Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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WEEKEND SUNSHINE PH,LCOP6
Sharre Diefenbaut, a junior in pre-med, becomes a sun worshipper
on weekends. What do the rest of UF's other 20,042 students do?
Some of them are shown in weekend action on page 2.

Campus Unrest Unit Seeks Truce

By CARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Writer
Special Assistant to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
Rae 0. Weimer said Sunday that
though some colleges may be
responsible for student unrest,
this is not the case at UF.
Responding to the charge by
the President Nixons
Commission on Campus Unrest
that colleges themselves are
partially responsible for student
unrest, Weimer said I cant
believe that criticism can be
leveled at this campus.
THE REPORT, released
Saturday, asked for a national

CEH 'lmproved By Last Years Freshmen

By Alligator Services
v '*
Freshmen who dont like their
Comprehensive English (CEH)
courses this year cant put all the
blame on the faculty.
They will have to blame their
fellow students.
THAT IS because students
proposed major changes in the
English program last spring
changes which were adopted by
the faculty.
The changes were proposed
by the Freshman English
Advisory Committee.
Committee members met with
lJt. James Hodges, CEH
department chairman, weekly or
semi-weekly from Christmas
until May, discussing problems
in the department and working
on ways to improve the
curriculum.
v
In the spring, the committee
proposed a program changing
the required three quarter
general English program to one
in which freshmen would take a

cease-fire among students, police
and politicians, and urged the
President to lead the way.
The Commission denounced
violence saying, students who
bomb and bum are criminals.
The report went on to state
that police and National
Guardsmen who needlessly
shoot or assault students are
criminals.
ALL WHO APPLAUD these
criminal acts share in their evil.
We must declare a national
cease-fire.
The commission also called
upon the President to lead the
way in establishing this national
cease-fire. The report urged him

general English course the first
quarter and choose English
electives in subjects which
interested them the last two
quarters in order to fulfill the
requirements of the course.
THE COMMITTEE based
most of its proposals on a
questionaire given to about 75
per cent of the last
year.
From the questionaire, the
committee proposed not only
the basic curriculum changes,
but that the lectures be
abolished or changed, that only
six writing assignments be
required per quarter and that
standardized department testing
for progress tests and finals be
abolished.
The department had already,
done away with departmental
testing on an experimental basis
before the committee made its
proposal.
The purpose of the CEH
course hasnt changed, Hodges
said, Only the content has

PRESIDENTS COMMISSION

Grand Jury To Probe
Hanging In Jail Cell

By RON SACHS
Alligator Assignments Editor
A grand jury investigation has
been called into the death of an
Alachua County Jail prisoner on
the basis of evidence turned up
by The Alligator and preliminary
investigations by the state
attorney and Alachua County
sheriffs offices.
Circumstances of the death of
William Baugher, a 25-year-old
man being held on a charge of
possession of marijuana, will be
the subject of the grand jury
investigation. Baughers death
has been tentatively termed
suicide.
Reports from two prisoners
who were released last week
alleged Baugher was the subject
of several attacks by other

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 63, No. 6

to end the Indochina war, renew
the national commitment to full
social justice and to be aware of
increasing charges of repression.
We recommend that the
President seek to convince 4
public officials and protesters
alike that rhetoric is dangerous.
IN THE CURRENT political
campaign and throughout the
years ahead, the President
should insist that no one play
irresponsible politics with the
issue of "campus unrest.
The commission also
proposed:
Nixon call national
meetings designed to foster

changed. The purpose is still to
give students experience on an
advanced level in critical reading,
expository writing and
speaking.
. THE ENTIRE department is
pleased with the changes that
the committee proposed. Some
very creative things came out of
the committee, he said.
Committee members say they
are pleased with the changes in
the CEH department this fall.
The CEH program last year
wasnt a bad program. The
department had undergone
change last year and the program
was better than the year before.
But 1 think the new program is
better, Steve Strang, committee
member said.
THIS YEAR students who
like drama can take a drama
course the second or third
quarter and get a lot more out of
that course than they could out
of a general English course in

prisoners during his four-month
stay in jail.
THE TWO released prisoners
told Die Alligator last week that
Baugher had been attacked by
two other men who held a
razor blade at his neck.
Sheriffs Office Inspector Ron
Stanley told The Alligator that
razor blades are available to the
prisoners during the time they
are permitted to leave their cells
to shower and shave.
It would be very difficult to
count razor blades at the end of
every day, Stanley said.
Stanley did not recall
Baughers complaining about
attacks from other prisoners or
ever receiving word of such
attacks from other jail officials.
MARIE MORAN, a UF
freshman, was a close friend of
Baughers. During the time he

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

understanding among those who
are now divided;
the government should
offer more financial aid for
black colleges and universities
and formerly all white schools
should step up minority student
recruitment;
the government should
practice strict controls of the
transfer and possession of
explosive materials to meet the
increasing threat of arson and
bombing.
Among other proposals was
one that said police and
National Guardsmen should
carry rifles and shotguns where
there is sniping and should

which they have no interest, he
said.
The English department has
always been more responsive to
students than the other
comprehensive departments have
been, Bob Marsh, president of
Yu lee Area and committee
member said.
The faculty seemed to be in
complete agreement with the
students on the committee.
There was a good coordination
of effort which makes for a good
student-teacher relationship.
Because of this coordination, 1
think new approach will be
successful, Marsh said.
IT ISNT the changes per se
that committee members were
most pleased with, however.
They said they were more
pleased with the fact they had a
voice in determining their own
curriculum and method in which
the course is taught.
There have been numerous
other committees where
students did the talking, but no

was in jail, Miss Moran visited
him on several occasions.
On one of my visits, officials
told me that he did not want to
see anybody,** Miss Moran said.
I knew that couldnt be true
and 1 later found out that Bill
had bruises all over his face.
The explanation given Miss
Moran was that Baugher had
fallen out of bed.
Ronald Hinson, a county
jailer, told The Alligator he
found the hanging body of
Baugher with his feet flat on
the floor.
All evidence turned up in
subsequent investigations by the
sheriffs office and state
attorneys office has been kept
confidential. An autopsy report
on Baughers body has been
completed, those findings
(SEE 'JURY* PAGE 7)

Monday, September 28, 1970

receive more training to cope
with civil disturbances and
training in nonlethal weaponry.
dr'
College reform from
curriculum was urged as well as
reform in the rule-making
process. However, the report
pointed out that nothing should
be done to hamper freedom of
speech and the exchange of ideas
on the college campuses.
On one important issue, the
report stated: Universities
should make clear to students
what kind of conduct will not be
permitted and should waste no
time calling police when violence
erupts.

one listened to them,** Marsh
said.
But on this committee, they
listened to us. We found out that
heads of departments are not
gods, but just people. You can
talk to people, he said.
DR. HODGES was great to
work with. We could talk to him
and tell him anything we
thought was wrong with the
(SEE 'ELECTIVES' PAGE 10)
Inside
TheOatog P"
REG CROWDER, Alligator
staff writer, explores
problems faced by the
Kennedy Space Center 9
Campus Crier 12
I Classifieds 13
Editorials 8
Entertainment 16
Letters 9
Movies 9
Sports 18
Whats Happening 14



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 28,1970

Page 2

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UF WEEKEND:
Heaven On Earth

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||g2||Jt C few *


K--- m .p lamiV'iii 'initrr ~im

vi THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the-
Universify of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will pot be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next

Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy
* Sell Trade Repair.
* Reloading supplies. Custom
w reloading. Harry Beckwith, T
gun dealer, Micanopy.
* 466-3340.

- i' V -'*JII fr~~ ~ *'-
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m Kjjjwi Jr J
mksr *1 _____
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n 'kjp A,
gan ikl 111 MtohDf
A Concert of Electronic Music
Tuesday #### I
Series Admission Free:
lihan Mimaroglu Bowery Bum
Mel Powell Electronic Setting (1961)
Bulent Arel Music for a Sacred Service (1961)
Mario Davidovsky Study No. 2 (1962)
Karlheins Stockhausen Gesang der Junglinge (195 5 56)
Contrasts (1959)
Oskar Sala Five Improvisations on Magnetic Tape
M Morton Subotnick : } .^.TTTT.'T'f^ouch

You've trudged to your eight o'clock all five days of the week. You did
approximately eight and one half loads of laundry, and did not bleach the
colors. You cleaned your room. You studied faithfully (?) every night so
you were well-prepared in all your classes. The first week is over. How to
spend the weekend? Read a book you aren't assigned, ride your bike all
over Gainesville, join your friends for some fun and games and then
well, it's probably the best thing to do on any day reach out and touch
somebody's heart and mind.



mi
IT BE..
By BEVERLY CHEUVRONT
Alligator Writer
Almost cut my hair.
Happened just the other day.
It was getting kind of long;
I could have said it was in my
way.
- David Crosby
With unisex fashions, men
must also face a perplexing
decision between minis or maxis
haircuts, that is.
Hair-wise the UF campus
often looks like a scene from
Woodstock, but local barbers are
predicting a change.
Students are now wearing
their hair short on top and
longer and fuller on the sides,
following European fashions, a
Reitz Union barber reported.
Kind of shaggy, with four to
five inches on the side, was the
University Plaza Barber Shops
description of new styles.
Several other barbers agreed
that styles were getting shorter,
although they attributed it to
different reasons.
Windys Barber Shop
maintained that short hair is
more attractive since it has more
body and tends to curl less.
Imitation of TV actors hair
styles is causing the increase of
haircuts, according to Roffler
Sculpture-Kut.
Reds Barber Shop claimed
shorter styles are on the return
because mothers like them.
All agreed they were seeing
longer sideburns and more
mustaches and beards than ever
before.
At Mr. Rays Style and Barber
Shop shorter haircuts are
popular, but many are selecting
an alternative short-haired
wigs.
My best customers are
ROTC students and reservists,
Mr. Ray said.
At this rate, fashion analysts
may soon be reporting that
men's hairstyles fluctuate up and
down with conditions of the
national economy.
Warrants A Warrant
The U. S. Supreme Court has
held that a fire or health
inspector must get a search
warrant to enter a building
without consent.
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
SSO a month entitles
you to 5 solo hours
Additional hours v
that same month
only $8 per hour
t No duos
o No foos
t No mootings
For information call
CASSELS IN THE AIR
378-2646

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Photos By Ph it Cope

Zo, 1970, TIB n9W MH|9of,

/ 'Wt¥ Wt '^o
-'M .9 |(, W fOUIfe H
HjEgv §

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida

Bike Riders'Futures Bright,
Major Changes Planned

r aacMABL cmjm
project that rradii change the
entire mode of tnoportatioe at
UF.
The project ns imtiafiy
started by Dr. Seymour Block,
professor Os diminl
Dr. J. IL Watson, profearor of
ITS MAjSTgQAL if to make
use of bike nays (separate paths


i, jBKHL
TOM KENNEDY
MANPOWER VERSUS MACHINEPOWER
...UF students opt for the latter?

Cyclists Need License In City

Beware: A $4 fine can be
levied against those who ride
bicydes off campus without a
Gainesville bike license.
According to Lt.J.Dasonof
the Gainesville police
department, Its a moving
violation of city ordinance 1&
to ride a bicycle off campus
without a license. Anyone
caught doing so may be stopped,
warned and/or fined.
BICYCLE LICENSES CAN be
bought at the Gainesville Fire
Station, located at 427 South
Main Street, for one dollar. The
fire station sells these licenses
weekdays from 5-7 pm. and
Saturdays from 8 am. to 7 pm.
The station is dosed on
Sundays.
Bicydes must be brought in
when applying for a license.
For the dollar, a registration
dip, a license tag, which is

Yap Itfflm
sMh OetTS HI Not. 10. Ca
i iTrJ

lor the oae of bicycle riders
osdy) to redact the traffic and
pofataon problem hero at UF.*
In additinn to the ramps,
other things have been done to
encourage bicycle riding.
Through the efforts of the
Sera Ctab a city ordinance was
changed which prohibited
bicycle riding on the sidewalks.
Now, cyders are permitted to
ride on any sidewalk, except
those in the downtown shopping
centers. The pedestrian stffl has
the qght of way.
IN NEXT YEARS

usually placed behind the
bicycle seat and a registration
number, which is stamped into
the bicyde frame are given.
In this way, the police have a
record of the bicyde and there is

Swing around!
ft
te
* 1 t
Budget Rent a Gap /v
of Gainesville
376-1245
Free pickup and
delivery anywhere 1 '*i
in Alachua County I |
GAINESVILLE/JACKSONVILLEI ~Cfk
ONE NAY SPECIAL I / U\
I S ls FLAT RATE I
Includes gas a air conditioning! VI
9 3 HOURS, K)0 MIES I \
A
We Rent
Better Cars
For Less.

undergraduate catalog there wifi
be a small statrjaritf encouraging
indents to aro bicycles on
Hock, who is also the
i Jirnmin of the subcommittee
reputing university planning
and development, along with
Watson, president of the Siena
dub, and Herrick Smith,
professor of architecture,
proposed a plan for bike ways to
the university planning
committee.
A problem of funding exists.
Money is needed to pay the
students who, under the
direction and supervision of
Smith, would be drawing the
plans. Money would also be
needed to purchase more bike
racks to be put in key areas
around the campus.
THERE ARE NO plans now
befog drawn up. There are
presently no funds and no bice
ways. Planning has been
temporarily stopped until
October, in order to give
teachers time to get organized.
Block said, it is unfortunate
that the university cant put up
toe money.**
Student government has
toown approval of this project
and plans to raise money are
already being discussed.
IN ADDITION TO clearing up
the transportation and pollution
problems, Smith believes the
plan would humanize** the
campus. Through the use of bike
ways, getting to and from classes
would be faster.

some protection against its being
stolen.
Part of the dollar goes few the
planting of bike way signs
which are being distributed
around Gainesville.

Future plans for the project
pAA a transportation system
for commuters.

SECOND GENESIS
A COMPLETE BOUTIQUE
FOR GUYS AND CHICKS
Bolls Joans and Slacks
Leather Hats, Vests, Balts, Haadbands
Body Shirts, Hoadgoar, American Flag Ties
1228 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE
Rapps Delicatessen
1515 SW 13th Street
373-3377
comeW^
WE ARE OPEN
Mb. & M&. 12app
mil liki to inttt ijwi.
carry out I
catering ? 1:00 AM Sun-Thurt
Delivery Service [ 2:00 AM Fri-Sat
GATOR SHOP
LEVI
HEADQUARTERS
Levi Blue Jeans 57.00
Levi White Jeans 55.50
g Levi Tan Jeans 55.50
W LEVI CORDUROY JEANS
f Tan Jeans $6.50
P Brown Jeans $6.50
Green Jeans $6.50
We also have
GATOR TIES ML
Alligator Club $5.00
Orange & Blue AflH
$6.50
the
JBB| bit as
mm shop
kdy QLhJ 1710 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE
Across From

HAVE YOU BEEN THINKING
ABOUT LEARNING TO FLY?
We win teach you for
S2lO
nS!S^7tIZJS*VtSST IS
Sts'
FLYING HAWKS
STENGEL AERODROME 375-00,,



Faculty/ Students Discuss UF Problems^

By ALBERT MANRARA
Alligator Writer
Anything goes seems to be the
mood for next Sundays
Presidents Retreat.
The 12th annual retreat will
imvolve forty administrative and
faculty members, and sixty
students.
THE RETREAT to be held at
the Reitz Union, will last the
entire day. It will begin at 9 am.
and will last into the evening,
ending around 11pm.
The purpose for this
come-together of faculty and
students is to probe, discuss and
even argue about the different
things affecting students.
Neither group is conducting
the retreat. It is a joint project
and the chairmen for the
discussion groups will be chosen
at the retreat.
REPRESENTING the student
body will be leaders of various
campus organizations and some
students chosen at random.
Cadets Win
Camp Award
Fifty-five UF Air Force
(AFROTC) cadets distinguished
themselves this year at summer
camps by winning 35 per cent of
all major awards given in
competition with cadets from
major universities across the
nation.
Thirty-two of the UF cadets,
who are seniors, spent four
weeks at Charleston AFB in
South Carolina.
THE OTHER 23 students
(new juniors) attended six weeks
of field training at Dover AFB,
in Delaware.
The cadets were placed in
leadership positions and
observed to see how well they
handled their responsibilities.
Sports competition, obstacle
courses, drill and ceremony,
problem solving and seminar
discussions were some of the
tests in which the cadets
participated.
Thirty-four per cent of the
UF cadets ranked within the top
five of their flights (25 men are
in a flight). Forty-three per cent
of the juniors finished in the top
5 of their flights..
SlacktraxN
1029 W. UNIV. AVE
IVY-FLARES-JEANS

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell and members of his
staff will represent the
administration while deans of
the various colleges will be
representing the faculty.
There is no strict agenda
planned for the day but some
guidelines will be followed.
IN THE MORNING three
groups will meet to discuss
various topics. These will be
Student Government, the role of
athletics on campus, and
academic changes.
Each of these groups will give
a report of their findings at the
general meeting which will take
place after lunch. After the

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$2.38 Per Hour
For Qualified Person
Only Experienced Bartender need apply
Good Fringe Benefits with Paid vacations
Contact CHUCK BROWER 378-1636

I The Chambers Brothers belong to I
I the pop scene... the rock I
I flll
I scene.. the psychedelic scene...
I ErwS the rhythm and blues scene I
i. I
I the blues scene.. I
I the total music scene. I
TIE
CUMBERS BROTHERS
IN CONCERT
I comedians Edmonds and Curley I
I Friday, October 2 Florida Gym I
I 7:30 & 10:30 PM $5.50 per couple I
Tickets on sole at: Record Bar Recordsville J.W.R.U. Box Office

AT PRESIDENTS RETREAT

general meeting there will be
discussions on the reports of the
three groups.
At 4 p.m. Dr. Harry H. Sisler,
Executive Vice President; Dr.
Paul Elliott, Dean of the College
of Arts and Science, and Mr.
Roy Mitchell, Director for
Disadvantaged Students, will
speak on Minority Affairs.
Following the report on
Minority Affairs an open
question and answer period will
take place.
SUPPER will be followed by
general discussions of the Honor
Code and the treatment of
students by the faculty and
university staff.

These retreats, which are held
at the beginning of every
academic year, have not always
been successful. Henry Solares,
Student Government Vice
President, said that last years
retreat was not very effective.

I 06 Red I
I K net the sin I
I cf Scarlet <*l ara. I

Monday, September 28,1970, The Florida Alligator,

This year, many hours have
gone into planning the retreat.
Solares, who is optimistic about
the retreat, expects some
concrete results to come out
of this communication
free-for-all.

Page 5



. The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 28,1970

Page 6

Charges Dropped In Trial

ORANGEBURG, S.C. (UPI)
The fourth day of the
Cleveland L. Sellers Jr. riot trial
begins Monday minus two of the
three charges against the former
national program director of the
Student Non-Violent
Coordinating Committee,
Circuit Judge John Grimball
issued a directed verdict of
acquital Saturday on charge of
conspiracy to riot and inciting to
riot. He said the single charge of
riot would go to the jury.
SELLERS NOW faces a


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maximum sentence of one year
or $250 fine on the remaining
charge. Grimball said the state,
which ended its case after
presenting 11 witnesses, had
failed to present any evidence to
support either the conspiracy or
inciting to riot charges.
The defense will begin its case
Monday.
Grimball said the riot charge
against Sellers, 28, would be
limited only to his activities on
the night of Feb. 6, 1968, two
nights before a confrontation

South Carolina State College
students which left three youths
dead and 27 others, including
Sellers, wounded.
THE JUDGE said the only
evidence presented to connect
Sellers with the fatal
confrontation was that he was
wounded.
If someone fires a bullet and
it hits a person or a student
reading at his desk it doesnt
mean that person was involved
in a riot, Grimball said.
GATOR GIRL
Today's Gator Girl is Carol
Holcombe, 4PE, a recreation
major who plans to become an
airlines stewardess after
graduation. Carol is the 1970
Miss Seminole and is a member
of Kappa Delta sorority. She
enjoys jogging, horseback riding
and chewing bubble gum in
fact she can blow a bubble
within a bubble!

tM Kl%.
. tav ters. 55.10; e*.
-now prnpM r^* l£ie sc,l e^amont
U A D Df M HtfiSi
WnKUZrm Is iiysTjT;
Get with it!
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Samson Hosts City Leaders

By LINDA BEREZIN
Alligator Writer
A panel of civic leaders will
discuss problems facing the
Gainesville Community at the
recruitment meeting of Samson
on Oct. 6.
The meeting will be at 7:30
p.m. in room 101, Little Hall.*
SAMSON IS an organization
of UF students who do
<
volunteer work in
socio-economic programs in the
Gainesville area.
Samson serves as a volunteer
placement agency between
community groups and the
students.
It provides an outlet for
students to work in poverty
areas, day care centers, schools,
and community action

Methodists Plan New
Modern Service

By KATHY ROBERTS
Alligator Writer.
0
Jesus said in Luke 5:37 that
no man could put new wine into
old wine skins. This is basically
the philosophy United
Methodist Church is trying to
employ in its Sunday
youth-oriented services.
Every Wednesday night at the
United Methodist Church a 6
p.m. dinner is served for fifty
cents to all who come to the
church courtyard.
Those who stay afterwards
(usually about 30 people) help
plan a contemporary worship
service for Sunday.
THE PAST Sunday service is
reviewed to make die coining
one better.
The contemporary service
begins at 11:15 a.m. following
the regular 10 a.m. service.
Orange juice and donuts are
served at 10:45.
Rev. H. Jack Downey and
Associate Minister Rick Payne,
presently getting his masters in
Counseling Education at UF, are
responsible for starting the new
youth worship service.
In charge of the Wednesday
night planning sessions is Sid
Taylor, a UF sophomore. Taylor
and a group of other students
got the idea for the
contemporary services last
snrine.

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agencies, Ron Murphy,
program director said.
This year the organization is
shifting emphasis in the
programs with which it will be
most involved.
WE ARE emphasizing the
Big Brother program more this
year, Murphy said.
Students will be able to
work with children, although
not in the educational sense.
More students will be able to be
involved because less of a
commitment is necessary.
Students who will be tutoring
school children will be required
to attend a training program this
quarter before they begin
tutoring. They will be able to
register for one credit when they
begin tutoring in the winter

THEY WANTED a worship
service in which there was
relevance and in which they
could feel freer.
The song Tommy by The
Who was performed by students
at last Sundays service as they
attempted to learn worship
involving all of themselves and
their senses: See me ... hear
me ... touch me ... heal
99
me ...
Jury Convenes
remaining classified with the
investigation.
THE GRAND JURY will
convene Oct. 12 to hear
statements from persons wishing
consideration of various matters.
The death at the county jail has
received priority on the present
agenda.
The grand jury proceedings
are closed to the public, but the
Oct. 12 meeting is open for
public attendance.
Asst. State A tty. Eugene
Whitworth said, Every possible
aspect of this case is being
considered.
Although the testimonies
during the investigation will be
confidential, any indictment
which may come out of the case
will be oubliclv issued.

term.
Those who will be working in
the other programs will be
required to attend three
workshops.
THERE WILL also be a parole
program where male students
can work with young offenders.
The local parole board will
provide a training center for the
students.
By The Neck...
Hanging is still the maximum
penalty for murder in nine
states.

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Everything You Always
Wanted To Know About
The Catholic Faith
INSTRUCTIONS IN THE CATHOLIC FAITH
* But Were Afraid To Ask
Instructor: Father George D. Kirkpatrick Beginning September 29th
Catholic Student Center Every Tuesday and Thursday
Comer West University Ave & 18th St. 7:30 to 8:15 pm
(Never any later)

Monday, September 28,1970, The Florida AlMtor.

Page 7



Page 8

I, Th Florida Alligator, Monday, Saptambar 28,1970

EDITORIAL ____
Alligator
Endorsements
It has been a wonderful four years for Claude Kirk Jr.
Our governor has vacationed in California and Europe
during the teachers strike in 1968, has taken over the
Manatee County school board during busing problems there
last fall, and now there is a wristwatch named after him.
He has even appeared on The Mike Douglas Show.
We are not impressed.
The list of Claude Kirks non-accomplishments are
endless.
The man should be voted out of office. We are tired of
him and his politics of confrontation; his broken promises
and his demagoguery.
He promised to make Florida No. 1 in education; it
dropped from 27th to 34th. He promised no new taxes
but we got them. He promised a war on crime; the crime
rate in the state has increased.
Claude Kirk is the issue in 1970. When voting in
Tuesdays second primary, remember his record. He does
not merit consideration.
For Governor
DEMOCRAT. We recommend Reubin Askew for
governor.
Sen. Askew (Pensacola) has been the only candidate in
the governors race with a program. He has recognized the
problems of the state and has offered specific programs.
His opponent, Attorney General Earl Faircloth, has
proposed nothing, prefering to attack Sen. Askew and his
programs. When not attacking Askew, he has conducted a
motherhood and apple pie, law and order campaign.
Askew has had the courage to emphasize the need for tax
reform. His program includes taxing profits on corporations
to provide property tax relief. Faircloth has played politics,
implying Askews corporate tax would lead to a personal
income tax, which could not happen.
Askew has said he would like to see a state wide system
of rehabilitation clinics established for drug users. Faircloth
wants stronger law enforcement in dealing with the
problem.
Askew would discourage industrial development that
would damage the environment. Faircloth talks of seeking
out the polluters. He hasnt found them yet.
Without a program, Faircloth is slighting the intelligence
of voters. By his statements he has based his campaign on
the ignorance of voters.
Askew has said, Im not a prophet of doom. Im an
apostle of hope. We agree.
REPUBLICAN. We recommend Jack Eckerd for
governor.
An independent businessman, Eckerd would bring to the
governor's chair something which has been missing since
Claude Kirk has occupied the seat: a businessmans
approach to state government.
Kirks only concern has been promoting Claude Kirk. He
has attempted to govern the state by the boss system.
Eckerd has claimed no special interests, something Kirk
cannot claim, as evidenced by his attempt to gain the
vice-presidential nomination in 1968 and his now infamous
Governors Club.
Eckerd has said he plans to run the state as a business
with our elected Republican legislators as my board of
directors.
From his record, there is no indication that Kirks style
of politics will change. With Kirk, Florida will continue to
.be the laughingstock of the nation.
It is time for a change and Eckerd is the man.
For Sonato
DEMOCRAT. We recommend Lawton Chiles for the U.S.
Senate.
Chiles feels that the people are frustrated. They feel cut
off from elected officials. They want to talk to the
candidates, shake their hands and look him in the eye.
In his unpreddented 1,000-mile walk through Florida,
Chiles took his campaign directly to the people, asked them
what they wanted and listened. His conversion from a hawk
on Vietnam to a dove illustrates this.
For this we admire him.
He represents a refreshing change in the old style politics
that former Grovemor Farris Bryant offers.
We fed Chiles can bring the people back into
government.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

I 1
-
From The Ole Mailbag

Dear Sick Mind:
So, youre at it again this
year, eh? I thought after the
hardhats got busy in New York
you would be afraid to show
your cowardly face around here
again!!! I wish some of them
would bust you up good!!!
When will you guys learn that
violence is not the answer?!!!!!
A Silent Majority Person
(and damn proud of it)
Dear Mr. Columns:
You are a person in a very
important position. In one or
two, or possibly three years you
will graduate and become a
highly paid engineer, doctor,
lawyer or other skilled person
and take your place among the
highly educated elite in our
society. When you do, you will
want those who visit your home
to realize that you are a person
of great intellectual ability.
That is why Great Books of
the Top Half of the Western
Hemisphere is prepared to make
you this once in a lifetime
offer...
Ramon Navarro
_ Dist. Sales Mngr.
Dear Johnny baby:
Just wanted to drop you a
note to tell you how much I
have been enjoying your
columns lately.
Also wonder if we could get
together on that $15,000 double
indemnity whole life policy I
mentioned on the phone the
other day? I really think, John,
that this plan is just tailor made
to fit a guy with your kind of
future in store.
So if you would John, just
give me a buzz at the office and

Alligator Staff
Ron Sachs Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
I **. ** tud nt <* th University of Florida undar the mmtiem of
the Board of Student Publications. wpcBor
Editorial, Bminw, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite
third floor, Reitz Union. m burte.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in die Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

JOHN PARKER

well set up a little get-together
to talk this over. I think it would
be a good idea to get this sort of
thing taken care of now because
you never can tell when
something dreadful, God Forbid,
will happen and you will be
dead. I mean really dead, cold as
a stone, you know what I mean?
Your buddy,
Larry Glockmaster
Provident Providence Mutual, Inc.
Dear Friend:
There is an insidious plot
afoot to destroy the fabric of
this great nation of ours.
Campus weirdos,
commie-agitators and pinko
journalists have been around for
years C.R.U.D. (Crusade for
Rigorous Uncovering of
Defectors) has uncovered a new
Mid dafigcious attack on our
precious liberties.
Chewing gum is Communist!!!
In 1802, Wrigley chewing gum
was introduced in a small town
in the northern part of
Mississippi. The people, taking it
for an innocent diversion, began
chewing it as if it were harmless.
NOT ONE OF THOSE
PEOPLE IS ALIVE TODAY!!!
Need we say more? If you are
a true American and believe in
all of what we are doing, just
send $75 by check or cash to
C.R.U.D. in care of Henrys
Barbershop, Selma, Ala.

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Loretta Tennant
News Editor

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392*1681,
82,83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waidman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1619

And maybe youll sleep a
little better tonight.
Sammy One-Eye Simpson
Grand Ring-Tail Turtledove
C.R.U.D.
Hey Johnny:
Dropped you a note yesterday
but didnt hear from you, so
thought I would let you know
I'm still reading those great
columns of yours!!
About that whole life policy,
John, I think now is the time to
consider your future (and what a
future you have in store!). How
about dropping by the ol office
and lets fill out some forms, ok?
Lets face facts, baby. Lot of
people don't dig that crap you
write about Vietnam and
fraternities (that one got me a
little upset, to be perfectly
honest John, since I'm an old
Diga Deepa myself (and damn
proud of it dss't midd; telling
you)). Anyway, lot of people,
John, are really happy about all
that stuff and you never can tell
when you're gonna push
somebody too hard and they
might just get some
an alarm clock... you get the
picture.
What Im trying to say, John,
is that you could be dead
tomorrow. Yes, you. Dead.
Breathing stopped, no blood
flowing, nothing. Dead.
Think about.
Your friend at PP Mutual,
Larry



KSC: Tangle Os Mismanagement

By REG CROWDER
Alligator Writer
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER
- In 1960 when what was to
become the nations spaceport
was little more than 88,000
acres of weeds and scrub oak on
Merritt Island, the space
program was busy being born.
No one was worrying about
how much it would cost to print
booklets or guard gates. All eyes
turned to space and the craft
that hopefully would carry men
to the moon by the end of the
decade.
The John F. Kennedy Space
Center, so named in November,
1963, was established in July,
1960, as the Launch Operations
Directorate.
THEN IT WAS part of
NASAs George C. Marshall
Space Flight Center at
Huntsville, Ala., but later
became an independent activity
in July, 1962.
Now, KSC is down from its
peak effort and with the glory of
man in space dimming, we can
see a tangle of mismanagement
and excessive spending that
some are calling a monster.
The space center in its haste
tried and succeeded in
circumventing the United States
Civil Service laws and has since
hired personnel through
contractors in areas never before
considered appropriate.
THE PRACTICE, aside from
being illegal, has been shown by
reports of NASA itself to be far
more expensive than going about
getting people the right way.
The center has acquired a
massive tangle of directorates
and directorates under
directorates supervising
personnel designed to monitor
the many contractors but who
tend to only make the task of
fixing responsibility impossible.
There are three types of
contractors at KSC.
THE FIRST TWO stage
contractors who make rockets
and spacecraft, and hardware
contractors who make other
equipment have a firm

REG CROWDER

About The Author

ALLIGATOR VIEWPOINT

foundation in both Federal
regulations and tradition.
The problem is that KSC has
also heavily engaged in
contracting out what NASA calls
support services.
Kennedy Space Centers
support contractors do not build
products. Rather, they provide
specialized technical services or
common services.
THE SIX MAJOR support
contractors are Bendix
Corporation, Pan American,
Federal Electric Corporation,
General Electric,
Ling-Temco-Vought/Service
Technologicy Corporation and
its subcontractor for printing
McGregor & Werner, and Trans
World Airlines and its
subcontractor for security the
Wackenhut Corporation.
They are the present
beneficiaries of a system which
sprung to life in 1963.
In that year KSC undertook a
study to find out the best way
to provide support services at its
new home on Merritt Island.
Four alternatives were
considered:
Extending the support
services contract for the Air
Force Eastern Test Range to
cover KSC.
Using one big contractor to
provide everything.
Using several contractors
divided up by areas.
Civil Service personnel.
KSC PROPOSED support
services be obtained through 12
separate contracts. NASA
headquarters rejected that
proposal. Then KSC asked for
seven separate contracts. NASA
rejected that, suggesting four
contracts. KSC made the
proposal for four contracts ant
it was approved.
KSC may have avoided the
Civil Service alternative only
because it knew the ceiling
which it had been given for such
positions was inadequate for the
new space centers needs.
It is doubtful one could ever
find out just what the findings
of the study were. In a report of
the U.S. Comptroller General on
KSCs photographic operations

Alligator staff writer Reg
Crowder interned as a
roving reporter for the
Miami Herald this summer.
During that time he spent
about three weeks in the
Cocoa area and was able to
speak to many of the
officials working with our
space program
This is the first of a
four-part series dealing with
the problems he discovered

No go mission control .. seems some red
tape you didn't count on is holding up
operations ..

it is noted even that agency
couldnt get a copy.
KSC HAD SAID the study
was the basis of its then-current
photographic service contractor.
So the Comptroller General
asked for a copy.
KSC officials advised us that
the decision was made in 1963
and that such documentation
was prepared but could not be
located, notes the January,
1968, report.
Despite the need for people
and the inability to get them
through Civil Service channels,
neither NASA nor KSC was
without guidance in what they
were doing.
A WHOLE STRING of
Comptroller Generals opinions
issued in the 1950 sto the armed
forces had already clarified the
law. They laid down the
principle that any contract
which tended to circumvent the
Civil Service laws is invalid.
In fact, much later in 1964,
the Comptroller General ruled
invalid a support contract held
by NASAs Goddard Space
Flight Center, Greenbelt,
Maryland.
A contract, awarded by a
Federal department or agency,
said the opinion, which
establishes an employer-employe,
relationship between the
government and contractor contractorfurnished
furnished contractorfurnished personnel acts to
defeat the provisions of these
statutes and such arrangements
are necessarily invalid.
AGAIN IN 1967 the
Comptroller General ruled
against Goddard Space Center

and was this time joined by the
Civil Service Commission.
The principles set forth were
applied throughout government.
The U.S. Navy circulated a
particularly candid explanation
of the decisions to its own
personnel to avoid running afowl
of the law.
THIS IS PART of a January,
1968, Memorandum for the
Deputy Under Secretary of the
Navy (Manpower):
Unless Congress has passed a
specific statute to authorize
something different, whenever a
government department or
agency decides to buy something
by contract it must buy some
sort of end item a piece of
hardware, or a defined piece of
research, or a report.
When it wants people it is
bound to hire them in
accordance with the Civil Service
Laws. \
IN A NUTSHELL, a service
contract is personal or illegal
when the relationship between
the government and the
contractors personnel is, for all
practical purposes, that of
employer and employe.
The memo goes on to explain
that the employer-employe
relationship can come about
either by the way the contract is
written or the way it is
administered.
Although NASA doesnt
officially agree with the
Goddard decisions, one of its
guidebooks on contracting out
says just about the same thing.
CONTRACTING FOR
services may be used only for
purposes other than evading

Monday, September 28, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

personnel ceiling limitations, it
says. Conversion from
government performance of
services to performance by
contracts, with the use for the
purposes of personnel spaces
released as a consequence, is
strongly indicative of such
evasion.
The booklet also recommends
that prior to contracting for
services, the nature of the
services involved should be
examined to ascertain whether
they are of a kind which
historically have been performed
by government employes..
It even goes on to say that if
work has been done by
government employes there
must be demonstrated
compelling reasons for the use of
a contract in the particular
situation at hand.
KSC MAINTAINS it is in
compliance with civil service
regulations.
At the Kennedy Space
Center management officials
have always attempted to
structure contractor support in
such a fashion to avoid the type
of situation which ultimately
arose at Goddard, was the
official response to a recent
question on support contracts.
KSC officials believe they
have been successful in this
attempt and that no similar
relationship to that critcized at
Goddard has developed to any
serious extent.
Where potential problem
areas have been identified
corrective action has been
taken.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 28.1970

Experimental College
Reopens This Fall

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
Florida Experimental College
(FEC)will open its doors again
this fall.
According to Rev. John
Talmage, ex-officio member at
FEC, registration for courses will
take place the second week in
October. Course catalogs will be
available next week and posted
all over campus.
REV. TALMAGE said the
college will present a new format
for those who dislike formal
classes. The key to FEC will be
informal classes and discussions.
In place of a teacher, a
coordinator will act as a resource
person.
The FEC will offer a variety
of six to eight week courses,
among them fishing, modem
dance, Zen Buddhism, science
fiction, Disney comics,

Electives Offered

||f^M6Eo^U
course and he listened, Strang
said.
We told him we thought we
had to read too many essays. We
told him we thought the lectures
were not profitable. He listened
and the department listened.
This year the lectures have
been changed, and a lot of the
less interesting essays have been
cut out, he said.
Faculty members also think
students having a voice in
decision making is good. Jeff
GorTell, a graduate assistant who
worked with the committee, said
he is in favor of students having
an equal voice in planning their
curriculum.
THE END result was good.
But it wasnt good because it
was our decision. It was good
because it was the students.
Students learned a lot of the
problems concerning making a
curriculum. And faculty
members learned a lot about
What students think and the
problems they have, Gorrell
said.
After the first quarter,
students can choose electives in
drama, fiction, poetry,
contemporary literature and
world literature.
join tlie fan!
THESWINGS
TO WINGS
Ait over America people are taking to the
sky young and old. some just for the fun
of it. others because their business bene benefits
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customers
TRY A LESSON
jUSt $5 That s all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
flying ease Come visit us today
1378-28461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Gainesville Airport
mmm Waldo Road
tfnm CmMmr

American cultural history (a
guide for international students),
tie-dying and others.
Registration will be handled
simply with a minimum of red
tape. Prospective students will
contact the coordinator of each
course by telephone. The names
and numbers will be included in
the catalog.
CLASSES will be held at the
Center of the United Ministers
for Higher Education, formerly
the Presbyterian Student Center.
Although some ministers work
with the college and the center
provides its physical facility, the
college will be secularly
oriented.
We do things the university
has no time to do. FEC provides
a place where the university and
community can come together,
said Rev. Talmage.
FECbegan two years ago with
a group of UF graduate students

STEVENS
STUDIOS
OF BOSTON AND MAINE
has been selected as the
official Portrait Photographer
for the 1971 Seminole,
yearbook of the University of Florida.
Senior and Greek portraits will be
taken October 6-23 in room 3470 f
the J. Wayne Reitz Union.
.
c
r I *.
.

acting as coordinators. Since its
incepetion the college has
become a quasi-independent
organization.
For more information contact
Rev. Talmage, Rev. Dan
Beardsley or Rev. Henry Gooch
at the center located at West
University Avenue and NW 14
Street or call 376-7539.
2 BEDROOM
FULLY FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME
SET ON LOT OF
YOUR CHOICE
$62.43 per mo.
AFTER SMALL DOWN
PAYMENT
Mustangd^.
MOBILE HOMESmctv
4820 N.W. 13th ST.
378-1346
WE WILL HELP YOU LOCATE
A LOT AT NO CHARGE

AN EXCLUSIVE SERVICE
FOR STUDENTS!
"THE INSURED COLLEGE RING jBo
YOUR NEW COLLEGE RING IS INSURED |
WHILE IN SCHOOL AGAINST .
* LOSS OR DAMAGE BY THEFT, ROBBERY,
BURGLARY, LARCENY OR FIRE. M
* LOSS OF STONE FROM ITS SETTING.
ACCIDENTAL BREAKAGE OF STONE.
RFGISTERED CERTIFICATE WI~Th EVERY RING. >y
HATCHERS JEWELERS 7*^'
2 EAST UNIV. AVE. 376 6892

I Lig Led I
I 1$ writing a beck. I
I Lilt it deesnt I
I answer. I



ATTEND FREE
Over 90% Os The People
Who Attend Increase Their Reading
Speed On The Spot!
For The Ist Time Ever...


World Famous Evelyn Wood
Reading Dynamics offers you
a free glimpse of what its like
to be able to read and study
much faster
Youll actually be taught how
to read and study faster during
the exciting Speed- Reading
Lesson.

We want you to decide for yourself the
value of becoming a Speed-Reader, Evelyn
Wood style.
For the first time we are offering a Special
Speed-Reading Lesson to provide you with
a glimpse of what it's like to be able to read
and study substantially faster ... and
you'll actually participate in the techniques
that will improve your reading and study
speed on the spot!

Free &£££> mom Lessons!
TODAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY
# 3,5:30, BPM ~
1125 W. Unlv. Ava.
W READING DYNAMICS*

next to Donigans

Ui 11 jted _S -a 11 ng-ftv ait a Id F e
GALL: 372-1600
To reserve your Seats

Youll see why President
Kennedy invited Evelyn Wood
to the White House to teach
his advisors and the Joint
Chiefs of Staff how to read
faster.
Youll hear what the faculty
members of one of Americas
foremost colleges says about
Evelyn Wood, and watch them
read-fast!

You'll find this Special Free offer of
increased reading speed to be an exciting
and unusual experience.
Limited Seating Available at Each Lesson.
Because of limited seating capacity, we ask
that you please call the number listed
below to Reserve Your Seat. Choose the
time most convenient to your schedule and
call now for Your Personal Reservation.

Monday

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 28,1970

I
tos#^*yL^ r t*.
*§trt-..: '- .ill Jrf **tbT* ~. t
'The Chambers Brothers will appear in
concert for IFC Frolics. Two Shows on Oct.
2."

Get Involved Through Student Senate
Students wishing to run for the Senate in the upcoming election on October 14 must qualify
on or before Thurs., October 1 at 5:00 p.m. You may register from 3 to 5 on the third
floor, J. Wayne Reitz Union.
Beat The Draft-Legally

A Student Draft Counseling Center has been established by the Dept, of Student Affairs. Interested
students can call 392-1665 for a personal appointment, or can visit the office in the Presbyterian Student
Center.
Participate In Consumer Protection
The Dept, of Consumer Affairs needs many volunteers to help arrange student discounts and consumer
protection programs. Don't just complain about high prices, call 392-1665 and offer your services in this
area.
The Student Senate Reconvenes
The Senate will meet on Tues., Sept. 29, at 7:30 in room 349, J. Wayne Reitz Union. The general student
is welcome at this and at every meeting of the Student Senate.
Free Math Tutoring
The Math Dept, is offering a free non-credit course in Trig. The course will run for eight weeks beginning
on Sept. 29. If you need a refresher in this field of Math, sign up in 205 Walker before Sept. 29. Required
text: 'Trigonometry, A Programmed Text," Keedy and Bettinger.
Insurance Cards Are "In
Students who have enrolled in the Blue Cross Insurance Plan can now pick up their Insurance I.D. cards at
the Infirmary
.
!
I' /
I jX THANKS
I *tbrm> bruce schwack
I J. DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
I STUDENT GOVERNMENT
I I -I A l
H* \ I

Campus Crier
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT

'9
A Chance For Questions And Answers
*
President O'Connell, Vice Pres. Hale, Dean Adams, Dean Cosby and Roy Mitchell will all
speak in an Open Forum Discussion to be held on Wed., Sept. 30, in the Plaza of the
Americas from 12:00 to 1:00. The purpose of the Forum is to air all and any issues that the
students have questions on. This is your chance to confront or compliment the
administration.
o
Get Involved Through University Committees
If the Senate is not your style, but you would still like to be active in Student Govt., there
are immediate openings on every one of more than thirty University Committees. Some of
the most noteworthy are:

Curriculum
Campus Planning
Space Utilization
Academic Regulation
Admissions
Teaching Evaluation

Disadvantaged Students
Student Housing
Student Affairs
Student Financial Aid
Student Health Services
Student Organizations

Student Publications
Wauburg Committee
Civil Defense
Parking and Transportation
Safety Committee



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
4MOOMMOO6SSBKSSBmfnoooOQKKrOQOOKf^,
CUSTOMIZED AND REBUILT 650
cc BSA, $550, Butler Qardwu Apt
91$. (A-31-4-P)
FOR SALEI Folk guitar, brand nama
original. Coat $l5O. Will sacrifice for
$50., or best offer. Also one stereo
amp, one year old. Original cost, SBO.
Will sell for S4O, or best offer.
392-6915. (A-st-4-p)
FOR SALE: Honda 590. 1968, 3800
ml, good shape. Call 373-1534.
(A-st-4-p)
Custom flghtwdlgnt
wheeler. Guaranteed perfect. SI2OO.
372- after spm. (A-7t-4-p)
68 Triumph 650 trophy, 1400 miles,
excellent condition. 2 helmets,
luggage rack, tool kit. $875. Call
373- (A-st-4-p)
Capt. America special yamaha isocr.
Xtr clean, excellent for campus or
road. Blue, s-bar helmet & extras.
Contact John, 373-2216 eve-.,
392-2027 dy. (A-st-64-p)
Portable typewriter owners. We will
dean, adjust, lubricate & Install new
ribbon on your machine for only
$14.50 and guarantee our work. This,
month only a savings of over $10.00.'
Don't miss out. JR Office Furniture
Co. 620 S. Main St., phone
376-1146. (A-10t-63-c)
Why buy used Junk? We sell new for
less. All metal, In black of gray. 2
drawer file cabinet NOW $19.95, 4
drawer file cabinet NOW $32.50. JR
Office Furniture Co., 620 S. Main
St., phone 376-1146. (A-10t-63-c)
i Ji.
Walnut finished study desk with 2
drawers, modern styling. While they
last ONLY $29.50. Why buy used
Junk? We sell new for less. JR Office
Furniture Co., 620 S. Main St.,
phone 376-1146. (a-10t-63-c)
"Antiques trash & treasure
Melrose, Fla. on hwy 26, 20 min
driver. Mon-Wed call 475-4931,
Thur-Sat 10-5. Open Sun 1-4. Kitty
& Terry Bowman. (A-lot-64-p)
Drum Set, Like new, Blue sparkle,
complete. Bass, snare, tom-tom, floor'
tom, hl-hat and rider cymbals. 1225
SW Ist Ave., Apt. 431. (A-st-64-p)
l . v i
Bel air stereo tape deck (subsid. of
R.C.A.). Plays on A.C., car or batt.,
Including 5 tapes. Only S6O.
373-1549 or 373-1908. (A-st-3-p)
'8 K3O trailer with a/C, Icebox, and
gas stove. 1 bdrm. Located In
Hlllcrest trailer pk. SBOO. write Gary
Felts, Box 128, Bradenton, 33505.
(A-st-3-p)
1967 Yamaha 180 CC, very good
shape. 2 helmets, plus gloves. Call
372-7475 between 7-9 PM. (A-st-5-p)
Reg Half Arabian Filly: elegant head
and carriage. In show shape. It has
been stalled and fitted for 6 mo. 15
mo. old, blue gray. SSOO Her Dam-
Sells open S3OO. 372-8558. ;
(A-st-63-p)
Stereo Dynaco SCA 80, KLH 6 spkrs.
Rek-o-kut turntable. Amp and spkrs.
6 mths old, $450, jU. Will sell part.
Bill 373-2783 evs. (A-3t-5-p)
FOR SALE: Honda 50 1970 model,
400 miles, virtually brand new. 125.
376-5212 ext. 18 answer leave message w switchboard
to return call. (A-si-5-p}
750 HONDA, 1 SUMMER OLD.
NEED GOLD. What else can I say?
TEL 373-2264 (A-3t-5-p)
Honda 150, 65. Excel lent condition.
Call 378-7255 before I PM. Bill
Sanders, Brown's Tr. Pk. Lot 48,
price S2OO. (A-3t-5-p)
Barely used clothes, good prices, sizes
5-9. Jonathan Logan Bobby Brooks,
call 376-6187 or corns by Village
Park No. 112. (A-it-6-p)
Welmaraner. 1 yr. male AKC
registered obedience school. Had
shots SIOO. 378-9272 after 5.
(A-2t-6-p)
1967 Harley Davidson Sprint in
excellent cond. Accessories Inch,
set-up for street or trail. Asking
$450. 417t0 S.W. 2nd St., 376-9538.
(A-St-6-p)
1064 Champion, 10x50, 2 Br,
carpeted, furnished, SSOO equity and
aatuma payments of $56.50 or $2250
cash. Call 3/I4SM after 5:00.
(A-3t-3-p)
i !'
Ounlop tennis balls 1.50 per can.
#$MMe headquarters: Master, Pro,
Regular-all at low
prices. BAB SPORTS CENTER,
,5320 NW 13th St. (A-4t-6-p)
Bob cats, coons, skunks, ferrets,
squirrels, monkeys, panrots, hawks,
ducks, foxes, snakes, turtles, for sale,
trade or we will buy. Call 475-2546
QT 475-2181 local. (A-10t-63-p)
Refrigerator for Sale: Perfect for
Dorm use, Excellent working order.
Call 373-4381 after 4 PM on
weekdays A 11 AM to 7PM on
. weekends. (A-st-6-p)

FOR SALE
x-x-x-x-x*x*x "NEVER used anything like It," say
users of Blue Lustre for cleaning
carpets. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
250 Kawasaki scrambler. Excellent
condition, 4000 miles, 1969 $425.
Call 373-1127 (A-2t-6-p)
Triumph Superbike *6so'.
Completely custom, 1 year old
Cerlanl's, all aluminum, chrome,
super clean & fast. Must sell, SI2OO.
378-7872 at 6pm. (A-st-6-p)
Bell A Howell 240 16mm movie
camera with 20mm lens A carrying
case. Perfect for news A sports work.
$85.00, call 378-1128, keep trying.
(A-st-6-p)
1969 Yahama 100 electric with 2
helmets, only $270. 1969 Honda 50
electric with helmet and only 900
miles, $l5O. Call 378-2498.
(A-3t-6-p)
Harley-Davidson 1970 Rapldo 125 cc
duel sprokets so street or wood,
only 1300 miles, uggage rack. $425.
376-5531 evenings. (A-st-6-p)
FOR SALE: 67 Honda 90 scrambler.
Runs great, fine cond. Graduating,
call 378-5766. 1220 NW 11th Ave.
$225, or best offer, helmet Included.
(A-st-6-p)
Scuba diving equip Inexpensive two
regulator sls, A 10, tank backpack,
SSO; weights, belt $4; wet suit sls;
or SBO for all. Call 378-3110 after 6
PM (A-lt-6-p)
Sony HPISOA Stereo-BSR Auto or
Lab turntable, separate speakers. 18
watts 50HZ-20KHZ response, $l4O.
2 yrs old, excellent condition,
378-5954. (A-3t-6-p)
WAKTTED^
Female Roommate Needed: to block
behind Norman. ($42.56? per month
plus utilities. Own room. 378-6154
after 3:00 pm. (C-2t-5-p)
Vegetarian needs place to grow, dose
to campus with kitchen. Call Steve at
378-5522. (C-st-64-p)
Could you use an extra male
roommate until December? Call Gary
after 5 PM at 376-0901. (C-st-64-p)
1 female roommate needed for 2
bedroom apt. In NE section. Will
have own bedroom, air-conditioned.
$35.00/month + to utilities, call
378-0447. (C-3t-4-p)
Need used bicycle. Good condition.
Call Sheryl at 378-5749 after 6 p.m.
(C-6t-5-p)
help wanted
Sarah Coventry Fashion Jewelry work
part time, average $5 hour. Set your
hours. Imaginative attractive girls
contact M. Llndsiey, 376-4475.
(E-10t-4-p)
Listeners wanted: will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Linda Bishop
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. for
appointment. 392-2049. (E-10t-4-p)
Need gardener and handlman. Prefer
rural or ag background. Call Rhea
376-4471 Os 376-7724. (E-2t-6-p)

r -to
Todays
more for your money meal
a.moisoivs
CAFETERIA
j MONDAY'S FEATURE j
! BAKED CHOPPED STEAK!
_ [ WITH HASH I
79< I
t | TUESDAYS FEATURE | \
a IGOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN 1 =
I ALL YOU CAN EAT |
: 99c!
I TJI
LUNCH: 11 til 2 SUPPER:4:3OtH 8 FREE PARKING
moisons I
CAFETERIA ..beyond comparison!
k 2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall

Monday, September 28,1970, The Florida Alligator,

X-X-X-x-x-XvXvX-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-:*?
HELP WANTED
Cocktail waitress wanted: full or part
time, no experience necessary. Will
train. Must be 21. Call after 5,
376-9175, ask for Mr. Thomas. Dub's
Steer Room, 4560 NW 13th St.
(E-30t-4-p)
PART TIME Job Involving ART
LETTERING. Desire Art, Art Ed.,
Design major, etc, with
transportation. Hours flexible. Pay
$1.75 per hour to start. Call
378-2016. (E-2t-5-p)
WANTED: Student to work part
time; room, rent to be part of
compensation. Ph. 376-3012
(E-3t-5-p)
' " mmimmmm mfe
Looking for opportunities to channel
your creativity? Try the 1971
SEMINOLE It's a book of a
different kind. The staff Is looking
for designers, layout, artists, writers,
business personnel, interested people,
and Just good dependable hard
workers. Give us a look at an open
staff meeting Tuesday, Sept. 29, 7:30
p.m., Rm. 334, J.W. Reitz Union.
Need 2 gardeners near Gvllle. Hours
arranged, good pay, 2 furnish tools,
permanent. Tel 533-2381, Kingsley
Lake, Rt. I, Box 361, Starke, Fla.
(E-2t-6-p)
*X$X$Xi
AUTOS
XXrXXXrXxX^XrXrXwXrXTXrXrXrXrX-X
'6 7 GTO factory balanced,
blueprinted 400 cu. Ram air. High
rise manifold, 3 bbl. carb. Doug's
Hedders, Offenhauser chrome
manifold covers. 90/10 front, 50/5C
rear shocks. Rally wheels. $?00C
Investment. $2495. on display Sept'
24 11 A.M. 9 til 3 p.m., 914 SW 7tl*
Ave., Gainesville. (G-64-4t-p)
LARGEST of USED IMPORTS IN
Nth. CENTRAL FLORIDA.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS, 1946
N. MAIN. (G-6t-63-p)
1968 TRIUMPH TR 250, wire
wheels, radio, mlchelln tires, one
owner, excellent cond. Call 392-1561
or 378-5537. (g-st-3-p)
1965 Tempest convertible.
Automatic, V 6 Excellent condition.
378-4477 or 372-4663 SBOO.
(G-st-64-p)
69 307 Chevy Nova, red black
Interior, 1400 miles, excellent
condition, S2OOO. Call 378-5154 or
378-0452. (G-st-6-p)
Need a car? I need bread. 62 Ford
rebuilt at, R A H, 4 door, VB, new
tire and battery, good reliable
transport, needs tag, S3OO. Call
378-7989. (G-st-6-p)
1963 VW Convertible, S3OO. Call any
time after 6 PM, 378-6409.
(G-3t-6-p)
1967 Ford Econollne supervan.
Excellent cond., paneling, carpets,
etc. SI2OO or best offer, call Steve.
392-7248. (G-4t-6-p)
1962 VW right hand drive, 7 tires,
good radio and battery, needs engine
repair, $l5O, call 378-9891 after
SPM. (G-2t-6-p)
1967 MGB Roadster, am-fm radio,
wire wheels, 25,000 miles, good
condition, $1395. Call Lake City
after 8 p.m., telephone 752-0846.
(G-st-4-p)

Page 13

:-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-xfrx-x-xx-xx-xx-x-x-
PERSONAL
CHESS ANYONE! Elec, chess table,
very unusual, $75.00 or trade for
antique weapons. See at THE COPY
CENTER, 1718 W Univ., 376-9334.
Xerox 5 cents 4 cents. (J-st-3-p)
Coeds Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrologlst, 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32M37-P)
Graduate student needs a cook for
dinner. Compensation to be arranged.
Call 373-2149. (J-3t-5-p)
"SPECIAL! Desks, lamps, file
cabinets, 15% off. THE COPY
CENTER 5 cents XEROX OUR
SPECIALTY 4 cents. 1718 W. Unlv.
376-9334 (J-st-3-p)
When nothing works LEATHER
WORKS! For custom pants. Jackets,
sandals, moccasslns, bags, belts. 16
NW 13th St. Home Made Goodness
and Mercy. (J-10t-63-p)
Popular, experimental, classic films.
Come help us run A choose the
Union films. Anyone interested come
to the Union lounges on Oct. I at
4:00. (J-3t-4-p)
Interest group In psychic-phenomene,
Edgar Cayce, Yoga and Mediation.
Mon 8:00 PM. Call 372-7883 for
Info. (J-3t-4-p)
Are you looking for beaded or
bamboo curtains, posters, black lights
and other things to decorate your apt
with. Check out the Spanish Main,
1642 W. Unlv. Ave. Open 10-10,
Mon-Sat. (J-3t-5-p)
Stop wasting money and precious
time not to mention exasperation
hunting a place to park. Rant a space
for your very own. In and out
privileges, day or night, directly
across W. Unlv. Ave. from center of
campus. 1702 W. Unlv. Ave., ph.
376-3012 (J-3t-5-p)
It's about time" that's what were
hearing from our customers about
our new coffee house. We agree, good
food, good people, good music and
good times. Open 10-10 Mon-Thurs
and 10AM-1:30 AM Frl and Sat.
There Is live entertainment every I*rl}
and Sat. night, plus open Stage weak
nights. Drop by, Its upstairs above
the Spanish Main, 1642 W. Univ.
Ave. (J-3t-5-p)
WOW Brian It doesn't matter
anymore that you are a laughinstoc
becuz you wore torn bells and Ed we
dont mind that you walk around
campus picking your teeth with a
plastic fork after eating choc late chip
cookies, becuz now you are SAEs
Love your female roommles.
(J-lt-6-p)
ROADRUNNER: Happy Birthday to
a paranoyic who when he looks at a
bag.. .School wouldn't be half as fun
without you. Love, meter me Id.
(J-lt-6-p)
Help get out vote In black precincts,
Tuesday, 4 p.m. Meat at Bartley
Temple Church, 1936 NE Bth Ave.
Details, call 372-7198. (J-2t-6-p)
Batter beans and bacon In peace
than cakes and ala In fear. Vkeop
the New Delhi Delicatessen, 706 West
University Avenue. (J-lt-6-p)
Suburbia lyrivc-In
N.W. 13th St. 372-9523
Penthouse 2
EASY
RIDER
SOP before 7:30
$1.09 after
Penthouse 3
Like m r
mother,
like I I
daughter
see before 7:30
1140 after B|

LOST St FOUND
FOUND: On* contact lansa in single
case on 100 blk of NW 15th Terrace.
Call Mr. Brown at 392-1286 during
working hours. (L-3t-5-p)
game, under NE standor rd!
Name on back. Call Ed, 2-7307.
(L-4t-3-p)
FOUND: 1970 H.S. class ring In
Little Hall. Call 372-0938 after 6.
(L-3t-5-p)
LOST: Want to help a lonely Indian?
Please help locate my four unopened
personal letters. Addressed to Pram
Datt, care foreign stdn. advsr., call
373-2362. (L-lt-6-p)
LOST: Black rim glasses In black case
between Campus bookstore and law
center. Call Rick, 378-0426 or Leave
at bookstore. (L-3t-5-c)
FOUND: Man's black bHlfo{d; found
on Hawthorne Rd. Contains student
I.D.'s, driver's license, etc. Call
372-2351. (L-3t-6-NC)
SERVICES
Kanapaha pre-school center, ages 3-V,
Mon-Frl. 715-545. fftfOAij 378-9830.
Archer Road, hot lunch, snacks,
reasonable rates. (M-lOt-3-p)
Fenced In parking, across the street
from Research Library, $25 per
quarter. For further Information, call
372- (M-3t-6-p)
b<4 you own a M6NdA? ArSydu
tired of poor service? Steve at the
CYCLE WORKS does tuneups A
minor repairs whiles-wait. Op* if
from 3 until 9 p.m., 1220 S. Main.
(M-st-64-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyegiaaM 4
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 51*
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480.
Stereo 8-track tape cartridges. 2 full
albums on 1 tape, recorded from
your LP*s for below the cost of a>
single album tap*. $6 complete. Free:
pick-up and delivery, highest quality..
John 378-5916 4-8 PM. (M-lt-3-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscript*
; theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
373- 9-5. (M-st-173-p)
l. il p I ii |
HORSES BOARDED SLEEPY
HOLLOW HORSE FARM, Finest
facilities, complete care, stalls,
pasture, trails, 300 ft. ring, dose to
Unlv., ph 373-1059. (M-st-63-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired:
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now! Bank Ameflcard A
Master Charge.
s mmr\
| Ml
LAST 2 DAYS
AT.. .2:01 4:30
'AMitIWK
f
MWMN HSIMOOD
*"SBRG
mrmmoKi
.1:51 4:30



Page 14

, Th Florida Alligator, Monday, Saptwnbar 28,1970

Palestinians Agree To Peace

By United Pr International
King Hussein, Palestinian
guerrila commander Yasser
Arafat ond other leaders of the
Arab world signed a peace
agreement in Cairo Sunday to
end the civil war in Jordan. The
pact provided for an end to all
fighting in the ravaged kingdom
and withdrawal of all troops
guerrila and army from the
Jordanian capital of Amman.
The Middle East News
Agency, the semiofficial voice of
the Egyptian government, said
the agreement calls for the
release of all prisoners by both
sides with security to be
maintained under civilian
administration.
FIRST SHOTS in the fighting
were fired Sept. 17. Hussein and
Arafat agreed to a ceasefire last
Friday but fighting was reported
after that. Dispatches Sunday
even as the Arab chiefs met in
Cairo told of new fighting in and
around Amman.
The agreement came as the
international implications of the
crisis eased with the release of
38 American hijack hostages the
guerillas had held for 21 days.
Thirty-two of them flew home
Sunday via Cyprus, telling how
they were nearly killed in the
crossfire raging around a camp
near Amman where they were
held.
Some of the Americans said
an Arab mob spat at them and
screamed insults as they were

WHAT'S HAPPENING

WHAT DO AN OLIVE
BRANCH AND A VETERAN
HAVE IN COMMON??: Peace.
The Veterans for Peace will meet
at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 29 at the
Bench' and Bar, 1206 W.
University Ave. All new and old
veterans are invited.
THE BIG RAP: Student
Government is sponsoring an
open-forum discussion in the
Plaza of the Americas on Sept.
30 between 12 and 1 pm.
Featured guests will include UF
President Stephen C. OConnell,
Lester Hale, vice-president of
student affairs, Roy Mitchell,
director of minority affairs,
Frank Adams gnd Betty Cosby,
deans of student affairs.
AGNEWS PET PEEVE: The
Florida Student Movement, a
group of students aiming to end
the war in Vietnam, will hold an
organizational meeting Sept. 29
at 7:30 p.m. in room 361 of the
Paint in Oils
Instruction by Hope White
$6.00 for 6 two-hour sessions
Tuesday evenings starting
Oct. 13 7:00-0:00 pm room
C-4, Union register at the first
lesson or in room 310 of the
liiiiL t.vu.nw** *y the JWR
Union.

Amman.
THE CAIRO agreement was'
signed in a hotel Sunday by 10
leaders, including Hussein,
Arafat and President Gamal
Abdel Nasser of Egypt after a
relatively brief -for Arabs
summit conference. It began at
1:30 p.m. after Husseins arrival
from Jordan, and the agreement
was announced about six hours
later.
A preamble to the pact said it
was signed to save Arab
bloodshed and safeguard
security and safety of the Arab
nation against imperialist
conspiracies and to bring
stability to Jordan which is now
facing division and suffering.
Political sources said Hussein
dropped his repeated demands
that the army should be
permitted free use of Amman
and other Jordanian cities while
the guerillas must get out of the
, metropolitan centers.
THE HIJACKINGS were part
of a PFLP plot to force the
release of commandos
imprisoned in Israel, Britain,
West Germany and Switzerland.
It appeared Sunday that the
ransom demands would not be
met, at least for the time being.
Most of the more than 400
persons who had been held in
the hijackings were allowed to
leave Jordan as civil war
engulfed the Arab kingdom. But
54 were held until last Friday

J. Wayne Reitz Union. All
interested students are invited.
THE TALENTED
COMPUTER: A concert of
electronic music will be
presented in the Union
Auditorium Sept. 29 at 8:15
p.m. Compositions by John
Cage, Mimaroglu, Morton
Subotnick, Bulen Arel, and

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1967 COUGAR $1695
Local one owner, factory air.
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2 Dr Hardtop, V-8, automatic tranamWon, factory air
1969 MUSTANG MACH I $2695
Automatic tranwniwion, double power, factory air.
1964 CHEVROLET $495
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vinyl roof.

the group of 16.
The 32 Americans freed
Sunday arrived at Nicosia, the
capital of Cyprus, aboard an
International Red Cross plane.
Jeff Newton, a student from the
Bronx, N.Y., said he was flying
to New York after a vacation in
Israel when the TWA plane was
hijacked hijackedl
l hijackedl WAS a little frightened, but
I was confident that sooner or
later we would be released
because we had the backing of
the whole world and the big
powers.
Newton said he and others
were imprisoned by the
guerrillas outside Amman.
The fighting was very heavy
and during the last few days our
area was heavily bombarded,
Newton said.
Sara Malka of North Bergen,
NJ., was one of several women
hostages.
OUR ONLY wish now is
that the other six hostages
should be freed as soon as
possible, Miss Malka said. She
spoke before the news of the
release of the six reached
Cyprus.
Derrel Suttles of Huntsville,
Ala., a young serviceman told of
the ordeal in Jordan.
I was kept in a village on the
outskirts of Amman, he said.
There were ear-splitting cracks
from the battle but we were not
hurt. We had enough water for a

Karlheinz Stockhausen will be
performed. Admission is free.
WHATS GREEN AND
ROUND AND GROWLS?: A
gator, I lied. All organizations
submitting skits for Gator Growl
are requested to come to a
meeting today at 4 p.m. in the
Union.

week but after that it got very
short.
Plans were sketchy but there
were early reports that the
hostages would spend the night
in Cyprus and fly to New York
Monday, possibly with a stop in
western Europe.

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New HC Emphasis
On Growl And Floats

By CARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Writer
Changes in this years
Homecoming weekend include a
switch in emphasis from house
and dorm decorations to floats,
expansion of the Homecoming
Parade, and more participation
in Gator Growl.
Jeff Warren, general chairman
of Homecoming, discussed some
of the changes Sunday.
WARREN SAID Gator Growl
would be expanded so more
student groups could try out for
the show.
We had considered having a
separate show Thursday night
(Oct. 29), but this would be a
burden on those students who
will be in Gator Growl on Friday
evening, he said.
So what we did was to
expand Gator Growl, so more
groups could try out and were
placing the emphasis on quality,
not the mass production.
Other changes that had been
suggested for Gator Growl were,
charging admission for students,
hiring a professional emcee and
rock group and elimination of
skits during the Growl.
WE PURSUED the idea of
hiring a professional emcee but
decided that this would detract
from the idea of student
involvement, said Warren.
Also, Warren said/ hiring a
professional emcee would mean
charging students admission to
Growl.
Steve Uhlfelder and others
didnt want the students charged
admission to the show, he
explained. Student
Government productions will
look into the prospects of
getting an emcee.
WARREN SAID that the idea
of decorating houses and dorms
was dropped so the financial
pressure on these groups
wouldnt be so great. What
were doing is having the houses
and dorms build floats for the
parade and then they can use the
floats for decorations.

9 vs SCULPTUR-KUT /V atUlSLook J> HAIRSTYLE
lVk? UNIVERSITY PLAZA
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The Gainesville Police
Department may clear parking
from the parade route so people
wont have to stand in the street
to watch the parade. Were also
looking into re-routing the
traffic so the traffic wont be
congested after the parade,
Warren said.
There were more changes
made in Homecoming weekend:
THE ALUMNI BARBEQUE
will be held in the gymnasium
this year, and students will be
able to attend. The students will
pay $2.00 for their dinner, the
cost that Servomation is
charging for the dinners, and
Alumni $2.50. The barbeque is
being held in the gym so that the
students and alumni can go right
to the field for the game.
Floats can be on any theme a
group wants. This was decided
after a suggestion by UF Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelder


Greeks Change Attitudes
UF Greeks are changing their attitudes about Homecoming.
At an Inter-Fraternity Council (IFC) meeting last spring, the
fraternities werent as enthusiastic as usual about paidcipating in the
traditional activities, according to Charlie Brackins, IFC presidents
A FEW fraternities expressed a desire to do something other than
build floats and put on skits.
Brackins feels pressures on Greeks are causing them to be more
oriented toward social issues.
Tau Epsilon Phi (TEP) and Pi Kappa Alpha (Pike) fraternities want
to use what they feel is misdirected energy for more constructive
purposes, Brackins said.
TEP President Tony Center said his fraternity sees no purpose in
house decorations and float building. TEPs, who spent S2OO on
decorations last year, want to present a meaningful message.
YOUR NEWEST SERVICE
DEALER FOR ALL FOREIGN CARS
WE KNOW THE VALUE OF CARS.
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that the theme be UFs
financial crises. This way, said
Warren, the groups can do a
float on the financial crises, or
anything they please.
There will be a campus-wide
dance Saturday night for
married students, foreign and
independent students who
usually dont have any {dace to
9f
§O.
CONCERNING THE DANCE
for Saturday night, Warren said,
the only problem that exists is
getting monetary backing for a
good band.
If we can get the money, we
want a good band, and we were
thinking of getting the Tams,
said Warren. A decision on that
will be made this week.
Warren said that the dance
was usually an Interhall function
and hopes that Interhall will be
able to put more money into the
project.

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Your fashion store for Men & Women in the University
Plaza; 1620 W. Univ. Ave., presents the weekly
football contest every Monday during the Gator
season.
Mens or Ladies Wear I
EXTRA $lO if wiMMr b a girl
Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will win
Saturday, Oct. 3 Estimate total yards to be gained by
Florida, which will be the tie breaker.
Home Tearn Visiting Team
1 Florida vs. Q No. Carolina St.
j Mississippi vs. H Alabama
rj Texas Christian vs. Arkansas
Boston U. vs*. Temple
San Diego St. vs Brigham Young
Kentucky vs. Auburn
Kansas vs. m New Mexico
( Minnesota vs. Nebraska
Michigan vs. Texas A& M
Texas vs. LJ U.C.L.A.
Total OFFENSE yardage gained by FLORIDA
Winner's Signature Must Agree With
Signature On Entry Blank.
Entries must be deposited in W* shop by Fri., Oct. 2
In case of tie, prize will be divided equally among winneis.
WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN:
1620 West University Avenue i University Plaza
SIGNATURE
ADDRESS
CITY STATE
ENTRIES LIMITED, TWO PER PERSON

Monday, Soptombor 28,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15





f

Timeless' Oldies Top New Tunes

By WARD BRISICK
Alligator Entertainment Writer
Remember when you used to
go into a record store and walk
up and down the rows of albums
unable to make a choice? There
seemed to be a hundred new
albums all of which you had to
have, one of which you could
afford.
Ladately it seems that
although the groups are still
recording there is a great absence
of good material. There are still
many albums being released.
LATELY IT SEEMS that
although the groups are still
recording and releasing albums
monthly very little new material
seems to rise above mediocrity.
A sudden absence of good
listening material prompted me
to look back through my record
collection. I discovered that I
had ignored some of the finest
music on record in my search for
the new and different.
A typical find was an old
Spencer Davis album titled Im
A Man, featuring Muff
Winwood and his 17-year-old
brother, Stevie.
THE ALBUM IS
representative of the skiffle style
of many English blues groups
during the early sixties. Steve
Winwoods early influences are
quite evident as he sings 1 Cant
Stand It, in his best John Lee

Love, Peace And Happiness
In Fla. Gym Friday Night

By WARD BRISICK
Alligator Entartainmont Writar
Prepare yourself for dancing in the aisles, twisting,
in the rows and hand-clapping testimonials because
the Chambers Brothers are coming to Fall Frolics.
The five Chambers Brothers, four from Mississippi
and one from England have been working together as
a group for six years in search of a sound that would
bring people together and make them happy.
THEY BELONG TO the rock scene, the blues
scene, the country-western scene, and the gospel
y This means they belong to the total music scene
and want to establish a true love feeling between their
audiences and themselves.
On stage the Brothers will go to any lengths to get
the audience into the music with them. Their style of

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Hooker and wails to his own
piano accompaniment in
Georgia On My Mind, a la Ray
Charles.
For most groups playing the
blues is a complex business. It
involves so many personal and
external conditions that it is
never certain just how well they
will perform until after the
performance.
Watching a blues group
perform makes you immediately
aware of their intense search for
new ways to interpret and
improvise upon their own
material.
PERHAPS THE album best
representative of the blues group
is John Mayalls Bluesbreakers
featuring Eric Clapton.
Clapton is the man
responsible for much of the
experimental improvising in the
free solo form. Leaving the
Yardbirds to join May all,
Clapton improved his technique
beyond recognition. Some idea
of this can be gained by listening
to his work on the albums
slowest number, Have You
Heard. His playing here is a
breath-takingly beautiful as it is
savage on the up-tempo All
Your Love, and Freddy Kings
Hideaway.
Clapton solos with great
abandon. Feeling each note he
articulately runs up and down

jl The Chambers Brothers are a different
II kind of rock group. People don 7 come to
see or hear the Brothers, they come to
experience the Brothers' sound and visual II
show. 99 H
flat-out-pull-your-pants-down music makes it easy for
the people to join in and perform with the group.
The Brothers have a magnetic way of reaching into
your hearts. Their travels have won them millions of
followers throughout the world.
This the Chambers Brothers will travel to
the Florida Gym for two shows at 7:30 and 10:30
p.m. ...
Tickets are $5.50 per couple and are on sale at
Recordsville, The Record Bar and the Reitz Union
Box Office.

the neck confined only by his
inborn metric sense. He plays
the blues and makes you believe
he means it.
SOMEHOW I ALWAYS relate
John May all to American Paul
Butterfield. Their groups have
been used as a coming-out
vehicle by many famous
musicians yet neither Mayall nor
Butterfield has reached
individual fame.
Butterfields East-West
album best exemplifies his
musical kinship with Mayall.
MIKE BLOOMFIELD,
Butterfields lead guitarist on the
album, was up-and-coming and
well-established himself with his
work on the Work Song, and
on the title instrumental
East-West.
Butterfields blues epitomizes
what the English were looking
for; slow 12-bar blues with
haunting harmonica and dismal
lyrics polyphonized by the more
somber lead guitar.
On the East Coast it was blues
while on the West Coast a whole
different musical idea was being
bom.
JIM MCGUINhrS Byrds, then
five now four, and all of the
West Coast which is to say Los
Angeles began to electrify a
basic folk sound which brought
the longhairs out of the

Page 16

mountains and forests making
them realize just how strong
their numbers were. The people
came to hear them play Dylan
and their own Eight Miles
High and Turn, Turn, Turn.

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Entertainment Editor

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 28, 1970

Listen to the Byrds, then to
Clapton and Winwood and
Butterfield. Much can be said for
this work. It was all recorded
five to six years ago and it is as
good now as it was then.



Herald Endorses Eckerd, Askew

MIAMI (UPI) The Miami
Herald endorsed Republican
Jack Eckerd and Democrat
Reubin Askew for their partys
nominations for governor
Sunday and spoke kindly of
former Gov. Farris Bryant, a
candidate for the U. S. Senate.
The Herald had endorsed
Eckerd over Gov. Claude Kirk in
the first primary Sept. 8, but
then favored Senate President John E. Mathews of
Jacksonville for the Democratic nomination.
Mathews was eliminated in that primary, which put
Askew and Attorney General Earl Faircloth in a
run-off for the Democratic nomination and matched
Kirk and Eckerd for the GOP nomination.
THE RESULT of nearly four years of
misgovemment... was to leave Kirk's own party
embarrassed, Floridians disgusted and the state in an
uproar," the Herald editorial said.
It praised Eckerd for showing an aptitude for

Veterinary School Planned,
Opening Set For 1974

By KATHY ROBERTS
Alligator Writer
The fall of 1974 is the target
date for the opening of the
Veterinarian College of Medicine
at UF, according to Dr. G.T.
Edds, chairman of the
veterinarian science staff.
Because there are only 18
colleges of veterinarian medicine
in the United States, the opening
of UFs vet college will be a help
to Florida residents who have
had to attend veterinarian
college out of state in the past.
The preferred site of the
college is an 80100 acre plot
west of the Veterans Hospital,
presently being used for beef
research.
The cost of the buildings and
facilities has been estimated at
$24,000,000. Pre-planning funds
from the state for Dean, staff,
curriculum, and facilities is
$175,000. A new planning
request for $247,000 has just
been submitted to the,
Shelters Open
ATLANTA (UPI) The Red
Cross said Sunday it has opened
12 shelters along both southern
coasts of Florida in anticipation
-of tropical storm Greta.
Sixteen other Red Cros.
disaster team members were
placed on alert and stand ready
to be moved in by air from
Atlanta if needed.
The shelters were opened at
Marathon, Sugarloaf, Key West,
Key Largo, Plantation Key and
Islamorada, the Red Cross said.
o rt o
o *; o
IV u a
o 4> o
o UJ o
Br
Zi I ot o
u >s!s!ssEg i
w c"3T sm x o
Oio
LI N O iimlU o>
-
El u XiaZO
fluj zaa g :
ITS P| j
i-jk

Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare for the
three year period of 1971-74.
Next month a dean selection
committee will announce the
new dean for the vet college. He
will head the college in all areas
of veterinarian medicine
including the Vet Science
Department eventually being
phased into the Vet College of
Medicine.
UF will admit sixty-four
students into the first class after
they meet the requirements of
ninety quarter hours. To receive
a D.V.M. (Doctor of

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political leadership in the best
sense," and said Askew is a
fresh, new presence on a scene
long dominated by the did hands
of the Democratic party in
Florida.
The Herald did not endorse
Bryant directly in his primary
battle with State Sen. Lawton
Chiles, D-Lakeland, but
defended him against an
old-line segregationist" label applied to him by a
national news magazine.
THE CHARGE today is preposterous," said the
Herald. His accomplishments in Tallahassee and
later in Washington qualify Governor Bryant for
meaningful service to the state of Florida.
The Herald also endorsed Sen. Robert L. Shevin,
D-Miami, for nomination as attorney general and
former Assistant Attorney General Wilson Wright of
Tallahassee for the Public Service Commission.

ALSO PICKS SHEVN

Veterinarian Medicine) a year
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quarters will have to be
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Campus
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If you meet our requirements
FULL or part time marketing
research and sales work. Must be
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No high pressure sales. No
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Pre-arranged appointments. For
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Monday. teplewher 2i. It7o. The Ftoride AJKfotor,

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator

Bama Tops Gators, Toss To Finish

if
E?* v NIS
JaBlT;^C;
v< m
: -'^v?^M x :'.< £?assessxV S
>**

mimmtt ****^^***^******^'" a mm^^mm ""** ammomaamm *"**£ 1
jSHBj KEN MCKINNON W^K']
Pattern Proved Consistent

- It had to be fate, just had to be.
It was destined to be one of those days.
The Gators have lost the toss of the coin only
twice in the last two years, both of which were
followed by losing efforts on the field.
So when the coin fell to Alabamas favor
Saturday, it was as if someone was trying to tell
everyone in Tuscaloosas Denny Stadium that it
would be another one of those days.
Everything fell into place, for Bama that is, after
the Tides defensive back Steve Williams picked off
an early John Reaves pass.
It had appeared up until then, which, my friends,
was very early, that the Gators would hold up their
half on that hot Alley bama afternoon.
The Tide wasted no time. Bryants bunch took
die opening kickoff, which, in rare form, the Gators
kamikazi squad managed to cover well, and set to
work.
As if with a secret insight the Bama offense
probed into Dickeys improving defense. The
Tide offered the big play for the UF defenders to
stop, but it was not to be. Alabama went on to
score.
With heat waves rising off the astroturf, Florida
took the return kickoff, followed the scoring-battle
lead that had been set for the game, and began to
march.
But then came that interception by Williams, who
slashed the ball from the receiving arms of our own
Carlos Alvarez at the Bama 18 and returned it to
the Tide 36. From there the Bamians marched right
back down the field, settling for a field goal and a
10-0 first quarter lead.
Without that interception, it would have been
7-7, the Gators at least having momentum enough
to get themselves fired-up.
The interception proved to be the biggest play of
the day in that so-important game up there
somewhere in the Alabama plateaus.
No one in the Gator locker room following the
game could say enough about those quick, big,
well-executin Tide country boys. Also, no one
could say enough about how poorly Florida had
riiowed.
I played so poorly, Alvarez said, bowing his
head a little as he spoke, but with a tint of that
obvious pride of his still there above the
humiliation. We cant do anything now except get
ready for the next game.
Quarterback John Reaves, who hit 22 of 44
passes for a not-so-bad 238 yards, said his passing
game was off, that the Bama coverage was good,
wasnt it obvious.
But, even through all that gloom, one had to feel
Bke they meant it when they said they would have

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Toss Os Coin, Faces Os Playors Reflect Outcome Os Game

to improve, that they would try harder now.
We didnt play well, Dickey admitted. We got
beat inside, on the line, and in the backfield.
- Harvin Clark, Gator defensive back physically
drained from the heat that came off that synthetic
stuff that someone seems to want so badly down
here, compared it to last years opening-game
slaughter of Houston.
Then, we could do no wrong, while Houston
could do nothing right, Clark said. This time it
was just the opposite with Alabama in the drivers
seat.
Gator defensive captain Mike Kelly, wincing with
pain from a reinjured bruised shoulder which he said
was worse than he had thought it was, said it was
the most fired-up team he had ever seen.
Everyone in that Gator locker room had praise
for the team that had just beaten them as
convincingly as any team has done in the last five
years. Everyone there said they played poorly.
But the legend himself, Bear Bryant, probably
summed it up best, when he said, if they had told
me it (the margin of victory) would have been this
big, I would have believed some of those stories
about Reaves smoking pot.
The pattern was consistent.
Florida lost the toss, lost momentum early and
got completely blown out of Denny Stadium.
A fitting end to the game was the fumble by
Leonard George, who became the first black player
to score for the University of Florida and, more
pleasantly, the first black player to score in Denny
Stadium.
That fumble came at the Bama three yard line,
where, it appeared, Florida would at least get some
compensation out of putting another one on the
scoreboard.
The pattern was there. It sure was.
Sure, Coach Dickey, just like you said, just call
it a good ole country whippin, nothing more,
nothing less.
And, like you, I believe that the Gators will ahve
their day again.

Page 18

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MIKE RICH STOPPED FOR NO GAIN
.... pile-up typifies Gator Day
Tide Dulls Day

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Alligator Sports Writer
It turned out to be a dark
afternoon for the Florida Gators
in sunny Denny Stadium
Saturday when Bear Bryants
Crimson Tide soundly defeated
the Gators 46-15.
From the opening kickoff, it
was Alabama all the way as they
tallied the first points of the
game with 10 minutes remaining
in the first quarter. Starting on
their own 25, Bama marched
upfield and capped their initial
drive when backup quarterback
Neb Hayden scored on a
quarterback keeper.
FT LOOKED for awhile that
the game would be an offensive
show as Florida took the kickoff
after the score and began their
first drive of the game.
But on a second down and six
on the Alabama 21, quarterback
John Reaves went back to pass
and threw to his favorite, Carlos
Alvarez.
Alvarez caught the ball, but at
the same time, so did defensive
back Steve Williams, who
intercepted and ran it back to
the 36.
From then on it was Alabama
as they proceeded to drive to the
Florida 16, where Richard
Ciemny kicked a 33 yard field
goal.
The score could have been
worse, but two touchdowns for
the Tide were called back on
penalties.

KEN McKINNON
Sports Editor

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JOHNNY MUSSO, who
gained more yardage running on
one Bama drive than Florida did
the whole game, broke through
the line and ran 31 yards for a
touchdown.
Bryant had praise for his
offensive line that opened holes
big enough for Musso to gain
139 yards on 21 carries.
Reaves had the chib driving
toward it* first touchdown, but
he. threw behind running back
Tommy Durrance and defensive
back Bill Blair intercepted and
ran it 78 yards for a touchdown.
THE GATORS were walking
off the field when the officials
called the [day bade for a
personal foul. The score would
have been 24-0 at that point if
the two scores were allowed, but
instead Florida was still in it.
Reaves came back to Mike
Rich for nine yards, completing
the drive for UF*s first score.
Asked about his game plan
against the Gators, Bryant said,
I had nothing to do with it.
(Steve) Sloan put the offense
together this week and came
down from the press box at half
time and told us what we were
doing wrong on offense and
what we should concentrate on
during the second half," Bryant
said.
Sloan, an All-American
quarterback for Alabama in
1965, is presently the offensive
coach for the Crimson Tide.



five Gators Make NFL

Former UF comerback Steve
Tannen survived final roster cuts
to bring the number of
ex-Gators playing professional
football to nine.
The University of Miami is the
number one pro-producing
school in the state with 11
members on NFL 40-man
rosters.
The school-by-school
rundown shows:
Miami ll
Florida 9
Florida State 8
Florida A&M 7
Bethune-Cookman 2
Edward Waters 1
Tannen joins four other
rookies from other state schools
that made the grade this season.
They include Florida State
tackle Jeff Curchin, Chicago
Bears; Miami defensive end Tony
Cline, Oakland Raiders; Florida
A&M running back Hubert Ginn,
Miami Dolphins; and
Bethune-Cookman comerback
Alvin Wyatt, who made it with
the Oakland Raiders.
FALCONS Cannonball Butler,
running back, Edward Waters;
Harmon Wages, running back,
Florida; John Matlock, center,
Miami.

How Opponents Fared

By Alligator Services
AUBURN-TENNESSEE: A
defense-minded Auburn team
topped Tennessee 36-23 in the
weekends top matchup of
upcoming Gator opponents. A
rash of fumbles and
interceptions keyed the Tigers
win over the Vols.
NORTH CAROLINA: North
Carolina State, the next team on
the Gator schedule, managed a
7-7 tie over a heavily favored
South Carolina team. Winless
N.C. State came up with a tough
defense that held the gamecocks
scoreless until the fourth period.
FSU: A highly favored FSU

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STEVE TANNEN
... starts for Jets
BEARS Jeff Curchin, tackle,
FSU; Bobby Joe Green, punter,
Florida; Randy Jackson, tackle,
Florida.
COWBOYS Bob Hayes, wide
receiver, Florida A&M.
LIONS Jim Yarbrough, tight
end, Florida.
RAMS Larry Smith, running
back, Florida.
SAINTS Del Williams, guard,
FSU.
CARDINALS Jerry Daanen,
wide receiver, Miami.
49ERS Steve Spurrier,
quarterback, Florida.
COLTS Ted Hendricks,
linebacker, Miami.
PATRIOTS Barry Brown, tight
end, Florida; Ron Sellers, wide
receiver, FSU; Kim Hammond,
quarterback, FSU.
BILLS Bob Tatarek, tackle,
Miami.
BENGALS Guy Dennis, guard,
Florida; Ken Riley, comerback,
Florida A&M.
BROWNS Chip Glass, tight end,

had to rely on the toe of kicking
specialist Frank Fonte for 13
points in its second half to come
from behind 19-14 win over
Wake Forest.
GEORGIA: A powerful
Georgia team ripped through
.hapless Clemson 38-0.
KENTUCKY: Archie Manning
threw two touchdowns to put
Mississippi on top of a surprising
Kentucky 20-17.
MIAMI: Eddie McAshan, the
black Gainesville quarterback
that got away from UF
recruiters, hit on two scoring
tosses to down the Gators final
opponent Miami, 31-21.

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LARRY SMITH
... Ram veteran
FSU; Walt Sumner, comerback, FSU.
BRONCOS AI Denson, wide
receiver, Florida A&M; Steve Tens!,
quarterback, FSU.
DOLPHINS Larry Little, guard,
Bethune-Cookman; Ed Weisacosky,
linebacker, Miami; Hubert Ginn,
running back, Florida A&M.
JETS Steve Tannen, comerback,
Florida; Roger Finnie, tackle, Florida
A&M.
RAIDERS Jim Otto, center,
Miami; Pete Banaszak, running back,
Miami; Fred Biletnikoff, wide
receiver, FSU; Tony Cline, defensive
end, Miami; Dan Conners, linebacker,
Miami; Hewritt Dixon, running back,
Florida A&M; Carleton Oats,
defensive end, Florida A&M; Alvin
Wyatt, cornerback,
Bethune-Cookman.
STEELERS Mike Haggerty,
tackle, Miami.
CHARGERS Russ Smith,
running back, Miami.

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Monday, September 28,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I. The Florida Alligator, Monday, Saptambar 28,1970

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