Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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SUZANNE CAMP

Ban Injunction Denied
By DUANE MERTZ
Ailigtor Writer
A last minute request for a temporary injunction against the UF
policy banning coolers and containers at football games was denied
Friday by Circuit Court Judge George Patten.
John Orman, a Tampa attorney, and Jim C. Long, a UF law school
student, filed the suit. They have 20 days to file an amended request.
THE PETITION was filed against the State Board of Regents, the
City of Gainesville and the UF Athletic Association. The city of
Gainesvihe was named in the suit even though it did not pass a law on
containers, but rather an ordinance against consuming alcohol on
Florida Field.
During the proceedings Patten dismissed Gainesville as a defendant.
The ban covers all containers, regardless of what they contain. The
~1T (SEI M WNCTION'PAGE 3)

Three Candidates View Gators, Express Views
Faircloth: 'Communicate Askew: Youth Vote Eckerd: Student Regent

With Students, Governor
By DUANE MERTZ
Alligator Writar

State Atty. Gen. Earl
gubernatorial candidate, said
"iblishmei t of a broad-based
student commission to
communicate with the governor
on a regular basis.
Faircloth said the
commission's format would be
decided later, but it may be
compriised of student body
presidents of the Florida
f; universities.
SPEAKING AT a morning
(SEE 'FAIRCLOTH' PAIIE 2)

Faircloth, Democratic
Saturday he favors
i'M

By JEFFRY KLINKENBERG
~~~~~ ~' ~~ '~.v ~ ~ *'._ ~~
*S
In the past, it was easy for University Police
Department Officer G. E. Watts. He would stand at
the entrance to Section 39 of Florida Field and say,
Sir, please sit down, youre blocking the exit or
Maam, youre sitting in the wrong seat, or maybe
even break up a fight. Stuff like that.
That was when things were normal.
SUDDENLY, Watts is also expected to watch for
people drinking from binoculars, or sipping from
sunglasses. He is expected to apprehend people
tippling alcoholic beverages at Florida Field.
In an effort to curb the consumption of alcohol
at the stadium, known in some circles as the largest

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

AT LAW COLLEGE

By ANNE B. FREEDi /IAN
Alligator Features Editor
Ushering in concern for the
average citizens understanding
of the law Joseph R. Julin,
associate dean of the University
of Michigan at Ann Arbor
(UMAA) will become dean of
the UF College of Law Jan. 1,
1971.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell announced the
appointment Friday following
Board of Regents approval in
the Reitz Union during the
boards monthly meeting.
JULIN IS replacing Frank E.
Maloney, now a visiting
professor of law at Vanderbilt
University. Maloney expects to
return to the UF law school in a
teaching capacity next fall.
While at the UMAA, Julin
developed a special interest in
giving the layman a closer look
at the workings of the law
through the mass media.
He hosted an award-winning
television series, A Quest for
Certainty, and had a weekly
radio show, Law in the News,
which was carried on 150
stations nationwide.
1 T HOPE to make a
measurable contribution to the
students and the university,
Julin said Friday.
Julin said he became
interested in the UF law school

. A 'Genuine Issue 1
By ANNE B. FREEDMAN
Alligator Features Editor
All tell-tale signs of State "Sen. Reubin Askews
attendance at the steam bath football game on Florida
- Field had vanished except for
his orange and blue Gator tie.

The Democratic
governor-hopeful collapsed on
the large comfortable living
room sofa of a Gainesville
builder, Jack McGriff, late
Saturday afternoon, for a brief,
unscheduled interview with the
Alligator reporter.
IM SORRY this has to be so
(SEE TAX PAGE 2)

'No Trouble At Fla. Field

Vol 63, No. 1

Julin Named Dean

The University of Fbrida, Gainesville

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JOSEPH H. JULIN
. former Michigan Dean
when members of the
administration approached him
several months ago.
UF is in a particularly
unique position, Julin said.
Its of sufficient size to be
flexible and it has a sound,
quality faculty.
The new dean declined to
comment on programs he will
institute until I know the
curriculum and the attitudes of
the faculty better.
DEAN FRANCIS A. Allen of
the UMAA Law School cliled
Julins resignation a substantial
loss to us.

HLI

cocktail party in the South, the administration wifi
into the stadium.
It does not matter if it contains water, Gator-ade
or goldfish. Containers are not allowed in the place.
It is an easy thing to enforce, Watts said at
halftime. No trouble, no trouble,** he said.
Nobodys gotten past me.*
IT WOULD have been difficult. At every entrance
to the stadium: officers, all of them looking
suspiciously at binocular cases and large
pocketbooks.
Officers inside the stadium watched for drinking
and other disturbances.
But some people managed to beat the system.
(SEE 'DRY' PAGE 4)

'ln Advisory Capacity 9
By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
Jack Eckerd, businessman-druggist, said he would favor
seating a university student on the Board of Regents if
elected governor.

Not as a voting member,
Eckerd said, but in an advisory
capacity.
HE FAVORS what he called a
more practical approach to
education, giving some priority
to) vocational training in the
Florida junior colleges.
There is no stigma attached
to anyones being a carpenter,
(SEE 'BARGE' PAGE 2)

Monday, September 21, 1970

OConnell said Dean Julins
leadership abilities displayed
at Michigan will be assets here
at UF.
A member of the UMAA
faculty since 1959, Julin became
associate dean in 1968. He has
served as chairman of the
Executive Committee of the
Institute of Continuing Legal
Education since 1965.
Julin is a specialist in property
law and is co-author of a
nationally-used law school text,
Basic Property Law. A 1952
graduate of the Northwestern
University School of Law, he
served as a lecturer at his alma
mater for seven years while
practicing law in Chicago prior
to joining the UMAA faculty.
liilliiiii
J .w.-.-.y.y.y.y.-.y.y.y.y.y.y-^^
TOPICS FROM BSU
v demands to a ban on
containers discussed
this summer page 16
Campos Crier r*........... .28
Classifieds 20
Editorials .8
Entertainment 34
Letters .9
Movies 20
Sports 17

....



Page 2

Florid*Alligt of,"Monday, September "21*, I#7o

Day Care And Night Concerts
Planned For Rose Theater

\ By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Writer
A day care center during the day suddenly becomes a concert hall
at night? Strange, but this may be the fate of the gutted out former
movie house, Rose Theatre.
ACCORDING TO the originator, Bruce Nearon, the basic concept
of the proposed Rose Auditorium is to establish a community
involvement center within the ghetto, where any number of projects,
from tutoring assistance to a learn -through-participation program,
could be realized.
The possibilities are endless, said Nearon, a fourth year
architectural student. The Rose Auditorium, on N.W. sth Ave., would
be handled and managed by a non-profit corporation. Much of the
funding would come through concerts at the Rose, once it is redone,
and through an Oct. 9 concert on campus.
Well be leasing the theatre from the owner. Ive already discussed
the project whith him, and he has agreed to allow a free hand in use of
the auditorium.
THE CONCERTS, initially on Friday and Saturday nights, will
attempt to touch all realms of music, including soul, country, rock
and folk.
Well try to get our groups at cost, since all profits will go toward
several of the day-time programs and the auditorium. Ideas now being
considered include a non-profit day care center for the university and
Gainesville community, a discover your world project for the
ghetto youth, and an opportunity for graduate students in such fields
as architecture, engineering, education, and chemistry to put their
knowledge to work.
The concerts would not only serve as an opportunity for students
to get together with the surrounding community and enjoy some
interesting music, but as a primary funding source.
Also scheduled is a benefit concert for the Rose on Oct. 9.
WERE HAVING the Celebration, another local group, and a light
show. Tickets will probably be 75 cents for the University Auditorium
concert.
Theres quite a need for something of this nature in the
community.
The university community is insulated from such realities as the
ghetto and the surrounding community. Rose Auditorium will give
them an opportunity to help and possibly achieve a mutual
understanding within the community.
The auditorium, the only one of its kind in the area, could serve as
a haven for numerous projects now in existence which might not have
a convenient meeting place.
IT IS NO mistake that the Rose Theatre was chosen for this
project.
Every year we have some trouble in the ghetto. It gets hot and
hassled with windows often ending up smashed. The Rose Auditorium
could give people something to do and a place to go..
Eventually we hope to change the large parking lot next door into
a park, and have cars park at the railroad station instead. I dont
anticipate any trouble with the concerts from either local officials or

Tax Reform Is Main Issue

MSE OWEgI
short, the tall 42-year-old
candidate apologized.
He had 10 minutes before
leaving the home for three
cocktail parties with hopes of
making a 7:30 p.m. flight at the
Gainesville airport.
Askew said he strongly
supported the 18-year-old vote
ammendment issue.
WHILE HE contended that
old enough to fight -old
enough to vote view was a

i STAK SHAK
' Student Special
| oHSmW (With The Coupon) |
I Our Regular 93< Steakburger
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
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Steak n Shake 1
S_W. 13th St. ~ m Gainesville |
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
-- tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion. ~' T

genuine issue, a more
persuasive argument Askew said
was the quality of voters in the
18-21 -year-old range.
The 18-21-year-old young
people are one of the most
informed groups in the
country, he said.
According to Askew, the big
issue of the campaign is tax
reform.
Corporate tax could provide
tax relief for the poor.
And the taxes may take off
the sales tax on utility bills, and

patrons. I think any minor problems, though, if they did occur, woul
be offset by the benefit of the project to the general community.
Nearon has never attempted anything of this nature before. But e
said he realized the unlimited opportunity that a non-profit
auditorium could provide.
1 WE CAN EVEN have theatre groups practicing and using Rose.
This could serve as an asset in community -university relations.
Lawyers have already begun work on the legal aspects of the
project and the non-profit corporation. The board of directors will
consist of local citizens including a black leader and a number of
university students. But the project will not be sponsored by UF.
The Rose Auditorium concept, begun last March, can become a
reality if campus and community support comes through.
We need volunteers from almost every university college,
particularly in such specialties as architecture, education, landscape
and public relations. For example, an education major could set up his
own working project, or an architecture student might assist in the
actual planning of the new interior (which was gutted by fire several
years ago).

Barge Canal Is Rat Hole

when a carpenter can make
about $45,000 a year, Eckerd
said.
Like other candidates running
for governor, Eckerd runs a
tough line on drug pushers. He
favors, however, a different
approach for those using drugs.
Eckerd favors programs such as
the Corner Drug Store in
Gainesville using former drug
users to show others the danger
of drug use.

Fairdoth : Drug Education

|^ROMIABEIieJ
>
press conference at the Flagler
Inn, the onetime UF student
stated that he supports the
18-year-old vote and, is happy
the people of Florida will have a
chance to vote on the question.

prevent a tax from every being
put on groceries.
ASKEW SAID HE was
opposed at this point to
naming a student to the Board
of Regents because members of
the board must serve nine-year
terms. p
Most students are in school
for only four years and then
they cease to be a student.
Askew said he would favor a
representative group of students
to work more closely with the
board.

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A TT FEATURING:
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Mi* tt SPECIALTY SANDWICHES
6 vEarmitmla 0 g delicious salads
A gv DOMESTIC & IMPORTED
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SERVING CONTINUOUSLY
S % # B 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
CttKpftW CONGENIAL
CONTINENTAL
IN THE MALL A TMOSPHERE

HE IS against legalizing
marijuana, but said he would
like to see simple possession
made a misdemeanor. At present
marijuana possession in Florida
is a felony.
Another group that runs afoul
of Eckerd is violent
demonstrators in the Florida
campuses. Eckerd said he would
like to see those people
expelled from our universities.
THE BALDING millionaire is
not one to favor the
controversial Cross Florida Barge
Canal. He called the canal a rat

The issue will appear on the
Nov. 29 ballot.
Faircloth also supports UF
President Stephen C. OConnells
handling of last years protests.
I think his actions last year
serve as a good example for
college presidents across the
nation, he said affirmatively.
WHEN I am elected, I intend
to give Florida college presidents
control over campus
demonstrations, he said.
On drug problems Faircloth
stated he wants, treatment for
young offenders and jail for
pushers. The candidate, who
just completed a comprehensive
drug study, named organized
crime as the force behind drug
traffic in the United States.
We must continue, our drug
education process and keep
informing people of the dangers
of taking drugs, said the
graying candidate.
FAIRCLOTH ALSO favors
the establishment of a state
environmental agency to deal

The possibilities are
endless. .. but without
money, our problems will
be close to insurmount insurmountable.
able. insurmountable. ..

hole, and would definitely like
to see it stopped.
And while he recognizes south
Floridas need for a jetport, he
would like to have the experts
look for a better place.
Talking about the upcoming
runoff Sept. 29, Eckerd said
Bafalis jumping to the Kirk
camp puzzles me. But he
smiled as he added 99 percent of
the Bafalis people have switched
to him.
Id rather have the team than
the captain, Eckerd said.

with ecological problems.
Various problems such as
construction of the Cross
Florida Barge Canal, the
Everglades jetport and damage
caused by oil slicks would come
under the jurisdiction of this
agency, Faircloth said.
He explained that, no one
can predict whether or not the
state will need to find new ways
to generate tax monies until he
studies the situation
thoroughly, and that he
will look at the situation once he
assumes office.
IM NOT convinced we cant
get along with new revenues, he
said.
In speaking about public
transportation, Faircloth said he
hopes to all federal funds
available to the state
Department of Transportation,
but rather better use of highway
taxes.
Do you know that only 28
cents of every highway tax
dollar goes to building roads?

Bruce Nearon



fts Crowded: Off-Campus

By CARL CRAWFORD
AKigator Writer
Director of Off-Campus
Housing Carl Opp said
Wednesday that a lack of new
construction, a tight money
situation and more students
wanting to live off-campus have
created an off-campus housing
crisis.
Weve been watching the
ratio of vacancies to total
number of units and find this
ratio may drop further this
year, Opp said.
This means out of the total
number of rental units in the
Gainesville area, a smaller
number are vacant and available
for rental.
IN THE FALL,of 1968 five
per cent of the total number of
units were available. In the fall
of 1969, 3.3 per cent were
available, Opp said. We dont
know what the percentage is this
year, but were shoe-homing
people in.***
The off-campus housing office
has a small number of available
spaces. Listings showed two
spaces each for single males and

Injunction Denied
On Container Ban
PAGE OHE^J
petition alleged this violates the legal rights of the plaintiffs to provide
themselves with food and beverages of their own choosing.
The petition also contended that fans will be forced either to go
without food and drink of their own choosing or to purchase said
foods and refreshments from an exclusive concessionaire.
WHILE THE petition was being argued in court, Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder appeared before the Board of Regents in an
unsuccessful attempt to change the regulation to simply ban alcoholic
beverages rather than containers of all types. The Regents voted 6-2 to
uphold the ban.
Uhlfelder said Thursday he did not oppose the alcohol ban, but he
said he disagreed with the method UF President Stephen C. OConnell
will use to enforce the rule.
I do not feel the university should be asking the city commission
for special ordinances to police university property, said Uhlfelder.
I feel this is a dangerous precedent to start.
Uhlfelder said he felt O'Connell and other officials could spend
their time more wisely than pushing the ban on containers which, he
said, could result in a backlash.
ITS NOT fair for the person who wants to drink lemonade or tea
to forbid all containers from the stadium, Uhlfelder said.
A release from OConnells office announcing the ban said: The
consensus of those present agreed that it would be mandatory to
prohibit entry of all coolers, since it would be physically impossible
for security forces to determine the Contents of any receptacle at the
g*e.
In a later release Sept. 17 OConnell said, No one recognized more
than we, that this portion of the policy will inconvenience many who
fully support the prohibition of alcohol.
It is but another example of action that must be taken to deal
effectively with the ill-considered actions of a relative few that
inconvenience many others, O'Connell said.

li . is I
something else I
your elders I
cant explain. I

single women, two unfurnished
houses, two unfurnished
apartments, three spaces for
couples and a few openings in
apartments already rented to
share.
The problem is caused by
three main factors, according to
Opp.
The first is an increase in the
number of upper division and
graduate students. Opp said
approximately 10,000 UF
students live off-campus.
Added to this is an increase of
800 students this year in the
number of upper division and
graduate students who usually
reside off-campus.
THE SECOND factor is a lack
of new construction of new
off-campus living units. For the
first half of 1970 permits were
issued for only 400 dwelling
units. When placed against the
expected increase of upper
division and graduate students,
this creates a housing strain.
Another factor is the tight
money policy many lending
sources have.
One of our more successful

builders has 15 acres available to
build an apartment complex,
and he wants to build.
THE PEOPLE, he borrowed
from to finance his first project
have given different terms. They
want nine per cent interest rate.
This would cause the builder to
raise the rates on his new
apartments about 20 per cent
over what he is charging for his
apartments now, Opp said.
Then the investors want two
per cent off the net of any
increase he makes in the rents.
This would all be written into
the mortgages, and for this
reason this builder is holding out
until the money situation
loosens.
Opp predicts the problem will
worsen, at least until the end of
this month.

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UF Housing has placed more than 135 students in study lounges
this term because of a housing shortage crisis. £
Approximately 113 students are living in study lounges in three
dorm areas. Some students have been there since last Tuesday. And
one housing area, Rawlings, the 13 girls in lounges can expect to be
there for a month.
ONE RESIDENT in a Rawlings study lounge, Wendy Casern, said
of the lounge accommodations: Its crowded. Its really bad, but we
have some good girls in there so its not too bad. They told us we can
expect to be here as much as a month.
Her roomate Julie Miller said, They have no business putting more
than four people in one of those lounges.
Rawlings is just one of the areas where lounge housing exists. In
Graham Area, there were 35 students in lounges, now there are only
eight.
In Hume Hall, there are 48 men and 22 women housed in lounge
space. They have been told they will be there for two weeks or three
weeks.
ANDY BEHRMAN, of Hume, said me arrangement is a bad deal,
thats all. Theres no privacy.
Other Hume lounge residents complained of no privacy, no space to
hang clothes, and no telephone privileges.

' Monday, September 21,1970, Tho Florida Alliptor,

...Anci On

Page 3



Page 4

The

Model Campus Planned
By Environmental Group

By MONA EDWARDS
AMfrtor Writer
Using S9OO allocated by
Student Government, the
Environmental Action Group
(EAG) is initiating a project to
dean up the UF campus.
In approximately two weeks,
EAG will place containers near
vending machines all over the
campus. EAG will sell the empty
cans placed in the containers for
half a cent each to Reynolds
Aluminum for recycling,
accordign to Hal Barcey, EAG
secretary r of environmental
affairs.
This is the first step in an
Dry Gators
No Trouble
You want to know how I did
it? one individual, stumbling
around at halftime, asked. I got
smashed before I got here. He
smelled rummy.
Another guy filled, six oranges
with vodka. Oranges were
allowed in the stadium if not
carried in a container.
AND POLICE apparently did
not sniff oranges.
I had to turn back two
people at this gate, said state
trooper R.W. Stevens, on his
beat on the west side of the
stadium. They were carrying
satchels. Told em to put em
back in their cars. No trouble.
They did. Were not allowed to
search anyone. We dont even
look in anyones container. If
they have a container, they just
dont get in the stadium.
It was not booze that made
people pass out in the stands.
When its ninety-nine degrees at
gametime, cola venders are the
most popular people in the
place.
State trooper Rale Hole was
too busy being amazed to notice
the heat. Ive been working
these games seven and a half
years, he said. And theres
always been some kind of
trouble. But nothing today.
ACCORDING TO trooper
Harvey Montgomery Jr., The
biggest problem in the past has
been the students drinking,
especially within the fraternities.
Youd get a couple of unfriendly
fraternities sitting next to each
other, and one guy would be
throwing ice at another and
before long, somebody would
knock the crap out of somebody
else.

1 r
I if T i Monday Thursday
I 0k __ Beef Burgundy Smothered Steak
JL Evening
Tuesday Friday
I SB" MpCCiulS Veal Parmagian Seafood Dinner
I k| 5:00-9:00 PM Wednesday Saturday
I JJ Roast Leg of Lamb Veal Parmagian
\T .;i/ § Sunday (noon 8/ night)
Roast Leg Lamb Roast Turkey
j AT THE
r m =- UJNCH
jj Primrose Inn
H 214 W. University Ave. L'.lSzZZr,,

EAG campaign to make UF a
model campus with respect tb
ecological balance and
environmental aesthetics,
according to Barcey.

y FOR CAMPUS. .
CAMPUS REQUIREMENTS IN
SLACKS THIS YARE ARE VARIED.
TWitlS, TGPSACKS, DENIMS,
CORDUROYS, VELVET AND MANY
OTHERS. IT'S NOT A BIG INVESTMENT
TO HAVE SOME OF EACH.
YOU'LL FIND THIS GREAT SELECTION
AT THE
YOUNG AMERICAN SHOP
208 W. UNIV. AVE.
ACROSS THE STREET FROM SILVERMAN'S

EAG will hold environmental
education sessions in each dorm,
set up a reading room of
envionmental materials in the
library, show weekly film
supplements concerning ecology
in the J. Wayne Reitz Union,
and have spot announcements
on network television, Barcey
said.
In this way, the organization
hopes to inform people of the
problems and show them exactly
what they can do.
Other EAG projects include
picketing local distributors of
one-way bottles and setting up
newspaper reclamation centers
in each dorm.

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-...- --% : I : i. r .
Draft Info
And Counsel
f SB
&% \*i jAk -
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- I *.
OH NO!!
Oh yes I! As we all know too
well the computer tells no lies.
Well, back to the sweatshop
called "Step 2 Development
of Class Schedule," "Step 3
Check in Table," etc., etc., ad
nauseum, ad nauseum. It's called
registration and it's a real. Class
A pain. Just ask anybody.
BSU Greets
Black Students
We told them what was
expected of them and what they
could expect in return/' Earl
Wilcox, Black Student Union
(BSU) deputy of
communications, said.
Black students are in the
minority and can't expect the
UF to cater to them according
to Wilcox.
We must make the university
cater to the entire student body
rather than us catering to them,
.Wilcox said.
THE BSU serves as a vehicle
of transport to deliver to black
students their goals and
objectives the things they
need and want, Wilcox said.
Our major issue is to address
ourselves to racism and the
problems that come from it, he
said. Students can insure justice
and put down discrimination by
supporting us.
There are roughly 300
blade students at UF, according
to Wilcox.
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i t . c-r -* - ;,I ,/( \
v r *.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder
announced Friday the formation of a draft
counseling center by SG.
Uhlfelder noted that most students, dont care,
dont check info their draft status or dont try to
understand whats going on until a problem arises.
We will supply the student with as much
information as we can legally, Uhlfelder said.
MAKING FRESHMMAN students aware of their
individual draft situation will be a primary concern
of the counseling center, according to Uhlfelder. A
room will be set up in the SG office complex and

A feature of Sears Anniversary Days
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will be stocked with at least 30 publications
concerning draft laws, deferments and obtaining
religious deferments.
Two draft counselers will be available, one in the
office provided by SG and one in the Presbyterian
Student Center.
We will be making appointments next week for
the counseling, and we plan to be all set and
formalized -by the second week of school,
Uhlfelder said.
Students were advised to call the SG office,
392-1665, for a counseling appointment.

tioinidby, SaptiMfibar 21, ttOb Tfw Florida Aiphr,

-
STEVE UHLFELDER
iwKWflXl QOVI vW| CHOCK

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 21.1970

Doors Closing On Open Mouse

ByCARL CRAWFORD
Alligator Writer
Dean James T. Hennessey,
assistant to the vice president for
student affairs, said Friday the
decision to make students set
their own open house hours and
methods of enforcing them was
made by housing and the school
administration in general, and is
not the result of a directive from
any one person in the school.
The decision was made, he
said, because of wide-spread
violations of the regulations last
year- IP
THEY (the housing areas)
are jiSst going to hold off on
having any open house until
the floor councils set their hours
within the hours set by the
housing council.
It has been rumored in all
dorms resident advisors were
told to enforce the rules
concerning open house, and
possession of alcohol and drugs
beginning this semester.
RA Ira Hatch, Graham Area,
denied such a crackdown.
SOME OF the kids are trying
to feel us out, but I dont know
anything of a crackdown.
One Graham Student
Assistant (SA) admitted
privately Saturday that a
crackdown was in affect, and the
RAs would get tough enforcing
housing rules. He mentioned an
RA might even listen at a
tenants door to find open house
violations.
RAs Ann Dixon and Don
Royston of Hume area did
Environment
Course Lives 9
Overpopulation. Pollution.
Human survival in todays world.
Those are the topics being
covered in a course being taught
this fall by Prof. Seymour S.
Block on environmental and
technological crises facing
mankind, with emphasis on
possible solutions.
Open to all students, the
course was offered last year as
EGG 300. It is CHE 498 this
year, and classes will meet
Tuesday and Thursday fifth
period, in room 211 of the
Mechanical Engineering
Building.
The course may be taken for
two credits with additional
credits received for projects and
outside work. It may be
repeated for additional credit.

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Your NEW Fiat Dealer 506 E. University Ave. Ph 372-4373 I

ENFORCEMENT PROMISED

admit to a crackdown.
MISS DIXON SAID- that the
crackdown was an attempt to
make the students realize their
responsibility to follow the
rules.
Were not really making a
police state, were just enforcing
rules that werent enforced last
year, Miss Dixon said.
Concerning the origin of a
crackdown, Dixon said: We
have been encouraged from
higher up to enforce the rules.
Royston laid the blame for a
crackdown on complaints made
to the administration among
other reasons.
PARENTS ARE complaining
right to (UF President Stephen
C.) OConnell and he and Vice
President of Student Affairs
Lester Hale and others are
directly concerned with this
thing, Royston said. Another
reason is that this is an election
year.
Both RAs said there were no
new policies concerning the
three major problem areas,
drugs, alcohol, and open house.
But rules in force last year are
being enforced.
Dixon blamed the crackdown
for the resignation of some
RAs.
RAS LAST YEAR thought
they were helping people, and
they didnt want to be
disciplinarians.
RA Tom McGrady of the
Murphee Area confessed he
knew nothing of any apparent
crackdown.

Prints & MjjjM ltajgi£
Posters
Arts & Crafts
. Sale BBiW ypjj
f'' i J W
myjtkWednesday & Thursday
only. . 11 to 9. e Union
Ballroom & Galleries. .
thanks to the JWR Union
an d the Quarterly too.

I wasnt here for orientation
with the other RAs this summer
so I dont know arching of a
crackdown, he said..
BARBARA LEMBCKE, a
resident counselor at Towers,
said Friday that open house is
still the students responsibility
and as long as it is enforced we
wont step in.
Should an RA go up and
find someone on that floor
(after hours) the floor loses its
open house... until they submit
a better plan, Mrs. Lembcke
said.
TOWERS IS different because
the floor is not considered the
basic unit of the dormitory, but
rather the suite. The rule in
Towers is that each suite must
set hours by which the four
residents will live.
THE RAS BEGAN, enforcing
the hours in Towers last week as
soon as students started moving
in. Most RAs agreed that the
policy may make them a bit
unpopular with students, but as
Adrienne Garcia, one of the
RAS, said I dont like to have
to do it, but its my job.
Mrs. Lembcke said all RAS
were informed of the policy
change before they started
working this year. Last year, she
said, there was very little actual
checking on the students and the
enforcement was left up to the
students.
SHE DESCRIBED the new
tougher policies as a reaction to
last years situation. Many
parents have written both to the

university and to state legislators
complaining about the policies.
In away, she said this was
strange because when questioned
most students said tfyey wanted
a 24-hour open house. The
number of letters from parents,
she said, indicated that students
who were dissatisfied with the
policies as they were last year
were complaining to their
parents rather than to the school
or the housing staff.

DANSKIN
LEOTARDS
and
TIGHTS
AVAILABLE AT:
IJCHTEk'S
IN THE MALL
HEADQUARTERS IN GAINESVILLE FOR DANCEWEAR
; panhellenic
CATCH 15
All 15 of us again
at informals this
weekend
T rj 'feulnrrrr f
-V-
r: -7-
pick-up:
invitations
Wed. Sept. 23 Is pm.
Schedules
Fri. Sept. 25 7-12 am.
V A
4
Union 346, 347, 349
-ST: r 3
> - / *"

3Jrfitrlcrs
Adjacent Kinfts Food Host
X-TRA quick watch repair
Diamond Setting JLy
Ring sizing
Jewelry repairs
Charms soldered
Trophies- plaques YK
Florida crest jewelry /mV
Lavaliers
Class rings {
Ena raving led
1802 W. Univ... 2 Blks. from Hub
BECK BECHTOLD 3731025



** T -***,. *. 4
AT CSBP MEETING

Uhlfelder Opposes
Activities Increase

By MARYANNE GILLIS
Alligator Writer
I am firmly against an
increase in the activities fee,
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder said Thursday.
Uhlfelder, speaking at a
meeting of the statewide Council
of Student Body Presidents
(CSBP) in the J. Wayne Reitz
Union, discussed the problem of
the allocation of the student
activity fees.
When we need money, we
use the excuse that we can keep
hitting the students, Uhlfelder
said. The support of our
colleges and our universities is
the responsibility of every
taxpayer and every
corporation in the state.
I AM FIRMLY against an
increase in the activities fee,
because it would mean an
increase in tuition, he said.
The dinner meeting, held each
year the night before the Board
of Regents meeting, is an
attempt to gain by talking,
Uhlfelder said. It is to inform
more than to formulate policy.
Steve Anderson, new staff
advisor to the board,
communicates to the Board of
Regents the problems discussed
at meetings from the student
point of view.
The possibility of a tuition
increase was a common problem
with all the represented
universities. FSU Comptroller
Marc Sussman said that FSU
President John Marshall felt
there definitely would be an
increase in tuition and was in
favor of an increase in the
activities fee in order to give

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YOU ARE IMPORTANT
Men and women everywhere are searching for ways to add
meaning to their lives. They want to accomplish something
significant. You are an individual with your own needs and
goals. Let Air Force ROTC help you satisfy those important
goals. The Air Force officer is a member of the changing
profession. He is concerned with improving conditions in
society today. You can be an Air Force officer. You can take
an active role by contributing your ideas and skills to a better
America. The Air Force needs your strength and imaginative
ideas. Join a team of concerned dedicated individuals by
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self-fulfillment as an Air Force officer dedicated to enriching
society.
Get the answers to your specific questions concerning Air
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You do not incur any military obligation by enrolling in MAF
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scholarships. We encourage you to come over to room 206 in
the Military Building and rap with us about your future and
ours. ______

iffl
|
Hi m jit yM
STEVE UHLFELDER
.. .proposes alternatives
the students a piece of the
raise.
UNIVERSITY OF South
Florida (USF) Student Body
President John Greer said
however there was no bill
prefiled with the state legislature
for a tuition increase and
nothing in the state budget
request to suggest a forthcoming
increase.
Alternatives to increasing the'
tuition fee in order to gain more
activities funds include cutting
from some areas and readjusting
in others, Uhlfelder said.
Florida Atlantic University
Student Body President Miles
McGrange is working with an
educational corporation to send
out questionnaires to all
students dealing with the use of
activities fees. Suggested services
are bail bond service, legal
services and day care centers.
Food service is taking on new
forms at state universities. Greer
explained that USF now has a
competitive catering service.

We have four cafeterias spread
over the campus, he explained.
Two different food services
cater them. It promotes moic
competition, which results in
better food and cheaper prices.
UHLFELDER SAID UF is
working toward a different type
of program. We are going
toward a stage where we will
have two central cafeterias,
possibly in the Union and one in
central campus, he said. The
others will sell food wholesale to
students so that they can cook
in their rooms.
Anderson brought up the
problem of teacher evaluation
and passed out copies of revised
evaluation objectives and rules,
and a report on the evaluation
program as it has been
conducted.
Progress was made at FSU,
Sussman said, when the
paperwork in the evaluation was
shortened and extended to
include course evaluation.
Ralph Glatfelter, president of
Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK),
sponsor of the UF teacher
evaluation, suggested the
evaluations include some specific
questions requested by ODK.
The results of those questions
would be published for the
students, while any other
questions requested by the
administration for purposes of
tenure and promotions would
remain unpublished.

*
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THE MOVEMENT II V\'T^iJj|
A novel of campus
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Monday. September 21* 19)0, The Florid*'Alii get or, 1

Page 7



Page 8

I, Thf Horida AMlfetor, Moodey,Sapngrfaf 21, WO
C: *' v v > * v c , / *, v r 4 v* 5 r ryz

EDITORIAL
Open Mouth,
Remove Thumb
The time has come to take our thumbs out of our
mouths.
- Young children can afford the luxury of sucking their
thumbs while living in a fairy tale world.
Adults cannot.
We claim to be adults. The time has come to prove it.
As we start another quarter and another year we must be
willing even eager to squarely face the problems which
. confront us. This means leaving our fairy tale world behind.
The time has come to live up to the responsibilities
which come with the privilege of American citizenship.
In this, an election year, every American has the
responsibility of deciding £or himself who are the best
qualified candidates, and working to see them elected.
Sure, some of us may not be 21, and eligible to vote. But
more and more students are working on political campaigns
this year.
You don't have to be 21 to ring a doorbell.
The time has come to examine the priorities of our
university. Here, as elsewhere across the country, students
are beginning to question the importance of athletics.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder has said UF has
major league athletics and minor league academics. Is that
the way we want it?
Sure, its fun to spend Saturday afternoon cheering the
Gators. But adults must know when to sacrifice fun and
*
games for more importariTthings.
The time has come to consider the methods of
changing our system, both from within and without.
Non-violent demonstrations are good. They create a
feeling of unity within the group and provide an outlet for
suppressed emotions.
They soothe.
But when a demonstration is over, what do we really
have? Are they really enough?
More constructive alternatives might be initiated with the
same amount of time and effort..
Pacifiers are great for toddlers.
But the time has come for us to walk away from all that.
Trouble Ahead?
ITEM: UF attorney Tom Biggs asks Gainesville City
Commission to pass an ordinance supporting a university
ruling which prohibits alcholic beverages on Florida Field.
To enforce the ruling a ban on liquid containers was also
put into effect.
ITEM: Rumors of a dorm crackdown produce several
resignations of residents advisors. They're making us
policemen not counselors, one RA was quoted as saying.
QUERY: Is the UF administration expecting trouble this
year or actively seeking it? As a Florida legislator once said,
a little bit of repression never hurt anyone.
STOOiwinES
__ FIRST SPIRO |
ALARM |

The
Florida
Alligator
The future is not a
gift: it is an achievement

L-
"Halleluiah! Halleluiah!"
i- Fluted =r mP
[ i J K u .. :
Fluting Columns
t PHII, rh

Fluted Columns? Fluted
columns?
What does that mean, that
Fluted Columns stuff?
YOUR BELOVED Fluted
Columnist has decided to start
the year off right with a
full-blown explanation of our
enigmatic column name.
If you remember anything at
all about a rather unpleasant
experience in computerized
learning called (with more than a
little irony) humanities, you
will remember a strange process
by which the Greeks used to
build their temple columns.
Since it was nearly impossible to
carve an entire column out of
solid stone, the Greeks stacked
-
huge disks of granite on top of
each other. Then they carved
grooves from top to bottom to
disguise the fact that the column
was not a solid piece. The
process, known as fluting,
made the whole conglomeration
look like a column instead of
large stack of over-sized granite
checkers which it was.
A fluted column is an
exercise in self-deceit.
AND THIS amalgamation of
large buildings and small minds
which we refer to jocularly as a
university provides a wealth of
material to flute about.
For instance:
The Florida Board of
Regents recently axed Project
CLEO, a' program to get more
blacks into law school via a
summer prep course. On the law
school bulletin board for several
weeks was a letter of
explanation from one of the
Regents on why he voted down
the project. One of the reasons
listed had something to do with
CLEO sounding communistic
in its attempt to make people
equal. The regents continue to
be a rather amusing group of
overstaffed, very comfortable,

Sam Pepper
Editor-In-Chief
... ,
Jeff Klinkenberg
Associate Editor

JOHN PARKER Tfe
: " 1 ui.iLimuiiii. m 'l'.u.'wmmpaap W'" & *

cigar-smoking you-scratch-my you-scratch-myback-and-Ill-scratch-yours
back-and-Ill-scratch-yours you-scratch-myback-and-Ill-scratch-yours
political minor leaguers.
Stevie Wonder OConnell,
our beloved and inspiring
president, has smitten another
powerful blow on the doers of
evil deeds. He has decided to
keep those rowdy alcoholics at
our football games in line by
refusing to let anyone take any
kind of container into the
stands. The reasoning (if such a
term may be so loosely applied)
is that the police wont have a
chance to check every bottle and
ice-chest, so therefore even those
who wish to avoid being scalded
by the Coke prices inside wont
be able to get their iced tea in.
Good thinking Steve.
Except for one thing. Boozers
have never been deterred before
by such piddling rules of
dubious enforcibility, so why
should they now? Indeed, why
did God make flasks and fake
binoculars, except to fool the
overly curious? The end result of
Uncle Steves edict will be that
the boozers will keep on boozing
(and probably having more fun
at it because its taboo) and all
the decent law abidin* folk will
have to pawn their Gator
buttons to keep from dying of
thirst. And let me predict right
now that they raise the price of
Cokes before the seasons over.
Keep flutin Steve. One day
maybe theyll make you Claude
Kirk.
When things are dull on the
local scene, there is always
fluting material on a national
basis. Tricky Dicks latest
comments on education bears

Phyllis Gallub
Managing Editor
Loretta Tennant
News Editor

scrutiny. He says the cause for
the decline in the quality of
education in this country is
dissent on the campus. So heres
what we have to do. First,
everybody forget about a war in
Vietnam which has persevered
through several layers of
weariness, a zone or two of
frustration, whole ionospheres
of anger and is now lodged
securely somewhere between
humor and outright giddiness.
But dont think about it. Forget
that the rivers are running with
sludge and that you can see the
air while you breathe it. Forget
about radiation, starvation and
other forms of mass death.
Forget about the The Bomb.
And then try to forget that
the whole show is being run by a
frustrated bench-warmer and a
cretin side-kick. And then the
quality of education in this
country will skyrocket. Right,
Dick?
Sure, right on. Keep it up
Milhous You are the King
Fluter.
BUT I LOVE it. I love
screarriing my head off at all the
fluting going on. And I havent
even mentioned some of my
favorite organizations, like flats
and sororities, where fluting is
taught on the college level. Nor
did I mention the PTA, FBI or
CIA, all of which undoubtedly
have my phone carefully tapped.
But I dont care. I like
speaking to large groups.
So it looks like its going to be
a great year for fluting and
screaming.
Welcome to the Monkey
House.



SPEAKING OUT

ROTC Not All Bad

The attempted fire-bombing
of UFs ROTC building over the
break cannot be tolerated as a
precedent for protest here. Such
acts of violence can only lead to
the gravest consequences for the
university community.
Fire-bombing is, by no stretch
of the imagination, to be
considered civil disobedience or
any other form of legitimate
difference with the
establishment. It can only be
termed violence which,
regardless of the motivation
behind it, endangers the lives of
fellow students and, in the long
run (especially with the
anti-anything-educational feeling
among Floridas numerous less
enlightened citizens) academic
freedom for all of us.
MOVING ON TO the
probable sentiments behind that
particular act someone seeking
the removal of ROTC from this
and all college campuses.
Anyone enduring two years of
forced ROTC training as I did
(complete with senseless drills
and over-authorized Little
Hitlers) has an understandably
unpleasant view of the military.
Idealistically this nation and
all others in the world should
not need a deadly military threat
to protect itself. That is an ideal
social-heaven I hope will begin
to break in our lifetime,
especially if we, as humanitarian

Alligator Staff
Ron Sachs Anne Freedman
Assignment Editor Feature Editor
Greg Jones Glenda hn
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant
Publnhed by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student Publications Suite,
third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Off lee phones: 392-1686,87,88 or 89.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Al^ B ** ol "f f^orida!
of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Vienna.

and feeling human beings, will
direct our lives to that end. But
brother, were not there yet and
the military is a foul, ugly reality
we must force ourselves to
accomodate (at restricted levels)
for the time being.
NOW THE QUESTION before
us is do we desire that military
to be commanded by West Point
war freaks whose whole training
and indoctrination is the
mechanical destruction of their
fellow man? The only apparent
alternative is ROTC, on this and
many other campuses.
It can hardly be argued that
the military nature of a military
academy graduate is going to be
much more harsh than that of a
campus ROTC product. The
guy, a UF ROTC graduate, is
still a civilian only he is
working out his military
obligation in as reasonable a
manner as possible. The West
Point man intends to devote a
career to the destruction of
living men. I dont think the
description is so far fetched.
So you dont dig ROTC. OK.
Nobodys making you take it
(anymore). Were it not for
ROTC officers, the West Point
crowd surely would have us at
war with the Communist nations
as well as anyone else who
looked at an American flag
cross-eyed.

KEN DRIGGS

IF GEORGE WALLACE had
had the brains, he surely would
have been a West Point man.
If you eliminate ROTC as it
is, think about the replacement
that would surely come about.
Something would fill the void,
and chances are it would be in
army green and very unpleasant
to us all.
If I still havent convinced
you of the sanity of Reserve
Officers Training Corps, please
dont look to explosions as the
answer. You may not agree with
the ROTC cadet, but hes still a
student and still your brother. If
you kill him, like a graduate
student was killed at Wisconsin
this summer, youve killed a
brother just as surely as if youd
pulled the trigger on an M-l and
killed a brother at Kent State.

mm i in I .'.Li i i mi mm-
' |pj|
READERS FORUM I
: I i .n.,

Hippie League
MR. EDITOR:
We just returned from San
Francisco and as members of the
silent majority we would like
to say this about that ...
If Haight-Ashbury is the
major league of hippydom, we
believe they should quickly
change sports ...
We saw no flowers or
love* there-only despair.
We saw no problems being
solved there-only human beings
dying very quickly
If you are considering joining
this team-dont. The warts and
blisters on their feet, the grunge
matted on their bodies, the
decayed reflexes, and the vacant
lode in their eyes is not a
winning sport.
We do care.
THE SILENT MAJORITY
(NAMES WITHELD)
Booze Ban
MR. EDITOR:
Today I received my football
tickets in the mail. Enclosed
with the tickets was a note
explaining the new policy,
concerning the use of coolers
and containers, to be
implemented this fall at Florida
Field.
According to this new policy,

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82,83 or 84
is
M. S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call:

no coolers or containers will be
permitted in the stadium.
Anyone bringing such an item to
the game will be stopped at the
gate by security forces and
denied admission.
Tell me, are your security
forces alsp going to frisk each
patron to make sure there is no
flask in the hip pocket or in the
inside coat pocket? Are your
forces also going to look inside
ladies* purses or a camera bag, or
a binocular case or an
innocent looking paper bag?
These are the methods used to
take alcohol into the stadium.
Odd thing though, I have yet to
see anyone take a bottle from a
cooler. This policy merely
eliminates the mixer, which
means the drinker must purchase
a cold drink in the stadium.
It seems to me that the only
people who will be
inconvenienced by this new
policy are the people who do
. not drink alcoholic beverages at
the games. The drinlris^fan wiH
merely smuggle his bottle in and
mix it with your watered down
twenty-five-cent Cokes. This
leads the logically thinking
person to the conclusion that
you do not wish to stop people
from drinking alcoholic
beverages but rather to force
everyone to buy your watered
down twenty-five-cent Cokes.
It is not enough that you
people who rule our university
have raised the price of tickets
one dollar, have eliminated
half-price tickets for faculty and
staff, and are now charging
students an extra $5 to go to
the games, but you now
declare that we must drink
your watered down
twenty-five-cent Cokes. I say
must because anyone who has
been to a game at Florida Field
knows that no human can
survive three hours in that heat
without a cold drink.
. yself, have been annoyed
trunks at football games. If I
thought your policy would solve
this problem I would allow

*o**,.**i*'X. WO. Th. PMH AWfrtor,

myself to be inconvenienced.
The reasoning behind this
policy, if there was any, was
totally without logic and thus is
doomed to failure. It will,
without a doubt, sell more
Cokes many, many more.
If you really want to stop or
reduce the drinking, have your
securityforces watch for
drinking in the stadium and
enforce the no-drinking law.
Why not try something different
for a change lets
inconvenience the lawbreaker
rather than the innocent.
I will not comply with the
new policy because I have
already served my military
obligation and my days of
unquestioned allegiance to
asinine policies have since
passed.
I do not, as yet, know the
legality of this policy but you
may be sure 1 will investigate
this aspect. You may also be
sure that I will continue to carry
my Thermos filled with iced tea
or lemonade into the stadium ~
and enjoy the Gator games
though there are those who wish
to take this right away.
JOHN G. VALENTI
LETTERS POLICY
s
Letters must:
4 Be typed, signed,
double-apaoed end not exceed
300 words.
Not tie signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addressee and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if
writer dtows Just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
letters for *>aoo.
Writers may submit longer
Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular
column is asked to contact the
editor and be prepared to diow
samples of his work.
~

Page 9



Page 10

>, Ihm Florida Monday, September 2T. 4*7#

Shuttle Buses Service Entire Campus

By CHRIS LANE
Alligator Writor
If footing it around campus just isnt your thing, then
relax, and leave the driving to them. Shuttle bus is here!
Campus buses run continuously frofti7:3o ajn. to 5:30
p.m. providing students with a time- and blister-saving
service for only $8 a year. A six month pass can be
obtained for $4.
Passes are available at the Jennings Hall Cafeteria from
8 ajn to 4:30 p.m.
STUDENTS REGISTERING automobiles on campus
need not purchase a pass. One shuttle bus pass will be
issued at no cost with the original car registration and
decal issue.

Rathskeller Starts New Year
By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Writer
The Rathskeller, UFs German-style beer hall, opened Sept. 15
under new streamlined management.
FINANCING OF beer, food and entertainment will be totally
separate in an effort to make the Rat pay its own way. The faculty
club will continue to control beer sales.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder said current plans call for
the food service to be expanded to offer pizza and delicatessen-type
sandwiches. Servomation-Mathias, UF caterer, will handle the food
service.
Student Government Productions (SGP) will be in charge of
entertainment. Admission prices will vary with the group appearing.
Prices will be the same for members and non-members.
_ ry-
The new Rathskeller Board of Directors will oversee operations.
The board includes representatives from the faculty club, SGP, UF
auxiliary services and Servomation.
ITS A MUCH tighter ship this year because all financial decisions
must go through the board of directors, Mike Brown, assistant
manager, said.
In its first year of operation, the Rat ran up $19,000 in debts. In
the past, the Rathskeller was run wholly by students on one blanket
budget.
All debts have been cleared up and we are starting with a clean
slate, Brown said.
THE RAT will be open from 11 ajn. to 7 pjn. on weekdays unless
special entertainment is planned.
Membership cards will be sold for drinking privileges to UF
students who are 21 years of age or older, to associate members of the
faculty Club and tO UF alumni.

College Loan Aid
Now Available
An appropriation of $243
million is now available to
college students in the form of
low cost loans.
THE FUNDS appropriated by
Congress were released last
week.
The bill containing college
loan appropriations has been
tied up in legislative maneuvers,
and definite allocation on the
university level is not yet
official.
The original bill, suggesting
$175.9 million for the National
Defense Student Loan program,
underwent alteration in the
Senate, raising the sum to $243
million. A Presidential veto was
overridden by Congress, but the
funds were delayed in allocation
to colleges.
THE APPROPRIATED funds
apply entirely to the current
school year and need to be
allocated immediately if they are
to have maximum effect,
according to acting Education
Commissioner Terrell H. Bell.
UF HAS already issued
current loans based on estimates
from the original bill. More than
$1 million has been dispersed to
1,600 UF students.
I. Douglas Turner, director of
student financial aid, said that if
and when additional funds are
officially allocated to UF, a
corresponding number of
student loans will be available
for the current year.

ALIVE Try
AND
WELL

Tonight & every Monday, with old-country meat sauce around
our Italian spaghetti- your fork and mamma miathat real
~ nri WaLmKMf JBBm Italian flavor really comes through.
ainner only yy esnts Make tonight spaghetti night at...
5-9 p.m. 2310 sw 13th st st-5-9
-5-9 st-5-9 p.m. 'r 1505 NW 13th St.

Gresham 16th Drag Inc.
*, .
Registered Pharmacist On Duty
Victor B. Shipley
I ; | F Buddy Patton
STUDENT CHARGE
ACCOUNTS WELCOME
Greeting Cards
Xerox Copies
"'Jf Prescriptions
OPEN WEEK DAYS Gifts
8:30-10:00 PM
SUNDAY: 1605 S.W. 13th ST.
1:00-10:00 rM Phone: 376-2568
"<

Bus stopsare convenient to both commuter (perimeter)
parking lots and residential complexes.
Rules concerning use of the bus pass include the
following:
All passengers must enter by the front door and exit
by the back door.
§ A shuttle bus pass must be presented when boarding
any shuttle bus.
Buses will only stop at designated campus spots to
pick up or discharge passengers.
No passengers will be permitted to stand on the
drivers side of the white line painted on the floor.
Bus passes must be in the rcrnie of the rider and will
not be transferable.

University Students
Required and Approved
Phys. Ed. Clothes
For Men and Women
Men Women
Tee Shirts Bermudas
Shorts Sweat-Suits
Supporters Jamaicas
Shoes-Socks Shirts
Sweat- Suits Shoes-Socks
Gymnastic Slippers
Hand Guards
Hand Balls
Hand Ball Gloves
Fraternity and Sorority Shirts)
Trophies And Sorority Shirts
Also Engravings
_ Jimmy Hughes

ln addition to the campus bus seivice, a double decker
straight from the land of fish and chips leaves the
terminal lot on North-South Drive for the Gainesville Mall
every 30 minutes beginning at 12:45 pjn. The final daily
jaunt departs at 4:45 pjn.
SHUTTLE BUS passes, however? are not honored on
the mall bus and a 25 cent one-way fare is required.
Forty-two bus stops, including one at the sewage plant,
pepper the UF campus over the four separate roarer.
The Norman Hall via Tigert Hall and Med Center routes
run at 10 minute intervals while the Norman Hall via
Sorority Row and Married Housing routes make the
circuit every 15 minutes.
Bus service is provided Monday through Friday.



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You'll actually be taught how Youll hear what the faculty
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We want you to decide for yourself the You'll find this Special Free offer of
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For the first time we are offering a Special Limited Seating Available at Each Lesson.
Speed-Reading Lesson to provide you with Because of limited seating capacity, we ask
a glimpse of what it's like to be able to read that you please call the number listed
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Tim Florid* KMgrtor;

Page 11



!, The Florida AHigator, Monday, September 21,1970

Page 12

'Ecological Paper Cups
Make Servomation Debut

A touch of colorhas been added to Servomation
lines this year. The familiar translucent plastic cups
have been replaced by bright psychedelic paper
ones.
But the change is not to please the eye. It is to
improve the enviomment.
In response to suggestions made last spring by the
Enviornmental Action Group, paper cups which
decompose readily have replaced plastic ones which
decompose at an extremely slow rate.
ACCOR DING TO Hal Barcey, EAG spokesman,
the plastic used in cold drink cups could last as long
as 2,000 years, and a plastic cup thrown on the
ground during the lifetime of Christ would still be
decomposing today.
Herb Houston, director of the Gainesville waste
conversion plant, explains that paper, ground with
other garbage, prodcuces compost used to improve
soil, and helps the enviornment.
IT TAKES A million years to produce the fossil

f Gator Plans Press Council
By REBECCA LUCAS
Alligator Writer
Like the weather, everybody talks about the Alligator and nobody
does anything about it.
But the Alligator is doing something about it.
THE PAPER IS setting up an advisory council to, in the words of
Sam Pepper, fall editor-in-chief, bring us closer to what the
grassroots on this campus think. >
Within the next two weeks, the Alligator plans to choose nine
students and three faculty or staff members to serve on a constructive
new press council. The editor, managing editor and others from
Student Publications will serve on the council.
The idea behind this council is to bring in a.cross-section of campus
opinion on what the Alligator is doing right or wrong. In addition,
the council will make the operation of the paper, and the problems
involved with putting out a daily, responsive to a wider group of
students.
HOWEVER, THE council will have no decision-making power. The
editor will use only those suggestions he feels are relevant.
The council will meet bi-weekly, and will have a moderator and a
secretary. The success of the board depends on the sincere efforts of
council members selected from a broad cross-section of the campus.
Anyone interested in serving on the council should contact Phyllis
Gallub in the Alligator office, 365 Reitz Union.
The staff is seeking people who are actively interested in UF, but
not actively engaged in activities. Students should have an interest in
newspapers, and the Alligator in particular, but no publications
experience is required.
OTSeonI
WM,' HAMBURGER I
NWS ON "tOASTED* BUN I
French Fried Potatoes
\ Tomato Slices on Lettuce
H \ \ m Choice of Beverage
|JH / ( tee Cream with Chocolate Sauce K
AUsl29 I
WELCOME BACK GATORS!
A nACE TO EAT WHILE IN THE MALL
GAINESVILLE MALL

fuel from which the plastic cups are made, Barcey
said, and a hundred years to create the wood pulp
base for the paper cups.
Robert Overton, the director of food services,
agreed to the change. Servomation was able to
acquire paper cups at a cost comparable to the
plastic ones.
I think it significant that the loss of this plastic
cup order will discourage their production, Barcey
said.
Similar investigation concerning Servomation
dishes has producted plastic-coated paper plates.
Overton said customers prefer plastic-coated plates
over flimsy paper ones. The plastic-coated plates are
a compromise acceptable to most
enviromentalist-customers.
The efforts of Overton and Servomation in
putting public responsibility before profit, Barcey
said, are our first successful step toward
establishing UF as a model ecological campus.

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"THE INSURED COLLEGE RING"
YOUR NEW COLLEGE RING IS INSURED | J^j
WHILE IN SCHOOL AGAINST ...
* LOSS OR DAMAGE BY THEFT. ROBBERY,
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Page 13



Page 14

I, Tlw Florida Alligator, Monday, laptaiwfcar 21,1970

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Thai is
the Gat of a three-part aeries on
the drag scene in Gainesville.)
By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
The drug problem in Alachua
County is not only being met by
law enforcement, but also by
people concerned with drug
users.
THE PART of drug use or
abuse, which most concerns UF
students is the hallucinogens
(LSD, psilocybin etc.) and the
speed drugs, such as
amphetamines and methedrine,
and marijuana.
Students have been jailed in
many busts from the police in
Gainesville who have been
cracking down on drugs.
In a recent bust a UF coed
and a Santa Fe Junior College
student were jailed for sale and
possession of marijuana.
But to John /Creech,
coordinator of the Comer Drug
Store, the problem is focused
from another point. His job is
ndt to arrest people who smoke,
drop or shoot up, but rather
to help them with their
particular problem.
THE CORNER Drug Store
was started last January by a
group of concerned UF students,
among them Dave Doucette,
former Alligator managing
editor, to help those students
who were having troubles with
drugs.
From the beginning, the cases
which came into the Drug Store
were the bad trips, the number
of which was fairly high before
the summer quarter began in
June.
Drug Store workers expect
that with the return of students
to UF during the fall quarter,
the number of bad trips will
again increase.
Creech is also concerned
about the bad stuff which is
being sold.
SOME OF THE acid which
has been filtering down in the
area shows it has strychnine

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Drug Store Offers New Services

added to it, and strychnine is a
fairly potent poison which can
cause severe stomach cramps if
taken in a large enough dose.
Since its modest start in a
small house and a handful of
volunteer workers from UF and
Santa Fe Junior College, the
Drug Store has grown.
Its functions have also
increased, besides just treating
bad trips.
Some services, according to
Creech, will be added to offer
alternatives to those who now
are taking drugs. These offerings
will include arts and crafts
groups and encounter groups.
THE DRUG Store is more
than just a service to UF, it is
also for the Gainesville
community in general. Since
January, the Drug Store has
become a United Fund Agency,
and former drug users have been
talking in local high schools on
the dangers of drug use. And
those using the facility are not
all UF students. Students from
local high schools have also
come in with drug problems.
We need volunteers, all kinds
of volunteers, with or without
personal drug experience,
Creech says.
To train those volunteers, a
program will be set up by the
drug store to familiarize the
prospective volunteers with the
process of helping people with a
drug problem.
VOLUNTEERS SHOULD call
John Creech at 392-2331, or
drop by the house 1128 S.W.
IstAve.
According to Creech, the use
j of drugs in the Gainesville area is
widespread. And he considers
the current crackdown on
marijuana to be harmful.
When kids dont have
marijuana they try the hard
stuff, Creech said. I saw this
happen in Nashville, where
Creech worked before for a
project similar to the Comer
Drug Store kids started to
use other stuff.
Which is the other stuff

BAD TRIPS TO BAD 'STUFF'

the harder stuff?
THE ANSWER may be
heroin, but something is being
done about that problem too.
Dr. Robert H. Gervais, an
assistant professor of psychology
at UF, heads a Methadone
maintenance treatment program
in Alachua County.
A Methadone clinic is a
different ball game than the
treatment of hallucinogenic
bummers. Heroin addicts may
have much deeper problems.
Figures from one Kentucky
hospital indicate a cure ratio of
one in four; that is, only 25 per
cent.
WITH METHADONE, the
addicts stop taking heroin, and
start to take Methadone. In
effect, they become addicted to
Methadone, with the important
difference, according to Gervais,
that they are able to function
normally in society.
Former heroin addicts take
about 100 milligrams of
Methadone orally, and this helps
them overcome their problems,
by preventing withdrawal
symptoms.

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The heroin addict, according
to Gervais, is not the person who
shoots up heroin once to try it;
it is rather the user who has to'
take many daily doses of the
drug.
The number of heroin addicts
in this area is not known by
Gervais, although the program
has been set up to accommodate
from six to 16 addicts.
THE ONLY indication of the
possibility of heroin addiction in
Gainesville comes from the
heroin found by local law

Big Led
wants tc meet
big blue.
Cbject: purple.

enforcement agencies during
arrests of drug dealers.
Another indication might be
in the sale of cough syrups
which contain narcotics, used to
lessen withdrawal symptoms by
heroin addicts.
Gervais said local druggists are
withdrawing cough syrups which
contain narcotics from their
stock.
Gervais will be at the Reitz
Union Sept. 30 at 7:30 pjn. to
speak on the program, and
interested persons are welcome.



Notional Job Market Tight
For Recent Graduotes

NEW YORK (UPI) College
diplomas, passports to instant
security several years ago, today
go begging in many segments of
the job market.
This is the worst September
since 1958, and there are no
signs things are picking up, said
Bill Pickle, head of Georgia
Techs placement office. Ten
per cent of our September 1970
graduating class have no job and
absolutely no plans.
THE CURRENT business
slump, with over-all
unemployment at 5.1 per cent,
has cut campus recruiting to the
lowest level in 10 years,
according to the University of
New Hampshire.
Dan McCleary, a June
graduate of a small eastern
college, gave up after looking a
month for a job around San
Francisco. I answered one ad,
he said, and the man said over
100 people had been there
before me. That cooled it for
me.
There are twice as many job
hunters in our files this year
than last, said John G. Young,
placement director for the

GATOR SHOP
P.E. CLOTHES
Gym shorts Sweat pants & shirts
Supporters Converse tennis shoes
T-shirts Converse basketball shoes
(black & white)
We are also your
Headquarters for ADIDAS
shoes. We have Gazelle,
Mexicana, Italian, and
Olympiad brands.
Handball gloves
Ace and Seamless handballs.
Van Heusen shirts
Flares by LEE RIDER and LEVI
Levi blue jeans corduroy,
white and tan jeans.
bit as
1710 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE
' Across From 7~
Murphree Area
.

College of Engineering at the
University of Michigan.
The Labor Department
reports that unemployment of
persons 24 and under, including
college and high school
graduates but not in a
break-down manner, rose 16 per
cent compared with 13.9 per
cent last June-July, the annual
two-month survey period.
A CHECK of placement
directors at 42 colleges and
universities in 19 states, 11 major
companies in seven states,
technical schools, and state,
federal and commercial
employment agencies
underscored the Labor
Department statistics.
Aside from the general
business recession, these officials
cited the following reasons for
the tough job situation for
graduates:
Government cutbacks in
research funding and grant
spending and in space and
defense projects, hurting
graduates in engineering,
electronics, the humanities and
the social sciences.
Lower draft calls putting

more job seekers on the market.
Returning servicemen,
especially officers, taking jobs
which once went to graduates.
THERE ARE. spots not so
dark in the graduate picture.
Job demand is down but
good students still have no
difficulties, said Stanley Fisher
at the engineering branch of the
University of Louisville.
Local Art Show
Begins Wednesday
A public art show featuring
the work of local artists will be
held Wednesday and Thursday
on the second floor of the Reitz
Union. Sponsored by the Florida
Quarterly in conjunction with
the Union Programs Office, the
show will run from 11 a.m.-9
p.m. both days.
There will be no registration
for artists although they are
required to show their own
work.
Jessica Everingham, editor of
the Florida Quarterly, said plans
are to make it
a quarterly function.

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Welcome new student wives.
If you are a Registered Nurse,
Typist (45 WPM) or Secretary
(45 WPM Typing and Shorthand);
\
* v
we may have the job you are seeking!
Please call 392-1222 for testing 7
and interview appointment.
CENTRAL EMPLOYMENT
Second Floor, "The Hub"
University of Florida
"Equal Opportunity Employer"

[[about getting a message across?)
[Alligator TBSONAt ads it|

Monday, Septombor 21,1970, Tha Florida AlHftor,

Reflections.
A new album
from The Lettermen.
Contains generous
helpings of past,
present, future;
well mixed and
gently stirring.
Ingredients:
Reflections
My Girl
Close To You
Touch Me
Up on the Roof
A Natural Man
Since Youve Been Gone
Make It With You
The Sun Aint Gonna
Shine Any More
Hey, Girl _____
love
joy
happiness.
THE LETTERMEN
REFLECTIONS
@
Capitol

Page 15



Page 16

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 21,1970

Blacks Demand Bottles Banned

By CARL CRAWFORD I^
Alligator Writar
While a majority of UFs
student body was on vacation
this summer, topics ranging from
demands from the Black Student
Union to a ban on containers in
Florida Field during football
games were discussed and acted
upon.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell announced Sept. 10
that all containers will be
banned from Florida Field in an
attempt to keep alcoholic
beverages out of football games.
This action has already drawn
reaction from Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder.
The BSU made five demands
on UF administrators this
summer, the major one being the
recruitment and admission of
500 black students from a total
of 2,800 freshmen, and
continuation of UFs Critical
First Year Program.
THE CRITICAL First Year
Program was designed to help
disadvantaged freshmen with
their economic problems.
Other demands include the
"following:
Formation of a Department
of Minority Affairs to replace
the office of minority affairs.
The BSU said the new
department should be headed by
Roy Mitchell, present director of
the office for minority affairs.
He would have a vice vicepresidential
presidential vicepresidential title.
Black administrators to
coordinate the recruitment of
black faculty.
Hiring of a black assistant
manager in personnel.
Recruiting and hiring black
faculty members reflecting the
ratio of black students in the
first demand. (This ratio is 18 per
cent, black to white high school
graduates.)
UFs administration is
reviewing the demands, and
Student Government has acted
in support of the BSU.
We will do our part by
helping the BSU in their high
school recruitment programs and
by supplying them with what
money we can, Uhlfelder
pledged.
THE RECRUITMENT
program would involve going to
W Nw in friendship,
in warm community...
we are a happy family.
We experience fulfillment
in living totally
for God's children.
Join us as a Priest
Brother.
.; v r-
Write to Father Joseph
I The Trinitarian#
I Grey Rock
i Garrison, Maryland 21055 I
i
| Name Age
I I
! 1
J Address j
I I
I
j 1 r? 2p i
i i
School Now Attending Year -~

SUMMER QUARTER HIGHLIGHTS

high schools around the state
and, in Uhlfelders words,
convincing people we are not a
racist school .**
The University Senate banned
the presence of guns in residence
halls and their transportation on
campus by students. This ban
applies to anyone on campus
with the exception of the
university police.
Uhlfelder also asked for more
student control over activity

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MINORITY VICE PRESIDENT?
... blacks demand Roy Mitchell

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He really bugs you.
>

Sometimes hes called a Germ. Other times
hes known as an Accident." And hes bad
news for you and your family.
Maybe you don't recognize the rascal from
our picture. But you're familiar with what he
causes. The flu, strep throat, mumps, mono mononucleosis,
nucleosis, mononucleosis, broken bones and often worse.
In fact, thousands of college students will
require hospitalization during the next year.
It adds up to a lot of money and lost hopes.
Because the resulting financial strain often
marks the end of a college career.

fees. Action on this request
includes formation of a
committee to review student
suggestions for spending activity
fees.
THIS COMMITTEE would
present its recommendations to
Uhlfelder, who would then make
formal recommendations to
OConnell.
The Student Senate asked for
a halt of mass testing methods.
Student Senator Bill Gillmore,

.. ; v
BLUE CROSS #9! BLUE SHIELD
Amrican Hospital Association. R National Association of Blue Shield Plans.
.

who introduced the resolution in
the senate, said (( This is not to
say that objective testing is bad,
but that mass standardized
testing achieves few of the
objectives of the general

The First Presbyterian Church
I ;
106 SW 3rd Street
CORDIALLY INVITES YOU
September 27th at 5:30 P.M.
Supper-Fellowship Hall
If you are interested in coming:
Your Name
Dorm Name
Someone from our church will get
in touch with you.

Be prepared. Join the low cost, Student
Government sponsored Blue Cross and Blue
Shield University of Florida Student Program.
The comprehensive benefits will help pay your
hospital and doctor bills if you're hospitalized
by an illness or accident.
Get full details and an application form at
the Student Government office or call the
Blue Cross and Blue Shield office at 376-1286.
Deadline for enrolling is Octpber 8.

courses.
Homecoming Slogan Contest
Chairman Jacquie Bolling
announced the theme for the
1970 homecoming: Gators
Create New Decades Fate.



Dickey's Machine On The Move

Doug Dickey has faced more
problems than he probably
expected to in the short eight
and a half months since that
weird turnover of events that
brought him and a number of his
assistants he& to take over
anew, not where now-Gator
Athletic Director Ray Graves
left off.
First came the player reaction
to his coming down to old
Flawreeda, especially that of
flashy Cuban-born, All-American
flanker Carlos Alvarez. Then
came the not-yet-completed
NCAA investigation of that same
move. The completion of spring
training left much to be desired,
because Dickey said that he
couldnt learn those things he
should learn about a team in the
short four weeks of practice.
Reason was, he said, was because
of key injuries to players who
might be able to help us in the
fall,'* leaving him waiting until
September to see how it was to
be.
THAT, PEOPLE you must
already know by now, is just to
mention a few, a very few.
The Cuban Comet came up
a little lame, but would be okay,
Dickey said.

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REAVES SETS TO THROW
... Tampa junior hit WaMI

Kgl||j KEN MCKINNON |B|

With an added five minutes
Saturday-last, Duke may have
very well beaten Dickey in his
Florida Debut in the Gator
Bowl, but that was not to be.
THE GATORS, and, without
a doubt, the coaches were all
wearing themselves thin in those
few weeks before the Duke game
was finally to be left only to the
discretion of Florida fan
memories and whatever history
books there may be to ledger
such events.
The team that was to be
Florida's best-ever still had not
answered the oh-so-many
questions that people who watch
this big-time game had waited so
long to have answered.
The inevitable was to happen.
POTENTIAL-ALL
AMERICAN" Fred Abbott
decided he would have no more
of what he said was once a game,
but now only played under the
guise of that word, that he
wouldn't play in Dickey's
emotionless football machine,"

that he would Be an animal no
longer.
Tension became unbearable,
emotions flared, but to the
rescue this time came team
captains Mike Kelley and Donny
Williams. They, and other
seniors and juniors on the squad,
Dickey said, picked up the
pieces and brought things back
where they should b& in order to
win football games.
And win they did.
WHAT A DIFFERENCE a
win can make. Everything begins
to take on a different
complexion.
The coaches dont seem as
worried about making the
system work, as Mike Kelley
said that he thought they had
worried before, causing them to

The
F1 ori d a
Alligator

Gators Have Smoothness
And Successive Victories

By PHIL PETTI JOHN
Alligator Sports. Writer
The Florida football machine,
like any other prototype,
sputtered at first. But under the
skilled, calculated hands of Doug
Dickey it has begun to run with
a polished smoothness.
In his first year at Florida
Dickey has already
demonstrated the cool efficiency
that gained him a 46-154 record
in six years at Tennessee.
Dickey began work four
weeks ago on a team that had
many of the makings of a fine
football team.
He had John Reaves to pass.
Tailback Tommy Durrance, last
years Southeastern Conference
scoring leader and hard-running
fullback Mike Rich returned in
the backfiekL
Willie Jackson, Floridas first
black football player emerged at
the flanker position.
This combination was rated as
possibly the most potent
offensive punch in the nation.
But along with this Dickey
also inherited from Ray Graves,
who gave up coaching to devote
his full time to athletic director,
an inexperienced offensive line,
a corp of young linebackers, a
general lack of depth and a
score of aggravating injuries.
But working with military
efficiency, which is part of his
background, Dickey, and an
assembly of assistants, installed
his system and made it work.
In his first game against Duke,
Dickey tried his system out, and
as he said, lucky to come out
with a winner 21-19.
His offense only hinted at
what they were capable of.
Reaves had an average night and
came away calling himself a
robot" after offensive Coach
Jimmy Dunn relayed plays from
the pressbox to the sideline and
then to Reaves.

be a little harder than maybe
they would be in a normal
situation. And John Reaves said
that he may have acted
immaturely when he said that he
felt like a robot after the
Duke game because of the
amount of plays called by his
coaches, that mainly he was
disappointed with his
performance in Jacksonville.
Now the thunder of
dissension among the Gators,"
that was heard so distinctly
earlier last week, has been
quieted to less than a murmur.
All because of a decisive, sure
victory.
AND, NOT to miss the fact,
or chance to say, Douglas
Dickey's outlook on life has,
happily for him, taken on a
different complexion.
So, too, has it for countless
numbers of Gator fans.
Yes, the Dickey machine has
arrived. Maybe one player

The offensive line protected
Reaves, but the Duke defense
never really applied pressure
here.
The defense, given difficult
field position all night showed
character Dickey said, by
stopping the Blue Devils four
times within the Florida 10.
Split end Alvarez said a win
is a win and that is all that
counts.
But in the days that followed,
as the Gators tuned up for
Mississippi State, the team and
coaches showed that winning
was not enough.
Dickey, the perfectionist,
demanded more.
Middle linebacker Fred
Abbott, called by the coaches a
potential All-American, quit the
team as murmurs of dissent on
the team grew to a rumble.
Reaves' statements about the
coaches calling all the plays
appeared all over the nation.
Other players grumbled about
the system that Dickey had
imposed on them. Some others
even spoke of following Abbott
away from what the Brooksville
sophomore called an
emotionless football machine"

;' .. " : '. '
K s
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S- % V' f *
XMIL BANNISTER
DURRANCE GETS 6
... agrinst Duke Saturday4a*t

Monday, Saptambor 21,1070, Tha Florida Alligator,

K# BULL GATOR DICKEY
... machine bin motion
couldn't accept it. He had his
own reasons, many good ones at
that.
My guess is, though, that if it
wins football games, then all
those people who would bet
their lives on a Gator football
game will take it with no
questions asked.

that had stripped his personal
pride.
But Dickey, who requires a
more stable fuel than emotion
for his football machine, would
not allow it.
Following the outburst of
dissention the team began to
unite and the spirit built.
Dickey primed his machine.
Well be better this week,
he predicted.
And they were.
The Gator offense showed
what they could do.
Reaves completed 14 of 25
passes for 272 yards, most of it
in the first half.
Jackson emerged as a threat
on the other side of the field.
The 210-pound flanker grabbed
four passes for 105 yards and
drew ovations from the soberest
crowd ever to watch Florida
play at home7
He didn't do anything in the
game that we hadn't seen him do
in practice, Dickey said Sunday
after reviewing the films. He
will be a threat that will make
our entire passing attack more
effective.
On the ground Durrance and
(SEE 'GATORS' PAGE 181

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 21,1970

Gators Smooth In 2nd Win

j^^TOPAGT|I72j
Rich accumulated most of the
Gators adequate 157 yards
rushing behind the young
offensive line.
We are not big in the line,"
Dickey said. It will not be
difficult to out muscle us there.
.The offensive line allowed
defenders to get to Reaves four
times for a minus 40 yards.
On defense the Gator
secondary played cautious and
although came close, to Dickeys
dismay, never came up with an
interception.
But the defensive backs never
allowed the highly rated Sammy
Milner (88) or David Smith (11)
to get behind them.
Y6U can't play people like
that tight, Dickey said. If you
do you get stung.
With Jack Youngblood and
sophomore Eddy Moore out of
the defensive line Dickey had to
bring up less experienced
players.
But they did the job of
blocking up the middle that had
concerned Dickey after the
Duke game.
We just got more done on
defense this week, Dickey said.
We have a depth problem in the
line but the boys (Jan Gowland,
Walter Hutchinson and Tim
Good) that played at the ends
did a fine job.
The worst aspect of the

Koosman Two-Hitter
Paces Met Win, 4-1

NEW YORK Jerry Koosman
snapped the New York Mets
four game losing streak by
pitching perfect ball for the first
five innings and went on to pitch
a two-hitter as the Mets downed
the Pittsburgh Pirates 4-1 in the
first game of a doubleheader.
The victory moved the Mets
to within two and a half games
of the league leading Pirates in
the tight National League east
race.
KOOSMAN HAD retired the
first IS batters he faced before
Jose Pagan drilled a home run
over the 396-foot mark in left
center field to lead off the sixth
inning. j
The win was number 11
against seven defeats for
Koosman. He spent the early
part of the season on the
disabled list for a sore arm.
*ick
t
MONTREAL Ron Fairly
knocked in two runs with an
eighth inning double off reliever
Ferguson Jenkins as the
Montreal Expos defeated the
Chicago Cubs 64.
The Cubs held a 4-2 lead
going into the inning when Jim
Gosger, Rusty Staub and Bob
Baily hit consecutive singles off
loser Phil Regan. Gosger scored
and Jenkins made his first relief
appearance in over a year as he
faced Fairly. Fairly doubled
down the first baseline to score
Staub and Baily with the tying
and winning runs.
The loss, coupled with the
Pirates loss to the New York

performance was the Gators
inability to cover on kickoffs.
The middle opened up to
allow State runners opening
there time after time.
The problem is two-fold as
Dickey explains it.
George Wester, whose
soccer-style kicking replaces
injured Youngbloods high
kickoffs, booted the ball low
and didnt give the defenders
time to get under it.
We also were overrunning
the ball carrier on the outsides,
Dickey said. This is something
we have worked hard on, and
will have to work on much
more.
When Dickey says hell work
more, you can believe it.
On Saturday night after the
game, instead of holding a press
cocktail party like Graves did
when coach, Dickey, a
non-drinker himself, chooses
instead to go over the game
films.
This is indicative of the mans
style. It is part of his system.
It may not allow room for the
personal relationships that the
team, most of whom played
under the Graves staff, would
like to have, but it is a winning
system.
It carried Tennessee to five
bowls and two SEC crowns in
six years, while making Dickey
the leagues coach of the year
three times.
We had a good game against
State, Dickey said, but it was

Mets in the first game of their
doubleheader, left the Cubs one
and a half games behind.

I I the Gainesville 1 jrFH
ngj Wllj;Ar
< Ccrt&diyh TWIG IS THE PLACE TO SHOP IN G'VILLE.
Jt \\ W I Pantsuits or jumpsuits, jeans and leather vests, suede bags am.
if'/ belts> ethnic look P nts kir, *- vests. Mini, midi or
I yiulj V I maxi.. .whatever's right.. .is at TWIG!
Ty- I\j m2 J | Boots Just for fun.. .at TWIG!
~ C ill I Something in orange or navvfor the game? Maybe a scarf to perk
p :: 4 up a pantsuit? It's at TWIG! |
| Branos.. .country set, lady bug, modem iunior. mister pants,
twig campus....at 1131 w. university ave.~ college town, jerell, rompin.. .they re all at TWIG!

not our best. We still lack the
polish that I think we are
capable of and that we will need
to win the rest of our games.
Dickeys system promises
continual. improvement. And
with Alabama the next
opponent on the schedule it will
take some to continue the
winning ways.

Like to get
off your CAN?
. *
Let EAG help. The Environmental Action Group is
striving to save our dwindling natural resources through
recycling.
We need your help. Now is the time for you to volunteer
your services in helping to save our environment. Beginning
in Mid-October, 100 containers will be placed on campus for
the proper disposal of aluminum and tin cans.
These cans will then be transported to Jacksonville where
they will be recycled. But this will only work if everyone
cooperates by using the containers.
a
Any student interested in working to fight polution please
contact the EAG office, 323 Reitz Union, or call 392-1635.
Now is the tiipe to get involved and get off your can.
Environmental Action Group
a m
v =T 2. : __ M

Sebastians Shop v t~T"
This fAorihs Special for V. W. Drivers
"Lube, oil change, dean air & oil filter, and
dutch and brake adjustment all for $3.95
Normal cost $11.50 -a savings of $7.55
Just clip out this adpresent it at
Sebastians 535 S.W.4th Ave.and
take advantage of this special
PHONE 376-8476



YOU ARE CAREFUL WITH YOUR MONEY NOT SO SHOP
ANNIVERSARY SALE
OOWMKMMM THE S^UAft WALKING DISTANCE FROAL THE CAMPUS
Anniversary Sale [fcffJlSff'/
$3.99 n FASHION\ Jjgr^lp
DASH from I Mr
u r , M.m Shop HEAD tii I n n\ \
s,r ** ,Floor HEMLINE | W-llr''
Nationally Known, I mi- : vf|
HjH Nationally Advertised I mU
H Veopround w.i9/.lf --vJo If IfcWIW
wH Sizes 29-42 Fine selection fjj m
V| of light and dark tones. 1
- Anniversary Jfcfe jm. SWEATER SUITS
JlMr Sale s 99 |pS| 4gp Sweaters and skirts and
sweaters and slacks in
You May Be A WINNER smart sets. Two and three
1 'l Register at Wilsons. Aife piec st Y les Mix them
\\( W\ 14 gift certificates given match fhem and have
Vi each week Second Floor JL& W wardrobe that "suits" you.
_ _____ Jslla % oris j2 - mo
SWEATERS lgr~ Anniversary Sale $12.99
Famous Brand flvVpili selection of solid colors and prints. MmrJm
Cardigans and Anniversary Sale s4.99^^^!
Or'-gTiT SHOP WILSON'S 9:30-9 slacks mB
Anniversary Sale $7.99 by Evem Eve/yn Pearson stretch in mm Fl
and I Appel 100% Orion, JH^I
All-Weather The long and the short styles 100% Dacron fljlft
TAPKRTS whichever you favor for dorm, polyester. MBBM
n i Li wear. Beautiful colors and Wahaff Wlu K
Water repellent durab washable tool Zip-up and Medium and Hi M
It. and dark tones in imijSMm fli button-front styles. dark tones Mr V I \m H
65% Dacron poly. Orig. sl2-s2l ; j- B M
35% combed cotton I SALE $9.99-$16.99 1 0r '9- Sl4-Sl6 gjp
Anniversary Sale $10.99 Sale $8.99 W

Monday, Saptembar 21,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 21,1970

Page 20

FOR SALE
ONE of the finer things of life Blue
Lustre Carpet and upholstery cleaner.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
Bob cats, coons, skunks, ferrets,
squirrels, monkeys, parrots, hawks,
ducks, foxes, snakes, turtles, for sale,
trade or we will buy. Call 475-2546
or 475-2181 local. (A-10t-63-p)
YAMAHA 125, good running
condition, complete with luggage
rack and 2 helmets. First 160 takes
it. Call 378-7355. (A-2t-63-p)
Stereo, Excellent condition. 3 yrs
old, 100 watt, sansul amp, 2 akal sw
130 spkrs. Sony 260 tape recorder,
$350 or separate. 378-9577 after
3:00. (A-st-63-p)
Honda 9, 40 mos old trail bike In
very good condition. Call 372-2533
day 378-9646 night. S3OO will
discuss price. (A-4t-63-p)
Headquarters for tennis, golf, guns,
water sports, handball, sports shoes,
fishing, physical fitness, team sports.
B & B SPORTS CENTER, 5320 N.W.
13th St. 378-1461. (a-st-63-p)
Reg Half Arabian Filly: elegant head
and carriage. In show shape. It has
been stalled and fitted for 6 mo. 15
mo. old, blue gray. SSOO Her Dam
Sells open .S3OO. 372-8558.
(A-st-63-p)
1967 Honda 305 cc Superhawk.
Excellent condition. $425, call Dick
at 376-8194. (A-st-63-p)
1966 El Camino, 396eng., 4 sp.,
mags, many extras, 1195. 1967
Yamaha 250 Big Bear. Been in
storage, only 4600 miles, like new.
Call 378-1267. (A-st-63-p)
Nice Furniture: Door-desk and desk
chairs, wight tables 9x12, axmlnster
rug and pad, porch rug, childs
folding table and 4 chairs, throw
rugs, antique mah. coffee and end
tables, etc. Phone 378-3188.
(A-lt-63-p)
Portable typewriter owners. We will
dean, adjust, lubricate & Install new
ribbon on your machine for only
$14.50 and guarantee our work. This
month only a savings of over SIO.OO.
Dont miss out. JR Office Furniture
Co. 620 S. Main St., phone
376-1146. (A-10t-63-c)
Walnut finished study desk with 2
drawers, modern styling. While they
last ONLY $29.50. Why buy used
Junk7 We sell new for less. JR Office
Furniture Co., 620 S. Main St.,
phone 376-1146. (a-10t-63-c)
Why buy used Junk? We sell new for
less. All metal, in black or gray. 2
drawer file cabinet NOW $19.95, 4
drawer file cabinet NOW $32.50. JR
Office Furniture Co., 620 S. Main
SL, phone 376-1146. (A-10t-63-c)
YAMAHA 60 cc only 4500 ml.
Helmet included, SIOO. Call
376-0126. (A-st-63-c)

t 1
Todays 1
more for your money meal I
moisorrs
CAFETERIA I
J 1 I
j MONDAYS FEATURE j I
2 BAKED CHOPPED STEAK J
> J with Hash Brown Potatoes... I I
o l 79 cents J
; I la I
| j TUESDAYS FEATURE J § I
I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN I
I ALL YOU CAN EAT..., |
J .1..
I Tr L |
LUNCH: 11H 2 SUPPER:4:3O HI 8 FREE PARKING I
moisons
CBFETERIB beyond comparison!
X .. street inthe Gainesville Mtlt rgfcs. hM
;v

FOR SALE
250 cc Motorcycle, good condition,
new tag, plus bell helmet, $lB5. Call
Bill 373-1561 or see at 103 N.W. 10
st. apt. no. 2. (A-2t-63-p)
69 Yamaha 350. Needs some work.
Best offer over S4OO. 68 Honda 125
street scrambler, good condition,
great transportation. Call Tom,
392-7200. (A-st-63-p)
FOR RENT
Female to share house, own
bedroom. $47 mo plus 1/3 utilities.
Must like animals. 12 string guitar
S9O. Also strange beads strung? 1012
NW 4 Ave. (B-2t-173-p)
HELP WANTED
Hammond Organist needs
exceptional musicians for rock group.
Lead, bass, drums, and vocalists. I
compose my own music. Randy
Soellner 2-7938. (E-st-63-p)
liITTf'M I LAST 2
DAYS
AT....1:55 4:28 70)1 9:39
4 V --
LAST 4
DAYS
The Love
Doctors
I AT....2:17 4:04
5:517:419:31 [ft]

k V jn,_
->* ' .V
To Put Out The Florida Alligator
FEATURES
SPORTS
ENTERTAINMENT
LAYOUT
REWRITE
ASSIGNMENTS
WIRE EDITOR
EDITORIAL
COLUMNISTS
GENERAL REPORTING
PHOTOGRAPHERS
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SECRETARIES
CLERKS
TYPISTS
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S-
4,
! '*>'
df
Need a Job This Quarter?
' v <
Staff Meeting: Tomorrow 9PM Alligator offices
VISIT
The Florida Alligator
ROOM 330, J. WAYNE REITZ UNiON
UNIVERSITY OF FLORI9A-
M "A- \
.| < j



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED
Are you a hurtin 1 gator? Need some
coins? Part or full time sales help
needed (m or f) set your own hours!
$2.50 to $5.00/hr. guaranteed to
service established customers.
Transportation needed. Call
378-0421 between 3 and 8 pm. Ask
for Ed Marquez. (E-st-63-p)
;
a
a
aaaaaaaaa.aa a a a a a a a a
AUTOS
tWf.mV.W.W.W.W.W.W.WS.WS.V.'S.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS.
YOUR NEW VOLVO FIAT MG
AUSTIN DEALER. 506 E.
UNIVERSITY. WE SERVICE ALL
IMPORTS. (G-st-63-p)
v : r '. '*
J
; 1

15H nufTlM 1 J yJ jiflfllLr
I THOMAS ;'
I
I T** W CLIFF ROBERTSON., I
TECNMCMN

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa #% a
aaaaa a a a.a a < a > a t a t a # a < a > a < a > a # t > a > a # # t a > a
AUTOS
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a

a a a a a a a aaaaa
LARGEST of USED IMPORTS IN
Nth. CENTRAL FLORIDA.
HARFRED AUTO IMPORTS, 1946
N. MAIN. (G-6t-63-p)
1970 Karmann Ghia VW, 9000 mi.
Empi equipped: 2 barrel carb, ram
Indkit, mag wheels + radials & many
extras. $2795 or best offer, 378-9577
after 3. (G-st-63-p)
PE RSONA L
****a*aa*aaaaaaaeeeeaeeaaeaeeeeeieeeee
When nothing works, leather works!
For custom pants, jackets, sandals,
moccassins, bags, belts, 16 NW 13th
St. Home made goodness and mercy.
(J-lot-63-p)
Happiness is receiving a free
transistor radio; a free U of F coffee
mug. Call 378-2167 for information
or see details on Miami Herald in
todays Alligator. (J-3t-63-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light, steno, etc.
373-1984, 9-5. (M-st-173-p)
HORSES BOARDED SLEEPY
HOLLOW HORSE FARM; Finest
facilities, complete care, stalls,
pasture, trails, 300 ft. ring, close to
Univ., ph 373-1059. (M-st-63-p)
GREEKS! Check your bulletin board
to order PARTY PHOTOS;- Prints
ordered by Wed. are delivered Thurs.
or Fri. at dnner. PHOTOS by STAN.
(M-lt-63-p)
SERV ICES
Alternators, generators, starters,
electrical systems tested and repaired.
Auto Electric Service, 1111 S. Main,
378-7330. Now! Bank AmerlcarcF &
Master Charge.

Open 7 days-
Btraa
Clip the
Pizza Inn
Buck
below for a special treat!
(TJtyT PIZZA INN DOUGH NOTE^^iA\
\LL'T ~ HedeemeMe with the JJ
\v \ eeccheae of any # /m 9
UJPTnma I f \ leit**iepi*e V
f limit 1 Wiio Inn | I at
dollar per family \ v-f / The Wi*a Inn
Offer need \ I f / 3145. W. 16th A^e./Wwyn\
WigNEPIZZAINNBUCIF^

Monday, September 21,1970, The Florida Alligator,

V.'ViVV*VVVVVVV/iVV*ViV*ViV*
SERV ICES
THE COPY CENTER 5 XEROX 4.
ASK ABOUT OUR CHARGE PLAN.
1718 W. Univ. 376-9334 next to
Malones Bookstore. (M-13t-162-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480.
Suburbia Drive-In
N.W. 13th St. 372-9523
Penthouse 2
MASH
jg
50* before 7:30
SI.OO after x
Penthouse 3
EASY
RIDER
jg
50* before 7:30
SI.OO after

Page 21

SERVICES
Coeds Facial Hair removed forever.
Fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrologist. 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)

ONLY 4 MORE DAYS! $
JUST A KID FROM THE i
PECKERWOODS DOIN f
FEATURE HIS OWN THING S
TIMES *
%.rb.- J
THE SAGMirPREm-BOr FLOYD__[_
ADAM ROARKE R ah an AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL mctum
S mrnrnmm pMMaan^yM
n#SfSyif?srV 1 Vi *************** *:zT
Is College Really Like This?
"A FILM THAT UNDERSTANDS!
HIGHLY PERSONAL. HIGHLY
AMUSING!" H
*! iiyp;
Whopping goodr k
Ji jMh
5 il Jfc&te
times CANDICE
4:05 I BERGB^^S*
it*-
a***********************
*****Â¥*******
* ONLY 4 MORE DAYS
!
o'

Campus
Representative
$325 MO. GUAR.
If you meet our requirements
FULL or part time marketing
research and sales work. Must be
over 18, have car. No canvassing.
No high pressure sales. No
experience necessary.
Pre-arranged appointments. For
application, write Great Books,
3121 Maple Drive, N.E., Atlanta,
Ga., 30305.



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 21,1970

GATORS NEXT FOE

Alabama Routs VPI

By Alligator Services
The UFs next opponent,
Alabama, combined the running
of fullback Dave Brungaid and
the passing of quarterback Scott
Hunter to down Virginia Tech
51-18.
After a season opening loss to
Southern California, the
Crimson Tide outclassed the
Gobblers. Hunter, who passed
for 14 yards to flanker Jerry
Cash for one touchdown, and 20
yards to fullback Joe Larue for
another, completed eight of nine
passes for 108 yards.
BRUNGARD SCORED on
runs of 20 and 21 yards for
Alabama while tailback Johnny
Musso teamed up with David
Bailey for an 11 yard scoring
play that put the game out of
reach for the Tide.
'kirk
A crowd of 44300 looked on
as North Carolina defeated
North Carolina State 19-0 at
Chapel Hill.
Don McCauley s6ored from
the two yard line for the final
North Carolina score in a game
that saw North Carolinas Ken
Craven attempt five field goals,
all missing.
iSft
IN A GAME played in 98
degree heat at Atlanta, Georgia
Tech defeated Florida State
University 23-13.
Sophomore Bruce Southall
scored twice on one yard runs
and receiver Larry Studdard
scored another on a tipped pass
from quarterback Eddie
McAshan to insure a Yellow
Jacket victory.
kkk
Bill Battle recorded his first
victory of his career as
Tennessee crushed Southern
Methodist University 28-3 at
Knoxville.
% Battle, who took over the
coaching spot when Doug
Dickey went to Florida over the
winter, saw fullback Curt
Watson score twice, once from
the six yard line and the other
from the four.
CHUCK HIXSON connected
on 20 of 38 passes for 212 yards
in a losing cause for SMU.

Auburn routed Southern
Mississippi 33-14 behind
quarterback Pat Sullivan who
passed for three touchdowns and
ran for a fourth.
Sullivan hit -split end Terry
Beasley with a 13 yard scoring
pass that pushed Auburn to an
overwhelming 19-6 half time
lead..
kkk
TULANE UPSET favored
Georgia in New Orleans on a 26
yard field goal by sophomore
Lee Gibson, 17-14.
In a game on the wet Sugar
Bowl field, Gibson came onto
the field to clinch the victory
with his kick in the third
quarter.
WWW
Junior quarterback Kelly
Cochrane threw for three
touchdowns and completed 2!

jot L
ABB I
Jli pi'
COACH BILL PETERSON
... FSU defeated 2343
of 32 attempts to lead the Miami
Hurricanes to a 36-14 victory
over William & Mary Friday
night at the Orange Bowl.
A turnout of 27,286 saw the
Hurricanes down 14-6 before
Cochrane started to hit.
JOE SCHMIDT caught eight
passes for 129 yards and one
touchdown for Miami.
A A
WWW
Archie Manning ran for two

BLUES
; ;; : 1
iU I j
"A QUESTION OF BALANCE" THE MOODY
THS 3* M 24803-m24603 BLUES
$5.98 LP $3.99
$6.98 8 TRACK NOW $4.99
PRICES ARE GOOD THRU SEPT. 21, 1970
RECORDSVILLE
GAINESVILLE MALL
aassissssss BssssssssssssssssssssssSssmmmmmttmmm^^^Kmmmammmrmmmmammmmmmtmm

Prints Pottery Posters Preserves
What have they got in common?
Somebody creative made each of them.
If you want to buy somebodys creation,
or if you want to sell some of yours...
;;('.
meet us this Wednesday & Thursday in
the Union Ballroom & Galleries
V < |
' **\
flotida quarterly the J. Wayne Reitz Union
~c / V

touchdowns and passed for a
third as he led Mississippi to a
47-13 conquest of Memphis
State.
Manning, a prime candidate
for the Heisman Trophy, ignited
a 21 point outburst in the
second quarterback by scoring
his two touchdowns, one for 14
yards and the other a
quarterback sneak from the one.
rrrcvc e .#. e# ee e
OTHER SCORES
UCLA 24, Pittsburgh IS .*
Baylor 10, Army 7
Tennessee St. 62, Kentucky St. 7
Auburn 33, Southern Min. 14 ;
Arkansas 23, Oklahoma St. 7
Tulane 17, Georgia 14
Alabama SI, Virginia Tech. 18
Mississippi 47, Memphis St. 13
Georgia Tech. 23, FSU 13
Kentucky 16, Kansas St. 3
Ctemson 27, Virginia 17
Tennessee 28, SMU 3
Texas A&M 20, Louisiana St. 18 :
Houston 42, Syracuse IS
Arkansas 23, Oklahoma St. 7 5
Texas S 6, California IS
Oklahoma 21, Wisconsin 7 j
Purdue IS, Texas Christian 0
Michigan 20, Arizona 9 ;
Notre Dame 3S, Northwestern 14 5
Texas Tech. 23, Kansas 0 :
Stanford 34, San Jose St. 3 5
Washington 42, Michigan St. 16 j

J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
BARBERSHOP
Located Ground Floor
H HAIR U STYING
STRAIGHTENING
RAZOR CUTS
SHOE SHINE
OPEN MON-FRI 8-5:30
Hair cut to suit individual
Gffiedc Lindsey
% tF' fm HANG TEN
/ / COTTON KNITS
A I fftt/ SOLIDS from
FLARE JEANS
the pants with BELL BOTTOMS the famous fit, styled long
and lean with a flare for fashion. Rugged all cotton, pre-shrunk
denim for lasting comfort. Stitched throughout with strongest
thread. SIZES 28-38.
Select your correct # c A
size from over w
900 pair Pair
LARGEST SELECTION OF
LEVI BELLS IN TOWN
in the Gainesville Shopping Center



How many of you
have seen this
Treasure Map before
\
\
/ ff . \
Not listed: 11 I
/ Delta Sigma Phi Unlv. Garden Apts. KZ I
Phi Kappa Theta 1123 N.W. Ist Ave. I tkc I
1 (Behind C.1.) I Bfi\ J
# i \
/ / cL/D 4 Sigma Nu 819 S.E. sth Ave. I jf\Tj \| Ti Vi >L 1
1/ I y temporary house just off south | \ V 1 \\ \ I
T*# H7 /d) main street _ \\ -A
£L-jy Slonida igma Phi J.W.R.U. I L-J \ J I I
l \'\% f# *;
s **l EfZZ**~z'
S A A iuSeftw*
* rr ,T ~ ~ ~ |f __ * ~ --- -' 11 ' ~' V
"H- N
i t,
t ) Y I tt=rJ v. r O __
All of you have probably teen it one time or another it's a map showing the location of the U of F's 28 fratamrtiei.
What you probably didn't realize was the value of the map.
i
The treasure map can guide you to the house where you can discover the values of the fraternity system where they are the
strongest in each of the 28 individual fraternities.
i-.* L.... ' Don't miss this opportunity of finding one of the greatest treasures of college life. Visit the fraternities this week during
their informal rush.
v V
\ 1
v. ", ' ... i ... .. r
Come by and see how...
GREEKS leMOVE
, -* * '* V v ** lrtrt '* ww> WV |. -W; -o *,'
j > : ' 1_

Monday, Saptara bar 21,1970,, Alllptqt.

Page 23



i, Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, Saptambar 21,1970

Page 24

' -fc '
****^ a^la; *"* tfaii l M^ *****^^M****************^******^************^*********^^^^^^^^
f A BOLD NEW ] I
1 ADVENTURE /
I A BOLD NEW BOOK! ( j
\ The moment you leave home, you're an entirely different person. You're on / I
l your own. Mom and dad are no longer there to tell you what todo. /
\ Yes, you're out to find yourself. You're out to experience the greatest times /
l There's the girl next door who just can't bear living without HIM .. /
1 There are football games when the score is 15-14 ... I
l There's a peace march led by Father Gannon ... just candles and prayers ... I I
\ there's your roommate who wants to drop out of school; you spend all night /
l talking him out of it. .. /
\ There are concerts with Donovan, the Lettermen, and the Fifth Dimension /
\ you don't want to forget... /
\ These are just some of the experiences you will find in your new life. And /
l everyone of these events will be one that you won't want to forget. There is a /
l way to remember these forever. *\ I
l The 1971 Seminole. /
\ The yearbook of the University of Florida. /
\ A new b00k... for a new student... I
1 Away of looking at the past year, capturing every detail of your new life ... /
1 registration ... dormiife... sports... Greeks... and concerts... I
1 The issues that confront y0u,... I s
1 The excitement you feel... /
l The faces you know... /
1 Those feelings that only a Florida student has... /
1 The events which will change your opinions and attitudes... /
1 A bold new adventure.. a bold new book ... the 1971 Seminole. I



' l;
The Official University Os Florida Bookstore A f Check Ollf List
Located In The Hub f For YOUf Needs

" ILIB
f !* i njHi[mil *9 111# JmSfiJw
, v vce M ''' 'fviUw Mr nf A wffu MiM
' tI* ? 'AT 1 fii I nl, v *
" - V .
X-. -.- §£££ - *&W. -v.. IfW^
w
Student Services
Notary Public Service
Check Cashing
Film Developing
'~ . T "' ~ ; .7- : ; : 77 *7 _i^_r_r r~ ; ~-- '
Special Order Service For
Reference Books & Supplies
Class Ring Orders
s. '. :*
Document Mounting Orders
Diplomas Os Gratitude Orders
Student Rate Magazine
Subscription Orders
*

I TEXTBOOK PRICE POLICY I
USED BOOKS SOLD AT 25% DISCOUNT FROM NEW BOOK PRICE.
WE PAY 60% OF NEW BOOKS PRICE FOR USED BOOKS IN GOOD CONDITION IF
AUTHORIZED TO BE USED AGAINAT THE END OF TERM.
... X v .
WE OFFER TOP MARKET PRICE FOR ANY TEXTBOOK THAT HAS BEEN DISCONTINED.

Monday, Saptambar 21,1970, Tha Florida AMfdor,

Textbooks New & Used
Architectural Equipment
& Supplies
Art Supplies
Craft Supplies
Study Lamps
Gym Outfits
Sweatshirts
College Pets
College Seal
Mascot Stationary
Candy, Cigarettes, Pipes,
Tobacco
Florida Record Albums
Norcross Greeting Cards
College Jewelry
Writing Equipment by
Schaeffer, Parker, Scripto
& Papermate
*
Pennants And Decals
1 *.. ;' '7
Complete Line Os
General Supplies
Drugs And Sundries

Page 25



I, The Florida AHigetor, Monday, September 21,1970

Page 26

Jackson Can Taste Score
But Hasnt Made It Yet

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Alligator Sports Writer
With 4:16 left in the first
quarter, quarterback John
Reaves went back to pass. The
obvious receiver on long bombs
like this is Carlos Alvarez,
-However, this time it was
number 22, Willie Jackson.
Jackson* Floridas first black
player, grabbed the ball, eluded
two Mississippi State defenders
and 4 sprinted down the sideline
in pursuit of his first
touchdown.
*T GUESS one reason I didn't
score on that play was because I
had scoring on my mind more
than I should have," Jackson
said in the Gator locker room
after Florida defeated State
34-13 Saturday.
As it was, the gain was good
for S 3 yards and set up Richard
Franco's first field goal of the
game.
Jackson, who along with
roommate Leonard George are
the only two blacks on the
Gator squad this year, feels that
being black doesnt hurt his
chances of making good on the
team.
THE GUYS on the team
along with the coaches treat me
just like any other player,
Jackson said. I dont think I get
any special treatment.
In the Gator victory last week
at Jacksonville, Jackson caught
only one pass, that being for a
nine yard gain. But this game,
the sophomore split end from
Sarasota caught four Reaves
tosses for 105 yards and picked
up six yards on two running
plays.
Early in the third quarter, the
Gators were faced with a fourth
down and one situation on the
Miss. State seven yard line.
The ball was given to Jackson
who was stopped, but squirmed
his way down to the two for the
first down. Tommy Durrance
scored on the next play.
WILLIE WAS coming up
with some key plays for us,
Coach Doug Dickey said. That
play we used with Jackson
running for the first down is
nothing new. Weve been using it
in practice and that was the best
time to try it.
Coach Charlie Shira of Miss.
State was also impressed with
Jackson.
I was surprised to see that he
is such a fine receiver, he said.
With Jackson on one side and
Alvarez on the other side of the
field, it is hard to stop as both
are deep threats.
BEING (WE of two blacks on
the team doesn't bother
Jackson.
I've always been one of the
few blacks on the teams I have
been playing for, Jackson said,.
At Vaily Forge Prep in
Pennsylvania his senior year in
high school, Jackson was voted
the outstanding prep player in
the greater Philadelphia area.
HAVE YOU BEEN THINKING
ABOUT LEARNING TO FLY?
We will teach you for
$2lO
Solo course in '69 Cessna 15'
includes grounds school & 10 l
of flight instruction.
$175
Solo course in Piper J-3, books,
ground school & 10 hours of flight
instruction.
FLYING HAWKS
STENGEL AERODROME 376-0011

Declared ineligible to play
freshman football because he
didn't pass an entrance exam
into the Southeastern
Conference, Jackson tried out in
the spring and impressed Coach
Dickey with his speed and moves
on the field.
BESIDES BEING,, the starting
split end for the Gators, Jackson
moonlights by running back
kick-offs.

ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
\ MRUO
MICMAMCS
-3? Student's Friend
Specializing in tune ups General
Auto Repair and Corvairs.
Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed
1031 So. Main St. Ph. 378-8532
[Central Charge] [Bank Americard] [Master Charge]

7 CTT VFPMA AT. |jj|k I
c3SHORT SLEEVES....FROM $6.50
225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. *? UT OUR u. of f. student
Free Customer Partcing on Ist Fed. Bank Lot i.m T R S, E .^ CCOUNT NOTH, NG TO "FILLOUT,"
_ JUST BRING YOUR CURRENT ID AND
Open Friday Night Until 9:00 YOU'VE GOT IT ON THE SPOT
Jiff-" = SILVERMAN'S DOWNTOWN 'VM'rrnrttirr
SIL VERMANSDOWNTOWN : -J

I was pulling for Carlos to do
good on his first punt return
against Duke last week because
that is the toughest kick to try
to return, Jackson said.
With the opposition running
down your throat on punts, you
don't have time to think. On
kick-offs, though, you can drop
the ball and still have time to
pick it up and run.

SPLIT END WILUE JACKSON'" A, ""* TeR
... looks for running room against Duke

SLEEPY
Riding Rings AJpCooled Barn
JB* Pasture Tack Room & Lounge
STATE HjjdSIWAY 234 PHONE 373-1059
(About 12 minutes from Gainesville)
Caring for Your Horse is Our Only Care



Gators Push For First SEC Crown

By MARTY PERLMUTTER
Alligator Sports Writsr
It will take 11 victories this
year for the UF to go unbeaten
in their quest to capture the
Southeastern Conference (SEC)
football title for the first time
in UF history.
After the National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA)
voted to raise the college
schedules to 11 games, the UF
went along with v other
universities in adding a game to
their schedule this year the
Duke Blue Devils.
THE GATORS travel to
Tuscaloosa this weekend to face
the University of Alabama in
their first crucial game of the
season.
Paul (Bear) Bryant, head
coach and athletic director of
the Bama Crimson Tide, has
been scouting players over the
winter hoping to revamp his
squad that finished with a 6-5
record including a 47-33 loss to
the University of Colorado in
the Liberty Bowl.
We were a one-armed team
last year, Bryant said. About
all we could do consistently was
throw the ball. Our running
game was streaky and our
defense suffered by our poor job
of coaching.
WE SHOULD be better this
year. We have more depth in our
receivers and runners. Our
interior line on offense is thin
and well have to get some
breaks on injuries to survive,
Bryant said.
On defense, we dont have
many experienced people back
from end to end on the line, but
we do have some good looking
youngsters coming up who have
to come through.
Leading the Tide this year will
be senior quarterback Scott
Hunter, junior split end David
Bailey and junior tailback
Johnny Musso.
NORTH CAROLINA STATE
face the Gators on Saturday,
Oct. 3, at Florida Field.
Coacti Earle Edwards will
have 26 lettermen returning
from last years team including
highly touted fullback Dave
Rodgers and captain of the
Wolfpack, Jack Whitley, as
safety.
Rival Florida State University
is next on Oct. 10, when UF
travels to Tallahassee.
COACH BILL PETERSON,
now in his 11th year at FSU will
have only one letterman
returning from his offensive line,
a fact that could hurt both the
team and the Seminoles
quarterback, Tommy Warren.
All-Southern quarterback
Charlie Richards and his

/_ c> 1
nnp k
POND' wit
iIL ?
; VfURING CHUCK WAC
OPEN 11 :U0 AM to 9:00 PM i' ty> Wm
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 3 8-3330
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

ALABAMA NEXT ON GATOR SCHEDUIE

PAUL 'BEAR' BRYANT
... ''poor coaching"
University of Richmond team
invade Gainesville Oct. 17.
Richards, ranked number five
in the nation last year in total
offense with 2,665 yards, was
number nine in passing in the
nation completing 175 of 356
for 2,556 and 21 touchdowns.
AFTER RICHMOND, three
games in a row will probably
decide the fate of the Gators this
year in the SEC title drive,
meeting Tennessee at Knoxville
Oct. 24, Auburn for
homecoming Oct. 31 and the
Georgia Bulldogs Nov. 7 in the
Gator bowl in Jacksonville.
Tennessee will be out for
revenge on the UF for stealing
their head coach Doug Dickey.
New coach Bill Battle, the
youngest football coach in SEC
history, will have all of his
offensive starters back from last
year except ends Gary Kreir and
Ken DeLong. However, the loss
of eight defensive starters
plagues the Volunteers.
Quarterback Bobby Scott
returns along with fullback Curt
Watson, all-SEC last year as a
sophomore to help the Vols in
their defense of the SEC crown.
It will be one of the biggest
games of the year for both sides
because of the controversial
coaching change over the winter.
AUBURN WILL be out to
blemish the UF record again this
year on homecoming weekend.
The only loss for the Gators last
year was a 38-12 defeat to the
Tigers in Auburn.
Things will be different this
year as All-Americans Buddy
McClinton and David Campbell
have graduated for Auburn.
Georgia Bulldogs, the other
blemish in the Gators 9-1-1
record last year as the teams tied
13-13, will bring a new pro-type
offense into the traditional game
at Jacksonville.
TAILBACK JACK
Montgomery and quarterback
Mike Cavan head a list of 35
lettermen returning for Coach
Vince Dooley.
The only game the Gators

play at Tampa this year is
against Coach John Rays
Kentucky Wildcats.
Our strong point this year
will be our defense, Ray said
after spring practice. Leading the
defensive unit will be tackle
David Roller, a 6-foot -2 inch
240 pound All-American
candidate.
LAST YEAR, John Reaves
and Carlos Alvarez combined for
two touchdown passes as UF
defeated the University of Miami
Hurricanes 35-16 in the Orange
Bowl.
Kelly Cochrane, a super
sophomore for the Canes last

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BOOK and SUPPLY, Inc.
Welcomes You to the University of Florida I
i I
; come in and sea as for* I
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Reference Books Engineering Equipment
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Outlines Art Supplies I
Florida T-shirts Sweatshirts I
Class Rings Pennants, Decals, etc.
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year, is back with an impressive
aerial show which included 11
touchdown passes, a university
record.
Rumors around the University
of Miami athletic department
say that Coach Charlie Tate
must have a good season this
year or his contract will not be
renewed (he is in the last year of
a multi-year contract he signed
in 1965.) The Canes will be at
Florida Field to close the Gator
season on Nov. 28.
Dickey was recruited from the
Volunteers in the hopes that he
could drive the team to the
Gator first SEC crowif.

Mdinday, S*p*n+~2}, I*7o, Ihm World. ASigrtor,

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Beginning Bridge Lessons
Instructor: Mrs. Dorothy Pat*
$7.50 for 8 two hour lewons
starting Sept. 29, till Nov. 17
room 118, Union, 7:00 to 9:00
p.m. register at the first lesson or
in room 310, Union
Sponsored by the J.W.R. Union

Page 27



Page 28

I, Tlm Florida Alligator, Monday, Saptembar 21,1970

t V i>
Campus Crier
. *. ~ ' _. ~~~ SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
-a*
' t
ALBERT SAYS WELCOME BACK
|| UNIVERSITY COMM. |
II If you are interested in serving on a campus wide University Committee contact the ||
Student Govt, office 3rd floor Reitz Union 392-1655.
I DRAFT COUNSELING I
Student Govt, is now providing an individual agency to provide students with
information concerning the selective service. You can call 392-1655 to set up an
individual appointment or just stop by for handbooks etc.
BOOK EXCHANGE
The Student Govt. Book Exchange is now operating for your convenience 1-5 p.m. ||
Mon.-FrL in the Union Collonade C-4.
STUDENT INSURANCE
Student insurance coverage will be handled by Blue Cross-Blue Shield for the
upcoming academic year (Sept. 70-71). In addition to offering the basic plan for single
students, they will be offering a plan for married students, spouses and their children.
Also their is an optional major medical plan available. Pick up your Student Insurance
brochure at the information desk, 3rd floor Reitz Union.
S.G. NEEDS YOU I
If you are interested in working in Student Govt, or any one of its agencies please II
come to room 305 in the Union or call 392-1665.
L___ I FREE MATH TUTORING ||
I The Math Dept, is offering a free non-credit course in Trig. The course will run for
eight weeks beginning on Sept. 29. If you need a refresher in this field of Math, sign up | 0
in 205 Walker before Sept. 29. Required text: "Trigonometry, A Programmed Text," |
Keedy and Bettinger.
HEAVY ROCK AT THE RAT
The Rathskeller will feature the Bethlehem Asylum this week. Two shows on both
weekend nights. 8:00 & 11:00,
POSTERS FOR YOUR PAD
Prints, posters, and arts and crafts will be on sale Sept. 23 & 24 in the Union }
Ballroom and Galleries. Lots of neat stuff for your room, house, of apartment. |
T*' r~ */ : t : I 1 r..-.- :
' ' ~ "t
* ' *
v *
.* * * H
* SS§
THANKS. I
i RODNEY MARGOL f
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENTGOVERNMENT |



Road Cleared For Clay
To Apply For NY License

By Alligator Services
NEW YORK Cassius Clay,
after 3Vi years of trying to get a
boxing license, had the road
cleared for him last week when
the New Yoik State Athletic
Commission yielded to a court
order and agreed to consider
granting him a license.
In an official statement the
commission said: In the light of
Federal Judge .Walter R.
Mansfield's decision rendered on
Sept. 14, 1970, in the matter of
Muhammad Ali, the New York
State Athletic Commission has
decided to consider his
, application for a boxer's license
when he files. The commission
also decided not to appeal the
decision.
CLAYS LICENSE was taken
away and he was stripped of his
title by the commission on April
28,1967, only moments after he
refused to be inducted into the
army. Clay, also known as
Muhammad Ali, subsequently
was convicted of draft evasion
but is free on bail while his
conviction is being appealed.
Every other major boxing
authority followed the New
York Commissions lead, but
only recently Clay was granted a
license in Atlanta for an Oct. 26
title defense against Jerry
Quarry.
Now that Clay is able to get a
license in New York, the Quarry
bout appears to be a step toward
meeting Joe Frazier, who wound
up as Clay's successor in a series
of elimination fights.
ON TUESDAY, Judge
Mansfield said the suspension
constituted arbitrary and
unreasonable departure from the
commissions established
practice of granting licenses to

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applicants convicted of crimes or
military offenses.
Mansfield added, The action
of the commission in denying
(Clay) a license because of his
refusal to serve in the armed
forces, while granting license to
hundreds of other applicants
convicted of other crimes and
military offenses involving moral
turpitude appears, on its face, to
be an intentional, arbitrary and
unreasonable discrimination
against plaintiff (Clay), not the
even-handed administration of
the law which the 14th
amendment requires.
Edwin Dooley, chairman of
the commission, had said
throughout Clays suspension
that he would like to see the
deposed champion fight again.
After the court order, he said he
would support granting Clay a
license but that he couldn't

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speak for the other members of
the commission. The other
members of the three-man body
are J. Raymond Lee and Albert
Berkowitz.
DOOLEY SAID. after the
meeting he looked forward to
having Clay return to a New
York ring.
Teddy Brenner, the Madison
Square Garden Matchmaker, said
he would try to arrange a bout
for the 28-year-old Clay as soon
as Clay received a New York
license.
Clays last bout was in'
Madison Square Garden on
March 22, 1967 -a successful
title defense with a
seventh-round technical
knockout against Zora Folley. It
was his ninth defense of the title
he won from Sonny Liston with
a seventh-round TKO on Feb.
25,1964.

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Monday, September 21,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 29



Page 30

'
Jh, FtafMi Momtay. IwUnto 21.1970

World Record On Matsons Mind

By Alligator Services
Big Randy Matson has only
one thought in mind for this
years track season, to break his
own world record.
But, he wont be surprised if
he doesnt.
Matson plans to work with his
16-pound iron ball in hopes of
betting the world standard of 71
feet SVI inches set during a
quadrangular meet in College
Station, Tex., April 22, 1967
while he was attending Texas
A&M University.
Matson has just taken over
duties as executive secretary of
the West Texas State
Universitys Buffalo Club. He
will head drives to raise money
for athletics on the canyon
campus.
Ive always had trouble
during the indoor season, said
the 6-foot-6 Pampa, Tex., native.
This year, with the help of the
facilities at West Texas State, I
plan to master the indoor
event.
Matson started pushing the
iron ball as a junior high
youngster, developed his
technique during high school
days and still uses those basic
techniques.
Over the years, I got bigger
and stronger and I had to make a
few adjustments, he said, but

Decibels Higher
Near Edmondson

By MIKE MOSCARDINI
Alligator Sports Writer
The man who claims the
unofficial title of Floridas
number one football fan never
attended UF as a student.
Neither is he a professor, an
employe or relative of any of the
football players.
In short, his only tie with the
Gators is an unswerving loyalty
that spans two decades.
IN THAT time he has yelled
himself hoarse at every UF home
game but four and many of the
road games.
He attends games packing a
bugle, a megaphone, three signs,
three whistles and a ton of
enthusiasm.
George Edmondson Jr. is his
name. He is a graduate of the
Citadel and presently a Tampa
insuranceman.
THE REASON I sort of
adopted the Gators as my team
is that all my friends here in
Tampa are UF grads, he said.
Edmondson uses his rabble
rousing prowess to inspire the
old grads to yell a little
louder. On his signs are printed
two-bits and go-gators (for
cheers) and louder when the
crowd gets listless or things are
going bad.
When he wants to get
attention to start one of his
?h??rs he gives a blast on hi?
wl sties. The bugle is simply a
rather efficient device to raise
the Florida Field noise level a
. ore decibels,
EDMONDSON SAID that he
* V b ig booster rout;
. Vais*. when the te
was having some lean years.
In those days, some of th*
fans were booing the players, i
didn t think they should do this
because it gets the team down.
Im for everything which

basically, Im still using the
things I learned in high school.
Matson has participated in
two Olympic games (Tokyo in
1964 and Mexico City in 1968)
and he hopes to compete at
Munich in 1972.
Its hard to get the shot out
of your mind, but Im sure some
day I will, he said. If I get
beat all the time and never win
then Im sure Ill begin to lose
interest.
Now, I just want to do the
best I can and try to better my
own world record.
Matson came very, very close
to doing just that last spring.
The only man to ever clear
the 70-foot barrier, the
25-year-old Texan did so twice
last season. And at Berkeley,
Calif., in late May he came
within a scant inch and one-half
of his world standard with a toss
of 71 4%.
I had a good year last year,
he said. I won all the meets I
entered. It was the first time
since the 1966-67 seasons I had
done that, and it felt good.
I hope with better
conditioning, I can improve my
distance.
At 260 pounds, Matson is
only five pounds under his world
record weight. He hopes to get
his weight back up.
Thats the only way I can

may be a bit unusual in these
days when people are against
everything, but Im just
naturally enthusiastic about
things, he said.
Edmondson achieved some
fame for his feats last year when
he began moving to different
sections of the stands spreading
his own brand of excitement.
PEOPLE STARTED calling
me two-bits and asking me to
come and lead them in cheers.
The game this year that Im
looking forward to the most is
Auburn. Last year I went to the
game, at Auburn, and I heard all
the War Eagles I ever want to
hear,he said.

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throw farther, he said.
Matson, now married and the
father of an 18-month-old
daughter, returned to the Texas
Panhandle area near his old

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Next to Malone's
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home town in the late summer.
He had spent three years in
Houston as a stock broker with
timeouts now and then to
compete in track meets.

Have openings for 3 college fellows.
Must be neat, personable with car.
Not door to door selling.
Earn 75.00 a week working 3 nites
and one-half day Saturday.
Interview on campus Thursday 4:00 PM
Reitz Union Rm 118.

The man who turned the
ancient Irish art of throwing the
iron ball into one of track and
fields premier events looks
forward to his new position.



ByHIKEMOSCARDINI
Alligator Sport* Writer
Football is a game of inches
and no one knows that better
than Mississippi State
cornerback Frank Dowsing.
It was Dowsing who was
beaten for a touchdown early in
the first quarter by Gator end
Carlos Alvarez on a 35 yard pass.
He made a desperate lunge
which failed -by inches to
break up the play. The ball
bounced off his shoulders and
i Alvarez managed to grab it.
He had me beaten, said
| Dowsing, the dive was just to
I try and distract him.
Dowsing said that he had
never faced a receiver as good as
Alvarez and I doubt that I ever
will.
Dowsing remained in the
jgame, after the Florida score, to
return the* kickoff. He raced
[through the center of the UF
defenders and seemed headed
Flyin Gators
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Alvarez Too Much For Dowsing

for a tying TD when
tackled by Harvin Clark.
Clark was the last man who
could have caught him.
In the second quarter a
deflected Reaves* pass slipped
agonizingly off the fingertips of
Dowsing. An interception would
have stopped a UF drive which
led to a field goal.
State Coach Charlie Shira said
that inexperience and lack of
depth hurt his team.
We are fairly inexperienced
at linebacker and have a
sophomore secondary that is still
inclined to make mistakes, said
Shira.
Reaves consistantly hit on a

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DISTRACTION PLAY FAILED

lob pass just behind the
linebacker, he said.
Bulldog end Sammy Milner
said that they tried to work on
Gator cornerback John Faix.
We thought that he was the
weaker of the two. That is not
to say that he isnt any good,
but Clark (left defensive
halfback Harvin) hit hard and
has good speed, he said.
Minler said that the State pass

ITS K 2
A
NEW DAWN

offense couldnt get rolling
because their quarterbacks
didnt have enough protection.
Shira agreed. We didnt
expect them to blitz as much as
they did, he said. And
quarterback Joe Reed could
only add, we gave it to them,
we made too many mistakes.
Flanker David Smith also
praised UF defender Clark. A

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Monday, Saptambar 21.1t70. Tha Florida AHlfator.

couple of times he really
knocked me on my (posterior),**
he said.
Milner said that penalties and
mistakes (such as the grounded
punt) have dogged the Bulldogs
for as long as he could
remember.
If we ever got a break or a
favorable penalty I just wouldn't
know what to do,** he said.

Page 31



Page 32

!, Tlw Florida Alligator, Monday, September 21.1970

Freshmen Key Cross Country Hopes

By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Corrwpondant
Last years NCAA regional
championship Gator cross
country team is now nearly
non-existent.
But Track Coach Jimmy
Hawk Carnes hopes to put
together a handful of good
veterans with several very
promising freshmen to try to live
up to the nearly undefeated SEC
runner-up squad of last season.
GONE IS number one runner
John Parker, who is running for
Floridas Track Club and is
coaching the young squad this
season.
Gone is Steve Atkinson,
always in the top three or four
last year, like Parker in second
year of law school and has used
up his eligibility.
Gone is number three man
Jack Nason;, through academic
troubles.
GONE IS first stringer A. W.
Smith, who as a freshman was in
the top seven Gator runners in
every meet.
Doubtful is number two man
Mark Bir, a high school
sensation, and leading runner
during most of last season, with
a pair of feet still recovering
from surgery.
Doubtful is Don Laene, who
came on strongly to finish
seventh in the SEC meet last
year, having academic problems.
DRAFTED IS Johnny Brown,
the first black to ever compete
for Florida two years ago when,
as a freshman, he led the cross
country team in nearly every
race. Uncle Sam found him out
of phase this summer and put
him in a uniform.
But Parker is far from
pessimistic about the young
squad.
We dont have quite the
same punch as last year when we
could put three runners way up
in the top, but with good sound
training we could easily be as
strong a team overall as last year.
HEADING THE list of
veterans returning is Ron Jon
Nabers, a cross country specialist
who ran nearly every varsity race
last season and played well in
the SEC meet. Also back is
Benny Vaughn, who made the
varsity last year as a freshman
and went on to place third in the
SEC 880 in 1:50 8 during the
spring.
Fellow half-miler Kenny
Bumsed, who was only a tenth
of a second behind Vaughn in
the SEC, had been unable to
make the cross country team.
This year he is doing
long-distance training and hopes
to make the team as he did two
years ago.
Roy Benjamin has been a top
Gator distance runner for several
seasons, placing fifth in the SEC
mile last year in 4:12 although
he hadn't been able to run cross
country due to injury.
JACK STEWART ran in the
top seven as a freshman during
the early season last year, then
went on to run 1:52 in the 880
during the outdoor season.
Although built somewhat
heavily for long distances, he
will be counted on as an
experienced runner.
The freshmen will make the
difference, Parker said. Most
of them have never run the four
or six mile cross country
way they bear
up to it will decide what kind of
team we have.
If -'-V- \ ?
*

iisF -
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BENNY VAUGHN LEADS CROSS COUNTRY PACK
.. .placed third in SEC 880 as freshman
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Dorms, Leaguers In Football
For Opening Os Intramural Year

' Someone once said that a
healthy body breeds a healthy
mind, so if studies are getting
you down, then maybe
intramurals holds the answer.
Independents will be going to
the basketball courts the first
week in October for the start of
the fall season. The deadline for
signing up for basketball has
been set for 5 p.m. Oct. 1.
Dormitories, too, will soon be
wrapped up in the annual battle
on the grid iron. Who will reign
dorm supreme? Hume? Leigh?
Murphree? Dorms must have
their entries in by the Oct. 1
deadline.
The law and engineering
leaguers will be warming up with
the pigskin in preparation for

it I
ll| fflfilll
pF jJM I
Hi
. H
IP%
FOOTBALL FIRST FOR DORMS
.. .entries due Oct. I

I ii> Red
is a
little orange.
I

their yearly clash. Deadline for
signing up is set for 5 pan. Oct.
7.
* *
Fraternities will be adding
volleyball and swimming
competition to their football
duelings this quarter.
Preliminaries for the annual
frat swim meet are scheduled for
Sept. 30 for the Blue League and
Oct. 1 for the Orange League.
Finals for both leagues are
slated for Oct. 5 and 6. Entry
forms must be turned in to the
Athletic Department no later
than 5 p.m. Sept. 28.
* *
If youre good at calling the
shots in basketball or football
then you might be interested in
the fun and profitable

experience of officiating athletic
events. Sign up at the Intramural
Office, room 229 in the Florida
Gym.
An officials meeting will be
held 7 p.m. Sept. 28 in room
216 of the gym. Potential
officials for football, volleyball,
basketball, and soccer are asked
to call 392-0581 with any
questions.
In t ramural representatives
should stop by the Intramural
Office to pick up a manuel and
calendar of events pertaining to
dorm, independent, law and
engineering activities for the
quarter.

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Monday, Saptambar 21,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 33



The
Florida
Alligator

Entertainment Is Education Too

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entartainmant Editor
By the time you read this,
many of you will be suffering
from your first overdose of
college education. Dont lose
your head over it, learning is to
be had elsewhere as well.
Take movies. In case you
havent noticed, youve probably
learned most of what you
already know from movies and
got to consume an awful lot of
popcorn, candy and cold drinks
in the bargain.
IT ISNT THAT CPS-121 isnt
Important, even without the
popcorn it is, but you need the
movies to show you why. I
mean, some of the most
profound explanations I heard
about **2001 came from
students who had done well in
CPS-121.
At the moment Gainesville is
gorged with cinematic
sustenance. So before, after and
sometimes even during class
consider the following
educational alternatives: Z, at
Plaza I. Z is doing for politics
what Easy Rider did for cultural
identity.
Remember at the end of Easy
Rider when the close-cropped
guy in new bells would jump up
in disbelief and scream a four
letter, Anglo-Saxon expletive?
Well, if you stand outside the
theater after Z, you can hear
him say how hed like to punch
a fascist. Os course the only
fascists at Z are those who
conclude it could never happen
here.
POLITICS ASIDE, Z is a
gripping thriller and easily one
of the best movies of the year. It
Why Do
You Read
So Slowly?
A noted publisher in Chicago
reports there is a simple
technique of rapid reading which
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your reading speed and yet
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According to this publisher,
many people, regardless of their
present reading skill, can use this
simple technique to improve
their reading ability to a
remarkable degree. Whether
reading stories, books, technical
matter, it becomes possible to
read sentences at a glance and
entire pages in seconds with this
method.
To acquaint the reader of this
newspaper with the
easy-to-follow rules for
developing rapid reading skill,
the company has printed full
details of its interesting
self-training method in a new
booklet, How to Read Faster
and Retain More, mailed free
to anyone who requests it. No
obligation. Send your name,
address, and zip code to:
Reading, 835 Diversey, Dept.
164-019, Chicago, 60614. A
postcard will do.

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is based on an actual event, the
assassination of Gregory
Lambrakis in Greece in 1963.
You can test your political
objectivity by finding the
historical inaccuracies in the
picture. The cast and setting of
the picture, as well as the
depiction of violence are as real
as the nightly newscast. s
The movie is never
self-consciously a movie as it
*sweeps the audience into the
blistering pace and dramatically
arouses their emotions as all
great propaganda must. One
final word, Irene Pappas as Z's
widow says more with her face
than most actresses can with a
career.
Woodstock, MA.S.H. and
Easy Rider at the Suburbia.
Woodstock always struck me as

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Z has done for
politics what Easy Rider
did for cultural identity.
%WASV.%V.V.V.VW.V.V.V.V.V.ttV. <
our generations alternative to
Verdun. Anyway, Sly, the late
Hendrix, Cocker and the Who
provide electric counterpoint to
Baez as they continue to
document our times. M.A.S.H. is
the funniest movie of the year
and should deposit alot of under
30 trust in its 45-year-old
director, Robert Altman. Each
member of the cast is brilliant,
dominated, of course by Donald
Sutherland and Elliot Gould. If
you havent seen it and are
afraid that there is nothing
humorous in a forward field
hospital during the Korean War,

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 21,1970

Page 34

take a chance. If youve already
seen it, go again in case you
missed something in Sally
**Hotlips Kellermans nude
scene. What more can be written
about Easy Rider? Apparently
Billy and Capt. went looking for

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GREG JONES
Entertainment Editor

America and found it.
Dont waste all your credits in
one week. The Union which
used to be an office building has
a dynamite line-up of films for
this fall thanks to the Program
Office.



'Getting Straight' Never Makes It

By GREG JONES
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Getting Straight, now at
Renter I, is another one of those
youth-oriented** movies
conceived out of the success of
Easy Rider and the desire to tap
the huge, hip** youth market.
The movie porports to deal
with campus unrest but it never
comes to terms with anything
except a self-conscious attempt
at being with-it.**
At the same time it never
loses sight of itself as a
conventional Hollywood conceit
that is out to make money not
a point. As such it is pointless
both from a political point of
view and a comic one.
WHY, IN A movie concerning
campus protest, would it be
necessary for the student/hero
to discard all the legitimate
reasons and impulses for unrest
for the coy observation that
students demonstrate because it
is sexy?
Because the producers want
to sell it to Saturday Night At
the Movies and theres no point
getting stuck with a dogmatic
slant? But then, why in a funny
little movie about the trials and
tribulations of a graduate
student, is it necessary to graft
crudely socially relevant** issues
like the campus struggles?
Watching with embarassment
the staged, sterile scenes of
demonstrations, one realizes
they have nothing to do with the
movie or reality.
THIS MOVIE is about Elliot
Gould and Candice Bergen.

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Gould plays an older graduate
student, a former activist,
dropping Selma as his filing
card, who returns to school after
a tour in Vietnam to try to get
his teaching degree.
He immediately establishes
that absolutely all he wants is to
get that degree because he is
broke, tired and dearly past the
struggle. I mean hes been
through all boat before. Sound
like a decent movie?
Well could be, but then comes
social relevance crashing down
with a vengeance. It seems that
all is not right at the university,
but golly, the kids just cant
seem to get it together without
Elliot.
Their demands continually
intrude upon his single-minded
quest. So does his girl. Candice
Bergen, as the Face That
Launched A Thousand Ships,
finally gets a chance to act and
spends most of her time crying.
I*M NOT sure if thats
indicative of anything or not. It
is obvious, however, that a
Womans Lib cell has captured
the production centers of
Hollywood because in these new
movies (G. S. and the
Strawberry Statement) it is the
chicks that make the guys (aw
heck, do I have to?) get
involved.
So when Candice becomes a
radical, which consists of her
donning a cut-off sweatshirt and
joining a bunch of scrubbed
extras from Central Casting
carrying extremist signs like
The Vote For 18-year-olds,

OUT FO9T SSS

Make Love, Not War, and
Win with Wilkie, she puts the
, bug in Elliots ear to join her.
But man, hes trying to get
that degree so he can teach the
underprivileged to read Don
' Quixote instead of the
Adventures of Sgt. Rock and the
Combat Happy Joes of Easy
Company.
WELL, YOU can see the
heavy political and social

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tensions in that situation. I*m
too humane to tell you the end,
which is the worst since My
Friend Flicka when the whole
family would laugh at some joke
the horse cracked.
Let it suffice to say that it Ji
inconsistent with the body of
the movie and the final cheap
attempt to grab any radicals the
antiseptic signs might have
missed. Elliot Could is as funny

Monday, Saptamt)ar 21,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

as ever and is absolutely
masterful in a five minute,
wordless take he does at his oral
examinations. In fact the entire
orals sequence is worth the price
of admission and is the stuff of
which fantasy is made. The
promo for Getting Straight says
that the movie lays it on the
line Unfortunately Getting
Straight then proceeds to
stumble over it on its way to
the box office.

Page 35



Rock Guitarist Jimi Fiendfix Dead

LONDON (UPI) Electric
guitarist Jimi Hendrix,
24-year-old millionaire idol of
the acid rock generation, died
Friday in a London hospital as
the result of an apparent
overdose of drugs.
An American musician of
Cherokee Indian and black
ancestry, Hendrixs recordings
frequently sold more than a
million each and he had been a
star attraction at the big rock
festivals from New Yorks
Woodstock to Englands Isle of
Wight. He had been arrested on
narcotics charges and some of
his concerts in the United States

Musical World
'Disintegrating
Hendrix is dead.
Slowly but surely the musical world many of us grew up in is
disintegrating. With its disintegration comes this generations
first intimations of mortality.
THE BEATLES are gone, Otis, Brian and npw Jimi are dead.
Hendrix was a great guitarist and a great stage prescence. He
blasted on the music scene with a shriek of feedback in 1967 to
dominate and influence lead guitarists everywhere. He was at his
visual, sensual best in the film, Monterrey Pop, when he assaulted
Wild Thing. His brilliance as a musician and sensitive artist was
most evident at Woodstock.
Hendrix was unique.
His passing reminds us that time did not stand still for this
generation as it once seemed it might because we begin to notice
we have something to remember.
A Night At The Rat
Bethleham Asylum, from Miami, and Sunshine Pavillion will appear
at the Rathskeller this week.
The groups are scheduled for Sept. 25 and 26, according to
Leonard Tanner, chairman of Student Government Productions
(SGP). There will be shows at 8 and 11 p.m. Admission will be $2.
ENTERTAINMENT FOR next month will include Riff, a local
band which will appear Oct. 9 and 10. A different slant for the
Rathskeller will be the Rhodes Brothers, night-club act from Miami,
appearing Oct. 21-24.
We are hoping faculty, staff and students will attend this program
to help promote the Rathskellers purpose of providing a gathering
place for students, Tanner said.
No further entertainment is booked, but SGP is presently
negotiating for future acts including country and western performers.
The Rathskeller is popular among national groups because of its
intimacy, Tanner said. Therefore, many groups who w have
performed here in the past desire return engagements.
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had been banned on grounds of
obscenity.
THE TALL, RANGY,
moustachioed guitarist, one of
the highest paid performers in
the world, was admitted to St.
Mary Abbots Hospital at 11:45
a.m. and died about an hour
later. Police sources said
unspecified drugs apparently
caused death but a coroner
would issue a final ruling.
According to British blues
singer Eric Burdon, a close
friend of bachelor Hendrix, the
guitarist had spent the night
with a girl friend instead of at

the Cumberland Hotel, where he
was registered.
She found him in a coma
this morning and called for an
ambulance, he said. All I

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know is that he has taken some
sleeping tablets.
HENDRIX WAS acquitted of
a charge of possessing hashish
and heroin in Toronto, Ontario,
last December.

Tha Florida Aligator, Monday, Soptambar 21,1970

Page 36

During the trial he said he
used marijuana, hashish, LSD
and cocaine but never heroin.
His most popular song, Purple
Haze was descriptive of the
drug culture.



Philosophical Circus
flew Course At UF
By DARLA ESPOSITO
Alligator Writer
One curriculum change initiated this quarter is the addition
of PPY 201, or Philosophical Circus, to the philosophy
department.
The previous series of 2004evel introductory courses has been
compressed into this general class, "Introduction to
Philosophy.
"The implication is that we are clowns, explained Dr. R. P.
Haynes of the philosophy department, "but we hope to show
the seriousness of our subject too.
THE COURSE will consist of a dialogue among four Ph. D.s.
The purpose of the dialogue is to demonstrate current methods
and problems involved in philosophy. The course is designed for
students with an interest in philosophy, but who are undecided
about their majors. H
Fifty-five students are presently enrolled. However, since
there are no pre-requisites, Haynes said he expects 40 or 50
more to add the course.
Varying opinions on the definition of philosophy will be
discussed. Professors will successively delve into existentialism,
analytics, logic and the philosophy of education. Student
participation involves papers on three of the four topics
presented.

Survival Problems
Topic In CHE 498
The numbers may change but the problems of human survival
are still with us.
The course, now changed to CHE 498, under Dr. S.S. Block
will discuss different aspects of the quality of life in todays
world.
These run from the environmental future of Florida to the
question of whether human technology can solve human
problems.
Last year taught as ECG 300, the course, now taught on the
400 level, is non-technical, requires no technical background
and presents the material so it is readily understood by students
on all levels.

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'Get Involved/ Women Told

Welcome. Be yourself. Get
involved. Do your own thing.
These were the ideas
expressed to new UF women
students Thursday evening at the
Campus Life Conference for
Women Students.
Mrs. Lester Hale, special guest
for the evening, welcomed UF
women and encouraged them to
become involved in UF.
"GOOD LUCK to all of you
and may your stay here be a
very happy one, Mrs. Hale said.
"A Florida girl needs no
introduction, Dr. Frank
Adams, dean of student
development, said.
"Whether you make the
academic accomplishments we
have said you can, Dean Adams

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said, "is up to you and the
decisions you make.
Representatives from
womens student organizations
introduced the opportunities
available to UF women.
Guest speakers were Carolyn
Jones, Miss UF; Nancy Wolfson,
Mortar Board; Dean Frank

Start Your
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Rolling Ah
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Beer and Wine at Rock-Bottom Prices
Come to 203 S.W. 2nd AVE A Save

Mowdiy. Sytwnbir 21,1970, Tha Florida Aiptor,

Adams, Associate Dean Phyllis
Meek, and Assistant Dean Loyce
Katz, Office of Student
Development; Susan Johnson,
Savant; Vicki Jay, Alpha
Lambda Delta; Leslie Lott,
Panhellenic; Susan Jacobs,
Interhall; Kathy White, Gator
Band, and Susan Stratton,
Cheerleaders.

Page 37



I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 21,1970

Page 38

AUTHORITIES SAY

Arson Source Os ROTC Fire

By DUANE MERTZ
Alligator Writar
A deputy state fire marshall
and campus police said arson
was the cause of a fire which
resulted in $2,000 damage to a
UF ROTC building.
Particles of a glass gallon jug
and other debris found at the
scene were forwarded to the FBI
laboratory in Washington, D.C.,
for fingerprint examination and
for determination of the

Students May Save
AtSG Book Exchange
By RANDY BELLOWS
Alligator Writar
The Student Book Exchange opened its doors Sept. 18 with
comparative success.
The book exchange serves students needs in two major ways. It
often gives students the opportunity to get a better price for a used
book, said Carolyn Landey, manager of the book exchange. For
example, if a person pays $8 for a book originally, a bookstore may
buy it back for $5 and resell it for $6. At the book exchange, a
student quotes the price he wants for the book, which say is $5.50;
thus both the buyer and seller benefit, excluding the middle man.
THE ALLIGATOR prints the coded numbers we give the books
sold on any one day, and SG follows up by sending the original owner
a check for the amount the buyer paid for it.
Any book not sold by Oct. 3, must be reclaimed or it becomes
Student Government property.
Most of our books are either brought in at the beginning of each
quarter, or left over from last year.
The book exchange also gives a student the opportunity to resell a
bode that has already become discontinued. These are books the
campus and local book stores would not be as willing to buy back.
We, at least, give the student a chance to sell the book as a reference
or study aid to others. Theres a 10 cent service charge on all books,
paid by the seller whether or not the book is sold.
AT PRESENT the book exchange has a comparatively limited
variety of titles.
This is due, in part, Miss Landey said, to the fact that students
dont know about the exchange. The students really cant lose on the
deal, unless a book is not sold during the exchange, and meanwhile
becomes discontinued.
The SG project, open from 1-5 p.m., will run until Friday.
Local book stores do not seem to be threatened by the book
exchange. Its not too much different than students trading among
themselves, Sam Getzen, director of the Campus Shop and
Bookstore said.
CERTAINLY IT will have some effect, but until it reaches the
point where it can cater to most student book needs, which requires a
sufficient stock of almost all titles required, I doubt if it will have a
serious impact on us.
The book exchange has to give an incentive to both the buyer and
seller, if it is to sell books in any number. That means selling at a
slightly lower price than at the bookstores. We buy our books back at
60 per cent new price, and resell it for 75 per cent, allowing a margin
for business expenses and a small profit.
The Campus Shop and Book Store is an auxilary service under the
UF Office of Business Affairs. The profit goes back to UF, usually
towards improving campus shops and bookstore facilities.

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chemical contents of the jug,
according to UF Police Chief
Audie Shuler.
University Police Investigator
Gene Watson and Deputy State
Fire Marshall T. W. Burkhart
have identified the jug and its
contents as the source of the
fire.
The fire at the ROTC building
was spotted late Thursday by
Earl Smith, a resident advisor in
North Hall. Officers R. D.

Martin and E.C. Crews of the
UPD answered the call.
Object of the arson attack is a
single story frame and brick
structure in the military
complex which was once the
ROTC stable. In recent years it
has been converted to classroom
use.
It will take two to three
weeks before well get the results
from the FBI, but all indications
point to arson, Shuler said.
Shuler also said the building is
not federally owned, and that
the FBI volunteered their
services to solve the case.
The fire-bombing is the first
such attack on a UF building.
The military-science complex
has been the focus for
demonstrations by student
radicals in the past.
The UF Physical Plant
Division estimated restoration of
the hallways sheet rock and
wood walls would cost about
$2,000.

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Early Orientation Helps
-Parents And Students Students

By Alligator Services
I go away with the feeling
that my son made the right
choice.
This is one parents reaction
to UFs summer orientation
program for entering freshmen
and their parents.
A PROSPECTIVE student
remarks, I wont be so nervous
and lost in September; it takes
away a lot of the scare.
And this expresses an attitude
7 go away with the
feeling that my son made
the right choice.
typical of most of the 2,465 new
freshmen who attended early
orientation and registration
during one of the 15 two-day
sessions which began in June and
ran through August.
Dr. William Childers, director
of the orientation program, in
preparing a report on the
project, noted that the number
of students attending
represented 85 per cent of the
entering freshman class.
AT THE END of each session,
students and parents alike were
asked to complete a form
regarding their reactions to the
program. Students frequently
said that one of the major
advantages of early orientation
was that they could avoid the
hectic first week on campus

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She spoke of things that
administrators strive to
avoid. She gave the
audience a real picture
of the campus, and didn *t
talk about budgets and
buildings.
since they would not have to
worry about scheduling classes
and finding their way around
campus.
One new element in the
program this summer was the
welcoming of students to UF by
a veteran student rather than a
faculty member or
administrator.
Miss Rebekah Slavis, a
summer student assistant in the
Office of Student Development,
spoke to the freshmen and their
parents on such topics as drugs
on campus, open house and
getting off on the fight foot.
CHILDERS SAYS of Miss
Slavis, She spoke of things that
I wont be so nervous
and lost in September; it
takes away a lot of the
scare.
administrators strive to avoid.
She gave the audience a real
picture of the campus, and
didnt talk about budgets and
buildings.
Childers notes that he plans to
continue to use students in the

program, and hopes to come up
with a really innovative
approach next summer.
Dean of University College
Franklin Doty said many parents
told him they felt much more
comforted about their son or
daughter attending UF after
having had an opportunity to
attend sessions acquainting them
with the campus.
Parents no longer felt
their offspring would be
cast upon the waters
and left to drift.
He said other parents
commented that they no longer
felt that their offspring would be
cast upon the waters and left to
drift. ;
So 85 per cent of the new
freshmen on campus and some
5,000 parents are resting a little
easier as the fall quarter begins
on UFs campus with final
registration and orientation this
week and classes beginning
today.

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Monday, Saptambar 21.1970, Tha Florida ANiyator,

Page 39



I, Tl* Florida Alligator, Monday, Saptambar 21,1970

Page 40

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