Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Aft Amimh

Vol. 63, No. 173

FACED WITH ALTERNATIVES
Fall Quarter A Time Os Reckoning For UC

By CARLOS A LICEA
Alligator outt writof
The fall quarter will be a time for
reckoning for UFs University College.
The 35-year-old institution will be
faced with alternatives that will either
eliminate UC in its present form, or
prolong its existence and scope.
UC HAS COME under fire from
different parts of the academic
community during the past year.
A committee was appointed late last
year to make a general evaluation of UC.

UFUbraries
r eshuffled
By CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Anyone visiting the two main libraries on campus recently is
aware of the great book shuffle that has taken place.
As a result of this shuffle, the graduate Research Crater and the
College Library are in for a name change to Library West and Library
East in September.
THIS IS BECAUSE it would no longer be appropriate to use the
old names when half the research collection is the College Library.
Besides we think of this as a single unit with the College, Latin


Al Hastings:
'lmmediate
Withdrawal'
By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Managing Editor
Immediate withdrawal from
Vietnam, increased control of
pollution and better
representation of both blacks
and whites were the main
campaign platforms Al Hastings,
Democratic candidate for U. S.
Senate, presented at his Reitz
Union appearance Saturday
night.
Hastings explained to his
audience he had changed his call
for Vietnam withdrawal at a
fixed point (mid-1971) to
immediate withdrawal because
he had learned the military were
always prepared with plans for
immediate withdrawals.
IT WAS AN unjust war, an
illegal war, from the beginning,**
he said.
While we are pulling out of
Vietnam I would lflce to see
2)
;eds REJOICE!
Youve eont# to the
right place if looking
for a man .page 2
Campus Living 14
ClmsHVirts ......: 12
Editoriab 6
Letters ..- 7
Movies 12
Orange A Blue 10
5p0rt5.......................; t l 5

The
Florida Alligator

0 w-
American, Rare Book, and
Florida History collections as all
part of the central library,**
Fleming Bennett, assistant
director for readers service, said.
Certain older books and runs
of journals have been moved to
the old law library stacks for
storage purpose. These include
books from the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, chemistry, and
engineering libraries.
BENNETT SAID the research
library was never large enough to
house the research collection
and by the middle of last
summer that library was
virtually blocked up with books
jammed tight and some even on
floors.
New books couldnt be
shelved, while at the same time
the stacks in the College Library
werent being used to capacity.
Bennett said it makes sense to
pick out certain books and move
them so that new books could
be shelved.
Although trying not to
inconvenience many, Bennett
said, no matter what sections
are moved we were going to get
some static.
HE POINTED OUT that since
there is a very definite {dan to
eventually build a science
library, it was a natural choice to
move the science collection out
of the research library since they
will only be moved again.
Beyond that, sections were
chosen that are used less
frequently.
As if is now, the lQOs, 200*s,
500s and Or half of the 600*s,
which is a backup collection for
other libraries on campus, have
all been moved to the College
Library.
WITH BOOKS being stored
and relocation of other books,
there is room to shelve new
materials in the research library
for the next four or five years,
% he said.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

The report submitted by this committee
presented a number of recommendations
relating to the improvement of general
education at UF.
The Action Conference during last
years spring quarter adopted a proposal
urging consideration be given to spreading
general education over a span of more
than two years. V
THIS YEAR, the mass standardized
testing used by UC has come under attack
from Student Government.
A resolution passed by the Student
Senate on Aug. 4 criticized mass testing.

The University of Florida, Gainesville

HH* "wn
mxmmi -w
miAa PHIL BANNISTER
CRAFT SHOP INDIAN

Look like a UF student resting up for finals or
recovering? Actually, it's one of the many creations
you can find hanging around the Reitz Union's

m 1 Mfek
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TOM WELLS
... turning to real estate
hM£* .'.'.Sv. ; *[-' .''*-.<%?/. **' : l l e 4 -i'.- v 'A ;; : '4-i '4-i*
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WILLIAM OSBORNE
... goes to Duka

This resolution came after SG officials
had presented a proposal to the
University Senates curriculum committee
to discontinue the mass testing on an
experimental basis.
The first proposal for a change in UC
came from UC Dean Franklin A. Doty. It
proposes UC should be extended
vertically, making the general education
program to a four-year span.
UC WILL ALSO be freed from the
responsibility of academic advisement, by
transfering this responsibility to an upper
division college as soon as a student

Wells, Osborne
Resign From UF

After almost 21 years at U F
Thomas N. Wells will retire on
Sept. 30 and leave his position as
UF business manager.
Another position will be
vacated around the same time
when William J. Osborne,
assistant director of operations
at the Reitz Union, will leave UF
to accept the position of
Director at Duke Universitys
Union.
WELLS AND HIS wife will
remain in Gainesville where he
will sell real estate on a part time
basis.
After passing the state exam
and receiving his realtors
license, Wells said he decided to
pursue this hobby he has had for
many years. Wells has associated
himself locally with another
realtor Edwin W. Peck.
Wells explained that in selling
real estate he can work as hard

seems firmly committed to a major, the
proposal states.
Another aspect of the Doty proposal
gives consideration of the need for
maintaining a separate faculty far general
education.
Other recommendations of this
proposal range from the opening of the
option of fulfilling general education
requirements in areas outside of major; to
re-emphasising in the general education
curriculum, of respect for intellectual
(SEE 'DOTY' PAGE 2)

Craft Shop. The shop will be closing down over the
quarter break.

\ J
\v jWTy

Tuesday, August 18,1970

and as often as he wants. This
will allow him and his wife to do
some traveling they have been
planning.
WELLS RECENTLY
purchased a mobile home and
expects to be making a trip
across the United States and.
down into Mexico.
Wells said he and his wife have
travelled before and now with
more spare time they will be
able to do some of the things
they ieUy enjoy.
Osborne, who has been at
UF about five years, said he is
looking forward to his position
of director.
Duke University has an old
building which is not adequate
for its activities and one of his
first tasks will be to work
towards building a new student
union, Osborne said.



.

Page 2

Looking For
A Man?
Listen

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A DIFFERENT VIEW
It may not look familiar, but try lying on your back undar one of tha
comer eaves of tha Reitz Union and saa if things don't begin to look
bettor.

Doty, Conner UC Proposals On The Line

JJ^MPAGEO^j
excellence and social responsibility.
THE SECOND proposal for UC reform
comes from Vice President for Academic
Affairs Frederick W. Conner, and it
differs somewhat from the (me presented
by Doty.
That the UC as at present constituted
be terminated and that, for the most part,
the members of the faculty of the college
be given the option of joining the
departments of their special field, or
remaining as a nucleus to continue the

its like buying a literary
magazine and getting a
photographic art magazine
free...
.
Florida Quarterly
Univrsgfc|*f RUjgHEla and 'ls published five times week to, extept during
June. A&mst when its pblished
holidayptml) exeh periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
.of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville. Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entared as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesvllla, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
ton# of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
i_y rt

By DAVID SPICER
Alligator Staff Writer
If you're looking for a man, Florida college and university
campuses may be just the place!
This was the beginning of an Associated Press story that ran
in various parts of the country in July. It went on to say that
guys outnumber the girls on student rolls, in administration and
on faculties at the six state universities.
THEY ALSO hold the balance of power at the 27 junior
colleges in the state.
UF was cited as the best hunting ground for coeds. The
boy-girl ratio is nearly two thirds, with 64.7 per cent of the
students being men.
The faculty ratio is even greater, 89.9 per cent are men.
THE REACTIONS of various students to this article ranged
from surprise to disbelief, but everyone polled had an opinion.
Susan McGinnis 3JM, said, I think this used to be a good
place to find guys but now the competition is really tough.
There are a lot of good looking guys here but they dont
hesitate to tell you how cool they think they are.
Miss McGinnis went on to state she had a boyfriend who
looked like the Pillsbury Doughboy and played pinball all the
time but she was happy to have him.
ANOTHER COED, Linda Hill 3NR, stated, I dont believe
it!

courses they are now teaching under
different administration and in most cases
on a reduced scale.
The Conner proposal asks for the
establishment of a dean ship and council
of liberal studies that will do with general
education a job similar to that done by
the dean and council of the graduate
school in respect to graduate education.
UNDER THIS heading, a division of
entering students will be created where all
freshmen should be in for one year, and
transfer students fcr a brief period of time
if necessary.
A third part of the proposal would
make general education a UF requirement

> _
Hastings: Black And 'Proud Os It

them pull out of Korea too, for I
am led to understand eight or
nine Americans die there every
day, Hastings added.
Hastings said the money being
spent on guarding the world and
ramming democracy down the
throats of emerging nations is
desperately needed in the cities.
THE SENATORIAL, hopeful
also said if he was elected he
would ask President Nixon to
personally attend the
SALT (Small Arms Limitations
Treaty) conference.
Its time we let the world
know we are busy about the
problems of the world, he said.
Hastings also hit ecological
destruction, saying it is an issue
that must be answered
completely in the 70V
IN POINTING out the
seriousness of the problem,
Hastings said in Jacksonville at

A Pictorial Record of What Happened During
the Academic Year 1969-70
Underground Guide to Communal Living
HPP*r

and hence distributable throughout the
four yean, including a formal provision
for orientation and guidance in the
freshman year.
These two proposals were presented
last year to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, but this year SG came out
with a third proposal for UC reformation,
which in essence is similar to that
presented by Conner.
The fate of the proposals is now up to
the University Senate. According to
Doty, the proposals have been given to
the senates Curriculum Committee who
in turn will make their proposals and
present it to that body in the fall.

If you dont catch them when youre a freshman the good
one, ,11 we gone. I tranrfened hew m a junior and I think the
quality of the guy, is really poordie concluded.
John D. Disnuke SEG, said, "I transferred here as a jurnor
and it didnt take me long to meet some cute girls and get dates.
There nay be more guys hew but if youre on the ball you can
usually find a date. ......
A DIMINUTIVE freshman identified only as Buchonan was
really down on UF coeds.
I havent had a date since Ive been here. It s really hard to
meet girls, especially when youre as short as I am. I d like to
tak-a anything out, even a dog,* he said.
The first blonde I talked to had a slight reluctancy to talk but
finally its really easy for any girl to find dates if she wants to
put out. I mean, Ive found a lot of guys but its hard to find
ones I like, said Ann Jurik 4AR.
THERE MAY be a lot of men here but three-fourths of
them are younger than me and a lot of the older ones are
married or going with someone. Just what are you supposed to
do on the'weekends? she asked.
This was a rambling sampling of people around campus. The
main opinion seems to be that as a girl gets older it gets harder
for her to find dates and the opposite for men.
And, as usual, everyone seems to think that UFs been
overrated again.
- ..-....-.-w-r.-.-aW.V. a

the present rate of ecological
destruction, by the most
conservative estimates, you will
need a gas mask to live by
1976.
Hastings said he differed from
the other candidates on the
pollution issue in that he
believes we must think about the
world and raise the ecological
problem to world level.
In criticizing his opponents,
Hastings added he did not feel
they were sufficiently concerned
with education.
LET ME REMIND you that
when you attend UF you are not
attending one of the nation's 10
best academic schools, he said.
In one more major pledge,
Hastings said he would work for
senate reform if elected. He was
especially critical in this area of
the senile old bastards who
have been hoarding the power
under seniority system. 5
Wouldnt it be interesting if
Gurney had to introduce me to
the Senate? he asked.

I WOULD LET the Senate
see I am in the Senate to
represent the interests of
Florida, both black and white,
he stated.
On the issue of race relations
Hastings said, I am black and I
am proud of it. But I know a
better color black and white
together.
We are going to have to work
together in this country or we
are not going to have it. And
that's not a threat; it's just the
way it is, he added.
HASTINGS SAID integration
is being hampered because
people are worrying more about
buses than about the quality of
the schools.
In this line he promised, if
elected, to work to take money
from the military for use in
education.
I will stand in the
schoolhouse door against
destruction over education,
Hastings quipped.

According to Dean of Faculties Robert
A. Bryan, the proposals are still under
study by the committee.
BUT IF and when these proposals are
accepted, it still will be a long while
before they can be put into effect.
According to Bryan, what ever the
senate approves will have to be presented
to the Board of Regents, who will have
the final say as to their implementations.
It can be said that any change will not be
implemented until 1971, Bryan said.
One thing seems certain, UC will not
be the same again if the proposals now
under study are put in to effect.



SENATE TO BE CONSIDERED
SG Plans Wauburg Referendtun For Fall

By LES GARDIEFF
While most UF students will spend the three
weeks between finals and the start of the fall
quarter soaking up the sun and leisurely relaxing,
many SG officials will spend at least part of their
vacation organizing themselves and their offices in
preparation to implement new programs and meet
the forseeable issues of a fresh year.
One of the primary projects SG has already begun
work on, according to Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder, is a possible referendum in the fall.
THE REFERENDUM would measure student
opinion on three basic subjects:
whether or not standardized testing should be
adopted;
whether or not Lake Wauburg should be
renovated with available money and, if so, how
much of the available money should be spent;
and whether or not the University Senate
should be reapportioned and should have voting
student representatives included.
Uhlfelder said he feels especially strong about
changing the University Senate.
My short range goal is to obtain a vote for the
students in the senate. My long range goal is to see it
eventually fairly reapportioned, Uhlfelder said.
The faculty does not need to be informed about

f US Should Get Out Os Vietnam 9
Senate Candidate Daves Said

By MURIEL EVERTON
Alligator Staff Writer
We have the military
capability to withdraw and
should get out of Vietnam
immediately, U.S. Senate
Candidate Joel T. Daves said
Thursday night.
Speaking in University
Auditorium, Daves pointed out
that nearly everyone agrees the
troops must be withdrawn
sometime.
WHATEVER is going to
happen will happen if we leave
today or five years from now.
He said a basic lesson the US.
should have learned from
Vietnam is that Congress and
not the President should declare
war.
He sees Vietnamization as just
a name that has been in
existence. It has been
unsuccessful he says, because of
the lack of support from the
people of the United States.
Were so divided in our
frontiers that we couktal meet
any crisis. This war in the
remote comer of the world is
draining our resources and
rendering us important.
Concerning NATO and the
troop involvement in Europe,
Daves said the United States
should take a new look at the
situation. With the unwillingness
of the French to help and other
changes, justification for being
there now should be made.
DAVES SPOKE! of his plan
for foreign policy. We need to
re-evaluate our position in light
5< XEROX 4<
1718 W. UNIV.
Thesis Dissertations
Book-Notes
COPY CENTER
Wt don't fivt prtMnts"
We Give Quality and
Service
Next to Malone's
jm

JOEL DAVES
. .senate candidate
of existing conditions, not those
of 20 years ago. We need to
define communism. And in light
of history and tradition we must
concentrate on supporting
existing democratic institutions
as well as those that grow up in
and of themselves
Concerning the draft, Daves
said the United States should
first get out of Vietnam and
look sensibly at the manpower
needed and the existing

Siif
Clip the
Pizza Inn
I '

What's In Store
For SG Next Foil?
/ 1 *
the University Senate but the students do, he added. ;
HOW MANY students know how the senate can
affect their lives, or UF President Stephen C.
OConnell is the chairman, or that he has veto
power? Uhlfelder asked.
Another project SG will be working on over the
break is a draft counseling service which Uhlfelder
hopes to have open early in the fall.
A consumer protection program for students is
also being planned with 13 complaint boxes to be
placed around the campus.
We want to publicize the fact that if anyone has
a complaint on or off campus this will be the place
to bring it. Hopefully we will publish a booklet
about the results of this years program and list the
merchants who give students a break, Uhlfelder
said.
IN COMMUNICATING the other way,
arrangements have been made for SG to take over
the student services booth near the Hub for
dispersing information about the draft, birth control
and any other thing we are wo iking on as well as

responsibilities. If manpower is
then necessary, the method of
selection should be democratic,
he said.
The Kent State tragedy was
the result of a lack of leadership,
he said. The National Guard was
a group of untrained, poorly
disciplined men. It wasn't
necessary for them even to be
armed.
When asked about his position
with respect to the busing of
students, Daves replied that it
should not be a political issue.
He said he favored leaving the
problem with the courts instead
of the local school boards and
that integration laws should be
applicable to all states.
Daves said his campaign must
project the message of not only
Vietnam and foreign
involvement but also his
domestic policy plan.
He said people are attacking
institutions and complaining
that information is being kept
from them. He concluded by
saying, We must survive the
traditions that have been set
before us or we will not survive
as a nation.

allowing other student organizations to use it.**
Other programs for the fall include a series of
monthly open forums on the Plaza of the Americas,
with OConnell, Vice-President for Student Affairs
Hale and other UF administrators present for the
September forum.
Also planned are an extension of the voter
registration drive among students, a continuation of
dorm stomping by SG leaders and the formation
of a tenant union in some of the apartment
complexes.
AT THE SAME time Uhlfdder said SG is
readying itself to take an active stand on certain
issues.
One campaign will center around making SG
more fiscally sound in terms of adding continuity to
financial management, though not necessarily
philosophical or political continuity.
This will involve having a full-time or part-time
graduate student auditing such programs as Student
Government Productions, Accent and Celebration.
ANOTHER CAMPAIGN will center on an
attempt to make recommendations to OConnell on
the distribution of the Activities Fee.
Were going to go to any extent necessary within
the law to see our goals are achieved this year in a
responsible manner, Uhlfelder said.

1 STUDY ALL NIGHT J
!You provide the dex, Student Government will provide the
place.
For those of you who find that as finals approach, a place is !:
needed to bum the midnight oil, several rooms across campus
will be kept open all night.
% BETWEEN AUG. 22 and 28, rooms 109, 125 and 127 in :j:
§: Little Hall and rooms 227, 229 and 230 in the Mechanical : : 'i
Engineering Building will be open for studying 24 hours a day. |
A Good luck on those exams. j§
:
*l 6e HancUefi, 9nc.
Gainesville's largest stock of Jeans
LEVI LEE WRANGLER
Denims Flares Permanent Press
ALSO LEVI DENIM JACKETS
Now in Progress jjj#
SUMMER
aiARANCI 'JIUB
If] I
I \ B'-
tgfunj-i) M- tmhne, He-
ana on iris /y
BANKAMERICARD
MASTER CHARGE
4821 N.W. 6th St. 376-4595
-

IMaivAwwMt. 1870, I

Page 3



Page 4

, Th# Florida AlUgrtor, Tuday, August 18,1870

MAY NOT GET 'DRUTHERS
Off-Campus Housing 'Tight Balance

By 808 WISE
Miiigaxor ouii wriior
Students looking for off campus housing this
M will probably find a place, but may not get their
druthers, according to Carl Opp, off-campus
housing director.
Basically, we have a very closely balanced
demand and supply situation, Opp said.
FOR THE PAST three years, 300 to 400 new
apartment units have been built in the Gainesville
area each year. But in the first six months of 1970,
only 390 building permits were issued for all new
construction in the city and Alachua county
combined, he said.
We have only added, basically, about 100 units,
which with about four tenants per unit is 400
spaces. If the enrollment goes up 800, we have a
theoretical shortage of4oo spaces, Opp said.
But other factors in the situation will result in

THINK THEY MEAN tr?
Wall, it's almost that time again. Back to the atl-nighters, bags under
your ayes and snacks until you never want to look at another candy
bar. Yes, finals are almost upon us.
T y^
| SG Book Exchange j|
|| Opens Wednesday j
Student Government is sponsoring a book exchange in room \
! C4B of the Reitz Union for the next two weeks. \
Any student interested in having his old books sold through 5
i the exchange should bring them by the Union between 1 and 7 3
! pjn. this Wednesday and Thursday or any day next week except \
THE PURPOSE OF the exchange is to give students a chance |
i to get a higher return on their used books than the bookstores %
i give- J
A receipt will be given by the exchange stating the price the :
| student expects for the books when they will be offered for sale ij
in the first two weeks of the fall. |

! HiGH-DRY
ACE TO BE
HAWAIIAN VILLAGE
; <
i AP T f 07 Q rn a r <
AA i *j / O J t l /
NOW LEASING i
FOR SEPTEMBER
<
x CT v #?? ? SfcwwA?
: . :, ,. ~ i

: a'
i V; >
\n i \
JUL l STEAK HOUffi^
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320

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- *&9 ;§?- ~X" ;:|fc
-H
' r -f-,.; *^tfr-'fy|" i "i 'T ,f 7 "' A -'''

adequate, though not abundant, off campus
vacancies, he said.
OPP ATTRIBUTED the slowdown to the high

By TED BURROWS
Alligator CotTNpondwit
The driver of the car that
struck and killed a local college
girl more than a month ago has
still not been identified,
according to Gainesville police
(GPD).
Miss Gregg Fullerton Toms, a
Santa Fe Junior College coed,
died after a car knocked her
from her bicycle at the
intersection of SW 13th St. and
SW sth Ave. The accident
occurred June 27 at 10:30 pjn.
Gainesville detectives are
continuing the. search.
GPD Traffic Officer E. E.
Eunice, Jr. said the investigation
was hampered by failure of
witnesses to get an adequate
description of the hit-and-run
vehicle and its driver.
Persons on the scene could
not agree on the make of car,
model year or color. The car was
described as a Plymouth,
Chevrolet and Pontiac. The
licence plate was from some
other county or some other
state. : 'V'
Investigators narrowed the
search to a brown Chevrolet of
1965-66 vintage and traced a
suspect to the Macon, Ga. area.
Then the trail grew cold.
Hit-and-run is one of our
worst problems, according to
UPD Cpl. J. M. King.
Most take place in parking
areas, and involve minor damage
and no injuries. Seldom is there
a witness.
r. 'i
X-Jff .V*
Many hit-and-run
investigations fail for lack of
proper descriptions by witnesses.

t Vfe have only added,
basically, about 100 units, 1
which with about four
tenants per unit is 400
spaces. If the enrollment
goes up 800, we have a
theoretical shortage of 400
spaces
, Carl Opp

'Hit And Run Still Sought

The GPD spokesman said that,
of 10i2 hit-and-runs on
Gainesville streets in 1969, 39
arrests were made.
The witness in a hit-and-run
case ought to supply more than
just a license number, said
Eunice. That alone is sometimes

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1 fjfff iL Student Special
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Our Regular 93< Steakburger
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value ft | V plus tax
i Steak n Shake
a 1610 S.W. 13th St. Gainesville

IGNITE GOLF ;;
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ST END GOLF COURSE

I daily luncheon
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SPECIALS
I Meat, 2 Veg, Jk m
I 2 Rolls and Butter, %M |C £
I Coffee or Tea
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costs of money, construction and land.
Since a high proportion of tenants have renewed
their leases or planned to live in the same apartment
during the coming year, the slowdown will result in
far fewer vacancies for the fall quarter, according to
Opp.
But rents will probably not be raised, he said.
RENTS HAVE already been raised by virtue of
increased taxes and costs of operation,'* he
commented.
But further increases in demand will probably
result in new construction rather than higher rents,
he said.
Since most tenants make long-term commitments
beginning in the fall quarter, the situation will not
be relieved in the winter quarter, according to Opp.
The tight balance" contrasts with the three
previous years, in which supply has always exceeded
demand, Opp said.

not sufficient to convict a
suspect.
It's easy to talk about it,
standing around calmly," but
descriptions of a "car, license
plate, driver's face and clothes
are not so easy at the hit-and-run
scene, King said.



WtM> Wants An Orange Ticket?

By SUSAN BROWN
A A -i
Miiignor worrosponcmit
The Reitz Union is getting a ticket spitter.
An automatic machine that hands out parking
timer-tickets will precede the electric entrance gate
now being installed. An attendant will still be Oft
duty to collect money, operate the exit gate and
give information.
THE COST TO the UF will be in excess of
$6,000.
UF Parking and Traffic Coordinator Lee
Burrows, said this is a large sum, and that it will
take some time for parking fees to pay for the
equipment.
He explained that an efficient method was


v 1
'Some Just Forget
WSBHm |i&B|

A car zoomed by the booth, screeched to a halt
several yards past, backed up and stopped again.
The driver handed back the orange ticket with a
sheepish grin.
Some of them just forget,** said Ronnie
Woodard, Sante Fe Junior College student who
works the Reitz Union parking lot booth full-time.
RONNIE SAID he gets about 25 to 30 runners**
a day.
The funniest time he remembered, was during a
recent garden show when these little ol* ladies
would drive past, their cars loaded with flowers,
smile sweetly and wave. They wouldnt stop going
in or out.
Ronnie said he wasnt sure how many cars came
to the Union every day, as he lifted that mornings
stack of several hundred.

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It moves with fast and bold living.
A new freedom. A private world
that features INDIVIDUAL,
PRIVATE BEDROOMS. Just two
blocks from campus, La Mancha
has both luxury single and
multi-level apartments with central
air. all electric kitchens, and rugged
Barcelona furniture. But it's also a
fun world with TGIF parties at the
patio and pool. And it all happens
for only S7O a month which
includes utilities. Stop in. Make
your reservations now for
September.
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914 SW Bth AYE

needed to centred the Union parking lot.
Because a great deal of people were running past
the booth without paying, the previous method
was not efficient, Burrows said.
HE DEFENDED the paying-lot concept; citing the
need to encourage a high turnover rate of parking ;
spaces.
The Union lot is a separate animal, Burrows
said. Because of the large number of
non-faculty/student visitors, decals were out of the
question. But because of the large number of people
all together, all-day parking had to be discouraged.
Employes of the Union and student activities
staff members have been instructed not to park in
the lot.

THE NEW
. ticket spitter

BUT WRJVE used around 1,000 cards in two
days, he said.
What time you got? interrupted a man outside
the booths window. After he answered, Ronnie said
he gets a lot of questions -about directions and
conventions most of the time.
The multi-colored booth has been hit twice with
Ronnie in it. He laughed and showed a big crack in
the front panels.
LUCKILY THAT happened before I came, he
said.
' \ -v'
Another man stopped and hurriedly indicated
that he just wanted to drive through to the other
side. Ronnie didnt try to hassle with him to explain
it was a dead end.
Take a ticket anyway, he offered.

fli
PC
_ jdjl
jtfe
where things happen fast
378-7224

PHIL BANNISTER

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|

THE OLD PHIL BANNISTER
... turns around
.<.
The Tough One
' ,-V
for Back-to-School!
H *w
P
k i
Bgi
llljl Uimfi
w I Levis!
cut to fit
saddle or out. Double X denim, stitched to stay,
with copper rivets ot all strain points. Pro-Shrunk.
Sixes 28-42. S£ Over 900 pair in regular stock: w!B
Shop Belk Lindsey in the
Gainesville Shopping Center

WuNf Augutt 18,1070, Tm norw ASifnor,

Page 5



Page 6

!. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 18,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
it the exercise of responsibility.

Friendly Politicians Get Rich

WASHINGTON One of
Americas banking giants has
devised an ingenious scheme for
skirting the Federal Corrupt
Practices Act so it can stuff
thousands of dollars into the
pockets of friendly politicians.
The act flatly prohibits
political contributions by
corporations. But the Marine
Midland Trust Co. of western
New York has cooked up away
to duck the law and keep the
cash flowing to the politicians as
well.
The Buffalo bank raises a
$9,000-a-year slush fund by
systematically dunning its top
officers for a percentage of their
salary. The money is then
pumped into strategic political
coffers.
The (dan was adopted after
being proposed by Senior Vice
President C. E. Berryman, in a
confidential memorandum to
bank President David J. Laub.
This column has obtained a
copy of the memo. It provides a
rare glimpse of the lengths to
which banks will go to preserve
their favored position with
public officials.
The following
recommendation is offered for
your consideration to solve the
problem of establishing a fund
from which contributions to
political candidates can be
obtained, the memo says.
Berryman then explains that
his plan grew, in part, out of
discussions at the American
Bankers Association (ABA)
convention an indication
that dreaming up ways to get
around the Corrupt Practices
Act is a popular backstage
pastime when bankers get
together.
He then outlines a proposal
salaries of $15,000 or more a
$5,000 deduction. The bank
would then assess on the basis
-of one half of one per cent of
the remainder to raise political
funds.
Berryman adds that he feds
the $9,000 would more than
cover our needs** for
Those bankers who have.
- 'he

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Executive Editor
\
" il wit J' v- ;

Merry-Go-Round
by Jack Anderson

all state that it cannot be done
on a voluntary basis. A certain
degree of persuasion has to
occur.
The memo concedes that
there are legal problems
involved** in the contribution
scheme. But it notes soberly that
the banks earnings depend
heavily on the level of our
public funds.*
Reached at his office,
President Laub acknowledged
that by public funds the
memo meant money deposited
in the bank by government
agencies.
Asked what was the
relationship between these
deposits and political
contributions, Laub at first said
there was none. Then he
reluctantly conceded that the
political giving was defensive
that is, an effort to protect
government deposits. The banks
total deposits are $1.2 billion.
Despite the systematic
arrangement proposed in the
memo, Laub insisted that the
contributions were absolutely
voluntary. I wish there was a
way we could put file arm on
the boys. But we cant, as you
well know.
Officers can even designate
the candidates who will receive
their money. The funds are then
used for dinner tickets, things
like that. It amounts to political
fund raising. Weve had our
attorneys check it out in every
way.
i
br Some wt Wtahingtbn*# molt
distinguished government hosts
ply their guest with bootleg
whiskey turned over to them
after it is confiscated by
Treasury agents.
The whiskey and other spirits
are seized by Customs and
Revenue agents at ports of
entry, or on raids inside the
country when its owners seek to
avoid federal taxes. When
Yiwwnty can find the man who

Las Gardieff
Managing Editor
Fred Vollrath
News Editor

claims it, he gets a chance to
prove its legal.
If no one claims it, the bottles
go to federal hospitals for
medicinal use, to charitable
organizations for similar
purposes or, as is often the case,
to federal agencies for
entertainment.
The only wrinkle in the gift of
the liquor, which is handled by
the General Services
Administration, is the partying
must be official, not personal.
In fiscal 1970, the Defense
Department got 1,382 fifths, the
State Department got 1,050, and
the Department of the Interior
got 699. Small quantities also
went to the National Science
Foundation, the Commerce
Department and the Department
of Health, Education, and
Welfare.
* A
Transportation Secretary
John Volpe, whose former
construction company is putting
up the vast new building which
will house his department, is
taking pains to avoid the
embarrassment of a super-plush
officer
He has instructed Walter
Hayhurst, chief planning officer
for the building, to convert a
planned bedroom in the
Secretarys suite into a
conference room.

Alligator Staff
Ms SpHf (OFM &
Auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
EdftoriMAsittant itori *!' AdvwtWna
offices in Student Publications
Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Dan Vining
Campus Living Editor Editorial Office phones: 392-1686
87,88 or 89
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the artkle and not those of the University of Florida.
** .LL*. 1 1 M f ***r.-t 4 t.

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EDITORIAL
Registration
Not Enough
We won the battle, lets not lose the war.
Students have won the right to vote in Alachua County,
now lets prove we deserve it.
Until recently, students had been denied the right to
register here, unless they were willing to swear they had
the intent to make Alachua County their permanent
residence.
Student Government, Alachua County Supervisor of
Elections Mrs. Alma Bethea and Atty. Gen. Earl Faircloth
have changed that.
Now it is up to the student body at UF to prove all that
effort was not wasted.
The primaries are Sept. 8. A majority of students
probably will not be in Gainesville at that time. But, you
can still vote absentee.
Dont forget, and dont fink out.
Its probably easier to vote absentee than in the regular,
election. All you have to do is go down to the County
Courthouse and mark your ballot.
The elections office is open from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
If you cannot get down there, send for the ballot. But
remember, all ballots must be notarized and returned by 5
p.m. the day before the primary.
A good citizen could find the time to do one or the
other. It won't take long.
There are some good candidates and there are some bad
candidates.
It's up to you to decide which are which. But, if you
don't, someone else will.
Are you willing to let others make that decision for you?
It is up to you. But, if you dont vote, remember not to
complain.

Student Publications
Business Staff
v.,..w .At .r,! ISkIU.
Td reach Advertisirifl,&tisinees and
PitimotMh Offices, Ci# 392-1681,
82,93 or 84
M.S. Davis
Business Manager
K.S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Wafcbnan
Promotion Manager
To reach Circulation Department,
call: 382-1619



x y* V;-

There is no hope
for the complacent man.
Black
Profs
Rare
EDITOR:
While on campus last week, I
happened to pick up a copy of
the August 6 edition of The
Alligator. Leafing through it I
was arrested by the article
concerning the student
governments view on the hiring
of black professors.
Whether the UF is stalling on
the matter, I don't know. Maybe
they are. I do know, however,
that the Student Government
should at least consider taking a
new perspective on the issue.
Black professors are not a
dime a dozen. Good ones are
even rarer. This of course is not
their fault, as they did not
receive the quality education
they were entitled to due to the
social climate of the times.
An unqualified professor is in
danger of producing substandard
students. That leaves the
educational system nowhere.
How can anyone better
themselves when they dont
receive the best education an
institution can offer?
The only way to improve the
situation is by demanding that
qualifications be kept high.
These qualifications then should
be applicable to every case,
whether black, white, purple or
green.
There's no argument that the
*ntoitn#oD jIWMtM
black students to find and hirer
the best black educators
available. The students, though,
owe it to the administration to
understand the problems
involved. Does the senator
quoted in the article expect
black professors to rain like
manna from tne nexvens:
DIANE HOLLINGSWORTH
r f t a ** #*.*>*

Your beloved Fluted
Columnist has been cavorting (4s
best I can cavort) in sunny old
California for several months.
You can imagine how
horrified I was to return to find
that the summer Alligator's
editorial pages have been ravaged
by Fred Vollrath, Alachua
County's answer to Spiro
Agnew.
Fred knows he can get away
with that sort of thing during
the summer while no one is
keeping a close eye on his cage,
but during the school year he
tones down considerably.
"I feel like a missionary
among the heathen, heh heh,"
he has commented to assembled
demonstrators on the Plaza of
the Americas. As a matter of
fact, since that is his only joke,
he usually has to surrender the

Womens Rights?
EDITOR:
In regard to the amendment passed Monday in the U.S. House of
Representatives and now pending in the UJS. Senate, I would like to
urge thinking women on this campus, throughout the state, and
throughout the nation, to write their respective U.S. Senators and
state Representatives and Senators in protest of passage.
I do not take this stand against the passage of the proposed
amendment to make women equal" out of desire to proclaim I
enjoy being a girl," or any other sentimental aphorism, although these
are not altogether devoid of merit themselves. Rather, mine is a purely
pragmatic point of view: there is no way of telling in what directions
interpretations of this amendment by the UJS. Supreme Court will
take us.
It may sound very good, and indeed harmless, for die amendment
to say no person shall be discriminated against on account of sex."
But sex doesn't mean just women. What if a Men's Lib Movement
sprung up, proclaiming men were being discriminated against by being
the only sex eligible for the draft. Already there have been mumblings
along these lines.
Actually, I dont want to enumerate possible ramifications of this
amendment. What I want to say to women is there is no telling what
might be the results of so vague an amendment that gives women no
more rights in particular and possible unforeseen liabilities in general,
If such uncertainty must be the ugly stepsister of equality, I choose
to be unequal.
CHERYL RYON,4ED

Still Wide-eyed And Wondering

Its almost over, time to move
on. 1 graduate in a couple of
weeks and four years of college
go into my memory bank. The
future is very murky, Im a little
scared. So what else is new?
I don't want to bore you with
a long rap about what college
has meant to me but there are a
few things I'd like to say.
I came here as a wide-eyed
freshman not knowing what it
was all about. I leave, still
wide-eyed, still wondering what
it all means. In between though,
a lot went down. There were
football games, parties, all
nighters, dorm and apartment
fK:f£ iTS;
There was this column which
I hope brought a few chuckles
now and then and there was of
course FLASH. The Mad
Emperor will follow me to the
JNfC*
You know, though, it's the
little things I remember best.
The way someone smiled at me
on i certain day; walking in the

Fluted Columns

Sorrow For The Right

microphone immediately to a
chorus of Go light your pipe,
Vollrath!"
That brings me to the point of
this whole improbable piece. I
feel sorry for the student
right-winger. He is a creature
horribly out of step with the
times, sneered at by his
contemporaries, and
misunderstood and feared by
The Establishment. He has no
allies.
At 22 he is an old man.
Arterio sclerosis of the mind has
set in early. He has forgone
adolescent idealism and jumped
right into middle age fear
fighting for all those wonderful
trinkets that come from a life of
not rocking the boat.
He dies before he has lived.
I remember reading an article
on Young Americans For

View From The Crowd
by Rob Matte

top; asking for extra dressing on
my salad; being bored in an
English class.
When someone walks up to
me and says, What did you
learn in college?" I will answer
with one word: people. If I
learned anything worthwhile it is
this; we all need each other, no
. ..t fIW is an island. Peace is elusive
i it "HWmftt will fe
because someone, tl idme where,
held out his hand in love and all
s 'tnkind grabbed hold.
It really is hard to say
goodbye. I dont think a painless
way has.yet been devised. I'm no
philosopher but let me dose
with two personal axioms I wish
I could follow more often:
remember the good times; smile
it's contagous.

Freedom (YAF), the most
prominent student right wing
organization. They were holding
a convention somewhere in
midwestem hotel. A pot-bellied
full-blooded All-American
e stablishmentarian approached
one of the young delegates,
suspiciously eyeballing his,
convention button which had
the word Freedom" written on
it.
What are you people doing
here?" he asked.
The young conservative
rattled off all the well-known
YAF right wing dogma about
decentralized government,
creeping socialism, et al. The old

Cuban Exiles

EDITOR:
,
Being Cuban exiles, we make
no pretense of objectivity or
updated knowledge about the
present conditions of Cuba. For
this reason, we avoid passing
judgement on Castro's Cuba.
As worshipers of reason, we
must pass judgement on the
irresponsible statements made
by Mr. Burrell in his deep
analysis" of (1) the
psychological conditions of the
Cuban people; (2) the present
conditions of humanity on one
group of people and (3) his
brilliant observation of the ills
that haunt American society as
portrayed by one, a racist and
two, by a warmonger's attack on
a defenseless open-minded,
long-haired young American.
Some of his statements, like
his definition of humanity, must
in ail fairness be judged
outdated. His observation of the
racist and the chauvinistic
soldier are perhaps true, but
melodramatic nevertheless.
His generalities about Cuba,

Good night Larry Phmick,
wherever you are.
LETTERS POLICY
UttMimua:
Be typed, elfned,
300 wonb.
9 Net be signed with e
t om:
f p 9,
Mmum will be withhald odv if
writer diows Juet eeuee. The
editor reserves die right to edit eN
letters for epeee.
wwseWPfw vTsvy WeMi ell a HJelJ^W^
essays, ookimns or tamers to be
eoweklered for use ee Speaking
Out" eolumne. Any writer
interested tat submitting e regular
column is asked to contact the
editor and be prepared to show
samples of his work.

Tuesday. Augurt It, 1970, The Florida AMfec,

by John Parker

guy thought he was some kind
of communist.
Whyntcha go somewhere
else if you dont like it here? he
asked and stormed off. He had
not recognized his own
constipated political/ notions
enamating from such a young
body.
Pity.
I can respect someone for
standing up for his views against
all pressures, but when you look
around and your fellow true
believers are Jimmy Bailey and a
Neo-Nazi Youth group, it's time
to take stock of your position.
But then again, maybe you
should stick with it Fred.
Perhaps someday they'll name
a wrist watch after you.

our nation from which we get
regular correspondence are, to
say the least, irresponsible and
worthy of being published in
any newspaper but one of a
university.
The disregard he displayed
toward life when he approvingly
applauded the hijacking without
the slightest consideration for
the life and security of the other
passengers is unbelievable;
The ease which he passed
judgement on the welfare of the
Cuban people, the reliability of
Washington, and the nature of
islanders, with the information
gathered in the sheltered
environment of two airports and
a bus in a couple of hours.
This is not a tribute to the
scientific nature supposedly
instilled at the UF, a reputable
institution which proved itself
unable to prepare tender minds
for rigorous trivel.
MARIO CABELLO,4AS
RICARDO MARTINEZ, 4AS
Repressors
EDITOR:
The University of Florida:
Pigheaded it stands, willfully
Sitting in an abyss of continual
mediocrity, surpressing any
degress of progression.
Its institutional greatness
found only with the repressors.
Its Reitz Union of
pluahiness perched upon the
dead minds of those who could
never afford it.
Its professional department of
athletics grinding the wallets of
all, for but a fee.
Its hyper-apathic, ignorant
students, concerned only with
their sensual drives and
compressed standardized
courses.
, Its system generates use, use
for diliree/'yef ;iHdir system
Ti- /ft-
Its blacks can be watched and
checked.
Its voices of equality are
found in a harmless
administrative foresight: Student
Government and a faculty senate
of puppets.
The University of Florida: a
living anachronism.
JOSEPHS. CHRISTY, 2UC
Jit gfl

Page 7



Page 8

w Th* Florida Alligator, Timdoy, August 18,1870

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Swing into fall with a purple and gold coordinate set by Garland. New
lace shoes are by Orchids. Modeled by Malinda.
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A bonnie plaid of bright fall colours is the fabric theme of this
jacket-dress team. The bodice of the dress is white crepe with a long,
long scarf. To change the dress scene slip on the matching plaid jacket,
buckle the belt and youYe off in a bonnie plaid suit. Sears Junior
Bazaar, modeled by Rita.

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_/"U_/AN _/"COTT

Fall time is funtime and Susan Scott has the clothes to prove it. This
dress with the crushed patent trim is perfect for the first game or
party, or whatever. If Susan Scott doesn't have it.. .it isn't. Modeled
by Judi.
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Alice models this fall's latest in pantsuits by Devon. Pantsuits will be
this year's ''Fashion Flair" for parties, dates and even football games.
No matter where you go or what you do outfit yourself for every
season, at Gainesville's fashion leader, Belk Lindsey.
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Tanya is ready for any occasion with this mulberry velour jumpsuit.
The cinched waist, high turtleneck, and flaired legs all combine and
project the leggy proportion basic to this season's fashion.
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Judy models a diagonal print, two-piece, fitted and flared suit by Mr.
Ares of California. In earth shades of beige and brown the outfit is
accented by a tortoise buckled, crocheted slip belt. A great outfit for
the big fall season ahead.
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The Mini-Mini look in this little three-piece negligee set of melon
coloured crepe with lace. The matching gown also has lace trim. Bikini
to match. Price about $20.00. Modeled by Cathy.
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Tuesday, Augurt W, WTO, Th# Ftonfli Alijitof,

Page 9



Page 10

t, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 18,1970

GriiffG and

SEND ALL NOTICES TO
DIVISION OF INFOR INFORMATION
MATION INFORMATION SERVICES,
BLDG. H

UNIVERSITY SENATE
CALENDAR FOR 1970-71:
Article 111, Section 4, off the
Constitution cells for the
University Senate to meet at
least once during each calender
month off the academic year.
Unless another date is specified
by the President or the Senate,
the regular meeting dates will be
the last Thursday of each
month. The following schedule
will apply for the 1970-71
meetings in McCarty Auditorium
at 3:90 p.m.:
October 1
October 29
December 3
January 28
February 25
March 25
April 29
May 27
June 24
There will be no regularly
scheduled meetings in July and
August.
ADMINISTRATIVE
COUNCIL CALENDAR FOR
1970-71: The Administrative
Council will meet at 2 p.m. in
the Board Room, 226 Tigert
Hall on the following dates
during the 1970-71 academic
year:
October 14
November 11
December 9
January 13
February 10
March 10
April 14
May 12
June 9
There will be no regularly
scheduled meetings in July and
August.
GRADUATING SENIORS:
Deliquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancvfiaxion s%tofi^
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduation, granting
or creoiT or veieaae or transertp
for any student whose account
with the University is deliquent

-Tl b I , "7 4 A i itlinwfeU .W fit
YOU DCIISIT NEED A PH.D. J
/ Set up an appointment with us. Anyone of our Loan
/ Officers will do. Let us get to know you and your
/ desires. Boat? Trip? Emergency?...or maybe you want
>r*"- to start a sa vin gs.
JwL P.S. WE LOAN TO PH.D's TOO!
Afc,. CAMPUS CREDIT UNION
j| 120 P .5, vy. Fifth Avenue 392-0393
' l l J- J- -t rre^r^p^wFPWP^-- ..

GRADUATING SENIORS: If
you have a National Defense
Student Loan or a S. A. F. E.
loan, you must complete the
exit interview procedure prior to
graduation in order to keep your
account current.
NATIONAL DEFENSE
LOAN BORROWERS: If you
have been approved for a release
of funds from the National
Defense Loan program for the
"fall quarter, and have
pro-registered for that quarter,
your fee payment can be
deducted from your loan. As
soon as you receive your fee
cards come to the Student
Accounts Office.
NOTICE OF DEPOSITORY
HOURS: Student Accounts in
the Hub will be open from 9a.m.
to 3p.m. Sept 15-18. If lines are
as long as they have been in the
past, the lines will be regulated
on these days so that there will
be enough time to wait on
everyone inside by 3 p.m. There
is an envelope drop on the east
wall of the depository for
student convenience.
UNDERGRADUATE AND
PROFESSIONAL COURSE
AND CURRICULUM
CHANGES FOR 1971-71: The
deadline for submission of
curriculum and course changes
for the 1971-72 catalog is Oct.
9, 1970. All proposals for
changes in undergraduate and
professional courses and
curricula should be submitted to
the University Curriculum
Committee, 233 Tigert Hall,
prior to this date.
Proposals for new courses
should be submitted in 20 copies
on the New Course Offering
Form, No. 101. Minor changes
in courses and course deletions
should be submitted in 20 copies
on the Deletions of, or Minor
Changes in. Course Offerings
Form, No. 100. Proposals for a
change in course credit by more
than one quarter credit hour or
substantial revision of an
existing course should be
submitted in 20 copies on the
New Course Offering Form, No.
101. Copies of these forms may
be obtained from the Office of
Academic Affairs, 233 Tigert
HaN.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
on Thursday, Aug. 27, at 1:30
pm in Room 235 Tigert Hall.

BLUB BULLETIN

ORIENTATION FOR STAFF
EMPLOYEES: On Thursday,
Aug. 20, at 9 a.m. and on
Thursday, Aug. 27, at 3 pm in
Room 109 Little Hall and Room
Mll2 Medical Sciences Building,
there will be an orientation
program for new staff merribss.
This program is primarily a video
tape presentation entitled,
"Working for the University of
Florida."
All new staff members who
missed one of the previous
programs and those who have
been employed since that time
are invited and encouraged to
attend.
THE ORANGE AND BLUE
BULLETIN ceases publication
for the summer quarter with this
issue. Publication will resume for
the fall quarter on Tuesday,
Sept. 22 and will be published
on Tuesday and Fridays.
Address all notices to the
Division of Information Services,
Building H, and all Calendar
notices to Public Functions, 101
Reitz Union.
ATHLETIC TICKETS: There
are a few tickets remaining on
the east side of the stadium for
faculty and staff and student
quests. Price is $7 per ticket.
The Alabama, Florida State,
Auburn and Georgia games are
sold out. There are a few
remaining spouse tickets
available for $15.50 if one of the
persons is a full-time student.
Spouse tickets can be picked up
at the ticket office Sept. 16-18.
Bring the validated spouse card.
Seating assignments must be
obtained before each game.
OMBUDSMAN CAN HELP
YOU with any problems
personal, legal, housing, and
academic. Any time during day
or night you can call 392-1650,
and leave a message so that we
can contact you, or come by
Room 232, Reitz Union any
weekday from 2 to 4 p.m. Your
identity and problem are
confidential. Ombudsman is a
Student Government project and
is run by Gamma Beta Phi
Society.
i

Campus
< V' "* '' -* .\r <3 : \
Calendar

Tuesday
Engineering Dames Meeting,
Perry House, 8:00 pjn.
Union Movie: "The Knack",
Union Auditorium, 6:00,
8:00, & 10:00 p.m.
UF Stamp Club Meeting, Doyle
Corner Building, 7:30 p.m.
Bridge Club Meeting, Doyle
Comer Building, 7:30 pjn.
Music Department:
UNIVERSITY SUMMER
CHOIR CONCERT,
University Auditorium, 8:15
pjn.
Wednesday
Union Movie: "The Knack",
Union Auditorium, 6:00,
8:00, & 10:00 p.m.
Black Student Union Meeting,
349 Union, 6:30 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 363 Union, 7:00
pjn. )
Union Bridge Lessons, 118
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 352
Union, 7:30 pjn.
MENS A Group Meeting,
Winnjammer, 9:00 p.m.
Music Department: BAYOU
FLUTE, Constans Theater,
8:15 p.m.

free expression
for $1.25?
*
read
florida quarterly

SEND ALL CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC
FUNCTIONS, 101 REITZ
UNION

Thursday
Music Department: BAYOU
FLUTE, Constant Theater,
8:15 p.m.
Union Dance: DAYBREAK,
Union Terrace, 9:00 p.ift.
Friday
Muslim Student's Prayer
Meeting, 122 Union, 12:30
p.m.
Music Department: BAYOU
FLUTE, Constant Theater,
8:15 p.m.
Saturday
Music Department: BAYOU
FLUTE, Constant Theater,
8:15 p.m.
Monday
Science Fiction Club Meeting,
356 Union, 8:00 p.m.
v, '



New Plan
To Train
Physicians

UF Grade Appeals Board
Planned By SCORE For Fall

By CARLOS 4. LICEA
ANiptor Staff Writer
The Student Commission On
Reorganizing Education
(SCORE) is planning to form a
university-wide grade appeals
board for UF next fall.
According to SCORE Director
David Chafin, groundwork is
already being done for the
formation of the boards.
HE SAID MOST colleges in
UF have a method for appealing
grades, but in many cases that
method is hidden from public
knowledge.
There are also some problems

Zoologist To Join UF
Eng. Graduate Faculty

Dr. Howard Thomas Odum,
internationally known zoologist
and ecologist, will join UFs
faculty Sept. 16 as a graduate
research professor of
environmental engineering.
In making the announcement,
Dr. Edwin E. Pyatt, chairman of
the Department of
Environmental Engineering, said
the successful recruitment of the
noted researcher and educator
was an outstanding achievement
for the College of Engineering.
ODUM WILL come to UF
from the University of North
Carolina where he has been on
the faculty since 1966. He
currently is professor of botany,
zoology and environmental
science and engineering there.
The appointment, a signal
honor for the College of.
Engineering, was made by Dean
ilmimm
181 1 Book and Supply gg
111 1 1 iviawT (mknnshv ffi*
I*ll II TEXTBOOKS H
SCHOOL SUPPLIES W
Ufa II AHTSUPPLIES
* *uw!" IWC
mmm mmt

By Attiptor Services
A new plan to better utilize
the facilities of the state
university system for training
physicians will offer advantages
to both medical school
administrators and prospective
medical students, according to
two deans at UF's College of
Medicine.
Dr. Emmanuel Suter, dean of
the College of Medicine, and Dr.
Paul Elliott, assistant dean for
Pre- Professional Education at
the College of Medicine,
described the new program of
decentralizing the basic medical
science phase of medical
training.
CURRENTLY, THESE
disciplines are taught only at UF
medical school to the students
who enter each year's freshman

There is a need on our
campus for a grade appeals
board so it will act as a
court of last resort.
Steve Uhlfelder
in establishing such a board,
according to Chafin, because a
professor's academic freedom
can be hindered. That is why the
subject of grade appealing must
be approached with caution.
He calls the area of grade
appeals a sensitive one, and
one which can face some
opposition from faculty

Harold Hanson of the Graduate
School. Odum will engage
primarily in research along with
work in graduate and
undergraduate teaching.

Welcome!
FRESHMEN
Today's the day on your busy schedule to visit
your on-campus Bookstore and meet some of the
people whose sole purpose is to serve
you introduce you to the textbook division
and make you familiar with the tools of your
- coileae eareor 4iere at-the University of Florida.
car included.... FREE!
SO Campus Shop&Bookstore
KS lMa u*ij?2-OW4
, j. . ..... t M.t
SUTER
... College of Medicine
class. Under the new proposal,
the faculties of FSU and Florida
A&M will jointly teach such
basic medical sulgects as
biochemistry, pharmacology and
physiology to a group of
students in Tallahassee.
Fifty of these students each

members in the various colleges
and schools at UF.
THERE IS A need on our
campus for a grade appeals
board, Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder said, so it will
act as a court of last resort.
The other project in which
SCORE will be involved by the
beginning of fall quarter is to
compile information from the
student advisory councils in UF
colleges.
Plans are being made to
coordinate the efforts of
Student Government and the
different councils for academic
reforms with the student
councils in the colleges, a
memorandum sent by Chafin to
SG officials said.
WORK IN SCORE will be a
little more informal next
quarter.
Chafin said he is planning to
hold a meeting for the staff in
the first weeks, and assign tasks
for the different staff members
to carry out.
It will be in these first weeks
that these two initial projects
will be started, Chafin said.

year will have secured
positions at UFs College of
Medicine for the second phase of
their training, which primarily
involves attendance of patients.
Those selected will begin,
usually at the end of their junior
year of college, to dovetail
regular undergraduate courses
with a basic medical science
curriculum. Most will then enter
the clinical years at Gainesville
two years later, although this
time may be flexible.
ELLIOTT, WHO is at work on
a similar program for UF
undergraduates, pointed out the
advantage of the plan in
improving utilization of state
resources.
This approach will enable us
to avoid the bottleneck we
currently have in teaching the
basic sciences,** he said,

Remember I
Summer I
Bowling I
Special I
REITZ UNION I

: y c *Vr4
it takes
, 1 .
'
-k.v
two hands

to handle a
Whopper

. -^j LtHbr
/ . v
> ..
.' n% V .;'; y *
the two-fitted
ia uc I
," ;
at
8 N. W. 16th Ave. "SMSS'S^r
H jsfiftlfrv&l Afc. '£ *'*:' * '& 'W *'** 4 *'4'
TMdw.AMMII, 1970, Tlm Florida AMfrtar,

emphasizing that it is the
shortage of ficilities for teaching
basic medical sciences which
presently limits the College of
Medicine's output of physicians
to 64 per year.
The college currently has
facilities adequate to handle a
considerably larger number of
students in the final, clinical
phase of training. The new
program, to be inaugarated in
Tallahassee next fall and in
Gainesville in 1972 or 1973,
should alleviate this problem.
SUTER STATED both the
Tallahassee and Gainesville
programs would offer definite
benefits to undergraduates*
planning a medical career, by
making the medical science
curriculum available to them at
an earlier date.
-i.

EVERY THIRD
WASH LOAD
FREE
Air-oonditioned Comfort
SPEED QUEEN
FABRIC CARE CENTER
SIN CITY PLAZA
OFF 13th St. on S.W. 16th Avo.

Page 11



]9HT IBK LV --.-SBL i tfSS. OT^3l"W r TE?*^^fcl^Dr

I ||FOR m SALE^^^
Ladles Bike 3 speed, brand new, must
sell, basket and chain. Call 376-1391
between 9 p.m. and 10 a.m. $45.
(A-3t-172-p)
Baby Bed, sls. Playpen, sls. Will
sail both for $25. Both In like new
cond. Call 376-0536 after s*oo.
(A-2t-172-p)
mmm jjg|^|j|jZZjZ^ZZZZjZZjjZZjjjZ^ZZZZ^
** take you for
+ an out of towoer
laUBIj is
t WUW.uSsTV^I \
M Mi
Peter OToole %
i Petula Clark
sfHHp
LAST
bSlmslbSml ays
I at J.
mm shockf (S
** litteHeatif
/ SIDNEY H
McNair /JBEgP)


FOR SALE
Raccoons, skunks, bob cats, snakes, v
turtles, monkeys, parrots, hawks,
chicks, for sale, trade for what pet
have you, or will buy. Call 475-2546
(Local) (A-st-169-P)
GE solid state portable stereo,
detachable speakers, great sound, at
the low low price of S3O. Call
373-1609 or 376-1891 anytime.
(a-3t-171-p)
1966 R-50 BMW Motorcycle Rebuilt
Engine, Fairing, Bags, Helmet,
Rainsuit, Well cared for. Canvas
Included SBOO Firm Call 378-3725
After 5:30 p.m. (a-2t-172-p)
v
MOBILE HOME, 10 wide Schutt 1
br., with screened porch, ac, storage,
located in nice park 15 sec. campus,
$2850. 378-0660 (a-3t-171-p)
Must sell 69 Kawa 250 sidewinder
2,200 ml. excellent condition, $75
equity and take over $29 mo.
payments. 378-0953 leave number,
will call back. (A-3t-172p)
For Sale Fiberglass 53 bear cub
bow, arrows, accessories, S4O.
Wooden swivel desk armchair, like
new, S3O. 700-108 S.W. 16th Ave.
372-1758. (A-2t-172-p)
Twin-lens reflex Minolta camera,
case, flash, filters, S6O. 392-1681,
room 330, Reitz Union. R. French.
(A-3t-172-p)
Double bed $25.00, Army officer's
dress uniform $20.00, chair, $7.00.
Call 378-6730. (A-lt-172-p)
Trailer Ideal for single student 27' x
8* 1960 Yellowstone. $3,400 new,
selling for S9OO. Call 378-1240 after
5 p.m. 392-3161 before. (A-2t-172-p)
500 TRIUMPH excellent running
condition. Completely overhauled In
July. Army forces sale. $650 call
John at 373-2511. (A-3t-172-p)
1969 Yamaha 180, Lug. Rack,
Helmuts, lots more. Used less than 1
year. 6700 ml. Fantastic Condition,
$450 I net. tune-up. Call Dave at
372-6598 1961 MG wire wheels complete with
tires, hubs bearings and spinners.
$40,376-0358 evenings. (A-lt-173-p)
FREE Half Siamese Kittens. Call
378-4319 after 2:30. (A-lt-173-p)
Female to share house and bedroom,
$47 mo plus 1/3 utilities, must like
animals 12 string guitar. S9O. Also
strange beads strung? 1012 NW 4
Ave. (A-2t-173-p)
Two volt scuba tanks, 50 cu. ft. New
1963, tested 1968. One with
backpKk sls, one without $lO. Call
392-0868 or 372-8712. (A-lt-173-p)
BE gentle, be kind, to that expensive
carpet, dean It with Blue Last re.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-IFC)
Trailer, 8 x 36, two bedroom,
alr-cond. See at 4546 NW 13th St.
Lot 22. Asking $950, call 372-6097.
Must move by Sept. 1. (A-2t-173-p)

I at
I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA I
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
I LUNCH AND DINNER
I MONDAY
BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI
I TUESDAY 79t I
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN A
I ALL YOU CAN EAT !|
I WEDNESDAY I
JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK
AND YELLOW RICE 79{
I THURSDAY I
BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS AAj
I FRIDAY I
FISH ALMONDINE AND FRENCH
\ FRIED POTATOES 89< I
I
I _ko m GAINESVILLE MALL I

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 18,1970

Page 12

*" §*
FOR SA LE
Custom-made VW Squareback roof
rack tubular steel constr. Ex cond.
Orig. $65. Only $25. Call 378-0790
or come by 242-0 Fiavet ill.
(A-lt-173-p)
FOR RENT
HOLIDAY GAR DEN S'
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1 bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S. w. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
included completely furnished
Ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-ts-c)
Live In luxury at The Place. Male
roommate needed starting fall qtr.
townhouse, Private Bedroom, AC,
Dishwasher. Call: 378-9441.
(B-st-169-P)
Furnished 1 and 2 br. apts. Quiet and
secluded. 2901 NW 14th St. 2 Blocks
North of the Mall Call 378-2076
(b-ts-c)
Rooms graduate & older men
students central heat & ac kitchen 2
blocks north of campus S6O month
year lease washer dryer 378-8122 or
376-6652. (b-4t-171-p)
Now available large, modern, two
bedroom apt. Wood beam ceiling, a.c,
off street parking and small patio.
Call Jim 372-0578 or 372-2005.
(B-2t-173-p)
Single rooms $25 and S3O per
month. Apartment for one $45,
utilities furnished. Boys and
upperclassman only. 1614 NW 3rd
place, call 372-2946 for
appointment. (B-lt-173-p)
WANTED
Law student needs male roommate
for absolutely fantastic wood-paneled
pad, one bedroom, ac, $45/mo. Call
372-1294 now! (c-4t-171-p)
Dec. grad? Need male roommate for
fall qtr. only. New 1 bedrm. duplex
apt. wooded area, air cond. SSO mo.
Call Neal, 376-1006, or Sunny
372-4157 (c-4t-171-p)
Available for fall University Apts.
Two bedroom and efftciericys AC,
Pool. Close to campus. 80-140.
376-8990. (B-9t-166-p)
Hip roommate. Singles or couples to
share large house near campus.
Starting now or fall quarter. Call
376-4858 ask for Mark or Larry.
(C-2t-172-p)
Only SSO/mo. share carpeted a/c
trailer IV* baths. Your own room.
Pool. Just 2 ml. to campus. Available
now yr. lease. Call Lisa at 373-2760.
(C-3t-172-p)

V.-.-.V.-.V.-.-.V.V.VAVKVAVBWWSW.V.V.
WANTED
Girls lightweight BIKE. Also coe> /
ROOMMATE for 2 br. duplex.
GRAD student preferred. 909 SW
6th AVE Call 378-1837.(C-2t-173-p)
y
One female roommate for La Bonne
Vie Townhouse 342, starting fall.
372-1987. (c-2t-173-p)
Looking for an apartment and or a
roommate? Join forces with Susan
Hill, tel 376-6083, 392-7945 late, no
heads or freaks, will pay S4O-60/mo.
(c-2t-173-p)
Rmate to share apt with Grad st. 2
big bdrms, liv rm, kltchsalr cond. 2
bks from campus, $65 mo. and elec.
Lease quarterly call Linda
392-7683.(c-2t-172-p).
Roommates for Hawaiian Village
Apt. Air cond, 2 bedrm 2 bath, pool,
dish wash. $55/mo and utt. Move In
now or Sept. Call 376-1387 after 5
p.m. (c-2t-173-p)
FILM Buffs, want to work some on
weekends? We need ushers for the J
W R Union Fall Films. Call the
program office 392-1655 for
Inf or matk>n.(c-2t-l 73-p)
WANTED
Vespa Mechanic to recondition
two scooters and do occasional
maintenance work at his leisure. Call
376-6283 between 3 7 p.m.
(E-3t-172-p)

KBUI ALL OUT ACTION
The Deadliest Man Alive
ft ...Takes on a Whole Army!
cunt EASTwnan
SHIRLEY MACLAINE
Jlil MARTIN RACKIN moucTiON
TWO MUIES FOR SISTER SARA
iGPI FEATURE AT 1:44 3:43 5:42 7:46 9:50
BUN 2nd BIG WEEK!
I u cA Hoy Named
Charlie *Broum n v
FEATURE AT. . ML
2:05 3:58 5:48 7:41 9:35
W_ M
f There is a niche 1
forThe Knack
\;. -.;A-arrihow
MniusniNcmM
RAY BROOKS MICHAEL CRAWFORD DONAL DONNELLY
RICHARD LESTER
Toes A Wed, August 18 A 19
at the Union Auditorium
** 4

WiVAft%%v.v.W.v.v.v.v.vAv.-.v.-.v.y
help wanted
SfISSSSSS^^
So you want to make money? You
want a challenge? OK Get Reedy!
Were looking for a sharp, aggressive
young man with at least two years
college and some sales experience.
Thar skies the limit for applicant who
enjoys meeting the public and can
communicate! We will consider
part-time or full-time situation.
Contact Mr. White at 378-2060 for
appointment. (E-2t-173-p).
* ,GUI SWCIMIABr Amn
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SO CINTS MAT AND EARLY WAD RWICE UMTIt 7:40 ft!



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

help wanted
Term break in Miami, care for 2
faculty children ages 2 & 4. Room
board, pool plus S3O week, Aug.
27 Sept 11; 378-3600. (E-lt-173-p)
WANTED: Business Manager for the
SEMINOLE. Includes management,
marketing. Salary. Call Jim Okula at
392-1681 or 373-1859.
AUTOS
wrrrrX-Xvivrvrr:::-:::::::*:-:-::*:-:-:-:*:-::-:-::-:-:-:-
DEAL 64 Spitfire w/rebuilt engine,
clutch. Many extras. SSOO or best
offer. Also spitfire hardtop, trailer
hitch, Sep. 373-2912 after 5 p.m.
(g-3t-171-p)
Army forces sale 1962 Porsche 356 B
Excellent mechanical condition, good
tires, am-fm radio. Call John at
378-3323 Best offer over SI2OO.
(g-3t-171-p)
1966 Chevy El Camino, 360 hp 396
eng 4sp, mags, new wide ovals,
toneau top, many performance
options, excellent condition, great
deal, call 372-6903. Chev Malibu 66, good mechanical
- condition, new tires, sta transmission,
6 cyl., S9OO or best offer. Body
needs some work. Call 378-1901.
(G-2t-173-p)

I I
| JjL: |
11
I I
| Majors I
| |
Earn money while gaining experience.
I |
Employers look for graduate with experience. With the
present job crunch," his experience can mean the $5:
difference between a so-so job and a good one.
Learn sales, advertising layout, production techniques and
the inside workings of a daily newspaper. Meet daily
deadlines and handle responsibility commensurate with
your abilities.
| Join us. We handle $240,000 a year in advertising and we're
| still growing. Call 392-1681, ask for Adv. Department.
1 v 1
I |
s 1- SJWm S
I 580 *B 230TATI
; V \ *7,. C3UIHIU I VJ:3r!T SJ****. Jf *? : S

AUTOS
1962 Rambler American 2 door
conv, radio, whitewall tires, 6
cyclinder automatic, new brakes,
heater. Good transporation. Call
378-4063 after 5. (G-2t-173-p
65. VW for Sale. Excellent condition,
$595. Call Paula 373-2147.
(G-2t-173-p)
PE X? SONA L
Free kittens, born- July 4, 376-0767
after 5 p.m. (j-st-170-p)
Coeds Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrologist 102 NW
2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
Student Organizations: Interested in
showing yourself off during
orientation this Fall? Call JWRU
Program Office 392-1655(J-st-169-P)
MEN, WHERE'S HOME NEXT
QUARTER! Try Georgia Seagle
Co-op. Room and Board
$220/Quarter. 1002 W. University
376-8941 (J-Bt-137-p)
Do you need a roommate? Female
transfer desires apt. for fall. Phone
collect Ellen 305-771-7478.
(]-4t-171-p)

Tuesday, August 18,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

TIRED OF WAR, racism and
pollution? Volunteers are needed for
Al Hastings campaign for the U.S.
Senate. 378-8959. (J-3t-172-p)
Urgent. Moving away. Must find good
homes for 2 kittens and their mother.
All affectionate, healthy. Have had
shots. g|ll 378-5655. (j-2t-171-p)
Desperately need good home for 3
beautiful, trained, well cared for,
affectionate cats, gray, orange, and
calico. 378-0660 (j-3t-171-p)
NEED YOUR TERM PAPER
TYPED? Will type anything, Only 50
cents a page. Cali 378-9824 after
5:30 p.m. (J-lt-173-p)
Beautiful Puppy for a beautiful
person. Call 372-3988. (J-2t-173-p)
Like money? handle ours! Position
for business manager for 1971
SEMINOLE open, good salary, call
Jim Okula at 392-1681 or 393-1859.
(J-2t-173-p)
Well organized and gung-ho? Apply
for position of SEMINOLE Business
Manager, good salary. Call Jim Okula
at 392-1681 or 373-1859.
(j-2t-1734

Page 13

Need ride to California, Sept. 1. Will
share expenses, prefer someone with
VW bus or similar vehicle. Call Ken at ,v
373-2116 or come by 134 Landmark.
q-2t-173-p)
An exp. self fulfillment group is
being sponsored by center of man for
fall quarter. Encounter, body
awakening, self expression
techniques. Cost free in exchange for
your cooperation. Serious inquiries
Invited. Call Dr. C.W. Duncan,
392-0731 or Lourdes Valdes,
376-1749. (J-2M73-P)
LOST 4s POUND
FOUND: Large black dog with collar.
Call 378-9726 to identify, after 5.
(L-3t-172-p)
SERVICES
ALTERATIONS by RUBY Mrs.
Ruby Mills, Apartment 217 100 N.E.
Bth Ave. near Gainesville Shopping
Center 376-8506 (m-st-170-p)
Free pussycats, 6 weeks old, part
Siamese, huge ears, very cuddly. Call
495-2226 during day; 495-2479 after
6:00. Free delivery. (j-2t-173-p)

SERVICES
* THE COPY CENTER 5 XEROX 4
ASK ABOUT OUR CHARGE PLAN.
1718 W. Univ. 376-9334 next to
Malones Bookstore. (M-13t-162-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480 (M-ts-c)
Hunt N Peck Typing Service: Spec, in
theses & dissertations. Fast accurate
service work guaranteed. Please call
376-6063
Alternators GeneratorsStarters
Electrical systems tested and repaiis
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 S
Main (M-ts-c)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc,
prompt pick-up, delivery 373-1984,
9-5.(M-st-173-p)
EXPERIENCED MATH,
SCIENTIFIC TYPIST
messy math, programs a specialty
guaranteed call 378-5652 after 5.
(M-2t-172-p)
HORSES BOARDED. New air cooled
barn, large box stalls, tack room,
large riding ring, trails, green pasture,
close to university. 373-1059.
(M-3t-172-p)



The
Florida
Alligator

Catch-22, War, Politics And John Sugg

(EDITOR'S NOTE: John Sugg is
a former news editor of The
Alligator, now living in Atlanta
for the Summer. Hes used his
talent to talk about many things
in this newspaper, most of them
connected in some Way with
politics. Here he reviews and
comments upon the impact of
Catch-22, a new film from
Joseph Heller's highly acclaimed
novel.)
The culmination of all this
comes when Milo makes a
contract with the Nazis. The
Germans agree to take cotton
off of his hands (it was hard to
unload) if Milo will bomb and
straffe his own airfield. A good
capitalist, Milo readily takes the
contract with the assistance, of
course, of the Army brass.
Why war? Yossarian is told
that patriotism is identical with
obeying the brass. However, he
can see no reason to get killed or
for his comrades to die (as
almost all have) so that his
colonel can have the honor of
commanding the squadron with

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25 Night. 59 Fumigator. 88 Baronet's 120 delampe. MM
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29 Aim. scene. 89 Faint. 122 Marine fish.
30 Sound of 62 Made 90 Hebrew 124 Sherbets. ; | KT WMti
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33 Fraternal -. 92 Sin. 127 From top to * 47 Hit B" I
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34 "Never" in infatuation. 94 Purport. 131 See Sl-O. 71 77 7 74
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6 Starry. question. 54 Game. 78 Family of B __l Bl
7 Celebrated. 26Container. 55 Woody Merry IJT 139 IS* 13*
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9 Beloved. 32 Turned. 57 Coarse composer. TIT BiT BilT BTjT
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modern. comb. form. 59 Addicted to 80 Ghostly. 7J7 B}jr
11 Millay, for 38 Etruscan galantry. 81 Encompass-
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12 Pluto's 40 Clear Accum- S 4 Momentous BBRl^**l**R*MB*^^*M*M*MM**B*^M^*^*B**M****MMtl^B
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13 anlmo. with from. 67 Sousa's change. 91 Lubricate costume. 1M Linkaman ns Pam gun. abbr.
14 Writing 42 Hindu god. favorite. 85 Author The wlth fat. 99 Impl.menL T, 1 123 Mold ,so 17. xa
tool. 44 Far: comb. encore. Zoo Story." 100891*. 110 1 volaote. ** 132 Wlrita Houag
15 An ace, form. 69 Property, M Equals. 93 Fog. 101 Ravine. *** 118 Ten-dollar 12S Soft drink. initials.
for on*. 48 See 131-A. for on*. 88 Hamlet, 94 Purposive. 104 Sunflower 112 Iron ore. gold piece. 128 Tandem. 133 Sea: comb.
16Woodwind. 478aucy. 70Cob. for on*. 95 Cuprite. scale. 113Vista. 119MenuHam. 129 Lummox. form.

Get The Knack
At The Union
i HWv n* : V T /"U
"The Knack" to at the Reitz
Union Theater tonight and
tomorrow night for your
pleasure.
The show, sponsored by the
Union Programs Office, will be
Shown at 6,8 and 10 pm. for SO
cents a head. It stars Michael
Crawford and Rita Tushingham
and to about getting the knack.
THE COMFORT EXPERTS
specializing in nfsatniwi
Yt ftmm
2702 N.EJWth DRIVE 378-1678
Patroniza Getar Adwittoavs
*wofw>fttw o

H|. jHn fIK JHk 9K _ JHH& :^H[
Iw IB ftnill I 81iIbI11
mm IHB' M W M ii B W gii :M
Br^-rvi'^l-::BH: : aiV9xSvA;:v:v:v:v::: >; B:v

the most combat missions (of
course, the colonel doesn't fly).
The only ones who benefit
from the war are the brass (who
get glory) and the captialists,
symbolized by Milo.
IT IS NOW no secret that
Roosevelt steered the UJS. into
WWII from the mid-1930s on.
To defend democracy or some
other similar myth? More
exactly, to save American
captialism and for a redivision of
the world market. Victory in
WWII meant, unquestionably,
that America gained a hegemony
over the world's productive
forces.
The fact that the battle
between the Nazis and the
western Allies was an economic
struggle between competing
capitalist blocs (with whole
populations as pawns) is
demonstrated, in Catch-22, by
the relative ease in which their
common denominator, their
class interest, overcomes any
other consideration.
The death of a close friend of

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FILM REVIEW AND COMMENTARY

Student Special l
Any car or color!
, A 12 mo. Guarantee
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2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
j Ph. 373>1665 _j
*T- -v

Yossarians in Milo's bombing of
the base is explained by Milo as
an unfortunate result of the
market system. Os course, it is
also sad that millions of others
were similarly caught in the
system that proved so profitable
to a few.
CATCH-22 STANDS as a
bitter condemnation of war and
the forces that motivate war, the
unquenchable appetites of the
capitalists to whom the suffering
of millions is merely
unfortunate.
It is significant that this movie
appears at a time when the mass
movement against the
Indochinan war, a continuation
of the drama of capitalist
barbarity, is reaching into all
sectors of society labor,
blades, chicanos, women, Gls
and students.
Much of society is coming to
the realization that Catch 22 is
the excuse of a privileged few to
force entire populations into
gigantic slaughters while the
privileged fatten off the profits.

Page 14

AND WHEN ASKED why,
the war-makers reply, Catch
22. This is a right we have given
ourselves and this is all the
reason we need.
There are many reasons to see
Catch-22. Good reasons. The
. political comment, of course.
The humor, also, even if it is
grim humor: Yossarian receiving
the Air Medal naked; the
frustrated general (Orson Welles)
who can't kill anyone he chooses
because of a s£Qy rule; Major
Major (Bob Newhart) explaining
that he only receives visitors to
his office when he is out. When
he is in, he receives no visitors.
Finally, Catch-22 says one
other thing. That without
commitment to a more rational
and humane society, Everyone
works for Milo.
This statement from the
extraordinary movie, Catch-22,
is the core of the message, a
brilliant and perceptive
comment on the causes of war:
Capitalism's need for money and
maikets.
THE MOVIE, while true to
Joseph Hellers novel, is an
artistic achievement itself.
In brief, the {dot is about an
GOOD THRU AUGUST
A . OFF
25< GAME
with coupon
3 BLOCKS NORTH OF MALL
PUTT-PUTT GOLF
3215 N.W. 13th St.
OPEN
M Sat 9AM 1 AM
SUN NOON -lAM

WHERE CAN YOU
GETALLTHISFOR
UNDER 2.00?
vMa w aC/VK I Kk
_ juicy tanriar
- J.; Strio Sirloin hrnlhil
m.H j_ L ni JBgjfi.
? xr BOIUMZE*
SIRLOIN PIT
*>* you 9i a break on steak amj e/er/thing %
2445 S.W. 13th Street 378-0946
WED. SPECIAL BEEF STEW

DAN VINING
Campus Living Editor

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. August 18,1970

Army Air-Force bombadier
named Yossarian (Alan Aikin)
stationed in Italy during World
War 11. Each time he gets near
the quota of combat missions
needed to return to the United
States, his squadron commander
raises the number.
Consequently, Yossarian
hopes to be grounded because of
insanity. But, as the Army
doctor explains, only those who
request to be grounded for
insanity can be considered. But,
anyone who requests to get out
of combat cant be crazy (so the
Army reasons). Hence,
Yossarians request cannot be
considered.
THE INSANITY of the war is
brought home through the
almost surrealistic nature of
much of the movie and the
meaningless brutality portrayed
throughout the film.
Catch-22 is already broadly
advertised as an anti-war movie.
However, it is not simply a
maudlin plea for peace but goes
to the roots of WWII with a
clarity that is no less true today
in Indochina than it was in
Europe 25 years ago. The movies
message is one that is inherently
anti-capitalist.
HAVE YOU BEEN THINKING
ABOUT LEARNING TO FLY?
We will teech you for
S2OO
Solo eourso in 69 Count 150,
includes grounds school a 10 hours
of flight instruction.
$l6O
Solo course in Piper J-3, books,
ground school ft 10 hours of flight
instruction.
FLYING HAWKS
STENGEL AERODROME 376-0011



The
Florida
Alligator

| Intramurals I
by Chuck Fessler m
Things were dearly up considerably in this the last week of
Intramural softball. Four teams remained undefeated and thus won
their bracket championships; These teams were: Gresham*s Drugs,
Silver Streaks, PJE. Petes, and the Wasps. The Streaks wrapped up the
title with a win over French Quarter, the Petes defeated the
Environmental Engineers, and the Wasps emerged victorious over the
Monster Men. In the semi-finals the Streaks will play Greshams while
the Petes will meet the Wasps. The semi-finals are sheduled for
Tuesday afternoon at 5:00 p.m. with the winners to meet at 5:00
pjn. on the following Thursday.
In basketball action four teams remained undefeated: Mixc,
B-Team, Gym Rats, and Onan. The biggest battle of the week will
take place when the Earl Findlay led Gym Rats take on the Gary
McElroy led Onan on Tuesday night at 6:30. The semi-finals are
scheduled for Wednesday night, while the finals are scheduled for
Thursday night. Both games will start at 7:30.
The Brothers Peek

On the Florida campus the
past few years it seems there
have been Peek brothers listed
on some sports roster at all
times. Contributing to this
illusion is David Peek who has
Receivers
Swarm
With All-American Carlos
Alvarez and clutch performer
Andy Cheney returning it is
natural Florida Head Football
Coach Doug Dickey is somewhat
optimistic about his 1970
receiving corps.
Naturally, much of this
optimism depends on the
physical condition of Alvarez
and the underrated Cheney.
However, all indications point to
an unqualified go** condition
for both athletes, each of whom
has had a knee problem.
THE GATORS appear to
have more depth at the wide
receiver positions with the
availability of capable veterans
like Jerry Vinesett and Terry
Ash, who was most impressive in
the spring before pulling a leg
muscle.
They have, also, added a
strong punch in sophomore Willie
Jackson of Sarasota, a 6-2,
210-pounder with speed and
exceptional ability. Jackson,
who can also play running bade,
is the kind who can turn a short
pass into a long touchdown run.
Tight end is in the hands of
junior Jim (Monk) Yancey, who
has developed year-by-year and
now ranks with any tight end in
recent Gator history. Yancey is
6-4, runs a 4.9 40-yard-dash and
catches the ball well in a crowd.
In addition, he is a solid blocker.
SOPHOMORE Jerry Coker
will spell Yancey and he, too,
had some encouraging moments
in the spring before an ankle
injury felled him during the
third week.
Alvarez caught 88 passes in
1969, Cheney 37, and Tommy
Durrance caught 26.
THE CANDY SHOPPE
L .ntoh'Z einli j
We Sp&Utize //? J
Hand Dipped ChocoMW h
Also
- Greeting Cards
- Gift Fruits
Westgate Shopping Center I
3311 W. Univ. Ave.
phon: 376-6806 | |

.... ... .....

been listed at so many different
positions on the football roster.
Peek has been an end, tackle,
guard, defensive lineman and,
last and not least, a center. He
moved to center halfway
through spring drills and quickly
put a clamp on the first team
job.
DAVIDS brother Gene wu a
split end for the Gators for three
seasons. Another brother,
Tommy, was a swimmer of note
in recent years. David threatens
to put them all in the shade,
however, with his football
performances.
Peek is 6-2,224, a strong j and
durable man to have in the
middle of the line. His big
hangup right now is lack of
experience. Once this comes his
coaches believe hell become one
of the better centers in the
Southeastern Conference.
Behind Peek is Gainesvilles
Richard Kensier, whose father
Ed was Head Offensive Coach
for the Gators two seasons ago.
Richard has been slowed by a
knee injury but figures strong in
plans for 1970.

.
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of HoKrfirrH- ON BIVAN ARM LAKE
PHONE 422.4536 RHONE 374-2931 I

The Gator Headhunters
m Vga * v :

Any resemblance between Floridas trio of first
team liitebackers off the field and on is, as they say,
purely coincidental.*
Mike KeDey, 6-2 and 220-pounds, recently ate 29
hard-boded eggs in a variety show. Richard
Buchanan is a gifted artist and can give perfect
imitations of racoons who have been hit by can.
FRED ABBOTT is a talented, if green journalist
who writes of the accomplishments of his friends.
and sends in color Polaroid pictures with his articles
to prove he hasnt made up such wild fantasy.
On the field its a dose race to decide which one
is the most talented, meanest, toughest and hardest
tackier.
Experts who follow the Gaton closely are divided
on this issue. All three linebackers have their
supporters and each is deserving of support for such
honors.
KELLEY is the veteran, a senior who was named
Most Valuable Player in the Gator Bowl game

Reggie Unhappy In Oakland

As slugger Reggie Jackson is
unhappy in Oakland and doesnt
care who knows it. Reluctant to
reveal his feelings until recently,
Jackson tells of his
disenchantment with his
situation.
There was a time I dreamed
of being a part of a dynasty built
by Mr. Finley (owner Charles O.
Finley), begins Jackson, of
being a part of a team which got
so strong it could just foil over
other teams the way Baltimore
does, and fling the empty
Oakland Coneum seats with
excited fans. Now I just dream
of going some (dace where I can
play in peace and perhaps
become the player I should be.**
JACKSONS disenchantment
with the As stems from his
periodic benchings, seemingly
senseless and arbitrary,
according to Reggie, and from a
series of fines livied against him
which he feels have been
unjustified. He feels that this
treatment may have been

Tuaiday, Augurt 18.1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

provoked by his holdout status
in the spring and complicated by
his normal difficulties as a slow
starter.
Last year, Jackson played
regularly and smashed 47 home
runs, while knocking in 118
runs. However, when he didnt
hit early this year, Finley
ordered manager John
McNamara to bench his star.
Finally, after an inordinate
number of days on the bench,
Reggie started and rapped a
homer. IngpfaHy, he was bandied
four more days before he was

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Sports Editor

because of his play in Floridas 14-13 win over
Tennessee.
Buchanan is a reckless, quick outside linebacker
who can cover backs in pass patterns and come up
to stop running plays with equal ability. He is a
junior from Pensacola.
Abbott, a 6-3,235-pounder from Brooksville, is a
sophomore who appears destined to fit in the mold
of great middle linebackers who have been produced
in college football. He, also can run with backs,
having 4.8 speed in the 40, and can plug a hole like
you would expect somebody his size to do.
ALL IN ALL, linebacking is solid for the Gators
going into the 1970 season. Depth is lacking,
although junior Gary Peterson can step in and play
in the middle or outside and do a most creditable
job.
This depth is something the coaches will be
searching for in the likes of senior Jim Kelly of
Sebring, Brad Powell, a senior from West Palm
Beach, and several sophomores.

allowed to return to the starting
lineup. Reg responded with
another homer in that game, yet
was benched again.
I dont want to give up,
says Reggie, but the few years
Ive had in baseball are breaking
my spirit. Already, a lot of the
joy has gone out of playing the
game.
As for the unjustified fines,
Jackson says: One time I went
off-balance swinging at a ball
and fell down. I was fined for
not running out the
grounder.

Page 15



Page 16

t, Th Florida Aligvtor, TuaMtay, inpwt 18.1970

I 'Hawk Comes Home
By MARSHALL GALLOP
5 AMI A w -A -A--->
--> -A---> MHiprwir apons vviiim
UF track coach Jimmy Hawk Carnes has just returned from
| a tour of Europe and Russia with the V. S. National Track and
I Field Team.
The U. S. team won meets in France, Germany and Moscow
while losing only once in a hot duel to the Russians.
| FLORIDA TRACK CLUB member Frank Shorter beat the
| Russians in the 10,000 meter run as well as beating perennial
I favorite Ron Clarke of Australia. Shorters time was only 14
| seconds off the U. S. record, which isnt much considering it
* takes almost half an hour to run the event.
The U. S. fielded a young team with average age of 22. Coach
j: Cames said, These boys will be the one's to watch in the next
: Olympics, some of the older stars like Randy Matson, Bob
j* Seagren and FTC's Jade Bachelor were busy with jobs or school
g and couldn't go.
$ The young stars provided much excitment on the tour,
x Fifteen personal records and two team records were set by the
4 American athletes.
Russia's famed Ter-Ovemesian was upset by 19-year old
j; Bouncy Moore in the long jump. Moore's victory over the
30-year old veteran was equaled only by Ken Swinson's
; half-mile record and Dave Romania's record in the 10
| kilometer walk.
An interesting sidelight to the meets was the teams' tour in
Russia. The team had a set of guides and buses at their
[ command, courtesy of the Russians. Coach Cames said, We
j saw all they wanted us to see.
The team also had an amusing set of experiences with the
secret service shadow that the Russians had assigned to follow
them wherever they went. The shadow supplied amusing
incidents to top off a successful tour.

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1971 seminole

Rams Picked As The Best

By Alligator Services
{
The tough Los Angeles Rams,
; led by quarterback Roman
Ostedfsl, Should battle their way
to the pro football
chamsuanshm in the Suner
Bowl? according to an exclusive
poll of more than 1000 pro grid
players appearing in the current
issue of SPORT Magazine.
In the poll the players are
asked to predict league standings
and top individual performers in
various categories.
WITH pro football realigned
in the completion of the
NFL-AFL merger, this is the
way the players see the standings
in the new division. In the AFC's
Eastern Division, the Colts are
picked by a narrow margin to
nip the Jets in the standings.
Cleveland is expected to run
away with the Central title and
Kansas City is a slim choice to
edge the Raiders in the West.
The NFC standings, according
to the poll, show Dallas a heavy
favorite over Washington in the
East, Minnesota a top-heavy
choice over Detroit in the
Central Division, and Los
Angeles a no-contest winner over

San Francisco and the rest of the
West.
In the magazine's listing for
the top individual performers in
1970, quarterback Daryle
Lamonipa of Oakland is
JWpected topn Most Valuable
Player'' honors hi the AFC and
the Rams* Gabriel is the NFC
pick.
SOME of the other likely
individuals standouts, according
to the players, will be Joe
Namath of the New York Jets (if
he decides to play), and Sonny
Jurgensen of the Washington
Redskins, top passers. Leroy
Kelly of the Cleveland Browns
and Gale Sayers of the Chicago
Bears, top runners, and Paul
Warfield of the Miami Dolphins
and Charley Taylor of the

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