Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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TOM KENNEDY
UF STUDENTS AT ALACHUA COUNTY JAIL
... 'we're out here for you!'

Priorities Questioned At SG Rally

By MARYANNE GILLIS
Alligator Writer
This university is out of tune
with the needs of our society,
said Roy Mitchell, director of
minority affairs.
Mitchell spoke at a rap session
sponsored by Student
Government in the Plaza of the
Anericas at noon Wednesday.
Also present to answer
questions were UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, Lester

Students Protest Death
Os Alachua Jail Inmate

Alligator Assignments Editor
Students paraded in the
parking lot with shouts of Hey,
were out here for you!
Reaction from prisoners from
their cells was varied.
LET ME OUT of here, was
blurted through double-screened
windows by several inmates.
This was the scene Tuesday
when 80 UF students marched
down University Ave. to the
Alachua County Jail to protest
the death of a prisoner last
w^k.
Inside
The Gator
CAMP WAUBURG, UFs
recreation center on South
44 U awaits reclamation in
student balloting page 3
Classifieds 16
Editorials 8
Entertainment 10
Letters 9
Movies 16
Sports 20

ADMINISTRATION ATTEMPTS ANSWERS

Hale, vice president of student
affairs and Frank Adams, dean
for student development.
WHAT IS THE priority of this
university, the education of
thousands of kids or football?
Mitchell asked. What is more
important, two hours on a a
- a afternoon or the
lifetime of a kid?
Questioned on the status of
Robert Canney, instructor and
graduate student at UF,
OConnell said Canney had not

One student protester shouted
an open question to the
prisoners, They treat you bad,
dont they?
AN ENTHUSED female
shouted, We shall overcome,
with a clenched fist.
The reply from a prisoner
was, I hope so.
Replies from the prisoners
included complaints about
bedding, the heat and the
absence of blankets in the cells.
THE MARCH was intended to
be a protest of William Baughers
death and conditions in the jail.
However, at least one protester
was in the dark regarding his
purpose for attending.
WEVE GOT to do
something, he said, because
that guys dead (Baugher) and
weve got to do something.
The march drew support of
The EYE, a new Gainesville

HAPPY
HOLIDAYS!

'Nothing Unofficial
In Dismissal Notice

By SUE CUSTODE
Alligator Writer
UF Attorney Tom Biggs said
Wednesday the verbal notice
given Robert Canney, UF
education instructor and
graduate assistant, by Dean of
the College of Education Bert L.
Sharpe was sufficient and there
is nothing unofficial about it.
Canney was convicted last
week of resisting arrest with
violence.
ASKED WHETHER the dean
had legal authority to remove
Canney from his teaching duties
and place him in research work,
Biggs said, I assume so. Youll

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol 63, No. 9

been dismissed, but
reassigned.
Mr. Canney has not been
fired, OConnell said. Whether
or not he will continue to teach
is under study. The university
attorney is studying the matter
and a decision will be made
soon. His status as a student
comes under the student code.
OConnell said that the
conviction of a teacher on a
felony charge disqualifies that
individual as a teacher in the

underground newspaper.
Students carrying placards
marched to the jail to make
known their feelings of the
alleged hanging of Baugher last
Tuesday.
STUDENT BODY President
Steve Uhlfelder drove ahead to
the jail to speak with officials in
an effort to head off any
possible trouble. No incidents
between police and students
occurred.
A grand jury investigation has
been called into the case because
of discrepancies in accounts of
the death. The investigation will
begin on Oct. 12. It was
announced on Sept. 26.
After a half hour of speaking
through windows to prisoners,
the marchers turned around and
went home, convinced that
... something must be done.

have to talk to the dean about
that.
Biggs added that Canney was
like any other university
employe. Its iust like anybody
else working at the university
- their boss can change them
around any time they want to.
Earlier this week Canney told
an Alligator reporter he was told
hed receive written notice
Tuesday but did not because
Biggs, from whom the notice
was to come, was ill. He said he
was assured he would receive the
notice Wednesday.
Canney could not be reached
Wednesday to confirm his
receipt of the written statement,
however, Sharp told The

University of Florida Gainesville

classroom. This is because the
teacher is likely to influence his
students and his conduct is
likely to be taken as acceptable
by them, OConnell said.
ACCUSED OF judging
Canney, OConnell said the
courts have decided the issues. If
Mr. Canney is found to be not
guilty, he will be entitled to be
reinstated.
OConnell said that he knew
of no FBI agents presently on
campus to investigate the
activities of student militants.
President Nixon
recommended that if the
destruction of property occurs
the FBI should investigate. I
would call them in in that
event.* he said.
A number of you are
copping out, Mitchell told the
crowd of around a thousand.
Youre hung up on drugs. You
want to change society, but you
cant change anything if youre
hung up on drugs.
WHAT THIS country needs
is a demonstration that lasts not
for a week or a month, but 365
days a year, a demonstration

Radicals At A&M
Either Black Panther leader Huey P. Newton or David Hilliard will
address the Revolutionary Solidarity Day on Oct. 3, at Florida A&M
University in Tallahassee.
The Revolutionary Solidaiity Day was originated to support the
struggle in the South.
PAUL BOUTTEL of the Socialist Worker Party; James Cummant,
leader of the spring revolution at Northwestern University; Brother
Omari, a government official from the Republic of North Africa; Jerry
Lefcourt, one of the New York 21 and Afene Shakur, a
revolutionary poet and also one of the New York 21 will speak at
the program beginning at 2 p.m. on the old track field behind the
Florida A&M gym.
Actress Jane Fonda may also speak before the group as well as
representatives of Young Lords Party, Peoples Party II and the
Georgia Black Liberation Front.
The solidarity program which begins today and runs to Oct. 7, is
being cosponsored by the Student Government of Fordham
University and the Malcolm X United Liberation Front in Tallahassee.

Alligator he had sent Canney the
notice.
HE REFUSED to comment
on the content of the notice and
said it was a matter of
correspondence between the
two of us.
Meanwhile, two campus
organizations have come to
Canneys defense since his
dismissal.
UF Professor of Philosophy
Kenneth Megill, president of the
local chapter of the American
Federation of Teachers (AFT)
said Wednesday that contact has
been made with the national
AFT office in Washington about
possible assistance for Canney in
a legal challenge.

Thursday, October 1, 1970

actively urging change in this
society, he said.
Reactions among the students
to the rally were mixed.; Carl
Mayer said that overall the rally
was a good idea.
It was a good thing, Mayer
said, because it exposed the
administration and the faculty
more to the students than ever
before. It might have some
effect on the action of students.
OConnell was too prone to
pass the buck, though, Mayer
continued. He didn't question
the institutions, he took the
facts without question.
ANOTHER STUDENT at the
rally preferred to remain
unnamed. I feel that the real
issue involved in the rally was
QfjrmngH copped nut
in that he did everything in his
power to avoid bringing up the
relevant issues.
OConnell said the rally was
successful.
Any expression and
exchange of ideas between
groups of people is helpful, he
said. I gave them some facts they
didnt have. Any time people are
(SEE 'SENATE' PAGE 2)



:, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 1.1970

Page 2

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WADE IN THE ROCKS?

The Reitz Union's African wood carving mural
got a new rock box the other day, and Todd Dewey
and Amy Griggs were taking a stroll through the

Whos Who, Hall Os Fame
Applications At Seminole

Nominations and applications
for Whos Who in American
Colleges and Universities and the
UF Hall of Fame are being
accepted through Oct. 9, by 5
p.m.
Applications may be obtained
and must be submitted to
Seminole Editor James Okula in
the Reitz Union. As in the past,
it is the tradition for the
Seminole yearbook staff to
handle all applications for both
recognition programs.
STUDENTS MAY be
nominated by the dean of their
college, by any organization or
the student may apply himself.

Blacks Enrolling
In Trial Program
The University Curriculum Committee belatedly approved a trial
program for blacks who have received Associate of Arts degrees from
areajunior colleges yesterday.
UNDER THE program, any biack with a degree and a C average
is eligible to enroll in the College of Arts and Sciences and may take
up to two quarters of course work on a pass-fail basis.
Dr. Alfred B. Clubok, associate professor of political science, said
the program had been instituted for blacks, because we have not been
an attractive institution (for blacks) to come to.
The approval of the program was unanimous.
Clubok said funds are available to provide private tutoring for up to
25 students in the program, but added that the biggest problem was
finding eligible students.
Three students have been recruited and are now attending classes
on the pass-fail option.
IN OTHER business, the committee received a proposal from Vice
President for Academic Affairs Frederick W. Conner for the
reorganization of the University College.
Conners proposal would create a College of General and Liberal
Studies and would eventually offer a four-year degree in General and
Liberal Studies.
Action on Conners proposal was deferred until further study.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion. -_ 1-:

Whos Who is a national
organization which has allotted
UF 36 placements this year.
While the national organization
sets certain standards, a select
committee choses those 36
outstanding students from all
applications received.
The Hall of Fame is the only
recognition awarded yearly by
UF.
I AM NOT sure of the
number of students who will
receive this distinction; no less
than 25, but hopefully more,
Okula said.
Students will be selected on
leadership abilities, academic

vicinity and decided to take a sample to determine
the quality of the replacements. We're pleased to
report they found it up to par.

performance, service and activity
involvement. The following
requirements must also be met:
the student must have a
minimum 10 quarter status.
attended UF for 2 prior
terms.
excelled in his major field
within the past year.
have at least a 2.0 grade
point average.
Students applying for Whos
Who must also have a minor and
may not be a past member of
the Hall of Fame.
Okula said he hopes all
qualified students apply.
Senate Asks
Reinstatement
PAGE ONE^
presented with the facts, they
can make a better decision.
THE RALLY WAS pretty
successful, said Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder. The
crowd was larger than expected.
Both views were presented, and
everybody had a chance to
talk.
The purpose of the rally,
Uhlfelder said, was not to
change the views of all the
students that were present. It
was a place for the
administration to see the views
of the students and the students
to understand the
administrations stand.
Rallies will be presented in
the plaza each month, Uhlfelder
said, with representatives from
the various colleges coming to
talk with the students.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins Smim

WUFT Gets
Color Ability
By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Writer
Dont be surprised if your next course via the boob tube is
preceded with a picture of campus mascot, Albert the Alligator,
wearing a rainbow-striped bikini and the familiar: This program is
brought to you in living color.
WUFT, UFs television station, has gone all color.
ACQUISITION of two color television cameras, worth
more than $150,000, has enabled WUFT (Channel 5) to become the
states first non-commercial station with full-color capability.
Program director Mark Damen said the switch to color was made to
provide broadcasting students with up-to-date equipment.
He explained that one of WUFTs primary reasons for existence is
to serve as an extensive laboratory in which students utilize the latest
in television technology.
THE 3540 students who graduate each year seek jobs in both the
commercial and non-commercial fields where there is the latest in
color equipment, he said. If they are to become professionals, our
students must have the latest equipment with which to train.
The cameras, a Norelco worth $75,000 and an EMI valued at
SBO,OOO, were obtained through a combination of university funding,
College of Journalism and Communications budget, program support
fund, a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB),
and funds from the State Department of Education.
Dr. Kenneth Christiansen, director of WUFT, recently said that it
would take SIOO,OOO from the state legislature and a matching grant
from the federal government to bring color programing to UF. The
grants, however, werent necessary.
WE WERE able to get these cameras for half price or less because
weve insisted on demonstrator cameras which allowed us to get a real
bargain, Christiansen said.
Transmitting facilities, including the tower and antenna, were
replaced upon recommendation from the state educational television
advisory council when the 1947 structures were declared unsafe and
dangerous.
The changes, costing an additional $150,000, were paid for by the
State Department of Education.
IT HAS BEEN the policy of the state to maintain all transmission
facilities in the state of Florida which, of course, relieves us of a great
deal of responsibility, Christiansen said.
In addition to broadcasting courses such as math and science over a
closed circuit network on campus, the purposes of WUFT include:
Training broadcasters for the state.
Serving instructional functions on assignment by the State Board
of Regents.
Operating in cooperation with the Board of Regents for public
broadcasting.
Acting as a service arm for university produced programs for
distribution to state commercial stations.
The station also provides studio space and facilities necessary to
produce the Doug Dickey Show for a Jacksonville film corporation
called Hi-Lite productions. The corporation pays the station a
contracted amount for use of the equipment.
The Dickey show is taped soon after Gator football games and
broadcast the next day featuring game films and commentary from
the head coach.
Senate Election
Qualifying Ends v

Students interested in running
for one of 40 Student Senate
seats to be filled in the Oct. 14
election must qualify no later
than 5 p.m. today, according to
Craig Hunter, SG secretary of
the interior.
Candidates are required to
pay a $5 registration fee and fill
out an application listing such
things as student classification,

Pall
Barbecue
at the Union
from 11-2 pm tomorrow on the colonnade
SI.OO for everything
barbeque beef or pork sandwich
cole slaw and beans and beverage

position sought and party
affiliation, if any.
Os the 40 available seats, 23
are off-campus and 17 are from
various housing areas including
three each for Murphree and
Hume-Graham; two each for
Broward-Rawlings, Tolbert and
Towers, and one each for
Jennings, Yulee, Flavet 111,
Diamond Schucht and Corry
Villages.



Lake Wauburg
Needs Repairs;
Decay Evident

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
Camp Wauburg is still waiting.
Eight months ago plans were
presented to the Student Senate
to develop a new site for the
outdoor recreation facility on
the south side of Lake Wauburg.
BUT A VISIT to the current
site of the camp last week
revealed nothing has been done
to move or improve the old site
since February.
Although the grass is kept
closely trimmed, and trash does
not mar the natural beauty of
the area, a large wooden
recreation building stands
deserted and condemned.
Doors and windows of the

TOM KENNEDY
SHIFT FOR YOURSELF
... barbecue grill made from a barrel
.p mfirami in-Y ? **
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~ ; / j~,*LooXlfam.iV. -p: jw 'c:. "f
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TOM KENNEDY
SWIMMING IN BROWNISH-GREEN WATER
... makes for uncrowded conditions
Introducing
Glenda
II Bringing to Gainesville 12 yean of experience, 10 years as a]
I leading stylist with Woody of Florida |
Expert Shaping iint^
J Sfe
Fr v M
MADELEINE'S Jfdx St^tuu
Now Locate At
THE FLAGLER INN ARCADE
Phone 378-6811

building which long ago
hosted UF student parties and
other activities are barred.
Inside, clusters of trash and
broken chairs he in piles of dust.
THE LARGE, red-brick fire
place has not felt the warmth of
a fire in several years.
Camp Wauburgs situation
may change, however.
Students will have a choice on
an Oct. 14 referendum vote, to
improve the current site, start
anew on the other side of the
lake, or forget the facility
altogether, addording to Steve
Uhlfelder, student body
president.
Further investigation around
Camp Wauburg last week found

TOM KENNEDY
WAUBURG RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES DECLINING
... illegal power boats tied to a rotting pier

only one noticeable
improvement. Behind the
condemned building are four
chemical toilets installed last
May when the camp was hastily
reopened for the summer. They
look like over-sized refrigerators
and give off a sickly-sweet odor.
A walk towards the lake shore
uncovers the fact that the camp
has less to offer than last year.
ONLY TWO CANOES out of
four remain this year for student
use. A float which was in the
water near the dock is now
missing.
Only six people were
swimming in the brownish-green
water of Lake Wauburg last
Wednesday. A power boat was
tied to the rotting boards,
quietly defying a county order
forbidding power boats on the
UF facility.
The refreshment stand behind
the dock is closed. Next to it, a
soft-drink machine vends its
products at 20 cents a can. On
campus, nine miles away, the
same cans cost 15 cents.
COOKING FACILITIES are
almost non-existent. An
enterprising cook-out buff has
created a barbecue grill from a
barrel sawed in half.
A service building is in the
same state of disrepair that The
Alligator reported last spring.
Last April, a Reitz Union

Protest the ordinary!
R 3-. Take your stand in the new boy-look. \rfjV
tsrw On brawny heel and broad toe. Made 'w*>!
female by bright crinkled patent with
IH THt OHMSVkU W

official accused then-Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd of playing political
football with the
$124,000 plans to develop the
south side of the lake.
THE PLAN WAS also
criticized by Shepherds
successor, Walter Morgan.
Morgan said Shepherd was trying
to build a monument to himself.
Wauburg remained closed

I Wanted: I
I Girl with I
I half a mind. I
I Gig ted. I

Thursday, October 1,1970, The Florida Alligator,

until May when the senate voted
to reopen the camp during the
summer, despite the limited
facilities.
Union Director William Rion
said the camp will close at the
end of October, two months
earlier than usual.
And Wauburg waits quietly
until Oct. 14, when the student
body will decide her fate at the
polls.

Page 3



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 1,1970

Page 4

Elections Highlight Seriate Meeting

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Writer
Rick Horder was elected
Student Senate president and
Ralph Nobo was chosen
president pro tem, during
Tuesday nights Senate meeting.
Horaer assumed the duties of
the office, left vacant when Tom
Tworoger graduated, this
summer. The body faced an
agenda fattened by bills
accumulated during the summer
quarter.
SENATE voting
representation was boosted by
13 senators named to replace
members lost to graduation and

Rosh Hashanah
Joyful Holiday

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Writer
People often get the
impression that because of its
solemnity, Rosh Hashanah is a
sad holiday. Not at all, said
Rabbi Michael Monson, of Hillel
Foundation. Rosh Hashanah is
a joyous holiday. Its the only
one in which I wear white robes,
for example, he said.
Wednesday night ushered in
the holiday with a new double
service.
WE HAD A contemporary
service besides our traditional 7
pjn. one. There was much less
Hebrew in it and it was basically
geared to contemporary
experience, said Rabbi
Monson.
What I attempted to do was
make the service more relevant
to the students who did not feel
like attending the, traditional
one. It wasnt reform. None of
the services could be classified in
that respect, he explained.

SAMSON, |
. 0 |
AN ACTIVIST ORGANIZATION
###### l
. f -* HER
M t Hll
If you're tired of politics and talk, call Samson I
392-1608. Samson will place you with people who I
need your help. Samson has programs in tutoring, I
day care, athletics and more, or you can work with I
VISTA, Big Brother, 4-H or the parole board. Most I
of all, you can help people. Come to Samson's I
recruitment meeting Tuesday October 6th at 7:30 I
in Little Hall room 101. paid for by Student I
Concern.
/. 1 ,: a

other miscellaneous reasons. The
replacements were made to
correct representation
deficiencies both on-campus and
off.
A three bill package involving
the election of student body
executive officer, including the
president and vice-president, was
corrected to require a
majority rather than a
plurality of voting students
necessary for election. The
amendment is to be placed on
the ballot for the general
election Oct. 14.
Also to be included on the fall
election ballot will be six
questions posed by the Senate
aimed at improving campus life.

Rosh Hashanah revolves about
the theme of repentance and
renewal. It should be a religious
experience, said the rabbi, the
matter of dress makes no
difference.
PEOPLE COME Friday nights
in all fashions, said Rabbi
Monson. Theres a great
difference between the high
holiday and the secular New
Year, January 1.
I think I was more of a
leader in these services,said
Rabbi Monson, than an
officiator. One of the new ideas
was to establish an atmosphere
of communication and exchange
between the pulpit and the seats,
where students could express
themselves.
ONCE ONE person says
something, it releases the
inhibitions in the rest of the
crowd, he said. On a Friday
night for example, with 85 or 90
people at services, we are often
able to establish this rapport.

HORDER, NOBO CHOSEN

The questions, necessary to
provide the senate with
information concerning the
desires of the student, include:
Whether or not to abolish
departmental testing as it now
exists in University College.
Favoring the UC system
and spreading the general
education requirements over
four years.
9 Abolishing the UC system
and spreading the general

More Blacks Attend UF

Roy Mitchell, director of the office for
minority affairs, estimated there are close to 300
black students enrolled at UF this fall.
During spring quarter, there were 150 black
students enrolled, Mitchell said.
The Universitys Critical First Year program
gained 110 students this summer.

GPD Auctions
Abandoned Bikes
The Gainesville Police
Department will auction 21
abandoned bicycles Oct. 6.
The auction will operate on a
cash basis, awarding the bikes to
the highest bidder.
Eleven automobiles will also
be available for purchase.
Game Tickets
At Gate 13
Ticket window at Gate 13 will
be open Saturday from 10 a.m.
until halftime for obtaining
student tickets to the N.C. State
game. This will not be done for
any other game. For those who
have made previous
arrangements through Student
Government for orange athletic
cards, they may be picked up at
this time also. Those who have
not made previous arrangements
nil st see Art Wroble in Student
Government between 9 to 11
a.m. and 1 to 2 p.m. Thursday
and Friday.

education requirements over
four years.
Favoring a University
Senate whose entire faculty
membership is elective,
regardless of academic rank.
Increasing the
representation of the senate with
full voting priviliges.
9 Spending SG funds to
develop Lake Wauburg.
Budget requests of S3OO to
the Environmental Action


The CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION is here I
Come meet and rap
with us.
Union R00m357 7:oopm tonight

SECOND GENESIS
bkuMjA QnmviMi
DESIGNS ALIVE
Alik A(hrn aI/iM
1228 W, University 373-2800

The program, Mitchell explained, provides :
financial aid for qualified students. :j
Besides the 150 students from last year and :
the 110 in the Critical First Year program, :
Mitchell stated that there were three or four
students in the College of Law, five in the :j:
medical school and several grad students. v

Group for the sale of bumper
stickers and SIOO for an SG
sponsored debate between
candidates in the state elections
were approved by the body.
In addition, $750 has been
authorized by the senate for the
Homecoming dance to be
sponsored by Interhall Council.
A $1 fee per student was also
proposed and will be charged for
the dance.



DR. E.T. YORK JR.
... school needs money
Funds Needed
In Forestry
By Alligator Services
UFs School of Forestry
stands to lose its accreditation
next year unless funds are
appropriated for a new facility,
according to Dr. E.T. York,
provost for agriculture.
York said in a news release
that the schools inadequate
facilities, are the cumulative
result of a failure to meet
building and capital
improvement needs over the past
15 years.
BESIDES CAUSING a
possible loss of accreditation for
forestry, the deficiencies are
limiting the effectiveness of
other agricultural programs,
York said.
UF agricultural programs will
not be allocated any of the $25
million resulting from the bond
program for this fiscal year.
IN OUTLINING the
institutes needs for the next
fiscal year, York explained that
approximately $9 million! will
be needed to correct capital
outlay deficiencies.
About a third of this would
be used to complete the final
wing (Unit E) of McCarty Hall
according to the original 1954
plans. The rest would be qsed
for the forestry, wildlife and
wood sciences building and
badly needed facilities at
research centers around the
state.
Foremost among these
off-campus centers are buildings
and other facilities for the new
light horse research unit at
Lowell. Operating funds were
authorized during the last
session of the legislature, but no
money has been provided for
buildings and the center cannot
function effectively without
them, York said.
THE McCARTY HALL
addition would permit some
departments to be consolidated
under one roof for the first time,
and relieve increasingly crowded
conditions for expanding
graduate research programs.
York said the school of
forestrys enrollment has nearly
tripled in the last six years and it
is the only unit in the state
university system which prepares
students for professional careers
in forestry, wildlife, outdoor
recreational resources,
management and forest products
technology.
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Delivers
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Thursday, October 1,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 1, 1970

Gator Growl's New Image

Something for everyone is
the hope for Gator Growl skits
this year, according to Doug
Duncan, executive director of
Gator Growl.
Several firsts are being
inaugurated this Homecoming
which the Growl Skit
Committee believes will
eliminate objections of previous
years to inside jokes and greek
domination of the Growl
presentation.
THESE FIRSTS include an
appeal to all campus
organizations to participate in
skit competition, a panel of
judges chosen from the academic
community at large rather than
on a political basis, and the
availability of the skit
committee for personal contact
with entrants throughout the
competition period.

New Apartment Planned For 71

A new 220-unit apartment
complex is expected to be
constructed in Gainesville
sometime this fall, but students
will not have first preference in
living there.
Funded by the FHA, the
three million dollar project may
provide modem housing for
married students and also permit
the continuation of the
replacement of Flavet 111.
BUT ACCORDING TO the
FHA, a regulatory agreement
will be made with the University
Foundation including the
statement: it is a condition of
this commitment that preference
or priority of occupancy shall be
given to any displaced families in
the community.
Displacement by
governmental action constitutes
eviction due to urban renewal,
highway construction, building
condemnation and other similar
reasons.
The FHA, however, said the
chances of this happening are
remote and that the provision is
strictly routine.
Dr. Fred Cantrei, dean of
relations of developments,
agreed that the propects of this
happening are dim.
He said he foresees only UF
students residing in the
join the fun!
THe'SWING'S
TO WINGS
Alt over America people are taking to the
tky young and old...some |ust for the fun
of it. others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 That s all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease Come visit us today.
1378-28461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
jjggg Waldo Road

SOMETHING FOR EVERYhit

This year, for the first time,
Growl will have its own theme
Hope for America, Duncan
said. Skits will center around
humor and critical commentary
on the local, state and national
level. Relevancy to current issues
concerning the general public
rather than just the student
body has been stressed.
There is no pre-determined
number of skits scheduled for
Growl presentation and the
committee hopes that the
elimination of house decorations
this year will encourage
participation from dormitory
areas and cooperative living
organizations in addition to
greek entrants.
A TEAM OF JUDGES from
both of the Oct. 20 tryouts and
the final competition during
Growl festivities will include

apartments and is certain UF
married students will receive top
priority in applying for the
accommodations.
The UF Foundation, headed
by Earl Powers, applied for the
FHA loan for construction of
the building approximately two
years ago.
Funds were reserved and

MMum'a
IS HAVING A SPECIAL
ON
PERMANENTS and FROSTINGS
THROUGHOUT OCTOBER
1250 WEST UNIVERSITY 378-6811

II I I I W m. il #% A a f" #%l l % liiPiii^*
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students, staff and other
personalities in the academic
community. Criteria for winning
skits includes conformation to
theme, humor, originality,
adaptability to Florida Field,
audience interest, plot, and
theme.
Trophies will be awarded to
finalists during Homecoming
game ceremonies.
Skit Chairman Sam Galloway
and his staff are available in the
Growl office in room 313 of the
Reitz Union to answer any
questions or help with problems
of skit entrants. They will be in
touch with all organizations
preparing skits in order to
minimize confusion regarding
rules and deadlines.
Final skit scripts are due at
the Growl office, on Oct. 5.

eligibility was determined late in
June. Plans were drawn and
approved.
The apartment house is
scheduled to begin accepting
occupants in the fall of 1971
with the determination of
monthly rental fee expected to
be made after the project has
been completed.

Svreelhearf CofcfiW Ocf 14
By DAVE MANKIN
Alligator Writer
Applications for this years Homecoming Sweetheart contest have
been sent out and should start returning by early next week,
according to Homecoming Sweetheart Chairman Mike Malone.
In order to qualify as a contestant, all applicants must be classified
2UC or higher, and have at least a 2.0 grade point average.
IN ADDITION, each contestant must be sponsored by campus
organization.
This years Sweetheart contest will be run slightly differently than
previous contests, Malone said. It will not be just a beauty pageant,
but the perfect UF coed.
POINTS AWARDED for personality will be combined with those
awarded for campus activity and grades. The total points for this
combined category will be given" the same value as those points
awarded for beauty.
The contest will be held in two parts; personality on Oct. 14, and
beauty on Oct. 18. The winner will be announced at Gator Growl.

"THE KEY TO BETTBt BUSINESS
AKV
ALPHA KAPPA PSI
RUSH SMOKER
THUR.OCT. 1 7:30 PM.
REITZ UNION 122-123

Reitz Union Gaines Area
Bowling Team
We will sponsor a bowling team of five men
and five woman to represent the UF in
Inter-collegiate competition. The first match
is against Florida State University October 10,
1970 in Tallahassee.
All bowlers interested in trying out please
report to games area Thursday, October 1, at
4:30 pm or call Pat Day at 392-1637 for more
information.



KSC Contractors Abm& System

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the final part of a series written
by staff writer Reg Crowder
concerning the Kennedy Space
Center.)
>
By REG CROWDER
Alligator Writer
7
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER
- When work is done at this
installation by a contractor, he is
observed or monitored to be
sure the work is up to what the
contract specifies.
On the KSC organization
chart there is ample provision
for catching improper work by
contractors and correcting it.
And there is evidence the
system doesnt work.
One of the more spectacular
instances of contractor <>abuse
came to light when a group of
Bendix Inc. employes were
caught showing a stag film Dec.
17,1968.
THE ON-DUTY workers were
showing the film in a Bendix
shop near the Vehicle Assembly
Building when a supervisor
happened to walk in.
The incident gained publicity
because it occurred in the last
few days before the first manned
Apollo flight.
What didnt come to light is
that a KSC monitor assigned to
observe Bendix operations had
filed reports on misconduct
from May 1966 to July 1968.
No action was taken during
that time by KSC officials and
the firm continued to receive
federal contract awards.
INFORMATION IS available
in this particular case, hot
because Bendix presents the
worst example, but because of
the actions of monitor James N.
Hillis.
He wrote to several members
of Congress about it.
On Feb. 3, 1969, Hillis wrote
Sen. William Proxmire, D-Wis.,
one of my concerns here at
KSC is the waste that (goes) on
every day both directly and
indirectly and listed his
complaints.
When Proxmire forwarded an
inquiry to KSC, Hillis was
formally reprimanded.
AN EMPLOYE IN the same
Bendix shop, Joseph W.
Nussbaumer Jr. was so
concerned at the conduct there
that in May 1968, he went to
the FBI OFFICE IN Orlando to
find out what he could do.
He complained of harassment
of two other employes, one
Flyin Gators
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Flying Club
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Additional hours
that same month
only $9 per hour
No dues.
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e No meetings
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CASSELS IN THE AIR

whose car was turned on its side
in the Bendix parking lot and
the other who had the water in
his radiator let out while he was
working.
Nussbaumer questioned why
those and others were
continually harassed on the job
and nothing (was) being done to
stop this type of treatment.
He was advised to send his
complaints through the firms
security office.
LATER HE signed a
statement for Bendix security
charging employes with theft,
gambling on the job, drinking
government issued alcohol and
destruction of expensive
equipment.
In October 1969 the funding
of the Bendix contract was
changed from research and
program management to
research and development.
With the change all KSC
monitors were removed from the
shop.
All these incidents point to
the need for more attention to
the unglamorous and less than
exciting portion of KSC
activities day t 6 day
management.
There is, right now, interest
building in Washington.
ROBERT J. Brown, special
assistant to President Nixon, said

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his office is looking into the
matter.
We have had some
correspondence from a number
of people down there (KSC)
about a number of things, he
said.
We have asked the Civil
Service Commission to look into
the whole matter and get back
to us with a report shortly.
Ed Hugler, a staff employe of
the U.S. House Subcommittee
on Manpower and Civil Service,
said the committee is very
interested in the problems at
KSC.
We have this same interest
and a variety of other interests
in many other agencies, he said,
although NASA does seem to
do more of it (contracting for
services) than any of the other
agencies.
HE SAID NASA has a long
history of obtaining such
services by contract and that,
of course, makes it more
difficult to break.
It would be easier for us to
take an agency which had

historically used Civil Service
people then switched over to
contractors, he said.
He said the subcommittee is
waiting for replies to several

K < |fi
I Cig Red I
I is wide spread. I
I Cut arent we all. I

Thursday, Odobar 1,1970, Tha Florida Alllptor,
' l -J.:

questions put to NASA before
deciding what to do next.
However long it takes, some
part of government, perhaps the
congress, will have to take strong
action.
Up to now the Comptroller
Generals office and the Civil
Service Commission together
have been unable to move KSC
and NASA, the agency that
doesnt seem to read its own
reports.

Page 7



Page 8

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 1, 1970

Hearing Needed
Before Robert Canney is pushed off into some dark
corner in Norman Hall, we believe the man is entitled to a
university hearing.
A UF graduate student and education instructor, Canney
was sentenced to a six month-to-two year prison term last
week for resisting arrest and striking a police officer at an
anti-war rally last spring in St. Petersburg. Canney is
presently free on bond, pending an appeal.
He was relieved of his teaching duties Monday by Bert L.
Sharp, dean of the college of education. Canney said he had
reason to believe that research work will now be his only
responsibility.
We believe Canney received a shoddy deal, and a hearing
is in order.
And not only because he has not yet received the laws
entire due process. Even the way Canney was notified of his
suspension was abominable. He received a memo from
Sharp telling him to report to the deans Norman Hall office
immediately following his 4:30 class. There he was told his
teaching days at UF were over.
And then there are the rumors of political repression,
which may have some truth to them. Canney believes he is
being made an example. This definitely bears a hearing.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder said he thought
the suspension of Canneys teaching duties was a really
rotten thing.
As things stand now, it would seem that way. How about
a hearing?
p [other colleces comment]
Rules For Order
Sometime before Nov. 11, the Arizona Board of
under the provisions of State Senate Bill 174, must adopt
rules and regulations for the maintenance of order upon the
campus.
The rules specifically must govern the conduct of
students, faculty and staff and all members of the public
while on school grounds. Penalties must be spelled out and
shall include for the ejection of a violator from the
property and, in the case of a student, faculty member or
other staff violator, his suspension, expulsion or other
appropriate disciplinary action.
Because of the tone of Senate Bill 174, and the wide
spectrum of action it leaves open under its ambigious
wording, the rules and regulations formed by the regents
may be the determining factors in whether the bill
ultimately acts to protect the campus or simply to give free
reign to police anxious to suppress all campus dissent
violent or non-violent.
Os particular concern is provision B of the Senate bill
which says that when an administrator or someone
designated by him to maintain order on the campus has
probable cause to believe someone is committing an act,
or has the intention of committing an act, which disrupts
the lawful use of university property he may order such a
person to leave the property. If such a person does not
leave, he is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of
not more than SSOO, by imprisonment of not more than
one year, or both.
The question of course, is: What does probable cause
mean and who interprets its meaning?
Robert L. Houston, vice president for physical resources,
told the Wildcat it all comes down to a policeman using his
own good judgement and that in his mind a policeman has
to have reason to believe that an act will interfere with the
lawful use of property.
One wonders, however, whether the average policeman,
during what he considers either a potentially or actually
violent situation, will be conscious enough of this demand
for evidence or whether he will act first and think later.
Unless the regents are very specific in drawing up their
regulations so that everyone faculty, students, staff and
police knows exactly what constitutes a breach of this
law, there is a great potential for injustice and denial of
constitutional rights.
No one should be punished for a crime someone else
THINKS he might commit and the regents should make this
clear.
The state legislature in drafting and passing Senate Bill
174, obviously was concerned primarily with preserving
peace on the campus. The regents in complying with the
bill, however, should be concerned with protecting the
rights of the persons most effected by it the faculty and
students. ...
- ARIZONA DAILY WILDCAT

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

/I / 8 11 1 Wr 1 ) AmSHPHK
Justice Not Carried Out

The universitys suspension of
instructor Bob Canney strikes
me as an unfortunate
misinterpretation of justice.
True, Canney has been
awarded what I should hope was
a fair trial and found guilty- by
the court at hand. But the
American legal system goes to
great lengths to insure that the
accused is not deemed guilty
until he has been found so
beyond any reasonable doubt.
The vehicle for that effort is the
appeals system.
APPARENTLY Canneys
lawyers dont feel he is guilty.
Appeal of his conviction has
been initiated and Canney has
been freed on bond pending the
out-come of that appeal. As a
layman who doesnt pretend any
super insight into the law, this
strikes me as a situation where

Alligator Staff
Ron Sachs Anna Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
01 F,o id * *
m 0 ;^t B R U^r rt, in in Si,..
Editorial Offica phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those at th.
of the writer of the article and not those of the ofFlorid

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

j I KEN DRIGGS |

legally the door is not closed
regarding his guilt.
The university, on the othpr
hand, seems to have viewed
Canney as guilty until he is
proven innocent by his appeals.
Canney has been relieved of his
teaching duties; supposedly, he
will now be unable to warp our
impressionable little minds.
I dont mean to say the
instructor is in fact not guilty. I
just think the jury is still out.
Apparently Dean Bert Sharp
(Education), who released
Canney, or someone higher up
unidentified in the Alligators
story of Sept. 29 feels the issue
closed.

' \
Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Loretta Tennant
News Editor

THE MOVE smacks of
political repression, it isnt hard
to see why the American
Federation or Teachers (AFT)
group on campus reacted with
no small amount of alarm to the
decision.
Giving the administration the
benefit of a doubt and exclusing
any intention of repression, it
was a bad decision.
Add that possibility of
repression. Even if it didnt enter
into the decision, as long as a
number of the university
community believe that to be
the case, the effects are the
same.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1619

mmhfk
/ A \



Are We Next?

Today I am presenting some
quotations I have recently
collected. Id like you to read
them several times and think
about them for a while.
Individually and collectively, the
quotes remind me of the poster
that shows a red-white-and-blue,
star-spangled swastika, with the
caption ARE WE NEXT?
Since, as the ACLU says, the
price of freedom is eternal
vigilance, here we go:
The New York Times
reported Saturday that the
Nixon Administration has
decided to suspend a 41-month
ban on full-scale arms shipments
to Greece ..! The move was
regarded as a victory for the
Department of Defense, which
The Times said has sought to
end the restrictions for some
time ... The Times said lifting
the ban would make the Greek
military government eligible to
receive tens of millions of dollars
worth of tanks, armored
personnel carriers, artillery and
other heavy weapons previously
withheld under a selective
embargo. (The Miami Herald,
9/20/70)
The 25-year-old liaison man
between the Nixon
Administration and the nations
students quit Thursday to
protest what he called high
officials implied approval of
even the most vicious tactics
against legitimate dissent.
Anthony J. Moffett, appointed
last September to head a new
Office of Students and Youth by
Education Commissioner James
E. Allen, said his resignation was
prompted by what 1 fear is a
very dangerous attitude in our
country. The recent remarks by
the President concerning student
protesters were most
instrumental in my decision. For
they confirmed what thousands
of students have believed or
suspected for some time:
Namely, that the President and
his most trusted advisers do not
view themselves as leaders of all
the American people; that they
do not have the best interests of

'i.-r-
tPW r f | fP^ ,^^ T
" Lets face it lady, even if the smog lifts and they get the
lights back on, nobody wants to get involved anymore"

DAVE
MILLER
L : :
' :
-
youth in mind; and, most
tragically, that they will sanction
even the most vicious tactics
against young people and other
legitimate political dissenters.
(The Miami Herald, 5/24/70)
We might be the first
people to go fascist by the
democratic vote, and that would
be something not even the
Germans or Italians did ...
Hitler neVer got more than 39
per cent of the vote in a free
election, but I think the
American people now would
vote for almost anything which
would put down the so-called
peaceniks and the college kids
and the blacks ... Hitler
promised to end the street
fighting that was arising from
the depression, but, of course it
was a hypocritical promise
because hed been conducting a
good deal of street fighting
himself The know knownothingism
nothingism knownothingism to which Nixon,
Agnew, and Mitchell appeal is
frightening. They are appealing
to the lowest denominator of
the people.
The streets of our country
are in turmoil. The universities
are filled with students rebelling
and rioting. Communists are
seeking to destroy our country.
Russia is threatening us with her
might and the Republic is in
danger. Yes, danger from within
and without. We need law and
order. Yes, without law and
order our nation cannot survive.
Elect us and we shall restore law
and order.
The second from the last
quotation was from William L.
Shirer, author of The Rise and
Fall Os The Third Reich, Los
Angeles, California, 1970.
The last was from Adolf
Hitler, Hamburg, Germany,
1932.

"" ~




1 READERS FORUM
>,?% ^

Crack Forces
MR. EDITOR:
Im writing this letter
regarding those crack forces that
help to keep Gatortown safe and
sober: the Gainesville Police.
This morning while
courageously fighting the 8 a.m.
super traffic snarl, I happened to
notice a man in boo ticketing
a fellow for the dastardly deed
of illegal parking.
Now its not that I feel this
terrible crook should have
gotten away scot-free, never by
God. (or J. Edgar Hoover.) But
why bother at 7:30 in the
morning when traffic from the
Sin City area on 441 is backed
up to Arbys? Why not direct
this energy to directing traffic so
that a few more cars could be
squeezed through in those
crucial left hand turn areas?
All the above probably could
be directed at the campus cops,
but I like Chief Schuler. Hes a
nice man and hes probably just
letting his men get a little extra
deep.
Finally if this fails there are a
number of solutions to the
traffic-parking problem: 1) Since
there is now no danger of
broken glass, turn Florida Field
into a parking lot. 2) Stagger a
few of the working staffs
schedules, an idea thumped to
death by the Traffic and Parking
Committee a year or so ago
probably because it was
suggested by a student. 3) And if
all else fails, make all roads one
way south and let Micanopy
worry about the problem.
JERRY SCHECHTER (ILW)
Baughmr Death
MR. EDITOR:
This is a copy of a letter I sent
to City Commissioner Neil
Butler on Sept. 24.
Dear Mr. Butler:
As a voter, taxpayer, and
student I am appalled at the
statement made by Inspector
Stanley for the Alachua Sheriffs
Office to Ron Sachs of The
Florida Alligator concerning the
death of William Baugher. A
suicide attempt, much less a
success, would be impossible to
hide from three normal adult
.a... m. j U wCll, ...-. u
fact alone should call for an
extensive investigation, not the

routine one Mr. Stanley spoke
of. In addition, there is reason to
suspect that this prisoner was
previously beaten by other
inmates. His current cellmates
were accused of robbery and
auto theft, pushing heroin, and
forcible rape.
It seems someone needs to do
some lengthy explaining and not
necessarily only Mr. Baughers
cellmates. If need be, the
ranking police officer involved
should be brought before a
grand jury and questioned, and
hopefully the results made
public.
ERIC MAKELA, (4AS)
Slanted Story
MR. EDITOR:
In my opinion, the front page
article Memo Asks Dorm Rules
Enforcement in Sept. 22*s
Alligator is an example of
slanted reporting, taking things
out of context.
It is a matter of record that
several residential areas suffered
trash chute fires last year. It is
my understanding, that, in order
to increase protection of dorm
residents against such hazards
this year, provisions were made
for locking trash chutes
overnight. This step, taken as a
security measure, has an
unfortunate consequence in that
there is a potential for trash to
build up in students rooms.
To alleviate this problem,
trash removal from the rooms on
a periodic basis by custodial
personnel was instituted as a
service to students. A detailed
explanation of this trash removal
procedure was provided.
Students have raised a
legitimate concern about the
inconvenience of room entry by
custodial personnel for trash
removal. I hope students will
also realize the benefits of
additional security from the
trash chute fire hazard and
alleviation of trash
accumulation.
Locking the trash chutes and
removing trash from rooms is a
new measure. It will take the
cooperation of both staff and
students to make it work.
Constructive criticism can aid in
A,t, re modification of the
present procedures. The
Alligator article by Carl

Thursday, October 1,1970, The Florida AMgator,

LETTERS POLICY
Lvttara must:
Be typed, signed,
double peeed end not exceed
300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addressee and
telephone numbers of writers.
ftfTitfS win do wraineio only n
writer shows Just cause. The
editor reserves the right to sdN sM
letters for speoe.
Writers may submit longer
essays, columns or letters to be
considered for use as Speaking
Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular
column is asked to contact the
editor and be prepared to show
samples of his work.

Crawford neither fosters the
necessary communication and
cooperation between staff and
students nor provides
constructive criticism.
RONSCHARNWEBER
Residence Administrator
Yulee Area
Dorm Keys
MR. EDITOR:
For most students, our dorm
rooms are our new homes.
Ethically, our possessions should
be safe in our rooms when the
doors are locked.
The housing people make a
big thing about locking the
doors but this isnt worth
anything when custodial
personnel have passkeys and
come in to remove the trash
once or twice a week, whether
you are there or not.
Since there is a trash shute on
each floor of most halls, campus
residents could take out their
own trash with a minimum of
effort. If the custodians were to
make the beds and sweep the
floors, as in a motel, they would
have a better purpose (or
excuse?) for coming into the
rooms.
But the dorm room is not a
motel room; it is a long-term
living unit, or in essence, a
home, and home should
include with it security.
GARYPASKAL

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida ANigrttor, Thursday, October 1,1970

'Players Start Season
sM'S\. , ~liyDOP>sr<<%
\ MBS
H&# £#ll < MR** t Jf"*
p
rjHs K B[ [H 1
CONSTANS THEATRE
.. .home of Florida Players

By WARD BRISICK
Alligator Entertainmant Writor
With the starting of classes comes the beginning
of the cultural season. Students about the UF will
be busy polishing their productions making them
ready for performances this fall.
The Florida Players are no exception as they cast
three productions to be performed in the Constans
Theatre.
REHEARSALS BEGAN this week for the Oct.
16 and 17 Readers Theatre presentation of James
Paul Deys Tassacaglia. The Readers Theatre,
under the direction of Dr. Richard Green, will give a
vocal interpretation of Deys work. This type of
performance involves the cast not as actors but as
interpreters of the written script from which they
read their part.
The Players will use other forms of theatric
performance throughout their season. They are a
quite talented group of Theatre majors who, under
the supervision of faculty, will present the most
traditional and modem theatre forms. The quality
of their work is as professional as you will find
anywhere.
The Theatres director, Dr. L.L. Zimmerman will
present Robert Bolts A Man For All Seasons
scheduled for Nov. 9-14. The play is sort of a 20th
centtKymoralina 16th century setting highlighted by
a multi-platformed, turn table stage designed by J.
Michael Gillette, and exquisite costuming by Lynn
Carroll.

Dragway
Concert
Canceled
The rock concert scheduled at
the Gainesville Dragway for 8
pjn. tonight featuring The
Allman Brothers, Third Power
and Celebration has been
cancelled.
The cancellation is only for a
couple of weeks until a new site
is found. At that time, the
concert will be announced.
nil fill Mr Wmn.
through
Instructor: Mason York
$7.50 for $ no hour ssnions
Uuthu Oct. 14 Nov. 18 room
C-4, Union 7:00-8:00 pm rtgktar
at tho tint lemon or in room 310,
spofuorod by tM JWR Union

A little less than
conventional...
8. .
v Jifc
k .jfl bJH |%,
i-- j||H
JSn:
1971
SEMINOLE
iViV/..V*\'V*t''SVj ** : *.* .*.**_ *AMA!AlAAV.Vl.V.Vifyv.vrfy.i<.>.

The cast includes:
Tom Nash The Common Man
Dan lessee Thomas More
John Palmer Richard Rich
Terry McGovern Norfolk
Becky Hoodwin Lady Alice
Susan Baum Lady Margaret
Bill Thomas Wolsey
GeneTouchet Cromwell
Gary Cheatham Chapuys
Chad Reed Attendent
Bruce Cornwell Will Roper
Hank Conner Henry the VHI
Rena Carney Catherine Anger
Bill Stradmann Thomas Cranmer
For the first time in the Constans Theatre,
director Michael Gillette will present An Evening
of Pantomine on December first through third.
The remainder of the season includes a series of one
act plays to be presented November 22-25. Rich
Besoyans Musical Comedy Little Mary Sunshine
will be presented February 15-20; Peter Shaffers
Five Finger Exercise March 4-6 and March 10-15.
A comedy will be announced for an April 7-10 run,
and the season will close with Howard
Richardson-William Bemey play Dark of the
Moon, May 10-15.
All productions will be staged in the Hi\
Constans Theatre adjacent to the Reitz Union.
Curtain at 8 p.m.

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Thursday. October 1.1970. Tha Florida Allwtor.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Octobar 1,1970

Sptzitdt .. a a .ap
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I Napkins zz 29 e Pancake Mix... 33 £ Arrow Tissue .. .4 J1 00 Sausage 4£. s l oc
HAWAIIAN ASSORTED ARROW FLOWER CART KLEENEX
I Punch 3ss 88 c Bath Tissue .... r 88 c Panty Hose 78 e Facial Tissue .. 3" S I OO
M WESSON CRACKIN'GOOD LUSTRE CREME BIG SCOn ASSORTED
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Shortening... .3 & 67* Cooking Oil 68 c Pork & Beans . N r 10- Quaker Oats ... 5£ 28- Pod-Uds 3f M
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Thursday, October 1,1970. Tha Florida AMgator,

Page 13



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 1, 1270

Neil Young: Unique In All Rock

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Blue, blue windows behind
the stars, yellow moon on the
rise/Big birds flying across the
sky, casting shadows on our
eyes/Leaves me helpless...
That is just how Neil Young
leaves me helpless. I mean
what can you say? Weve all felt
that way before, and when Neil
tells you about that place in
Ontario all his changes were
there and that mournful steel
guitar steals up and cuts you
with nostalgia, well weve all felt
that way before. Its a quality
impossible to write about, a
quality that has to be heard.
NEIL YOUNG is emerging as
one of the major talents in the
country. His work with the
much lamented Buffalo
Springfield, with the much
publicized CSN&Y and with
Crazy Horse has exhibited a
uniqueness quite unmatched in
Rock today, that uniqueness
pervades what he plays, what he
sings, how he sings and how he
plays. Few rock singers have
really unique voices; Lennon,
Jagger perhaps McCartney,
Winwood and James Brown have
readily identifiable voices.
Neil Youngs high nasal twang
is unmistakable and is perfect
for his material which strains
with quiet urgency or comforts
with voice-cracking melancholy.
His guitar work can only be
described as loose he does not
play tight music nor does he
dazzle you with high speed
fret-work. He explores with his
guitar, probing every nuance of a
song, attempting every
combination of notes within his
melodic intent until you get into
the song just as he gets into it.
The essence of his uniqueness
is that you dont just listen to
Neil Young, you get into Neil
Young. His albums, while
immediately worth the
investment, require at least three
plays to get into, according to
one afficionado, and are then a
rich source of replays. Indeed I
never met a man who was tired
of Young, his records can be
listened to and appreciated

1,.
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L i

v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.y.y.>>X'
Neil Y o ung s h igh
nasal twang is
unmistakable and is
perfect for his material
which strains )yith quiet
urgency or comforts with
vo ice-cracking
melancholy.
y.Yv/.v.v.v.%v.v,v.v.
anew, again and again.
YOUNG HAS THREE solo
albums on the market in
addition to the old Springfield
albums and DejaVu. His first was
simply Neil Young and the
cover, a stylized portrait of
Young, mirrors the towers of a
city against a mountainous
wilderness. That cover captures
the sources of his music. As he
says in Last Trip To Tulsa: I
used to be a folk singer, keeping
managers alive, when you saw
me on the corner and told me I
was jive. So I unlocked your
mind you know to see what I
could see. If you guarantee the
postage, Ill mail you back the
key.
Young wears plaid woolen
shirts and levis and feels country
and in many of his songs he uses
the country medium to relay his
message. But, as he says in the
song, his subject is more than
country it goes to the mind and
the heart. Through this
combination of subject and
medium he is able to employ the
agonizing sweetness of country
music at its best without its
consequent cominess. Helpless is
a perfect example. The two best
songs on his first album (there
are no bad songs on any of his
albums) are, The Loner, which
was featured in the Strawberry
Statement and the
aforementioned Last Trip To
Tulsa. The two songs display the
variety of approaches he uses.
The Loner is heavy rock with
Young driving on the guitar.
Last Trip To Tulsa is folk with
Young accompanying himself on
acpustic guitar in his distinctive
hammer-on style.
Where in the Loner he
describes his subject as
counterpoint to the raunchy

music, on Tulsa Young uses his
high imploring voice
hesitatingly, slowly, building to
a climax as if the listener was
forcing his tale of cynicism and
bitterness out of him.
Youngs second album was
Everybody Knows This Is
Nowhere with his band Crazy
Horse. This album was more in
the rock mainstream as he used
amplified instruments
throughout. On Nowhere,
Youngs enigmatic lyrics placed
a new focus on himself and
events as he experienced them.
Round & Round is an exquisite
little sad song of hope (it wont
be long) that is a favorite of
many and sure to get anyone
started down the road towards
helpless. Down by the River, one
of his best known songs, takes a
simple lyric (Down by the river I
shot my baby) and gives it
meaning with a nine minute,
unhurried guitar exploration of
the drama in those lines. The
bass runs and the background
chording become almost
hypnotic as Young musically
moves from statement of fact to
understanding to lament that he
shot his baby.
Running Dry is the most
interesting song Young has
written. It features a
schizophrenic violin that can
never decide if it is gypsy or
country, that pierces and haunts
and cries while Young entreats,
Oh please help me, oh please
help me ...
Youngs latest album is After
the Goldrush. For the most part
this album is musically tighter


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than the first two and foregoes
long compositions. The longest
is Southern Man, a wailing plea
to the Southern Man to use his
head and remember what his
goodbook said. It is a powerful
song, one youd never hear on
the radio, that doesnt condem
but expects. The finest cut on
the album is the title song,
which again is reinforced by
Youngs unique nasality and
which features a beautiful
French horn. The song wonders

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1971
1
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about nature after the global
goldrush.
With sidemen on the three
albums like Jack Nitzsche, Merry
Clayton, Greg Reeves and Steven
Stills something is bound to
sound good. Something does.
But more importantly something
feels good too. Young has the
talent to make us feel deeply
about the right things, be it
humanity, nostalgia, Ohio,
nature or life in the city and the
country and in our heads.



Thursday, October 1, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

PUBLIX MANAGER: Maam, if you could change
just one thing about
PUBLIX here in Gainesville,
what would you do?
shopper: LOWER PRICES!
PUBLIX MANAGER: LOWER PRICES?
\
shopper: LOWER PRICES!
This isnt an imaginary conversation. Were always asking shoppers how
they feel about us. You probably feel the same way as most people. You want
our quality merchandise, you want our attractive supermarkets, you
want S&H Green Stamps .. and you want lower prices, too.
Now, thats just what weve done!
We reviewed our pricing procedures, fed all the information into a
computer, and now were using our all-new pricing structure right here
in Gainesville.
Naturally certain things had to change before we could take this
revolutionary step. Heres what they are:
Weve cut out limited specials with their restrictions of time, quantity and
other purchases. Our new thrifty prices are in effect on every item,
every day.
In addition to everyday low thrifty pricing, whenever our buyers can make
extraordinary savings well pass those savings on to you as Bonus Buys.
No more 2 for or "3 for pricing. Every item is marked with its own
thrifty single unit price. You know exactly what youll pay for everything
you buy. No limits, either.
S&H Green Stamps that are really a bonus. Our way of saying thanks"
for letting us serve you. None of the so-called discounters offer
low prices PLUS trading stamps. PUBLIX does.
Youll still find the greatest selection of all the name brands you want in
| J attractive, comfortable surroundings. Youll still find ALL our
S happy differences.
And now the newest happy difference. New thrifty prices on the
mmm finest products ... every day!
:%/_
Cmon in today and save on lower prices at PUBLIX ... where shopping
' j S a pleasure.
ivfv ;w
sS! T)TTRT TV
II v7r.l I I I JL .WHERE SHOPPING IS A PLEASURE.
X IXLiiyV
' >4,

Page 15



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

*S*:*:*:*:*:^
FOR SALE
Custom lightweight honda three
wheeler. Guaranteed perfect. SI2OO.
372- after spm. (A-7t-4-p)
Why buy used junk? We sell new for
less. All metal, in black or gray. 2
drawer file cabinet NOW $19.95, 4
drawer file cabinet NOW $32.50. JR
Office Furniture Co., 620 S. Main
St., phone 376-1146. (A-10t-63-c)
Portable typewriter owners. We will
clean, adjust, lubricate & install new
ribbon on your machine for only
$14.50 and guarantee our work. This
month only a savings of over SIO.OO.
Dont miss out. JR Office Furniture
Co. 620 S. Main St., phone
376-1146. (A-10t-63-c)
Walnut finished study desk with 2
drawers, modern styling. While they
last ONLY $29.50. Why buy used
junk? We sell new for less. JR Office
Furniture Co., 620 S. Main St.,
phone 376-1146. (a-10t-63-c)
Antiques trash & treasure"
Melrose, Fla. on hwy 26, 20 min
driver. Mon-Wed call 475-4931,
Thur-Sat 10-5. Open Sun 1-4. Kitty
& Terry Bowman. (A-10t-64-p)
Bel air stereo tape deck (subsid. of
R.C.A.). Plays on A.C., car or batt.,
including 5 tapes. Only S6O.
373- or 373-1908. (A-st-3-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space, and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't Use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -3.00 pjn. 2 days prior to staffing day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* W M -r,
I l| 1| p| aanoPDOD 5
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FOR SALE
1967 Yamaha 180 CC, very good
shape. 2 helmets, plus gloves. Call
372-7475 between 7-9 PM. (A-st-5-p)
FOR SALE: Honda 50 1970 model,
400 miles, virtually brand new. 125.
376-5212 ext. 18 (anderson) if no
answer leave message w switchboard
to return call. (A-st-5-p)
1967 Harley Davidson Sprint in
excellent cond. Accessories incl.,
set-up for street or trail. Asking
$450. 417V2 S.W. 2nd St., 376-9538.
(A-st-6-p)
Triumph Superbike *6so.
Completely custom, 1 year old
Cerianls, all aluminum, chrome,
super clean & fast. Must sell, SI2OO.
378-7872 at 6pm. (A-st-6-p)
Bell & Howell 240 16mm movie
camera with 20mm lens & carrying
case. Perfect for news & sports work.
$85.00, call 378-1128, keep trying.
(A-st-6-p)
Harley-Davidson 1970 Rapido 125 cc
duel sprokets for street or wood,
only 1300 miles, luggage rack. $425.
376-5531 evenings. (A-st-6-p)
FOR SALE: 67 Honda 90 scrambler.
Runs great, fine cond. Graduating,
call 378-5766. 1220 NW 11th Ave.
$225, or best offer, helmet Included.
(A-st-6-p)

Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 1,1970

FOR SALE
Dunlop tennis balls 1.50 per can.
Frlsbee headquarters: Master, Pro,
Moonlighter, Regular-all at low
prices. B & B SPORTS CENTER
5320 NW 13th 5t.,378-1461
(A-4t-6-p)
Honda 450 1967 $450. 1621 SE 23
PI. (A-st-8-p)
1964 Karmen Ghia New paint, tires
16,000 miles SBOO or best offer
378-4750 after spm: Sewing Machine
with accessories S6O excell. cond.
(A-st-7-p)
Honda 100 Road Scrambler new;
only 20 miles of use. Helmet
Included. $450 invested; must sell for
$395. Call 392-8016 after 4:00 pm.
(A-3t-7-p)
Component Stereo System, 77"
Walnut Cabinet, Elco Amp & Tuner,
AR turntable, EV 12 speakers, A-l
condition, SSOO. 373-3890.
(A-3t-8-p)
Open face tape deck, AMP. with
Am.Frn receiver with speakers all
Panasonic. Call 376-9009 between
5-6:45 S2OO. (A-4t-8-p)
SCUBA equipt tank, pack, belt,
weights, regulator, snorkel, mask, fins
$95 or In parts call 372-1827 after 6
PM married student. (A-3t-8-p)
Beautiful 6 month old mikado 60
watt Am-Fm tuner-amplifier. Walnut
casing. $l5O call Glenn 372-5942.
(A-4t-7-p)
Stereo Tape Recorder Akal
XIBOOSD, 6 watt per chan records
reels or 8 track cartridges. S3OO.
373-3890. (A-3t-8-p)
DROPPING OUTI Giant liquidation!
Dishes, pots, novels, etc. Call Larry at
372-7240. (710 S.W. 10 st.) Help the
poor. Sob. (A-2t-8-p)

FEATURE AT...2:254:50 7:15 9:50
loday is Harolds birthday This is his present
IHE BCTS IN THE B4ND b
j 1 mio< 1 %
IH MARVIN CUNT EASTWOOD JEAN SBERG
BMNMJRWAGON m
FEATURE AT
N 1:51 4:20 6:55 9:30
Todays \
more for your money meal I
at mom*isons
CRFETERIR I
Thursday's Feature! I
I PORK CUTLET PARMESAM I
WITH A A A 1
§ I SPAGHETTI TT TrC I p
s T l
I i I FRIDAYS FEATURE I S I
& I Morrinn's famous A A I ?
£ I ROAST TURKEY o/lI 3
I WITH I
! MASHED POTATOES,
J DRESSING, GRAVY,
|_AND CRANBERRY SAUCE
LUNCH: 11 til 2 -SUPPER: 4:30 til 8 -FREE PARKING
moisons
CRFETERIR ... .. beyond comparison! |
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

FOR sale:
IF carpets look dull and drear,
remove the spots as they appear with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-165-lt-c)
German shepherd pups: 8 weeks old,
AKC registered. Daml is
exceptionally good-tempered. Males
& females available. 466-3538
anytime. (A-st-8-p)
VESPA *63. Excellent mech.
condition. Needs some body work.
SBS Spare tire Included. Call Phil
anytime at 373-1162. (A-st-9-p)
Flamenco guitar, fernandez (madrid)
serious inquiries-in search of Martin
or Vega 12. Chuck Tasca 378-5624.
(A-st-9-p)
Spots before your on your new
carpet remove them with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co. (A-tfc)
El CO 3707 Solid state stereo amp 70
watts IHF $99.50. FULL SET OF
Wilson golf clubs. $35.00 378-8855.
(A-2t-9-p)
Roberts 770 x tape recorder $250,
originally $360, being drafted,
376-0936. (A-2t-9-p)
1970 KAWASAKI 350. Street
scrambler. 3 months old. 1900 miles,
mechanically perfect. $725 or best
offer. Call Steve 378-9270. (A-3t-9-p)
Stereo components! This week at
ALTMAN STEREO a $540 stereo
component system may be yours for
only $399.95. You must hear It to
believe it I Features Sansul 100 watt
Am-Fm stereo receiver, 2 12-inch
3-way speaker systems and Garrard
record changer complete. 807 W.
University Ave. 376-9583. 10 AM to
9 PM. (A-2t-9-p)

.V.V.V.V.V.V*
for sale
1967 Honda 305 cc Superhawk.
Excellent condition. 4255, call Dick
at 376-8194. (A-3t-9-p)
FOR RENT
Need a roommate or others for your
apartment? Come to the Gator and
Housing Placement Center and we
will locate you. Run by students who
want to help. 373-2688 1105 W.
Univ. Ave., Rm. no. 2. (B-4t-8-p)
Efficiency A/C Immediate occupancy
378-7928 anytime. (B-2t-9-p)
WANTED
Need used bicycle. Good condition.
Call Sheryl at 378-5749 after 6 p.m.
4C-6t-5-p)
Want to hire neat and dependable
female to prepare noon and evening
meals for 2 working male students at
Village Park. Salary and meals
furnished. No strings, Just meals!
Additional housekeeping work
available if desired, for extra salary.
Call Asher, 373-1077 or 376-4417.
(C-st-8-p)
Help I need 1 or 2 roommates for 2
bedroom place very close to campus
$123 for fall quarter for 2, $165 for
1. 1105 NW 3rd Ave., Apt. I Please
leave a note. (C-2t-8-p)
SAN FRANCISCO Riders wanted.
Leave wk-ed of Oct. 3 454-1577 or
454-1594. (C-3t-8-p)
Male roommate, 3 blocks from
campus, alrcondltioned, own
bedroom, brand new, $75 a month +
V 2 util., Call Tim at 376-5081.
(C-4t-8-p)
1 bedrm apt for 2nd & 3rd quarters
call 373-3656 or 378-6305.
(C-2t-9-p)
HELP* WANTED
Listeners wanted: will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Linda Bishop
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. for
appointment. 392-2049. (E-10t-4-p)
Cocktail waitress wanted: full or part
time, no experience necessary. Will
train. Must be 21. Call after 5,
376-9175, ask for Mr. Thomas. Dubs
Steer Room, 4560 NW 13th St.
(E-30t-4-p)
WANTEDsTRANSMITTER
OPERATORS FOR WRUF AM AND
FM. MUST HAVE Ist PHONE
LICENSE. CALL WRUF STUDIOS
AND ASK FOR ED SLIMAK
392-0771. (E-10t-7-p)
Parents not giving you enough cash?
Make a little on the side? Sell the
SEMINOLE. Commission. Call Janet
at 373-3817 evenings. (E-4t-7-p)
Union film manager needed. If you
are a student, you can be taking only
6 hrs. Must be able to work all 3 ngts.
of weekend and others call 392-1655.
(E-3t-7-p)
Need someone to do pants alterations
for a store 5-10 pairs a day 373-2800.
(E-st-9-p)
No house to house. Part or full time.
Weekly Income S4O 4 up. Snowing
make up techniques. Vivlane
Woodard Cosmetics. Call Cindy
378-9879. (E-st-9-p)
AUTOS
1967 Ford Econoline supervan.
Excellent eond., paneling, carpets,
etc. SI2OO or best offer, call Steve.
392-7248. (G-4t-6-p)
1969 Flat Coupe free-flow exhaust.
Radlals. SI4OO. 1963 Buick special.
Air, power brakes, steering. $520.
Call 378-8278 after 5:30 (G-st-7-p)
THE A
GRADUATE
Starring Dustin Hoffman
and Katherine Ross
Sunday, Oct. 4 2:00, 4:30,
7:00. 9:30
Monday & Tuesday 5:30,
8:00, 10:30
buy your advance tickets
tomorrow from 12:30-4:30 at
the 2nd floor box office
50<



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
1963 Jacquar XKE Type E. Top
mechanical condition. 50,000 mile*.
1 700 or best offer. Call Steve
anytime 378-4758. (G-st-8-p)
. 69 XKE Jaguar, low mileage,
warranty, factory AC, excellent
condition. Call 376-3196 after 6:00
pm. (G-st-8-p)
TR4A IRS 1966 torn top, shabby
Interior, good tonneau cover, very
good mechanically. Ron at 392-1372
daytime or 372-6589 evenings &
weekend. (G-3t-8-p)
69 307 Chevy Nova, red black
interior, 1400 miles, excellent
condition, S2OOO. Call 378-5154 or
378-0452. (G-st-6-p)
Need a car? I need bread. 62 Ford
rebuilt at, R & H, 4 door, VB, new
tire and battery, good reliable
transport, needs tag, S3OO. Call
378-7989. (G-st-6-p)
65 Dodge Dart-white, standard shift,
radio, heater, good tires, plates, great
shape. $650. call 372-6034.
(G-3r-9-p)
1962 AUSTIN HEALEY 3000 good
condition, runs well, circumstances
force sale. $650. Call 378-7344 after
SPM. (G-4t-9-p)
*69 Roadrunner air, tape, auto trans.,
new poly tires, excellent condition,
only 20,000 miles, $2500 372-7559.
(G-3t-9-p)
Popular, experimental, classic films.
Come help us run 8i choose the
Union films. Anyone Interested come
to the Union lounges on Oct. I at
4:00. (J-3t-4-p)
HELP. S7O worth of checks
destroyed In washing machine. If you
bought pottery on 23 or 24th &
payed by check please call 372-5095,
Doug Dewey. (J-st-8-p)
HI kid! Friends? Yesl Thanks for the
roses. But who do I thank? Call me?
376-7852. (J-2t-8-p)
VOLUNTEERS ARE
DESPERATELY NEEDED TO HELP
THE ENVIRONMENTAL CAUSE.
We especially need people interested
In WRITING, PHOTOGRAPHY,
SEWING, ART WORK, CLIPPING 8.
TYPING. If you wont help, who
will? Please call 392-1635 or
392-7426, leave your name and
number for Hal A I will call you
back. (J-2t-8-p)
When nothing works LEATHER
WORKS! For custom pants, Jackets,
sandal!, moccasslns, bags, belts. 16
NW 13th St. Home Made Goodness
and Mercy. (J-10t-63-p)
Free time Is a drag, give It to us. call
Jan about selling the *7l SEMINOLE,
commission basis. 373-3817.
(J-4t-7-p)
Coeds Facial Hair removed foreve*
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrologlst 102 NW
2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
Pray for peace and grace and
spiritual food, for wisdom and
guidance, for all these are good, but
dont forget the potatoes. New
Delhi Delicatessen 706 W. Unlv.
(J-lt-9-p)
The outdoor portrait man is backii
Yes. Now you can have beautiful
color outdoor portraits of yourself
lust like the girls In Jennings,
Rawlings, Graham, Towns, The D G
A D pi Housesdld last spring. 12
different shots of you are taken.
Prls are still (color) 4x1055.00,
5 x 753.00, 4x5-82.00, 6
wallets-$4.00. I did over 200
outdoor portraits of UF coeds last
spring & summer. The current Miss
University of Florida selected me to
photograph her. I will be back In
wool next quarter so do It NOWI
r n>ore info or appointment call
Ronnie Kora 376-6042. (J-lt-9-p)
I.W. I Jth ft.
N-Us CO-HIT
Htt WE GO AROUND MULBERRY BUSH
_ _'* -*TTCO INO ONI UNOan II ADMITTro
WOOg/toA I RATED X
-l-riir lv M,c( TINT*
TYf* ,r VOll AWA.vt iirom It.

USOMA ~T
Rockwell Welsh: Did you know the
Miami Herald's special student offer
Is still available? Call 378-2167 to
start delivery tomorrow. (J-3t-9-p)
FLORIDA SWIMMERS we found
our can goods Monday thanks a lot
nice Jobl Love Cathy and Pam.
(J-2t-9-p)
Sweet Annette, many things have
happened since I last saw you I am
lonely and just Thought I would say
hello. Hello. Affectionately, Jack.
(J-lt-9-p)
Pray for peace and grace and spiritual
food, for wisdom and guidance, for
all these are good, but don't forget
the potatoes. New Delhi
Delicatessen 706 W. Unlv. (J-lt-9-p)
FREE KITTENS, Four 6 wk. old
kittens (Grey and Grey Striped,
long-haired) Call 376-9671 or come
to Gatortown 153. (J-3t-9-p)
PLAN a picnlcl pick up all you need
from KEN'S BAKERY 15 SW 2nd.
st. down the street from Penny's.
Roast beef on large bun 65 cents,
Ham 60 cents, Hot dog 20 cents, soft
drinks 15 cents Danish pastry 6
cents, etc. (J-lt-9-p)
Looking for personalized service and
the best values In stereo components?
Student owned and operated
ALTMAN STEREO has both. 807 W.
University Ave. (J-7t-9-p)
LOST & FOUND
FOUND: Female Calico cat with
white collar. Call 376-8608.
(L-3t-7-nc)
I'M BLIND LOST: gold rim
prescription sunglasses In black case,
please call Roger, 378-9266.
(L-St-7-p)
FOUND: Ladles watch found at
campus shop & book store at the
Hub can be claimed at the hub.
(L-3t-7-nc)
FOUND: Passport and ID's at the
bub campus shop & book store can
be picked up at the hub. (L-3t-7-Nc>
FOUND: between A.G.R. & Norman
Hall, 14 keys. Call 466-3244.
(L-3t-8-NC)
LOST: Ladies Seiko Wrist Watch
Sept. 19 Reitz Union Reward Ph.
378-9104. (L-3t-8-p)
LOST: Prescription sunglasses, black,
mans In brown case, lost In front of
Peabody Hall last Friday PM Reward
Call Jim 373-2771. (L-2t-9-p)
Lost bag with film and camera
equlpmet in engineering parking lot
call Walter Power 392-0904 Reward.
(L-3t-9-p)

l44Ss5l
ART THfATMi V. jf|
Hks Fou Must Be 18 Years of
K7| \A/ Age to Enter & Prove it! \A/iyT]

Thursday, October 1,1970. The Florida Alligator,

I::;:::::::::::::::;:;:;:::::::::::;:;:::::::::::;:;:::;:;:;:;::::::::::::::
jSF!HT7l^is?jai
Kanapaha pre-school center, ages 3-5,
Mon-Frl. 715-545. Phone 378-9830.
Archer Road, hot lunch, snacks,
reasonable rates. (M-lot-3-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Nowl Bank Amertcard &
Master Charge.
HORSES BOARDED Alachua
County's finest featuring complete
horse care stalls pasture trails ring &
tack room near Unlv. Ph. 373-1059.
(M-st-8-p)
CARS WASHED AND WAXED AT
YOUR HOME. 10.00. CALL
372-2427 EVENINGS. (M-st-8-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480.
STEVE CARES about your HONDA
See him at the CYCLE WORKS.
1220 S. Main St. Open 3 until 8 PM.
(M-3t-9-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
373-1984, 9-5. (M-10t-9-p)
Stereo tape club forming! Get with
other students to Increase your stereo
tape library 8-track, reei-to-reel or
cassette at rock bottom cost. Call
Jay, 376-9583, between 5 and 9 PM
for details. (M-st-9-p)
Flower Arranging Lessons
Instructor: Joel Buchanan
$7.50 for 8 lessons starting
Oct. 1 till Nov. 19 room 118,
Union 7:00 pm register at the
first lesson or in room 310,
Union
Sponsored by the JWR Union

Page 17

Advertise: Its Good Business
2l2SsSlSfii2Mii2£^^^£!i£Sli£sS££i£SS2SSSS££S2£2£S
REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM
<*
V *- >- i 1
/ / / y
.|f W'ill Fn* & Sat, Oct 2&3 50 cents
| HS 5:30,8:00,10:30 pm
Advance tickets on sale. 2nd floor box office every Fri from
12:30-4:30 pm for all weekend film showings.
sponsored by JWRU
SPECIAL RATES FOR FLORIDA RESIDENTS
j|B|r On The World Famous
H|jf£ GLASS BOTTOM BOATS at
BEjU*v'r£toriiigs
mnbjf fj
KaySiJjryM 1 LAST DAY 1 :
"Getting Straight"
j /mm From :
; the man who
; gave you AIRPORT. ;
Arthur Hailey unlocks
J all the doors in his ;
sensation-filled best
LM^j
NOW # *j
Show J Patton is Rough!
Times Patton is Tough!
Patton is /k \
AMERICA'S jfS Slkwlws*.!
2 ; Qg
T ~7;is(R(jH(lsarrr :
CttWITKIUI ivy-*-1
i v:.-.. d..^srn
liftl:ll>M \
| LAST DAY | 2
?!S£ TOMORROW j "Loving Feeling" |
2 THE MOST SAVAGE!
fiun in histmivi
9:30
order JHH;
was j|^Hg|H;
good
soldiers
follow
orders.
j Joseph lisS~
: SOLDER BLUE HH :
sk a StOHM,
: CANDICE BERGEN PETER STRAUSS :




Page 18

I, The RoHda Aliyator, Thursday, Octofaar 1,1970

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Thursday, October 1, 1970, The Florida Alligator

Page 19



The
Florida
Alligator

Schnebly Number 2, Doesnt Mind

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Alligator Sports Writer
Watching John Schnebly in
practice, one would think he is
the number one quarterback in
the nation, instead of the
number two signal caller on the
UF team.
But he doesnt think too
much about being number two
anymore after two years behind
John Reaves.
When we were freshmen, we
were supposed to be equal.
Reaves would play a half, and
then I would finish the game, or
vice versa, Schnebly said after
Wednesdays practice. But
towards the end of the year, the
coaches were leaning towards
John more than me, although I
hardly blame them.
SCHNEBLY, a teammate of
Tommy Durrance at Daytona
Mainland High School,
completed six passes in eight
attempts last year subbing for
Reaves in the late stages of a big
win or a big loss.
It is some consolation to me
that I am back-up to the nations
top quarterback, Schnebly said.
When not playing or
practicing each afternoon,
Schnebly goes home, not to Yon
Hall where the team lives, but
home to his bride of three
months.
Now that I am married, I
have to think towards my future
more than I did before, he said.
THOSE PLANS do not
include pro football.
The way I figure it, if you
cant play in college, you cant
{day in the professionals.
And nowadays, the scouts
for the teams are looking for the
big quarterbacks, those over
6-foot and weighing over 200
pounds, Schnebly said.
Those figures are a bit over
the juniors head as he weighs in
at 177 and stands 5-foot 10
inches.
Also in the plans for Schnebly
Yoga iossoas
Instructor: Steve Sheridan
$15.00 for six VA hour sessions
starting Oct. 6 til Nov. 10. Call
372-7942 after 6 p.m. and before
October 2 for information.
\
Sponsored by the JWR Union
v
x
% g
Patronize I
§ I
Gator §
| Advertise* |

GATOR SPORTS

include getting back to his
studies this quarter, since he will
not be playing much this year
except to hold extra points and
field goals for Richard Franco.
HUNTING AND fishing were
on the Schnebly activity list for

jgtfSwf tiraS vjfijjSauHQnL Bfc Bfc*3
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JOHN SCHNEBLY (NO. 9) IN GEORGIA GAME
.... back-up quarterback sees action as holder on place kicks

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FOR THE
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WILL BE TAKEN OCTOBER 6-23 IN ROOM 346 OF THE
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APPOINTMENTS CAN BE MADE AT THE SERVICE BOOTH
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hobbies until he married.
Now, I dont go hunting as
much as I used to because I want
to be with my wife as much as I
can.
She doesnt stop me from
going hunting, but she doesnt

Page 20

like for me to go out, he said.
JOHN SCHNEBLY thinks of
being the number two
quarterback once in a while,
something not every quarterback
with his creditials can do.
But not every back-up
quarterback has the composure
John Schnebly has.
PRACTICE NOTES The
UF worked hard today in
preparation for Saturdays game

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Sports Editor

l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 1,1970

with North Carolina State at
Florida Field.
I think we had two good
workouts in a row this week,
Coach Doug Dickey said.
The attitude on the field
was good and will get better by
the end of the week, Dickey
continued.
Andy Cheney, sidelined since
the Miami game last year, was
running at full speed and will see
action Saturday.



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Thuryfry. October 1.1970. Th Florida AHigrtor,

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Aligrtor, Thursday, October 1,1970

2 Gators Dont Pay Golf Green Fees

By Chuck Keller
Alligator Sports Writer
An orange and blue sign reads This is Gator Country on the
door entering the pro shop of the UF Golf Club.
It couldnt be closer to the truth, because the golf course is a
frequent playground for two live gators not the type gator
that enrolls for 11 hours and swears by the orange and blue.
Dick Kip, manager of the pro shop, said the two alligators
dont pay green fees and They cant read the no trespassing
signs, either.
The two gators are known to visit the large pond that hugs
the eighth hole on the UF course. They can be found sunning
out there quite often, said Coach Buster Bishop, UF club pro
and golf coach, who has viewed them crossing the seventh
fairway to reach the small pond behind the seventh green.
Afternoon visits seem to please the gators according to most
observations, however its not definitely known where the UF
mascots call home.
I imagine they come from Lake Alice, said Kip, who
conceded that the lake is a good gator walk or crawl away from
the course. But Kip said the nearby woods fostered wet areas
that could thrill the hide of any alligator.

Tate Resigns Miami Post
In Final Year Os Contract

By Alligator Services
Charlie Tate, in the final
year of a seven-year contract,
resigned Wednesday as head
football coach and athletic
director of the University of
Miami.
Tates resignation was
announced by University
President Henry King Stanford
who said it came as a complete
shock and surprise to me.
STANFORD GAVE no reason
for the sudden decision of Tate,
saying only that Tate told him
he was resigning in the best
interests of the university, the
coaches, the recruiting program
and everyone concerned.
Stanford said he had named
long-time Miami assistant Walter
Kichefski to replace Tate as

FOR THE FIRST
TIME...
SEE
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BINOCULARS
FROM $1995

coach and athletic director, at
least through the end of this
season.
Tate was nowhere to be found
following Stanfords hastily
assembled mid-afternoon news
conference at the universitys
faculty club.
THE RESIGNATION came
two days before Miami, with a
1-1 record, takes on Maryland in
the Orange Bowl Friday night.
The Hurricanes opened the
season with a ragged 36-14,
victory over outmanned William
and Mary, then lost to Georgia
Tech 31-21, in Atlanta last
Saturday.
There was some talk of
dissension among the players
during spring training, based
largely on articles in the
universitys student newspaper.

EAT FREE CATFISH TOO

Jl A
a
/ imLa

But interviews with players then
and this fall seemed to dispel
any indication of dissension.
Kickefski, in accepting Tates
position, said, The attitude of
the players so far this fall has
been better than it has been the
past three years. With this
continued enthusiasm I am
certain our squad will mature
and become a fine football
team.
STANFORD told newsmen he
had just accepted reluctantly
Charlie Tates resignation as
head football coach and athletic
director of the University of
Miami. The resignation will take
place immediately.
A university spokesman said
Tate had seen the president
Tuesday night about resigning,
and that Stanford asked him to
think overnight on the decision.

Bishop mentioned of a possible home in an adjoining
maintenance area.
Its hard to tell if the gators are the same ones that visit each
time, said Kip.
Bishop thinks the gators, that are in the three and half foot
range, are two of the same. Os course, Bishop added. Im
not going too close to check.
The gators so far have presented no problem, according to
Kip and Bishop. People will come in once in a while and say
they saw the alligators, said Kip. Some think its great, for all
is not lost (positive sign for ecology).
Kip suggested the big attraction for the gators are the
abundant catfish in the main pond. They probably come over
for a different diet, he said.
While the two gators are usually more content to prey upon
the catfish, one UF student knows of a substitute diet.
Mike Michel, 4AS, left a tee shot in water short of a green in
a golf round last spring. When he went to take his next shot, he
found a three-foot gator holding his ball in its jaws. The gator
then slid back into the pond, ball and all.
I think Im going to carry a gun in my golf bag next time,
said Michel after the incident. I also may try to get a refund on
my golf ball from the university.

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1971
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'BamaOle Miss Top Weekend Slate

T - f- *
The Ole Miss-Alabama
football game .gets nationwide,
prime-time exposure again
Saturday night, but dont tune
in thinking youre going to get a
replay of last years spectacular.
Not that it shouldnt be a
good game. The Bth-ranked
Rebels are only four point
favorites over the 19th-ranked
Crimson Tide for this meeting at
Jackson, Miss., and with Archie
Manning on hand there should
be some fireworks.
But last years Ole
Miss-Alabama game was
something special. The Tide,
scoring last in a see-saw battle,
won it 33-32 despite a 540-yard,
five-touch-down performance by

Rugby Wants New Recruits

By FRED JOY
Alligator Writer
The Rugby Club, 7-7-1 last
year, is starting its second year
at UF and is hoping to recruit
players and fans from the ranks
of the devout football fans.
LAST FALL there was a total
of 15 players to initially come
out for the sport. In its first
week of practice this year, the
Rugby Club attracted about 40
players.
Player-coach Phil Whyatt, an
Australian-born graduate student
in pharmacology and founder of
the Rugby Club, said there is
little trouble in teaching the
game to those who have never
played it.
In a 10-page booklet given to
each new player, Coach Whyatt
explains his feeling for rugby:
In many ways rugby is the
most elemental game of all. Each
side attempts to ground the ball
beyond their opponents goal
line. Their opponents try to stop
them by tackling the man who
has the ball.
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Mr. Manning. *
Although both teams have
been emphasizing offense this
fall Alabama averaging 39.3
ppg in a 2-1 start and Ole Miss
33.5 ppg while going 2-0 it
simply doesnt figure that either
could score five touchdowns
Saturday night and lose. The
llth-ranked Auburn Tigers,
solid contenders for at least a
share of this years Southeastern
Conference title after beating
defending champion Tennessee,
36-23, last week visit the
Kentucky Wildcats, an
upset-minded team Ole Miss
barely beat, 20-17.
The only other
intra-conference game on this
weeks slate is also at Jackson,
Miss., where Mississippi State,

- B ~ Bra
A MAN'S GAME
... rugby begins Oct. 10
simpler, Whyatt maintains,
There is no pussyfooting about,
as .in soccer, no
World-War-111-plus World-War-111-pluscommittee-organization,
committee-organization, World-War-111-pluscommittee-organization, as in
American football, no
bludgeoning your way to
victory, as in field hockey,
lacrosse, or hurling.
The rugby ball, which can be
best described as a pregnant
football, may be carried,
kicked, or passed by the players.

% a ;$
I IX^^PIFIOR 1 dT"S I
r*/
20-6 upset winner over
Vanderbilt, takes on the Georgia
Bulldogs in the day half of a
twin bill that features Ole
Miss-Alabama.
The other SEC teams all play
outside the conference with
Florida hosting North Carolina

Fifteen players constitute a team
and no pads are worn. Unlike
football, there is no blocking or
obstructing and no substitution,
even if a player is injured.
Coach Whyatt uses the first
practices to rid his players of
bad habits they have picked
up from football. Frequently
during scrimmages the words
Dont tuck that bloody ball!
come from Whyatt in a distinct
Australian accent.
The fact all players on the
squad can handle the ball makes
the game more of a team sport.
There are no specialized
positions which obtain a
super-star status.
The season officially opens on
October 10 in a home game with
the Nassau Rugby Club at
Fleming Field, however, there
will be an intra squad game on
the ROTC field immediately
following the Oct. 10 freshman
football game.
Practices are Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 5:00 p.m. and
Sundays at 4:00 p.m. on
Fleming Field. There are still
openings for tryouts.

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State, Louisiana State hosting
Baylor, Tennessee hosting North
Carolina.
Among the independents:
16th-ranked Georgia Tech hosts
Clemson, Miami Fla. hosts
Maryland in a Friday night
game. Tulane is at Cincinnati
also on Friday night, Southern
Mississippi hosts Richmond and
Tampa is at Youngstown.
Auburn, paced by quarterback
Pat Sullivan in a 2-0 start, is a
solid 10 point favorite over
Kentucky. Georgia is favored by
10, Florida by 16, Tennessee by
19, Georgia Tech by 13, and
Miami by 15. Vanderbilt is a 4
point underdog and LSU is such
a heavy favorite that no odds
have been given.

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Thursday, October 1,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Southeast footnotes:
Although the season is' only
three weeks old, there remain
only three unbeaten major
college teams in the deep South
- Georgia tech 3-0, Auburn and
Ole Miss...
Auburns Sullivan has gained
an average of 291 yards per
game while Floridas John
Reaves has averaged 236 and
Manning 198... Georgia Tech
sophomore Eddie McAshan is
tops among the independent
quarterbacks with a 216
average...
Georgia, 1-1, leads the
nations major colleges in pass
defense, having allowed an
average of only 40.5 yards per
game.

Page 23



Page 24

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, October 1, 1970

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