Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Vol. 63, No. 174

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SPENCER COOK
FUN AND GRACE
"What we women go through to be beautiful!" This is the way it is as
young girls strive to learn to be graceful 'like mommy." And don't all
mothers seem to think the best way to team b through weekly ballet
leseora? Hours of practice when most girls would rather be out playing
baseball with the boys. But don't worry, someday it will all have been
worth it.
UF-Leased Land
Causes Problems
By DAVID SPICER
ANieetor Staff Writer
OF is trying to obtain a clear title to a parcel of land directly west
of Norman Hall which UF now rents from the City of Gainesville.
When UF planners decided to move to Gainesville from Lake Cit>
the city gave UF a 99-year lease on that particular parcel of land.
THIS WAS ONE of the early concessions given to UF along with
freewater.
It is possible the city may ask for some sort of remuneration to
give UF clear title to the land. Speculation is that it will involve the
free water issue.
If UF paid for the water it uses, the tab would be $140,000. The
total city water revenue is $ 1300,000.
THE GAINESVILLE City commission discussed the lease Monday
night and referred the matter to the Real Estate Board.
One of the main points of controversy over the lease has to do with
a reversal in the lease. This clause states that the land was to be
xd forP.K. Ycnge l dfiwUwy ftrhmwl
P. K. Yonge was built in siwHrr location and Norman Hall
dominates the land covered by the lease.
THE APPRAISED value of the leased land is $752,000.
According to one of the City Commissioners, since the land was not
used for P. K. Yonge the City of Gainesville could use the reversal
rtaiif* and legally claim the land when the lease runs out
If this happens, apparently the city might use this to barter with
UF for some concession. ,
UF has pi*" to build on the land as soon as it can obtain dear title
to it. The present lease does not run out until 1985.

Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

The University of Florida, Camesville

SISLER SAYS
Administration Shares
Concern Os Blacks

See Editorial Page 8
See Statement, Page 4
By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Amid growing controversy surrounding a series of demands by
Black Student Union, UF Executive Vice-President Harry L. Sisler
released an official statement concerning the BSU demands.
It is dear from statements in the press, Sisler said, that portions
Os the University community are unaware, to some extent at least, of
the steps the University has taken, programs which die University has
instituted, and plans which the University is implementing to deal
with minority group problems.
SISLERS STATEMENT said .. .requests recently presented by
the Black Student Union (BSU) are in conflict with academic and
legal responsibilities of the University.
'This will be explained in a detailed response currently being
prepared.
Nevertheless, the administration of the University shares With
Student Government and with the BSU and other campus

organizations their concern with
problems of black students and
other minority groups.
SISLERS STATEMENT
came as a response to die five
BSU demands, approved and
supported by the Student
Senate, and a series of articles
analyzing the demands which
have appeared recendy in the
Florida Alligator.
The BSU demands are:
Recruiting and admission
of 500 black students out of the
quota of 2,800 freshmen each
year, while continuing the
recendy started Critical Year
Freshmen program;
A department of minority
affairs (to replace the present
office of minority affaire) under
the direction of Roy I. Mitchell,
who would assume the rank of
vice-president;
A black administrator to
coordinate recruitment of black
faculty;
Hiring of a black assistant
manager in personnel;
Intensified recruiting and
hiring of black faculty to reflect
the ratio of black students under
the first demand (18 per cent).
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell is out of town on
vacation and was not available
for comment.
STUCKMT SENATE cuts
*7O-*7l cheerleader
budget to aero Tuesday
night .-page 3
Campus Crier ...17
Campus Living 18
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies 12
Sports 18

'D/srupfives
Not Allowed
See Editorial Page 8
By 808 WISE
AMlgrtor Staff Writer
A new Board of Regents policy to keep applicants with a record of
disruptive activities out of state universities was approved by the
State Board of Education Tuesday.
How disruptive will be defined is left up to the individual
university. Each school must develop a plan for considering
applicants character and behavior, and for excluding those with a
record of disruptive behavior or other acts not to the best interests
of the university.
THE ACTION was in response to Senate Bill 29, now codified,
which authorizes the Regents to create such a policy, according to
Regent Henry Chandler.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder questioned the legality and
constitutionality of the policy.
I havent read the law, but from what I have heard it doesn't seem
to me to be a fair or equitable law, Uhlfelder said Tuesday.
THE DEFINITION of the word disruptive would be a crucial
point, he said.
I don't know what 'disruptive' means a football game disrupts
the operation of a university; President Nixon has caused a lot of
disruption on campus by his actions. Is it disruptive to speak on the
Plaza of the Americas? Uhlfelder said.
UF VICE-PRESIDENT Dr. Harry Sisler said the administration
could make no comment until it had received official notice of the
new policy, examined it and determined all its ramifications.
According to Chandler, the new policy reads:
The Board directs that the universities under its control exercise
due care in the selection of students, taking into account not only
their academic ability to perform satisfactorily but also their character
and behavior.
The universities shall refuse admission to an applicant whose
record shows previous disruptive or other misconduct not to the best
interests of the university. Each university shall develop a plan for
implementing this policy, including procedures for an appeal.
Quarter Ends

Friday marks the last day
of classes for the UF's
; 1969-70 academic year. Final
examinations will be held the
week of Aug. 24-28.
Walter L. Red Barber
will speak at commencement
ceremonies scheduled for 7
p.m. Aug. 29 at Florida Field.
There are 1,350 candidates
for degrees.

\ /
* _/

Thursday, August 20, 1970

-
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'" ip
M t 1
HARRY SISLER
rslsssss rtjt6fnont

An estimated 21300
itadeats wffl begin fall
t Mr chores Sept. 21.
Unfemity offices will be
open during the three week
class-break except for an
official state Labor Day
holiday on Sept. 7
Orientation and i
registration is set for Sept.
15-18.



Page 2

August JM, 1970

UF May Need 'Racism In Reverse

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the
last of a sms by Alligator
Staffer Larry Jordan on the
demands of .the Black Student
Union.)
By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
During Black Student Union
demonstrations last month, a
key UF administrator reportedly
said he would make no
concessions for black students.
That would be racism in
reverse.
In view of the present
statistics available on blacks at
UF and present programs now
being planned to attract more
blacks; racism in reverse may
well be needed.
The debate at UF over
whether special concessions
should be made for blacks is
characteristic of many other
schools around the nation.
DR. CORBIN CARNELL
headed the office now run by
Roy I. Mitchell during the
summer of 1969. Under the
Summer Developmental
Program that year, 11 black
students were admitted to UF
the first time black students
were admitted under the Board
of Regents five per cent ruling.
At the end of his term as
interim coordinator for minority
affairs, Camell wrote a letter to
Vice-President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale and said:
Until we have more black
students on campus, the .5 per
cent which we now have are
bound to feel conspicuous. They
are likely to feel even more
alienated and paranoid than the
ordinary white student,
especially at registration or exam
tune.
YET OUR administrators
being as law-and-order minded as
administrators are expected to
be, fear any sizable increase in
our black student population,
particularly if this would raise
certain questions which have
been tackled with disruption or
even violence elsewhere.
After only three months as
coordinator for minority affairs,
Roy Mitchell began to voice
similar sentiments.
Mitchell, in a summary report
for HEW, said if current trends
and sentiments were not
reversed; UF would be guilty of
racism by default.
RACISM BY default refers
to the lack of a futuristic
outlook on the part of Floridas
administration for the special
needs (and) abnormal problems
created when the ... special
problems of disadvantaged
students are intermingled with
an established social and
academic curriculum for ...
students of ... more affluent
social and academic
backgrounds.
The tendency, Mitchell
continued, is either to refuse to
recognize the existence of such
conflicts, refuse to act on them,

the FLORIDA alligator is the Official student newspaper of the
* University of Florida and Is. published fly* limes weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Onion Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
* W7II
11

Analysis

or attempt to alleviate them
with hastily and haphazardly
structure solutions.
Hastily structured solutions
are precisely what UF
administrators should avoid.
And the burden of determining
what is a hasty solution, and
what is not, must rest with
administrators and not students.
BECAUSE OF the transient
nature of students themselves,
they are usually concerned more
with present rather than with
long range results. A delicate
balance must be maintained
between what is desirable for
short range effects and what is
prudent for long range solutions.
For instance: The BSU
demand for a quota of 500
new black students a year, if it is
implemented, may work against
the best long range interests of
black students.
There may come a day when
the number of qualified black
mmmmmmU
i ,v- *ffl| ;
./PIW
W ; |sj
Racism by default refers
to the lack of a
furturistic outlook on the
part of Floridas
administration for the
special needs (and)
abnormal problems
created when
the ... special problems
or disadvantaged
students are intermingled
with an established social
and academic curriculum
for . students
of . more affluent
social and academic
background.
Roy Mitchell
applicants to UF will outnumber
their ratio in the states
population. What happens then?
Will, new demonstrations and
new confrontations develop
because UF, sticking strictly to
its quota system, will only admit
500 each year?
CLEARLY THE door should
be left open for more.
But for the present, massive
action is needed simply to make
a dent. Now, in 1970, 500

hardly makes a dent. Ten years
from now 500 a year may not be
enough.
Other states have already
begun long-range statewide
programs for black and other
disadvantaged students.
. In Florida at the present time,
no state funds are available to
operate a disadvantaged student
program.
THIS MAY CHANGE
however, if a bill to be presented
in the state Legislature is passed.
Legislation sponsored by Rep.
D. Robert Graham, D-Miami,
and calling for the creation of a
Florida Educational
Opportunity Fund has been
pre-filed.
If passed, this bill would
provide funds for both public
and private institutions in the
state which have disadvantaged
student programs, and funds for
the needy students themselves.
SUCH LEGISLATION for the
Florida is long over due.
The states system of public
higher education is less than
democratic.
In 1969, a study by Douglas
Windham, then a doctoral
candidate at Florida State
University, revealed that lower
income groups shoulder
proportionally more of the cost
of higher education in the state,
and receive less in return.
The last two demands more
black faculty members and a
black personnel administrator
presented to UFs administration
by the Black Student Union
(BSU) are not new requests.
Similar requests have been
made before by Department of
Health, Education and Welfare
auditors.
IN JANUARY, a HEW
auditors report criticized UF for
the small number of black
faculty teaching on a fill! time
basis here.
In March, another HEW
auditors report criticized UFs
Personnel Department for its
black recruitment efforts.
The March report said,
... present hiring practices
and staffing patterns in the past
twelve months clearly indicate
that the University has
concentrated its efforts on white
applicants.
The report also revealed that:
Between Jan. 1, 1969, and
Dec. 31, 1969, approximately
3,200 persons were hired in
non-instructional areas.
Ninety-one per cent were white,
and only 8 per cent were black.
There were 922 new
academic appointments during
the same period 913 white
and only nine black.
At UF there are 151
persons with authority to
initiate personnel actions all
are white.
§THE CANDY SHOPPE
We Specialize In
Hand Dipped Chocolates
Also
- Greeting Cards
- Gift Fruits
Wastage Shopping Center
3311 W. Unhr. Ave.
phone: 376*6806

And of the nine black
professionals hired in 1969, all
except one raised questions
concerning the type of
appointment which they
received.
A FORD FOUNDATION
survey show few black faculty
prospects nationwide. The
survey concluded that unless
educationally efforts were
increased for black Americans,
the numbers would not rise any
time in the near future.
UFs black faculty
recruitment problems are further
complicated by the desire for
black Ph.D.s and by the
reluctance to raid all black
college faculties.
Roy I. Mitchell, Coordinator
for Minority Affairs at UF,
called black faculty recruitment
a grave need.
THERE IS a problem with
communications when you try
to recruit black faculty,
Mitchell said. When you tell
them UF is now making efforts
for blacks, immediately you
create a vacuum of disbelief.
According to Dr. Ernest St.
Jacque, assistant dean for
Academic Affairs, UF will have at
least four new black faculty
members next year.
More may be hired next year,
he said. And Academic Affairs is
now in the process of hiring a
full-time black administrator to
coordinate UFs faculty
recruitment efforts.
BLACK STUDENTS feel
these efforts are progressing too
slow. The problem is this: In
areas where little or no racial
progress has been made before,
beginning efforts rarely make a
dent in the already established
patterns.
The real question behind the
BSU demands and the apparent
reluctance of UFs
administrators to act on them
has nothing to do with the
specific demands themselves.
IF THE administration finds
the demands objectionable and
can supply other alternatives
which could work equally as
well with desirable long range
result, so much the better.
The important thing for UF
administrators to consider is
this: are black students to
become equal partners in UFs
intellectual community?
There are problems.
Admitting more black students
will not solve the problems
unless something is done about
their status as human beings

FROSTED GLASS
and friends, will be playing rock & roll music Sunday
on the Union Terrace from 6:30-9:00 pjn.
|

mmmmmmmmmmmm. H
fl Mk
fl B
w ; L^ttayti'^gMpy
J I
Hk JH
Until we have more
black students on
campus, the .5 per cent
which we now have are
bound to feel
conspicuous. They are
likely to feel even more
f/ww /7ze ordinary white
student, especially at
registration or exam
time.
Dr. Corbin Cornell
once they get here.
ADMITTING BLACK
students without a parallel
increase in black faculty would
simply accelerate the tensions
that already exist between
blacks and whites.
Admitting more black
students and hiring more black
faculty without the appointment
of a black personnel
administrator with some
measure of authority would only
lead to more demonstrations.
What is needed is a total
package, a complete
commitment.
UF is both an educational
center and a urban institution. It
employs thousands of people,
spends millions of dollars and
occupies acres of prime real
estate.
It is an employer, landlord,
neighbor, investor and buyer. It
has a real responsibility to its
communities student and
townspeople because, for
better or worse, it shapes both.
The BSU demands question
the equality of this total media
in which black students have to
live, learn and survive.
The issue is about the .content
of this media at UF. And about
whether the content of the
educational experience here
reflects what society is, and
should be.



Student Senate Cuts Off
f| |* * fipi
'7O-71 Cheerleader Funds

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
The feud between Student Government and the
Athletic Association (AA) flared Tuesday night as
student senators grilled AA Treasurer Ray Daniel on
the association's policies and finances.
Daniel appeared at the invitation of the Student
Senateto speak on a bill cutting off SG funds to the
cheerleaders for 1970-71.
LAST YEAR they received $1,225.40. The
measure passed first and second readings in two
consecutive meetings Tuesday night.
We are not asking the senate to fund the
cheerleaders. We are asking that you give serious
thought to what this bill might imply, Daniel said.
The AA provides most of die cheerleaders funds,
Daniel said. What they wanted from the senate, he
said, was some tangible evidence that you do, in
fact, support the cheerleaders.
**l7 JUST DIDN'T seem to the committee that
whether we had control over the cheerleaders was
the most important thing, she said.
Sen. Ralph Glatfelter pointed out that the senate
had control over the cheerleaders through their
charter, regardless of whether it funded them or
not. s
Others contended there would be little real
control without funding.
DANIEL WAS ASKED why the senate should
cooperate with the AA after die association
apparently ignored student preferences on ticket
prices, as weS as last weeks senate resolution calling
for relaxed ticket deadlines.
The AA would probably not comply with the
resolution this season, he replied.
*7 would think, probably, not this season, for die
ticket policies have already been set for this
season, he said.
Study Rooms
The following rooms will be open for students
who wish to use them to study for final exams:
PEABODY. rooms open 24 hours a day,! l, 2,
10, 11,101,112, and 114.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Building, rooms
open 5:30 pjn. to 8 ajn. 227,229, and 230.
Study rooms in these buildings will be open from
Aug. 22 to Aug. 28.

LOST:
One Pooch
Have you seen a little Mack
pooch?
Rush, a greyish-black terrier
with a beige face that every
mother would love, was lost last
Monday somewhere near the
600 block of SW 10th Street.
Rush is a female terrier with
no vMMe identification tags or
marks save for those listed
above. She does, however, have a
plastic flea collar around her
neck.
If you see this dog, or if you
know anyone who has, please
call 376-4858.
Youll dry the eyes of one
tremendously upset girl.
And youll make Rush happy
too.
florida
quarterly
We only did it for you.

WHERE CAN YOU
GET ALUMS FOR
UNDER 1.60?
Sab h i lit m m m I
QrfnCnM in DUliwfy gOOunWI
Hwaiiza
weapon wmuHMSPnwa^w
SIRLOIN PIT
Ahofe you o'i a Ofe.i- ?" stea< a n a e.er>n ng e st st-2445
-2445 st-2445 SW 13th Street 378-0946
MON. SPECIAL RIBEYE STEAK $1.29

We are not asking the senate to fund
the cheerleaders. We are asking that you
give serious thought to what this bill
might imply.
Ray Daniel
UF*S STUDENT ticket policies compared
favorably with other SEC and big 10 schools in total
cost and convenience to students, Daniel claimed.
No other SEC school has a date ticket or a spouse
ticket, he said.
**We have made the statement that at no one time
has any Florida student been denied permission to
see a football game. A lot of the schools in the SEC
can not make this statement, he said.
Student Government at Florida State University
contributed $1,900 to their cheerleaders, and at
Miami University, SI,OOO tos2,ooohe said.
ONE SENATOR pointed out that unless a great
number of students buy season cards in the next
two weeks, the AA will have considerable extra
ticket sales to add to its protected $60,000 surplus
for the coming fiscal year. Only 7,000 tickets have
been sold, according to Daniel.
I would suggest that you use this to pay for the
cheerleaders, the senator said.
Also approved Tuesday night was a resolution
calling for an end to most of the regulations
governing open house in the dormitories.
The resolution would abolish the open house
sign-in register, the 24 hours advance notice to the
area office and the requirement for a responsible
person to supervise the closing of each open house.
Only the hours for open house would remain
unchanged.
If you axe going to put your trust in students to
have open house, then you should put your trust in
them to be their own little policemen, commented
Sen. Bill Gfflmoie.
Also approved were funds for the Law Review,
hiring of a business advisor for SG, $363.15 to pay
additional Rathskeller debts and an additional $250
for cut-rate theater tickets.

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SPENCER COOK
WEIRD HUH?
*u-j .:i. J* a. ;. w- ; :*!','.,.'tv '.;; **
This poster is just one of the sights at the University Gallery. Com* by
pud see some of the others anytime. It's a nice break from studying.

11 '. .: ' . ;
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maa6 Shctfeu
FLORIDA
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go west, young girl
HO '- tr> >-': -. R< ':' :&' : ;
. Shirtdressing thats been 6 &****s l* ***
yi'iitwb bn*. ,yN99w-t(tiss. bsnatioiKj.. 3 a fa>!w JeuouA 1..? y'-.Mu
>* skinid, midid. Lassded with a belt bn M v
of leather-like vinyl, flashing
fringe to anyone who comes within a
few paces. Created by Jonathan
Logan; rust only in sizes 5-13,30.00
Junior Dresses
ii.iXiiui.ifc.iii .i.imii, .gviij|] iyii. ~ :'i. i .;' 'C.'hi i' i .11 i.l, ' i, p|

'JL' v a.a a iCn ~ilrflii v ?
Timnovy, Aiigun ># w/u # ini rionoi Aingnor,

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, August 20,1970

Biweekly Payroll
For UF By Jan. 1
By MURIEL EVERTON
Alligator Staff Writer
Its going into effect in January but ithete will be ampli
opportunity to have questions about the new biweekly payroll system
answered.
Within die next two weeks, the personnel and finance directors plan
to have a team of knowledgeable people from their offices schedule
meetings in colleges throughout the campus. The purpose of the
meetings will be to explain the expected changes in the payroll.
THEY WILL have the latest information because a schedule of
payroll dates for 1971 will have been formed with the help of the
computer processing, finance, and personnel departments.
A memorandum giving six months notice of the change was sent
out to deans, directors and departmental chairmen on July 10. They
were asked in the memo to pass the information along to the
employees under their supervision. However a number of questions
and misunderstandings have arisen since then on campus.
UF is the last of the state schools to make the changeover. FSU is
converting Sept. 1.
ACCORDING TO Finance and Accounting Director Joseph P.
Hough and Assistant Director Robert D. Moore, the new system will
be implemented over a period of several weeks to avoid bringing any
financial hardship to employes. They explained the transition with
hypothetical dates because the final dates have not been formed.
All employes will be payed as normal until Jan. 1. Beginning then, a
two-week pay period will be pre-certified three days after the period is
over. Two and one-half weeks or so after their last one, they will get
j
IWI m again.
After the next period the check will be pre-certified six days later
and they will receive a paycheck after, again, about two and one-half
weeks have passed.
THIS CONTINUES until post-certification reaches 14 days. From
then on UF will be on a post certified biweekly system.
At no point should the employee go longer than two and one-half
weeks without a paycheck.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell has asked State Comptroller
Fred. O. Dickinson to establish an office on campus enabling checks
to be printed here instead of sending them to Tallahassee. Hough said
this was a timely and necessary move.
ALL EMPLOYES will be on the biweekly system imaking payroil
more standardized. Instead of the several payrolls now in existence
such as the supplementary monthly, biweekly and emergency there
will be only the biweekly ones.
Work will be cut down, Moore said, because instead of sending
certification and receiving it back, the department will handle
basically two steps. These will be sending the time card in and
distributing the checks when they return.
Moore foresees less work, fewer delays, and quicker pay after the
initial transition has been ihade.
The faculty will be paid every two weeks, but are pre-certified
because they are on contract.
The continual haphazard flow with the heavy volume of paychecks
throughout the state will be cut down, Moore said. The payroll will be
on a regular schedule, causing fewer delays.
Welcome!
FRESHMEN
AND
Today's the day on your busy schedule to visit
your on-campus Bookstore and meet some of the
people whose sole purpose is to serve
you ... .introduce you to the textbook division
and make you familiar with the tools of your
college career here at the University of Florida.
Come in....browse around and pick up your
information portfolio with Florida decals for your f @
-i.T CT -Tmimn rV -i- n riiiMFnii W him $
" car mehtdad... FREE!
Mm BCampusShop&Bookstore
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OUTSTANDING SENIORS m,L BANN,STER

Five outstanding graduating seniors have been
selected by the UF Alumni Association. They are
(left to right): Mac Steen, athletics; Wladimiro
Scheffer, male scholarship; Ken Driggs, male

Text Os Sislers Statement

It is dear from statements in the press that
portions of the University community are unaware,
to some extent at least, of the steps the university
has taken, programs which the University has
instituted, and plans which the University is
implementing to deal with minority group
problems. Certain requests recently presented by
the Black Student Union are in conflict with
academic and legal responsibilities of the university.
This will be explained in a detailed response
currently being prepared.
Nevertheless, the administration of the University
shares with student government and with the Black
Student Union and other campus organizations their
concern with problems of blade students and other
minority groups.
FURTHERMORE, working within the context of
its assigned role in the State University System, the
administration of the University is, and must
continue to be, committed to courses of action
which will lead to effective solutions of minority
group problems. '";
It should be known that the university has
instituted programs which will result, and in fact are
resulting, in substantial increases in the numbers of
qualified minority group students on this campus. It
should be known further that in projecting its
budget needs for the next halfdozen years under
the new PPBS budgeting system, the university has
requested major increases in funds for special help
for minority students.
It should be known that the university has
committed itself to employment programs which
will result, and in fact -are lesulfipfl. in substantial

HI .a*
.
*
- .

It moves with fast and bold living. a*&- ',; A new freedom. A private world
that features INDIVIDUAL,
PRIVATE BEDROOMS. Just two 1
blocks from campus. La Mancha
has both luxury single and K*' j>^K r
multi-level apartments with central > .;^
air. all electric kitchens, and rugged I
Barcelona furniture. But it's also a I ft
fun world with TGIF parties at the ly : \'\ v "-*;' ~%}£* A ft'
patio and pool. And it all happens I '
for only S7O a month which
includes utilities Stop in Make >
your reservations now for
September. I
flacky .., * *
.
>MinM^ihMHfMt
is ;
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.
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leadership; Mary Curtis, female scholarship; and
Karen Eng, female leadership. These outstanding
seniors will be honored at commencement exercises
August 29.

increases in the rates of employment of qualified
minority group faculty, administrators and
non-academic staff. Furthermore, it should be
known that the University has committed itself to
programs which will improve the employability of
members of minority groups and will increase the
rate at which employees in these groups can qualify
for promotion.
FINALLY, IT should be noted that these
programs in the area of employment have been
submitted to the Department of Health, Education
and Welfare as part of the university's affirmative
action program and have received unqualified
approval of that agency.
In order to meet the need for better
understanding of the University's position with
respect to minority group problems and of its
positive steps in this area a detailed analysis is being
prepared and will be available early in the autumn
quarter.
This analysis will deal not only with current
programs and accomplishments but will also include
a frank discussion of the difficulties which need to
be overcome and the guidelines under which the
university must work. It is hoped that a constructive
collaboration between all interested parties can be
based on this analysis.
To make this campus a place where all students
of whatever race, national origin or creed can work
and study without prejudice and without
discrimination is a challenge worthy of our greatest
commitment. It's achievement will demand no less
than this on the part of us all students, faculty
and administration alike.



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WOLF WHISTLES FOR DOC
From toft, they are Drs. Nell Pottar,
them three University of Florida Student Health Susan Puhl and Esta Kress. They staff the services
Services doctors, especially when their patients are along with seven men doctors.
CLAMS ENTOMOLOGY HEAD
FDA Absolute Ban On DDT
Disastrous To Food Prices

The chairman of the UFs
Entomology Department said an
Environmental Defense Fund
petition to establish a zero
tolerance for DDT in raw
agricultural commodities is not
only impratical, but would be
disastrous for agriculture and
food prices.
EDF has thrust this proposal
on the Food and Drug
Administration, and such a law

Three Employe Advisors
Bridge Communication Gap

Three employe relations
advisors have been appointed to
provide communications aid to
specific areas of the University
of Florida campus.
Appointees are Herman Mace
for the J. HHlis Miller Health
Center, John McAvoy for the
Physical Plant Division,
Laundry, Campus Shop and
Bookstore and Printing, and
James Wacksman for the
Housing Division, Field Services
of the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences and the J.
Wayne Reitz Union.
THE APPOINTMENTS are
part of the Universitys recent
effort ato communicate more
specific information on
procedures and personnel
policies. Each advisor will
conduct training sessions and
assist supervisors and employees
in all areas of employee
relations.
The program encompasses
new and revised written
communications to employees
and a series of live programs
with employees and supervisors,
as well as the advisors, to aid in
Maor maiored in butinea*
wESr*** Marshal!
University, Huntington, W. Va.
He retired from the UJS. Air
Force in 1967 and joined the
University staff as an
employment interviewer that
same year. In May, 1968, he
became personnel representative
for the Health Center.
McAVOY EARNED a
bachelor of arts
political science fri#.yl&
University of Florida and served

could reduce the production and
sale of many agricultural
commodities in Florida and
elsewhere by as much as 50 per
cent, warns Dr. W. G. Eden
with the Universitys Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS). Not to mention the
higher food prices such a drastic
step would precipitate.
HE SAID HE was well aware
of the problems persistent

in the UJS. Navy for four years.
He returned to the campus in
May, 1968, first as an
employment interviewer, and
later as a job analyst.
Wacksman received his B.S.
degree in management from the
Universitys College of Business
Administration where he was a
member of Alpha Kappa Psi
professional fraternity. He
joined the University staff in
February, 1969, as a job analyst.

I DAILY LUNCHEON
AND DINNER
SPECIALS
I Meat, 2 Veg, S a I
I 2 Rolls and Butter, %M W I
I Coffee or Tea W f I
I
I only at I
I gtS* 1225 W. UNIV. AVE. I
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phi e * +*-s* *. > Amm
* c <* + f Mttt- > eVv #%fwl
P V ** P P-,P * * P *4 P P P IMt.ttHM /% V#VV | |V/

pesticides such as DDT pose to
the environment, and favored
use of less persistent chemicals
when they can be safely and
effectively used. But trace
amounts of DDT are detectable
in vegetables, eggs, milk, meat,
fish, and wildlife. Enforcement
of an absolute zero tolerance
would mean all commodities
containing even a trace of DDT
would be termed adulterated
and not for sale.
Based on typical samples
made by the Florida Department
of Agriculture, about half of all
food products could fall into
this so-called adulterated
category.
Opposition to the
Environmental Defense Fund
proposal has also been voiced by
Wayne Hawkins of the Florida
Fruit and Vegetable Association,
Orlando.
Even if DDT were totally
banned in the U.S., he said most
of the commodities would still
be unacceptable for sale because
trace amounts of DDT can be
found in them.

Uloridt Quirteriy
The thcfll of a lifetime
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22 YOU CAN b* a sin 16 by Ott 10
GUARANTEE
If for any reason you fall to
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Elaine Powers Figure Salon's
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INTRODUCTORY OFFER
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Page 5



Florida AlHertor, Thonday. Augmt 20.1070

Page 6

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PHIL BANNISTER
CRAFT SHOP Will BE OPEN

The Reitz Union's Craft Shop will not be closed
over the quarter break as was incorrectly staled in
Registration
By CARLOS J. LICEA
AMiator Staff Writer
*
Increased registration in Alachua County may
surpass figures estimated by county officials.
Supervisor of Elections Alma Bethea says the
number of people registering may be above the
projected figures.**
THE SUPERVISOR'S office has no projections
either on the number of students registering.
One of the factors in the rise of voting
registration could be a ruling by Florida A tty. Gen.
Earl Faircloth.
Faircloth said last month students could register
to vote in Alachua County even though they had no
intention of establidnng residence. Up to that time,
the supervisors office refused to register students
who were not planning to make Alachua their
county of residence,
f
MRS. BETHEA said figures on voting registration

Better Now Than Later

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w wicom: OTf?A.FC HOUSE %
II P FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
lill II m m S J B OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
SlrtJlH S I Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
I m mV H 332l^.iiftiy§wtj;-A^v^^wtt.Tlw
Tuesday's Alligator. The office will be open 1-5
p.m. Mon.-Fri.
Increased?
..
will not be available for some time.
Those who have already registered, but will be
absent from the county election day can still get
their absentee ballot.
According to Mrs. Bethea, people can still go in
person to the Supervisor's office and apply for an
absentee ballot for one September Primary election.
IT IS IMPORTANT ballots be obtained and
mailed early, because there might be some conflict
before the September primaries and Labor Day.
Labor Day falls on Sept. 7 and the elections will
be the following day. The supervisor's office will be
dosed, and those who do not have their ballots in
by the Friday before, Sept. 4 may not have their
ballots counted.
Mrs. Bethea is trying to arrange with the post
office for her to pick up the ballots by S pjn.
Monday Sept. 7,but as of yet, nothing has been
worked out

University Police Department
officials have posted these signs
at the station house on campus.
Students are urged to save
themselves and the police a lot
of grief, by paying their fines on
time.
OBVIOUSLY, not too many
have done so, but policemen are
arresting people for delinquent
tickets.
Dont be one of those who
gets caught, pay it. You're going
to have to do it anyway, so why
wait?
It isn't always "better late
than never."

Rathskeller Will
Open Again In Fall
The Rathskeller will open again this fall, only this time it will
be off the hook financially. n
The two-year-old club, which is the first club to sell beer on
campus, has been, if not breaking even, in the red since its
opening. During this time, the Rathskeller also accumulated a
debt that caused the club to be closed for the summer quarter.
THE DEBT, totalling almost 19,000 has finally been paid by
the Student Senate.
Some of this money to pay the debt has been paid m the
form of a loan for the financially insecure club.
We hope this way we will get some of our money back some
day, Tom Tworoger, president of the senate said Tuesday.
TWOROGER SAID the amount will be divided into parts and
presented to the senate on different occasions.
It is with this debt out of the way that the Rathskeller may
be opening its doors the week before classes start.
According to Robert Overton, director of food service,
Servomation will open the food concession at the Rathskeller
around this time.
ACCORDING TO Michael Brown, 4JM, director of the
Rathskeller, SG will meet with representatives from the Faculty
Club (who holds the Rathskellers beer license) and Overton.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder said policies will be
determined in this meeting. What Uhlfelder envisions is SG, the
Faculty Club, and Servomation working in cooperation to
have a successful operation.
Entertainment, according to Uhlfelder, will remain with SG.
He said SG is planning to bring some entertainment to the
Rathskeller by the first weekend after school starts in
September.
IN ORDER TO cut expenses, and have a more financially
sound organization, Servomation will be handling the
management and food in the Rathskeller, while keeping out of
entertainment, Uhlfelder said.
With SG handling entertainment only, there will be no
overhead expenses as in the past, Servomation will be in charge
of hiring and firing employes. Other expenses have been
reduced.
There might not be as much money put in advertising,
Uhlfelder said. But there will be just as much entertainment.
@sef(c Lindsey
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unable It pvtclMM
any advertised Ham, please request a rain c b .~, ~ "Super-Right" Whole or Shank Halt (16 to 18 lbs. Avg.)
check Quantity Rights Reserved. ouper-Kight Freshly
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'Super-Right" Western Beet Special! "Super-Right" Corn Fed Shoulder Speciall
Chuck Steaks. .69' Pork Steaks .. *69'
'Market Style'Smoked "Super-Right" Cuban Style Copeland AH Meat
Sliced Bacon eeeeeeeee U. 79* Sandwich 39* Sli. Bologna £69*
John's Frozen Cop'n John'i Frozen "Super-Right" Delicious
Perch Fillets ........IS 59* Cod fillets & 49* Sli. Picnic ... .*. 99*
M *1 eiVB Cut Onm Beans 1 lb. can. OK OHM
Sausage .......... 4i£ s l* w SwM Poo. lb, con 11 M I
Patch Fresh Kosher Stkks-or Whole MM Os I
DlaUa* M-oz. mA| w Tomato vatvp 14 ox. wn. yoilt
PICKIeS itHNHHma iar W Fruit Punch 46 or. can CHOICE
pickle Patch fresh 1 Orange er Grape Dr. 46 #*. can H
Garden Salad J.V 33*
Meotor Liter BMvoed Es Green Limas 1-lb can or light Chunk Tuna 7
Ken-L-Ration.3/. 47*
Ann Page Regular <&ngg3 BACK /m at* i
Pudding 5............. *TlO* C?ff WWftlflrlllfflllliia3s^W
dwv 4 - f qrmw "w"
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llimraili IQ* n,,a 9 90 fra* Ripe freestone
* ** w nflfTfiwr ** t* Peaches 19*
Sourer earn . T M IIIIMIIIM
ZZ**. o on. L" 8 1 BitfimflH Hmyww * W
Margarine...... 2^29* u A ,*,*
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ThMtrtty, Augu* 20,1970, Tfm Florida AM ter.

Page 7



l.nHM,Allt|ow>.Tlwrafcy.Aint.lWO

Page 8

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

I fust choke them to death
Military Support For NRA

WASHINGTON Under
pressure from the National Rifle
Association and members of
Congress, Secretary of Defense
Mel Laird has quietly agreed to
provide at least $70,000 in
military support for the
NRA-sponsored 1970 World
Shooting Championships.
By allowing the private gun
lobbys shooting match to be
publicly subsidized, Laird
overruled vigorous objections
from Army Under Secretary
Thaddeus Beal. The Army was
being asketf for most of the
support.
UNTIL RECENTLY, the
Pentagon provided all-out
assistance to the NRAs animal
national competition. But this
came to an abrupt end when
controversy erupted over the
association's high pressure
lobbying against gun control
after Senator Robert F.
Kennedys assassination.
Undaunted, the NRA and its
friends in Washington again
rallied to hit up the Pentagon for
help during this year's
worldwide event. The
International Championship is
being held in this country under
NRA sponsorship for the first
time. Contestants from 60
nations will take part.
The backstage maneuvering
began last spring when the
association submitted a huge
shopping list of requested
assistance to the Pentagon. The
NRA, which is used to getting its
way in Washington, wanted
everything from a
motion-picture detachment to a
team of linguists.
THE REQUEST got an icy
reception from the Army.
In a private memo June 2,
Under Secretary Beal declared:
*Tleie is neither precedent nor
regulatory authority for
ptoMb* personnel support to a
purely civilian-sponsored
tooting event conducted, pff a
military installation.
''Austere funding and
reduction of programmed
resources by the
Department.. preclude the
provision of either support
personnel or equipment to to
- BUT BEAL'S argument was
Tost on Laird, who was
, gr | t 4r 1 1 \ <.v

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Galhib
Executive Editor
: --A

Merry-Go-Round
by Jack Anderson

the heat from Capitol Hill.
For one thing, Texas Rep.
George Mahon's mighty
Appropriations Committee had
urged Pentagon support for the
shooting contest.
For another, Rep. John J.
Rhodes and Sen. Barry
Goldwater, both Arizona
Republicans, were asking
military assistance for the event.
It will be held at Black Canyon
in their home state from
October 12 to 26.
SO LAIRD'S office asked the
Army to take another look and
consider a shortened shopping
list. £
On July 27, Deputy Under
Secretary of the Army David H.
Ward again protested that even
the shortened NRA request
should be flatly rejected.
Two days later, Laird's final
decision was made known in a
private message to Ward from
Acting Under Secretary of
Defense Vice Admiral W. P.
Mack." The Secretary of Defense
desires that the support... be
furnished," it read.
THE RESULT: The Army
will provide the NRA a radio
communications system with
two mechanics and six
operators, 22 field telephones,
four general purpose tents, two
supply officers and eight duty
soldiers, two first aid stations
with two ambulances and
qualified medical personnel, four
small aims vans, four armorers
and 68 officers and enlisted men
to "command, control and
operate equipment."
The total cost of the Armys
share will be $62,000. the Navy
and Air Force will chip in
assistance worth an extra
SIO,OOO.
* *
Fear of an unknown
eavesdropper haunts every
telephone caller in official
Washington. A secretary or
recording device may be taking
down every word. Or an entire
roomful of people could be
'> LI t' r f

Les Gardieff
Managing Editor
Fred Vollrath
News Editor

listening in on a squawk box.
CONGRESSMAN JOHN
Moss, D-Calif., has ordered a
probe of this insidious practice.
He has demanded information
from more than 50 government
offices on possible telephonic
eavesdropping. Moss instructed
his Government Operations
subcommittee staff to question
each agency via a written form.
The reports are to be submitted
to him by September l.
The questionnaire seeks
information on which agencies
allow a secretary to listen in,
which use electronic
"third-party eavesdroppers, and
how much it costs the taxpayer
to have his calls monitored
without his knowing it.
The Congressman also asked
what offices have regulations on
eavesdropping and which ones
simply allow a third ear to be
summoned to the phone
whenever wanted.
Moss took a similar survey in
1962 and found that of 37
agencies questioned, 33
permitted monitoring. Nine
agencies could see no reason for
regulating the practice. Both the
CIA and Justice Department
told him explicitly that they
planned to keep it up.
*
The Post Office Department
sent out its press releases on to
signing of the postal reform bill
not by special delivery mail, but
by messenger service.

Alligator Staff
DevaSbriir Published by students of the
ro tfEmCT.*icmloV- University ( ajL,Florida, under the
Editorial Assistant *J*J2* # Advertising
offices in Student Publications
Su'**' third floor, Reitz Union.
Campus Living Editor Editorial Office phones: 392-1686
87,88 or 89
Optekms expressed in the Florida Alligator as those of the
of the writer of the article and not those of the ofnSd*
v.y- Y-fe'- I,LI

EDITORIAL
What A Pity
College students havent been overly popular with the
Florida Legislature this past year.
We imagine this was due to a lack of ability to understand
the motives, problems and real needs which underlay the
massive demonstrations during the Fall and Spring quarters.
It is sad the legislature reacted in such a hostile manner,
but we aren't suprised.
We would never have suspected, however, that the hoard
of Regents -a group which should make every effort to
fully understand what is happening on the campuses and
why should follow the legislature's ignorant path.
The Board of Education has approved the Board of
Regents policy directing that universities shall refuse
admission to an applicant whose record shows previous
disruptive or other misconduct not to the best interest of
the university.
We cannot understand the reasoning behind the policy.
Was it to keep down demonstrations on the campuses? If
so, we hope the Board isn't going to hold its breath waiting,
for lack of known disrupters does not a peaceful campus
make.
Was it to popularize the university system with the
legislature and the public? This is, sadly, the more likely of
the two alternatives.
The law and order mania has gone a little too far.
The universities, until now, had the right to refuse
admission to known disrupters. But now, they have no
choice.
What a pity.
Needed: Facts
The Black Student Union, backed up by the Student
Senate, has received some sort of an answer from Tigert Hall
on its five demands.
Like many administration statements, it says little, but at
least Vice President Harold Sisler has let the BSU know
Tigert has received the demands and is considering them.
But that is not quite enough.
Certain demands were in conflict with the academic and
.. legal responsibilities of the university. We hope the
adminstrations promised statement gives us good reasons
for turning down the demands.
But, even more importantly, we hope the administration
provides us with some concrete proof of immediate
implementation of the demands that do not conflict.
A statement means nothing without facts to back it up.

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 39*1681,
82* 83 or 84
M.S.Dab
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldmen
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Dapartnoent,
caii: 392.1619



Speaking Out

IL |
There is no hope
for the complacent man
Flavet
Theft
EDITOR
Friday, Aug. 14, there was a
theft in Flavet village. About
twenty-five or thirty dollars
worth of women's underwear
were stolen from one of my
neighbors. They were hanging on
the line facing the backside of
fraternity row. They could have
been stolen by anyone, but
reason narrows the field down.
(1) This is not the sort of
adventure a woman would
participate in.
(2) A MARRIED man would
have no motive.
(3) A single man whos ego is
boosted by conquest than talk
would have no motive.
This line of reasoning leaves
only two likely groups.
(1) Transvestites who gain
sexual satisfaction from
possessing and wearing womens
clothing.
(2) SINGLE MALES, who's
ego is so dwarft that it has to be
inflated by lying about
non-existant conquests.
Unfortunately a pair of
panties on a bachelor's wall is a
common decoration and the lies
he is more than willing to tell are
ridiculous and pitiful because
they are obvious Ues.
(a) The satisfied man would
not need to brag and certainly
would be reluctant to louse up a
good thing with idle talk.
(b) NO MATTER what
activitM?tak&place on a datr ac
clothing behind so that thee bdySi
friend can hang them on his
rearview mirror for the world to
see.
So, if an aquaintance of yours
sports a wall full of trophies
you know for certain he is a liar
and you can also wonder if, in
the privacy of his room, he puts
them cm, and admires himself in
the mirror.
* JIM 6ALLOWAÂ¥r3FÂ¥*

Fraternity Free-For-All Nears

n-; The first annual All-Fraternity hundred numb survivors finally
free-for-all, commonly known as accept their invitations to
fall rush without rush rules, is membership,
about to begin. THAT'S NOTHING new.
Fraternities, armed with But the freshman are new.
liquor bottles, fistfulls of And this year they'll bring with
pledge-pins, little sisters, them an attitude that could spell
paunchey alumni and glittering the death of the traditional old
promises of new houses, will Florida fraternities, unless they
assault the 1,500 or so new learn to evolve with these new
freshmen males until a few thinking students.
Lack Os Coverage
EDITOR:
At this time, before the dose of another quarter, we would like to
thank the Alligator on behalf of the student body for the fine
comprehensive coverage of the change in the Athletic Association's
student football ticket policy.
Because of this thorough coverage or perhaps, more correctly, in
spite of it the news of the change has spread far and wide. As of
Friday, August 14, two weeks before the August 30 deadline, a mere
5,000 students have purchased the $5 card. We suspect that over
half the student body doesnt even realize that they must buy a card
* to see the Gators play in the fall.
THIS IS not to say that Student Government endorses the present
ticket policy. Quite the contrary. None of us like the circumstances
we find ourselves under. We can assure you that the Uhlfelder
administration and this office in particular is doing everything in its
power to make things more palatable to the students.
However, if this effort is to be successful, we must work within the
system to obtain the desired results. But the Alligator has been a
continuous deterrent to our fight to save the students from 'The
Monster (Athletic Association).
We have no doubts, however, that come fall there will be mass
confusion, bitterness, and disillusionment; over the new ticket policy.
Perhaps, then, .the Alligator will see fit to accept its share of the
responsibility for the unnecessary confusion.
It is extremely difficult to fight the Athletic Association alone, but
it is impossible to fight both the Athletic Association and the Student
Press simultaneously.
ARTWROBLE
SECRETARY OF ATHLETICS

Castro Misses Mark

Fidel Castros economic
failure might be a lesson for
students of economics as to
what not to do in a country if
that state wants to experience an
economic take-off.
Cuba now has become the
second nation in this continent
to regress from developed into
developing Argentina has
slowly done so. This regression
has taken 11 short years, which
has been called a great
socialistic experiment.
CASTRO IS now doing what
his more bourgeois neighbors to
the south have learned to do
over the years. The dance of the
musical ministers has begun to
the somber tone of Castros
voice.
Francisco Marrero, the
minister of sugar, has become
one of Castros scapegoats. Jose
. Llanusa, long time friend of
a Castro'iHas^Sitht^tiliuTiPfoV"-
Castro said was not progressing
satisfactorily. Both men have
been dismissed, and we will
have more, Castro said.
The year-long campaign for
the ten million tons had been
building up to a feverish pace
and the failure spells trouble for
the government itself. Many
officials involved in other areas
* of pro&gction have blamed their

Staff Writings
RBillM
by Carlos J. Licea

failures to meet their quotas on
the harvest. These officials will
probably be receiving the ax
next. The effect of failure is
already becoming evident.
The let down after the
campaign for a ten million ton
harvest has made some of the
discontent in Cuba flourish.
OUR enemies say that we
have difficulties, and in that, our
enemies are right, admitted
Castro to those who heard his
three-hour speech in the Plaza de
on Jify
nffi afihi'V'ersaiy of tne
of his revolution.
Castro cited absenteeism in
industry as one of the problems,
hinting those who fail to show
up to work are working against
his regime. Castro now faces two
choices: he can step down, and
gracefully let someone else take
the rap for his failure, or he can
strengthen hi. grip on gmu by
establishing more repression and

The old paddle, image of
fraternitiesf fill! of pledge
pranks, google-eyed sorority girls
and a definition of brotherhood
which required conformity, has
little or no appeal. If you think
it still does, try and sell it to
rushees this fall.
FRATERNITIES CAN offer a
freshman something that no
other student organization can
the potential to facilitate
personal development as an
individual, a desire for
scholarship and service, and a
better understanding of how the
other fellow thinks, is there in
the ideals and purpose of every
Greek house.
The problem is in the
application.
A very strong fraternity
system exists at UF, one of the
most solid in the country. But
it's weakening because of its
own reluctance to change.
THIS YEAR'S new students
won't be genuinely impressed by
the coolest club of 1959.
Instead, they'll be looking to
fraternities that take their ideals
seriously, that practice a mature
pledge program and that are
genuinely interesting in fostering
better men.

Subdued Anger

EDITOR
Many of us here in Vietnam
have been following the news
stories about the unrest on the
nations campuses with subdued
anger. It is demoralizing to read
about our UNDERPRIVILIGED

pushing Cubas masses to
produce more similar to Stalins
five year plans of the 19305.
The first choice seems
unlikely. Castro offered to step
down if the people wish, but
he had already done that in
1959 to obtain the removal of
' Cubas first president under the
revolutionary regime, Manuel
Urrutia Lleo, a former justice of
the supreme court. Urrutia left
for exile in Mexico, and Castro
remained. Chances are, in 1970,
Castro will repeat himself.
yviiPT ad! .UOO.fd# sd ,OiW amiia
ai qirio Uiw oaiol. ijA has
The second choice then,
seems the most likely. Castro
announced the creation of a post
above his cabinet of ministers,
with the purpose of coordinating
administrative and economic
planning. The person who
occupies this post will oversee a
bureau of social production,
similar to the politburo of the
Communist Party. As of yet this
person has not been named.

Thursday. August 20,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

by Ken Driggs

The in-fighting in this
campuses* fraternity system has
to stop now. The grumbling at
the prospects of change or a
service project have got to stop.
Just because a fraternity man
wears his pin less often, starts
wearing love beads and drops his
weekend drunk in favor of
getting stoned, doesnt mean
hes made any significant
changes.
If the wide-open rush planned
for this fall is to be something
more than the early vibrations of
death in the system, then
fraternities particularly
individual fraternity men, have
got to reevaluate themselves.
Pledge programs must be
overhauled, the freedom of
members to be themselves has
to be lived up to and methods of
membership selection have to be
examined. The problem of
alumni interference has to be
mastered.
* Being realistic for 1959 isnt
enough. Fraternities should
come join their fellow students
in the 1970*5, only then can
they expect to reach their hill
potentials as brotherhoods and
learn something aboutbrotherly
love through brotherly
respect.

counterparts vandalizing campus
buildings, manhandling the
leaders of our educational
institutes, and generally making
asses of themselves.
It is painful to the thousands
of less pampered students
here who have had to take their
lessons from instructors ip black
pajamas and sandals, where the
classrooms are muddy foxholes
and hot sweaty jungles, where
the Saturday night date is maybe
a hot beer and a letter from
home and where the grades are
not A's, Bs or C's but sudden
death, crippling wounds or
maybe a temporary victory. You
cant take the lessons over again
if you fail the test.
WE CANT expect you
people, back in the world to be
concerned, you did your share in
44 or maybe 52 and now
youre too tired to do more than
mutter, I just dont know what
this world is coming to.
Well dont worry people,
because someday soon this war
is going to end and half a million
angry young man, filled with
dreams of homes, families,
education and jobs, looking
toward a peaceful future are
going to descend on the 50
states.
When these men hit the
campuses, I sincerely hope that
someone tries to stoo an
j ex-marine from gfctngfto class, or
fool tries to
J a VietCdflgflagbeside the
artifical leg of a Seabee, or spits
in the scarred face of an army
medic or tells a navy corpsman
that he is stupid or calls him a
war mongral...
I guarantee that it will only
happen once.
LCPL ROBERT G SAGLD4E
FORMER UF STUDBKT
aW *3B

Page 9



Page 10

i, ti num/mmr. Timwhy. m, wm

WHILE THEY LA qq #4*
DINNER PLATE FRUIT DISH you less, gives you LB*
CUP or SAUCER BRIAO & BUTTER with a $3. purchase morel BA
HUNT** TQMATQ STRAINED BccCHNUI M
2 wr.rr:.. a*s- 2 sssar... 4 a 2Pm i*k .. - 2 cSTiood.... 7 i 0 to <* 75
SSTtoto .4~J >1" IE Softor STf fsa, 4 = *1 w "40*" Owner w W
C } TALL BLUE BAY
CHEK ALL FLAVORS SOFT to Al I
DRINKS HVMN-J
4 VANITY FAIR
COMET
'iQuTTisor *lOl bars" C\
KAUI4 CHARCOAL Wi 0 1 28 tM
THRIFTY MAID CALIFORNIA SIOO p' FTY WH 'lj Q
|A jf A THRIFTY MAIO CUT DOLE 1C FRUIT I M
HE 4 m Asparagus 3 '^ $ 1 00 Cocktail 6 s l PBIKO
urry c$ or wk ooio SIOO p WIUWIO SIOO
B THRIFTY MAID PURPLE TOASTIM BLUEBERRY, ORAFC, APPLE, STRAWBERRY,
*... 4 ~r *r kc
SCOPE Potatoes 5->1" ET-.i-y l'll
7Ar /Q1 Fees... .5 tr 1 ftS*. .4 r 1~ !' U
.cm. g y £sS)J Punch .. .3 ss s l Buns 3 s s l
'"m tn B ?i^^3R'DrinteA9ito39ftd lrtsed^toy,,, Z : 43 c
4,y.m jfcl- ---99* Sauce tt33 c
'SESSSsSI- 1 Spinach 35 c Detergent Sff 85 c
UMMTMI COUPON JOHL O toto I'D"" I UIJI *"* m|j P"IT-TT" 11 1 ** *
imtvwrvn QHC T et qh| HQT.ltft - CAN |j, ONtW>SI
"mr* 881 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS -_. 1401 N. MAIN ST.



K M | l I l I I I V I mm mm m I M H I
* I m '^MmM- : : -'-rn mix* --m tSmm KMw if'v-'-l I
rf*g& PRICES good thru wed. NOON AUO. 26
X# W-D BRAND YOUNG BROAD BREASTED
''QUICK FROZEN" -
Sliced Ham T e ! ST^ritai^... 99- KSaSTT!. .is 39 CnCheese. .2 33-
Sliced Bacon. a 69- pSsTrfH&s 69- cGSS cjKo
iLiver... 49- FSKISfCti 89< PiSTcheem.. S 69- Franl. .. .. 49-
Neck Bones ... 29- PrtHesT. 79- ChMseSpr^T 869' TARNOW PIZZA
BRAND US ) SWIFTS PREMIUM
ROAST BONELESS
i CHOICE BRAND CHUCK USDA
SRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF CALIFORNIA J MAND GR^^ D ROUND
BRAND USDA BEEF BONELESS CHUCK IjHjE
__- noast 99* Steakett6s2-.*l n HUB
U.S. NO. 1 REGULAR BAG nVll# MJVffff9P9 U(iS. CHOICE?
Rights Reserved BIRDSEYE COOL fl Hfilgfl
DflT A Tilt \ uiuid 1
VM Dui QU£EN |* AI p AR MAG,AN or 2 c t ken^ c y¥nir
- 65 c wmmmmm
tiiS 1 mm sms
ASTOR A
- 0y515n..... 59-
1e..3 >1 C0n,... 10 69' sSSm a *1" (K*ST.. St 69
Peaches 6 . s l Onions 3 >s 39 Fish & Chips ... 59* Lemonade ... 9Si 99*
Tomatoes 19* Drink ... 3 M OO KlllmdiEM Honey Buns. .4 St s l Coconut Cake.. * 79*
SANTA ROOA O'SUNSHINE FRENCH RECKILAR OR CRINKLE CUT mST'Tffl* n , AA
Plums .. .4 *1 Butter.... - 69* H Fry Potatoes .5 S M Waffles 2ss 89*
"** .... " u r ..a 4Qc HKitHK# Hi 13 01 r. 0 "*'*" .5... COc
CAbsgs .2 39- MorgsnK. 43 H Soboj. Pins. 69- Damn 59
05,.. .2 39- K a 45- Cheese Ceke .. K 49- Speech 5- >1
Ciikes"* .5 39* Topping 3 s l Corn on Cob... a 39* Green Beons. 5 M
Mocardhi v ..xaSicJZPbseWijrieiSafteAGtni!s9 ent jS|||j^
Vermicelli tt 29^"GUwec..... 2 = WKte^ent. IwOKCRRH
Frencli Dressi na St 43 c fop Job 69* Cascade ...... & 79* CUU
JW Ftei, Knwhee voioasthm/o m 4 0 DOZEN
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. k^p
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS ...... 1401 N. MAIN ST.

THURDAY

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Ladies Bike 3 speed, brand new, must
sell, basket and chain. Calf 376-1391
between 9 p.m. and 10 a.m. $45.
(A-3t-172-p)
1966 R-50 BMW Motorcycle Rebuilt
Engine, Fairing, Bags, Helmet,
Rainsuit, Well cared for. Canvas
Included SBOO Firm Call 378-3725
After 5:30 p.m. (a-2t-172-p)
Twin-lens reflex Minolta camera,
case, flash, filters, S6O. 392-1681,
room 330, Reitz Union. R. French.
(A-3t-172-p)
500 TRIUMPH excellent running
.condition. Completely overhauled In
July. Army forces sale. $650 call
John at 373-2511. (A-3t-172-p)
1969 Yamaha 180, Lug. Rack,
Helmuts, lots more. Used less than 1
year. 6700 ml. Fantastic Condition
$450 Ind. tune-up. Call Dave at
372-6598 (A-2M7-P)
Female to share house and bedroom,
$47 mo ptps 1/3 utilities, must l!ke
animals 12 string guitar. S9O. Also
strange beads strung? 1012 NW 4
Ave. (A-2t-173-p)
SELLING EVERYTHING leaving
U.S. Furniture, appliances, personal
and household effects must be sold at
any price. 17 NW 36 St., 3 to 6 dally.
(A-lt-174-p)
MOVING MUST SELL GE
refrigerator excellent mech. cond.,
$35. Two handmacjp cot sized beds
and mattresses $7.00 ea. Buffet
antiqued red, $30.00. Matching shelf
$7.00. Electric fan, $5.00, electric
thermostate controlled heaters (3)
$5-12, lawn tools mlsc. small Items,
377-7968, 372-7968 1112 NW 38th
St. (A-lt-174-p)
1967 12x60 Hillcrest mobile home.
Beautiful Interior, like new cond.
Must see to believe. Equity & assume
mortgage. 376-5860 after 5.
(A-lt-174-p)
Leaving for graduate school. Must sell
pottery at wholesale prices. Also
ampex 865 tape recorder $190.00 or
best offer. Maybe you would like to
trade partially for a bus or van. Come
by Landmark 95 anytime.
(A-lt-174-p)
Roberts 770 x tape deck, as adv. In
playboy cost $365, will sell for SIBO.
6 months old, call 372-1310.
(A-lt-174-p)
16 foot flberglas canoe for salel with
rack, paddles, etc. Must sell now.
Also tape recorder, B Lite posters,
records, candles. Call Wes 378-2298.
(A-lt-174-p)
KLH-11 port, stereo, new cart, and
spkr. cords. Ampex 860 stereo tape
rec., recently sac. re cond. Complete
super-8 movie outfit with zoom elec,
eye camera, auto. proj. lights, screen,
case. Ph. 372-7779. (A-lt-175-p)

SDFDFS

FOR SALE
r"J £'? 'i D
SCHULT MOBILE HOME, 10 Wide,
1 br, AC, screened porch, almost on
campus. Excellent condition, $2750.
378-0660, Glynwood Perk number 7.
(A-lt-175-p)
Bell & Howell 16mm movie camera
w/20mm lens, case included. Exc.
cond. asking SIIO.OO or best offer.
Call 378-1128; please keep trying.
(A-lt-175-p)
Plymouth 64 Meehan., perfect
condition S4OO. Call 378-8701
mornings. (A-lt-175-p)
NW 3 br. 2 bath, Fla rm, central heat,
2 air units, fenced yd., washer &
dryer, $13,000 MTG. SIB,OOO total.
Call after 6, 378-3330. (A-lt-175-p)
NEVER used anything like it" say
users of Blue Lustre for cleaning
carpets. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
Trailer, 8 x 36, two bedroom,
alr-cond. See at 4546 NW 13th St.
Lot 22. Asking $950, call 372-6097.
Must move by Sept. 1. (A-2t-173-p)
FOR RENT
HOLIDAY GARDENS
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. within walking distance of
campus. A/C,' 1 bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S. W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Across street from campus, stucoto
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
Included completely fumlshea
Ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-ts-c)
Furnished 1 and 2 br. apts. Quiet and
secluded. 2901 NW 14th St. 2 Blocks
North of the Mall Calf 378-2076
(b-ts-c)
Rooms graduate & older men
students central heat & ac kitchen 2
blocks north of campus S6O month
year lease washer dryer 378-8122 or
376-6651 (b-4t-171-p)
WANTED
Law student needs male roommate
for absolutely fantastic wood-paneled
pad, one bedroom, ac, $45/mo. Call
372-1294 nowl (c-4t-171-p)
>*s-
Dec. grad? Need male roommate for
fall qtr. only. New 1 bedrm. duplex
apt. wooded area, air cond. SSO mo.
Call Neal, 376-1006, or Sunny
372-4157 (C-4M71-P)
Available for fall University Apts,
Two bedroom and efficiency* *c.
Pool. Close to campus. 80-140.
376-8990. (B-9t-166-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, August 20,1970

WANTED
Hip roommate. Singles or couples to
share large house near campus.
Starting now or fall quarter. Call
376-4858 ask for Mark or Larry.
(C-2t-172.fr)
Only SSO/mo. share carpeted a/c
trailer 1W baths. Your own room.
Pool. Just 2 ml. to campus. Available
now yr. lease. Call Lisa at 373-2760.
(C-3t-172-p)
Girl's lightweight BIKE. Also coed
ROOMMATE for 2 br. duplex.
GRAD student preferred. 909 SW
6th AVE Call 378-1837.(c-2t-173-p)
One female roommate for La Bonne
Vie Townhouse 342, starting fall.
372-1987. (c-2t-173-p)
Looking for an apartment and or a
roommate? Join forces with Susan
Hill, tel 376-6083, 392-7945 late, no
heads or freaks, will pay S4O-60/mo.
(c-2t-173-p)
Roommates for Hawaiian Village
Apt. Air cond, 2 bedrm 2 bath, pool,
dlshwash. $55/mo and utl. Move In
now or Sept. Call 376-1387 after 5
p.m. (c-2t-173-p)
Vespa Mechanic to recondition
two scooters and do occasional
maintenance work at his leisure. Call
376-6283 between 3 7 p.m.
(E-3t-172-p)
FILM Buffs, want to work some on
weekends? We need ushers for the J
W R Union Fall Films. Call the
program office 392-1655 for
Inf ormatlon.(c-2t-l 73-p)
Female Roommate wanted for 2 br
French Quarter apt. Call 372-3148.
(C-lt-174-p)
Wanted roomate Village Park apt. 3
grad students, need a 4th. SB7 mo.
Call 378-0043 and ask for Bob or
392-0505 ask for Rich. (C-lt-175-p)
Male roommate wanted. Have your
own room, 10 min. from campus.
$47.50/mo plus util. Call 376-8012
after 6:00 p.m. (C-lt-174-p)
The friendly maintenance man to
extend his southern hospitality to the
mlnl-ha-has of Lac du Flambeau
Wisconsin, (c-lt-176-p)
HELPWAN^BD
WANTED: Business Managed for the
SEMINOLE. Includes management,
marketlrtg. Salary. Call Jim Okula at
392-1681 or 373-1859.

! -----
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I Alligator WANTED ads aregoigj_|
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* Guidance Suggested
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* ; it irrrMYiVrfi^fiViiVrrfiVfrrtVnVAV^OTfrrrWVrrnwmVrrrrr^rtVswrrrrrrrriiTrrrrrrrrrnrMTMJwr.*.*.*. I .*^*.*.*/^.*.*.*.*.*^
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

So you want to maka money? You
want a challenge? OK Gut Ready!
Were looking for a sharp, aggressive
young man with at least two years
college and some sales experience.
The skies the limit for applicant who
enjoys meeting the public and can
communicate! We will consider
part-time or full-time situation.
Contact Mr. White at 378-2060 for
appointment. (E-2t*173-p).
AUTOS
1966 Chevy El Camlno, 360 hp 396
eng 4sp, mags, new wide ovals,
toneau top, many performance
options, excellent condition, great
deal, call 372-6903.(G-2t-173-p)
Chev Mailbu 66, good mechanical
condition, new tires, sta transmission,
6 cyl., S9OO or best offer. Body
needs some work. Call 378-1901.
(6-2t-173-p)
65 VW for Sale. Excellent condition,
$595. Call Paula 373-2147.
(G-2t-173-p)
1962 Rambler American 2 door
conv, radio, whitewall tires, 6
cyclinder automatic, new brakes,
heater. Good transporatlon. Call
378-4063 after 5. (G-2t-173-p
1961 Volkswagen for sale SIOO or
best offer. Phone 378-3241 after
5:30. (G-lt-174-p)
Free kittens, born July 4, 376-0767
after 5 p.m. (J*st-170-p)
Like money? handle ours! Position
for business manager for 1971
SEMINOLE open, good salary, call
Jim Okula at 392-1681 or 393-1859.
(J-2t-173-p)
MEN. WHERES HOME NEXT
QUARTERI Try Georgia Seagle
Co-op. Room and Board
$220/QUarter. 1002 w. University
376-8941 (J-Bt-137-p)
Do you need a roommate? Female
transfer desires apt. for fall. Phone
collect Ellen 305-771-7478.
(J-4t-171-p)
TIRED OF WAR, racism and
pollution? Volunteers are needed for
Ai Hastings campaign for the U.S.
Senate. 378-8959. (J-3t-172-p)
Well organized and gung-ho? Apply
for position of SEMINOLE Business
Manager, good salary. Call Jim Okula
at 392-1681 or 373-1859.
(J*2t-173-p)
Coeds Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrologist 102 NW
2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
Beautiful Puppy for a beautiful
person. Call 372-3988. (J-2t-173-p)
Free pussycats, 6 weeks old, part
Siamese, huge ears, very cuddly. Call
495-2226 during day; 495-2479 after
6:00. Free delivery. (J-2t-173-p)
KEN DRIGGS: did you know? Life
is like a ladder; each step we take is
either up or down. Your EE and
Summer Thing 69-70 etc.
(J-lt-174-p)
Free pretty brown and white kitten.
Call 372-6034. (J-lt-174-p)
Idaho Joe: Just to get It In writing, I
LOVE YOU. Remember Atlanta is
only 5 hours away 111 Thanks for the
wonderful life yrs. me. (J-lt-175-p)
I'-HWH WOW'S ki homihn J
I PLUS f
AT
9 **% *** .* -*%'*%
i*. ,**.\**.%*.******. ,/vv'' %
jivSv?*
vT%vAv*vXv% isv>vicKi
X'Xv!*!Â¥2X -^v.v.yV.y.%xXy>X*X*X # X\*XXvV?Sy**v*^!*^*?sx
5

PERSONAL
Need ride to California, Sept. 1. win
xp nsMi someone with
VW bus or simitar vehicle. Cali Ken at
373-2116 or come by 134 Landmark.
U-2t-173-p)
An exp. self fulfillment group Is
being sponsored by center of man for
fall quarter. Encounter, body
awakening, self expression
techniques. Cost free In exchange for
your cooperation. Serious inquiries
invited. Call Dr. C.W. Duncan,
392-0731 or Lourdes Valdes,
376-1749. (J-2t-173-p)
LOST St FOUND
FOUND: Large black dog with collar.
Call 378-9726 to identify, after 5.
(L-3t-172-p)
Lost: univ. hospital beeper Aug 7 at
track field by resident physician. Call
372-2961. (L-lt-175-p)
FOUND: Lady's watch at the Hub,
Aug. 14, Friday. Come to cashier's
office at bookstore to identify, or
call 392-0194. (L-3t-174-p)

[PECIAL EARLY BIRD PRICE
16 PER PERSON IF YOU ARRIVE BEFORE 7:30
- N.W. 13th St PH 372-9523
ACROSS FROM THE MALL
John Wayne
PENTHOUSE 21 PENTHOUSE 3
LAST NITE
BUTCH CASSIDY AND OVER
THE SUNDANCE KID WHAT DO YOU SA Y
STARTS FRI. aug. 21 TO A NAKED LADY
M.A.S.H.
50 CENTS ADM. MAT AND EARLY BIRD PRICE UNTIL 7:45 PM
_REG. APM^SLOjL
HORSBNMI^P
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
I BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI I
I TUESDAY ALL YOU CAN EAT 79< I
I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN AA I
ALL YOU CAN EAT TT{ I
I WEDNESDAY
JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK ft
AND YELLOW RICE /< I
I BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS p. I
I FRIDA FISH ALMONDINE AND FRENCH I
I GAINESVILLE MALL I
. -w*. -*
a

Thursday, August 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested end repain
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 £
Main (M-ts-c)
ALTERATIONS by RUBY Mrs.
Ruby Mills, Apartment 217 100 N.E.
Bth Ave. near Gainesville Shopping
Center 376-8506 (m-st-170-p)
THE COPY CENTER 5 XEROX 4
ASK ABOUT OUR CHARGE PLAN.
1718 W. Univ. 376-9334 next to
Malones Bookstore. (M-13t-162-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480 (M-ts-c)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc,
prompt pick-up, delivery 373-1984,
9-5.(M-st-173-p)
HORSES BOARDED. New air cooled
barn, large box stalls, tack room,
large riding ring, trails, green pasture,
close' to university. 373-1059.
(M-3t-172-p)

Page 13

JSHE3IYV IC£)S
Hunt N Peck Typing Service: Spec. In
theses & dissertations. Fast accurate
service work guaranteed. Please cell
376-6063

I /TwrfarJ_ aa
iS3EBMSt
l When they take you for an out~oftoumer, |
they really take you.
JRCNUMMM
1 IHL MM STORY 1
! THEOUT-OF-TOWIKRS
Iq3 &, >'* Ml Ml>lfl AM A m*AMOUNIPK TUK
U J
j Starts LAST DAY I
TOMORROW! |coodbye,mr. chips|
J They make their own laws
J at "The Cheyenne Social Club
I NATIONAL GENERAL PICTURES PRESENTS
JAZZES STEWART i
! HENRY FONDA J
apia
i
I THE CHEYENNE SOCIAL CLUB 11
i SHIRLEY JONES J
I SUE ANE LAMGDON I
I wntten it JAMES LEE BARRETT munch mi moth it GENE KELLY
| aictmt munch JAMES LEE GARRETT mac it ruth saw rrrimniir nswiw B
RiWii r~"-H-ast'day"*~T "]
[ T Sj THEY CALL ME
j niMRTif!MBTI- TIBBS 1 j
I . jwYff jKJjM
! j
: -cm ;
! irla
w PRTRICR O'KRb '**
TECMNtCOtOR* Est
M^WAV*y%-arV!sX^<^.tX^^,WVSiVAViVAVWWSW. i

Patronize
Gator Advertisers



Page 14

The Florida

" C-P '' '" Or.. C
l ~iwi^~~ : Orange Juice 3 69*
Corn Towteos .. 3 *1
FnnmHzn*^*-^
LJ SAVI 4c Soft Margarine
I
f ,*T* Plllsbury Buttermilk, Sweat mi Ik or Ixtra-Light
J f'- S-os. J% (
, f . Biscuits iO c
Bor4 n>
Pillsbury's
- /jj If)etlcaietten
SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT. Flavorful Sliced Polish Leaf er
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE Dutch Loaf 49*
Lean
Swift'* Pram lent boneless Tap tewed. Key Clwb or Oolictous Kitchen-Fresh
Sirloin Steaks r $ 1 Potato Salad .. 39*
_ .... ~.. V X' Old Fashion Flavor
Swift's Ereminas Proton, Grillin' Good \ ~ ee 1 ee
Chuck Steaks ST 89* cBaked Beans.. .£ 39*
Swift's Premiaas Proton Sene-In .. j, Oven Fresh Testy
Pet Roast ST 79* |HMRW Italian Bread .. ZT 49*
Imperial Roast TZT 99* Kaiser Rolls ....£! 49*
Beef Roast T *1 09 Sandwich ~V 49*
Premium Proton Beef
Armour's Star Nutritions Sliced ; l
Swift's Premium Oven-roust
Now Zeeland 1
Swift's Premium Bonoloss Canned \ I
Hostess Hams rJZ *4 I ** JB JBJ I
Smoked Dainties KT 99* I
Brown 'N Serve X 69* 1 you* choice: l '" c Br eai B'%
Swift's Franks 55* \ptsts. Cu '* ** C r r ossrt |) '* h M kMIXI
Swifts Franks.......
SwlnA rremfa'hi tiflffliUMl "--* *' #P a\ Prices Effective
Salami. Tburinger or Summer Sausage) .£~~~ u \ Quant ity BRightS 8 RightS jflH
feefT-r* Treat. Small Florida \ Reserved
WhltG Shrimp eeeeeeee lb. 89 \



Sncery Sfiept. flHHHHH||ii^^|
24c All Frsh CoHee (limit tKr .f >5 ,
Felger's 69' M IMH WT
iatfoods 7*l BKPB BEnM i PUBUX 1
Golden Corn ... 5 ;r $ 1 &X TBK M *" K T VJ
Shellie Beans s:r $ 1 ji Kn^M
iAVE He Grata Oiwt T4r Strati MM lM
Green Peas.... 5- *1 ~ ~
iavi i#c Meta* DAIRI-PRKSH ORADI A g/iwwy (^w**ae
KS3HP w tlOmOGenlmed French Pressing 9JPI
_ mm n e A Am mjn# SAVE 6c PtrMMl Sle (Sc eW m 4-ber pfco-)
Paper Napkins .3;. $ 1 Milk ivory soap
(AVI Sc lady SeMjr MeeHMel h*lf flSj. lull !. X SAVI 15c Dishwasher Detergent (15c e) (mHy
Prune Juice 49 e g%. ne. *?,* c s 9 * 94
Mt.mum.tMt,|Uy WWt Spray Starch T 49*
Texize Liquid .. 3- *1 * w ....
SAVI 10c Mrs. Sell'*
B POCMIIIB Blitter GGe GG e hr 69*
I ;
B Tomato Jake tr 29
BBp
HB v
Bn,.. I
A Aftfti V 11 -e*. Ceceeet, I 1-as. lemon Jeaihle Rings er '7 A ks ~" .'M \ A
B "lb H ei. Sager Uni Caohloii fl
io< tiJi bi 3 ?
i p * jviowrKwash ~ 69' | FLOUR ,uw *,r I
| Complain IL^.Z., 93 1 I
| vour sat KK£n~. .-..
IADD MATCHING PIECES sum nioanm-is-ac I VALUABLE COUPON <£&>' §
,1 AT DISCOUNT PRICES v ^Bb
j -IB frxi. txira umj
Y A b Aj lllJlWWGreenStampspa
t inirrrsnpwnsiwniii niniininii si n- n Mbafcd sit" mis coeson an* rveCNAti BbHBI
- Singleton's 1
JBBHBBBBBBBBBL: Frozen Shrimp
11/4-1 b. pkg. $1.69 I
I w** * **. itr** |
mSHH [fiTil^GreenStampspl
*** | lemon-clear-lotion
I White Rain Shampoo
V^ T a Tgl |9lpv | 14-ez. bet. 93
_ 4 ~ '9b (>*) w4. *>>> i*. it?*)
J k ( fl Jfl WOS '*" 'W ? 4 I /xlm XAeeereeeeeeeeeaiMMiileAeeeeafteeeaeeeeeir
w e B L :<%* if T1 extra P^l
I Rb JN BL,, / llllJ^GreenStampsP l *]
.JjmHgp'
BkBBBB H ur AH r Mour
Deederent
S-es. sise S9c
Welt* W4. As at
XAe>AAoeAAAo>AAAAehe>eessseesssssnAA
rm. extra p^i
I idone
Juicy Western i
leverfwl Nertliwestern
Bartlett Pears 10 69* M^Greenstampsp^
II Veil Up lomm ana tail cttNaaat ratcatu W Bhiim
| * Write* |OsA. Antt'se. tem
FTI 2 4 Rjl^WGreVnStamps[S|
WEStGATE SHOPPING CENfER ;
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER I- rIDUA^^BEISSEPi
I GAINESVILLE MALL Bfc^-"'HP* I
2630

Ttanfcy, Aapal 9K MPi/rat <

Page 15



Page 16

the Florida

Outstanding Professors Chosen

. *r anipp*
M. HI | i ||
Miiigaxor mvt whim
Five faculty members were named outstanding
professors** for the coming academic year by the
editors and writers of the Course and Teacher
Evaluation Booklet.
The five were cited for their interest in a
subject, openness to ideas, fairness in grading,**
enthusiasm and the ability to induce students to
get involved in the course,** according to Doug
Shachtman, chairman of the project.
WE FEEL TEACHING has not been emphasized
enough on the UF campus. There seems to be
entirely too much emphasis on publication and not
enough on whether teachers can communicate with
students,** Shachtman said.

UF Student
Wins $1,350
On'Jeopardy'
Miss Connie Blauer, 4AS, of
Jacksonville recently appeared
on WNBC-TVs Jeopardy**
program during the special
Back To College Week* which
will be aired locally on
WFGA-TV on Sept. 9 and 10.
She wonsl,3So.
The Back To College
Week** program will be played
exclusively by students returning
to their sophomore, junior and
senior years at college.
Miss Blauer is a senior student
at UF. Categories will include
such youthful ideas as Rock
Groups,** The Draft,** etc.
The first show in the series
will be aired on Sept. 8. Should
the show prove a success,
Jeopardy is planning to schedule
other similar programs during
Christmas holidays, Easter
breaks, etc., making them
regular seasonal features.
Jeopardy is a Merv Griffin
Production presentation.
No Conspiracy,
Chafin Says I
SCORE director David Chafin
said he did not mean to imply j
that I feel there is some sort of
gigantic conspiracy among
administrators and faculty to
deny the student who wishes to
do so the right to appeal a
grade** in reference to comments
made by him in an Alligator
story last Tuesday.

HIGH DRY
:'X PLACE IO BE 1
wmrnmmmwmmmmmmmm* X
1 HAWAIIAN VILLAGE I
A P TS 378 5905

NOV. LEASING I
I FOR SEPTEMBER I
a
I
I 3
\
l


WNN
BffiSff i m
B
CONNIE BLAUER
... an 'Jaopardy'
| DAILY LUNCHEON I
AND DINNER
I SPECIALS
I Meat, 2 Veg, J| M I
I 2 Rolls and Butter, %M £ I
I Coffee or Tea I
I only at I ;
I AtfP* 1225 W. UNIV. AVE. I
I 0m .. j OPEN
I f*CWM4A 7:00 AM TIL I
I ..- 300 AM ~ I

The five selected were:
DR. Ail. BURNS, assistant professor of social
sciences and history.
MR. ALAN M. DAHMS, assistant professor of
comprehensive logic and education.
e DR. DANIEL L. KELLY, assistant professor of
English and advisor.
e DR. HAROLD KNOWLES, professor of
physical science and physics.
MR. WALTER WELSCH, assistant professor of
physical education and assistant track coach.
Since the course and teacher evaluation booklet
will cover only the 100 and 200 level courses, the
outstanding professors were chosen from those
courses only, Shachtman said.

Decals At Jennings?
Its Really The Truth
By CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
A lllnatnr Cj.ff
Aingnor mitt wnur
Students and faculty who wish to register their cars and purchase
decals must go to Jennings cafeteria instead of the traffic and parking
office in the Hub.
These temporary headquarters, located east of the Police Station on
Museum Road, formerly Radio Road, will be in use until Sept. 25.
AUTO DECALS will go on sale for faculty and staff next week
ranging in price from $5 to $lO.
Student decals may be purchased beginning Sept. 14. There is a
choice of either the $6 decal good through March or the annual pass
for $lO.
Med center personnel are urged to wait in purchasing decals since
they will go on sale at the J. Hillis Miller Health Center between Sept.
8 and 11.
SHUTTLE BUS passes will not be required until the first day of fall
quarter classes and may be purchased in Jennings cafeteria at the same
time decals are sold.
These passes will be $8 for the year.
EVERY THIRD
WASH LOAD
THE COMFORT EXPERTS FREE
Specializing in Residential 1
& MOBILE HOME Air-conditioned Comfort
jlranjjjiv SPEED QUEEN
FABRIC CARECENTER
OFF 13th St. on S.W. 16th Ay.,
J
! if lt*(lrly 49C, Clwck Full < I
I 1 IT / Pmi ndClmmm Sugar. 1-lb. tmrf I
! \!f y. Breakfast
l\ Bread
0.llclo* Lars* 4-Inch I
r Apple I
crumb Pie J
I I
F, f
j DANISH BAKERY j
| Goinesville Moll |
| Special Orders Coll 372-3885
£4., j£ : >.v/ V:%V / V*: J

The booklet was compiled on the basis of
evaluations collected from students in classes of all
UF professors who, when contacted, agreed to the
evaluation.
Comments on the outstanding five included such
statements as:
He was the most outstanding professor I have
ever had at UF.*' y
He was able to do a lot with poor material.'*
In spite of difficulties raised by the course, he
was able to do an outstanding job."
The editors intended to contact all faculty
members on campus, as well as graduate students,
but after a list of those who did not agree to
evaluation was published, many complained they
had not been asked.



Campus Crier I
!* TV SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
JBHHMHHHHf
I Don't gat down kids, just ona mora waak and you'll go to tha teach, GRANDMA'S? I
I or to the zoo, or on picnics or grandma's... I
GOOD LUCK ON FINALS!
v 'V" -' '- ; if y ' 1 V", '*
[ABSENTEE VOTING I
Now that you have registered to vote exercise your privilege. If you will not be here
on Sept 8 to vote make sure you turn in an absentee ballot before 5 pm Sept. 7. Do
your part in ending student apathy.
HOMECOMING I
L-- *A
Homecoming needs personnel. Anyone interested in working a special area of I
Homecoming such as Parade, Gator Growl etc. should contact the Blue Key Office 3rd
floor Reitz Union.
SG BOOK EXCHANGE NEEDS HELP I
The student Govt Book Exchange needs employes. The Exchange opens during the
week of finals Mon. Thurs. 2-7:30 p.m. Employes will receive $1.50 per hour.
Contact the S.G. office 392-1665.
STUDENT INSURANCE I
Student insurance coverage will be handled by Blue Cross-Blue Shield for the I
upcoming academic year (Sept. 70-Sept. 71). In addition to offering the basic plan for
single students, they will be offering a plan for married students, spouses and their
children. Also their is an optional major medical plan available. Pick up your Student
Insurance brochure at the information desk, 3rd floor Reitz Union.
FOOTBALL SEASON CARD I
Students who plan on attending home football games are reminded that there are
only 10 days remaining before the August 30 deadline to purchase the $5.00 season
football card. Cards can be validated either via return mail or in person at the Athletic
Ticket Office West Stadium, from 9:00 to 12:00 and 1:30 to 4:30, Monday through
Friday. Tickets for the Duke game can be purchased at this time.
DISCOUNT ON MOVIE TICKETS I
IfL Ttie Dept, of Consumer Affairs is offering Florida State theater passes at a discount. I
These nett** are good at the Center I & 11, The Florida, or any other Florida State
Theater. Each pass is only SI.OO. They are on sale 8-4:30, Mon. Fri. at the Student
Activities desk, 3rd floor Reitz Union. r
H H Vi -ir*'' #} Tfl& tfflf iin AZf.zlSk m~.. .. aA..._
9 :.. Mr 95 P i ~
I 1
I THANKS. I
RODNEY MARGOL
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
I STUDENT GOVERNMENT I

/ > V ,' , 4

i minay, ahpk /v f w rwn

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator

m; %* >&Hp nftk >'*** a, -^. vnw?w
1PR&?,.....;,, s: H .. 'lgptgf %g?fflr : r '&*'v>
* :>jHb
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v.... <
.wS-$' :?*<£ ft< ' (* -v v racwfoy^Y : jft'^- v^**j~>, '^ ,
HERE GOES NOTHING

Someone once said that school would baa lot easier
if they put the final exams at the beginning of the
quarter instead of the end. That way, someone once
said, people would feel more like studying and it

Marin County Civic Center
A Tribute To Architect

San Rafael, Calif. (UPI) In
1958, Frank Lloyd Wright
scanned 140 .acres in Marin
County north of San Francisco
for just 20 minutes and
announced:
I know just what I am going
to do here. Fm going to bridge
these hills with graceful arches.*'
THE RESULT was the $16.7
million Marin County Civic
Center completed this year on
the 100th anniversary of the
famed architect's birth.
Wright died shortly after his.
20-minute vision was
materialized in drawings, but the
plan was closely carried out in
construction by an associate,
Aaron G. Green.
It was the only building
Wright designed for
governmental use and intended
to open the eyes of bureaucrats
to what can be achieved at less
square foot cost than average.
Running horizontally across
the tops of four hills, a four-level
structure with a bright sky blue
roof springs from arches in the
gullies*
ROWS OF ARCHES and
circles on upper floors cany out
the theme for outside viewers,
and just about everybody inside
has a view through arched
windows echoing the roundness
of its hills.
Interior malls, illuminated by
natural light from a plastic roof,
offer hillside greenery rising
from behind retaining walls and
fresh air from areas open to the
iky. From one level's walkway
to another, people can chat bade
HAVE YOU BEEN THINKING-l
ABOUT LEARNING TO FLY? 1
W will tao*i you for ||
S2OO
Solo eouno in *St Count iso.
includes grounds school ft 10 hours
of flll*t Instruction.
$l6O
Solo course in Piper J-3, boohs,
round school ft to hours of flight
instruction.
FLYING HAWKS
>TENOEUAEROOROME37MOn

p i iinnc uifiiif*
|aS |H| 9B| IBUB'
ewe^eaeawaeeweeawwaftwnu^ -'*

and forth across the mall.
The circular theme is carried
out even in courtrooms, an area
of which Green says there had
been no new thinking for the
past 150 years.
Marin Countys courtrooms
now are essentially round and
place the judge, lawyers, jurors
and witnesses in a dose
functional relationship.
EVENTUALLY, the site will
include a 2,000-seat circular
auditorium, alongside the
existing lagoon, and a county
fair pavilion under a dear roof
and without walls.
Costs were kept somewhat
low by use of precast concrete

Answrs To TygdqyY Puzzle:
||A IT IT nTHR |a 11 VI lf]T|iV TfT^^V l |ir|Sr|^^^l?^E r i|l
I* |E |n MU |n IA |v 11 |m |fc Iff IC IV |U |LI T
AAAJ|
ll* !/%"trnMnM71 l V fi"iTw^nTTai^BlCTTTiniinTTr'nmnl
IIA 1C IH HF ]A IN 11 11 IGIHIT HT IS IA IR IfllSll
t I I I lil I" t_ W | n || lVl | 'L v WII
ip | a |y |ir it In |y 11 Ic lc
*. ltHj F |p i, gU*H*MlMiw^Hw4lb4 | jJUCMAiriHixlniu^wnl
\ TAKE THeIoMINUTE DRIVE AND I
I SAVE! I
v r-i.y^p
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER *
I HOURS I
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM I
SATURDAY BAM IPM
JoAJNESVIILLE^PHOIM^^7M!IO3jAN\rTIMIE^nrjAPPOINTMENriIJ

wouldn't be so hot and crummy. The hotness and
the erumminess of studying made the Plaza of the
Americas a desirable spot for this pair to hit the
books.

and a modular system allowing
reorganization of interior walls.
Extra space was induded to
meet demands of population
growth in the next 20 years.
Wright's radical design was
not carried out without some
bitter political fighting, but now
it's on Marin County residents'
tours for visiting relatives. Each
year 100,000 tourists inspect the
building.
The good building, Wright
once told Marin County people,
"is not one that hurts the
landscape, but one that makes
the landscape more beautiful
than it was before the building
was built.

Page 18

Book Has 200,000 Characters
But The Plot Is Simple
* - --4

ROME (UPl)The Pontifical
University has published what is
billed as the Roman Catholic
Churchs most complete
Encyclopedia of Saints.
The 12-volume work, written
Remember I
Summer I
Bowling I
Special I
REITZ UNION I


! STEAK* SHAKE
1 Student Special 1
I (With The Coupon) |
I VIW ^ r Regular 93< Steak burger i
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value I W 90{ plus tax; |
i Steak n* Shake 1
| 1610 S. W. 13th St. Gainesville |
ra
B 11 i / i B
I 1 |\ ffll #
I SEA SQUAbToR GROUPER I
I PIRATES COVE LOBSTER HOUSE I
SEAFOOD FRESH FROM THE SEA" 7 I
I SERVING DAILY FROM S P.M. I
OCALA GAINESVILLE
""SaS* 1 OPEN SUNDAY 5-10
I Vi MAeSouth 3500 $. W. 13th ST.
of HoMoy Inn ON MV AN ARM LAKE
I PHONE 622-6556 PHONE 375-2931

DAN VINING
Campus Living Editor

, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, August 20,1970

by 500 experts from 19 nations,
relates the lives of 20,000
recognized or legendary Saints
and candidates for sainthood. It
has 3,000 illustrations and costs
156,000 lire ($250).
A ...
GOOD THRU AUGUST
A >. OFF
25C 1 game
with coupon
3 BLOCKS NORTH OF MALL
PUTT-PUTT GOLF
3215 N.W. I3th St.
OPEN
M Sat 9AM 1 AM
SUN NOON lAM



The
Florida
Alligator

Hr 4ffl
&
m v
&. _^ggg|gKfjM&
I 'wfc's' :-: : ??^r?xx'< : yff./.:aJ
::" : SP': iflll
JgX;;
I $£ xSHBSs s '" ::;
~ iHI
DOUG SORENSON
.. .monster man

Burns, Key To Defense

After many shifts and hours
of staff thinking it appears the
Florida secondary is set for the
opening of practice.
Basically, the decision was a
question of where to best use
senior Jack Bums and how the
other defensive backs would
then fit into the pattern.
GATOR COACHES have
decided Bums is the man to {day
safety, where veteran Jimmy
Barr was lost due to back
suigery. From this point he will
lead the secondary.
In his Monster spot will be
Junior Doug Sorensen, who
moves from defensive comer.
The Eau Gallie letterman is a
nigged tackier with speed and
should fit this role perfectly.
Opening at the comers will be
veterans Ted Hager, a senior who
has bounced bade and forth
between offense and defense,
and junior Harvin Clark, who is
the team's leading returning pass
interceptor.
HAGER'S best moments have
come at defensive halfback,
where he has played two
consecutive outstanding games
aginst FSU. He has speed and
Coach Doug Dickey believes
with concentrated attention at
one spot he will develop into a
standout.
Backup depth, and
competition for the starting
honors, will come from
sophomores John Silman and
Mark Buell at Monster,
sophomore John Clifford and
juniors John Faix and Dennis
Zeleznik at comers.
This could be a sound
secondary," says Dickey. They
need to develop as a unit and get
the experience of working
together, this will come with
work v Theres a certain degree of
talent here and with Burns
directing things from safety we
should have a good situation."
The secondary is not expected
Jo be a major problem in 1970.
, With the opening game again jt
] Student Sputiat
1 svsssi
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~v~-.* -T^ray

JACK BURNS
.. .hard-nosed player

Duke just a shade less than a
month away UF football coach
Doug Dickey is already starting
to worry about the Blue Devils
Leo Hart.
You might say he's the
subject of considerable
conversation in the staff
meetings we have started," says
Dickey. He's a great athlete
who can throw about as well as
anybody you'll see in college
football.

We know what
you want to wear.

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Also, he's big and strong and
can run the ball with a great deal
of power for a quarterback. With
him in the lineup Duke's offense
is dangerous."
Hart threw for over 1600
yards in 1969, completing 145
passes with 43 of them going to
split end Wes Chesson, a talented
athlete with moves and speed.
I would rank Chesson with
any wide receiver well face this
season," says Dickey.

Thursday, Aypast 20,1970, The Florida ANifutor, i

Guard Injuries
Cause Question

When a guy swallows SI live
i minnows these days, as UF
i offensive guard Gene Conrad did
jj recently, you know he possesses
jj a certain degree of mental
: toughness.
jj This mental toughness of
:j Conrads could be one of the
:j keys to the interior of the Gator
£ offensive line. Conrad was
§ operated on for a knee injury a
5 couple of weeks ago. Doctors
< now say he has come so far, so
: fast he might be ready to play
jj: by the time the opening game
with Duke rolls around
| September 12.
j SHOULD this happen and
|i should the once-gimpy knees of
itwo fellow guards, Dale
j Hutcherson and Donny Williams
j j hold up, then the Gators are
\j going to be better off here than
| many people believe they will be
Sin 1970.

ycc can't hold
hands when
yoa'rc eating a
Whopper
j||M[p|r
- -.- :
'' '*i'
because
the burgers are
The Howe es the Whiter
8 N. W. 16th Ave.

DAVE SPAHR
Sports Editor

Williams was a standout jj
lineman last year, one of the j
finest in the Southeastern jj
Conference. He was named to jj
the second team ALL-SEC j
offensive unit and figured to j
improve because 1969 was only ;j
his first year on offense. He was :j
a converted linebacker. \
A knee injury against Miami:!
and the following operation put j:
him out of spring work and!
Coach Doug Dickey has not seen!
him work yet. jj
HUTCHERSON was hurt in]
the Gator Bowl game, which he]
started in place of Williams. He]
underwent knee surgery later
and was also out of spring work.j
These three, phis another?
converted linebacker, junior Eric:
Taggart, are the mainstays in the ?
offensive guard picture at the;
moment.

Page 19



, f" 1 *-t A S-St ,,* - 1 ~" ~
: ..\ _. L v i,_*!L 3 (a t,, ' J im 0 ~ '" vv 'W* 1* r t
'.- T

ONTARIO
SPEEDWAY

FSU Inks Top Kicker

Frank Fontes, one of the countrys outstanding
placekickers, has signed a football grant-in-aid to
attend Florida State University.
The Perth Amboy, NJ. t resident attended
Ferram Junior College in Ferrum, Va., last year. He
wiU be eligible to kick for the Seminoles this fall.
AT FERRUM JC last season, the 54, 150
pounder booted six field goals 45 yards or better.
Longest of 1969 was 58 yards and he once kicked
one 70 yards during a coaching clinic.
Fontes was bom in North Africa and spent his
early years there before his family moved to Perth
Amboy.
He has one of the strongest legs Ive ever seen
said Florida State head coach Bill Peterson. Not
only does he have excellent distance on field goals,
he can kick-off into the end zone. This has been

Steve.
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Ontario Motor Speedway, its finishing touches now
applied, sprawls impressively in the heart of southern
California's vineyards. This view of the $25.5 million
facility looks south towards the main grandstands. The

something that hurt us in previous years since short
kickoffs allowed opponents the opportunity for
runbacks and good opening field position.**

FONTES was highly sought by many universities
and originally signed with the University of
Alabama. However, he decided not to attend
Alabama when it was determined he would not have
been able to kick for the Tide this fall since
Southeastern Conference rules require a junior
college degree for immediate eligibility.
At Ferrum, Fontes was required to placekick
with his shoe on under junior college rules,
However, he prefers to kick with his shoe off and he
will have tha option this fall at Florida State.
The signing of Fontes should really improve our
kicking game,** said Peterson.

:>:v ; 'r ..
Myi WHHBI
HEALTH CLUB
"The All American Health Club for Hen A Women
207 N.W.23rd Blvd. Phone 378-2441

speedway is slated to open Sept. 6, for the first California
500.
The race for Indianapolis-type cars will be run on the
2.5-mile oval, where the fastest 33 care will be determined

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<
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m
i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, August 20,1970

Page 20

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