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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Allege Sex Attacks Cause Hanaina

By RON SACHS
Alligator Assignments Editor
Two prisoners released from
the Alachua County Jail earlier
this week said Thursday night
that William Baugher, found
dead in his jail cell Tuesday
morning, was the subject of both
verbal and physical attacks by
other inmates.
We also heard he was
homosexually molested, said
one of the released prisoners.
JAILHOUSE trustees, who
bring food and supplies to the

1?alttl
*Att jAmOUM

Vol 63, No. 5

V! & '3* & y. i ImMBB
ROBERT CANNEY PHIL COPE
... out on bond
Prof. Released After
Arrest For Obscenity


By RANDY BELLOWS
And PREM DATT
Alligator Writers
Theyve' worked out a beautiful system of
Hhnmani7atiftn m our prison system, where a
prisoner loses his entire personality, respect and
pride along with his hair.
Those are the words of Robert Canney, UF
instructor and doctoral candidate after his release
from Lake'Butler prison Thursday.
CANNEY WAS sentenced to prison following his
conviction in April for resisting arrest and striking a
police officer at an anti-war rally in St. Petersburg.
Canney was incarcerated Tuesday following a 15
minute jury verdict in the 6th Circuit Court which
resulted in a six month to two year prison term.
According to Canney, his attorney had not filed
on time and was therefore not allowed to call
witnesses because of this technicality.
My attorney in his summary called the trial an
obscenity, Canney We had over 100
witnesses who were not allowed to testify.
THE PROSECUTING attorney had worked out
an arrangement with our attorneys to waive the
' Reality if they could interrogate the witnesses,
canney said. Canneys attorneys refused when they
found that they would not be allowed to be present
at the interrogation.
JOMO (Junta of Militant Organizations) and
Community Liberation Movement (CLM) sponsored
the anti-war rally where Canney was a scheduled
speaker. It wps at the rally in St. Petersburg that his
arrest took plpce.
Two police officers spoke at the trial, and
quoted me as saying, Goddamn pig, when all I said
was *Let*s bring the Goddamned war home, and
begin dealing with the problems of society.

prisoners, were cited as giving
prisoners a great deal of
information of what takes in
other cells, according to the
former prisoners who spoke with
the Alligator. Several
prisoners were talking of a
recent attack on Braugher.
We heard some prisoners talk
about how in his (Braughers)
cell, two other prisoners had
held a razor blade at his neck
and forced him into homosexual
acts, said one former prisoner.
This alleged incident took
place only about two days

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

OTHER SPEAKERS has also used Goddamn,
but I was the one that was arrested for using
offensive (obscene) language. Apparently they were
looking for a scapegoat and time was running out.
Canney said he felt that the St. Petersburg police
were out there to show that they wouldnt tolerate
outside agitators in Pinellas County attending an
open meeting to discuss a controversial issue.
Canney continued, I think they chose me as
their scapegoat because I spoke on this, the first
statewide protest against the war, tied in with the
entire Black Liberation struggle.
Tuesday night the $2,500 in bond money was
raised and Canney was informed that it would be
brought to the Pinellas County jail on Wednesday
morning around 10 a.m. Prisoners are usually
detained in the Pinellas County, Clearwater Jail
before being transferred to a different place of
incarceration.
THE NEXT morning they took me out to what
I thought would be my release. Instead they said
they were planning on transferring me to the Lake
Butler Jail, said Canney.
The $2,500 bond arrived at a quarter after 10,
fifteen minutes after they had unfairly removed me
from the Clearwater prison. They fully knew, said
Canney, that my bond was supposed to come
between 10 and 11:30 ajn.
Canney plaims he was ostensibly removed from
the Clearwater prison because of lack of space.
Canney said, Well, I saw plenty of empty cells (at
the Clearwater jail), but when I was brought to Lake
Butler Prison they kept me overnight in a 6' X 8*
cell meant for one man, but with three other
prisoners in it.
_ (SEE 'CANNEY' PAGE 2)

j IN DEPTH ||
iY.Yii.YiVf
before Braughers death,
according to the former
prisoners who asked to remain
anonymous.
A TRUSTEE informed the
two prisoners on Tuesday
afternoon that Baugher had
been hung in his cell. One of
the former prisoners who spoke

University of Florida, Gainesville

with the ALLIGATOR said he
did not recall the trustee calling
the death a suicide.
The jailer who found the
hanging body of the 25-year-old
Baugher said he feld the other
prisoners in the cell were aware
of the situation before the
death.
Ronald Hinson, jailer from
midnight to 8 am. was informed
an inmate was hanging, by a jail
trustee.
HINSON IMMEDIATELY
went to the cell to find William
Baugher hanging from his cell

FBI TO COKES

UF President
Tells Plans

UF President Stephen C.
O'Connell said Thursday his
administration would <( welcome
FBI assistance to help us avoid
any damage to UF buildings and
my harm to our students and
staff.
was commenting
on a question concerning
President Nixons authorization
of FBI officials to assist the
nations colleges and universities
in investigating campus
disturbances.
HE SAID UF will continue to
enforce existing regulations to
prevent campus disorder.
I hope we dont have any
more Kent States and I dont
think we will. The vast majority
of our students, faculty and staff
do not want any disruptions,
he said.
We will continue to protect
the freedom of expression for
all. However, our demonstration
policy will be utilized if
necessary, he said.
HE SAID at the 10 am, press
conference in the presidential
suite conference room in the
Reitz Union we need to do a
better job of helping people

- w m * w ,-w w w w.w wwwwwwwvw w w.v.v^v.w.v
8 8
| New Bra Test I
Flunks School [
§ i
WEST PALM BEACH (UPI) An attorney has threatened to \
bounce the Palm Beach County school system into court for ij:
§ enforcing a dress code that he insists includes a bra test** for
1 girls. !$
Sylvan Burdick claimed Wednesday the school system's dress x
code with its so-called bra test" is an invasion of individual :
privacy. Athelstan Spilhaus, a scientist who was appointed :
county school superintendent recently, denied the existence of |
such a test.
( Burdick maintains that girls suspected of not wearing :
appropriate undergarments are summoned before the school's :
dean of women for the test.
He said the dean, a woman, asks the gal to jump up and $
down. If there is too much bounce," the girl is sent home and j:
told not to return without a bra. :
Edward Eissey, principal of Palm Beach Gardens High,
admitted several girls had been sent home for not wearing bras,
$ but said the alleged 'lira test" has never been used at his school, |

door, a sheet wrapped around
his neck.
The other prisoners in the cell
were all awake and up at the
time Hinson came to investigate
the incident, around 4 a.m.
Tuesday morning.
Hinson said he asked the
other prisoners why they didnt
call him to tell him of the death.
Prisoner Terry 0. Grubb, being
held on charges of robbery and
auto theft replied, Its his
(Baughers) business.
(SEE 'CONVICTS* PAGE 2)

Friday September 25, 1970

understand that, for the most
part, our institutions are
contributing positively and
effectively to the progress of the
state and nation.
Concerning the record fall
quarter enrollment of 22,043
students, OConnell indicated
the 1,302 student increase over
1969 reflects the largest yearly
jump in the past decade.
He said the quality of service
UF is able to provide may suffer
if enrollment continues to
(SEE 'O'CONNELL PAGE 2)
THE C ONTROVERSIA
No Knock** policy
has passed the House
341-6 page 2
classifieds 14
Editorials 8
Eui criainme nt ... .. .19
Movies 14
Sports 21
What's Happening .2
II I ,1 I 11



!, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, Saptambar 25,1570

Page 2

VOTE 34?6

'No Knock Passes

WASHINGTON (UPI) The House
overwhelmingly approved President Nixons drug
abuse bill Thursday after upholding a bitterly
fought no knock provision that would allow
federal agents to break into homes unannounced to
seize evidence.
The bill, a key measure in Nixons anti-crime
package, was expected to win early acceptance by
the Senate, which passed a similar but more limited
bill several months ago. The House vote was 341 to
6.
Both bills would provide stiffer penalties for
pushers, including a possible life sentence for those
involved in organized crime, but would reduce the
punishment for first offense possession of any drug
form a felony to a misdemeanor.
THE NO KNOCK provision would allow
narcotics agents with warrants to enter private
premises unannounced if they felt there was danger
of evidence being destroyed or risk to their lives.

SB Pres. Goes To DC

By BILL SHUFORD
Alligator Writer
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder and Dr. Lester Hale,
vice president of student affairs,
leaves UF today for Washington,
D.C., and the second annual
President to Presidents
Conference.
The conference, organized by
the Association of Student
Canney Free
frawiyatt
Canney continued, Today
before I left, their attitude
seemed to change. 1 guess they
figured I would soon be released,
so they treated me with some
diplomacy.
Canneys immediate plans are
to return to his seven classes
Friday, and continue working on
his dissertation. His lawyers are
working on an appeal, hopefully
in federal court. He plans to pay
off part of his bond and past and
future court costs through
public blood donations.

WHAT'S HAPPENING

THEYRE COMING TO TAKE
US AWAY: The Bethlehem
Asylum" will play two dances in
the Reitz Union ballroom
tonight and Saturday from 9
pm. -1 ajn.
Back-up bands will be Rush"
on Friday and 'The Back
Basement** on Saturday.
Admission is $1 per person.
PIGS GRUNT, ELEPHANTS
BELLOW, AND GATORS??:
Growl. There will be a skit
meeting Sept. 28 from 4-6
pm. in room 349 in the Union
for all campus organizations who
plan to try out skits for Gator
Growl.
WHAT HAS 18 LEGS AND
CATCHES FUES?: A baseball

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of tnr
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second clast matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is gfvgn to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
mote than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

Governments, is a three-day
affair aimed at creating greater
understanding between the
federal government and higher
education.
It will be highlighted by
discussions and speeched by
Daniel Moynihan, counselor to
President Nixon; Melvin Laird,
secretary of defense; Walter
Hickel, secretary of the interior;
Dr. Curtis Tarr, director of
selective service; William Rogers,
secretary of state; John Mitchell,
attorney-general; Dr. Terrell
Bell, acting commissioner of
education; and Dr. Henry
Kissinger, counsellor to the
President.
Uhlfelder speaks of the
conference as an open
discussion at the White House on
problems on campus. He hopes
to get answers to questions on
Vietnam, drug legislation,
poverty, and the lack of blacks
in higher education.
Uhlfelder said he understands
the report of the Commission on

team. Baseball clinic for the UF
baseball team will be held Sept.
28 Oct. 2 from 4:30 6 pm.
in the gym. The meeting is open
to -freshmen and returning
students. P. A. Lee will coach
the clinic.
FANCY FILM FARE: Four
movies will be shown at the
Union this weekend. At 5:30, 8
and 10:30 pm. on Friday and
Saturday, Accident** will be
shown in the Union Auditorium.
Sunday, The Caretaker* will
play,same time,same place.
The India Club will show
Anupama in the Union
Auditorium at 2 pm. Saturday.
Admission to all these events is
50 cents.

Another controversial proposal that was added to
the bill on the floor would allow judges to impose
an additional 25-year prison sentence on special
dangerous offenders convicted of drug violations.
The sentence, which could be imposed on the basis
of evidence the defendant would not be allowed to
contest, was termed an unconstitutional
infringement of individual rights by opponents. The
administration-backed amendment was adopted on
a nonrecord vote of 147 to 61.
The house rejected by voice vote an attempt by
the House Select Committee on Crime to amend the
bill to give the Attorney General authority to limit
production of amphetamines or pep pills.
The House biU would double most penalties for
drug pushers. It also would provide $165 million
over three years to expand rehabilitation programs
and authorize $6 million for the hiring of 300
additional agents by the US Bureau of Narcotics and
Dangerous Drugs. None of these provisions is in the
Senate bdl.

ijsj
I' I
LESTER HALE
... ho goes too
Campus Unrest will be released
at the conference and will be
quite critical of the Nixon
administration.
The first Presidents
Conference last year drew 600
student body and unversity or
college presidents. President
Nixon and other high
government officials attended
that conference.

PTA HOW DO YOU
PRONOUNCE THAT?: The J. J.
Finley School Parent-Teachers
Association (PTA) will have a
meeting for parents of all fifth
grade students Sept. 29, at 7:30
pm. at the school. The topic
will be Parent-Teacher
Communication: A New
Approach to Parent-Teacher
Relationships."
(NOTE: Whats Happening"
will be published on Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday. Notices
for the column must be turned
into the Alligator office TWO
days in advance of publication.
Notices for Monday must be in
early Friday.)

SECOND GENESIS
A COMPLETE BOUTIQUE
FOR GUYS AND CHICKS
Bells Jeans and Slacks
Leather- ..Hats, Vests, Belts, Headbands
Body Shirts, Headgear, American Flag Ties
1228 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE

Athletic Cards Ready
Students who have not been able to obtain athletic cards can
pick them up before the Oct. 3 North Carolina State game,
according to the Student Government Secretary of Athletics Art
Wroble.
Approximately 400 UF students have appealed to SG because
they either did not receive an athletic card application or missed
the requested deadline.
These students can pick up both their athletic cards and their
tickets Tuesday, Sept. 29, at Gate 13 in the stadium between 10
ajn. and 8 p.m.
Those wishing to sit in bloc must contact their bloc seating
chairman before Sept. 28. The chairman should have each
students name, student number, and fall 1970 fee card with
him when he picks up seating assignments Monday, Sept. 28. SG
will check each name against a list of students who have
legitimately requested an athletic card.

Convicts Cut Baugher
FFROM PAGE ON J

HINSON EXPLAINED it was
necessary to cut the body loose
in order to open the cell door.
The other three prisoners were
put together in another cell
and were there for
approximately another hour.
The three were later isolated in
separate cells.
The dead mans neck did not
appear to be broken according
to Hinson, but a bruise across
the front of the victims neck
was visible to the jailer.
Hinson said Baughers body
was facing away from the hall
and toward the cell.
HIS (BAUGHERS) feet
were flat on the floor but his
head was a little to the side,
said the jailer.
Hinson made a check of the
cells at approximately 2 a.m.
and recalled that all four men in
the ceH where Baugher died later
were awake and carrying on a
conversation.
Baugher died sometime in
the next two hours, Hinson
said.
BAUGHER WAS a quiet
prisoner and well behaved, he
said.
Hinson said that acoustics in
the cell block are of a nature
that if a prisoner was yelling it
could be heard throughout the
cells and even outside.
Hinson said he heard no
extraordinary sounds between
the time he checked Baughers
cell and the time he discovered
the body.
Dr. Robert Klein, Alachua
County medical examiner, could
not release information on the
autopsy of the body and a
secretary in the state attorneys
office said information on
autopsies is not released in cases
being investigated.
SHERIFFS DEPARTMENT
Investigator, Horace Moody, was
in Lake County Thursday with
the other three prisoners,
conducting a lie detector test.
Results of those tests will be
held confidential during the
course of the investigation,
according to Inspector Ron
Stanley.
Baughers parents, Mr. and

Baughers parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Martin Baugher, were in
town on Thursday. They arrived
late Wednesday after being
notified of the death at their
Liberty, Mo. home. They left on
a flight home late Thursday.
The body will be cremated in
Gainesville at the
William-Thomas Funeral Home
on Main Street, the remains
being flown to Missouri.
The investigation is being
conducted jointly by the
Sheriffs Office and the state
attorneys office.
Moody, after returning from
the tests with the three
prisoners, Moody said the
investigation would be a
thorough one and not be hastily
made.
OConnell:
No Kent
PAGE o^|
increase while budget allocations
fall short of requests.
O'CONNELL ALSO said he
was opposed to suggested [dans
offering state aid to private
institutions of higher learning.
Until the state provides
adequately for its nine public
universities, I would be opposed
to any state-supported program
of tuition equalization, he said.
Asked for additional
comments about the container
ban at football games on Florida
Field, OrConfieD siad: All cur
reports indicate that there were
no incidents. We received the
greatest cooperation from all
fans in spite of the
inconveniences that it causes
them
Repeating part of a statement
released by him Sept. 21,
OConnell said Athletic Director
Ray Graves and his concessions
staff recognize that vast
imporvement must be made in
service and distribution of cold
drinks at our games. They have
pledges that everything that can
be done will be accomplished
and implemented at our next
home game with North Carolina
State on Oct. 3. 1

HAVE YuU BEEN THINKJf 1 /"'
ABOUT LEARNING TO FLY?
W will teech you for
$2lO
Solo eourao In *OO Cessna 15'
includes grounds school & 101
of flight instruction.
$175
Solo course In Piper Ji3, hooks,
ground school 5 10 hours of flight
Instruction.
FLYING HAWKS
STENQEL AERODROME 37Q-0011



liairtime Features Gator Marching Band

By DAVE MANKIN
Alligator Writer
Its one minute till halftime at Florida Field.
Over 50 000 Gator fans pack the stands excited, cheering and
very, very hot. 6
The timer runs down to zero and momentarily the field is blank
But not for long.
B \- the D dru 1 m with the bi BS est boom in Dixie...
It s the Gator Marching Band!
MarcWng Band is equally dynamic when not in the
spotlight. Talking with the persons in charge of the band some
interesting facets of its existence came to light.
The spirit and unity of the members is impressive. They come from
every walk of campus life, a scant 20 per cent of them majoring in
music. As Robert E. Foster, associate director of bands, put it:
People don t realize that band students arent subsidized for their
time. Here is a student organization with 250 members in which each
might earn one credit and give up his lifes blood.
KATHY WHITE, has been with the band for three years. Now the
band secretary, she believes the great thing about the band is the fact
that these kids get to find a sense of identity right away. They get to
feel part of the school even before classes begin.
At present, all band members are awaiting the Oct. 10 game against
FSU. At that game they will again have the opportunity to compete
with their favorite rival band.
There is a victory to be won at halftime by band personnel as well
as the football team, explained Miss White.
What will it be like when our 250-man band confronts FSUs
172-man ensemble? Foster says the band will murder them.
PHIL COPE
PRETTY MAJORETTES
... add the finishing touch

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BRAND NEW ORANGE AND BLUE UNIFORMS PH,L COPE
... are sported by Gator Band members
New Music Dept. Building
Ready By Spring Quarter

By DOUG LYNES
Alligator Writer
The long-awaited building
that will house the Music
Department will be ready for
occupancy before spring quarter,
according to Dr. Elwood Keister,
director of the UF choir.
The orchestra, band, choir,
and other fatality members
submitted designs to the
architect, who worked their
ideas into the structure. The
building will be functional as
well as beautiful, Keister said.
Sound isolation is the main
design feature.
WE THINK IT will be the
finest music facility in the
South, Dr. Keister said.
Charles Dorman, choir
president, sees the choir as more
than a performing organization.
They meet at least five times to

sing a heavier, more serious,
type of music.
AS WELL AS preparing to
move into their new home, the
choir is practicing for upcoming
programs. The Christmas
Program will be presented on
Dec. 2 along with the Mens and
Womens Glee Clubs.
On Dec. 6, the program will
feature the choir and the UF

tMEET THE BROTHERS OF
DELTA SIGMA PI
Professional Business Fraternity
_ Saturday
Delta A Listening Party Gators v. Ala.
Sigma A Cook-out Following Game v-
Pi A Party BYOB from 9 PM
Come by Tanglewood Apt. 4 anytime after 1 PM or, meet the
Brothers at our Formal Rush Smoker Monday Reitz Union
Rms 150 C & D

Friday, September 25,1970, The Florida AlNptor,

Sinfonietta.
We dont just teach music
pieces, we teach choral and vocal
technique which will be useful
to the student the rest of his
singing life, Keister said.
The choir performs at least 25
times a year at various schools,
churches and on campus as well
as going on tour between
quarters.

Page 3



r* . * :>*-! 1C V .* vl _f.' HJ _*,
~ .in Florida Alfigrtor, Friday,Saptambar 25,1870

Page 4

(We) must reduce the
emphasis of inter intercollegiate
collegiate intercollegiate athletics,
returning its purpose to
that of participation and
striving for excellence
and enjoyment.
-Chuck Sherman

HC Queen: Charm, Beauty

Charm, beauty, and individual
accomplishment will be
requirements for contestants in
this years Homecoming

7 mm ~ngjjsEKs3& jQ&
;g /? ~ jil nriiMr -~ I
. .ikW .fill! "4
K|p m -:BW
WALDA WILLIAMSON
... 1969 Homecoming queen

I SPECIAL OFFER SAVE 35< A WEEK
STUDENTS
FULL TERM SUBSCRIPTION TO
THE TAMPA
jLIVT|4O* week
DELIVERED DIRECT
] \ JA~n ifor kmaadtoteHOME DELIVERY Call Gainwville 372-4902

f eturn To Amateur Athletics

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Florida State University Student Body
President Chuck Sherman called Wednesday for the formation of a
new athletic conference in the South along the lines of the Ivy
League.
Citing the undeniable crisis in intercollegiate athletics, Sherman
urged a return to amateur athletics.
HE AND FSU Athletic Director Vaughn Mancha debated the issue
on the lawn near the student union building.
Mancha acknowledged the program cost about $1.6 million this
year, but said competing universities spent more and that increases
were due to the cost-of-living rather than an expanded program.
The twin goals of this new conference, Sherman said, must be
to reduce the emphasis on intercollegiate athletics, returning its
purpose to that of participation and striving for excellence and
enjoyment, and reducing its total costs so that they do not exceed
ticket revenues.
CONTROVERSY arising from an increased share of student fees
going to athletics and the sale of student tickets to FSU football

Sweetheart Pageant, Chairman
Mike Malone announced today.
In addition to the traditional
swim suit, evening gown and

personality areas of competition,
grades and campus activities will
also be added as categories in
selecting the finalists and the
Homecoming, he said.
All campus organizations are
invited to enter a contestant.
Applications must be received
by the Florida Blue Key office
on the third floor of the Reitz
Union no later than 5 pan.
Wednesday, Oct. 9.
Each girl must be classified as
2UC or higher in school, and
must have a 2.0 overall grade
point average.
There is a S2O entry fee.
This year finalists will receive
portions of a total of $1,200 in
prizes to be provided by local
merchants. The top prize is a
SSOO scholarship donated by
Publix.
The contest will begin Oct. 14
with preliminary competition to
select three finalists. All
competition will be held at the
Constans Theater and is open to
the public.
Following their selection, the
finalists will tour the state
including visits to Busch
Gardens, Cypress Gardens, Lion
Country Safari and Cape
Kennedy as well as receptions
with UF President Stephen C.
OConnell and Gov. Glaude R.
Kirk. The tours will take place
Oct. 19-29.
The announcement of the
Queen will be made at Gator
Growl on Oct. 29. She will reign
over the festivities of the
Homecoming weekend.

games for the first time this year acted as a backdrop to the debate.
Sherman repeatedly asked where additional money would b<
coming from to cover increased expenses and projected loss of statt
financial support by 1975.
The state legislature now appropriates SIOO,OOO for the program.
Mancha said only that the athletic board expected to meet its
budget this year.

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Sundays 9:45 AM- Tuesdays 7:30 PM I
at the church ; n homes I
Telephone 392-7926 or 372-1203 I
for information and transportation

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Pedlow Witnesses Wanted

By MARYANNE GILLIS
Alligator Writer
The state attorneys office is
looking for three persons who
were present at the rooming
house at 1824 SE 4th Ave. on
Sept. 13 when Debbie Pedlow, a
secretary at UF, died.
Miss Pedlew died by choking
on her own vomit after taking
some form of narcotic,
according to Eugene Whitworth,
assistant state attorney.
They were not directly
involved with anything that
went on there, Whitworth said.
Apparently they were not
under the influence of anything,
. and could probably tell us more
about what happened.

Students Fi

By BECKY LLOYD
Alligator Writer
Does the life of Jesus Christ have relevance to the
life of the typical college student?
Students attending College Life meetings
Wednesday and Thursday nights must think so as
they testified to the change Christ has made in their
lives.
COLLEGE LIFE meetings, sponsored by Campus
Crusade for Christ usually are held Sunday evenings
at 9:13. This week, however, they have been
holding meetings in dorm areas on school nights in
order to give new students a chance to
participate, according to Richard Parker, one of
the Campus Life leaders.
The meetings were held in the Graham rec room
and Rawlings Hall.
We want to confront students with the claims of
Jesus Christ and the impact they can have on their
lives.
Parker said most students reject Christ because
they have a false impression of him.
THEY HAVENT taken the time to investigate

WHITWORTH COULD NOT
release the names of the three
wanted for questioning.
John Clements, one of the
four youths recently released
from jail after being sentenced
to 90 days for refusing to testify
concerning Miss Pedlows death,
? f ***********.*.*. .*.*-*.*X V.W.V.V.W..
t **t'
\ Union Changes j
I; !;
: The local Chapter of the :
: Service Employees Union
:j AFL-CIO will meet at 5 p.m., :!
: rather than at the announced
: 7 P- m meeting time, at the
: Presbyterian University
$ Center. $
S $
V
VA%VtV*%%V#V*V*V.VtV.V*V*VVVAV#%%S

nd Relevance In Christ

his life, Parker said.
Besides the informal Sunday night get-togethers,
the students meet in smaller groups for more
personal interaction. They discuss questions about
the Bible and anything else in which they are
interested.
Parker said the informal, non-denominational
meetings are open to everyone. Singing,
entertainment and a discussion on how Christ
influences the lives of people are included in the
hour long gatherings.
CAMPUS CRUSADE for Christ was founded in
1951 by Dr. Bill Bright at UCLA.
There are currently 2,200 full-time staff members
on all major college campuses and in 43 foreign
countries. It is an outreach arm of the church
with high school, college, lay, atheletic and military
divisions.
The next College Life meeting will be Sunday at
9:13 p.m. at the Alpha Tau Omega house across
from Tigert Hall. The meeting begins at 9:13 p.m.
so no one will forget the time, according to a
College Life member.

is on seven year probation from
Manatee County for illegal
possession of narcotics,
Whitworth said.
The state attorneys office is
waiting for the final results of
the autopsy which was
performed on Miss Pedlow by
Dr. Robert F. Klein, county
medical examiner, Sept. 13.
Analyses of tissue and blood
samples sent to the toxology
laboratory at Auburn University
in Alabama have not yet been
received.
WE WONT KNOW if any
felony has occurred until we
receive the final autopsy
report, said Whitworth.
There is a very, very remote
possibility that any charge made

against the youths would be
homicide, but it would more
likely be a charge of possession
of illegal drugs, he said.
Benjamin Tench, member of
the legal firm of Goldin and
Tench, which is representing the
youths, explained why a
homicide charge was considered:
Whenever anyone dies under
mysterious circumstances, there
is the possibility that a felony
has occurred.

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Page 5



Page 6

>, TheFiorid* WpKwb r 28,1970

eye%

The EYE: New
Paper 'Fills Void

By MIKECAHLIN
Alligator Writer
Gainesville has another new
underground newspaper.
It is called the EYE, and is
dedicated to filling a
communications void in this
area.
APPROXIMATELY 3,000
copies of the paper have been
distributed this week at a cost of
ten cents per paper.
The paper is put out primarily
py two UF students, Delia
Anderson and Charles Rankin.
In a front page editorial, the
EYE said the paper was created
because of a communications
void... in this area. That
void... consists of a lack of
news analysis. The EYE is
designed to fill this void.
THE EDITORIAL also says
that the EYEs two basic goals is
to tell it like it is, and to
have a commitment to human
liberation.
Topics covered in the first
issue of the EYE included black
liberation, womens liberation,
racism, student protest, the war,

Communication Gap
Topic Os SG Forum
For those who feel there is a communication gap at UF between
students and administrators, Student Government has initiated a new
program aimed toward helping both students and administrators get a
fuller prospective on campus or world issues and problems.
Beginning Sept. 30 between noon and 1 p.m., an open forum-type
discussion between administrators, faculty, and students will be held
in the Plaza of the Americas.
* AT THIS TIME,, students wiH have the opportunity to ask
questions or discuss problems with UF President Stephen C.
OConnell; Lester Hale, vice-president of student affairs; Frank
Adams, dean of student development; Dr. Betty Cosby, assistant to
the vice-president for student affairs for educational planning; and
Roy Mitchell, director of minority affairs.
If we get a big turn out, Gail Merein, Secretary of Academic
Affairs, we would like to continue this forum every month with
different people and organizations such as the'Athletic Association,
Campus Police, and representatives from different colleges.
In order to lend a casual atmosphere in airing problems and posing
questions, the Plaza of the Americas was chosen as the site for the
open-forum.

II Big Red |
II ycuf ve gcttci if
II draw the line If

UNDERGROUND PAPER
... watches Gainesville

the environment, drugs, the
economy, labor problems,
imperialism and political
repression.
Although the paper is free,
a 10 cent donation is asked. The
financial success of the paper
depends on the number of
papers sold. The staff would like
to come out weekly and another
issue is planned for distribution
early next week.
SOME OF THE EYEs
contributors include UF faculty.
Marilyn Zweig, who writes the
EYEs womens section is an
assistant professor of
philosophy. Ken Megill is a
professor of philosophy.
Marshall Jones is a former
associate professor of education.
In the front page editorial, the
editors of EYE said, we are
living in very critical times, and
we share a sense of urgency in
responding to and dealing with
the problems that confront us.
In the final analysis, our
differences will only be
resolved .. through the
cooperation of enough
concerned people.

N.W. 13th
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PROF APPOINTED

State Studies Ecoloav

by LEE HINNANT
Alligator Writer
Dr. George W. Cornwell, UF
professor of wildlife ecology, is
one of five persons appointed by
Gov. Claude Kirk to the Florida
Inventory Council, created by
the 1970 session of the state
legislature.
The council was authorized
by the legislature to compile an
inventory of land and water
resources in the state.
CORNWELL, a member of
the powerful lobbying agency
for environmental protection,
Conservation 7os, has
commended the state legislature
for creating the council.
The council is the first step
in intelligent planning,*
Cornwell said.
Conservationists of Florida
consider this a major step
forward to seeking basic
solutions. This gets to the root
of the problem; namely deciding
what we have in natural
resources and planning how to
use them.
Old House
Renovated
Tlie college class of First
Methodist Church is sending a
bus full of interested students to
help renovate an old house this
Saturday. The house is at 305
N.E. 6th Street.
We have decided to become
project conscious and make a
real mark on our environment,
Ken Murrell, a member of the
group, said.
THE PROJECT is headed by
Gainesville Neighborhood
Development, Inc. The project
will help low income residents of
the area in the long run,
according to Murrell.
The houses arebeing repaired
so that they are no longer in a
potential slum condition, he
said. We will re-do the 14 room
house and then rent it on a more
or less low income basis. Rooms
can then be rented to cover the
cpsts of payments.
The bus will leave the front of
the Reitz Union at 9 a.m. Sept.
26 and will return at noon.
Powerful
Deal
_
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The new Citroen is its own high highpowered
powered highpowered salesman. Standard power
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front inboard disc brakes. The last lasting
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YOU KNOW THE VALUE
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JUST HOW much of Floridas
coastline is suitable for use as
public beach land is unknown
according to Cornwell.
The councils study of land
and water resources and how
they could best be used is
expected to last three years.
The legislature has
appropriated about $70,000
to the council, which will be
responsible to the State
Department of Conservation.
CONSERVATIONISTS have
prodded the legislature for a
year and a half to pass legislation
setting up the council, Cornwell
said. The council will consist of
the five private citizens
appointed by Kirk, and 10 other
members from within
government agencies.
The associate professor, who
has taught at UF for four years,
said he expected the council
would meet soon to outline its
course of action.
Among the other four persons
appointed by Kiik was Lyman
Rogers, president of

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Conservation 7os. Also
appointed were Joel Kuperberg,
executive director of the Collier
County Conservancey; Dr.
Durbin Tabb, professor of
marine ecology at the University
of Miami, and Dr. Edward
McClure, chairman of the
department of regional planning
at Florida State University.

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Page 7



Page 8

I, Th* Florida Alligator. Friday, Saptambar 25,1970

EDITORIAL
Fred, Big Man
When Fred Abbott knocked on Doug Dickeys door
Wednesday morning it would have been easy for the UF
football coach to tell his prodigal linebacker Nobodys
home.
In fact, no one could have blamed Dickey for doing so.
But Dickey took Abbott back.
We are delighted he did.
Upset with his play in the UFs opening game against
Duke Sept. 12, Abbott quit football last week with a blast
at Dickey and his methods of coaching.
He said he was tired of being their animal and said he
could no longer play Dickeys emotionless style of
football.
Wednesday Dickey said, I knew the statements Fred was
making were not coming from his true self. He was a little
mixed up at the time.
In a day of the new breed of athlete, such as Abbott,
Doug Dickey displayed unusual perception and empathy
which unfortunately, are rare qualities in those members of
the fun and games department.
For this, we commend the man.
r ~zzzzinzzzzzzzj
J OTHER COLLEGES COMMENT p§j|
Although President Henry King Stanford has refused to
dismiss classes so that students could campaign for
candidates in the November election, University of Miamis
government department has come up with an idea that is
almost as good.
There is a one-credit course now available to students
who want to get involved in politics this semester, and when
you think of it, that's quite a revolutionary thing to do.
Its evidence that the university is finally seeing some
academic relevance in experiences that occur outside the
classroom. Hopefully, enough students will realize that this
is a fine opportunity to increase the strength of the youth
movement into the political scene.
So much has been said about winning the right to vote
for the eighteen-year-olds, yet little evidence has been
available to prove that young people are truly interested in
politics. The new course, entitled Practical Politics (and it
truly is) can become a fulcrum for increased student
involvement in community government. It will also be
valuable in demonstrating to the over 21, legal voters r who
will be responsible for deciding the fate of the
18-year-old-voter amendment, that young people are
genuinely capable of operating within the present political
system.
And once young people begin to establish themselves
within the sytem, things can be changed. Peace candidates
will get elected and anti-war laws will be passed.
By participating in the new course, you may become a
small but significant part of a revolution -a revolution to
bring government back to the people.
There are no prerequisites for the course. There are no
prerequisites for the revolution.
jKf + a I
ft: V\ y

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

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A Lesson In Rhetoric

Spiro Agnews coming. Spiro
Agnews coming.
No. Its not the opening line to
a new Alfred Hitchcock thriller.
Everybodys favorite vice
president of the United States
will be in the neighborhood
soon, although not likely in
Gainesville.
Vice President Agnews office
has confirmed that he will
campaign Oct. 15 and 16 in the
Jacksonville and Orlando areas
for Congressman William C.
Cramer.
Carmer is seeking the
soon-vacant Senate seat of
Spessard Holland.
Although its not nicely Agnew
will tread upon Gainesville,
much less campus ground, a lot
of people are hoping.
The people in the English
disciplines, for example.
They are dying to personally
witness Agnews next travesty
on the English language. I
understand they were left
tittering for days over whether it
is possible to have an effete
corps.
Then there are the logic and
debating scholars who are awe
stricken by the man. The vice
president has siezed upon one of
the most base tactics of
argumentation, name calling,
and exercised it to its fullest.
Rather than using the tried
and true obscenities cherished
3* across the f
continent, he has bravely
inhov ate d n w.i t^ t new
combinations of words and
pioneered new frontiers in
character assassination.
Indeed the whole structure of
ilniversityhas *h interest *

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

Agnew lays the blame for the
nations troubles at the feet of
higher education. It seems
professors and administrators are
responsible for everything but
the Van Allen Radiation Belt
and the melting of the polar ice
cap.
He appears to believe that if
the nation was ignorant enough
it would support the
administrations policies.
Perhaps.
There are others who simply
cant help admiring a guy who
can stand in a Las Vegas casino
hotel and complain about
immoral lyrics in Beatles
records.
A few of us would like to see
him come so he could be
indicted for Conspiracy to Cross
State Lines to Incite to Riot (the
Rap Brown act).

| Example: Effete Corps of Impudent Snobs
Has: ffir- sssep*- assa. f
| 4. Absurd CpX£ Destruction j
W.V.%%p p n,,-'^, n r L ¥| n M fl.- u^LWL vifl.^yJ

. Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Loretta Tennant
News Editor

REG CROWDER

To insure that the Vice
Presidents visit to the Sunshine
State is a memorable one I have
assembled below a Spiro
Agnew Character Defamation
Chart.
By picking different
combinations of words from the
verticle columns and reading
horizontally to the right (of
course) anyone can write or
speak like the Vice president.
His basic attack mode is the
adjective-noun-preposition adjective-noun-preposition-adjective-noun
-adjective-noun adjective-noun-preposition-adjective-noun combination, as
in the classic efete corps of
impudent snobs.
For example, the number 2
column in the chart gives you
ludicrous apostles of political
abomination. The words may
be interchanged freely as long as
they follow the basic pattern.
Happy rhetoric.



Hussein? That you, Hussein?
READERS FORUM

MR. EDITOR:
Carl Crawford should be
proud of his article Memo Asks
- Dorm Rules Enforcement.** Not
only has he created a real fear in
the hearts of students who live
in university housing facilities,
but he has succeeded in
establishing a real pride in the
university housing staff, so that
the students can look with
confidence upon them as
competent policemen, spies, and
whatever else paranoid term fits
them. Now we can all relax and
be assured of a wonderful year
at UF, for we all know that in
the dormitories student-staff
relations concerning drug usage
have been well considered and
well understood.
If Carl Crawford was so
interested in the dorm rules
concerning drugs, he would have
.been much wiser to consult with
a member of the housing staff,
rather than using second-hand
information given to him by
students from the dorms. How
students react to dorm rules is
quite different from what those
rules actually are.-
First, the memo to the
housing custodial staff was
LETTERS POLICY
UMM must:
Be typed, signed,
Rouble epeeed and not exeeed
300 words.
Not be signed with a
Heve addresses and
Namaa wM be withheld only If
writer shown Just cause. The
odtor reserves the right to edit all
letters for spues.
Writers may submit longer
essays, columns or letters to be
doneidered for use as "Speaking
Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular
ooturnn is aehed te contartthe
samples of Ms work.

issued because of a previous
change in the policy of emptying
the trash, whereby the
custodians were to enter the
room to pick up wastebaskets.
The purpose of knocking on
the door was that, after meetings
with students it was found that
some did not like the idea of
being waken by the glorious
sound of garbage at 9:00 am; by
this method of knocking on the
doors the janitor would know
not to return to the room again.
In reality, the rule is a
preventative measure against the
invasion of students* privacy!
Second, the resident advisor
on the floor cannot, I repeat, is
not allowed to search a students
room in University of Florida
dorms. The only person who can
search a room is a city
policeman, provided he possesses
a valid search warrant or warrant
for arrest. Students such as Miss
Labagh, who made the
statement that this year RAs will
be able to search rooms, should
not be blamed. The power of the
good-old-fashioned rumor has
yet ceased to amaze me if it is
inevitable that untruths should
start, let people such as staff
writers mi newspapers at
attempt to rid us of them
instead of digging them up.
I am side of the general
ignorance of the duties of the
resident advisor. No one can be
put in a more precarious
position in terms of the conflict
between their enforcement of
job rules and their attempt at
dealing with the personal lives
and resultant hassles of students.
On one hand, the RA is a
member of -the university
housing staff, which, in turn is
required to acknowledge state
jaws, as well as any other public
institution. On the other hand,
the RA is still species
homosapien ,** believe it or not, a
person who lives, eats, and
breathes, and in cherishing these
freedom does not want to see
any student losing them because
the species cannabis was kept
in their room.
As a student volunteer in
Tolbert Area this year, I hope to
dissolve the barrier and form a
real bond between the student
and the RA so that the housing

,V>*V. *** V v <

program can be looked upon in
terms of human kindness and
honesty rather than inhumane
hostility and fear. Inadequate
and biased articles such as
Crawfords deserve the Nobel
Prize in severing those bonds.
MICHELE BARRIE (4 ED)
Oil Use
MR. EDITOR:
For the first time in centuries
the Middle East has a chance to
improve its environment with its
oil income.
Oil fields do not last forever.
They had better be making
better use of it than fighting an
obnoxious war.
WILLIAM R. SULLIVAN
New Threat
MR. EDITOR:
Last quarter it was the threat
of guns this quarter its the
threat of .. .any bottle, can,
coder thermos, or any other
receptacle of ice or liquid of any
I rb*A n
WUOT e "- --- =
I wonder what device will be
hazardous to life, limb and
pursuit of happiness next
quarter.
Its too bad the citizens of
Gainesville do not have enough
foresight to participate in these
efforts by an enlightened few
to eliminate all of our rights.
The reason might be that the
ratio of pseudo-intellectual,
liberals is not quite as high off
campus as it is on campus.
JAMES ROYAL

Alligator Staff
Ron Sachs Anna Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
Published by students off the University of Florfda under the TTrrftrii off
the Board off Slsdsst FuUbsliosffb -
Editorial, Business, Advertising offioaa in Student Publications Suite,
' third floor. Rain Union. *, t*T
EditorW Offioa phonaa: 302*1686,87,88 er 89.
Opinioas expreseed in die Florida AWgator ate those of the editors or
of the writer of die article and not those of the University of Florida.

Right On Beckys

Since it is wrong to believe in
prejudice and stereotypes, I have
tried to rid myself of the belief
that all Arabs hate all Jews, as
many Members of the Tribe feel.
I keep trying to convince myself
that at least a few rational Arabs
exist, somewhere on this planet.
But its very hard to find
evidence of such sanity; it seems
that Klansmen and Arabs have
more in common than the
wearing of white sheets.
I read an article in the Sept.
23 Alligator in which Jewish and
Arab students were asked to
comment about the Mideast
situation, the blame for which
can be placed upon the Arab
governments, the Arab terrorists,
and the Fascist government of
Russia.
The comments from the latter
students reflected the futility of
any peaceful settlement in the
Mideast, because with idiots like
that in the 13 Arab nations
allied in a genocial mission
against Israel, negotiation,* like
reason, is a rather meaningless
word.
I .particularly enjoyed the
comments of Becky Coury,
whoever she is. Listen to this: 1
dont think we should be helping
the Jews at all. Oh, WOW!
Becky is this year's recipient of
the H. L. Hunt Fellowship Os
Christians And Jews B*Nai
Brith Anti-Defamation League
Contest, to be awarded by the
rulers of Nigeria, Brazil, and
Greece. Moreover, Becky is
quoted as saying that American
society, and its press, TV, radio
and even movie industry, are
Jewish controlled, so that we
couldnt possibly get an
objective view on the war.
This type of racist garbage is
about what Id expect from the
Thunderbolt (or the Militant or
the Black Panther). When I was
in high school, a neo-Nazi I
knew showed me some of his
publications from the American
Nazi Party.. Rockwells Rebels
were convinced that Zionists,
particularly Zionist-Bolshe Zionist-Bolsheviks,
viks, Zionist-Bolsheviks, controlled all the media in
America and distorted
ebverything to keep the public
from finding out the TRUTH,
which, as we all know, is
revealed in the Protocol Os The
Elders Os Zion. as interpreted
by El Fatah. It is a shame that
college students, who allegedly
have at least a miniscule amount
of intelligence, cannot rise above
such foolish, racist statements.
We are told that the hijackings
helped the goal of the Arabs.
That goal, of course, is the total
annihilation of the Jewish
inhabitants of Israel. By driving

Friday, September 25,1970. Tha Florida Ali^tor,

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82,83 or 84
M.S. Davis
Business Manager
ICS. Dupree **
Advertising Manager
- Kathy A. Wahfcwn
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1619

Israel into the sea, the Arabs
would achieve their genoddal
aims, a sort of instant replay of
the savage murder of the Ibos of
Biafra. The destruction of
property and threatening of lives
that have recently been
perpetrated do not convince me
that the goal of the Arabs is
peace or love. The recent
ruthlessness we have witnessed is
but a sample of what might
come about.
The war is mentioned.
Which war? The war between 76
million Arabs (from 13 nations)
and 2 million Jews? The war
between 4rab guerillas and King
Hussein? The war between Arab
guerillas and American planes?
The war between terrorists and
anyone else who doesnt believe
in the destruction of Israel? The
attacks upon Hussein, the only
Arab leader to show any signs of
humanity, shows the stupidity
of a people who don't know
who is helping them and who is
exploiting them.
Leaders such as Nasser are
getting rich off the people
(Nasser has millions in a Swiss
bank, and his people are
underfed and undereducated),
and these leaders are keeping the
huge profits from Western oil
merchants. Israel, by contrast, is
the most Democratic, most
socialized nation in the Mideast.
In fact, the John Birch Society,
which considers the UJS. about
65% Communistic, considers
Israel about 95%. So whom do
the power to the
people"-chanting terrorists
attack? You guessed it. Thats
sheer stupidity.
Life magazine showed o
pictures of the Tiger Cubs,
grade school-age boys that are
taught how to shoot a rifle, so
that they may grow up to be big,
strong Israeli-killers. This
emphasis upon violence and
racism, a terribly prominent part
of Arab society, is the reason
that many Jews, myself
included, often get the feeling
that Arabs always grow up
hating Jews. Unfortunately, this
feeling is quite justified. Perhaps
some day Arabs will wise up and
overthrow the real oppressors,
the real exploiters of the Arab
people. But the future, like the
present, looks very bleak.

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida Alligator, Friday, September 25,1970

Education Grads Publish
Dissent And Unrest 7 Journal

By Alligator Services
A group of graduate students
in the UF College of Education
is taking a plunge into the
scholarly publishing business in
hopes of providing a rational
expression of dissent and
unrest.
New Voices in Education,
their unique journal, is to come
rolling off the presses for
national distribution Nov. 1.
Ron Comfort, content editor
of New Voices, said the
32 -page quarterly is to be the
only journal published by and
for students in education.
Conceived last spring, the idea
for the journal got a quick
endorsement from Dr. Bert
Sharp, dean of the College of
Education, and Dr. C. Glenn
I lass, professor of education and
a recent past president of the
national John Dewey Society.
Through the Dewey Society
and the Society for Professors of
Education, the Florida students
contacted other education
students at some 150 campuses.
The response was overwhelming,
said Jerry Boyle, coordinating

FBK Sponsors
Homecoming Meet
A breakfast meeting sponsored by Florida Blue Key (FBK) will be
held Sept. 29 at 9 a.m. at the Holiday Inn on SW 13th St. to inform
all those who are working on Homecoming 1971 of the events of
homecoming week, according to Henry Block, Homecoming 1971
personnel chairman.
The breakfast is open to all organizations who are participating in
any phase of the homecoming program, Block said.
Committee chairmen will speak on rules and regulations
surrounding the events. A 20-page book, Gator Guide, explaining
the program, its goals and regulations will be given to those present.
A donation ot $1 is requested from all delegates to cover costs of
the breakfast.
GET OFF
YOUR CAN!
Student Government and the Environmental Action
Group need your help.
EAG through Student Government is striving to save
our natural resources through recycling.
Now is the time for you to volunteer your services
in helping to save our environment. Beginning in
Mid-October, 100 containers will be placed on campus
and another six 6x6 foot bins will be placed
throughout the city for the proper disposal of
aluminum and tin cans.
All cans will then be transported to Jacksonville
where they are to be recycled. This will only work if
everyone cooperates by using the containers on
campus as well as off campus.
Any student interested in working to fight pollution
please contact the EAG office, 323 Reitz Union, or
call 392-1635.
Now is the time to get off your can and get
involved.
~' V
Enviromental
, <3
Action Group
w# >. * r BF ts f-w

editor for New Voices.
For the first issue, 24
manuscripts were received. A
national editorial board of
students at five other universities
will select 10 articles for
publication.
The editors hope the journal
will become a free-swinging
forum. One of their purposes is
to give university administrators
an uninhibited view of student
opinion.
Comfort observed,
Education attracts conservative
people. They tend to write
articles which hedge.
Walt Mickler, New Voices
advertising and publicity editor,
noted: Weve been asked if we
really are willing to publish
highly critical articles. Our first
issue should make it clear that
we are.
The first issues central topic
is The Changing Role of the
Graduate Student. This issue
will be complimentary.
Subsequent issues will be sold on
subscription.
To underwrite initial
expenses, the seven students
obtained funds from the
Graduate School, the College of

Education, the Dewey Society
and the Society of Professors of
Education.
In addition to Comfort,
Boyle, and Mickler, other
journal staffers here are Thaxton
Springfield Jr., features editor;
Charles Mould, budget and
subscriptions editor; Michael
Jackson*, design editor, and Fred
Ferinden, editor for campus
representatives.
| THE COPY CENTER
i. 1718 W. Univ. Ave. j
Next to Malone's
J 376-9334 j
Xerox Copies
5 cents and 4 cents
10% off with
coupon i
Supplies & Charge
Accounts Available
Good Thru Sept. 30
j

Wr Jr f
f AW'
'*Mf\
Appearing at the Union:
Friday, Sept. 25 9:00 pmloo am
(with "RUSH)
Saturday, Sept. 26 9:00 pm1:00 am
Iwifh %ack Basement)
ONLY $1 PER PERSON t Student Government 1
(Friday Night only limited to U of F Students with I.D/s)
m and Reitz Union Production B

I THE FIDELITY SHOP
sUfr. m §
-- '' Bit isfe
fl'P* i M
... . ; '
I w
LISTEN TO THE FULL DYNAMIC RANGE OF STEREO
SOUND IN COMPLETE PRIVACY!
YOU ARE THERE WITH THE PIONEER SE-30 HEADPHONES
IN CUSHIONED COMFORT-WITHOUT FATIGUE!
Model SE-30 PIONEER STEREOPHONIC HEADPHONES
(U) PIONEER

RUSH
SATURDAY



ATTEND FREE
Over 90% Os The People
Who Attend Increase Their Reading
Speed On The Spot!
For The Ist Time Ever...
f
World Famous Evelyn Wood You'll see why President
Reading Dynamics offers you / Kennedy invited Evelyn Wood
a free glimpse of what it's like to the White House to teach
to be able to read and study his advisors and the Joint
much faster Chiefs of Staff how to read
faster.
Youll actually be taught how Youll hear what the faculty
to read and study faster during members of one of Americas
the exciting Speed- Reading foremost colleges says about
Lesson. Evelyn Wood, and watch them
read-fast!
_ -1 urn iinnii I m i MiwunfnMi'niiiT r rm MMMnMfMVMWMMMrnMTiriiMMMMWiiiitiiim

I We want you to decide for yourself the
value of becoming a Speed-Reader, Evelyn
Wood style.
For the first time we are offering a Special
Speed-Reading Lesson to provide you with
a glimpse of what it's like to be able to read
and study substantially faster... and
you'll actually participate in the techniques
that will improve your reading and study
speed on the spot! ...

Free spud mmm Lessons!
I TODAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY |
w X

I f V:' 3, 5:30, 8 PM I
I 11i5 w Univ Ave I
I \ -7 HEADING DYNAMICS* I
I ' ' ." .....
I next to Donigans I

You'll find this Special Free offer of I
increased reading speed to be an exciting
and unusual experience.
Limited Seating Available at Each Lesson.
Because of limited seating capacity, we ask
that you please call the number listed
below to Reserve Yovir Seat. Choose the
time most convenient to your schedule and
call now for Your Personal Reservation.

Friday, SapMbar 25,1070. THa Florida AKgator,

Page 11



!, Th Florida Alligator. Friday, Saptambar 26,1970

Page 12

Orange and

SEND ALL NOTICES TO
DIVISION OF INFOR INFORMATION
MATION INFORMATION SERVICES,
BLDG. H

REGENTS COMMITMENT
TO QUARTER CALENDAR:
The Board of Regents on Sept.
18 reaffirmed its commitment to
the quarter calendar and
expressed great confidence in it
as the one most capable of
meeting the growing educational
needs of the state, and of
providing the most effedent
year-round operation possible.
The Board also expressed
confidence in the ability of the
faculty and administration
personnel to adapt to the
quarter system in the continuing
search for maximum efficiency
and quality within the new
calendar.

Calendar
Friday
Friday, September 25
Dept, of Physics and
Astronomy, "On the T Tauri
Stars," Dr. Arto V. Landolt,
Bless Aud., 4:00 p.m.
Student Government Used Book
Sale, C-4 Union, 1:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Accident",
Union Aud. 5:30, 8:00 8t
10:30 p.m.
Union Dance, "Rush" &
"Bethlehem Asylum", Union
Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.
Sponsored by ReitzsUnion &
SGP.
Saturday
*
Saturday, September 26
Union Movie, "Accident",
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
SGP Dance, "Bethlehem" and
Back Basement", Union
Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.

DRIVE LIKE A KING
f \ Add to the trade-in value and at the
/O /y' \\ same time enjoy air conditioned com comv
v comv *j3y£\ \\ fort...arrive refreshed and wrinkle free!
\\ That's what YOUR CAMPUS O CREDIT
si \v \\ sth Avenue at the comer of 12th Street
. 2yj V . V/ \\ ipBQQu
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

The Regents are committed to
the quarter system as the best
educational vehicle, and urge all
members of the university
community to join in a total
thrust toward excellence under
the year-round calendar.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
FORUM: Student Government
is sponsoring an open forum in
the Plaza of the Americas on
Wednesday, Sept. 30 between 12
noon and 1 p.m. Featured guests
include President Stephen C.
O'Connell, Vice President Lester
L. Hale, Roy Mitchell, Dean
Frank Adams and Dean Betty
Cosby.

STATEMENT
by University President Stephen C. O'Connell
September 21,1970
To each Florida student and each Gator fan who attended the
football game on Saturday, I offer highest praise and sincerest
gratitude for the excellent manner in which you quietly observed and
cooperated in enforcement of the inconvenient, but very necessary,
rule prohibiting ticket holders from bringing containers of liquid into
the stadium.
And to all who observed in a new way the old policy against
possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages in our stadium, I
offer the thanks of the University and those of our guests who
benefited most from observance of the policy. Those very few who
"beat" the policy gained nothing but the contempt of those who
followed it.
That the day passed without incident is a great credit to all our fans
and supporters. It indicates their full understanding and support of
what we are seeking to accomplish.
All that was accomplished would have been impossible without the
great cooperation given by the news media, the security officers, and a
host of others who assisted in planning and executing the new
enforcement procedures and informing those concerned. We are
grateful to all who assisted.
Athletic Director Ray Graves and his concessions staff recognize
that vast improvement must be made in service and distribution of
cold drinks at our games. They have pledged that everything that can
be done will be accomplished and implemented at our next home
game with North Carolina State on October 3.

BLUB BULLETIN

GRAVES APPRECIATION
DAY is Saturday, Oct. 3, with
the buffet luncheon in the Reitz
Union Ballroom from 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets are $3 per
person and reservations can be
made by calling Alumni Office,
392-1691. Tickets may be
picked up in advance at, the
Alumni Office or at the door.
FLORIDA RETIREMENT
SYSTEM: Members of the
Teachers' Retirement System
must decide on or about Oct.
15, 1970, if they wish to elect
Social Security coverage and
transfer to the Florida
Retirement System (FRS). For
those members in the Teachers'
Retirement System who elect to
transfer, effective date for
transfer will be Dec. 1,1970.

Sunday
Sunday, September 27
i
Union Movie, 'The Caretaker"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:30 p.m. <
India Club, Movie, "Anupama,"
Union Aud., 2:00 p.m.

The University Personnel
Department and state
representatives will conduct an
orientation session for
University faculty members on
Sept. 29 at 8 p.m. in University
Auditorium. WUFT-TV will
carry a panel discussion on the
topic of "Report 5" at 8 p.m. on
Oct. 6.
Mrs. Mary Ann Green, fringe*
benefits manager, is available to
department chairmen who wish
to arrange a more detailed
explanation of the system. She
can be reached at 392-1228.
EH 350-Del will meet in
219-C Architecture and Fine
Arts Complex at 7 p.m. on
Tuesday night.

SEND ALL CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC
FUNCTIONS, 101 REITZ
UNION

FLORIDA STATE
TEACHING SCHOLARSHIP
LOAN EXAMINATION will be
given Oct. 13, at 8:30 a.m. at
the Florida State Armory
(Army), 1126 N. E. 8 Ave.
Applications for the general
teaching loan and exceptional
child teaching loan can be
picked up in 124 Norman Hall.
NURSING SCHOLARSHIP
LOAN EXAMINATION will be
given Oct. 13 from 9 to 11 am.
at the National Guard Armory,
1125 N. E. 8 Ave. Information
and application forme may be
obtained from the Board of
Public Instruction, 1817 W.
University Ave.

Monday
Monday, September 28
Block and Bridle Cookout,
Livestock Pavillion, 8:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur! Radio Club
Meeting, 525 E. & I Bldg.,
8:00 p.m.
Science Fiction Club Meeting,
356 Union, 8:00 pm.
Dept, of Physiology, "Brain
Fluid Spates and Ventricular
Clearance in the Turtle," Dr.
S. R. Heisey, M-523, 4:00
p.m.
Tuesday, September 29
Student Government Used Book
Sate, C 4 Union, 1:00 pm.
Veterans Club 1 Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 pm.
Florida Student Movement
Meeting, 361 Union, 7:30
pm.
Beginning Bridge, C-4 Union,
7:00 p.m. ----
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:30 p.m.
Music Dept: Concert, Electronic
Music, Union Aud., 8:15 pm.
Tuesday
Tuesday, September 29
.1971 Seminole staff open
meeting, 364 Union, 7:30
p.m.



FBK Forming 2-Way
Student-Police Grouo^

A Student-Police Liaison Committee is being
formed under the chairmanship of Florida Blue Key
Vice President Jim Kersey.
The committee, according to Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder, is intended to function as
a two-way review board, serving to encourage
understanding between campus police and students.
Once formed, the committee will air student
grievances towards the police and present the police
viewpoints to the students. The desired result would
be increased understanding and cooperation
between both parties.
The committee will at no time act as junior cop

Rock Concert At Dragway
Features Allman Brothers

Gainesville Dragway will take
on a new complexion when the
Allman Brothers, Third Power
and local group, Celebration,
perform in concert Wednesday
at 8 p.m.
The Allman Brothers are a
six-piece experimental
blues-rock band. Formerly a
Florida based band, they are
now nationally known..
ALOS performing will be the
Third Power, a rock group from
Detroit. They have played in
Orlando with The Quicksilver
Messenger Service.
Rick Douthit, a UF student,
has formed the production
company sponsoring the
concert.
We are constructing this
concert around the theory that
no entertainment is provided to
students off campus other than
UF sponsored programs,"
Dduthit said..

n Burger Chef
I fights Inflation. I
I Special Introductory Offer I
I Super Shes, Friday, Saturday, I
I French Fries and Sunday I
I and only. I
I Large Coke 1 I
| This coupon good for
Super Shes, French fries end i
I | coke for only 69 cents I
I Only one coupon per person allowed 1
I / | | I
I £ #l O% X offer good Fri. Sat & Sunday I I
I MA only at 715 N.W. 13th j M I
I "Burger Chef Special good only tSMBBsSaj I
jto please the student! 715 N.W. l3tll St. |

WE ARE presenting a
program geared for young
people, by young people,
focusing on their music and way
of life, Douthit said.
Should the concert be
successful, Douthit mentioned
the possibility of bi-monthly

Sebastians Shop Vo .*£?r"
This Months Special for V, W. Drivers
"Lube, oil change, dean air & oil filter, and
dutch and brake adjustment all for $3.95
Normal cost $11.50 a savings of $7.55
Just clip out this adpresent it at
Sebastians 535 S.W.4h Ave.and
take advantage of this special
PHONE 375-S3SI

or critical student, Kersey said.
Formed as a result of the spring quarters gun
committee report, the new committee will also
attempt to ease potentially dangerous student-police
encounters.
Total membership of the committee is to include
approximately 10 students plus participating police
officers. All interested students may fill out
applications and be interviewed at the Student
Government Office in the Reitz Union.
Participation by women and minority group
students is especially urged. The deadline for
applications is Wednesday.

concerts also held at the
dragway.
Tickets are available at the
Spanish Main, Subterranean
Circus, Recordsville, and
Altmans Stereo. Admission is
$3 in advance and $3.50 at the
gate.

IRUSHI^
I mm iwnd < i
Rush will be playing with Bethlehem Asylum in the
Union Friday, September 25 from 9-la.m. in the Ballroom. A U
of F student I.D. is needed for admission. Cost SI.OO.
Sponsored by J. W. Rsiis Union and Studant Government Productions
THE MOODY BLUES
1
W B
% IwK
A
A QUESTION OF BALANCE THE MOODY
THS 3- M 24803-m24603 BLUES
$5.98 LP $3.99
$6.98 8 TRACK NOW $4.99
PRICES ARE GOOD THRU SEPT. 21,1970
RECORDSVILLE
GAINESVILLE MALL.
OPEN 10-9 MON-SAT.

Friday, Saptambar 25,1970, Tha Florida AWigator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR BALE
CUSTOMIZED AND REBUILT 650
cc BSA, 6550, Butler Gardens Apt Apt-918.
-918. Apt-918. (A-3t-4-p)
FOR SALEI Folk guitar, brand name
original. Cost 6150. will sacrifice for
650., or best offer. Also one stereo
amp, one year old. Original cost, 660.
Will sell for 640, or best offer.
392-6915. (A-st-4-p)
FOR SALE: Honda 590. 1968, 3800
ml, good shape. Call 373-1534.
(A-st-4-p)
Custom lightweight honda three
wheeler. Guaranteed perfect. 61200.
372- after spm. (A-7t-4-p)
68 Triumph 650 trophy, 1400 miles,
excellent condition. 2 helmets,
luggage rack, tool kit. 8875. Call
373- (A-st-4-p)

HftlPaMJ WHOPPING GOOD! i
Mnrnr ft |
J LAST BIG i I
I WEEKEND £ 1| >
GETTING STRAIGHT'IS MIRACULOUSLY J".. Ihf 1
TIMELY AND OUTRAGEOUSLY FUNNY! I
BERGEN
6:45 i
9:20 jGETTggPL;
1 ibis n~w. im jML i
*' ,l,iri " "TiRNHHiWTi I llW
"The epic Amerlcanwar _____
movie Mai Hollywood A MAN I
has always wanted YOULL
to make, but never had ivum I
Tire gulls i
,CH KABi MALDEN S
PATTON:
NOW SHOWING J
S h o W STM, MINSS DM, i
Times MI Miff
S : fete SHE
9:30

FOR SALE
Stereo, Excellent condition. 3 yrs
old, 100 watt, sansui amp, 2 akal sw
130 spkrs. Sony 260 tape recorder,
6350 or separate. 378-9577 after
3:00. (A-st-63-p)
1967 Honda 305 cc Superhawk.
Excellent condition. 6425, call Dick
At 376-8194. {A-st-63-p)
1966 El Camlno, 396eng., 4 sp.,
mags, many extras, 1195. 1967
Yamaha 250 Big Bear. Been In
storage, only 4600 miles, like new.
Call 378-1267. (A-st-63-p)
THIS WEEK ONLY: BRAND NEW
1970 KAWASAKI 350 Big Horn,
6795. Art's Kawasaki, 376-5481.
1040 E. Unlv. at Waldo Rd.
(A-4t*64-p)

Page 14

E The Florida AWgator, Friday, gapeWber ZB/WO

FOR SALE
YAMAHA 60 CC only 4500 ml.
Helmet Included, 6100. Call
376-0126. (A-St-63-O
69 Yamaha 350. Needs some work.
Best offer over 6400. 68 Honda 125
street scrambler, good condition,
great transportation. Call Tom,
392-7200. (A-st-63-p)
Capt. America special yamaha 180 cc.
Xtr dean, excellent for campus or
road. Blue, s-bar helmet & extras.
Contact John, 373-2216 eve-.,
392-2027 dy. (A-st-64-p)
HOME OWNERS: Discount prices on
Sun, Storm and BURGLER
protection for window and door.
378-7743 376-9517 6 p.m.
(A-4t-64-p)
HONDA 450 *66, new paint, recent
overhall, 595 (book value) or best
offer. 372-2375 p.m. (A-4t-64-p)
Portable typewriter owners. We will
dean, adjust, lubricate & Install new
ribbon on your machine for only
614.50 and guarantee our work. This
month only a savings of over SIO.OO.
Don't miss out. JR Office Furniture
Co. 620 S. Main St., phone
376-1146. (A-lOt-63-c)
Why buy used Junk? We sell new for
less. All metal, In black or gray. 2
drawer file cabinet NOW 619.95, 4
drawer file cabinet NOW 632.50. JR
Office Furniture Co., 620 S. Main
St., phone 376-1146. (A-10t-63-c)
Walnut finished study desk with 2
drawers, modern styling. While they
last ONLY $29.50. Why buy used
Junk? We sell new for less. JR Office
Furniture Co., 620 S. Main St.,
phone 376-1146. (a-10t-63-c)

* aMBP
I BBMi y fgwmm, I utSII Aall r
jg. SHBBp win can j
BMP
m I

FOR SALE
"Antiques trash & treasure
Melrose, Fla. on hwy 26, 20 min
driver. Mon-Wed call 475-4931,
Thur-Sat 10-5. Open Sun 1-4. Kitty
A Terry Bowman. (A-10t-64-p)
Drum Set, Like new. Blue sparkle,
complete. Bass, snare, tom-tom, floor
tom, hl-hat and rider cymbals. 1225
SW Ist Ave., Apt. 431. (A-st-64-p)
Honda SL 350 srambler, over sized
pistons, TT pipes, extra scrambling
sprockets, woods knobby, 7,000
miles, 8550. 1500 NW 16 Ave. No.
206, 7 to 9 p.m. (A-3t-3-p)
1964 champion, 10 x 50, 2 br,
carpeted, furnished, 8500 equity and
assume payments of $58.50 or 62250
cash. Call 378-8090 after 5:00.
(A-3t-3-p)
FOR SALE: Air conditioner, 6000
BTU, practically new, used only one
month. sllO or best offer. Call
378-3692. (A-3t-3-p)
Bel air stereo tape deck (subsld. of
R.C.A.). Plays on A.C., car or batt.,
Including 5 tapes. Only 660.
373-1549 or 373-1908. (A-st-3-p)
8 x3O trailer with a/c. Icebox, and
gas stove. 1 bdrm. Located In
Hlllcrest trailer pk. 8800. Write Gary
Felts, Box 128, Bradenton, 33505.
(A-st-3-p)
1967 Yamaha 180 CC, very good
shape. 2 helmets, plus gloves. Call
372-7475 between 7-9 PM. (A-st-5-p)
Yamaha 69, 250 DT 18, low
mileage, excellent condition, id-sal
for street or trail riding. $595.
378-4912 (A-3t-3-p)

FOR SALE
vlyXvXW^^
Rg Half Arabian Filly: elegant head
and carriage. In show shape. It has
bean stalled and fitted for 6 mo. 15
mo. old, blue gray. SSOO Her Dem
Sells open S3OO. 372-ssss.
(A-st-63*p)
Headquarters for tennis, golf, guns,
water sports, handball, sports shoes,
fishing, physical fitness, team sports.
BAB SPORTS CENTER, 5320 N.W.
13th St. 378-1461. (a-st-63-p)
Stereo Dynaco SCA 80, KLH 6 spkrs.
Rek-o-kut turntable. Amp and spkrs.
6 mths old, $450, Bi. Will sell part.
* Bill 373-2783 evs. (A-3t-S-p)
FOR SALE: Honda 50 1970 model,
400 miles, virtually brand new. 125.
376-5212 ext. 18 (anderson) if no
answer leave message w switchboard
to return call. (A-st-5-p)
750 HONDA, 1 SUMMER OLD.
NEED GOLD. What else can I say?
TEL 373-2264 (A-3t-5-p)
Honda 150, 65. Excellant condition.
Call 378-7255 before I PM. Bill
Sanders, Brown's Tr. Pk. Lot 48,
price S2OO. (A-3t-5-p)
DON'T merely brlten your
carpets. .Blue Lustre
them.. .eliminate rapid resolllng, rent
electric shampooer, sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
Stereo 8-track tape cartridges. 2 full
albums on 1 tape, recorded from
your LP*s for below the cost of a
single album tape. $6 complete. Free
pick-up and delivery, highest quality.
John 378-5916 4-BPM. (A-lt-3-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

r.v.v.v-X**-**"''"'-*'**'*"*'*'*'"*"*"''"*'*'-*-''"-**-'*
FOR SA LE
1964 Champion, 10x50, 2 Br,
carpeted, furnished, SSOO equity and
assume payments of $58.50 or $2250
cash. Call 378-0890 after 5:00.
(A-3t-3-p)
for rent
Need a roommate or others for your
apartment? Come to the Gator
Roommate and Housing Placement
Center and we will locate you. Run
by students who want to help.
373-2688. 1105 W. Unlv. Ave., Rm.
no. 2. (B-4t-64-p)
Roommate wanted: One liberal
female. La Bonne Vie no. 346. $55
per mo, pool and tennis court. Come
by anytime. (B-3t-3-p)
WANTED
1 female roommate needed for 2
bedroom apt. in NE section. Will
have own bedroom, air-conditioned.
$35.00/month + V* utilities, call
378-0447. (C-3t-4-p)
i ________________
Vegetarian needs place to grow, close
to campus with kitchen. Call Steve at
378-5522. (C-st-64-p)
Could you use an extra male
roommate until December? Call Gary
after 5 PM at 376-0901. (C-st-64-p)
Suburbia Drive-In
N.W. 13th St. 372-9523
I m
W
FRIDAY AND Me
SATURDAY M
NO EARLY V
BIRD PRICE
ADMISSION
Penthouse 2
EASY
Frl. & Sat
Penthouse 3
Wum
mother,
daughter
Frl & sat

r Todays
I more for your money meal
a,moisorrs
I CAFETERIA
I i ii
i ii I FRIDAY'S FEATURE
I I ,1
1 Mormon'* Famous |
I I! ROAST TURKEY ]
I I With Mashed Potatoes J 5
1 & I Dressing, Gravy I >
j £ | and Cranberry Sauce | J
i 82< i
I I
LUNCH: 11 Til 2 SUPPER:4:3O til 8 FREE PARKING
moisons
CAFETERIA .beyond comparison!
2620 N.W. 13th Street in the Gainesville Mall A

WANTED
V.V.V.VAV#V.V.Vi%%V.VfV/.V/.V.V.%V.%%
HELP! One hip male student needs a
place to live! If you can help me out,
call Cary at 378-5522. (C-3t-3-p)
Need used bicycle. Good condition.
Call Sheryl at 378-5749 after 6 p.m.
(C-6t-5-p)
Female Roommate, own bedroom,
must have car. Quiet, trees. $35 a
month plus Vi utilities. Call 378-8414
after 6. (C-lt-5-p)
Female Roommate Needed: Vi block
behind Norman. $42.50 per month
plus utilities. Own room. 378-6154
after 3:00 pm. (C-2t-5-p)
HELP WANTED
Hammond Organist needs
exceptional musicians for rock group.
Lead, bass, drums, and vocalists. I
compose my own music. Randy
Soellner 2-7938. (E-st-63-p)
Are you a hurtin gator? Need some
coins? Part or full time sales help
needed (m or f) set your own hours!
$2.50 to $5.00/hr. guaranteed to
service established customers.
Transportation needed. Call
378-0421 between 3 and 8 pm. Ask
for Ed Marquez. (E-st-63-p)
Need parttime salesman for men's
retail clothing store. Experience
preferredl. Apply in person at
Silverman's, 225 West Unlv. Ave.
(E-4t-64-p)
Sarah Coventry Fashion jewelry work
part time, average $5 hour. Set your
hours. Imaginative attractive girls
contact M. Llndsley, 376-4475.
(E-10t-4-p)
HELP WANTED: male or female,
newspaper carriers for on campus and
off campus delivery. 378-3333.
(E-2t-4-p)
Listeners wanted: will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Linda Bishop
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. for
appointment. 392-2049. (E-10t-4-p)
Cocktail waitress wanted: full or part
time, no experience necessary. Will
train. Must be 21. Call after 5,
376-9175, ask for Mr. Thomas. Dubs
Steer Room, 4560 NW 13th St.
(E-30t-4-p)
Are you experienced? If you are we
want you, If not you can get the
experience so necessary In today's
publishing world. The 1971
SEMINOLE will have an open staff
meeting Tuesday, September 29,
7:30 pm, Rm 334, JW Reitz
Union. (E-lt-5-pX
PART TIME Job Involving ART
LETTERING. Desire Art, Art Ed.,
Design major, etc, with
transportation. Hours flexible. Pay
$1.75 per hour to start. Call
378-2016. (E-2t-5-p)
WANTED: Student to work part
time; room, rent to be part of
compensation. Ph. 376-3012
(E-3t-5-p)

Friday, September 25,1970. The Florida Alligator,

AUTOS
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS.
YOUR NEW VOLVO FIAT MG
AUSTIN DEALER. 506 E.
UNIVERSITY. WE SERVICE ALL
IMPORTS. (G-st-63-p)
1965 Tempest convertible.
Automatic, V 6 Excellent condition.
378-4477 or 372-4663 SBOO.
(G-st-64-p)
1970 Karmann Ghia VW, 9000 ml.
Empi equipped: 2 barrel carb, ram
Indkit, mag wheels + radials & many
extras. $2795 or best offer, 378-9577
after 3. (G-st-63-p)
*67 GTO factory balanced,
blueprinted 400 cu. Ram air. High
rise manifold, 3 bbl. carb. Doug':
Hedders, Offenhauser chrome
manifold covers. 90/10 front, 50/5C
rear shocks. Rally wheels. S7OOC
investment. $2495. on display Sept
24 11 A.M. 9 til 3 p.m., 914 SW 7th
Ave., Gainesville. (G-64-4t-p)
LARGEST of USED IMPORTS IN
Nth. CENTRAL FLORIDA.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS, 1946
N. MAIN. (G-6t-63-p)
1968 TRIUMPH TR 250, Wire
wheels, radio, mlchelin tires, one
owner, excellent cond. Call 392-1561
or 378-5537. (g-st-3-p)

needs

|^j~-J| |GP]<35 II
I Today
inmv \\
I MARVIN cum ffISIWOOP J N SEBERG V
I A BIG MUSICAL
HIT-IN THE
WINNERS CORNER!
-Archer Winsten, N Y Post
1 I HILARIOUS AND
W.T. 11 V. IK ff ENTERTAINING...
W jBIIaIHMS IN THE STREAM OF
m WMIH SOUND OF MUSIC
-Joyce Haber. L.A. Times Syndicate
I Wx A BIG, BAWDY
' RIP-ROARING
Tiprir i~ MBlplm MUSICAL!
MH^IH^^IIiIMNIMH^ HOWL| NGLY FUNNY!
I V ~Wanda Hale. NY.Dfly News j
R.W WALSTON RARVEPRESNELL mw!*< *i vn* I 1:51 4:20 6:55 9:30
I f -- J

Page 15

SHE CAME
TO SIT
Wm \ A /j| I CROW* INK *N*noMl RCTUWS wnM, aR
I 8A8Y... WEEKEND I
AND WITH THE
I AWAY BABYSITTER I
v a /i-r-. 'r~ COLOR by DELUXE
WITH Gr]<> -A, 1
DADDY!
PLUS IN COLOR I
I SANDY DENNIS IN I
i 'UP THE DOWN STAIRCASE i
NEXT I



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

'''
.at.
AUTOS
1967 MGB Roadster, am-fm radio,
wire wheels, 25,000 miles, good
condition, $1395. Call Lake City
after 8 p.m., telephone 752-0846.
(G-st-4-p)
DODGE Dart 65 conv. New paint
and tires. 895 or best offer 372-2375
p.m. (G-4t-64-p)
PERSONAL
/X # X # X*XX*X*X # XX*!*s!*!*!*!"!*r*£!*!"!e£!es£sii
CHESS ANYONE! Elec, chess table,,
very unusual, $75.00 or trade for
antique weapons. See at THE COPY
CENTER, 1718 W Unlv., 376-9334.
Xerox 5 cents 4 cents. (J-st-3-p)
Coeds Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrologlst, 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
Graduate student needs a cook for
dinner. Compensation to be arranged.
Call 373-2149. (J-3t-5-p)
SPECIALI Desks, lamps, file
cabinets, 15% off. THE COPY
CENTER 5 cents XEROX OUR
SPECIALTY 4 cents. 1718 W. Unlv.
376-9334 (J-st-3-p)
When nothing works LEATHER
WORKS! For custom pants. Jackets,
sandals, moccasslns, bags, belts. 16
NW 13th St. Home Made Goodness
and Mercy. (J-10t-63-p)
Interest group In psychic-phenomena,
Edgar Cayce, Yoga and Mediation.
Mon 8:00 PM. Call 372-7883 for
Info. (J-3t-4-p)
Popular, experimental, classic films.
Come help us run & choose the
Union films. Anyone Interested come
to the Union lounges on Oct. I at
4:00. (J-3t-4-p)
Are you looking for beaded or
bamboo curtains, posters, black lights
and other things to decorate your apt
with. Check out the Spanish Main,
1642 W. Unlv. Ave. Open 10-10,
Mon-Sat. (J-3t-5-p)
Phil you Nikon every door and I
shutter to think other people can
come between us. I cant picture
myself without you. (J-lt-5-p)
"Tell me what you eat and I will tell
you what you are ." Savarln. The
NEW Delhi Delicatessen, 706 West
University Avenue. GOO Is alive!
(J-lt-5-p)
READ THIS AD AT 10:30 AM:
Hung up about lunch? Stretched out
because of the Zero vending
machine meals? Break* out! Send
someone to Kens Bakery, 15 SW 2nd
St. FANTASTIC LARGE Witb lotsa
roast beef, 65 cents, super ham on
large ludous bun, 60 cents. Hot dog
on FRESi?;. roll, 20 cents. Soft
drinks, 15 cents a btl. Call ahead,
376-7703. P.S. We also have delicious
fresh bake goods. Down thestreet
from Pennys. We are open from 7:00
AM to 5:30. (J-lt-5-p)
Stop wasting money and precious
time not to mention exasperation
hunting a place to park. Rent a space
for your very own. In and out
nrhriigM. day or night, directly
across W. Unlv. Ave. from center of
campus. 1702 W. Unlv. Ave., ph.
376-3012 (J-3t-5-p)
join the fun!
THESWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky young and old., some |ust lor the tun
of it. others because their business berwJ
tits from taster llymg trips to out-of-town
tustomers
TRY A LESSON
fust $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
Hying ease Come visit us today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
~ -inesville Airport
grnm Waldo Road

Page 16

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, September 25,1970

Harketh SEMINOLE lackies arise and
unltel There will be an open staff
meeting Tuesday, Sept. 29, 7:30
p.m., Rm. 334, J.W. Reitz Union. We
cant wait to see you oldies again and
we welcome all interested
newcomers. (J-lt-5-p)
The College Class of First Methodist
Church is sponsoring a bus to take
interested students to help the
Gainesville Neighborhood
Development Incorporated. We will
leave from the Union at 9:00 Sat
morning and work until 12:00. Help
us help others. (J-lt-5-p)
Its about time thats what were
hearing 'from opr customers about
our new coffee house. We agree, good
food, good people, good music and
good times. Open 10-10 Mon-Thurs
and 10AM-1:30 AM Frl and Sat.
There Is live entertainment every Frl.
and Sat. night, plus open Stage week
nights. Drop by, its upstairs above
the Spanish Main, 1642 W. Unlv.
Ave. (J-3t-5-p)
LOST u& FOUND
FOUND: Men's reading glasses In
brown leather case at 1600 block, SW
Ist avenue. Outside 1.0. Dr. J.M.
Widdersheln, Cal! 392-1171, ask
from Mrs. Thomas Storff (L-3t-3-nc)
LOST: Silver wristwatch at miss. st.
game, under Nfc stand or on EW rd.
Name on back. Call Ed, 2-7307.
(L-4t-3-p)
Kanapaha pre-school center, ages 3-5,
Mon-Fri. 715-545. Phone 378-9830.
Archer Road, hot lunch, snacks,
reasonable rates. (M-10t-3-p)
LOST: Black rim glasses in black case
between Campus bookstore and law
center. Call Rick, 378-0426 or Leave
at bookstore. (L-3t-5-c)
FOUND: One contact lense In single
case on 100 blk of NW 15th Terrace.
Call Mr. Brown at 392-1286 during
working hours. (L-3t-5-p)
$ S?
A X
§ Advertise: §
& 8
| 1
1 Its Good I
| i
I Business
I $
I |

Swing around!
to
SiiuySu nuiiii 8 Gar /V
of Gainesville
376-1245
Free pickup and - '5 fl
delivery anywhere IhY #
in Alachua County I \
I QAINESVILLE/JACKSONVILLE I 7 -I (y§L
ONE WAV SPECIAL I f wL
*ISHATATI I VW
NCLUDES GAS A AIR CONDITIONING! V
3 hours; 100 MILES I iL 1
We Rent
lL 0 t Better Cars
Bent a Gan
mmmm For Less.

PERSONAL
FOUND: 1970 H.S. class ring In
Little Hall. Call 372-0938 after 6.
(L-3t-5-p)
Stereo 8-track tape cartridges. 2 full
albums on 1 tape, recorded from
your LPs for below the cost of a
single album tape. $6 complete. Free
pick-up and delivery, highest quality.
John 378-5916 4-8 PM. (M-lt-3-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480.
Do you own a HONDA? Are you
tired of poor service? Steve at the
CYCLE WORKS does tuneups &
minor repairs whlle-u-wait. Open
from 3 until 9 p.m., 1220 S. Main.
(M-st-64-p)
HORSES BOARDED SLEEPY
HOLLOW HORSE FARM, Finest
facilities, complete care, stalls,
pasture, trails, 300 ft. ring, close to
Unlv., ph 373-1059. (M-st-63-p)
*
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now! Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge.

Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
373-1984, 9-5. (M-st-173-p)
M Guns Guns Guns
* Inventory over 450. Buy
Sell Trade Repair.
+ Reloading supplies. Custom
reloading. Harry Beckwith,
"T gun dealer, Micanopy. *T
* 466-3340.
Fkmet Airan£n, Lessons
Instructor: Joel Buchanan
$7.50 for 8 lessons starting
Sept. 30 till Nov. 18 room
118, Union 7:00 pm register
at the first lesson or in room
310, Union
Sponsored by the JWR Union

VOO ?iftOofV T
i
Gsa?aie& £S
AM-FM STEREOPHONIC RECEIVER/COMPACT
Designed with an adaptable top panel
so you can add on a record changer
whenever youre ready. fTSHHHBrt
Gyro-Touch tuning (patented)
results in silky-smooth tuning. Output Power: 60 watts RMS
Interstation circuit muting continuous into 3 ohms; (30
switch. watts RMS continuous per
Variable-Overlap Drive channel, both channels driven
(patent pending) eliminates i nto g ohms, 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz
irritating crossover-notch at less than 0.3% intermodulation
distortion. and harmonic distortion).
Tape-monitoring control. Comparable Total Music Power
Stereo headphone jack. (IHF): 90 watts @ 8 ohms.
Unique quik-connect IHF FM Sensitivity: 2.8 pV.
speaker terminals. Dimensions: 18h" W x bW H
Advanced tuner circuitry x 17H" D.
includes PETS, ICs, and four fourgang
gang fourgang tuning capacitor. 420 NW 13 STREET
Three-year parts and labor 378-8045
warrantv.
THE FIDELITY SHOP
WELCOME I
U of F
STUDENTS

a mister Gjt
VPonut/
tea^ED
rCome in for the freshest donuts ewer \\\ rt
Jellyones Sugared ones Custard. \J sS
coconut cinnamon ones. Donuts plain X %.
Donuts fancy We also rrke muffins. Y
brownies and the world s best cup df
coffee So say hello soon And don t
forget to bring along Mister Ddnut s T
money-saving open house coupon
OPEN 24 HOURS
j
P |o6|s4oSMkr I
Rm Qfl rant- MISTER DONUT WON T YOU please come HOME
111 taka dozen'
X I*;. Dottn J 2111 N WI3TH ST. I
f f f



Parking Problem Unsolved

The Parking and
Transportation Committee did
tot set forth any new policies at
heir weekly meeting held
[Thursday in the conference
loom of the college of
[architecture and Fine Arts.
Brad Raffle, administrative
(assistant to Student Body
resident Steve Uhfelder
(brought three proposals to the
committee to alleviate certain
campus parking and traffic
[problems.
I THE FIRST SUGGESTION
[was to analyze the present decal
allocation system and to cut
[parking priviledges wherever
[possible. The committee
[considered this proposal, but
| expressed no desire to cut any of
the present priviledges.
The second request was to
provide bussing for students
living in the 16th Avenue
apartment complexes. The
committee suggested that Raffle

Computer Matches
Interests With Jobs

A new computer facility will
enable the University Placement
Center to match students* career
interests and qualifications with
job opportunities.
The computer service, which
is beginning this fall, is being
provided by Placement
Research, a division of
Placement Publications, Inc,
based in Rahway, NJ.
THE SERVICE will be
available to seniors who are not
planning to attend graduate
school and graduate students
eligible for 1971 degrees.
Placement Director Maurice
Mayberry said this week that the
new system provides for rapid
gathering of career opportunities
and matches them with
individual students* personal
qualifications and desires.
Mayberry stressed that the
new system would not guarantee
jobs, but would offer a more
efficient means of matching
candidates and opportunities.
IT EXPEDITES contact,
Mayberry said, but it doesnt
fiim CLASSIC
hhhbbhv hhhbbhv-1
-1 hhhbbhv-1 L.
THE
CARETAKER
From the play by Harold
Fimar Starring Donald
Ptaasance, Robert Shaw, and
Alan Bata*
* thfcet* and floor
Sunday, Sept 27 5^0,8:00,
10:30 pjn. showing SQ cants
M the Union AudHarbnn
Spomorod by J w Roftx Union

get in touch with Wallace
Brown, who is connected with
the Gainesville Transit Company
to see what possibilities could be
worked out.
Raffles third proposal was to
provide bussing for the wives of

SAs Work For Credit

Credit will be given for the
first time to student advisors
through a special course offerred
for the first time this fall.
The volunteer SAs, as they are
known in the various living
areas, are replacements for the
orientation leaders of two years
ago who guided freshmen on a
week-long introduction to the
campus. Now the emphasis is on
a more long-term relationship
between SAs and freshmen. The
SA serves now more as a
peer-advisor on problems of
adjusting to the university
environment through the entire
year. He lives on the same floor
in the dorm area with 15 or

replace the interview. The
student still must sell himself to
the prospective employer.
The placement office is
beginning to record names of all
students nearing graduation, and
filing data cards on these
students, even if they have not
come to the office for aid.
This will enable employers to
find students who have failed to
apply for a job.
Mayberry urged all eligible
students to complete placement
questionnaires promptly so data
can be fed to the computer
service and reports returned
before recruiters begin campus
visits.

# 1232 W.
UNIVERSITY AVE.
376-7657
PHOTOGRAPHIC
SUPPLY
HEADQUARTERS
for all
Art & Journalism
Students
A A 1232
iikiTk W. UNIV.
376 76 57

the universitys married
students. The committee
appointed one of their members
to lode into the financial aspects
of this suggestion, and to discuss
all the proposals further at next
Thursdays meeting.

more freshmen and is
responsible for them.
THIS YEAR the volunteers
will be taking a special course
through the College of
Education called Student
Development in a University
Setting. The three-hour credit
course is required for the
position and will be offerred on
a pass-fad basis. Each student
enrolled in the course must
complete some kind of project
involving his freshmen and their
relationship to others.
We want to provide the
volunteers with a body of
knowledge which will help them
be better equipped to handle
discussions in the residence
halls, said Dr. Betty Cosby,
assistant to UFs vice president
for student affairs.
Team-teachers for the course
will indude Dr. Cosby, Dr.
Harold Riker, director of the
universitys housing division; Dr.
Marlin Schmidt, associate
professor of education; and
professional housing counselors.
The topics in the course
indude drugs, student activism,
and problems of group living
all considered to be relevant in
the college community.
Water! Water!
New Mexico state engineers
indicate their state will need to
import 1.5 million acre-feet of
water annually by the year 2020
to meet needs.

1 1 1
I Welcome new student wives.
i
I If you aro a Registered Nurse,
I Typist (45 WPM) or Secretary
I (45 WPM Typing and Shorthand);
I we may have the job you are seeking!
I Please call 392-1222 for testing
I and interview appointment.
CENTRAL EMPLOYMENT
I Second Floor, "The Hub
I University of Florida
I "Equal Opportunity Employer"

j
. .. '' ~ **

VBrr ONE OF THE SOUTHS LARGEST JEWELRY STORES
CLASS RINGS
Finest Quality
Hwfflnlaln Fastest Service
' Right Price
mm
DIAMONDS # KHS
Orange Blossom %
.
w*? r< Perre aux I
Accutron
Caravelle
*tlil&- gjjp l .. ***** many more I
fraternity jewelry I
Sorority Jewelry
Favors, etc. f
GUARANTEED WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIR I
Ooiae by our craftsmen in our own Asp.
8 South Main Street |
Hi the Center of Downtown GakteawMo

Friday, September 28,1970, The Florida AMpater,

Page 17



Page 18

l Ttw FtoirMa ANigttor, Friday,

$8.6 Million Given In Aid
To Help Many Students

By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
Alligator Writer
Student financial aid at UF is a huge program
involving more than 10,000 students and a total
sum of $8.6 million.
Ideally, it would be financially possible for
every high school graduate in the U. S. to attend
college, said Douglas Turner, director of student
aid.
LACK OF FUNDS limit our program, but some
form of loan, grant, scholarship or work program is
available for all students with financial need,
Turner said.
These four programs are blueprints for allocating
funds. Applications, received from November to
February, are evaluated by the Student Aid staff.
We attempt to develop a combination of loan,
work and scholarship moneys for each applicant,
said Turner.
The majority of student aid recipients are
involved in a combination deferred payment loan
and student employment program. Payment on
most loans is deferred six to ten months after
graduation. Only one of the ten loan funds accrues
interest.

AFROTC Gets Girls

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Writer
- For the first time, three UF
coeds have enrolled ih UFs Air
Force ROTC program this fall
with an opportunity to become
commissioned officers in the
Womans Air Force (WAF) by
way of the four-year AFROTC
program.
UF is one of 95 colleges and
universities whose AFROTC
departments are opening their
doors to women for the first
time, according to the AFROTC
Information Officer, Capt. J. E.
Kinnan.
HE SAID FSUS AFROTC is
also open to coeds this year.
Captain Kinnan said that
previously training for WAF
officers was offered only
through a three-month program
at Lackland Air Force Base in
San Antonio, Texas.
But in 1969 AFROTC
programs at four colleges
allowed the enrollment of coeds.
The program was successful, and
this year the Air Force invited
all its ROTC programs at 170
colleges and universities to
encourage the enrollment of
women.
THE FOUR-YEAR ROTC
program offers much better
training than could the
three-month program at OTS
(Officer Training School),
Kinnan said.
Coeds as well as male cadets
are not obligated to the Air
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
SSO a month entitles
you to 5 solo hours
Additional hours
that same month
only $9 per hour
No duos
o No foot
o No mootings
For information call
CASSELS IN THE AIR
378-2646

Fotce until they begin classes
their junior year, he said.
Coeds in the AFROTC
programs will attend classes with
men, march in drills with men,
and between their sophomore
and junior years will attend
six-week summer training camps
with male ROTC cadets.
KAREN GRIMM IS one of
the three UF freshmen coeds
enrolled in the program this fall.
My father is in the Air Force
and I wanted to enroll in the
program to see what it was all
about, Miss Grimm said. I had
considered a career in WAF
before coming to college.
Miss Grimm said she was
attending MAF 101, but said
Drills dont begin until Oct. 8.
ONE PROBLEM is I dont

panhellenic
CATCH 15
All 15 of us again
at informals this
weekend
. ii-TT*> - J L
t
pick-up:
\
Schedules
Fri. Sept. 25 712 am.
i
i
Union 346, 347, 349

MORE THAN $5.5 million has been loaned to
8,500 students this year. $4.5 million of this is
supplied by federal programs. The National
Defense Student Loan, because of its magnitude and
accessibility, is the most effective program presently
functioning, Turner said.
In addition, the federal government gives
$300,000 in grants and another $300,000 through
the College Work-Study Program. The bulk of
employment funds, however, is supplied by the
state.
Federal funds are appropriated through an
income scale. Students with an income of up to
$5,000 can receive a grant and loan combination.
Those making $7,000 or less are eligible for a
work-loan package. Students with up to SIO,OOO
incomes are considered for loans or a state
employment program. Federal Insurance Loans can
be granted to students with an income greater than
SIO,OOO.
SEVERAL LOANS and grants, as well as all
scholarships are restricted to colleges, such as
nursing and pharmacy, or to students from specific
geographic locations.

have a uniform. I offered to- sew'
one up a little bit, but they said
no, so I dont know exactly
what will happen.
Kinnan said coeds could also
attend the two-year AFROTC
program after completion of the
summer training camp, but that
no upperclass coeds were
enrolled this year.
When asked whether 4he
opening of AFROTC programs
to women was in response to an
officer manpower shortage,
Kinnan said the directive sent to
him listed no specific reason for
the new program.
Kinnan said after the first
week of classes coeds could still
add AFROTC courses, but only
through the petition process.

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MiniPinters Are Here

By GREG JONES
Alligator Enfrfinmant Editor
The best for good
entertainment during, our first
weekend of discontent in
Gainesville, is the Reitz. Union.
Certainly the best two movies in
town are there. This weekend is
sort of a mini-pinter festival for
the Union, featuring two
pictures written by Britains
Harold Pinter.
The first is Accident,
directed by Joseph Losey and
starring Dirk Bogard and Michael
York. Accident is a neat little
gothic tale full of the sense of
restrained uneasiness so
characteristic of Pinter.
TtlE CAST is excellent. Dirk
Bogard is the most versatile and
the most gifted character actor
in England and has added his
intense, visual grace to movies
like The Fixer Oh What A
Lovely War and The
Damned. In Accident he
plays a university professor who
shares a strange relationship with
a rich young peer and his
fiancee..
The young man is portrayed
by Michael York who played the
fierce Tybalt in Zefferellis
Romeo and Juliet. The movie
flows like dark water around and
over the relationships of the
characters who move with a
sense of impending doom
through the eerily muted
landscapes of their existence.
It is not a horror movie but it
is a disquieting one. For those
who need institutionalized
guarantees, Accident won two
awards at Cannes. It plays
Friday and Saturday at MJU,
8:00 and 10:30 pan.
THE SECOND Pinter film is
The Caretaker which was
adapted by him from his play of
the same name. Its cast is even
better than that of Accident.
It stars Alan Bates, Donald

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The incomparable Bates was
most recently seen as the
sensitive Birkin in D. H.
Lawrences Women in Love.
Those of you who missed him
there (and they stayed away in
droves) will remember him as
The Fixer or maybe as the
mod boyfriend in Georgy
Girl.
Donald Pleasence is a Pinter
regular who is probably best
kno.wn in America for his role as
the blind forger in The Great
Escape.
FINALLY, ROBERT Shaw is
a proto-Renaissance man who
acts so he can afford to write. In
addition to his roles as the
SMERSH heavy in From Russia
With Love and as the young
Henry VIII in A Man For All
Seasons. He wrote the critically
acclaimed Man In The Glass
Booth.
The three come together in
the top floor of an abandoned
house to five and end up
tormenting themselves and each
other with their inherent cruelty
and sadly human behavior.
The Caretaker plays on
Sunday. If the cast, author and
praise dont get you maybe the
50 cents admission price will.
ALSO PLANNED for this
weekend, Friday and Saturday
from 9 to 1 p.m., is a concert by
the Bethlehem Asylum. It has
taken an extraordinary amount
of discipline and not a little
decency to avoid all the obvious
puns on their name, a courtesy
not observed by their type.
The Asylum comes with yards
of favorable advance notices and
appear to offer five excellent
musicians as well. Their sound is
described as, take your pick,
jazz-rock, Bloodwyn Pig-Jethro
Tull-King Crimson, and

indescribable. The group
features in addition to guitars
and drums, steel guitar, tenor
sax, electric flute, piano and
assorted woodwinds.
One review described the
Asylum as frighteningly
unique, almost coolly obscene to
witness and hear, somewhat like
the Stones at Altamont. Every
review I read forcasts eventual
greatness for them and while I
dont recommend psychological
groupie-ism, they might make an
album someday and we all can
say we made it there. Besides a
group on the way up works
harder than groups already there
or on the way down so a good
show would seem to be in the
offing.
If they dont turn out well
you can always expect to see
(God forgive me) several rough
beasts slouching towards
Bethlehem. So much for
discipline and decency.
Admission is SI.OO per person.

..*<( KS
... per day. *? sl :
ffilf- the rate of market do- f but rather somewhere in the
.ng to .ou BhM
' M bp
; on last year.
B B jsyi B
n hav" beer.EH HH EH VH HI IH ( IHH HI EH Hi PI B \PrT
ual basis per cent, ine year-to-year ad- C 7 mg' ~ IMRI
vane* varied from 19.9 cents * ll Jijjj
'1 more under Tarnp-i Bay M Krh I
holiday M /
Get with it! T J
... read St. Petersburg Times daily and Sunday
"STUDENT SPECIAL"
Subscription Offer
For the entire school year For one-half school year
Now thru June 9, 1971 Now thru Jan. 29, 1971
1 Jiwt $14.98 2. Just $8
Save nearly sls off single Renewable Jan. 30 thru
copy price! June 9 at same price.
Start enjoying Florida's Best Newspaper today. Complete features, sports, state and
national news delivered to your door. Automatically stops Dec. 16 for holidays
starts again Jan. 6. A refund will be made if you permanently leave college.
MAIL TODAY TO START HOME DELIVERY
OF THE TIMES.
OFFER EXPIRES OCTOBER 15.
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- SB.OO subscription for approximately one-half school year from now
thru Jan. 29, 1971
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Sun., SeptJ27,lo to 5
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EXHIBITS-PEALERS

Friday, September 25, 1970, The Florida Alligator

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, September 25,1970

The Skin Flicks Come To Town

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Lets see. The students,
22,000 strong, have come, to
town add the movie theaters,
little more than empty park
benches without them, get
ready. Right?
Well, they yank Z which
they advertised as more
exciting than James Bond and
run in The Love Doctors and
Loving Feeling.** As a
concession to adventure-lovers,
they throw in Charltons chest
and chin in the Hawaiians,
and for the art crowd, The
Boys in The Band, a sort of
Who is Afraid of Virginia
Woolf* number with a lisp, is
due in shortly.
THE QUESTION is, where are
all the good movies? Well, the
theater managers dont know.
They simply show what the
distribution corporation that
owns their particular theater
sends them. Reputedly one of
the movie chains in town is
booked by computer. A
computer! I mean, you can tell
right away someone, be he
humanoid or transisteroid,
doesnt think much of our town.
The logic for sending certain
movies to Gainesville seems to
be impeccable. College kids are
earnest proponents and eager
practitioners of sexual freedom.
Right? So we can make a buck
by sending skin flicks. Right?
I can just picture some dude
in Miami or wherever
headquarters is, programming
Gainesville. He has been hired by
this company because hes hip
and understands kids see, and
hes been to college so hes a
natural for a college town. He is
dressed in what John Reaves
would rafflshly describe as
mod clothes; grey bells, loud
blue shirt, cufflinks, gaudy scarf
with a genuine peace symbol
clasp, white shoes and belt and a
diamond pinkie ring.
SOMEWHERE IN his closet
hang four shiny Nehru jackets he
cant understand why nobody
wears anymore. His hair is
razored, long sidies, short sides,
cut around the ear and heavily
sprayed on top. He uses all the
words that were listed in last
months Miami Herald as being
the in lingo of those crazy
kids. He cant complete a
sentence without including at
least one of the following:
RELEVANT, HEAVY,
GROOVY and FAR OUT.
He catches Woodstock
because he hears there is frontal
skin in it and after reading in
Variety how well its going
down with the college crowd, he
puts two and two together. Why

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not send some skin Soaked in
hep situations to G*ville? That is
sure to pack them in.
So we get movies with
come-ons like Stevie Day, the
boss Dee-Jay, got played so
much he wore out. The stringer
assures us that the movie is a
compelling, sophisticated love
story. Thats like haggling over
the price with an ugly hooker
only to have her assure you that
this is the start of a meaningful
relationship.
Dont get me wrong, Im not
opposed to skin. The Dragon,
with the greatest, greasiest fries
in the world is a great place to
slip away to and enjoy epidermal
excitement and exotic ecstacies.
But the Florida Theater where
they showed Ben-Hur? Sacrilege!
What is objectionable is the
pandering of bad movies that
exist on the breathless, panting
level of all-night bull sessions.
What is objectionable is the
naughty cocktail napkin-like
intelligence of the films. Most
importantly, these fillers are
keeping really good movies out
of town.
SURELY, EVEN the most
deprived homy toad amongst us
would prefer a lode at
Performance rather than the
Love Doctors.*
Performance, starring Mick
J agger and James Fox, is
currently causing a critical
uproar in the Big Cities. It has
been called disgusting, squalid,
revolting, depraved, evil and a
few other nice things by
establishment critics.
One in particular developed
an almost obsessive loathing
attraction for and against
Jaggers wet, blubbery,
obscene, sausage-like lips.
Even those critics who were
appalled by it spent considerable
time in an attempt to unravel
the films complexities. Rolling
Stone calls the film stunning,
weird and beautiful; Jaggers
performance as Turner,
exquisite.
THE FILM, made nearly two
years ago, is a precursor of
Altamont according to Rolling
Stone. It is a dark yin to
Woodstocks yang.
Without even going into the
plot, the music, the direction or
the meaning we can see we have
more than your ordinary two
hour flickering interlude here.
Even if the film was bad it
would be worth seeing and
deciding for ourselves.
But dont look, for it in
Gainesville.
ANOTHER FILM we might
willingly trade Loving Feeling
for is Five Easy Pieces, the
new Jack Nicholson film that
has opened to rave reviews m

COMPUTER PICKS 'EM

New York. Or what about two
under-promoted films that share
the funniest actor in America?
I am speaking of none other
than Gene Wilder. The man who
did so much for hysteria in The
Producers is currently starring
.in Start the Revolution
Without Me ancT Quackser
Fortune Has A Cousin in the
Bronx.
Revolution** also stars
Donald Sutherland and is an
insane parody of the old Warner
Brothers costume extravaganzas.
The revolution referred to in the
title is the French one and
Wilder and Sutherland play four
roles as switched twins. The
sight gags and the outrageous
wordplay more than compensate
for an ending worse than all the
My Friend Flicka endings
combined. The movie is a
two-hour belly laugh and would
go a long way in these humorless
proceedings.
QUACKSER PRESENTS
Wilder in what he calls his best
role, that of an Irish manureman
who is pushed out of a job by
the motor car. The movie
redeved excellent reviews.
But what about the new
Frank and Eleanor Perry film,
Diary of a Mad Housewife,
starring Richard Benjamin and
Carrie Snodgress? Surely the
team that gave us David and
Lisa and Last Summer could
be counted on to fill a theater.
I havent even mentioned
Joe, the controversial movie
about hard-hats, or Borsalino
with John-Paul Belmondo and
Alain Delon, or Lovers and
Other Strangers, or
Catch-22. That list neglects
Patton, Fantasia, Cotton
Comes To Harlem, The Angel
Levine, The Virgin and the
Gypsy or Rider on the Rain.
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THESE ARE important
movies and we should have the
chance to see them. It would be
great to report next week that
the theaters had decided to brin

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Call 392-1637 or come by the GAMES
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Mixed and mixed doubles Leagues are
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at least a few of the above.
But C. B. Deiralle only helps
those who help themselves. If
there is a movie you want to see
inform the theater manager



I The
I Florida
I Alligator

By KEN MCKINNON
I Alligator Sport* Editor

I The turning point arrives
j tomorrow for the Florida Gators
when they face a Bear Bryant
Crimson Tide team that hasnt
lost a game on Denny Stadiums
now-astroturf covering in seven
years.
*'
Florida was the only team to
defeat Bryant in Tuscalossa.
That was back in 1963 when UF
jjhalfback Dick Kirk ran a 46 yard
clincher right through the Bama
defensive middle.
THAT WAS the past, this is
the present and neither Bryant
nor UF head coach Doug Dickey
are showing the least bit of
over-confidence.
But he has nothing but praise
for this 1970 Florida football
5 team that he says has more super
stars than any team he has ever
played in the SEC, and that, my
friends, is a lot of teams.
ONE REASON for his
not-so-confident-attitude toward
tomorrows game, which could
very well tell the story of the
UFs year in the SEC, is because
of the ego-thrashing he got from
powerhouse Southern Cal. two
weeks ago.
The nations number one
team, the Trojans ran up an
I unbelievable 485 rushing against
the Tide, giving people like
I Florida running back Mike Rich
I the impression that Bama could
be run on.
r
Our offensive line has been
I blocking* well the last couple of
I weeks, Rich said. Yeh, I think
I we can run on em.
BUT DICKEY hasnt
I expressed any thing of that sort
Kail week, saying, like Bryant said
of his Gators, that the
I capabilities of that* team, up in
that small Alabama village, were
of the caliber of any in the SEC.
This game could be decided
n the line, Dickey said.
Alabama is very quick and the
Seam setting nff th? w-u i
gvnuig WU UIV UOil WSI
night control the course of the
Same.
Bama pluses are quarterback
cott Hunter, who threw 16 of
7 passes for 167 yards against
outhem Cal, wide receivers
Savid Bailey and George
manager and tailback Johnny
usso.
IBAILEY CAUGHT seven
Ssses against theTrqjans, while

aceigdew
"Accident", winner of two Best Film Awards at the 1967
Cannes Festival, stars Dirk Bogarde, Stanley Baker, and
Jacqueline Sassard. The Director is Joseph Losey and the
*creenplay was done by Harold Pinter.
Time says it is "a dissection of human passion."
Esquire: "One of the year's important movies.
Accident shows this Fri & Sat at 5:30, 8:00 and 10:30 p.m. in the
Union Aud. Admission is 50 cants. Advance tickets on sele Fri in the
wcond floor box office from 12:30 4:30 p.m. for all weekend showings.
Sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union

-JiaKiA ~_ Ili. SB Si BB 4 i'-^S

Gators Reach Turning Point

w Awl
SPECTATORS-EYE- VIEW
Under the watchful eye of coaches George McKinney (foreground)
and Dave Fuller, two UF gridders work out on Astroturf. The
Monsanto Co. donated the artificial turf to familiarize the team with
the surface before they play on it this Saturday in Tuscaloosa. Head
Coach Doug Dickey said, the university is considering seeking the
funds to install the plastic grass on Florida Field. Dickey mentioned a
plan to acquire the money similar to the donation program used at
Kansas State.

Musso caught three and rushed
for 43 yards.
BOTH TEAMS come off
convincing, decisive victories,
Bama completely destroying
VPI, 51-13, the Gators, of
course, nailing Mississippi State,
34-13, after slipping by Duke,
21-19, a week earlier in that
earlier-than-usual opener in the
Gator Bowl.
Major factor in favor of
Bryants squad, no doubt, is the
Tartan turf that no Florida team
has played on in its history,'
Dickey trying to offset that by
working the team on a
10-square-yard gift of
astroturf* similar to that
synthetic stuff on Denny
Stadium's field, from Monsanto.
Another plus, already
mentioned, is the home field
advantage. Finally, you must
take into account those Crimson
Tide footballers must be
oh-so-hupgry after that
humiliating defeat at the hands
of Southern Cal.
A big plus, besides the
obvious ones Bryant spoke of,
for the Gators has to be the
return of sophomore middle

linebacker Fred Abbott,
6-foot-3, 220 pounds, who left
the team 10 days ago, thought
about it and then decided that
football was the life for him.
No matter what the pluses are
for either team, its a fact that
both teams are hungry, that
both teams know this could
mean life or death in this years
SEC final standings.
Game time is 2;30 p.m. EDT
and will be broadcast on WRUF
radio.

1 T SCULPTUR-KUT NatlllSLook b HAIRSTYLE f
IhMO university plaza I
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§call373jll9S^^^^^^^^AKg^F^^^^^cicrosifroiiicaiiipusl

Friday. September 25.1970, The Florida Alligator,

JML l STEAK HOUSB
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:OQ PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
It does 0 to 150 M
in IX seconds. M
So we darit handover
the keys to just any \ST
that comes along,
SEE THE TEAM
1 ON CAMPUS: Mjk
Sept. 280ct.^^w
FiK NAVY /
Sr j
i

KEN McKINNON
Sports Editor

Page 21



Page 22

Th Florid. A dig. tor. Friday. Seotamber 25.1970

Heisman Winner Crow Likes Alvarez

By MIKE MOSCARDINI
Alligator Sports Writer
The scout from Alabama
introduced himself as John
Crow.
He then proceeded to
expound the usual litany of
praise for the home team and
wondered how in the world the
Crimson Tide could possibly
stay on the same field with the
Gators.
He said that Reaves was
tremendous and that the
defense looked tough.
Crow also had praise for
All-American split end Carlos
Alvarez.
Alverez looks more like
Tommy MacDonald than any
other receiver I have ever seen,
said Crow.
Is Crow qualified to make the
McDonald-Alvarez comparison?
No, but I played with him in
three Pro Bowls, said Crow.
Crow, the Alabama scout, is
the same John David Crow the
Texas A&M Heisman Trophy

Profits From Soda Sales
Go To Student Loan Fund

Florida Director of Athletics
Ray Graves announced today
the excess of net profits over last
season from the East Stands
soft-drink concessions sales at
home football games will be
contributed to the Student Loan
Fund.
Graves noted an earlier ban on
the bringing of coolers and
containers into Florida Field for
football games had been
imposed without consideration
of probable increased revenue
from soft-drink concession sales
in the stadium.
AS AN ACT of good faith
with the student body in this
regard our Board of Directors
voted unanimously last week to
contribute these profits above
last season's to the Student Loan
Fund, said Graves.
Also, in an effort to improve
concessions service on the East
side of the stadium an additional
concessions stand has been built,
giving fans on that side of the
field a total of seven, and 30
additional water fountains are
beinf installed and will be
operational for the N.C. State
game and the remainder of the
season.

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winner and former all-pro
running back for the St. Louis
Cardinals.
Coming from a man of this
caliber, the Alvarez-MacDonald
comparison becomes more
noteable.
Tommy MacDonald was a
split end on the 1960
CARLOS ALVAREZ
like Tommy MacDonald

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Philadelphia Eagle team that
defeated the Green Bay Packers
in Vince Lombardi's first shot at
an NFL championship.
MacDonald, like Alvarez, was
a small man among the giants
who play football. MacDonald
was also known for his
irrepressible exuberance for
playing the game, and his ability,
again like Alvarez, to make the
dutch catch.
Both MacDonald and Alvarez
wore only a single bar face guard
on their helmets so that their
view of the ball was least
obstructed. Both also cut the
sleeves off their jerseys to free
their arms.
Looking ahead to Saturdays
football showdown between UF
and Alabama, Crow said he had
not yet analysed the UF team
enough to make any specific
predictions.
He did say that UF
quarterback John Reaves and his
Bama counterpart Scott Hunter

are very similar, although
Reaves may run a little more.
On the number one Alabama
running back, Johnny Musso,
Crow said that at 5-11 and 190

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pounds, he is definitely not a
power runner. He has good
speed, about 4.7 for the 40 yard
dash, and relies mostly on his
quickness.



Baby Gators Open With Auburn

TheabyGators wffl Jrickoff
their 1970 football season when
they meet the Auburn Baby
Tigers here on Oct. 5.
It looks lice we have a good
sound freshman team but I cant
pass judgement until theyve
been up against their first
opponent, head Freshman
Coach Jimmy Haynes said.
The Baby Gators have been
practicing daily among
themselves and against the
varsity.
Players from as far away as
Mississippi, Texas, New Jersey
and Tennessee have blended
together as a team under the
guidance of coaches, Jack Jones,
offense; Charles Fulton, running
backs; Wayne Griffith, offensive
line; Bubba McGowan, wide
receivers; and defensive coaches:
Jack Hall, line backers; Jim
Payne, ends and tackles and Don
Deal, secondaries.
Vince Kendrick, Miami
Springs, looks like a very
promising running back and
Lenny Lucas, Daytona Beach,
has done very well at the same
spot.
Chan Gailey, Americus, Ga.
and David Pope, DeFuniak

Gators Ready For r ama

A brief workout this
afternoon will wrap up a
satisfactory week of practice
for the Gators, who traveled this
morning to Tuscaloosa.
They will hold a light practice
on the Astroturf at Denny
Stadium before meeting the
Crimson Tide tomorrow.
WE HAD a satisfactory week
of woik, head Coach Doug
Dickey said. I hope that we
made some progress.
Dickey concentrated on
installing new offensive plays
and worked on improving the
kick coverage game.
There are no new serious
injuries. Linebacker Mike Kelley
suffered a bruised shoulder.
Tuesday and sat out Wednesday.
Fred Abbott, who quit last
week, has returned to back up
Kelley.
SPLIT END Carlos Alvarez,
still on his practice-a-day-rest-a practice-a-day-rest-a-day
day practice-a-day-rest-a-day schedule has had no trouble
with his knee, and will be at full
speed.
Dickey had the squad doing
drills on the 10 square yard strip
of Astroturf donated to help
familiarize the team with the
feeling of the artificial grass.
There is often a mental

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Springs, will alternate in the
quarterback position during the
Auburn game, as they have done
at practice. In addition to
football, Pope is a member of
the freshman honor section.
Wide receiver Joel Parker, a
two sport All-American in his
Clearwater high school,
basketball and football, has
shown fine speed and good
hands.
Larry Adams of Coral Gables
is doing a fine job in he Mnn
position.
The team has other offensive
standouts in Mark King of
Tallahassee at center; Trippe
Whitaker, Tallahassee, guard;
Kris Anderson of Orlando at
tackle; and Henry Foldberg,
Atlanta, Ga., tight end.
Robert Beody of Roswell,
Ga., Ricky Browne of Maitland,
and James Booth of Sarasota,
are doing excellent jobs at
linebacker. Defensive ends,
Danny Azeredo, Riveria Beach
and Kim Kruse, Ft. Lauderdale,
have shown a lot of talent on the
field.
Doing very well at defensive
tackle are Walter Hobbs of
Tampa; Clint Griffith, Baker;

problem about falling on the
surface, said defensive
coordinator Doug Knotts, whose
teams at Tennessee played on
the plastic rug. But with our
coaches being familiar with it,
we stopped the mental block
before it started.
Dickey hopes the team can
maintain the mental high they
carried into last weeks State
game.
The season will not be over
if we lose to Alabama, Dickey
said, but it would be a big jump
for us if we could come out on
top.

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David Hitchcock, Winter Haven;
and John Lacer, Brandon.
Defensive backs James Revels
of Merritt Island, who in
scrimmage against the varsity
intercepted a pass and ran it
back 70 yds. for a touchdown
and Greg Langley, Ft.
Lauderdale, are very promising.
Defensive free safety Carey
Geiger, Savannah, Ga. and Ricky
Browne, Maitland, will punt,
while Clifton Aust, Clearwater
and Bobby Hickman, Jasper,
Ga., will handle the extra points
and field goals.
Injuries to the 53-man team
He
ppwT*
mWF
JjwjVjpWjl
JIMMY HAYNES
... uncertain of season

>. j/2-. W -
MIKE KELLEY
... sore but ready

have been minimal. Ricky
Browne has suffered a strained
knee; Jim McDowell, Vero
Beach, has knee injuries; Mike

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Friday* fiptwnbur 25,1970, Tlw Florida AMprtar,

Craft, Key West, has an injured
hand;, and Donnie Crowder,
Lakeland, suffers from a
previous back iiqury.

Page 23



Page 24

The Florida Friday, September 25,1970

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(Inf I ; The Harmon Football Forecast IlMNil {
\ i ITexas 6Notre Dame 11Tennessee 16Alabama \ \
111 f 2Mississippi 7Stanford 12Auburn 17Florida
lfliflKf= / 3Penn State BSouthern Cal 13West Virginia 18U.C.L.A. f
BBBBBBBBSS \\ 4Missouri 9Nebraska 14Michigan 19Air Force V i
- BK|| sHouston 10Arkansas 15Purdue 20San Diego State SjSSSSSjMSs \\
Saturday, Sept. 26 Major Colleges HIGHLIGHTS FOR SEPT. 26
Alabama Florida Big
|g Arizona 22 San Jose State 6 w .. don't think VOU'll need a
Arizona State 31 Kansas State 27 we really aon T tmnK you n iiewu a
Arkansas lulsaI ulsa dictionary or a copy of "Whos Who to
Brigham Young read our first Top 20 of the 1970 season. Iff
Cincinnati 17 wifuSn'&*M.ry M Most of the face* are probably all too
Columbia 20 Lafayette 15 familiar
Cornell 21 Colgate 14 laminar.
Dartmouth 22 Massachusetts 14 Texas IS Still unchallenged for that
Duke n 20 Virginia Gree 1? Number One position, and the Longhorns
FforidJ'SLte £ SB.'KSt *1" o'WiV the top spot with a2B point
Georgia 24 ciemson io spanking of Texas Tech this Saturday.
Harvard Tec 27 Northeastern o 6th-ranked Notre Dame will be waiting to
Houston 3 ** 34 Shorn a state 14 boil the 15th-rated Riveters of Purdue, the
Kent state 21 Buffalo 19 1969 season. The "spoiler will be played in
tsar 27 mc e nsylvan a io South Bend, and it looks like a 5-point
KfchSin State 26 Washington iJ revenge victory for Notre Dame.
Michigan state 25 Washington state 21 The Air Force, no. 19, may be Victim the
Minnesota 21 Ohio U 13 '
Missouri 21 Air Force 10 Third for the Tigers of Missouri ranked I
Nebraska PI 33 Army UCky fourth. Rolling with a full head of steam,
KSrth fi? a It LcfuTsviUe 9 Mizzou will have to keep the fire hot in
A Northern Illinois 20 Xavier is order to clip the Falcons. The spread could
Notre Dame 22 Purdue 17 r
Ohio State 31 Texas A&M 10 be 11 points.
Pacific 24 Idaho o Though a little late in appearing onstage
Pittsburgh 3 BSy* for the 1970 football season, the Ohio State
Princeton 28 Rutgers 16 Buckeyes plan to make up for lost time,
san Diego state 66 Los Angeles state o Texas A&M is the first guest, and they II be
ItAiiitffi iSJthemcar 8 ?i a Caro,ma state jJ treated rather poorly. The Bucks will whip *mmm
V ADD \ south'. Mississippi 30 S*o'n* ic S 3 e U the Agiesby 22 points. Al AII'C f llhana
ImMl a# Stanford 33 Oregon 7 And after a breather last Saturday, MLHIv J wIIUQIICi
Tennessee 22 Auburn 21 7th-ranked Stanford moves into Pacific I
I\CI irATCCCQI T*c"u. 24 ESSoIS* 14 Coeat Conference action against Oregon. The ii | i
DtUtAlUjtll SS £ If,HT" 13 Ducks may be tough, but the Indians will be fV\IST6r
Vanderbilt II &sfrefstat. 7 Mississippi, Southern Califomia, and r- I
SSTS. If Sta Cl3r3 1 no. 2. no. 8, and no. 9 OQndWICh
m AtAi r lA.I r. West virsipia 56 v.m.i. o respectively, should heve things feirly easy
ISIS SW. 13th St wyom!ng M,chlgan 24 utST state 0 20 Seturday. The Rebels teke on Kentucky as f
Ya,e 20 Connecticut is they start their quest for the Southeast Ol
Other Games East Conference crown. Mississippi will beet the
AWA vmm Albright 20 Juniata 19 Wilcats by 27 points. The Trojans bump into r%Â¥f\ r
373-3377 SEiSS?' If IST" R3S ,1 Big Tan competition, birt they'll have little -V7UIUI
Baidwin.waii.ce 27 Buckn.il io troubla beating lowa by 21. And Nebraska -ww
Bowdoin 21 Worcester Tech 6 will conquer the Cadets of West Point by 26 I COI I ntr\/
Bridgeport 20 Adelphi 0 V/ WI 11 I 7
- ,' C W Post 17 Wagner 6 points.
i I QI wm JA Camegie-rvienon |C wnmgton & Jeffn 7 Rated third in our national rankings, Penn
!1H iwKI / # ZA coiby 14 coast Guard 7 State travels to Colorado for an
BE,*T K n 3 Hampshire o inunectiona \ bsttte. The Buffalos are Big _i\E| |%#EBC
KSSSTu (P.) S- co'ZZrt"' s Eight title contenders.. .Ponn State i. out to "VELIYEKa"
Kenyon 20 Hobart is keeo its emezine undefeated streak alive.
Lock Haven 20 Califomia State 17 .
Maine 21 Hofstra 7 The Nittany Lions will win by sixteen.
Moravian 17 Delaware valley is Two prides of me ooutneast Conference A A
rE3T g IS 3 b""P t-X-O" ill the Big One of the (toy. -p AbT AbTc
c AbTc *i ji ssss? r .ck 3 gssr j v p
V -At rYntDrll Trenton 16 Frostburg 14 12th-rated Auburn by a single point. Youve
vwSin II MMUbuni i* h rd * mention grandmas red tricycle
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OPENING DAY Sept.2B The Greatest SandWches
NY Cheese Cake Salads Submarines Regulars
Corned Beef Subs ALL KINDS ALL VARIETIES
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Roast Beef Pickles 378-1230 373-1031
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