Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
' V~t
Memo Asks Dorm Rules Enforcement

By CARL CRAWFORD
AHJgator Writer
A memo issued to the housing
custodial staff asking members to report
unusual conditions in any student rooms
was released Monday, following earlier
reports of dorm crackdowns.
The possibility of an RA crackdown on
housing rules is accepted as fact by many
students, but the memo to the custodial
staff has just been brought to light.-
THE MEMO, issued by Daniel F.
Rousseau, assistant building
superintendent, is an explanation of how
is to be collected from dorm rooms.
The memo states, If a student refuses

I?AL
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Problems, problems. Not only was the Alligator late Monday, but
one of the trucks bringing the papers to the Union crashed against the
toll booth creating more problems. ... But the booth needed
re-modeling anyway.

Four Jailed In Contempt

Four youths, at least one of whom is a former UF
student, are in Alachua County Jail on contempt of
court charges concerning the death of UF Speech
department secretary Debbie Pedlow of an overdose
drugs.
t The four were found in contempt of court Sept.
15 when they refused to answer State Attorney
T. E. Duncans questions concerning the
circumstances surrounding Miss Pedlows death. The
court sentenced them because they did not show
legal justification for not answering the questions,
even though they acted on the advice of counsel.
THE FOUR Robert Meso, John Clements,
Wesley Keaton and Rea Phillips will appear before

to let you in his room, do not argue.
Make a note of the room number and tell
your supervisor.
The memo continued, If there are
unusual circumstances, such as snakes or
animals in the room, tell your
supervisor.
STUDENT REACTION to an RA
crackdown to enforce dorm rules was
mostly against such measures.
Reports of the crackdown have been
circulating throughout the campus since
last Wednesday, and have disturbed many
returning students.
Eris Reddoch, a returning sophomore
living in Graham area, said, Something is
going on, but I cant say how bad it is.

The
Florida Alligator

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Judge John Crews today at 4 p.m. concerning a
mitigation (lessening) of sentence. They are
represented by the firm of Goldin and Tench.
Miss Pedlow was found dead in her room Sept. 13
by Meso, her boyfriend. Meso took Miss Pedlow to
Alachua County Hospital where she was announced
dead on arrival.
The exact cause of death is pending the written
report of an autopsy by Dr. Robert F. Klein, county
medical examiner. The cause of death was
tentatively identified as an overdose of barbiturates.
When police arrived at the house in which Miss
Pedlow died, they were refused entry by the houses
r (SEE 'ROOMMATE' PAGE 2)

University of Florida, Gainesville

COUEGE OF EDUCATION
Professors Boycott
Senate Elections

See Editorial Page 8
By DUANE MERTZ
Alligator Writer
Protest over who formulates local policies erupted again at the UF
campus when assistant and associate professors of the College of
Education refused to elect their representatives to the University
Senate, calling it undemocratic.
The senate, which includes 475 full professors, is headed by
UF President Stephen C. OConnell, who holds veto power over any
proposals.
IN A STATEMENT .prepared by Robert Sherman, an education
professor, the group said, We refuse to vote for any persons in this
election because of a lack of confidence in the University Senate and
because that body is not democratically constituted.
There are 400 full professors at UF who are automatically senate
members by the nature of their status, but of the nearly 700 associate
and assistant professors on the campus, only 50 are in the senate,
Sherman said Monday.
Weve put up with this, but we dont think you can make that
much distinction between full and associate or assistant professors, so
we feel were not being represented fairly, Sherman said.
CONTROVERSY HAS also centered around the number of
representatives the College of Agriculture has in the senate. Currently
that department has 25 per cent of the total number of
representatives in the body.
Dr. John Greenman of the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences'said in a recent St. Petersburg Times interview he opposes
broader representation, because it is those who have maturity,
experience and length of service at the institution that is, the full
professors who should have the primary voice.
The full professors are the ones with the knowledge to effectively
handle the problems of the university.

REDDOCH SAlDsthat the biggest
hassle was over drugs. They used tossy
just dont get caught, but now they say
someone is going to catch you.
Another Graham area resident who
wished to remain anonymous said, The
student assistants said they were to get
very tough on drugs and alcohol in the
dorm. They said they were expecting a
lot of busts this year.
A resident of Hume, Donna Labagh,
said, The RAs are going to enforce the
rules more, and they said something
about an election year. They said if you
have drugs in the room, hide them good.
MISS LABAGH explained that this

-
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
has removed the cheerleaders
from its budget, but theyll
still be around page 6
Classifieds 11
Editorials 8
Entertainment 13
Letters 9
Movies 11
Orange and Blue 10
Sports ~. 14

year RAs will be able to search rooms.
Im a transfer student, but other girls
who lived in dorms before dont like it,
she said.
In Murphree area, two students who
also wished to have their names withheld
said conditions were tolerable, but the
RAs have warned of stringent
enforcement of all housing rules.
Students contacted in the other dorm
areas on campus stated that their RAs
warned of strong enforcement of rules in
three main aieas. In cases of possession of
drags, alcohol and open house violations,
the enforcement will not be lenient,
according to the information given during
dorm meetings last week.

Tuesday, September 22, 1970

DR. ROBERTSHERMAN
... senate 'undemocratic'
Jordan Wants
U.S. Help
WASHINGTON (UP!) King
Hussein has appealed to the
United States and other world
powers for help in turning back
Syrian government troops who
have joined Arab guerrillas
trying to overthrow Jordans
government, official sources said
Monday.
Administration officials were
unclear whether the young king
was seeking direct U. S. military
assistance. His vague request,
which was understood to have
gone also to Britain, France and
Russia, asked what each country
was prepared to do to get Syrian
government forces out of
Jordan.
OFFICIALS HERE viewed
the request for aid as reflecting
the very difficult position
Hussein found himself in as
Syrian forces were reported to
hold Jordans second largest city
and fighting was reported
continuing in tattle-scarred
Amman.
There was no information
* (SEE U.S/ PAGE 2)



!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. September 22,1970

Page 2

IN TV DEBATc
Agnew Called 'Precursor Os Violence[

NEW YORK (UPI) A college student accused Vice
President Spiro T. Agnew Monday night in a
face-to-face exchange of being a political joke whose
public words made him a precursor of violence.
Agnew in a spirited reply hit at the disgusting
permissive attitudes of people in command of college
campuses. To make him a scapegoat because of these
attitudes, the Vice President said, was one of the most
ridiculous charges Ive ever heard.
THE EXCHANGE came at the end of a 90-minute
taping of a television panel show in which Agnew took
on five student leaders from a group of nine. They
appeared on the David Frost Show which is shown at
various times around the country on week nights.
It was scheduled to appear Friday in New York and
several of the other large television areas.
Until the final exchange, the show was conducted in
good spirit and without acrimony, with topics ranging
over many areas of student dissent and of Agnews
recent speeches.
THE STUDENT who accused Agnew was Richard
Silverman, president of the Associated Students of the
University of Washington, who is studying for a
doctorate in political science in the field of urban

Housing Bans Guns In Dorms

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
Gun lovers will not be able to
keep their guns in UF housing
from now on, due to harsher
enforcement of existing UF
regulations.
Students who keep guns on
campus should take them to the
University Police Department
(UPD) for storage, or face
suspension.
ACCORDING TO UF
attorney Tom Biggs, the policy
Roommate 111
residents for four hours. When
police were allowed to enter, the
room was thoroughly cleaned
and all the trash cans were
emptied.
Late the same day, Madeline ~
Carroll, Miss Pedlows
20-year-old roommate, was
admitted to the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center with an apparent
overdose of drugs. She is being
treated for opium overdose and
hepatitis. She was reported in
good condition by hospital
authorities yesterday.

Have openings for 3 ccMsge follows.
Must be neat, personable with car.
.. '*s
Not door to door selling.
Earn 75.00 a week working 3 nites
and one-half day Saturday.
Interview on campus Thursday 400 PM
Roitz Union Rm 118.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The- Florida*'AlHgator- reserves the-rtght-to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than on? Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.


of keeping guns out of campus
housing will be enforced from
now on. vv
This renewed policy
enforcement arises from
recommendations from the
Committee for the Removal and
Control of Guns on Campus.
The committee recommended all
guns not belonging to the UPD
or used in ROTC should be kept
out of the UF campus.
The resolution passed by the
University Senate on Aug. 4
stated:
BE IT RESOLVED by the
University Senate that it does
hereby endorse the principle of
absolute prohibition against
unauthorized posession -of
weapons on campus.
The resolution continued,
... such a prohibition is a
regulation of the university and
violation thereof may be cause
forte r mination of
appointment.
This resolution intended for
UF staff members, now applies
to anyone, including UF
students.
BIGGS SAID this provision
will be incorporated shortly in
the student code of conduct.
Students living in UF housing

violence. Things had begun to heat up in the final
segment of the show with talk about the Kent State
campus slayings and hardhat construction worker
activists.
Os Kent State, where four students died, Agnew said
the evidence seems to indicate the National Guard
overreacted in shooting. He said they were not
professional soldiers and I dont excuse what they
did.
But he added it was amazing how the American
people had forgotten the precursors of the
shooting-rioting for two nights and the burning of the
ROTC building the night before and cutting of the
hoses of firemen who came to the blaze.
THE CLASH of the hardhats with young activists
was out of the rage of people who work to build this
country and not a premeditated attack. I dont
condone the violence, he said. These people worked
with their hands and worked hard to get where they
are in this country.
He added that, I cant equate that wave of
revulsion when they saw the flag defiled with campus
unrest.
You talk about an aura of violence, a precursor,

have been advised of the
regulations.
According to Director of
Housing Dr. Harold Riker,
students who would be living in
campus housing were advised
not to bring guns to UF this fall.
IN CONNECTION with the
hunting season, if any students
decided to bring guns, they were
advised that the guns should be
stored with the campus security
officer, Riker said.
He added that if any student
is observed by the staff in any
hall harboring weapons,

Honorary Sells Books
The UFs chapter of the international history honor society, Phi
Alpha Theta, will hold its fall quarter book sale today and tomorrow
in Peabody 201, from 3 to 5 p.m.
All history students and faculty are invited to participate in the
sale. All sellers should bring their books to Peabody Hall, room 206
today before 3 p.m. Enclosed should be a paper with the title of the
book the desired price and name and address of the seller written on
it.
THE BOOKS and/or money should be picked up by the seller on
Tuesday between 5 and 5:30 p.m.
The sale is a service of the society to the students and faculty of
histoiy and all proceeds of the sale go to the owners of the books
sold.
Anyone interested in the activities of the society should contact the
chapters president, Robert Doria, c/o the Department of Histoiy
206 Peabody Hall. J

L\
A BOLD NEW
BOOK
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f X* 5 /
A BOLD NEW /
ADVENTURE
i
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appropriate action will be taken,
' depending on the circumstances.
For those who want to store
guns, however, there will be a
place for them.
When the Committee
presented its recommendations
to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell during the spring
quarter, some married students
claimed they would need guns
for protection of their homes.
As it stands now, even
married students face suspension
if they breach this regulation,
Biggs said.

Silverman said. You have the distinction of being a
political joke. You are the most single precursor of
violence. You have done more to build a milieu of
violence than anyone I know.
YOU YOURSELF are perhaps the greatest
precursor of violence in this country .
Agnew replied, with a twinkle, that long before I
became a household word there had been plenty of
violence. He said Columbia University was turned
topsy-turvy long before President Nixon was ever
nominated. Violence had become away of life j n
schools in Japan, Germany and other countries where
my rhetoric is scarcely known.
Warming up, he said: To use me as some
convenient bete noire for the violence thats existed in
this country ... because of the disgusting permissive
attitudes of people in command of college campuses, is
one of the most ridiculous carves Ive ever heard.
Bete noire, a French term, is defined in the
dictionary as something that one especially dislikes or
dreads. It gives bugbear as a synonym, and means
literally, black beast.

f Tickets Scarce
: : S
: A limited number of
: Alabama tickets for UF >
: students are now available. ;i;
: They can be purchased for $7
j at Gate 13 at the stadium on
: Monday and Tuesday of this $
: week from 2 until 8 p.m.
: each day. x
;I
V.V.VAV.V.V.VAVAV.VWrtWiWWA 1
U.S. Silent
U^MPAGToNEjI
immediately available as to a
possible U. S. response to the
message, because officials were
not clear exactly what Hussein
sought.
Officials have refused to say
just what the United States
would do except use military
forces to rescue and evacuate
U. S. citizens in Jordan if that
became necessary and feasible.
But it has been assumed here
that the United States would not
intervene militarily simply to
preserve Husseins government.
U. S. OFFICIALS do,
however, hope that the
moderate Hussein government
can survive the Arab civil war.



P.E. Decision To Come
Within A Few Weeks

By DUANE MERTZ
Alligator Writer
After months of debate,
Robert A. Bryan, dean of
faculties, expects a decision on
the controversial physical
education requirement within a
few weeks.
As a result of a University
Senate action last year, UF
students are no longer required
to sweat out six quarters of
physical education, but may
fulfill the requirement in three
quarters.
ON FEB. 26 the senate
approved a requirement of
three quarters, one-hour

ODK Survey Due
By DEE DEE ESPOSITO
Alligator Writer
The results of teacher evaluation forms issued last spring will be
published next week, according to Ralph Glatfelter, Omicron Delta
Kappa (ODK) president*
11,000 OF the pamphlets, compiled by ODK, will be distributed
through the Student Government communication bureau. The results
will be made available to every freshman and sophomore.
Publication was delayed, Glatfelter said, because of problems in
having the results compiled and written out in readable form.
Students worked four weeks this summer summarizing classes
opinions of instructors. The summaries considered along with factual
information supplied by the professors to produce the final evaluation
of each instructor and course, Glatfelter said*
ODK, IN cooperation with SG, has sponsored teacher evaluation
the past four years.
Previously, evaluation was totally optional, and results were strictly
donfidential. Results were returned to those professors who
volunteered for evaluation.
The system operated in its first three years with small response
from professors. In September of 1969, former Vice-President for
Academic Affairs Frederick W. Conner instructed all deans to institute
an evaluation program for all courses by fall of 1970.
DDK'S PURDUE > Rating Scale for Instruction was readily
available, and response greatly increased.
Glatfelter said that three years of limited use have produced a
good instrument for evaluation.
We feel that the results are now reliable and complete enough for
publication, he said.

Help, Jobs Available

If you want to go to a party
and cant leave your little darling
alone don't fret.
If you need a little extra cash
for that outfit you've been
wanting, theres away you can
earn it.
A NEW TWO-WAY.
babysitting service for students
has been initiated by student
services, and sponsored by
Student Government. No

9
is c) {>!!><*; tiller.
_____________________________,

sequence of physical education
and health.
Instead of being required to
take six quarters of P.E. for no
credit, UF students now are
required to take only three
quarters and receive one credit
hour for each.
The new requirement has set
off a wave of debate concerning
who is responsible for enforcing
the new regulation. When the
senate passed the original
motion it also stated that: This
is a UF requirement and not a
University College requirement.
NOTHING HAS changed on
the issue since the Council of
Academic Deans met in

director has been appointed yet,
according to Jib Black, SG
secretary of student services.
Students interested in making
a little extra money may apply
anytime in the SG office, third
floor of the Reitz Union.
Anyone needing a babysitter
may call the SG office and
receive a list of applicants. The
student sits at the individual's
home. No pay scale has been
decided upon.

August, Bryan said Friday.
In addition to meeting the
requirement, students may
enroll in more PJE.courses and
receive extra credit. But the
deans must grant students in
their colleges permission to take
the course, according to Clifford
Boyd, dean of the College of
Physical Education and Health.
I
Many colleges do not
pressure students into taking
PE, Bryan said, and a student
could conceivably graduate
without fulfilling the
requirement unless some
controls are placed on the
program.

.. \
m I
SUBSCRIBE NOW! MIAMI HERALDS
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT OFFER
Subscribe for one quarter at $7.00 and SAVE
$3.50 over regular rates PLUS you get a FREE
coffee cup with the University of Florida Seal.
Subscribe for three quarters at SIB.OO and
SAVE $11.25 over regular rates AND you get a
FREE solid state transistor radio and a coffee
cup with University of Florida Seal.
ORDER BY PHONE: lj||| mPtr
ORDER BY MAIL:
CALL 378-2167 NOW! And W.ll D.liv.r Your
Froo Gifts and Collect Your Subscription Prko
OR (IF YOU PREFER) MAIL TO: MIAMI HERALD
BOX 14412. UNIVERSITY STATION, GAINESVILLE, (32B01) _____
(And W*H Deliver Your Fra* Gift*)
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Address
Room Number ________ Phone Number

Voting Set 0ct.14
until 6 pjn. according to Craig Hunter, secretary of the
interior.
Hunter stressed the need for good voter turnout and people
to seek office. Our goal in this election is to top all previous
elections records, Hunter said*
THERE ARE forty senate posts open with seventeen On
Campus seats broken down as follows: Murphree-3:
Grahmn-Hume-3; Broward-Rawlings-2; Tolbertr2; Towers-2;
Jennings-1; Yulee-1; Flavet Village-1; Diamond-Schult Village-1;
and Corry Village-1.
Deadline for qualifying has been set at 5 pjn. Oct. 1. A $5
fee must be paid in order to be eligible to qualify.
Other qualifications for students seeking office include
residence in the area of nomination, full-time status at the UF,
and a 2.0 grade point average.

Black Art Featured

A lecture by Dr. Ronald C.
Foreman, director of UFs
Afro-American Studies Program,
opened a three-week art exhibit
featuring black artists at the

Toaaday, siptwAw 22,1970, Tha Florida ABlprtor, I

University Gallery Sunday.
The gallery is open from 9
ajn. to 5 pjtL Monday through
Friday and from 1 to 5 p.m. on
Sunday.

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, flaptambai 22,1070

ELECTION TRAIL

Tax Reform Keys Debate

ORLANDO (UPI) Other
issues in the Florida
gubernatorial race were drowned
out in an argument over tax
reform as the two Democratic
candidates came face-to-face for
a rare town- meeting type debate
at a Jaycee Hall here Monday.
Attorney General Earl
Fairdoth and state Sen. Reubin
Askew, playing to their own
partisan cheering sections in an
evenly divided crowd, both said
they would veto a personal
income tax but derided each
others stand on taxes..
THIS IS really just a good,
old-fashioned rally, observed
Askew, a Pensacolan who has
been 12 years in the legislature.
Surprisingly, neither
candidate mentioned school
desegregation, or compulsory
busing, and neither was asked to
comment on it.
About Askew's proposal for
tax reforms, which would
indude a corporate income tax,
Fairdoth said: I am reminded
of the deep chasm between what
candidate Askew says and what
senator Askew did.
THE ATTORNEY general
Bryant Nixes
Road Crictics
JACKSONVILLE (UPI)
Former Gov. Farris Bryant
released a statement today
defending the road building
program of his administration
which had come under attack in
die Democratic U.S. Senate
primary campaign.
Bryant, who faces State Sen.
Lawton Chiles in the Sept. 29
runoff, said he built more roads
when he was chief executive
than any governor in Florida's
history.
BRYANT SAID he extended
the Florida turnpike from Fort
Pierce to Wildwood, built much
of Interstate 4 and Interstate 75,
and increased constriction of
Interstate 95 from 18 miles at
the time of his inauguration to
10 times that much at the end of
his administration.
We completed four-laning
U.S. 1, fourJaned a great deal of
U.S. 301 and U.S. 19, and
four-laned SR 60 east from
Tampa, said Bryant, we also
built extensive sections of UJS.
41, U.S. 441 and U.S. 27 in the
central, southern and southwest
part of the state, Bryant, whose
financing of the Florida
Turnpike has come under attack,
said the interstate system was a
15-year program and was neither
funded nor intended to be built
in four years.
r
j THE COPY CENTER
1718 W. Univ. Af.
NmttoftMonrt
376-8334
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| 5 cents and 4 cents
i tts***
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1
rororo* wmmm*

said Askew voted for all the
consumer taxes, including raising
the sales tax while he was in
the legislature.
Askew said that what is
important is now and we say it is
a
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t& ii&'r mi''-' dg
H Ipw
m |^K : '9
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REUBIN ASKEW
.. veto income tax"

GOP LEADER
RAPSECKERD
ORLANDO (UPI) The state chairman of the Republican Party
accused gubernatorial candidate Jack Eckerd Monday of trying to
destroy the party and said an Eckerd-sponsored tabloid leveling
charges against the executive committee consisted of lies and insulted
all Republicans.
Duke Crittenden said he had called Eckerd this morning and asked
that the candidate give his word by 2 p.m. that distribution of the
tabloid be halted.
CRITTENDEN said the tabloid charged that the Republican Partv
of Florida was bankrupt, that millions of dollars have been drained
from party funds in less than four years, that large checks have been
written out of the state committee for cash and that there are little
party funds left for Republican office seekers.
Crittenden issued a statement at a morning news conference in
which he .told of the charges and to each said: This is a lie. This
piece insults the members of the state committee by suggesting that
there should be a house cleaning, Crittenden said.
THIS IS direct slap at the committee and I say to Mr. Eckerd
that our house is clean.
What makes me so incensed is that the candidate has attacked the
whole Republican Party, all 711,000 of us, Crittenden said.
Jack Eckered, if not stopped, can destroy the party, he added.
The state chairman said the state GOP organization has never been
in better financial condition and said more money has been
contributed to the party during the administration of Gov. Claude
Kirk than ever before.
And there has never been a check written for cash since Ive been
chairman of the party, he said.
GAINESVILLE COIN CLUB
presents
SIOO9OOO
COIN SHOW
Serf., Sept. 26,10 to 10
Sun., Sept27,lo to 5
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time to readjust our tax
schedules.
I would veto any tax on
grocery and veto any personal
income tax, Askejj) said.
Fairdoth said he would veto
any increase in the consumer
taxes, including the sales tax.
n | 111I 1 1 ,| ilWi'| 'j k| ||
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Fashion Store For Men <£ Women
# . f
tOpen 9 A.M. to 9 P.M.
&
conveniently located at:
1620 West University Ave ... University Plaza
4 $
Welcome new student wives.
If you aro a Registered Nurse,
Typist (45 WPM) or Secretary
(45 WPM Typing and Shorthand);
we may have the job you are seeking!
Please call 392-1222 for testing
and interview appointment.
CENTRAL EMPLOYMENT
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BUDGET OFFERED
/ * ei
Debate Gets New Coach

By DEE SCARR
Alligator Corrsspondant
The UF debate team is starting the 1970-71
season with a new coach and a new budget.
Dr. -Michael Cornett, UFs new debate coach, has
had experience working with debaters at
Georgetown University and Florida State
University. Cornett received his PhJ). in rhetoric
and public address from FSU in 1968.
THE DEBATE team was left fundless by new
Student Government rules last year. This year,
through the help of Vice President Frederick
Conner and Dr. Donald Williams of the speech
department, the team received funding from the
administration. With, this funding and returning
varsity debaters, Cornett expects the team to
continue its record and build the UFs rising

Nader Plans
Jax Visit
JACKSONVILLE (UPI)
Consumer spokesman Ralph
Nader will speak at Jacksonville
University Sept. 30 in the first
of four days of concern
scheduled on the campus during
the school year.
The first day of concern
will focus on ecology and will
feature an afternoon panel
discussion with local
representatives from
government, industry and
conservation groups.
The days of concern
program was created to allow
students, professors and experts
from a variety of fields to have
an opportunity to exchange
ideas on particular problems.
The second day of concern
will be held in November.

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Something's missing
Print Poster Arts Crafts Sale
Sponsored by the Union with a little help from x.
our friends at the Florida
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2nd f100r... 11 to 9 ... come

national reputation for excellence in debate.
Last year, the debate team, on funds donated by
Senator George Smathers, travelled to fifteen states
to participate in tournaments.
WITH INCREASED funds this year, there will be
more tournaments attended and the team will be
able to travel more extensively.
Anyone interested in joining the debate team is
urged to attend the organizational meeting, to be
held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 22, in room 347 of
the Arts and Sciences building. Students unable to
attend the meeting, may call Dr. Cornett at
392-2119 or see him in his office, room 352A, ASB.
This years intercollegiate debate topic is:
Resolved: That the Federal Government Should
Adopt a Program of Compulsory Wage and Price
Controls.

Crash Kills Student
A 22-year-old UF student, Thomas Eugene Parker, was killed
Sept. 17 when the automobile in which he was riding left the
road and overturned three times, eight miles north of Haines
City.
He was listed dead on arrival at Winter Haven Hospital.
PARKERS WIFE Mary Lewellen, 21, who was driving the
car, is listed in critical condition in Winter Haven Hospital.
Florida Highway Patrolmen reported Mrs. Parker was heading
south on U.S. 27 when the car left the east shoulder of the road
and overturned at 7:30 p.m.
Trooper G.C. Dodson reported no charges have yet been
filed.
We re Not Ashamed
ROMANS I* ,h 9 S P #I f
1: JESUS
16 1 CHRIST
Like To Join Us ?
College And Career Class
Meets Sundays At 9:45A.M.
Bible Study Tuesday 7:30 P.M.
r HIGHLANDS
Telephone
392-
PRESBYTERIAN
1203
Transportation rtlllDftl 1001
VilUllvn NE 16th Ave.
Sunday worship at 11 A.M. & 7:30 P.M
Rev. William Shea, Pastor

Tuwday, Saptambar 22,1970, The Florida Alligator,!

Page 5



Page 6

. Th Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 22,1970

BIGHT APPOINTED
New Faces For Gator
- ~r~ ~ vW ' x,£; - y -f* -* v- r ~ q

J 9 Hp ||
p
t' .JpP?
ken mckinnon
... sports editor
jH It H 11111 111 11C mm
S :> r jflfP
*&r
CRAIG GOLDWYN
... assistant news editor

SG Eliminates Cheerleadersss

By DARLA DEE ESPOSITO
Alligator Writer
Student Government has eliminated its
traditional appropriation to cheeiieaders.
The entire $1,350 allocation has been removed
from the budget and transferred to the special
requests account.
THIS WAS THE best place to put the money,
said Candy Caputo, Student Senate secretary,
because any student organization with an
emergency need can apply for funds through special
requests.
The SG special requests budget now totals
$2, 580.97.
SGs decision to cut the cheerleading budget
resulted in the Athletic Association (AA) assuming
total financial support of the cheeiieaders.
Ellen Corenswet, chairman of the senate Budget
and Finance Committee, said the transfer of
financial support from SG to the AA was done
because the responsibility of the cheerleaders is

I Looking
For Jj> A
I Used Car?
I FIND IT UNDER
I AUTOS J
I IN' GATOft 1W
I CLASSIFIEDS I
I UNIV. EX: 2832 I

By LINDA CREESY
Alligator Writer
Eight students have been appointed to editorial positions on the
Florida Alligator, according to Phyllis Gallub, Alligator managing
editor.
They are: Loretta Tennant, news editor; Craig Goldwyn, assistant
news editor; Ronnie Sachs, assignment editor; Anne Freedman,
feature editor; Greg Jones, entertainment editor; Ken McKinnon,
sports editor; Steve Strang, assistant assignment editor, and Jeff
Klinkenberg, associate editor.
MISS TENNANT began with the Alligator as a student typesetter in
December, 1967. She became a full-time typesetter in September,
1969 and held that position until June of this year.
Goldwyn, 4JM, has been a staff writer and a former sports editor
for the Alligator.
Sachs, 3JM, has been editor of his fraternity magazine. He was an
Alligator staff writer last spring.
MISS FREEDMAN 4JM, interned with the Palm Beach Post this
past summer. She was feature editor during the spring quarter of 1969
and the winter quarter of 1970.
Jones, 3LW, is a member of Florida Blue Key and calls himself
cultural revolutionary.
McKinnon has been a correspondent for the Tampa Tribune since
the spring of this year. He also worked as an intern with the Ft.
Lauderdale News last summer and was assistant sports editor for the
Alligator during the winter quarter, last year.
Strang, 2UC, was a staff writer for the Alligator during the spring
quarter. At UF he is a member of the University Squires and the
Freshman English Advisory Committee.
Klinkenberg worked briefly last year with the Alligator and the
Florida Probe. He is a former editor and sports writer on The Falcon
Times at Miami-Dade Junior College and an internship with the Miami
News this summer. He is currently a stringer with the Miami News,
Palm Beach Post and the Tampa Times during football season.

The Florida Alligator I wWfjSSyJSfU
W 9:oopm
Rm 330 JWRU V

more toward the AA than the student body.
HEAD CHEERLEADER Bruce Bradbum feels
the cut was not detrimental to UF cheerleaders
because the AA was gracious enough to pick us up.
However, since the cheerleaders represent the
students to the athletic departments, alumni and
fans, we should be affiliated with the student body.
Im sorry it happened, not because of the financial
transfer, but because of the implied change of
loyalty and service.
The decision came after extended debate
involving SG, the cheerleaders and the AA. Ray
Daniels, representing the AA, said his organization
agreed to assume the deficit left by the withdrawal
of SG funds. The AA previously supplied the major
portion of cheerleading funds, and accepting total
support simply increased their donation.
The budget cut means that SG no longer has any
monetary control or jurisdiction over the
cheerleaders. The organizations charter is
unaffected by the change, and cheerleaders are still
registered with SG as a student organization.

Jr r 'm^il^Smmt^
\ 0 "*
Just an ounce of Bareling bra, and suddenly
all those plummeting necklines are a snap to
wear! Feels like nothingness, but the way it fits,
you feel like the girl who has everything. Its
bodyshaped with fiberfill... or opaquely natural
and lightly underwired to lift and curve you. Even
the straps do a nice thing by converting to a
halter. The Bareling is Crepelon of Enka Crepe Crepeset
set Crepeset nylon, about $6... to match a smooth little
ounce of Crepelon half-slip $4.
Patronize Gator Advertisers



CITY, CAMPUS COPS CRACK DOWN
Prime Police Target: Pushers

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is
the second of a three-part series
on the drag scene in Gainesville.)
tty CARLOS J. LICE A
MVI||V(Dr vVIVUM
Local law enforcement
agencies do not know how much
dope there is in the Gainesville
area, but as one police officer
put it there is plenty.
Sgt. Charles C. Snowden of
the Gainesville Police said it is
hard to estimate the number
of drug pushers and dealers in
the area, but conceded there was
a considerable number of
them around.
AND THAT IS -not the only
problem- the drugs coming into
the area are not only
hallucinogenics, which are
common around college
campuses, but also, heroin has
been found in this area by the
local law enforcement agencies.
Snowden admits there are
heroin addicts in Gainesville. But
that is a problem for a doctor
and the addict; his job, Snowden
said, is law enforcement.
He said the drug problem is
not only centered in UF, we
have found acid (LSD) at the
junior high level.
WITH THIS problem, the
police in Gainesville have been
cracking down on drug abuse,
especially marijuana, but there
is an ample supply of marijuana
in Gainesville, Snowden said.

Monopoly, Scrabble
And Now Vietnam
ByDQUGLYNES
Alligator Writarc
The games people play.
Vietnam can be added to the list according to Hal Barcey, who
recently completed the design of a game entitled Vietnam.
Barcey said we have fobtball, and basketball seasons, and now we
have Vietnam.
rr HAS BEEN-around so long it is just another game, Barcey said.
The originator of the ecology button, which pictures man balanced
with nature, has designed the Vietnam game in the shape of the
pentagon. During the course of the game players may pass through
such places as jail, Canada, college, Vietnam and the hospital.
GOOD LUCK is required to avoid the square marked crippled.
To win, your token must remain on the board while all others are
in the grave. The winner beats the system, not fellow players.
To keep out of the grave, a player can be honorably discharged
from the service or collect seven years of seniority and come home.
The honorable discharge is almost impossible to get because only one
square is so marked. The seniority is collected by avoiding all the
pitfalls of a draft-age young man.
Barcey has had two offers to get his Vietnam game into production,
but he has no plans now to market his product.

Snowden does not think
organized crime is responsible
for bringing drugs to Gainesville,
but it is the independant
individuals who decide to make
some money on some big deal.
AN EXAMPLE sos this is an
arrest about a month ago of one
individual who was caught as he
was leaving Gainesville. 2000
tablets of LSD were found in his
car.
But fighting drugs is not just a
cops and robbers game for the
police department.
According to Snowden, those
people who are on drugs, and
ask for help are referred to the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center for
treatment*
HE POINTED -out calls have
been made to the police
department asking for advise on
drugs, those people have been
referred either to their
doctors, or to the Comer Drug
Store.
The Corner Drug Store
provides drug information, as
well as help to those who might
need it if they are having
problems with hallucigenic
drugs.
If they (students) get
involved with drugs, the penalty
is on the books as to what can
happen to them if they are
caught, Snowden said.
THE PENALTY for
possession of marijuana in the
state of Florida is up to five

iND^TH
years for possession, and up to
10 for sale.
Marijuana is still considered a
felony in the books.
But getting closer to home, at
the University Police
Department, the drug problem is
also acknowledged.

|SSBEI SUPERSCOPE J
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PR 150 18-% x 1800 -7" reel 3.69
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C-120 Cassette l2ominutes 3.49
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A FEW MONTHS ago, UF
President Stephen C. O'Connell
announced an anti-drug drive
that was to take place jointly by
the UPD and the local law
enforcement agencies.
According to UPD Chief
Audie Shuler the drug drive has
been very effective.
Shuler said small amounts of
marijuana and LSD have been
found on the UF campus, but
that their drive has been
directed at the pushers.
HE SAID there would not be


TuMctoy, StpiMnbtr 22,1970, Tht Flondi AMgrtv,

any additional increase in the
UPD anti-drug drive, but that
this drive will continue.
Shuler said UF had been used
by people as a contact point to
sell drugs.
Shuler has no stand as to
whether the penalty for
possession of marijuana should
be lowered, I accept the law as
it is.
He does, however, have a
stem warning for those who
would like to try drags: dont
take a chance.

Page 7



Page 8

I, Ttw Florida Alligator. Tuaaday, Saptambar 22.1970

EDITORIAL
Push 'Em,
Shove 'Em
UF President Stephen C. OConnell is in the hot seat.
University Senate needs to be reapportioned badly.
Pushing too hard, OConnell, as chairman, could easily be
accused of being dictatorial.
Doing nothing, he is accused of doing just that nothing.
He does have a reason. He says UFs constitution calls for
the senate to reapportion themselves
This is true and we admire President OConnells respect
for the law.
But in this country we also have a concept ofone man,
one vote, recently enunciated by the Supreme Court with
respect to national legislative bodies.
Unfortunately, that same concept does not hold for UFs
legislative body University Senate.
President OConnell was made uncomfortably aware of
the discontent concerning that oversight Friday. This might
force him to do something.
Assistant and associate professors of the College of
Education refused to elect their representatives to the
senate, calling it undemocratic.
We refuse to vote for any persons in this election
because of a lack of confidence in the University Senate and
because that body is not democratically constituted,
Robert Sherman, education professor said.
Full professors are ex officio members of the senate.
Fifty-one administrators are appointed to the senate.
However, there are only 50 elected members who
represent the more than 650 assistant and associate
professors. This represents approximately 8.6 per cent of
the senate seats, although this group constitutes probably as
large an aggregate number as the full professors in the total
faculty.
Sounds like it needs reapportioning?
Wait, theres more to come.
President OConnells Action Conference Task Force
which studied the problem recommended restructuring.
As a matter of fact, hardly anyone with the exception
of the senators involved argues with the need for
reapportionment.
Under pressure, some bodies might reapportion
themselves.
But this one seems to be holding out pretty well.
So, if the only thing which is holding up needed revisions
is a statement that the senate must revise itself we say
change that statement.
The only real question we have is when the push came to
a shove, did President OConnell do enough?
.MMR,
ICNJTTDW'; ,^|MHofioi ilL
IPOLU\C.K
I-V im
p Up

,* 1
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Fluted Columns
Haircut Mentality Test

There are too many people in
positions of authority in this
country who think that a short
haircut is tantamount to a box
seat at the right hand of God.
The proposition hardly seems
to warrant full refutation, but 9
since the haircut mentality
seems to be alive and thriving in
this land of southern gentility,
perhaps a few backhands and a
hearty Hi Ho Balderdash are in
order.
IN THE first place, to anyone
with half a mind (how about a
three eights.. .a fourth?) hair
length can be taken as a general
indication of nothing in
particular.
Example. The top mafia
chiefs in this country are the
cleanest cut guys youd ever
want to meet.
Example. A dope pusher a
friend of mine met looked like a
used car salesman from
Jacksonville. Are you crazy?
he said, why should I grow long
hair and dress freaky? Id get
busted immediately by the
litres. Clever fellow.
Example. Guy I knew had
shoulder length hair and a
politcal philosophy on the far
far end of fascism that made
Hitler look like Ma Kettle.
FINAL EXAMPLE. Trite as it
is, fellow named Christ had long,
I mean really long hair, and a
really groovy beard. And all the
Haircut Mentalities just jump up
and down and salivate and roll
on the floor if you just happen
to mention Christianity. Its
their bag. They go to church.
They pray. They read the Bible.
And yet Jesus Christ would
not be able to play for the Gator
football team. 7
Right on, all you tolerant
Southern Baptist teddy bears.-
** *
Im not saying that freakism is
tfye answer to life. Quite the
contrary/ they have their own
set of hangups, their own kind
of conformity which is almost as
rigid as that which they loath.
But whether they do a good
job of it or not, they are trying
to express themselves in a
manner not generally approved

mmm wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
- - 1
! X;'';.x.
JOHN PARKER
"
t- J'#. m,/> *4 XX; ,;i
MNMIMMftMMttMMMMMIMMMIIMMIIIMMMIMMHMMMMMMMMMtoHHMMMMMMttMMMMIAHIIIIIIMIMNMIMNMMMMMMIIIMaMNtfNNIiMMMft

by their elders. And if they all
end up singing the same song, at
least its a different one than
weve heard from youth during
the silent generation that
preceeded us.
IF YOU are an uptight silent
majorityite and are tempted to
get irate the next time you see
one of those disgusting guys
with lenghthy locks, think twice
about why you are reacting the
way you do.
You would be just as freaky
back in the early days of our

QUICK QUOTES
The academic society is responsible for all of our troubles in this
country. These are people that are destroying the country. Martha
Mitchell, in a United Press International interview.
* *
To be realistic, I must admit there is no quick settlement in view.
We both know what the problems are, but are unable to agree on the
solutions. United Autp Workers President Leonard Woodcock on
his unions strike against General Motors.
* *
I have no intention of meddling in American politics. I am neither
a Republican or a Democrat, neither a hawk or a dove. I think only of
the interests of Vietnam. My speech will be that of a fellow soldier, of
one ally to another.'* South Vietnam Vice-President Nguyen Cao
Ky, on his proposed visit to the United States and his decision to
speak at a March for Victory rally in Washington Oct. 3.
* *
If it s accomplishing the stated purpose of keeping drugs off the
hands of young people, then maybe its worth the trouble. Sixto
Morales, Tijuana store manager on Project Intercept, the U. S. effort
to reduce illegal drug traffic from Mexice into this country.
*
ose w h cannot accept that rule of reason, those who resort to
e rule of force, have no place on a college campus. Richard
Nixon on the university community.
*
, f commission report lives up to the published expectations of
the hberal press, President Nixon should be prepared torscpudiate it.
arr y Goldwater on the President's campus unrest commission
report to be released Sept. 26.
* *
er * s those who doubt. College kids are in an age when
t 0 d ? h }' You b to try different things to get the most
out of them and do what is best for the team.- UF Football Coach
Doug Dickey on the teams reported dissension last week.

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement
Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor
Loretta Tennant
News Editor
N

country if you didnt wear a
powdered wig. Custom is king,
Thucydides said 20 centuries
ago. Try not to be a slave,
mass-minded tunnel vision.
Casanova had long hair, Prince
Valiant has long hair (in the
Sunday funnies, anyway),
Tarzan had long hair (no hair
stylists along the Amazon), so
what if Raquel Welch has long
hair too?
Long hair is indicative of
nothing except that the wearer
has not been sheared for awhile.
Let it be, baby.



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rtl \m umm lr( o r 's'.' %'//t''''' '% "'/,
\ W \/J i-g Vm_r J vu llw V M1 fd ys?
Here comes Santa Craus, here comes Santa Craus ..."

The surprise endorsement of
Governor Claude R. Kirk Jr. by
one of his Sept. 8 opponents in
the Republican race for the
governor's nomination has hurt
Jack Eckerd.
Eckerds camp has expected
state Sen. LA. Skip Bafalis
endorsement or at worst his
neutrality in the run off primary
Sept. 29.
Bafalis was one of the first
Republicans in the state to come
out strong against Kirk and was
the first man to declare against
Kirk.
THE STRATEGY for Eckerd
was to pick up the Bafalis vote
and some of the votes who went
for Kirk because they thought
Eckerd didn't have a chance.
There is evidence that while
Bafalis went for Kirk in
exchange for Kirk and his
organizations promise to back
Bafalis in later campaigns, most
of Bafalis' organization is going
over to Eckerd.
Kirk is in deep trouble with

Alligator Staff
Ron Sachs Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editoi
Greg Jones 1
Entertainment Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reita Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida AJJjitor
of the writeTof the article and not those of the University or non

Bafalis Pulls Switch

| | FRED |

the Republican Party. Much of
his strength comes from his
independent organization which
is loyal to Kirk first and then
Republicans. Kirk does have
some organizational support,
especially in northern and
central Florida.
BUT KIRK has been
constantly rebuffed by the state
Republican Party. The little
following he has within ranks
was shown by his inability to
control the delegation to the
national convention inl96B in
Miami.
The Florida party gave 33
votes to Richard Nixon and Kirk
delivered one vote, his own, to
his choice for the Republican
Presidential nomination, Nelson
A. Rockefeller.
Eckerds people feel Kirk has

outlived his usefulness. They feel
when he became governor in
1966, he was the kind of man
needed to be the first
Republican governor in almost a
century.
Had an ordinary man gone to
Tallahassee under the same
circumstances he "would have
been eaten up. But, Kirk seized
ball from the Democrats
and ran away with it.
THE CHARGE is that now
Kirk after four years of
showmanship really has very
little to show in the way of
concrete accomplishment. He is
in f act an image of
accomplishment rather than
accomplishment and the
Republican party no longer
needs an image, but a reality.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 392-1619

ResisMhe Left

Resistance to the totalitarian
actions of the left wing has
already begun. It began at this
university last May when
hundreds of students refused to
be forced from their classrooms
in Matherly and Little Hall.
Although one female radical
said at the time: We will dance
on your graves it appears that
the left has begun to bury itself.
Resistance to the new fascism of
the left will not only continue
but spread to counteraction. In
short, the violent and intolerant
left is doomed.
THERE MUST be no more
take-overs of campus buildings
such as the one at Walker
Auditorium last May. Next time
radicals attempt to use this tactic
we must resist. It is becoming
quite clear that what is at stake
is not just the university, but our
individual liberties as well.
It is difficult to feel at easy
with such thoughts. Most of us
wish to avoid an extremist
reaction. The dilemma we now
face can only be resolved if
university administrators face up
to their responsibilities and
provide leadership. Submission
and vacillation must end.
We must seek to avoid the
creation of an atmosphere of
terror and repression. Instead,
we must resist the violent left
and its fascist tactics of
intimidation. Those of us who
believe in the rule of reason
rather than the rule of the mob
cannot always and must not
seek to negotiate and
compromise with those
threatening chaos and disorder.
THE EVENTS of last May
radicalized many students. They
are now in the ranks of the left
wing. Many students here felt
they were abandoned by the
administration and sold down
the river when radicals were
permitted to remain in control
of Walker Auditorium. Most
deeply resent to this day the
closing down of the university
on May 8 by President Stephen
OConnell even though it was
done to keep things cool, not as
an act of capitulation.
If the administration here and

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Theyre multiplying like

Tuesday, Saptamtwr 22,1970, The Florida Alligator,

BRUCE
ALPER
elsewhere abdicates its authority
and fails to face up to
responsibilities, moderates may
be forced into the ranks of a
newly arisen right wing of
extremism.
Moderate students rely on the
university president to speak for
them, for they cannot act as an
organized whole by themselves.
To this extent moderates are the
silent majority we hear so much
about these days. The
paramount question today is not
whether the left will be defeated
nor whether the right can be
restrained but whether
moderation can survive,
accomplishing both these goals.
BOTH LEFT and right are the
enemies of freedom. The right
wing desires to destroy those it
considers the enemies of
America and save the nation.
The left wants to destroy
America and save itself.
Many present day
moderates, including many
university presidents, have lost
sight of the requirements of
moderation. Compromise is
necessary but capitulation is the
death blow to liberty. Merely
yielding to radical leftist
demands in order to prevent an
outbreak of violence is poor
strategy.
Concessions made under the
threat of violence amount to no
less than a waiver of the
freedoms and rights of other
students who desire to attend
classes.
The enemies of the university
and of tolerance are present in
full force this year. What we will
soon learn is whether those who
love it and believe in liberty are
stronger and more courageous.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator. Tuesday, September 22,1970

ORANG

SEND ALL NOTICES TO
DIVISION OF INFOR INFORMATION
MATION INFORMATION SERVICES,
BLDG. H

INTERNAL COMMUNI COMMUNICATIONS:
CATIONS: COMMUNICATIONS: The orange and Blue
Bulletin, as was done this
summer, will continue to be
utilized as the means of
communicating official
University policy, notices and
memoranda. All persons on
campus are urged to use this
twice weekly availability of
space to provide important
messages to students, faculty
and staff.
The Division of Information
Services is responsible for
preparing copy which will
appear in the Tuesday and
Friday editions. Deadline for
receipt of Tuesday copy is 3
p.m. Friday; the Friday copy
should be received by 3 p.m.
Wednesday All official notices
should be mailed or delivered to
the Information Services office
in Building H. No items will be
accepted via telephone. Calendar
notices should be sent to Public
Functions Office, 101 Reitz
Union.

Tuesday
Student Government Book Sale,
C 4 Union, 1:00 p.m.
Chess Club, 118 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Prjjna IRQ P IJnjQn, 7:30"
p.m.
Univ of Fla. Debate
Get-Acquainted Meeting, 347
Arts & Sciences Bldg., 7:00
p.m.
Wednesday
Wednesday September 23
Union Print Sale, East & West
Galleries, Union, 11:00 a.m.
9:00 p.m.

iTfB become a chef... ~
r in your own back yard. Let us help
f\ '' rTTVI I y(XJ build that new patio y u ve been w A
I wishing for. We'll even let you include
ks lm the world's fanciest grilL.and outdoor
h0f238 J cooking lessons too!
" GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Abu l A j* A,.. Mua* H. I~ ~ r ~

Campus
Calendar

UNDERGRADUATE AND
PROFESSIONAL COURSE
AND CURRICULUM
CHANGESS FOR 1971-72: The
deadline for submission of
curriculum and course changes
for the 1971-72 catalog is Oct.
9, 1970. All proposals for
changes in undergraduate and
professional courses and
curricula should be submitted to
the University Curriculum
Committee, 233 Tigert Hall,
prior to this date.
- Proposals for new courses
should be submitted in 20 copies
on the New Course Offering
Form, No. 101. Minor changes
in courses and course deletions
should be submitted in 20 copies
on the Deletions of, Minor
Changes in, Course Offerings
Form, No. 100. Proposals for a
change in course credit by more
than one quarter credit hour or
substantial revision of an
existing course should be
submitted in 20 copies on the
Form No. 101. Copies of these
forms may be obtained from the
Office of Academic Affairs, 233
Tigert Hall.
f

Student Government Book Sale,
C-4 Union, 1:00 p.m.
Black Student Union Meeting,
349 Union, 6:30 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 347 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Sail Club Meeting, Union Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m. : ;i \
f
Thursday
Thursday, September 24
Union Print Sale, East & West
Galleries, Union, 11:00 a.m:
9:00 p.m.
Student Government Book Sale,
C-4 Union, 1:00 p.m.
Lecture & Concert, Electronic
Music, Union Music Listening
Room, 4:00 p.m.
Tau Beta Pi Meeting, 346 Union,
7:30 p.m.

BLUB BULLETIN

RE-NAMING OF LIBRARY
BUILDINGS: The two major
library buildings are to. be
known as Library East and
Library West. The building
called College Library for the
past four years has been
re-named Library East, and the
newer building, Graduate
Research Library, is to be called
Library West.
Library East houses the
College Collection, the Latin
American Collection and certain
segments of the Research
Collection, while Library West
houses the major portion of the
Research Collection, the P. K.
Yonge Library of Florida
History, the Rare Books
Collection, etc., plus the
administrative and technical
processing departments of the
University Libraries.

Gator Football Film, Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organizarion
Meeting, 357 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Friday
Friday, September 25
Union Movie, "Accident",
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Union Dance, "Rush", Union
Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.

POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS
OTHER THAN CAMPUS
ELECTIONS: The use of
University facilities in political
campaigns other than campus
elections will be governed by the
policy of the Board of Regents.
The policy is: The president of
eacfivinstitution may authorize
the use of University property
for political (campaign)
speeches, and these shall be
limited to meetings sponsored
by recognized organizations of
the University and shall be held
0n1y... at the J. Wayne Reitz
Union, the University
Auditorium and the Plaza of the
Americas. Authorization is to
be requested through the Public
Functions Office.
r
MULTIPLE ACCOUNT
PERSONNEL APPOINT APPOINTMENTS:
MENTS: APPOINTMENTS: Effective Oct. 1, the
maximum number of accounts
to which a single appointment
may be charged is three. In the
event costs need to be allocated
to additional accounts (over
three) an interdepartmental
invoice (ID For 414) should be
submitted by the department
charging the appropriate
account. The responsibility for
initiating such salary
reallocations rests with the
department. Questions should be
addressed to the Payroll Office,
2-1231.

if
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, rV?'if*Vi!i!i!il')*fli!)ViYl'l*f)lVff;;';V;Y;* '';*i'** : JL Vy LL I
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

SEND ALL CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC
FUNCTIONS, 101 REITZ
UNION

ELIGIBILITY FOR
PARTICIPATION IN
E XTRACURRICULAR
ACTIVITIES: To hold any
elected or appointed office in
any extracurricular activity, a
student must be free of
disciplinary, scholastic, academic
or admissions probation. He also
must be classfied as a full-time
student enrolled in a minimum
of 12 hours. In exceptional
circumstances, a student, not
eligible to hold an elected or
appointed office, may obtain
information on seeking a waiver
by contacting the Office of
Student Affairs.
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT:
The Office of Student Financial
Aid has asked that deans,
directors and department
chairmen give serious
consideration to hiring student
helpers typists, receptionists,
secretaries, cashiers, lab helpers
and others. Needs can be listed
with Mrs. Stechmiller at 2-1275.
INFORMATION CENTERS:
The Union Information Desks
on the ground and first floors
will be open each weekend with
information available about the
University for visitors. The
information Desk in Tigert Hall
will be open from 9 ajn. to
noon on Oct. 3, Oct. 17, Oct. 31
and Nov. 28 (dates of home
football games). Signs directing
persons to the University
information centers will be
erected at University entrances
in the near future.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
YAMAHA 125, good running
condition, complete with luggage
rack and 2 helmets. First 160 takes
it. Call 378-7355. (A-2t-63-p)
Stereo, Excellent condition. 3 yrs
old, 100 watt, sansui amp, 2 akai sw
130 spkrs. Sony 260 tape recorder,
$350 or separate. 378-9577 after
3:00. (A-st-63-p)
Honda 9, 40 mos old trail bike in
very good condition. Call 372-2533
day 378-9646 night. S3OO will
discuss price. (A-4t-63-p)
Headquarters for tennis, golf, guns,
water sports, handball, sports shoes,
fishing, physical fitness, team sports.
B & B SPORTS CENTER, 5320 N.W.
13th St. 378-1461. (a-st-63-p)
Reg Half Arabian Filly: elegant head
and carriage. In show shape. It has
been stalled and fitted for 6 mo. 15
mo. old, blue gray. SSOO Her Dam
Sells open S3OO. 372-8558.
(A-st-63-p)
1967 Honda 305 cc Superhawk.
Excellent condition. $425, call Dick
at 376-8194. (A-st-63-p)
1966 El Camino, 396eng., 4 sp.,
mags, many extras, 1195. 1967
Yamaha 250 Big Bear. Been in
storage, only 4600 miles, like new.
Call 378-1267. (A-st-63-p)
YAMAHA 60 cc only 4500 mi.
Helmet included, SIOO. Call
376-0126. (A-st-63-c)
250 cc Motorcycle, good condition,
new tag, plus bell helmet, $lB5. Cali
Bill 373-1561 or see at 103 N.W. 10
st. apt. no. 2. (A-2t-63-p)
69 Yamaha 350. Needs some work.
Best offer over S4OO. 68 Honda 125
street scrambler, good condition,
great transportation. Call Tom,
392-7200. (A-st-63-p)
THIS WEEK ONLY: BRAND NEW
1970 KAWASAKI 350 Big Horn,
$795. Art's Kawasaki, 376-5481.
1040 E. Univ. at Waldo Rd.
(A-4t-64-p)
Capt. America special yamaha 180 cc.
Xtr clean, excellent for campus or
road. Blue, s-bar helmet & extras.
Contact John, 373-2216 eve.,
392-2027 dy. (A-st-64-p)
FINALLY GOT AN APT? Electric
broom (vacuum), $10; pictures, 50
cents $8; 6 x 9 coaxial speaker with
enclosure, $10; liquor carrying case,
$8; Pica portable typewriter $35. Call
378-7671 anytime. (A-3t-64-p)
HOME OWNERS: Discount prices on
Sun, Storm and BURGLER
protection for window and door.
378-7743 376-0517 6 p.m.
(A-4t-64-p)
1962 Chevy, 67 engine, S3OO.
Mortorola port. TV, S6O. Call Bill,
392-6047, 101 Tower B. (A-2t-64-p)
Walnut finished study desk with 2
drawers, modern styling. While they
last ONLY $29.50. Why buy used
Junk? We sell new for less. JR Office
Furniture Co., 620 S. Main St.,
phone 376-1146. (a-10t-63-c)

1 Todays
more for your money meal
a,moisons
CAFETERIA
i
1 TOeSIMYS FEATURE
I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN I
§ | ALL YOU CAN EAT I
* 99cents I 3
Q I Z
Z|* I O
h 1 WEDNESDAY S FEATURE[ |
u| | a
BOUNTIFUL BEEF STEW |
with Rice.. |
79cents |
BMP BMM MMM MM IMP MM VMM mJ
I til 2 SUPPER: 4: 30 til 8* FREE PARKING
moisons
CAFETERIA ..beyond comparison!
2620 N.W. 13th Sheet m the Gainesville Mall

vxXxXyixX-x-xx-Xvx-x-XrX:Xyxx.v
for sale
rXrXrX'X-X'X-XxXvXvXvX-XvX*'*'*.'.-.*
HONDA 450 66, new paint, recent
overhall, 595 (book value) or best
offer. 372-2375 p.m. (A-4t-64-p)
Portable typewriter owners. We will
clean, adjust, jubricate & install new
ribbon on your machine for only
$14.50 and guarantee our work. This
month only a savings of over SIO.OO.
Don't miss out. JR Office Furniture
Co. 620 S. Main St., phone
376-1146. (A-10t-63-c)
Antiques trash & treasure
Melrose, Fla. on hwy 26, 20 min
driver. Mon-Wed call 475-4931,
Thur-Sat 10-5. Open Sun 1-4. Kitty
& Terry Bowman. (A-iot-64-p)
Drum Set, Like new, Blue sparkle,
complete. Bass, snare, tom-tom, floor
tom, hi-hat and rider cymbals. 1225
SW Ist Ave., Apt. 431. (A-st-64-p)
KEEP your carpets beautiful despite
constant footsteps of a busy family.
Get Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-ts-c)
Why buy used junk? We sell new for
less. All metal, in black or gray. 2
drawer file cabinet NOW $19.95, 4
drawer file cabinet NOW $32.50. JR
Office Furniture Co., 620 S. Main
St., phone 376-1146. (A-10t-63-c)
FOR RENT
Female to share house, own
bedroom. $47 mo plus 1/3 utilities.
Must like animals. 12 string guitar
S9O. Also strange beads strung? 1012
NW 4 Ave. (B-2t-173-p)
Need a roommate or others for your
apartment? Come to the Gator
Roommate and Housing Placement
Center and we will locate yqu. Run
by students who want to help.
373-2688. 1105 W. Univ. Ave., Rm.
no. 2. (B-4t-64-p)
WANTED
Vegetarian needs place to grow, close
to campus with kitchen. Call Steve at
378-5522. (C-st-64-p)
Could you use an extra male
roommate until December? Call Gary
after 5 PM at 376-0901. (C-st-64-p)
#
t mm
HELP WANTED
;X;X;XrXrXrX!X;!*xX;XxXx";*xXxXxXx
Hammond Organist needs
exceptional musicians for rock group.
Lead, bass, drums, and vocalists. I
compose my own music. Randy
Soellner 2-7938. (E-st-63-p)
Are you a hurtin gator? Need some
coins? Part or full time sales help
needed (m pr f) set your own hours!
$2.50 to $5.00/hr. guaranteed to
service established customers.
Transportation needed. Call
378-0421 between 3 and 8 pm. Ask
for Ed Marquez. (E-st-63-p)
Need parttime salesman for mens
retail clothing store. Experience
preferred! Apply In person at
Silvermans, 225 West Univ. Ave.
(E-4t-64-p)

Tuesday, September 22,1970, The Florida Alligator,

****i*j*,*,** * m m m
%%!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
AUTOS
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS.
YOUR NEW VOLVO FIAT MG
AUSTIN DEALER. 506 E.
UNIVERSITY. WE SERVICE ALL
IMPORTS. (G-st-63-p)
1965 Tempest convertible.
Automatic, V 6 Excellent condition.
378-4477 or 372-4663 SBOO.
(G-st-64-p)
'67 GTO factory balanced,
blueprinted 400 cu. Ram air. High
rise manifold, 3 bbl. carb. Doug!
Hedders, Offenhauser chrome
manifold covers. 90/10 front, 50/5C
rear shocks. Rally wheels. S7OOC
investment. $2495. on display Sept
24 11 A.M. 9 til 3 p.m., 914 SW 7tt
Ave., Gainesville. (G-64-4t-p)
LARGEST of USED IMPORTS IN
Nth. CENTRAL FLORIDA.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS, 1946
N. MAIN. (G-6t-63-p)
1970 Karmann Ghia VW, 9000 ml.
Empi equipped: 2 barrel carb, ram
Indkit, mag wheels + radials & many
extras. $2795 or best offer, 378-9577
after 3. (G-st-63-p)
DODGE Dart 65 conv. New paint
and tires. 895 or best offer 372-2375
p.m. (G-4t-64-p)
PERSONAL
:.X;X:X;X:X:X;X:XxX:X:-xXxX'XxX*X-X-
When nothing works, leather works!
For custom pants, jackets, sandals,
moccassins, bags, belts, 16 NW 13th
St. Home made goodness and mercy.
(J-lot-63-p)
Happiness is receiving a free
transistor radio; a free U of F coffee
mug. Call 378-2167 for information
or see details on Miami Herald in
todays Alligator. (J-3t-63-p)
Coeds Facial Hair removed forever.
Fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrologist. 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
LOST & FOUND
rXtXtXtXwXtXrXtXtXrliXrXrXrXrXrXwX:
LOST: Beautiful young puppy. Shiny
black coat with golden paws in
vicinity of XU house. Answers to Ho
Chi. Call 392-7884. Reward
(L-2t-64-p)
.gj Getting
/If Straight
1. lays it on the line*
Irt i ELLIOTT GOULD
IHRf
[ Omwatmwa Wmrffc 1 LAST
liJM:lfiTfl2 days
*
CHARLES
J ARTHUR V'
:ET Afe-o A
* Os THE
* MINOR FAOIAN FORTE +
VICES! JOCELYN lane

Page 11

V^VAV.VAV.V.Wa%VAWa # AVAV.V.V
SERVICES
x-x-x-xvs%\x-x-xxx*xvx-x-xx. ; x-x-x
£
Do you own a HONDA? Are you
tired of poor service? Steve at the
CYCLE WORKS does tuneups &
minor repairs while-u-wait. Open
from 3 until 9 p.m., 1220 S. Main.
(M-st-64-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc,
373-1984, 9-5. (M-st-173-p)
HORSES BOARDED SLEEPY
HOLLOW HORSE FARM, Finest
facilities, complete care, stalls,
pasture, trails, 300 ft. ring, close to
Univ., ph 373-1059. (M-st-63-p)
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Nowl Bank Amerlcard &
Master Charge.
THE COPY CENTER 5 XEROX 4.
ASK ABOUT OUR CHARGE PLAN.
1718 W. Univ. 376-9334 next to
Malones Bookstore. (M-13t-162-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480.
lvXJvXvlv

I
IM.W. 13th St, at 23r* RD A ln]|V
Talaph 37-2434 fc 1 |
THE HAWAIIHNSa
The Continuation of 1
James A.Micheneri |J I
I
v.* '"'.i.
THE MIRISCH PRODUCTION COMPANY Prese
CHARLTON HESTON _. UIUI I
miriech praoai THE HAWAIIANS
Co-starring Also starring
GERALDINE CHAPUN, JOHN PHILLIP LAW. MAKO. TINA CHEN I
McCOWEN as' CAHHAIE- Music- HENRY MANCINI Screenplay by JAMES R.WEBfi
Based on (he Novel'HAWAII' by JAMES A.MICHENER Produced by WALTER MIRISCH Directed by TOM 6RIES
PANAVISION COLOR by Deluxe* GP <%3> United APtISfS I
HURRmASTTjME^OgAjrrj
NEXT..... AND WE DO MEAN -NEXT
*THE Em IN THE E4ND*
LAST 3
WjUW\ The Love
Doctors
Tfe w *' Eastman Color / Distributed by Sigma 111

wra-raW.V.VarrtroVor.VaVoWerrf.V.Wa-i-
RED PIN n
night "jR
8-10 PM OC j
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA
WIN FREE GAMES
Suburbia Drive-In
N.W. 13th St. 372 9523
Penthouse 2
MASH U
H 0^
50yt before 7:30 M
SI.OO after g
Penthouse 3
EASY V
RIDER
jg
50* before 7:30 |Z3E|
SI.OO after
**""" i.r



Page 12

!, Th Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 22,1970

OVERCHARGING COMPLAINTS
SG To Investigate Merchants

By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Wrttor
Student Government will
soon begin investigating various
complaints that local merchants
have been talcing advantage of
the near monopoly on student
goods through overcharging.
This Mill be carried out through
a student consumer protection
program.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder said, We plan to
approach this thing from a
positive rather than a negative
view-point. Well start with
students in the field, attempting
to gather merchant support
through student discounts.
WE ALREADY have an
agreement with Florida State
theatres, whereby students can
purchase, in the SG office,
theatre tickets for $.65 off
regular purchase price. Well
encourage the students to
patronize these markets

Midi Nixed By Coeds

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator writer
Will the midi become an
accepted fashion trend at UF?
Not according to a number of
UF students.
The majority of the coeds
interviewed said they did not
like the midi and would not
wear it, regardless of the fashion
trends.
I think they look
unfemimne, one coed said,
The guys wont like them and
the girls naturally dress to suit
the guys.
Midis are unattractive, a UF
man said. Most girls look out of
proportion in them. I would
much rather see them in short
dresses.
Most girls agree they would
rather wear dresses to the
ground instead of going only
halfway.
SOME WOMEN are
purchasing a few midi length
outfits in addition to their

regular wardrobe, but they are
hy no means replacing old length
in wardrobes, a Gainesville
merchant said.
One fashion designer
described the fall styles to be
join the fun!
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky.. .young and old...some fust tor the tun
ot it. others because their business bene benetts
tts benetts from taster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modem low wing and total
fiyiftg ease. Comp ys u$ today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
...jsville Airport
mum Wa,do Road
JKSbwww

whenever possible, Uhlfelder
continued.
lf enough merchant support
is gathered a booklet will be
published at a later date
publicizing these stores. This
would not only benefit the
students through more equitable
pricing, but also be good
publicity and advertisement for
the participating merchants.
Being a student shopper could
become a benefit, rather then a
drawback.
Handling it from the negative
viewpoint could be very touchy,
according to Uhlfelder.
A boycott against merchants
would be an alternative but only
if no agreement was reached. It
would likely be against only one
sector of the business
community, say gasoline, that
was consistently overcharging
student commerce,said
Uhlfelder. In a case like that
Uhlfelder would be willing to go
through with a boycott.
We have the power to do it;
but it would, of course, be up to

mixi. Each woman may
choose the dress length she
prefers.
Until the hemline hassle is
m
11'
in
HIDDEN ANKLES
... a new look for fall?
over many girls will stick with
pantsuits, a Hume coed said.
ACCORDING TO many
fashion forecasters, pantsuits
will become more and more

recognize this man I
recognize this man
recognize this man]
recognize this man
SIMs
63Mi TWlflOTl

the students to follow through,
he said.
SG ALSO plans to give
students the opportunity to
register complaints regarding
merchant inequities. After
compiling and researching these
complaints, SG will attempt to
alleviate the problem.
For example, Uhlfelder
said, this past year Southern
Bell was taking very high
deposits from the students. We
talked to them about this and
managed to have deposits
returned after six months.
SG is considering a
comparative price listing on
goods sold in the community,
but after researching the project
this summer it was decided that
the time and effort needed for
the massive listing, could be used
more effectively towards solving
the problem here in Gainesville.
There arent many
community situations similar to
Gainesville; for a comparative
listing. A broad comparison is
being planned.
Right now, Uhlfelder said,

accepted for any occasion.
Women can escape the
controversial styles and still be
properly dressed.
The midi looks like the
dresses my mom wore in high
school. Ive always laughed at
them. How could I wear one? a
coed asked.
The designers are all uptight,
because with the short skirts
staying in so long, their sales
have declined, a blonde
sophomore said. They think
just because the yell midi
well all go out and buy new
wardrobes.
WITH IDEAS of womens
liberation and womens equality
sweeping the nation, many are
asking why they should conform
to the dictates of a few fashion
designers. Why shouldn't a
woman decide for herself?
Maybe the midi will catch on
up North where its colder, but I
just can't see it catching on in
Florida, (me girl said.

we need these merchant
discounts. This has been
attempted before, but not
successfully.
We need the man-power;
people wholl go and find out
just what the problem is. We can
move on from there, Uhlfelder
said.

S 3Uj* plnfoerstig j&fnp |
AL 4 <|2
J Fashion Store For Men & Women
4 Open 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 4
4 4
conveniently located at:
4 4
The First Presbyterian Church
106 SW 3rd Street
CORDIALLY INVITES YOU
- Ci. -- £- * 1
September 27th at 5:30 P.M.
Supper-Fellowship Hall
If you are interested in coming:
Ji
Your Name
Dorm Name
o.
Someone from our church will get
in touch with you.
EiMgm|MSMEe|3ri
Uigatof HUP WANTED idft Iwlp |

. *...r *
- 1 '" vI I
Jig* f >
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Flower Arrangii. lessons
Instructor: Joel Buchanan
$7.50 for 8 lessons starting
Sept. 30 till Nov. 18 room
118, Union 7:00 pm register
at the first lesson or in room
310, Union
Sponsored by the JWR Union



The r 1
Florida
Alligator

Cooking With The Chambers Brothers

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Put it down on your
calendars, Oct. 2 at 7:30 and
10:30 in steamy Florida Gym,
the Chambers Brothers are going
to cook.
But dont take my word for
it, go and get down for awhile
yourself.
THE CHAMBERS Brothers
are four real brothers and one
Irish brother who bring
Mississippi gospel; thumping,
cowbell clanking, foot-stomping,
low-down guitar playing, lay it
back and howl, Mississippi
gospel to every place they play.
This warning should drive the
Bobby Sherman-Fifth
Dimension freaks out of their
front row seats and let the
children in to boogie. The
Chambers Brothers are a concert
band as opposed to groups who
play modem chamber music and
prefer to be heard and not seen.
The Chambers Brothers are
best in person.
THE FOUR REAL brothers
started out, as you might expect,
as a gospel group in Mississippi.
You can still find their early
records in the back of dusty
gospel bins in the less traveled
record stores.
They looked fairly
conventional then, black and
rangy but dressed in those shiny
three-button suits gospel singers
wore.
Yet you could tell, even then,
that these guys are bad dudes. I
mean, you get the feeling
looking at the picture that as
dynamic as black gospel can get
it wont be enough.
LIKE MOST OF the great acts
around today, the Chambers
Brothers are visually outrageous.
They look like great backwoods
farmers with their floppy hats,
their scraggly beards, all thats
missing is overalls. That'ft part
of their mystique, their visual
connection with deepest
Mississippi, that impression of
rough sharecroppers boys who
have picked up axes, drums and
electricity to tell you about life,
jy and music under the
pulsating heat of the South, it
works. Nothing gets between
them and the music because the
beat, the stage action and their
appearance are all part of the
Flyin Gators
Cessna 150
Flying Club
SSO a month entitles
you to 5 solo hours
Additional hours
that same month
only $9 per hour
No duos
No fees I
For information call
* . ... r -,
CASSELS IN THE AIR _
378-2646

| Lll I Lmm § H Bl i|||[ p; .B: ; B
ImIIuU HIHmLFI I

music, visual and vocal
impressions of life as they see it.
The press clippings about
them from the Filmore, the
festivals and almost everywhere
else are unanimous in defining
the Chambers Brothers as a band
that gets the people in the aisles.
They offer a lot of
provocation.
Blues, good old rock and roll,

;aw.W.AW.W........... W W ....iV.V.VA%%WW.%V.V.%W.%%%V.V.VW.%%V.V.W.Vi-.;^
I Art Sale At Union
: §
: Wednesday and Thursday, the Reitz Union will hold its
annual print sale in the Union Ballroom and second floor $
i galleries. Hours of the sale are from 11 a.m. to 9 pun. |
i All Gainesville artisans are invited to go commercial and bring §
; their own work, whatever change-making bread they can muster ?!
from the old garret, and set up shop to sell whatever it is they §
; want to sell to a public looking for original are to go along with ij
i; he old masters prints. j;|
! Questions should be directed to the Union Program Office, v
3924655. g
,/,V, ,W,,,,, V'*V*'.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V. AV.V. ,VV. .V.V. , .V. .V.V. .V. .V.V.W.V/: >A X

    r
    I
    I DIAL 1390
    I FIRST 1
    with
    _ GATOR SPORTS REPORTS
    TOP POPULAR MUSIC
    * CAMPUS AND LOCAL NEWS
    if
    "COME Sfi US IN THE MALL"

    soul, acapella and gospel, the
    Brothers will cover all the
    ground between their version of
    Bang-Bang to their greatest
    hit, Time. Tickets go on sale
    Wednesday at the Reitz Union,
    Recordsville and the Record Bar.
    So if you feel like a little
    Mississippi jukin, and in a week
    and a half, who wont, try some
    with the Chambers Brothers.

    TiNodey, September 22,1970, The Florida Aligetor,

    Enjoy Oriental Cooking
    *
    For the ultimate in Chinese Food, dine here. Prices
    are low, take-out service, too.
    V V, - V1,.,;..
    Open 5-9 pm. Daily
    2409 SW. 13th St. (Village Square)
    372-6801

    O '-" 7
    r
    GREG JONES
    Entertainment Editor

    Page 13



    Page 14

    The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. September 22.1970

    The
    Florida
    Alligator

    SOPH FULLBACK RETURNS
    Rich 'Happens To Start

    BY PHIL PETTIJOHN
    Alligator Sports Writer
    When Floridas
    super-sophomores of 1969 grew
    into their junior starting roles
    this year, fullback Mike Rich
    was almost left behind.
    The 6-3, 217 pound native of
    Dublin, Ga. returned to school
    this fall listed as the Gators
    number two fullback behind
    senior Garry Walker, but he will
    start for the third time Saturday
    when Florida meets Alabama in
    Tuscaloosa.
    RICH, WHO had been third
    team, and fellow super-soph
    Tommy* Durrance took over the
    starting fullback and tailback
    positions from Walker and
    tailback Jerry Vinsett last year.
    They joined quarterback John
    Reaves and Carlos Alvarez in the
    all-sophomore backfield.
    Durrance led the Southeastern
    Conference in scoring.
    Rich, now 20, carried the ball
    85 times for 340 yards and
    provided fine power running to
    offset Durance's runs and the
    Reaves-Alvarez passing
    combination.
    DESPITE THIS he finished
    the spring practice as number
    two behind Walker again.
    He just didnt have that good
    a spring, said head offensive
    coach Jimmy Dunn. Both boys
    were about equal so I thought
    Walker, being a senior, deserved
    the chance.
    But Rich, who had become
    accustomed to his starting role,
    set out to work to regain the
    position.
    I FELT THAT Garry was
    starting because of his excellent
    blocking ability, Rich said. So
    with help from coach (Lindy)
    Infante (coaches running backs)
    I worked on it and felt I
    improved.
    Dunn kept a close eye on
    Rich and Walker as they pushed
    each other into working harder.
    The competition was good
    for kith of them, Dunn said.
    Mike (Rich) did we ll in early
    scrimmages this fall. He came up
    with the big play. He caught
    well, and generally seemed to
    make things happen when he
    had the ball, so he got the
    starting call against Duke.
    RICH NOW leads the team in
    receiving. He has made nine
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    MIKE RICH
    ... gets big yardage

    catches for 208 yards to edge
    All-American split end Carlos
    Alvarez who has 10 catches for
    195 yards.
    That is probably because so
    many teams are conscious of
    Carlos and let up on covering the
    backs, Rich said.
    Rich grabbed a pass just over
    the linebacker's head against
    Mississippi State and ran
    untouched 15 yards into the
    endzone.
    HIS RUNNING style,
    standing straight up, limits him
    on off tackle plays, but on an
    open field he is a bruising runner
    that is seldom brought down by
    one man.
    If a defender makes the
    mistake of hitting him around
    the legs he can't stop Rich,
    Dunn said. But off tackle he

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    to
    Budget Rent a Cap /v
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    378-1245
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    in Alachua County I 9
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    takes a lot of punishment in the
    chest from linebackers. We are
    working on getting his head
    down, but he has not
    responded.
    The University of Southern
    California, with its strong
    offensive line and big backs
    proved that a team could run
    against Bear Bryant's Crimson
    Tide. USC gained over 400 yards
    in Bama's opener.
    We'll have to come out quick
    and establish our running game
    if our passing attack is going to
    work, Dunn said..
    Theyre (Alabama) pretty
    quick, but our line and backs
    have been doing a good job of
    blocking, said Rich, who gained
    many of his yards on power
    sweeps. I think we can run
    against them.

    f Sty* Mniberstiw j&ljop S
    1| 4fr
    Fashion Store For Men & Women *
    T
    4y Open 9 A.M. to 9 P.M.
    % t #
    conveniently located at:
    1620 West University Ave ... University Plaza
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    TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
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    jWlHflF
    I STARKE, FLORIDA
    SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER \|f
    - HOURS
    WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
    SATURDAY BAM IPM
    GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
    FALL BOWLING
    LEAGUES ARE
    ORGANIZING NOW
    Call 392-1673 or come by the GAMES
    AREA and fill out an application. Deadline
    for signup is Monday, Sept, 28.
    Mixed and mixed doubles Leagues art*
    forming for Monday through Thursday
    nights 6:30 and 9:00 PM.
    i
    Ran UNION GUMS AKA |
    ISyiir^L
    Coffee Shop Only
    1100 a.m.ll:oo p.m.
    Your Choice flO A
    fried chicken
    chopped sirloin
    fried fillet of fish p,M ,ax
    fried shrimp pops
    Served With Withfrench
    french Withfrench fries col# slow
    roll A butter iced tee, coffee, or coke
    r j>,, v/fcv l zfJsAfi *\ :;V Wr
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    - 10 cants extra p t<> ~i -i ~ir m Upping
    College Inn
    178 W. IWv.



    Rocky Robinson In Fifth Year

    By JEFF KLINKENBERG ~
    Alligator Associate Editor
    Rocky Robinson says one of the things hes gotten out of playing
    football five years at UF is humility. He has never started, played
    rarely. Hes usually floated between the third string and B team
    said Norm Carlson, the sports publicity director. Robinson was red
    shirted as a sophomore.
    Im too slow for college football, Rocky Robinson said.,
    DEFENSIVE END Jack Youngblood runs the 40 yards dash in 4.7
    seconds, as does tackle Eddie Moore. Robinson does it in 5.1 or 5.2
    His road has indeed been rocky. He was a freshman when Steve
    Spurrier was a senior, when Bill Can was a senior. Carr is a Florida
    Coach now. Robinson is a defensive tackle, not listed on the depth
    chart. He realizes he is too slow.
    Not being able to play has been a great disappointment, the
    6-foot-2 233-pound senior said. But Im not frustrated. I used to be,
    but not any more. Football isnt the only thing in life.
    WHEN HE graduated from Tampa Plant in 1966, football played a
    major part in Robinsons life. With good reason. He had been a starter
    at Plant, an outstanding player. I made a few all-star teams, he said.
    In high school, I could do just about anything I wanted. I had big
    plans for when I got here. But they didnt work out.
    He came to Gainesville without a scholarship, but earned one his
    freshman year when he started four games. He didnt get into a game
    as a sophomore. This meant he had three years of eligibility left. He
    played little the next fall, technically his junior year, but in football
    context, his sophomore season. He did play a little more last fall.
    Florida was 9-1-1.
    ROBINSON DOES not figure to play much Saturday against
    Alabama. Coach Doug Dickey will be giving his regulars all the time
    they need to get settled, to attain confidence. The Tides Scott Hunter
    is supposed to lie tough on defenses.
    Robinson hopes for overwhelming victories. His chances of playing
    are better then. Floridas game with Tennessee in the Gator Bowl was
    his biggest thrill, he claims. But the game was too close for me to get
    Turf To Be Ready
    For Gators Today

    By MARTY PERLMUTTER
    Alligator Sports Writer
    The Gators split their squad
    Monday, with defense trying to
    improve their pass coverage that
    saw Mississippi State run up 181
    yards in last Saturdays game,
    while the offense practiced their
    passing game.
    Coach Doug Dickey also was
    working to get better coverage
    from his specialty teams on punt
    returns and kickoff returns, a
    weak point in the Gator machine
    last weekend.
    BUT WHILE the team was on
    the practice field, representatives
    of Monsanto, makers of the
    artificial playing field Astro-turf,
    were answering questions about
    the complimentary strip they
    were to lay down last night.
    We thought the 10-yard
    square piece would help the
    Gators decide whether or not
    they want to put some down in
    Florida Field next year and also
    give them a chance to play on
    the same as the one at *Bama,
    Walt Schoenke of Monsanto
    said.

    ' -U -U---REWARD
    --REWARD -U---REWARD
    FOR FBEStV^EU."/
    J
    W
    AQAttKOTCOffEOS
    SCWOLARSU\PS,
    LEA&ER£MIP,CA4>U,
    TM/EL,CO^66\o^4:
    I :' I DE P E RMcWT6 / **> <* {
    > **,i_uS*2r\39s v
    / to
    I

    The question of financing the
    Astro-turf if it were put in the
    stadium has arisen. But
    Schoenke said, Kansas State
    University financed their new
    surface by asking the alumni
    association for donations.
    ATHLETIC DIRECTOR
    Ray Graves had mentioned to
    me that he may do the same
    thing here if UF were to install
    the new turf, Schoenke said.
    During the recent baseball
    All-Star game in Cincinnati, Pete
    Rose of the Cincinnati Reds
    complained of the tremendous
    heat that had accumulated in the
    -
    rug.
    At the present time, we have
    come up with no solution to the
    heat problem. Coach Darrell
    Royal at the University of Texas
    has a temporary way, though,
    Shoenke said.
    Royal sprays the field with
    water before his team practices
    or plays a game on it.
    The Astro-turf will be ready
    for use by the Gators in time for
    the practice session today.

    m > he said. The Gators won, 14-13. I dressed out, Rocky said.
    And so, he begins his final season of football. A marketing major,
    he plans to graduate in March or June. He will be a football graduate
    in December, whether he plays this fall or not. This is his last season
    of eligibility; he cannot be red-shirted a second time.
    WHAT, BESIDES a scholarship then, has Rocky Robinson received
    from five years of football practice? A good education, he said.
    Its hard to explain in words. For me, it was either play on the B
    team or dont play. It taught me humility, you learn to take the hard
    knocks. Just dressing out for a game has been worth it for me.
    People will forget about the guys who started. They wont
    remember who started on the offensive line or, the defensive line.
    People will remember the team. I was on that team.
    Carlson said, The most notable thing Rocky Robinson has done
    here is stay out for the team. Hes persistent, a hard worker.

    Alumni Plans
    New Events
    Alumni activites are planned
    in conjunction with 10 of the 11
    UF football games this year. The
    schedule includes special events
    in Jacksonville, Tallahasee and
    Tampa, Executive Secretary
    William J. Watson said last week.

    P P caduacs D MOST PRICtS REDUCED 8

    1969 FLEETWOOD 60 SPECIAL $5495
    White with white leather interior, air conditioned, tilt,
    telescoping steering wheel, remote trunk release, six
    way electric seat, power door locks, twilight sentinel,
    AM/FM stereo radio. A beautiful automobile.
    1969 ELDORADO $5695
    Two door hardtop, front wheel drive, full power, air
    conditioned. Sliver with dark blue interior.
    1968 SEDAN de VILLE $4095
    Four door hardtop. White with blue Interior. Air
    conditioned, fully powered Including electric windows
    and seat.
    1968 SEDAN de VILLE $4195
    Four door hardtop with bucket seats. Black vinyl over
    turquoise. Air conditioned, full power, factory
    warranty.
    1968 SIXTY SPECIAL $4295
    Four door sedan. Turquoise with matching interior.
    Air conditioned, full power, new belted tires.

    IS) sro M c| L MOST PRICES RIDUgD Iggjl

    1969 VOLKSWAGEN from $1795
    White bug with automatic stick, easy to drive
    excellent condition. 2 In stock.
    1969 MUSTANG MACH I $2995
    *%
    Qreen with gold racing stripes, black interior, radio
    and heater, automatic transmission, power disc brakes,
    power steering, 351 V-8 with four barrel carburetor,
    F7O x 14 belted tires.
    1968 OLDSMOBILE $2695
    Delta 88 four door sedan, air conditioned, electric
    windows and seat, remote trunk power door
    locks, light blue wltlf matching blue vinyl interior.
    1968 FORD .$1895
    Fatrlane 500. V-8, four door sedan. Green. Air
    conditioned, radio, heater, power steering & brakes,
    automatic transmission.
    1968 VOLKSWAGEN BUS $2295
    Bright red with sliding side doors, radio, heater and is
    AIR CONDITIONED. Excellent condition.
    1967 OLDSMOBILE Toronado i.oin
    $2295
    Two door hardtop with front wheel drive. Full power
    and air conditioned. Choose from 2 in stock.
    1967 CHRYSLER .$2295
    Town and Country Station Wagon. Gold with
    matching Gold vinyl Interior, air conditioned, radio,
    and heater, automatic transmission, power steering
    and power brakes.

    I 37 MORE USED CARS IN STOCK I

    COLLEGIATE
    CIYITAN
    MEETING
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    THURSDAY
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    TuiNday, September 22,1970, Ttw Florida AMprtar,

    1966 SEDAN de VILLE $2395
    Four door hardtop, beige with red leather Interior. Air Airconditioned,
    conditioned, Airconditioned, full power, clean.
    1964 CADILLACS (choice of 3) from
    $1095
    Assortment of colors, all are air conditioned and have
    full power.
    1969 OLDSMOBILE .$3695
    '9B". Luxury sedan. Popular four door model. Air
    conditioned, power steering, power brakes, automatic
    transmission. Choose from 2 In stock.
    1969 OLDSMOBI LE $3795
    98" Luxury Sedan. Four door hardtop, white over
    gold, air conditioned, radio, electric windows anc
    seats, Tilt-telescoping steering wheel, remote trunk
    release.

    1967 RAMBLER REBEL 770 ".. .$1395
    Cross Country four door station wagon, VB, automatic
    transmission, radio, heater, air conditioned, power
    steering. Yellow.
    1966 BUICK .$1895
    Electra 225. Four door hardtop, air conditioned, full
    power, tilt telescoping wheel, local owner, nice carl
    1966 COMET $1495
    Two door hardtop, V-8, automatic transmission. Whits
    with blue interior. Air conditioned and power steering.
    1966 CHEVY II ... .. .$1095
    Blue station wagon, six cylinder, automatic
    transmission, radio, heater. Nice clean car.
    1966 CHEVROLET NOVA (Chevy II)
    $1095
    Four door sedan. Blue. Radio, heater, clean.
    1966 MERCURY from $1195
    Choice of -two. Four door sedans, air conditioned,
    radio, hpater, automatic transmission.
    1966 DODGE DART .$995
    Two door sedan, radio, heater, three speed column
    shift, low mileage, dean. White.
    1965 BUICK RIVIERA .$1595
    Two door hardtop coupe, white with blue Interior, air
    conditioned, full power, dean.
    1965 PONTIAC .$1295
    Catalina station wagon. Air conditioned, radio, heater,
    automatic transmlssslon, power steering, power
    brakes, blue with matching blue Interior.

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    Page 15



    >, The Florida AMigator, Tiday, Saptambar 22,1970

    Page 16

    AT SYRACUSE
    Racial Discrimination Spurs Investigation

    By Alligator Serview
    Chancellor John E. Corbally
    of Syracuse University
    announced Monday a
    trustee-faculty-student
    committee will investigate
    charges of racial discrimination
    on the part of the universitys
    athletic department and other
    matters raised by black athletes
    in a statement of expectations
    issued last week.
    At the same time, a statement
    by Corbally said it was not
    considered advisable at this time
    to return eight suspended black
    players to the football squad.
    The statement of
    expectations was submitted to
    Corballys office last Thursday,
    the day the suspended black
    players signed a statement of
    commitment, indicating they
    would like to be reinstated.
    WITHOUT THE eight,
    including last seasons two top
    ground gainers, Syracuse opened
    its 1970 football schedule
    Saturday and suffered a 42-15
    drubbing at the hands of the
    University of Houston.
    The concerns expressed by
    this statement of the black
    athletes, primarily the
    allegations of discrimination on
    the part of the athletic
    department, have been dealt
    with by the Syracuse and
    Onondaga County Human
    Rights Commission,* Corbally

    Sullivan Tops SEC Backs

    By Alligator Services
    Auburns junior quarterback
    Pat Sullivan is quietly breaking
    most of his schools offensive
    records and keeping the Tigers
    on a winning track, but is
    finding it difficult to get
    recognition in a conference that
    has the likes of Archie Manning
    and John Reaves.
    Howere, Sullivans
    performance in Auburns
    season-opening win over the
    University of Southern
    Mississippi today earned him the
    honor of being named
    Southeastern Offensive Player of
    the Week by United Press
    International.
    The 6-0, 188 pounder from
    Birmingham completed 15 of 24
    passes for 244 yards Saturday to
    lead the Tigers to the 33-14
    victory.
    HE THREW, three
    touchdown passes and ran for
    another before giving way to a
    reserve early in the third period.
    He had set up his eight-yard
    scoring run on a 43-yard pass.
    It is quite a surprise and
    honor that I should be selected
    since there were some big upsets
    around the south Saturday,
    said Sullivan.
    I received great pass
    protection and the receivers
    made some great catches. I feel
    they should get their share of
    this honor, said the 20-year-old
    quarterback.
    Tiger Coach Ralph Shug
    Jordan also expressed surprise at
    Sullivan's selection in light of
    the upsets.
    I HAD no idea that Pat
    would be considered for such a'
    fine honor because we were
    expected to win, said Jordan.
    Pat had a real good first half
    when he accounted for all three
    touchdowns that really clinched
    the game. He showed us a lot

    said. Nevertheless, the
    continuing concern of the black
    athletes leaves me, with support
    of the athletic department and
    the football coaching staff, to
    appoint a trustee-faculty-student
    committee to thoroughly review
    their allegations.
    Corbally said the committee
    members will be announced on
    Wednesday and he will ask them
    to meet immediately and work
    on a tight time schedule. He
    said he wanted the committee to
    prepare a comprehensive public
    report as soon as possible.
    THE BLACK players first
    boycotted football practice last
    spring to draw attention to their
    complaints of racial
    discrimination on the Syracuse
    team. The eight were suspended
    by veteran coach Floyd Ben
    Schwartzwalder and, afterseveral
    days in August of trying to find
    a basis of peace between the
    players and coaching staff, the
    suspensions were made
    permanent on the first day of
    fall practice.
    Schwartzwalder, who has
    produced such outstanding black
    players as Jim Brown, Heisman
    Trophy winner Ernie Davis,
    Floyd Little and Jim Nance in
    his 22 years at the helm of
    Syracuse, admitted last week
    that the loss of the eight would
    hurt the Orange, both
    offensively and defensively.

    w\.
    more poise in his first game this
    year and we are expecting more
    big things from him the
    remainder of the season.
    In the first half Sullivan
    completed 13 of 15 passes for
    215 yards. He was in for only
    two drives in the second half and
    one of those resulted in a score.
    As a sophomore last season,
    Sullivan broke several school

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    The expectations as issued
    by the blacks included:
    i THERE should be black
    professionals and other
    personnel hired on the athletic
    department of Syracuse
    University and in the coaching
    staff on all levels.
    There should be a full-scale
    investigation into charges of
    racial discrimination in Syracuse
    University athletics by the vice
    provost for minority affairs, and
    the results of this investigation
    should be reopened to the
    Syracuse University community
    by the beginning of the second
    semester.
    tAn advisory committee,
    appointed by the chancellor
    with the approval of the black
    athletes, should develop a
    monitoring system to assure that
    the participation of black
    players is commensurate with
    their skills and talents. Persons
    on the advisory committee
    should be drawn from local
    community groups and black
    athletic alumni.
    THE university should
    undertake immediate steps to
    fulfill the requirements of items
    No. 2 and 3 of the conciliation
    recommendations of the
    Syracuse and Onondaga Human
    Rights Commission which state
    the following: 1-The coach
    should prepare a written plan to
    establish a new rapport with

    records and led the tigers to an
    8-2 regular season record.
    He broke the Auburn record
    for total offense in one season
    with 1,891 yards. He also has
    school single season records for
    most passes (257), most passes
    completed (123), most
    touchdown passes (16), and
    most passing yardage (1,686).
    WITH only one varsity season
    behind him, Sullivan already
    ranks ninth in total career
    offense at Auburn.
    Behind Sullivan, the 1969
    team finished second in the SEC
    in total offense with an average
    of 420.3 yards per game, a new
    school record. The Tigers also
    led the conference in scoring
    with 36.3 yards per game.
    Jordan stuck with his young
    field general last season even
    though he had a bad showing
    against Tennessee in the second
    game.

    black players in the light of
    historical and contemporary
    events; 2-A sensitivity program
    should be developed to facilitate

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    communication and positive
    attitude development among the
    athletic department and its
    participants.