.
METALLURGICAL ENGlNEElNGMetallurgical de departments
partments departments of steel plants and manufacturing operations.
Engineering and service divisions. Technical and super supervisory
visory supervisory positions in steelmaking departments and rolling
mills. Also: Research or Sales.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS-Technical and supervisory
positions in coke works, including production of by byproduct
product byproduct chemicals. Fuel and combustion departments,
including responsibility for operation and maintenance
of air and water pollution control equipment. Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering and metallurgical departments. Steelmaking opera operations.
tions. operations. Also: Research or Sales.
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING-Positions in steel plants,
fabricating works, shipyards, and mines. Engineering
and maintenance departments. Supervision of steel steelmaking,
making, steelmaking, rolling, manufacturing, and fabricating opera operations.
tions. operations. Also: Sales.
CIVIL ENGINEERINGFabricated Steel Construction
assignments in engineering, field erection, or works
management. Steel plant, mine, or shipyard assign assignments
ments assignments in engineering, construction, and maintenance.
Supervision of production operations. Sales Department
assignments as line salesman or sales engineer (tech (technical
nical (technical service to architects and engineers).

WHEN YOU SIGN UP be sure to pick up a copy of our booklet, Bethlehem Steels Loop Course.
We think you will like what we have to say.
BETHLEHEM STEEL
An Equal Opportunity Employer

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING-Steel plant, fabricating
works, mining operations, and shipyard electrical en engineering,
gineering, engineering, construction, and maintenance departments.
Technical and supervisory positions in large production
operations involving sophisticated electrical and elec electronic
tronic electronic equipment. Also: Research or Sales.
MINING ENGINEERINGOur Mining Department op operates
erates operates coal and iron ore mining operations and lime limestone
stone limestone quarries, many of which are among the most
modern and efficient in the industry. This "0,000-man
activity offers unlimited opportunities to lining en engineers.
gineers. engineers. Also: Research.
NAVAL ARCHITECTS AND MARINE ENGINEERS-
Graduates are urged to inquire about opportunities in
our Shipbuilding Department, including the Central
Technical Division, our design and engineering organi organization.
zation. organization. Also: Traffic.
OTHER TECHNICAL DEGREES-Every year we recruit
loopers with technical degrees other than those listed
above. Seniors enrolled in such curricula are encour encouraged
aged encouraged to sign up for an interview.
ACCOUNTANTSGraduates in accounting or business
administration (24 hours of accounting are preferred)
are recruited for training for supervisory assignments
in our 3,000-man Accounting Department. :,
OTHER NON-TECHNICAL DEGREES-Graduates with
degrees in liberal arts, business, and the humanities are
invited to discuss opportunities in the Sales Department.
Some non-technical graduates may be chosen to fill
openings in steel plant operations and other departments.

f Tu#*dy; < 6ctbbr f3,1970' Ts Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, October 13,1970

EDITORIAL
Help Wauburg
Plans for developing Lake Wauburg into an adequate
facility for UF students have been in some kind of
committee or another for five years.
And for five years, there has been a lot of talk, a lot of
hope and a lot of plans.
But that is all. Plans have led to other plans. We agree
with Melvin L. Sharpe, the present student chairman of the
Wauburg Development Committee, who blames the lack of
progress on wheel spinning.
It is time for wheel spinning to stop.
And it is the students who will have the opportunity to
apply the brake.
The Student Senate last week passed a bill which will
place three referendum questions on what to do with the
recreational facilities on the northwest area of the lake in
elections Wednesday.
We believe a yes answer to question two Do you
favor spending only sufficient Student Government funds
on Lake Wauburg and its immediate closing? will best
serve the needs of students and the lake itself.
The other questions are:
Do you favor spending no SG funds on Lake Wauburg
and its immediate closing?
Do you favor spending $124,000 of SG funds to
develop the south side of Lake Wauburg?
At this point, we do not see a need to develop the other
side of the lake, particularly when the SG has $98,000 in
reserve which it planned to use towards the $124,000
needed to develop a new site for the student facilities.
We believe this money could be used to renovate the old
facilities in addition to maintaining them.
At one time, the Wauburg area was the pride of the
campus. It was a splendid place to spend a Sunday
afternoon. It was a splendid place to have a picnic. It was a
splendid place to escape from the pressures of being a UF
student.
At one time, there were seven canoes and ten rowboats
available to students. There were volleyball courts. There
were barbeque and lawn chairs and a recreation hall.
The recreation hall is now closed, used by only roaches
and mice. Picnic tables are missing. One volleyball court
remains, but the net is tom.
The place has been left to go to hell.
And students can do something about it Wednesday.
Vote yes to question two.
I > I
OTHER COLLEGES COMMENT I I d
Equal Time
I believe that the nature of our political system requires
that every broadcast of an uninterrupted presidential
address gives rise to an obligation to present appropriate
contrasting viewpoints.
So said Federal Communications Commissioner Nicholas
Johnson.
Johnson cited FCC rulings on the efforts of antiwar
forces to gain television time.
Johnson did say that he thought the FCC had taken a
step forward by granting some television time for response
to five televised war speeches by President Richard M.
Nixon. But he disagreed with the FCCs denying there is any
absolute right of anyone to answer a television telecast.
Johnson said that the doors of access to the media for
the direct expression of views on that war have remained
tightly locked.
We feel that Commissioner Johnson does have a point
when he said that the FCC and its chairman, Dean Burch,
have been suppressing dissent against the war in Vietnam.
President Nixon can go on the television screen any time
to present his side and tell everyone how he is right. The
opposition (at least in the case of the recent anti-war
amendments) must raise enough money to present paid TV
commercials.
The broadcast media is here to serve the public; equal
time should be guaranteed all sides; after all, the broadcast
media is not just a microphone to be used by the President
to ram his views down the throats of the listeners and
viewers.
The right to dissent should remain a cherished freedom in
the U. S. After all, isnt that what we are fighting to
protect in Vietnam?
- TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

Tactics Seem Familiar

This week Bruce Alper strikes
back against those who last week
butchered the truth, engaged in
verbal assassination and
renounced the use of reason. I
now get my turn to brand the
John Parkers, the John Floods
and others who have indulged in
hurling malicious,epithets at me,
for what they are-a bunch of
intolerant and desperate men.
Last Friday Mr. John Flood
(4LW) you know who you are
you rascal in a letter to the
editor employed the very tactics
he condemned me for
supposedly using. Mr. Flood
accused me of .. .the same old
mindless name calling solution.
He, however, saw nothing
inconsistent of hypocritical in
calling me .. .an idiot and
.. .dumb. Unable to provide
any real contribution to the
debate on the issues, Mr. Flood
demeaned himself by using his
tongue rather than his limited
mind.
ANYWAY MR. Flood, I just
wanted to let you know that
you will drown in your own
hypocritical rhetoric.
Everytime I speak out against
the radical left, not its more
moderate elements which must
be accepted as patriotic, the

Alligator Staff
Denise Valiante Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
Steve Strang Craig Goidwyn
Assistant Assignment Editor A
Assistant News Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the ausoices of
the Board of Student Publications. P 8S f
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suit*
third floor. Raitz Union. Ult8
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editor*
of the writer of the article and not those of the University ofFlorida

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

H" A'". 1 "
BRUCE ALPER

Parkers and the Floods end up
calling me a right-winger and spit
up their derogatory remarks.
Now, Mr. John Parker last
week also resorted to needless
language which was the product
of emotion, not of intelligent
reflection. Unable to deal with
the issues directly he made
reference to .. .all you smug
right wing godamers out there.
In addition to this, Mr. Parker
let us know that he can recite
Godam at least eleven times in
succession.
Now I ask, just who has rejected
tolerance, the use of reason and
who indeed has polarized the
nation?
I AM going to be watching the
papers carefully in the months
ahead to see if our good friend
J ohn Parker dies from an
overdose of Godam.
Rumor has it these days that
John Parker wears.a Spiro T.
Agnew watch with the hands set
to go backwards just to
remind JP. in which direction
he is going.
Not only did John Parker

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Loretta Tennant
News Editor

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
v Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1619

Ixbabk

attack me in an uncivilized
manner but he embarked upon
one of his diatribes against
sorority girls a few days before.
Mr. Parker cant stand to see a
girl that wont join his aspiring
radical entourage. In fact, J.P.
may just hate people but so far
he still is in love with himself.
NEXT WEEK we may read
how John Parker attempted to
rush a sorority but was rejected.
Hell probably claim it was
because of political prejudice
rather than his obvious lack of
the proper sexual qualifications.
I have embarked upon this
short lampoon only because
with such persons as Mr. Parker
and Mr. Flood it is impossible to
deal with the issues for they
constantly sink into the filth of
their own minds for words.
By now John Parker must be
really angry and have jumped up
from his chair but this is only
because hot air rises.
And to all of this Mr. Parker
must have surely just
uttered.. .Godam.



Ken Driggs
MR. EDITOR:
Ken Driggs, in his Sept. 30
article, Senator Who? seemed
to imply that perhaps one of the
causes of our sluggish Student
Senate is student apathy. We
submit that one factor in this
apparent apathy is the failure of
Student Government to provide
adequate and convenient polling
places, particularly for
Off-Campus students, who elect
nearly 30% of the Student
Senate.
A case in point is the Law
School, where there are nearly a
thousand students, for most of
whom the nearest polling place
is Reitz Union.
For this reason we
wholeheartedly support the
stand taken by the Student
Freedom Party to provide ALL
students with adequate AND
convenient polling places.
4
GEORGE G. DANIELS 3LW
Tom Slade
MR. EDITOR:
After hearing State Senator
Tom Slade speak in the Plaza of
the Americas, I must say that it
took a lot of courage to say
what Mr. Slade said, especially in
front of a hostile left-wing
crowd.
Its too bad that the majority
of the students werent
represented. During the course
of Mr. Slades speech, a few
loudmouths began to yell
goddamn (evidently, these
people have a very limited
vocabulary). However,
fortunately, their attempts to
oppress Mr. Slades political
views failed.
After reading your objective
front page news story on Mr.
Slades speech, it seems apparent
that this is exactly the biased,
one-sided type of thing which
Mr. Agnew is talking about. It
was evident that Mr. Slade knew
the true meaning of the word
freedom. It was also evident
that Mr. Slade was hitting hard
at radicalism and violence.
Maybe this is why some jeered
the speech.
To Mr. Skinner, who debated
with Mr. Slade at one point, I
must say that his argument is
irrelevent for the very fact that
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed,
double spaced and not exoaad
300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if
writer shows just cause. The
ditor reserves the right to edit all
letters for space.
Writers may submit longer
V*. columns or letters to be
considered for use as "Speaking
Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular
column is asked to contact the
ditor and be prepared to show
mples of his work.

READERS FORUM

the American Revolution of the
18th Century is totally different
from that of the Un-American
Revolution of today.
I would like to commend the
Young Americans for Freedom
on inviting such a dynamic and
responsible speaker to speak
here at the University. Tom
Slade knows what freedom and
America are all about.
BOBBY WILLIAMS
C amp Wauburg
MR. EDITOR:
After reading the story in the
Alligator concerning Camp
Wauburg, I decided to try to
find the true facts behind Camp
Wauburg. I went there last
Wednesday to see how bad it
was and what I saw was a
beautiful lake surrounded by
very well kept, quiet grounds. I
also saw a total of four people
enjoying the serenity of Camp
Wauburg. (Its truly a shame that
only four people were here.)
I talked to one of the
grounds keepers, Willie, and I
was amazed to hear about some
of the history of Camp Wauburg.
Its hard to believe that at one
time students used to line the
road with their cars. There were
seven canoes and ten rowboats
available to the students; there
was a recreation hall with ping pingpong
pong pingpong tables and chairs to relax;
there were horseshoe pits and
three volleyball courts; there
were eleven barbecue pits, 32
lawn chairs, and plenty of picnic
tables. Now, there are two
canoes; the volleyball courts
have decreased to one torn net;
the recreational hall is closed;
the barbecue pits, lawn chairs,
and a lot of the picnic tables are
gone. Its truly a shame that
Camp Wauburg has been left to
fall apart.
To my knowledge, money is
available to re-open Camp
Wauburg. Money is available to
refurnish Camp Wauburg into
the most beautiful camp in the
state of Florida and remember,
the camp is for the students and
faculty.
To continue with my
investigation, I decided to try to
find out why only four people
were at Camp Wauburg. So I
drove back to campus and
stopped some students and
friends and asked them what
they thought of Camp Wauburg.
Fortunately, most of them
knew what Camp Wauburg was,
but less than half even knew in
what direction Camp Wauburg
was located, much less know
that it is located nine miles
south of Gainesville on U. S.
441. Why doesnt Student
Government inform the students
about Camp Wauburg? Why
arent there buses that run on a
regular schedule to and from
Camp Wauburg? The only reason
I can see is that for some reason
Student Government doesnt
want the students to know. I
feel that if the students were
informed and there was away
for them to get there, Camp
Wauburg would be packed every
day; T
If you dont believe the facts I
have used above, why dont you
drive to Camp Wauburg and ask

for Willie. He should know; he
has been working there for 19
years.
ROGER PORTFOLIO 3PHY
TOBY ELLIS 4JM
Agnew Moralism
MR. EDITOR:
Another case of Western
Agnew moralism.
As Minister of Education of
the Black Student Union, I think
perhaps it would be feasible to
break all of our rules and permit
Mr. Bobby Williams, (Comic
Section, Alligator, Oct. 6) to
become a member of BSU in
order to insure him an adequate
education in these troubled
times of the radical left and
political oppression.
Apparently, Mr, Williams is
either blind in one eye or
ignorant to a lot of facts in that
he quickly recognized potential
political oppression against Mr.
Agnew, but didnt bother to
mention Dr. Canney or Bobby
Seale or Ike Boothe or Huey P.
Newton or Janice Harvey or
even the student body at UF
whose dictator, excuse me,
president wont even hear and
legislate frivolous demands of
the students. A GAME.
For your information Mr.
Williams, there are people dying
to get out of their America, the
land of the plenty, the free, the
brave, god, hell. If you dont
believe it, go with me down sth
Avenue and ask the people
whether they dig living in the
ghetto or would they like to
have descent homes, sanitary
facilities, descent meals etc.
Not only will you have the
educational privilege to see what
America means to a helluva lot
of people, but you and Mr.
Agnew can even speak down
there and see how the brothers
accept your conservative,
all-American rhetoric. Theyll
love you to death!
As for Mr. Agnew speaking
for a lot of Americans, youre
right, because most Americans
are just as confused as Mr.
Agnew. I assume, Mr. Williams,
and if Im wrong, forgive me, if
Im right, mark one down for
the BSU,. that you are white,
middle class and conservative.
Those are the very issues on
which most Americans are
confused. Dont feel bad, your
father (the generation gap) is
probably the same.. .confused.
Just remember one thing Mr.
Williams; oppressed people have
only one right, the right to
destroy. Check the Declaration
of Independence.
Food for thought: These
means include violence because
in a world where oppression is
maintained by violence from
above, it becomes necessary to
liquidate it with violence from
below. -Franz Fanon
DONALD DIXON

-AND SO, IN THE INTEREST OF
RESTORING FAITH IN WIIVIA*S
FM/RE. I. GENERAL OSVALTO
- -* % JXM.OMY. I mow WHEN
ffl ONBE
El FUEEtPfHTE. JOSE!

Senate Best Bets

Student Senate elections are
this Wednesday with 40 seats up
for grabs. Here are some names
that are worth strong
consideration when you vote:
One of the most outstanding
of the current 80 senators,
Ralph Nobo, is a Focus Party
candidate for a third year as an
off campus senator.
SENATOR NOBO IS the
current President Pro Tern of the
Senate and a past Minority Floor
Leader. His performance as
Chairman of the Senate
Judiciary Committee was so
outstanding he received the Paul
Park Award as the outstanding
chairman of the year.
Seeking her first elected term
is the past Chairman of the
Senate's Budget and Finance
Committee, Ellen Corenswet.
Senator Corenswet was
appointed to fill a vacancy in
January and has since chaired
that important committee as
well as authored and pushed
some of the summer legislation
which helped to bail the
Rathskeller out of debt. She's on
, the Focus Ticket.
Bob Berrin, a former Hume
Area Senator, is seeking another
seat as an off campus
representative. Berrin has proven
himself capable as Minority
Floor Leader of the Senate and
as an active member of the
Budget and Finance Committee.
A number of fresh faces are
seeking Senate seats and some
appear to be quite promising.
Among the off campus candiates
seeking their first go around are;
Rocky Draud, a sophomore
with an outstanding academic
record and dependable
performances as a fraternity
officer.
Owen Beitsch, a senior who
served this summer as a
replacement senator and served
with leadership and ability.
That means he spoke up in
Senate meetings, a thing few
senators do.
Steve Rokeach is a junior
Vanderbilt transfer also seeking
**ff campus seat with
..aiderable talents to back it
up.
All in all, there are 17 off
campus seats being sought by
over 40 candidates.

Tuesday, October 13,1970, The Florida Alligator,

llllgf ~ '
KEN
DRIGGS
I
L
On campus in Murphree Area,
a sophomore resident advisor
named Andy Van Bueren is
running as an independent
candidate. He is one of very few
RAs with sophomore status
which speaks well for his
muturity and interest in
government. As a freshman he
played a big role in setting up
effective self government in that
dorm area.
It doesnt look like Tolbert
Area can lose with two capable
blacks seeking the one senate
seat. Isaac Nunn, a freshman, is
running under the Focus banner
and Clarence Martin, a
sophomore, flies the Student
Freedom colors. A vote either
way won't be wasted.
In the Twin Towers Susan
Baughman, an Edison J.C.
transfer is seeking their seat, and
she looks like the best. A Past
Broward Area President Cindi
Lavely, is seeking their senate
seat. Her past interest and
performance in area government
has earned her the nod to fill a
senate seat.
These are only a few of the
candidates, they represent both
the political parties involved and
a number of independents.
My endorsements are based
on either their past
performances or their evident
potential.
But their efforts aren't worth
a damn unless you go out and
vote. In addition to the senator
elections, a number of
constitutional questions are on
the ballot. Student Government
will, and rightfully so, accept the
results of this election as
representative of the opinion of
the student body.
If you don't intend to vote
Wednesday then you had better
be prepared to keep your mouth
shut until the next election. If
you do vote, its Carte Blanche
to bitch. But by all means,
participate in the democratic
process.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 13,1970

The
Florida
Alligator

j Ravi Shankar
At Fla. Gym

by GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Just a short time ago,
chronologically, but decades if
measured by what has happened
since, a music festival was held
in Monterey, Cal. A huge crowd
of what were then called flower
children coverged to hear and
live the music of people like the
Jefferson Airplane, Jimi
Hendrix, Otis RTedding, Country
Joe and Janis Joplin. Hear them
they did and the people
witnessed some of the greatest
performances in the history of
rock.
Some say the greatest
performance was given by a
middle-aged Indian named Ravi
Shankar, who did not sing or
play the guitar, but who excelled
on the sitar and had a lot of
people like George Harrison and
Brian Jones as disciples. Films of
the event show an entire
audience roaring something
more than approval as they are
transformed by the unamphfied,
non-verbal virtuosity of a
consumate musician.
RAVI SHANKAR defines the
reaction to his artistry this way,
Through the freshness of the
spontaneous creation, a heady
and trance-like feeling is felt by
the listener, and it is true that
one can feel high and reach a
state of euphoria through this
music alone, without any help of
external stimulus. In order to
establish an aestyetic and joyous
rapport between the artist and
the listener there has to be a
*
clear vibration; then only can
one experience the great
moments in listening to this art
form which has been handed
down to us by the Gurus
through many centuries.
Such requirements have rarely
been presented to audiences here
but file challenge will be met
Thursday night, Oct. 15 at 8:10
p.m. This concert is the first in a
series by Student Government
Productions and will be held at
the Florida Gym.
Besides introducing a major
Indian Art form to the West,
Ravi Shankar has had a
profound effect on rock music.
join the fun!
THESWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky young and old. some just for the fun
of it. others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers
TRY A LESSON
just $5 That's all it costs Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease Come visit us today.
1378-26461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
SUED Waldo Road
Vrt CwMar

ENTERTAINMENT

It started when Brian Jones
played a sitar on the Rolling
Stones recording of Paint it
Black. This was closely followed
by George Harrisons use of a
sitar on Norwegian Wood. The
inspiration for' both these
experiments was Ravi Shankar
and on Harrisons part the
inspiration became a musical
center.

YOUR NEWEST SERVICE
iDEALERnRALLFOREIGNCARS^^I
pTHgIHi
I YOU KNOW THE VALUE OF SERVICE. 1

1
STEVENS
* m
--- v
STUDIOS
OF BOSTON AND MAINE I
i has been selected as the I
official Portrait Photographer 1
for the 1971 Seminole, I
yearbook of the University of Florida. V ~ J
Senior and Greek portraits will be
taken October 6-23 in room 347 of I
the J. Wayne Reitz Union. I
/. v raja

gQnKF
Tt
VIA.
Jg I jKk,
M if- £ Mi MiWmmm
Wmmm MiWmmm jimSkm
E> t
/; Ik, ML f
V .... .x
v WKm
SITARIST
... here Thursday

'BOB STACY f IUC
378-5222

* to 10 i V J ,9msp.>
CAMPUS REP
miller-brown motors
JHHSHR 4222 N. W. 13TH ST. 376-4592
BUSY BUG OWNERS...
DID YOU KNOW THAT WE ARE THE ONLY
CAR WASH IN TOWN GIVING BUG OWNERS
A BREAK! JUST FILL UP ... (8 GAL. MINI-'
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EXTRA COST. IF YOUR BUG ISN'T THIRSTY
BUT NEEDS A BATH. WE'LL DO IT FOR JUST
A BUCK!
GAS NSAVE CAR WASH
616 N.W. 13th St.
PSSTI WE CAN HANDLE BIG CARS TOO!

SALES
SERVICE
PARTS
ACCESSORIES

B



Notices for Page of Record mutt be
sent to Betty Coomes, Division of
Information Services, Building H. All
copy for Tuesday must be received
by 3 p.m. Friday. Friday deadline is
3 p.m. tne previous Wednesday.

MID TERMS scheduled
All students are expected to
report for the following tests
and to bring No. 2 lead pencils.
They will be required to use
Social Security numbers.
£3
CSS 111 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CSS 11 will be given Tuesday,
Oct. 20, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A report to Bryan
Hall 120 or 201; B to Little 101
or 109; C to Architecture and
Fine Arts 4,8, 14, 16, 213 or
219; D-E to Little 113, 121 or
125; F to Little 201, 203, 205
or 207; G to Little 213, 215,
217, 219 or 221; H to Little
223, 225, 227, 233,235 or 239.
Others report as follows: l-L
to Matherly .2, 3,4,5,6,7,8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117,118 or 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110 or
112; P-Q to Floyd 104, 106, or
109; R to Flint 101,102,110 or
112; S to Walker Auditorium;
T-V to Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18
or 20; W-Z to Walker
Auditorium.
CSS 112 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CSS 112 will be given Tuesday,
Oct. 20, at 7 p.m. in Peabody
201,202,205,208 and 209.
CSS 115 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CSS 115 will be given Tuesday,
Oct. 20, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4, 7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101, 102, 112,
or 114.
CLC 141, 13X, CLC 144
MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CLC 141 (including 14X) and
CLC 144 will be given Thursday,
Cot. 22, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last
t9ui with A report to Bryan
Hall 120 or 201; B to Little 101
or 109; C to Architecture and
Fine Arta 4,8, 14. 16. 213 or
219; D-E to Little 113. 121 or
126; P o Little 201. 203, 205
or 207; G to Little 213, 216,
217, 219 or 221; H to Little
224, 225, 227. 233.236 or 239.

Gainesville Florida campus federal credit union
Hours :8K)0ojn. -3:30 p.m. Monday through Fridoy W W I

Others report as follows: l-L
to Matherly 2, 3,4,5,6,7,8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117,118 or 119;
R to Flint 101,102,110 or 112;
S to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 142, 14Y, CLC 145
MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CLC 142 (including 14Y) and
CLC 145 will be given Thursday,
Oct. 22, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z report to Peabody 101,
102,112 or 114.
CHN 251 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CHN 251 will be given
Wednesday, Oct. 21, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A report to Bryan
Hall 120 or 201; B to Little 101
or 109; C to Architecture and
Fine Arts 4,8, 14, 16, 213 or
219; D-E to Little 113, 121 or
125; F to Little 201, 203, 205
or 207; G to Little 213, 215,
217, 219 or 221; H to Little
223, 225, 227, 233,235 or 239.
Others report as follows: l-L
to Matherly 2, 3,4,5,6,7,8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117,118 or 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110 or
CHN 252 MID-TERM
The mid-term examination for
CHN 252 will be given
Wednesday, Oct. 21 at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names
begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101, 102, 112
or 114.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
PLACEMENT TESTS
Placement tests in French,
German, Latin and Spanish will
be given at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 15, In Little Hall, Room
101.
These tests are required for
initial registration at the
University of Florida in a
language in which the students
has any prior knowledge
acquired in or out of class.
Testing time is one hour.

for an^,^ ue Bulletin. Produced every Tuesday & Friday
the DiviSon nf Inf f off Cia Univwsit V "Mice* and public events by
Division of Information Sendees and the Public Functions Office.

1970-71 REGENTS MEETING
SCHEDULE
The following is the Board of
Regents schedule of meetings for
the balance of the 1970-71 year:
Friday, Nov. 20, Tallahassee,
1:30 p.m.; Friday, Dec. 11, Boca
Raton; Monday, Jan. 11, Miami,
Monday, Feb. 1, Orlando;
Monday, March 1, St.
Petersburg; Monday, April 5,
Tallahassee; Monday, May 3,
Pensacola; Monday, June 7,
Tampa; and Friday, July 9,
Jacksonville. All of the meetings
are at 9:30 a.m., with the
exception of the one in
November as noted above.
ENGINEERING EXAM
Any engineering senior wishing
to take the December
examination for certification as
an engineer-in-training must mail
his application to the Board of
Engineering Examiners in
Orlando by Oct. 15.
Applications may be obtained in
Dr. Marion Foreman's Office,
Room 308, Weil Hall.
Information about exam
review sessions, sponsored by
the Florida Engineering Society,
will be announced at a later
date.
UPPER DIVISION,
GRADUATE STUDY ENTRY
DEADLINE
All students planning to enter an
upper division college or
graduate study for the 1971
winter quarter must submit their
applications by Oct. 16 to the
Registrar's Office.
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS
United States male students with
at least junior standing who were
between the ages of 18 and 24
on Oct. 1,1970, may apply for a
Rhodes Scholarship. They are
tenable for two to three years at
Oxford University in England.
Value is approximately $3,100
per year. Interested persons
should apply to Dr.
A. A. Murphree, 202 Anderson
Hall before Oct 24.

GRADUATE COUNCIL MEETS
OCT. 15
There will be a meeting of the
Graduate Council on Thursday,
Oct. 15, at 1:30 p.m. in Room
235, Tigert Hall.

university calendar

Tuesday, October 13
Seminole Picture Taking, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Union Paint for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 355 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
Meeting, 347 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Education Dames Meeting,
Home of Dean & Mrs. Sharp,
1211 N.W. 36th Street,
Speaker: Dr. Emmett
Williams, 8:00 p.m.
Union Yoga Lessons, 122 Union,
8:00 p.m.
Beethoven Bi-Centepial Chamber
Music Concert, Union
Ballroom, 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, October 14
, : li' 1
Seminole Picture Taking, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Women's Self Defense Lessons,
C-4 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society,
347 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m.
A.A.U.P. Chapter Meeting, 109
Little Hall, 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday, October 13,1370, The Florida AMgefnr,

Notices for the University Calendar
may be submitted to the Student
Activities desk, third floor of Reitz
Union or mailed to the Public Func Functions
tions Functions Office, G-72, Reitz Union. Dead Deadline
line Deadline for the Tuesday Alligator is the
previous Friday at noon; for the
Friday Alligator, the previous Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday at noon.

REMOVAL OF "I" GRADES
DEADLINE
Friday, Oct. 16 at 4 p.m. is the
deadline for removing of "I"
grades for candidates for
graduate degrees to be conferred
at the end of the fall quarter.

Thursday, October 15
Seminole Picture Taking, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Union Flower Arranging Class,
118 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Gator Football Film, Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
SGP: "RAVI SHANKAR,"
Florida Gym, 8:00 p.m.
v
Friday, October 16
Florida Players, "Passacaglia,"
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Union Dance, "Power" and
Light Show, Union Ballroom,
8:30 p.m.
Union Movie, "Dr. Strangekwe,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Seminole Picture Taking, 346
Union, 8:00 a.m.
SGP: "RAVI SHANKER",
Faculty, Staff & Gen. Public,
$2.50, $2.00 & $150; U. of
F. Student, $2.00, $1.50 &
SI.OO. "Panacaglia", U. of F.
Students, $.25; Gen. Pub.,
$.75.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
AKC German Shepherd pups 3 mo.
old black and tan $75 pure black
SIOO excellent pedigreed call
372-7016 or 392-0243. All shots and
wormed (A-st-16-p)
Drawing table and desk model royal
electric typewriter $45 each or best
offer. Call Ada or M.J. 378-7025.
(A-4t-14-p)
1965 FORD ECONOLINE VAN.
Excellent mechanical condition S7OO
Call 373-1754 after 5:00 p.m.
(A-4t-14-p)
STEREO RC AM-FM port, console
separate spkrs. Ex. con; good sound.
Lak-a-bred. 378-4850 after 6. S2OO,
albums incl. (A-st-14-p)
CAREER I
OPPORTUNITIES I
Due to New Store Expansion
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Have Openings for I
- MEAT CUTTERS 1
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Full time and part time I
Excellent wage rates and
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APPLY In Person To I
David Allagood At The I
BIG STAR
3736 Newberry Rd.
Gainesville, Fla. 1
Oct. 8,9, &i 2 thru 161
8 AM 6 PM J
In h Ifiiul (Ififtm h niftlnsrt H

(paid political advertisement)
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VOTE M.R.S.
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FOR SALE
GIBSON 125 TDC Hollow Body
Electric Guitar. Double Pickups.
Costs New $350. Excellent
condition. Guitar and Case $175.
392-7161 (A-lt-16-p)
1969 Honda 750 3500m1. Excellent
Cond. 372-7070 after spm.
(A-st-15-p)
6cuba Divers: Equipment, repairs,
hydro-testing, North Florldas largest
air station Merritt Enterprises 711
NW 16 Ave. (A-st-11-p)
Flamenco guitar, fernandez (madrld)
serious inquirles-ln search of Martin
or Vega 12. Chuck Tasca 378-5624.
(A-st-9-p)
12 string EKO guitar, pearl enlay,
perfect condition and great sound.
Call 372-6946 after six. Price $125.
(A-st-13-p)
Must sell 1968 VW excellent
condition call 376-6683 after 5:00
Glenn Springs Apt. G 4 Jerry Welbom
(A-st-15-p)
Batteries, chains, helmets and
accessories cost less at the CYCLE
WORKS 1220 S. Main open 3 until
BP.M. (A-3t-15-p)
CAMERA: Miranda sensomat, sir,
thru-the-lens meter, 50/1.9 auto;
35/2.8 auto; 135/2.8 auto, 2x
converter, other accessories.
373-1947 or 392-0221. (A-3t-15-p)
New Kustom 200 watt amp. with rev,
vib, and fuzz. 3-15 spks. $550 or
best offer. Vox cont. organ. S4OO or
best offer. Call 392-8239. (A-st-15-p)
Belair port. 8-trk stereo tapeplyr;
seldom used; perfect condition; SIOO
new, will sell for S6O; need $ to visit
Army husband; call 373-2627.
(A-3t-13-p)
STUDENT SPECIAL clean, adjust,
lubricate & install New Ribbon on
your portable standard typewriter
then guarantee it for 30 days all for
JUST $14.50! Limited time only. JR
Office Furniture & Equip. Co., 620
S. Main St., Phone 376-1146.
(A-24t-13-c)
1970 Honda CB 175 luggage rack,
crash bars very clean 5 mo old need
money see at 505 ne 3rd st Asking
SSOO, Includes new tag (A-st-13-p)
1970 Mobile Home S3BOO Nothing
Down Mr. Olln 964 5606 Starke Fla
(A-st-16-p)

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 13,1970

Page 12

XwX-X-X-X-X-X*X:X*X:XXv::X:X:X:Xw
RA T
:X:X:%X*W*S*!*
YAMAHA 350 1969 Excel cond only
4000 mi fast and reliable two helmets
incl must sell wife is preg Call
378-4402 after SPM (A-st-16-p)
1970 BSA 650 thunderbolt bright
red 2 helmets luggage rack MUST
SACRIFICE $950 Bob 373-1242
(A-st-16-p)
KEEP your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Electric upholstery
shampooers also available. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
Conn alto saxophone with case, two
mouth pieces and strap. S9O. or best
offer. Ph 378-0477 call after 6:00 PM
(A-st-16-p)
/EB2C Gibson Bass Guitar and Fender
Bass man Amplifier. $450 or Best
Offer 378-0477. (A-st-16-p)
$350 value, panosonlc stereo
components asking S2OO Call
372- after 4PM
Desperated I (A-4t-16-p)
Need $$ cassette recorder with tapes
SSO HONDA 450 3000 miles new
last spring $750 Call 376-1429 after
5 PM (A-st-16-p)
8-track car tape deck w/4 speakers 9
months old. SSO Firm S6O/w 10
heavy tapes. Call 373-2520 ask for
Bishop (A-st-16-p)
150 Honda road cycle needs a little
work 2 helmets S7O 373-2520 call
between 5 and 7 also bell & howel
auto load 16 movie camera $45 Steve
373-2520. (A-st-16-p)
FOR RENT
S*x*x-x-x-x^
Female roomate wanted La Bonne
Vie apt. 346 nice apt. Roomates easy
to get along with come by anytime or
call Pris 373-4230. (B-4t-15-p)
For Rent 2 Bedroom Trailer, A/C
heated, Furnished 109.50 per mth
Call 376-0486 or 378-8070 Lease
until June (B-3t-16-p)
WANTED
Hip girl to live In modern house with
2acres In SE heed car cook, light
clean own room $25 + Vi util.
373- (C-st-17-p)
Female roommate wanted S4B/mo.
upstairs and poolside. Village Park
call after 2PM 372-5463 (C-lt-18-p)
Formal 7/8 8/9 475-1065 after 6:30
(C-2M6-P)
l l .n.
Male roommate, own bedroom, new
trailer, S2OO per quarter + V 2 util. Call
Bill at 392-7508 between 8 and 9
pm. (C-st-13-p)
Wanted Immediately 1 female
roommate, SBS a month + deposits
or 2 at $52.50 a month + deposits.
Village Park. Phone 372-1560 after
?pm. (C-st-15-p)
Male roommate wanted to share two
bedroom apt. at no. 108 Landmark,
$65 a month plus utilities. Call
372-4270 or come by. (C-st-14-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted-La
Mancha apts. Prlv room $75/mo.
utilities Included 378-3034 Apt. 55
immediate occupancy (C-2t-16-p)
1 11 1 /Vjs
Wanted bass guitarist and organist
with equipment for Chicago
Butterfield type group Call Tim or
Charlie at 378-9497 anytime after
five. (C-3t-16-p)

dttjj NMj HHj HI H HIHH *tt H HH j" ~ I | 111 v ~ I HM| jM |H ~ \ I H B r v
B NOW OPEN EVERY NIGHT!
BL. IX A AnftN ART THEATRE jfl STARTING WED.: -THE I
MINX' and 'SHANNON'S I
HbH^bh|
. %> Mdr i jflH|[p MSv"
t W /
n H B^\

WANTED
X : : ; :-:-X ; X-X ; X-X'-X ; X-X ; :-:w: ; X ; X'*X : x : : : :v
Female roommate over 21 to share 2
bedroom Point West Apt AC carpet,
pool, dishwasher. SIOO/mo. plus
utilities. 373-2370 (C-st-15-p)
Want to hire neat and dependable
female to prepare noon and evening
meals for 2 working male students at
Village Park. Salary and meals
furnished. No strings, just meals!
Additional housekeeping work
available If desired, for extra salary,
call Asher, 373-1077 or 376-4417.
(C-st-8-p)


recognize this man..
i recognize this camera.. j
i.-._..._.-..._.-.-._.-.-.-.i

r ~ ]
dt ,
?UmWl
BML, IfcaJl JBIPIPI
f
JrtM mSMtd I

help wanted
::^%:ft:s*:s*sft?:ss:*-r**s^*^* : : : : : : : :
GROOVY CHICKS NOW BEING
INTERVIEWED by local ad agency
for modeling and/or public contact
work at manufacturers trade shows.
Have fun and earn good bread at the
same time! Must be young, attractive,
personable, articulate, and enjoy
meeting the public. Expense paid
travel for some assignments. Call
376*4656 for appointment.
(E-5M5-P)
Cartoonist wanted for Alligator
experience helpful see Steve Strang
after 3PM room 365 Union 392-1686
(E-tfc)

W.C. FIELDS
. FULL LENGTH
MOVIE
"ALICE IN
WONDERLAND
also starring
CARY GRANT &
GARY COOPER
7:30 9:00 10:30 p.m.
Admission 25 cents
Frs to memoers and those
who buy mambarships
at tha door.
Presented by Student
Government Productions



*eeeee aww gee eeeeeevwvwww -
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

JSKiWAW.vw. -
HELP wanted
medical technician or
TECHNOLOGIST: Background In
histology. To bo trained m electron
microscopy- Excellent position for
oart-tims student or student spouse.
Tarm appointment 2% years. Salary
$6,548-88,098 depending upon
qu,Hflcitlon,.EujF Opportunity
moloyer. Writ Cfil*# rcrsonn6l
Division, VA Hospital, Lake City,
Florida 32055. (E-7t-13-p)
EARN EXTRA MONEYI We need on
campus representatives, to sell
quality receivers, speakers, tape
recorders, record changers, 81
cartridges at discounts. Write to: Jeff
Johnson National Direct Sales Co.
Suite 111 Hopkins, Minnesota 55343
(E-3M7-P)
Cocktail waitress wanted: full or part
time, no experience necessary. Will
train. Must be 21. Call after 5,
376-9175, ask for Mr. Thomas. Dubs
Steer Room, 4560 NW 13th St.
(E-30t-4-p)
HELP WANTED! Local company
needs secretary immediately good
skills & personality. Must be willing
to move to Tampa/Sarasota area
January 1. Call personnel supervisor
372-5343. (E-st-13-p)
AUTOS
LARGEST STOCK Os USED
IMPORTS In Nth. CENTRAL
FLORIDA! HARFRED AUTO
IMPORTS, 1946 N. Main 378-7085.
(G-tfc)
62 Buick convertable good engine
trans need u-joint must be pulled
away SSO. Leave, name and number
at Elrods Auto Repair or call
372- (G-st-14-p)
SUCH A DEAL! Metallic blue 66
Corvalrwell serviced, 3-speed
dependable transportation. Sporty
yet economical. Asking 600
373- (G-st-15-p)
1964 TR4 red $750 call 376-6072
evenings ask for Dave. (G-4t-14-p)
1967 Mustang Convertible 289 d V 8
wide oval tires 4 speed transmission
excellent condition Phone 378-8884
student 2157 NW 9th Ave.
(G-4M7-P)
1969 Pontiac Lemans 4spd radio
heater air 350 Call 378-5867 after 5
PM (G-2t-16-p)
TR4A IRS 1966 Very good
mechanically; Interior not so good.
Ron at 392-1372 or 372-6589.
(G-3t-16-p)
FOR SALE 62 olds super 88-V8 new
tlres-Just tuned-rest In good
condltlon-$325 or best offer Call Bob
after 8. 376-5981 (G-st-16-p)
Pdntlac Tempest custom, 67, V-8,
air, AM-FM, new tires, excellent
condition, 1550, call after six
372-6946. (G-st-13-p)

I Todays T
I more for your money meal I
mORRISOITS
I CAFETERIA I
I rruesoArs feature ~i I
OOLOEN FRIED CHICKENj
I ALL YOU CAN EAT
I 99<
I 5 WEDNESDAYS : I
% FEATURE S
I ~ J SAVORY BEEF STEW j I
I I with 7Aa J I
I RICE / J I
LUNCHU m 2SUPPER:4:3OtiI 8-FREE PARKING j
I moisons I
I CAFETERIA ...beyond comparison! I
2620 N.W. 13th Straat in tha Giinasvilh

PERSONA L
A unique and unusual gift u
dllta!?**? 9 ,d or s,lver rtn - Original
R?onIhi OUr private symbol.
373 ,M7
for an auditory
feedback study, will pay you SB.OO
PlMe call Michelle Jensen Evenings:
f, 7 *:*? Days: 392-2046
(J-10t-15-p)
SINGLE STUDENTS! Meet morv
members of the opposite sex through
NDS. All dates in Gainesville. Most
dates with U.F. students. For free
details write: Nationwide Dating
Service, P.O. Box 77346, Atlanta,
GA 30309. (J-10t-13-p)
WANTED: Back issues of PLABOY
before 1961. Will buy or trade. Call
Vince at 376-9473 after 6:00 pm.
(J-st-13-p)
Coeds Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrologist 102 NW
2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
V rnmmmmmmmm __________ _____
WANT AN EXPERIENCED GIRL?
Sharon Friedman Is qualified with
past experience on the Senate. Vote
for Sharon Friedman on Oct. 14 for
Senator, pd. pol. adv. (J-3t-16-p)
What are all the Beautiful People
listening to this year? 1390 radio
with pop music plus cash and prizes.
Dial 1390 Now I WUWU Radio!
(J-lt-17-p)
Balance the STUDENT SENATE
with concerned candidates. YOUR
concerned Off-Campus candidate Is
Student Freedom Party's MRS (pd
pol adv)(J-lt-17-p)
We may live without friends; we
may live without books; but civilized
man can not live without cooks
Lytton New Delhi Dell 706 W. Unlv.
(J-lt-17-p)
Dont let student government be
controlled by one party and the elite
few at the top of that party
organization. Be Independent! Vote
Kelly off campus senator.
Independent pd. pol. adv. (J-lt-17-p)
JENNIFER A I dont know if you
will read this but If you do please
write as the loneleness Is getting to
me, Box 13841 Unlv. Sta. (J-lt-16-p)
BRING BALANCE TO THE
SENATE. Vote Student Freedom
Party (pd. pol. adv.) (J-17-2t-p)
EMPATHY NOT APATHY! Help us
a little; well help you alot. Vote
Student Freedom Party (pd. pol.
adv.) (J-17-2t-p)
You can wash (clothes, dishes) for
less with little or no phosphates. All
products totally biodegradable and
guaranteed 100%. Call 378-5810
(J-2t-17-p)
Empathy not apathy; People not
politicians; Action not actors. Elect
some you can talk to. Vote Student
Freedom Party, pd. pol. adv.
(J-17-2t-p)

Tuesday, October 13,170, The Florida AWgetor,

PERSONA L
Care about student govt? Let me
back in the senate! vote OWEN
itsch, student senator,
off-campus. Ive been there before!
Pd. Pol. Adv. U-4t-15^
Off Campus Residents! Student
Senate elections Wed., Oct. 14 Vote
for Rocky Drautf. Foots. Pd. Pol.
Adv. (J-3t-16-p)
LOST: One notebook and psyche
textbook. Helpl Im lost without It!
Please search! Reward offered
contact Carieen 373-1228.
(J-3t-16-p)
PEOPLE NOT POLITICIANS. Put US
In, call us up. Vote Student Freedom
Party (pd. pol. adv.) (J-lt-18-p)
- 'mmm*
LET STUDENT FREEDOM RING!
Vote Student Freedom Party, (pd.
pol. adv.) (j.jt-18-p)
OFF CAMPUS STUDENTS vote
today. Stop by the west library or
the Union and vote. Vote Kelly
Independt (pd. pol. adv) (J-lt-17-p)
Living off campus? Elect at least one
cadidate that Is not party selected
and party controlled. Vote Kelly off
campus Independent get Involved
(pd. pol. adv.) (J-lt-17-p)
Full figure model, experienced In
drawlng/photog. No fakes, please.
$3/hr. 376-5774 (J-2t-16-p)
LOST St FOUND
Lost brown wallet containing ID card
& other valuable cards Jf found call
Victor B Viner 392-7899, 441 South
Hall reward offered. (L-2t-16-p)
LOST: One notebook and psyche
textbook. Helpl Im lost without It!
Please search! Reward offered.
Contact Carieen 373-1228.
(L-3t-16-p)

Statement of Ownership Management and Circulation I
1. Date of Filing: October 1,1970
2. Title of Publication: Florida Alligator
3. Frequency of Issue: Mornings, Monday through Friday, I
except during June, July and August when it is published I
semi-weekly, and during student holidays and examination |
periods. I
4. Location of Known Office of Publication: Room 330, J. I
Wayne Reitz Union, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
32601 1
5. Location of the Headquarters or General Business Offices of I
the Publishers: Room 330, J. Wayne Reitz Union, University of I
Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. j
6. Names and Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing j
Editor: Publisher: Board of Student Publications, Room 330 J. ~
Wayne Reitz Union, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida |
32601 Editor: Samuel J. Pepper, 716 304 S. W. 16th Avenue,
University Gardens Apartments, Gainesville, Florida 32601;
Managing Editor: Phyllis E. Gallub, 2026 18 W. University,
Gainesville, Florida 32601 j
7. Owner: The University of Florida
8. Known Bondholders, Mortgages, and Other Security Holders
Owning or Holding 1 Per Cent or More of Total Amount of
Bonds, Mortgages or Other Securities: None. jf
9. The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this I
organization and the exempt status for Federal income tax
purposes: Have not changed during the preceding 12 months. |
10. Extent and Nature of Circulation: j
A. Total No. Copies Printed:
B. Paid Circulation:
1. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors and I
counter sales J
2. Mail Subscriptions j
C. Total Paid Circulation f
D. Free Distribution by mail, carrier or other means
E. Total Distribution {
F. Office use, left-over, unaccounted, spoiled after printing I
G. Total Actual No. of Copies
Average No. Copies of Single Issue
Each Issue During Published Nearest to f
Preceding 12 Months Filing Date I
A. 19,000 22,000 j
B. 1. None None _____
B. 2. go ,145
C. so 145
D. 18,758 21,726
E- 18,838 21,812
F. 162 188 J
G. 19,000 22,000
I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and
complete. j
Charles E. Barber
Operations Manager

Page 13

LOST dc POUND
FOUND: Black & brown mutt,
female Was advertised In lost column.
11D3 SW 7th Ave. 373-3061
(MW-lpfk:
Found: IWnp Moore High School
ring found outside of Anderson cad
372-6832 after five. (t-3t-26-no)
FOUND: Siamese kitten on corner or
N.W. 3rd Nice 8. 18th street. Found
Friday, Sept. 25. Call 378-8268.
(L-3t14-nc)
SERVICES
Were wired for sight at the smallest
eyeglass office In town. Drive your
own waiting room to UNIVERSITY
OPTICIANS at 519 SW 4th Ave,
across from Greyhound Bus Station,
378-4480. (m-tfc)
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE has a staff of typists
trained to type theses, dissertations,
textbooks, manuscripts, etc. 1405
NW 13th St., IBM Bldg., Rm 206,
Phone 376-7160. (M-15t-10-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now I Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge (M-tfc)
Tired of walking to classes while your
HONDA Is being worked on??? See
Steve at the CYCLE WORKS for fast
service & low prices. Open 3 until
BP.M. 1220 S. Main. (M-3t-15-p)
We SERVICE ALL IMPORTS.
Factory trained mechanics.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS. 506 E.
Unlv. 372-4373. (M-tfc)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
373-1984, 9-5. (M-10t-9-p)

Ruby's Alteration* apt. 217-100 N.E.
Bth Av Gain es v III*, ,JF lor Ida
Mrs. Ruby Mills.
H
\T.TI JTTwTw "pTH r*T3 I kiTml
\ | J | *r< y .4 yx* I l*iW
1 40 early bird I
-earl^lr^rrlY^*fbr^3tJ
Silver Springs
* aj..>
"o'.
LAST / WITH HERBIE .. ,\
3 BOUNCE WITH
DAYS ; BALOOt |
r-XSe WALT
r?oB TH*. DISNEY
\ rt ;sT rjMU
UUillail /.Jb
1 itu n. w, imr\gy);GP^
# r A MAN Afy^
/ YOU'LL
* NEVER Y
I FORGET! I
NY foil |
_2Gih Century-Fox Presents
% <;kok<;k c, shot f-* /
A At J Rlit/' i A
/
* cum ++
( fcZjST"! LAST
lilflilliTl 2
l w. PAYS
£ WINNER OFO\
ACADEMY AWARDS!
| L -g DAVID LEANS FILM |
* DOCTOR
* zhi\a<;o*
\Qtm SHARIF AS/HIvAOO i
\ IN PANAVISION- *#
* % AND METROCOLOR + + |Qjjj
Special: Adults $1.26
AH Day



r .< .;>}. t 1 ;.}
The
Florida
Alligator

Rich Injury Reshapes Backfield

By PHIL PETTI JOHN
Alligator Sports Writer
The depth problem that has plagued UF all year, has brought on
three changes in the Gators starting offensive backfield.
All-Southern Conference tailback Tommy Durrance was moved to
fullback. Willie Jackson was shifted to the tailback position, while
Andy Cheney moved into the starting flanker spot left vacant by
Jackson.
The move came about after starting fullback Mike Rich suffered a
broken rib in the Gators 38-27 win over rival Florida State Saturday.
DWAYNE DOEL of Plantation and Garry Walker were behind Rich
at fullback, but the coaches decided on the move Monday afternoon,
and began working the new backfield at half-speed without pads.
We made the move to keep the depth where we think we need it,
head coach Doug Dickey said. It is looking past Richmond (Floridas
next opponent), but we try to keep six running backs since we use
that many.
The change will not be that much for Durrance, who scored 110
points last season.
IN UFS mirror offense both the tailback and the fullback run
the same type of plays.
The fullback position requires more blocking, said offensive
coordinator Jimmy Dunn. But that is no problem. Tommy is a good
blocker.
In UFs five games (4-1) the fullback, usually Rich, has caught more
passes than the tailback.
DURRANCE IS the best receiver of our running backs, Dunn
said. He has caught 7 passes for 74 yards.
Jackson has started all five games at the flanker position, where he
has caught 14 passes for 168 yards and one touchdown.
Floridas first black football player, Jackson worked at flanker,
split end and tailback in the spring.
IF CHENEY had not missed spring with a knee injury Willie
would have never been moved to wideout, Dunn said. He is a good
running back.
Jackson is not the speedster that some people think he is.
He has a quick start, but Dunn said that in shape he is only about a
10.2 sprinter in the 100 yard dash.
BUT HE HAS quick feet and has a knack of getting his legs out of
a tacklers reach, Dunn said. He can usually find a soft spot.
Cheney will start against injury ridden Richmond next Saturday.
He missed spring and the Gators first three games after a knee
operation.
Cheney had alot to do with our decision to make the move,
Dunn said. With him healthy we can still maintain the level we need
from our receivers.
No changes were made on defense, where Doug Sorenson is out at
the monster position and tackle Eddy Moore has a cast on his ankle.
Swing around!
to
Budget Renti a Car
of Gainesville
376-1245 ;
Free pickup and
delivery anywhere 1 4 Jr
in Alachua Counfy I \
GAINESVILLE/JACKSONVILLE I / 'll
ONE WAY SPECIAL I f x\
11 *15 00 FLAT RATE I \ \
Includes gas a air conditioning! V \ \1
II 3 HOURS, 100 MILES I \\ 1
J § J
I SP5!!!! We Rent
1 Better Cars
' Bant aCap
P 998981 For Less.
>" 1 "

t < iff *.
V 1M Ty. ?? "W-' !!!!! ! 111 !.
JBH' IB : IB Mr B B Bi Wm ilr ~~~ ~~ ill ms w"
~jK[^K^9. < B Bap B BB^B.H'. <

v.
lyiinK
9 wyaKj 9§r
rr f m
TOMMY DURRANCE
... moved to fullback
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES AH ACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

SENIOR AND GREEK
PORTRAITS
FOR THE
1971 SEMINOLE
WILL BE TAKEN OCTOBER 6-23 IN ROOM 346 OF THE
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION, FROM 8:30-5 PM AND 6-9 PM.
SHOOT ING -MON DAY -THU RSD AY 1-SPM, 6-9 PM
FRIDAY-3:30-12 NOON, 1-SPM
SENIORS MAY CALL 392-6550 FOR APPOINTMENTS.
SITTING FEE $1.50
OCTOBER 6-14
SENIORS WITH LAST NAME OF A-L
X 0 AXA X* ATP *SS
AE* AAA AXO AX AS* AOII
*
AEn A*E AAII Ar KA SKY
ato ata Ben at ks
OCTOBER 15-23
SENIORS WITH LAST NAME OF M-Z
*rA sx *Ae *m n* sn
nKA SN KA9 nn* tke zta
nA* S*E KA SK SAM
SAE TE* *KT ex *Ke

Page 14

ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
YgVj) AND SALES
Ms CMAMCS
Students Friend
Specializing in tune ups General
Auto Repair and Corvairs.
Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed
1031 So. Main St. Ph. 378-8532
[Central Charge) [Bank American*} [Matter Charge]
LIVING OFF CAMPUS?
ELECT A SENATOR
THAT IS NOT PARTY
SELECTED OR PARTY
CONTROLLED
BE INDEPENDENT
VOTE KELLY
PAID POLITICAL ANNOUNCEMENT

KEN McKINNON
Sports Editor

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 13,1970



# w. M *'
Different Items Seen
During FSU-UF Rivalry

Odds and ends during the
Florida State University and UF
football game Saturday
included:
. Defensive end Jack
Youngblood standing on the
Gator bench and leading the
FSU cheer Go to hell Fla-ri-da,
go to hell.
... Flambeau sports editor
Dale Friedleys change of
expression after FSU took the
early lead in the game. But then
he saw John Reaves and Jim
Yancey team up to bring the
Gators back to life.
... SPORTS WRITERS in the
second row of the press box
trying to follow the action on
the field, while all the time
looking around the window
braces on the enclosed press
box.
... Members of the UF press
corp inquiring about the lack of
hot dogs in the press box.
. . Gov. Claude Kirk
marching down the UF sideline
in the fourth quarter and
applauding the Seminoles good
plays. Kirk marching down the
Seminoles sideline during the
first half and applauding the
Gators good plays.
... Trying to interview the
stars of the game in the locker
room after the game. The locker
room was made to accomodate
only players-not the press. It
was about half the size of the
Gator locker room.
... WATCHING THE referee
bring peace to the game when
both sides wanted to kill the
other after the big fight.
.. And have you seen coach
Doug Dickey run faster than he
did when the fight started? He
showed some of his old speed
that he had when he was a
quarterback at UF.

OFF CAMPUS STUDENTS
THE STUDENT SENATE HAS COME
OF AGE. THE SENATE NEEDS
QUALIFIED STUDENTS. WE NEED
YOUR HELP TO SERVE YOU.
V A RALPH NOBO
1. Senate Pres. Pro-Tem
/" 2. Chairmen Judiciary Comm.
0/ 3. Sen. Minority Leader
/ 4. Senator (2 yrs.)
T/ DIANE WALLACE
/ /1 1. Orientation Staff
/ / 2. Logic Representative
g J / 3. Child Psychiatric Ward Vol. Chrm.
F/jff DOniE HAMBLIN
/ / 1. Budget and Finance Comm.
" 2. Student Rights Comm.
3. Senator (1 yr.)
STEWART HERSHEY
\ 1. Sen. Majority Whip
\ 2. Senate (2 yrs.)
U\ 3. Past-Pres. of Hillel Foundation
\j 4. Phi Beta Kappa
SJIM GUNDRY
1. Senate (1 yr.)
2. Budget and Finance Comm.
3. Shuttle Bus Comm.
Paid Political Advertisement nADTV
- PAID FOR BY MEMBERS OF FOCUS PARTY

1 MARTY I
perlmutteri
.. Willie Jackson and
Leonard George congradulating
one another after the game. The
roommates have a friendly battle
going as to who will score the
most. It now stands at one
touchdown each.
... Offensive coach Jimmy
Dunn repremanding a sports
writer for a story he wrote.
That was the worst story I have
ever read. Sorry, coach.
...THE DEBUT of John
Reaves as a field goal holder in
place of back-up quarterback
John Schnebly.
... The good showing of third
string quarterback Gary Huff of
FSU leading the Seminoles to
three late fourth period
touchdowns. The performance,
however, was against the second
unit of the Gators and not the
first team.
... Harvin Clark about his
touchdown on a punt return
that was called back because of a
clipping penalty: I should have
told everyone on the field at the
time to just lay down and dont
block.
... Freshman Vince Kendrick
observing every offensive play
the varsity made. The Miami
Springs running back has to wait
another year to make the big
team.
... And the return to form of
Carlos Alvarez after three
average games. Did you see
the move he made when he
caught the punt and left a
Seminole defender on his tail?

.. Placekicker Richard
Franco remaining perfect with
his extra points. He now has 14
in a row.
.. DICKEY HURRYING
Reaves in the locker room.
Hurry up, youre holding up
the bus.
Rather nice game for the
Gators, rather nice.
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Tuesday, October 13,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

, Th* Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Octobar 13,1970

iininininiiiHNMMMMMMMnnMHMntiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiM
ntramurals j
SiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiitimiiiiimitimuHWUWttir by Harvey SpoonerimJ
Law League football got under way last week and once again the
big name in the news is you guessed it-Alvarez! The older Alvarez
brothers, Ceasar and Arthur, have moved up from independent to law
league athletics and are setting the pace on the Redshirts team that is
spearheaded by shifty quarterback Billy Parker.
Arthur led the Redshirts to their first win, a 26-0 trouncing of the
Fat Boys. The Fat Boys were no floosies either with such great stars
playing for them as Mitch Dont whitewash me Dasher, Goofy Uffie
Uhlfelder, Shy Rod Logan, and Struggling Don Middlebrooks.
Browns Bandits were edged by the Frosh, 12-7. The Sweet Slinging
Brine boozed their way to two wins last week as they stomped the
Hopn Gators in the first battle 43-6. The Hopn Gators bounced
back, however, with a nifty 7-0 shutout of the Fat Boys.
LAST YEARS champions, the Ball Busters boomed to two big
wins amassing 70 points in their first week of action.
Law league captains are encouraged to put information about their
teams and players in the S box (for Spooner of course) at the Law
School. This information will be picked up regularly.
In Independent basketball action the Celtics opened their season
with a relaxed 50-41 victory over the Chem Cats. Guard Dave Rose hit
14 points while Bill Weedon hit 10 in only one half.
Ted Gindlays rebounding and defensive work also sparked the
Celts.
OTHER LEADERS in independent action now include the Flea
Circus, Georgia Seagle, the Wild Bunch, and Alvin Lee II all with two
victories against no losses.
In dorm action North I, Tolbert 111, and South IV lead Tolbert
Area. In Murphree area, Thomas D, Fletcher O, Murphree B, and
Murphree A have two wins. Little, Keppel, and Bristol all lead in
Hume Area and Henderson and Crandall have yet to be defeated in
two tries in Graham. In East Campus, Reid II and Towers 10 are the
leaders.
Independents and dorm rats are reminded to get their sidelights on
the games into the Intramural Office at Florida Gym.
Engineering league will not start today as originally posted but will
start Tuesday the 20th.
Track Club Glimmers

By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Corraspondant
Florida Track Clubs mighty
cross country team showed
glimmers of its national title
hopes in walking over all comers
at the Daytona Beach
Invitational five mile run this
past weekend. In the wake were
FSU and Floridas young varsity
squad.
Jack Bacheler, UF grad
student and former Olympian
edged out Ken Misner of FSU
for first place honors in 23:58.
Misner competes for the track
club himself when the collegiate
season ends.
In third place was Jeff
Galloway, a graduate student at
FSU who trains with Misner,
followed by Jerry Slavin, a
recent addition to Bachelers
trainees, and John Parker, a UF
law student who won the SEC
mile last year.
THE GATOR varsity was led
by Roy Benjamin in seventh,
Jim McQuinn in 10th, Ken
Bumsed in 21st, Dave Harrison
in 14th, Bill Hicks in 15th and
George Bridges in 16th. Dennis
Bruce, Benny Vaughn, Jack
Stewart and David Heitkamp
finished in that order for UF.
The club team ran without
internationalist Frank Shorter
who is now training at altitude
in Boulder, Colo. Shorter won
the 10,000 meters (six miles)
against the Russians in the
US-USSR meet this
summer.
When we add Frank to this
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group, said club coach Jimmy
Hawk Carnes, we should be
as seriously considered for the
AAU title as any other team in
the country, and with everyone
running his best, we could win it
easily.

'
HAS DONE MORE THAN PROMISE!
niveriity of Florida more responsive to student needs and social
Mrheaded drives in every area of campus concern. During the
3CUS senators.
id a successful on-campus, off-campus voter
I rive
nds and personnel to form a draft counseling
hind student body president Steve Uhtfeider
illenged the Athletic Association ticket policy
numerous social and environmental projects,
AG, Samson's summer camp, a program
inority students into law school, the Baby
f, and the SG legal aid service.
I discount prices on theater tickets
more than its own interests. With candidates representing Greek,
ips, and former Action party candidates FOCUS speeks for you.
need, interested and well-informed.
JS FOR OFF-CAMPUS SENATE VACANCIES
Paid Political Advertising

Rugby Club Impressive

By FRED JOY
Alligator Sports Writer
If first impressions have any
value at all, it appears that UF
has bred a winning rugby team
this year.
The Florida Rugby Club,
starting only its second season,
put on an impressive show in
three games played with the
visiting Nassau, Bahamas team
this past weekend.
In the first of two games
Saturday, the Florida B team
took the field with only three
weeks experience and handed
Nassau a stunning 6-3 setback.

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AS IF THIS wasnt enough
humiliation for one day,
Floridas best 15 ruggers kicked
off the second game and
proceded to upset their more
experienced opponents by a
26-0 score. How can this be?
Even though Nassau got an
11-3 revenge in the Sunday
exhibition game, the UF Rugby
Club proved beyond a doubt
that it could overcome its
obvious lack of depth and
experience with a fierce
determination to win.
When the dust had cleared

U. S. MARINE CORPS OFFICER TRAINING
PLC PROGRAM
UNDERGRADUATES ENROLL NOV.'
COMMISSIONED AT GRADUATION
COMPLETE COLLEGE EACHELOR/MASTERS
NO ON-CAMPUS TRAINING
CHOOSE AVIATION OR GROUND
ATTEND LAW SCHOOL OR GRADUATE STUDY
AQC PROGRAM
FOR SENIORS AND GRADUATE STUDENTS
PILOT/FLIGHT OFFICER
THE OFFICER SELECTION TEAM WILL BE AT THE
REITZ UNION LOBBY FROM 9:00 AM TO 3:00 PM
ON 13-16 OCTOBER 1970.

Saturday and the ruggers of both
teams began cooling things off
with gulps of beer, all
player-coach Phil Whyatt could
say was, Fantastic! He then
went on to praise Dave Knecht,
Paul Faulkner, John Apple, and
Tony Barker for their
outstanding play. Barker was
personally responsible for
kicking four extra points.
The Rugby Club will play its
next game against South
Carolina Oct. 24. The players
will drive to South Carolina to
play that one.

Ken Anderson
Steve Baker
Bob Berrin
Owen Beitsch
Will Corbin
Ellen Corenswet
Mona Couts
Clint Davis
Rocky Draud
Mona Floyd
Gwen Francis
Sharon Friedman
Jim Gundry
Qottie Hamblin
Stuart Hershey
Dave Jackson
Howell Melton Jr.
Ralph Nobo
David Perryman
Steve Rokeach
Toni Simms
Martha Snedaker
Diane Wallace
Off-Campus
Candidates
For Senate