Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
MONEY A MAJOR PROBLEM
11 ' I I
Wheels Os Racial Progress Grind Slowly

See Editorial, Page 6
(EDITORS NOTE: This,
is the first in a series of
articles by Alligator Staff
Writer Larry Jordan on the
plight of black students at
the UF.
By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The wheels of Racial progress
appear to be grinding forward at
UF. But for black students these
wheels, like the wheels of the

The
Florida Alligator

Vol 63, No. 171

Pres. O'Connell
Answers SG
Fee Request
A proposal by Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder last
week that Student Government
be allowed to recommend
allocation of the entire $32.50
activity fee was countered
Thursday by a letter from UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
proposing an alternate plan.
In a letter to O'Connell,
Uhlfelder suggested the five
recipients of the activities fee
athletics, the Reitz Union, the
infirmary, SG and Student
Publications submit budget
requests to the Student Senate's
Budget and Finance Committee.
THIS WAY the budgets would
be given a careful examination
by SG officials to "determine
their priority," Uhlfelder said.
Priority is one of the key
factors in the recommendation.
While certain of the agencies
benefiting from the fee are doing
well economically others are in
the red.
O'Connell responded with a
proposal that each agency
submit a proposed budget to
him with copies sent to the
(SEE 'MORE', PAGE 2)

V; J E
B ifi ; : : -^H
SPENCER COOK
JH STUDENT MODERATORS
WW m wil% JBHBm

Gods, axe grinding exceedingly
slow.
The Black Student Union
(BSU) has presented UF's
administration with a list of five
"demands" backed by the
Student Senate. When and if
these "demands" are acted upon
wifi largely determine the course
of race relations at UF during
the next academic year.
BSU SPOKESMEN say these

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

K1 Wm,,
ml
PI Kfjgka
PHIL BANNISTER
BLUES IMAGE
The lead singer for the Bluet Image, here last Thursday nifjit, gives his
all to "Ride, Captain, Ride." The blues rock group sang to hundreds
of. high school and UF students sitting on blankets on the Florida
Gym floor. Student Government Productions sponsored the group.

Its Good (Sesame Street) News

By PHILIP MORGAN
Alligator Writer
;. ', ''' * ' v ; ' .. *'\ Pii
Good evening, kiddies. Mickey Mouse said today
in Disneyland that...
It doesn't go quite like that. In fact, Open
Sesame News" is a 10 minute program produced by
five students in the UP broadcasting 430 class
designed to tell kids whats going on around
them," News Anchorman Jim Richardson said.
STARTED SPRING quarter by WUFF-TV News
Director Don Grooms, the program has been bn the
air over 62 times, twice a day before Sesame
Street", on UFs educational station.
We have no murders, traffic fatalities or
politics," said Richardson, 4JM. We show public
relations film releases, children fashion news,
football game film clips and have panel discussions.
The program is part entertainment, part news
and part whatever comes around," he said.
THE PANEL discussion is on a Meet the Press"
format, with children expressing their views on
topics such as Violence on Saturday morning

_
1 Analysis.
t l ll '***i v

five "demands" are a bare
minimum. More should be done,
they say, but to do less would
seriously impair the rate of UF's
racial progress.
The five BSU demands and an

Tuesday, August 11, 1970

analysis of what they could
mean for UF reveals some
interesting observations.
First, the BSU "demands" UF
recruit and admit 500 black
freshmen each year, while

WHO ENFORCES?
Required P.E.
Still Unclear
By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligitor Staff Writer
Debate is still raging over the Physical Education requirement
on the UF campus.
According to Dr. Robert A. Bryan, dean of faculties, physical
education is a requirement of the UF. The trouble is, no one really
knows who is supposed to enforce this rule.
ON FEB. 26 OF this year, the University Senate approved a
physical education requirement of three quarters, one-hour sequence
of physical education and health.**
The senate motion passed also said: This is a UF requirement and
not a University College requirement.**
In a meeting last Wednesday morning, the Council of Academic
Deans could not answer as to who has the power to enforce such a
rule.
M NOBODY IS, in so far as we know, willing to enforce this
regulation,** Bryan said. Many students do not sign up.**
He pointed out the regulation is not enforced by UC since it is not
a requirement there, and the colleges do not pressure the students
into taking physical education.**
The council also received a notification from Tallahassee indicating
non-credit continuing education budget cannot be increased, and that
it cannot run into a deficit for the 1970-71 academic year. The old
programs will be maintained, but a few new ones would be added.
THE COUNCIL is also preparing a program which might lower the
insurance premiums for faculty members. To do this, it is necessary
for incoming faculty members to take a physical examination.

If this program is established,
the physicals could probably be
done at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center at UF expense.
The new budget also received
some consideration by the
council, and it shows that
although there has been a 6 per
cent increase in expense money
over the 1969-70 budget, there
has been a 3 per cent cut in the
money allowed for the hiring of
graduate students, and auxiliary
personnel.
The new budget also shows
there has been a 4.99 per cent
increase on faculty salaries.

cartoon shows, Whats a good allowance?" and
The proper bedtime hour."
Richardson said the kids like the panel discussion.
THEY ARE honest They say what they think."
FOR EXAMPLE, when the U. S. government
reported its findings on the big-name breakfast
cereals controversy, one child on Open Sesame"
said about the companies, Well, they were lying.
The U. S. government won't come out and say it
- the kids will," said Richardson.
A little girl was asked what animal she would
most like to be and why.
I WANT TO be an elephant so I can stomp on
people," she said.
The program has received fan mail and even
hate mail from as far as Ocala, Lake City and
Cedar Key. One woman wrote in complaining that
the program was influencing antUehool feelings in
the chddien who range in age from two to 11.
All I said is that summer is a good time to have
fun, said Richardson. She also complained that
her three-year-old will no longer eat squash since a
child on die panel discussion said, Id eat squash if
(SEEJM* PAGE 2)

M
continuing the Critical Year
Freshmen Program.
IF IMPLEMENTED, the long
range effect of this demand
would tend to equalize the racial
balance here by 1980, if current
population trends and the
predicted growth rate for UF
remains constant.
i A Board of Regents rule
prohibits state universities from
having a freshman class made up
(SEE TROGRESS' PAGE 2)

UF'S QUARTER system
is highly unpopular, a
study by Steve Anderson
shows page 14.
Campus Living IS
Classifieds io
Editorials 6
Letters 7
Movies ..io
Orange & Blue ..12
Sports 16



Page 2

* Thm Florida AMgator. Tuaaday, August 11, 1970

Enrollment Limit
Is Increase
For UF Doty

More Power
Given SG
? *
CDAU n a iir AMC
PAuC Unt^M
other agencies.
.SG WILL then consider the
request of each agency for a
share of the fee, and by
resolution make recom recommendations
mendations recommendations as to any change in
the amount erf the fee to be
requested of the Board of
Regents and the legislature, and
the amount to be allocated to
each agency from the proposed
fee.**
In turn, the activity fee
advisory council will be asked to
consider the proposed budgets
along with the recommendations
fromSG.
With the advice and proposals
of SG, a decision will be made as
to whether any increase of the
fee will be requested by the
Regents.
IN EFFECT, SG will have
more of a hand in determining
these budgets.
In effect, it will be a sharing
of the fee, according to
Uhlfelder, and the different
agencies will use the money as
they need it. This will prevent
increases in tuition.
Uhlfelder also indicated the
findings of SG on the agency
budgets will be made public.

Jm Students Give Kids News

|jTIWPAeE 051
the only other choice was spinach.'**
HE SAID he didn't care what adults said, though.
'They are two-faced, kids are honest.
He has become a bit of a celebrity in Gainesville.
M I WAS IN Krystal eating a hamburger the other
day when a guy came up to me and asked me if I
was Jim Richardson. I said yes, and he told me that
his two-year-old watches me every morning.
Financed by the state, Richardson said they are
having budget problems, and our equipment is

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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR it th official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when lt*s published semi-weekly; and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida,. Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered m second ctess-matter at the United States Post Office
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate thtf*typpgrapbiC
tone of all advertisements and to revise or tum away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

ByCARtOSJ.LICEA
AingiTor own onnr
*'
The Board of Regents might have set a
limit to the number of freshmen entering
UF, but this will not have a significant
effect on the size of the freshmen class.
The limit will be enforced starting in
September, 1971.
ACCORDING TO Dr. Franklin Doty,
dean of University College, the limit of
2,900 which has been set by the regents is
100 students above the previous limit.
Doty said UF has been limiting the
number of entering freshmen to 2,800 for

W
Â¥ jm

IMAGE IN LIGHT
Light and darkness combined at the Blues Image show Thursday night
to give the Alligator photographer Mark Hauser a different view of the
show.

EVERY THIRD
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FREE
Air-conditioned Comfort
SPEED QUEEN
FABRIC CARE CENTER
SIN CITY FLAZA
OFF IStli St. on S.W. ISthAve.

WWH, if that.** He said they have two new cameras
but cant use them, He doesn't know why.
The students tape shows ahead to cover the time
between quarters. He said this is necessary because
they would lose viewers if they closed down on class
breaks.
KEEPING INTEREST is a big problem, he said,
on the format itself.
We have to keep things moving because the
child's attention span is short and kids are our
best feedback as to how the show's going.
The show takes up much of his time, and he has
other courses.
It has driven me to drink, he said with a laugh.

a number of years.
This, according to Doty, does not
include the disadvantaged students who
have entered UF as part of the Critical
Freshmen Year program.
THERE IS, however, another source
from which people come to UC.
There are a lot of junior college
transfers who come to the UF as
sophomores. Because they have not
completed their requirements to enter the
upper division, they go into UC.
Adding to the number of students in
UC (between 7,200 and 7,300 last year)
is a number of sophomores who have
changed majors and who might remain as

Burger Chef
goes all out
the student!
715 NW 13th St. tEUSo
1 B B W I -

Progress Slow At UF

PAGE gj
of more than five per cent of
students who fail to meet
normal admissions requirements.
But, the rule applies only to
the fall freshman class. UF could
admit 500 black students each
year who do not meet normal
requirements by extending
admissions over a three quarter
period.
ASIDE FROM THE feasibility
of the demand, financing and
the limitations of UFs physical
facilities to accomodate the
unanticipated growth would also
have to be considered.
Money is one of the major
problems hampering black
student recruitment. Black
students who score high on
achievement tests can command
lucrative scholarships from
Northern and Midwestern
schools. UF has no scholarships
for entering black freshmen.
The moment a black high
school or junior college student
hears this, their assessment of
UF changes.
IT WOULD COST
approximately $1 million to
completely finance 500 new
black students each year. The
total federal funding for UFs
Financial Aid Office last year
National Defense Loans, Federal
Work-Study and Educational
Opportunity Grants totaled
only $1.5 million.
Could UF finance 500 new
Hack students each year?
We would have to greatly
expand our state and federal
programs and seek private
sources to do this, said I.
Douglas Turner, director of UFs
Financial Aid Office.
HOPEFULLY THE coming
legislature will be presented with
a state program which would
parallel federal funding of the

sophomores for up to five quarters.
BUT I DONT think it (UC) is
overcrowded, Doty said.
He said the number of people in UC
might reach 7,400 by the fall quarter.
Also receiving a limit for 1971 are
Florida State University, 2,500;
University of South Florida,
Florida Technical University 2,000.
This move has been made to direct
more freshmen and sophomore students
into the states junior colleges, this way
insuring the orderly growth of the
universities according to a memorandum
from the regents.

last four years, Turner said.
If this bill is passed it will
generate state funds that will
supplement federal funding for
student financial aid. Monies
from this bill could conceivably
be used to finance more black
students.
But this type of financing, if
it occurs, would not necessarily
attract the states top black
students to UF. Free money
scholarships can be had
elsewhere.
UF HAS NONE now and the
prospects of administering
special scholarships for black
students is complicated by the
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare (HEW).
An HEW ruling prohibits
universities from administering
scholarships based solely on
race. Such scholarships can be
administered by UF, according
to Turner, but only on a
custodial arrangement.
Under this arrangement
Financial Aid administers special
scholarships at the time, and in
the amount specified by the
donor.
A similar arrangement could
be worked out for black student
scholarships if money from
private sources becomes
available.
Florida State University, the
University of South Florida and
University of Miami already have
found ways to circumvent the
HEW ruling. Special scholarships
and grant programs for black
students are now operating at
these schools.
Dialogue
Dialogue will present Leonard
Tanner, chairman of Student
Government Productions (SGP)
and Miles Wilkins, executive vice
president of the Inter Fraternity
Council Tuesday night at 11
p jil on WRUF.
The show will be about the
work of SGP.



Registration Books Close,
Final Turnout'Fantastic'

A full count of the number of
UF students registered to vote in
Alachua County will be released
in about 10 days according to
Supervisor of Elections Mrs.
Alma Bethea.
the voter registration books
for the Sept. 8 state primaries

State Director Explains
Union Pay Increases
Pay adjustments for some Reitz Union employes were determined
by an evaluation conducted by management consultants, according to
Jay McQon, state director of the Division of Personnel and
Retirement
The explanation for the wage increase for some, but not ail Union
employes was explained by McQon in a letter to Patrick J. Day,
union recreation supervisor.
McGLON SAID the objective of the evaluation was to review
wage structure in determining whether the State of Florida as an
employer could recruit and retain personnel.
A pay survey for all classes of employes in career service will be
conducted during the fiscal year 1970-71 and more adjustments may
be made at that time, he added.
Day had stated he felt the new scale was unfair to the white
collar-supervisory and clerical positions in a July 3 letter to McGlon.

Grad Student
Found Dead
A UF graduate student is dead
in what the Gainesville Police
Department considers a possible
suicide.
Ronald William Shultis, 25,
402 NW 2nd Ave., died Saturday
of a bullet wound in his
head.
His roommate, David Lee
Martin, 19, told police he found
Shultis dead on the bedroom
floor Sunday morning.
Separated from his wife, he
had made a previous suicide
attempt and had been seeing a
psychiatrist, police said.
Hastings Hen
A1 Hastings, Democratic
candidate for U. S. Senate, will
speak at UF Saturday night. The
speech is sponsored by the
Aiblic Functions committee and
win begin at 7:30 in room 349,
Reitz Union.
Man Os The Year
Deadline for nominations
for the Florida Alligator's Man
of the Year is Thursday.
The award is presented to
the man or woman who has
contributed the most to higher
education in Florida during the
past year and will be announced
in the new student mailaway
edition of the Affigstor
distributed Aug. 21.
Nominations should include
a paragraph telling why the
person should receive the award.

and the Nov. 3 election closed
on Saturday.
MRS. BETHEA described the
final turnout as fantastic.
During the rush at the end of
the week she said people
standing in lines were
understanding and sympathetic.

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Everyone was most courteous to
work with.
Several people voted their
absentee ballots at the time they
registered.
Qualified UF students were
permitted to register in Alachua
County after a statement of
clarification was sent to Mrs.
Bethea by State Atty. General
Earl Faircloth.
An exact count of UF
students registered cannot be
given at this time because the
interviewee cards go from Mrs.
Bethea's office to data
processing, she said.
CIO Party
The Co u ncil of
International Organizations
.(CIO), made up of the 900 UF
foreign students, is holding a
party Friday to meet other
students.
There will be music, dancing
and free snacks, according to
organizer Guljit Kochlar. The
party begins at 9 pm in Twin
Towers lobby.

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"Florida Quarterlyl
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- -.

Page 3



Page 4

[, The Florfcfa'Aliibitbr, Tuesday, August IT/TSTO

Communication Lack
Causes UF Difficulties

By MURIEL EVERTON
Alligator Writer
Lack of effectiveness in communication was a
basic factor found by the Presidents Advisory
Council to be underlying difficulties at UF.
The council, chaired by Dr. Robert B. Gaither,
has submitted their final report for the 1969-70
academic year to UF President Stephen C.
O'Connell. In all six areas studied by the group,
proposals were made and action has begun. These
areas included the honor system, campus
communications and student fee distribution.
ACCORDING TO Gaither the nature of the
council made it necessary to inquire into the six
areas. In contrast to groups being able to respond
immediately to charges, the Advisory Council found

Student Government Backs
Used Textbook Sales Again

By SOB WISE
AMgetor Staff Writer
Student Government is back
in the used textbook business,
and needs used books as well as
four to five employes to kick off
its new book exchange.
Anyone wanting to sell books
can take them to room 04 of
the Reitz Union beginning the
week of Aug. 16. Thats around
the corner from the Union
bookstore and barber shop,
outside, underneath the
colonnade. - v
THOSE WHO TURN in books
will set the price themselves, and
will receive a numbered receipt.
The bodes will be offered for
Newsletter
Advises On
Money Use
For Richer, For Poorer, is a
free newsletter series being
offered to young marrieds by an
Alachua County Extension
Home Economics agent.
The newsletters are designed
to help couples enjoy their hard
earned money through sound
money management.
ACCORDING TO Mrs.
Elizabeth C. Ahrano, home
economics agent, inflation is a
fact of life with which all must
learn to live. Information on
fighting inflation will be given in
the newsletters.
Mrs. Ahrano says the amount
of debt is related to the family's
income and young marrieds
should determine a reasonable
debt limit.
The new series will also
contain information on credit
purchasing which has become so
much a part of American
spending. v
irsssi
|||l I 1712 W. University j||
ill |I TEXTBOOKS fe
II SCHOOL SUPPLIES m
mm l I apt supplies m
all iwaiNttstw^

sale during the first 10 days of
the fall quarter.
Later, the proceeeds and
unsold books will be announced
in the Alligator by receipt
number, and students can pick
them up by showing their
receipt at room C-4.
Brad Raffle, administrative
assistant, ;to Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder
recommends each book be
priced slightly below the price a
book of similar quality is going
for at the Hub or other
bookstores.
THIS WILL RESULT in a
somewhat bettor price for the
buyer and a much better return
for the setter.
The book exchange is the
answer for those who complain
about high textbook prices, but
its success depends on
reasonable pricing and plenty of
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it difficult to maintain continuous enthusiasm
during their questioning. Recommendations were
made to improve the council in the future by
making its approach to problems more direct,
Gaither said. Jv* v*
However cooperation among the committee
members and those contacted during the year by
the members was excellent, he said.
The communications problem needs to be dealt
with constantly, Gaither said.
The council suggested that a large percentage of
the information received by individuals in the UF
community, was being confused with the status of
documents which are official.
Other suggestions included a "State of the
University message from the president and
immediate attention to the honor system.

participation according to
Raffle.
If we can get a significant
number of students to ask a
reasonable price for their books,
it will be a success, he said.
Also needed are clerks,
cashiers and supervisors to work
for an hourly wage in the
exchange, during the last week
of classes and during finals.
Anyone interested sholdcall dr
apply in person to the SG office,
room 301 in the Union.
Orchestra ~
The University Summer
Orchestra presents a concert of
light music tonight at 8:15 in
fire University Auditorium.
Selections will include
compositions by Bartok,
Brahms, Bizet, and Jacob.
The Summer band presents its
final Twilight Concert
Wednesday night at 7:30 on the
Union lawn.
THE COMFORT EXPERTS
Specializing in Hatidantial
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:t- Box Office 392-1653 :
| *#>
: '. ''* '' -" . -7 >' t -;: ". V S '' ,: ; v:
Burger Kings
WHOPPER
is so big ...
you have to
put it down
to munch
your fries,
or drink
your shake!
MpMINK*
i rrm- II M



Blindness
Faces Thieves
Some local light bulb thieves
are in danger of getting burned
eye-balls.
According to Jack Bacheler,
and Lewis McCarter, doctoral
students in entomology, several
black light bulbs have been
stolen from two different insect
traps at entomology labs south
of Archer Road. The black light
is peculiarly attractive to flying
insects and is used to lure the
creatures into cages.
THE TROUBLE is that some
of these bulbs are unshielded,
said McCarter, and the harmful
rays are strong enough to bum
tire surface of the eyes, like
watching an arc welder. There is
no easy way to tell a shielded
bulb from one that isnt, so
some teenager who has found a
cheap way to decorate his room
may find it a painful
experience.
Bacheler said the labs are state
property and the penalty for
stealing from them is a heavy
fine and/or imprisonment.
Considering the. danger to
their eyes and the possible
penalty, it hardly seems worth
the $5 bulbs, said Bacheler.
Registrar
Will Not
List Profs
By CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
Allpter Staff Writer
Whos teaching what course
and what section is a pretty
popular question around
registration time.
In an effort to get that
question answered Student
Government made a request to
the Office of the Registrar to
have this information printed in
the course schedule book.
THAT REQUEST has been
denied.
Gail Merein, secretary of
academic affairs said SG feels
this practice should be
implemented at least on the
departmental or college level.
The feeling is that students
who are allowed to choose their
own instructor will have a more
favorable attitude toward the
class in general.
IT IS HOPED the classroom
atmosphere wffl then be more
conducive to learning.
So far five favorable responses
have been received from
University College, Education,
Arts and Sciences, Agriculture
and Business Administration.
Several colleges including
Journatiam, University College
and Arts and Sciences already
have such a practice.
5 XEROX 4<
17W W. UNIV.
Thesis Dissertations
Book-Notes
THE
COPY CENTER
w * to YSBfYtS d i
We Grve dlutfity and
Next to Malone's
St XEROX 4<

. : " ' ; "' 5 1 ~ t v' %>§

PRIVATE BEDROOMS FOR EACH STUDENT allows
you to do your own thing. Centrally air conditioned 4
bedroom apartments allow luxury living and maximum
privacy at minimum expense.
LUXURIOUS Barcelona furnishings beautifully
complement La Mancha*s unique Spanish design. Every
apartment is fully carpeted and tastefully appointed for
lasting beauty.
FUN areas include one of the few pools near campus and a
patio-garden complete with gas grills. A central courtyard
provides a center for swinging social activities.
TGIF parties at the pool help to get your weekend
started... plus kegs, food and a band after football games.
QUIET bedrooms face away from the courtyard so you
can get away from it all. Thick concrete floors and
double-ceil walls stop all out side noise from entering.
ROOMY 1,000-square-foot apartments are among
Gainesvilles largest.
ECONOMICAL. Cost is less than 2 students sharing a
apartment.
CONVENIENT. Location is within easy walking distance
to class... away from heavy traffic... next to sorority
row.
CHOICE townhouse or single level apartments are
beautifully unique in design most face the courtyard and
pool.
CUSTOM-MADE for student living... designed to meet
Qf lT I i iMfl OJ
COMPLETE services WMhtoMQftid by the
landlord, ample laundry and storage facilities, garbage
disposals in every kitchen and maid service.


"


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Tuesday, August 11, 1970, Th* Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

b Th AMpeor. Tuesday, August 11. 1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

OCT
r

Big Spender Under Investigation

WASHINGTON -An angry
Arch Moore, who was elected
governor of West Virginia on a
pledge of clean government,
recently summoned reporters
from all over the state to a
televised press conference to
denounce as a despicable lie'*
this columns charges against
him.
This column reported that
the governor had short-changed
Uncle Sam on taxes, had paid
personal bills with money
donated for his political
campaign and had accepted
illegal donations from
corporations. He roared his
denials into the TV cameras,
then stomped out of the press
conference without answering
questions.
I IMMEDIATELY offered
to face him on television and put
up my evidence against his
epithets. He turned down the
opportunity. Hare, therefore, is
some of the additional evidence
I had intended to present:
From 1962 through 1966,
Moore reported only $45,000 in
taxable income at a time when
he was earning $30,000 a year as
a Congressman arid diverting
campaign collections into his
personal accounts. During this
five-year period, he siphoned off
more than SBO,OOO from
political funds to pay his
personal bills. Yet one year he
listed his taxable income at less
than $5,000.
*
All the while he was
reporting such low income, he
was gaining a reputation in
Washington as a big spender. He
lived in a fashionable home in
the Potomac countryside where
he kept riding horses and led the
life of a country squire.
MOORE WHITTLED down
the net income he reported in
his tax returns by claiming huge
deductions. A typical example:
he deducted the cost of
operating the private plane that
flew him back and forth
between Washington and West
Virginia. Earlier, he had Charged
the pilot's salary to the
taxpayers by putting pilot Floyd
Graham on the congressional
payroll for 20 months.
Moore also received outside
income from law firm which

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Galhib
Executive Editor

1 A DRINK? I NOTHE I
WATER IS I
CHEMICALS. |
Vwm

Merry-Go-Round
imUHlUllllUimilHHlllllllllllllUllHlHmilllllllllHimillUlMHlfMHlM
by Jack Anderson

represented, among other
clients, Pittsburgh Plate Glass.
At the same time, he defended
Pittsburgh Plate Glass in
congressional hearings.
As executor of an estate, he
also helped himself to several
hundred shares of stock that the
will had left for charity. Os
1,500 shares intended for
charity, tax agents discovered he
had transferred 900 shares to his
own name. Later, he took
custody of another 300 shares.
THE TAX agents concluded
from their painstaking
investigation that Moore's
taxable income for the five-year
period was $176,000 -a
whopping $131,000 more than
he had reported. The internal
Revenue Service has now
referred the case to the Justice
Department for criminal
prosecution.
* *
L. Mendel Riven, the
hifahitin House Armed Services
chairman, doesn't believe in
buying airline tickets. He uses
the Air Force as his own private
airline. If he wishes to stop at an
airport that can't handle Air
Force jets, he can always wangle
a small private plane from a
defense contractor.
Last Friday, Riven snapped
s his fingen for an Air Force plane
for his customary flight home to
Charleston, S.C., for the
weekend. The Air Force
obediently wheeled out a sleek
Lockheed Jetstar to fly the lone
Congressman to South Carolina.
HE HAD summoned
Farmen Home Administrator
James V. Smith down to
Walterboro, S.C., meanwhile, to
see how the drought had hurt his
rural constituents. Rivers wanted:
to hit up the Famien Home
Administration for several
millions to bail out South
Carolina's corn, watermelon and
tobacco farmers.
Smith knew better than to
turn down a summons from the
powerful Riven. In fact, he

Les Gardieff
Managing Editor
Fred Vollrath
News Editor

il^ADGoiiirnHH|
TO TAKE ME
FISHING SUNDAY?
OCEANS AND I
Rl U WUOTEU I
jfllJnl Ijw*

arranged to bring his emergency
loan director, Jack Frost, along.
The grateful Rivers
magnanimously offered them
transportation to Walterboro.
This too is too small an air
strip for Air Force jets. So
Riven simply called upon Beech
Aircraft Corporation, a big
government contractor, to
provide a special plane. Beech
immediately put a handsome
King Air 725-K, a twin-engined
turboprop, at Riven's disposal.
*
ALTHOUGH THE
government officials aren't
supposed to accept such favors,
Smith and Frost flew to
Walterboro like a pair of kings.
They were met by Riven and
Rep. Tom Gettys, D-S.C., who
trotted out farmen to testify
about drought damage. Gettys
was the only one who took a
commercial flight.
After the impromptu
hearings, Riven, Gettys and the
two Agriculture officials flew
back to Washington in the
company Beechcraft.
Footnote: Smith refused to
say whether the trip had
persuaded him to grant River's
constituents government aid. As
for the free flight, he explained
that he knew Riven had
arranged the plane but didn't
know it was provided by a
government contractor.

Alligator Staff

OnwSptfw
Sports Editor
' J| Mi Ml m+O m flgta
HlHnmu DfiVV
Editorial Assistant
*jjj j s|. j,
Dan Vining
Campus Living Editor

Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the edfe*. ~
of the writer of the article and not those 6t the University of Florida

EDITORIAL
Headless Hawk
Time has come for UF administrators to find a solution
to the problems of black students on this campus.
In the past campus race relations have drifted about
without any direction from UFs administration.
Only when a crisis developed, and then only after the
fact, has UFs administration responded to the plight of
black students at UF.
During these times the administration has responded with
a blur of motion; a proposal here, a new committee there to
supersede an old one, a blade appointment. Motion minus
direction, like a gigantic hawk swooning around without a
head and no sense of direction.
Where was Tigert in 1968 when Spenser Boyer, a
visiting black law professor, was forced to leave town
because of racially-threatening phone calls?
Where was Tigert in December, 1968, when Fred
Kanali, a black African student was spit upon in front of the
research library?
And what has happened to all of the Action
Conference proposals concerning black students at UF?
When the university community should have had
direction from Tigert we received silence instead.
Now the administration has a chance to make amends for
the silence of the past.
The Black Student Union and the Student Senate has
presented the administration with a list of five demands
concerning the status of black students at UF.
The administration should seriously consider these
demands.
The Department of Health, Education and Welfares last
report criticized UF for the slow pace of racial progress
here. Last week Charles Quick, a visiting black law
professor, called UF an all white university with a little
gray around the edges.
All of this has been discounted by key administrators
who say they are distorted observations, TTiey talk of new
programs soon to be started which will bring racial harmony
toUF.
But results? No substance just talk coming down from
key UF administrators.
With a student body 99.1 per cent white and a faculty
99.8 per cent white, how can we say significant racial
progress has been made?
The time has come for the hawk to regain its head and,
with it, a sense of direction. The time has come for the talk
to be joined by action.
Whats the matter with everybody?

Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising
offices in Student Publications
Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686
87,88 or 89

Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, CaH: 392-1681,
82, 83 or 84
M# S. Davis
Business Manager
K.S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
- | I Promotion Manager ;
To reach Circulation Department
call: 392-1619



Celebration Turns To Mourning

The 26th of July, 1970, the
17th anniversary of the start of
the revolution was supposed
to have been a great celebration
in Cuba. It was going to be a
combination of Christmas,
New Years, and the celebration
for the ten million ton sugar
harvest.
Instead the Cubans were
treated to a relatively short
three-hour speech by Cubas
prime minister Fidel Castro, who
told them of the failure of the
government's program. The huge

Agnew Watch Starts Trend

Remember when as a kid you
had a Mickey Mouse, Hop A
Long Cassidy, or maybe
Cinderella wrist watch? Well, it
seems the world has grown up.
They (that secretive murky
conspiracy) weren't content
with making replicas of early
Mickey Mouse watches.
Now the move is to the
political arena. Spiro Agnew will
become the new tick tock hero
of impressionable five year-olds
just learning how to tell time. It
sounds like a Republican plot to
control the minds of future
generations.
SPIRO AGNEW watches are
only a foreshadowing of things
to come. The landslide is about
to start and if I had any artistic
talent I'd be cashing in. What
can we expect in the coming
weeks and months?
TRICKY DICKY TALKING
DOLL It wears an
unconvincing smile, looks

Speaking Out
Military Bad Breath Unchecked
. by Ken Driggs

In it's never ending drive to
save mankind from itself, or
more likely from his certainly
dangerous fellow man, military
forces all over the world once
created poison gas, one of a
number of ultimate weapons'*
spawned by the glorious men in
green and brass.
The variety of gases available
was once magnificent. Some
LETTERS POLICY
S typed, stflned,
300 words.
Net be signed wHh e
* eddreeses end
be withheld only if
Mae for meet* M 2gtnteu
Wrttws may p tebndt leogw
ameye, aebimna or Imtaas to be
eeneldered for me as BpMking
Out" writer
rtftnT end to show

crowd at Havanas Plaza de la
Revolucion listened to an
enumeration -of the setbacks
suffered, and a promise of more
years of hard work.
THE EIGHT and one half
million tons of sugar harvested is
the most sugar Cuba has ever
produced. This figure slightly
exceeds previous harvests in
pre-Castro days.
But in itself, this figure is
deceptive.
The 1969 harvest, the one in
question, lasted six months more

View From The Crowd
by Rob Matte

suspiciously like an old Nixon
doll that came out several years
ago, says things like, "Let me
make one thing perfectly dear
and "The negotiations are
progressing satisfactorily.''
TEDDY KENNEDY BOARD
GAME Will Teddy make the
bridge this time or once more
soak Chappaquiddick into your
memory? You control events,
You dedde if he really called
Jackie that night. You make or
unmake history.
GEORGE C. WALLACE
QUICK GRITS When you
wake up in the morning, stand
up for America with this
patriotic rebel rouser in your

*
were subtle invisible clouds of
gas settled on the evil tnemy to
halt the functions of his nervous
system. Instant death. But these
aren't nearly as much fun as
more overt gases because the
enemy hardly ever realized he
was being killed.
OTHER BRANDS could float
across towns in dirty yellow
clouds and sear out his lungs.
The process was delightfully
painful and just slow enough for
him to watch his comrades fall
and realize you had done him in.
A whole lot of these military
sorts had a war once and it was
ideal for testing and developing
these silent killers, the trench
wars of World War I.
But people, not to be
confused with the military,
suffered fsotwrlHy from the
poison gas** kt'lftat Wtf that
they insisted gas be excluded
from all future wars or police
actions.'' (Modem powers have
not exhibited so much wisdom
about nuclear weapons capable
of destroying the whole
planet.)That provision of the

than usual. The prolonged
harvest included cutting cane
which should have spared for
this years harvest, eliminating
the chances of a recuperation in
the next few years.
INDEED, IF the sugar
obtained this year is substracted
from the actual sugar produced,
the Castro government has only
received six million tons of sugar
frdm the 1969 harvest. This is a
far cry from pre-Castro
production which reached 7.6

stomach. They are on your
grocers shelf in the white box
with the hood on it.
ABBIE HOFFMAN MAKEUP
KIT Everything you need to
scare the hell out of the
establishment. Included. are a
frizzy hair stretch wig, bode on
how to indte a riot for fun and
profit and a complete transcript
of the Chicago seven trial.
These are only a few
possibilities; some of the more
reasonable products which may
come out. Maybe when it is all
over we can get back to Davy
Crockett Bubble Gum Cards
where we belong.

peace settlements following the
First World War was accepted by
all participants, including the
United States.
BUT THE United States
military block, in its continued
endeavor to insure world peace
through the threat of total world
distraction (follow that logic
carefully) continued to
manufacture and stockpile
newer and more effective"
poison pases. Reports even
filtered back from Vietnam that
poison gases of a sort were being
used in limited action there.
So now, for some mysterious
reason known only to the
pentagon, some of those gases
are being disposed of. But
instead of neutraling or
dumhothem ocean. The
latest dumping scheduled for off
the Florida coast.
Apparently it never occurred
to those skilled military
scientists there might be some
need to render the gases
harmless, so nobody thought to

Staff Writings
by Carlos J. Licea

million tons in the year of most
production.
But, then, this is only sugar.
For the Zafra de los Diez
Mdlones (ten million harvest)
Castro mobilized a great
majority of Cuba's working
population, ignoring other areas
of production to the point of
having negligible production
from other crops (such as
tobacco and coffee). These
products will now suffer even
Stricter rationing.
THE ONCE thriving industry
of tourism has almost
completely collapsed and light
industry in the cities has ground
to almost a complete halt in an
effort to divert the workers to
the sugar fields.
The nickel and copper mines
in Oriente province have
produced only a trickle of their
potential and the one-time
highly regarded production of
cattle-related foodstuffs and
dairy products are now almost
non-existent.
But the ten million ton
harvest was supposed to make
up for deficits in other fields of
production.
THE ONLY trouble is Castro
stacked the honor of his
revolution on achieving the ten
million ton harvest goal, even
though the sacrifice meant doing
what Castro once criticized as
being beneficial for American
Imperialism The monocrop.
Even Marxist economists, who
usually have been sympathetic
to Castro, have criticized the
great shift of resources and
manpower which the harvest has
required.
The issue of monocultivo
monocrop, one-crop economy
is one of the issues of Castro's
revolution. The dependence of a
nation on one crop can render
that nation prey to economic

develop a means of doing so.
Instead, what we have is
something new and different for
our struggling environment to
cope with.
SO LATER it conies out the
gas must be disposed quickly
because the concrete and steel
containers it is stored in are
leaking, but only a little bit, a
sort of military bad breath will
accompany them where ever
they go. To top it off, the
rockets the gas is mounted in are
becoming unstable.
All aiong the planned
transportation route of the gas
coffins (if only they wouldn't
use that word) the military has
set up fancy safety measures.
Nobody's going to get zapped
sl.rinw.iKw
3#fi mStH and
poisonous, it s going touget
dumped a few odd miles off the
Florida coast. Perhaps someday
a not-so-happy environment
simply will refuse to absorb that
poison and all of Florida will be
exterminated by a dirty grey
cloud of military bad breath.

Tuesday, Auguest 11, 1970, The Fleride Alligater, Page 7

imperialism. Castro sharply
criticized past governments in
Cuba for their dependence on
sugar for capital and dependence
of the United States as the
biggest market for Cuban sugar.
CASTRO NOW finds himself
in the other end of the barrel of
his own criticism. In 1970 Cuba
is in an economic position
similar to the one which existed
in the early 1950*5. The country
is dependent upon one crop,
sugar, and there is very little
hope for industrialization.
Even worse, other industries
which were beginning to develop
in the 1950's are lagging behind,
and the much heralded fishing
fleet has almost all been t
grounded so that the workers
involved could help in the sugar
effort.
If anything, Cuba has fallen
prey again to economic
imperialism from the Soviet
Union, which is pumping one
million dollars a day to keep
Castro's revolution afloat. The
Soviets are also Castro's major
market and the foreign debt to
the Soviets keeps mounting as
each day goes by.
The revolution is in trouble.
Cuba is depending on the pillar
of sugar which might not be
there by the time the 1970
harvest rolls in.
UF Progs
Unjustified
EDITOR:
Even though I was in the
invitational honors program
during my freshman and
sophomore years in University
College, I had utmost sympathy
for my fellow classmen who had
to endure prog tests; 1 had the
unfortunate experience of being
forced to take the last part of
Physical Science under that
system because of a schedule
conflict; it was doubtless the
worst course in my academic
history!
There is no justification, as I
see it, to attempt to standardize
grading procedures or course
content among teachers in the
University College; no earthly
way to accomplish this task
exists, with the possible>
exception of teaching machines.
Individual differences in teacher
preparation, student interest,
etc. cannot be standardized, nor
is there any particular virtue in
doing so.
IF STANDARDIZING of all
UC courses is to be desired, then
why not standardize all sections
of FH 133 or EDF 345? What
Great Troth" established the
desirability of standardizing the
content and testing procedures
in UC and not doing likewise in
all sections of any other course,
undergraduate or graduate?
I strongly support SG's
recommendation that
standardized testing be
abolished; perhaps, this
accomplished, some effort may
be made to do away with
standardization of course
content also: a general syllabus
should be enough.
BETH NICHOLAS, 7ED

Page 7



Page 8

I, Tt Florida TiM*r, *at 11/1970

MAAS BROTHERS ( / "/
Francesca got the best of Italy to produce this smartest of pantsuits. i/ (ry By
The long cocoa sweater and pants cling and turtle in keeping with |\ /*.
today's fashions. Leather borders the arms and hardware zipper for \ 14*1
the stylish earthly look. Modeled by Gaye. \ J 11 BW m
BELK LINDSEY \\ \ 1
From all angles, "the weMook" by Lilli Ann is going to be the Fall \s\\ |
coat fashion. This versatile coat even keeps off the rain, and Belk gg \\w 1 a- 'Hitt
Lindsey has it! For the leaders fashion. the fashion leader If 4 P* \W
... Belk Lindsey. SHBUBHK fgKp
Willi 1
4 v '^K # 1
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IMILk 1*
I f y f| |\ || *$ |g
fl \* I't o) '%/ ~rk "-'k,, k''*' V-V kv s i -:\, I I : H ~l\ / v y 4 r /-
' 11 f| 9| /' |m| : 9
jM _' ,mI :j _- | |i B ~ i
SUSAN SCOTT B# jB ill
The Gaucho is certain to be in every fashion roundup this Fall. You KBn ' f B
need not go West for this fancy gaucho get-up: it's yours from boots 9| Ifv *Li ' t
to blouse at Susan Scott's. Modeled by Judi. S V 3
' ..Mi' % > >1 ~. ;C v 9ittlriiWii#ir K j
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Meditation by an old mill stream seems to be the "thing" of the day.
Likewise, Cathy displays a two-piece lounging set in pastel colors. The
outfit is made of washable nylon with self-covered buttons and a
wrap-around belt.

.' .. ; .y ; . ;_. . tfiiHuiM &**&
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SEARS
". HS' ' w

Things are looking up with this 100% orlon acrylic pants outfit for
this Fall. Sears Junior Bazaar presents the wide-leg look offset by a
bright print scarf. Modeled by Rita.
5L:'
sv ** *'/
SILVERMAN'S
f, - :;-.v '
We have the perfect outfit for you for Fall. A rust-colored gaucho
outfit by Pranx of double-knit fabric. Accenting the outfit is a white
cotton, ruffled body shirt by Stuffed Shirt.
El"'.: -p '
\ .* .. v.\
VI- ; % i,,;
' .
COLONY SHOP (center)
Tracy Petits brings us this light weight purple two-piece ensemble for
early Fall. The shoes are black crushed patent by Miss America.
Modeled by Judy.


TMdy, Au 11,1970, Tlw Ftori AWfr.

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1966 Capita 10 x 52 Mobil* Horn*.
Air conditioned, shod, washing
machine, 2 bedroom, many extras.
See at Lot 48, Westgate Mobil*
Manor. Call 378-3725. (A-5M67-P)
Two full albums recorded onto on*
8-track tape cartridge $5 Including
cartridge, high quality guaranteed
free pick-up and delivery. Inlay
service, call John 378-2004
(A-st-167-p)
Raccoons, skunks, bob cats, snakes,
turtles, monkeys, parrots, hawks,
chicks, for sale, trade for what pet
have you, or will buy. Call 475-2546
(Local) (A-st-169-P)
TR 3 *57 runs good, motor rebuilt
8175 373-1895 (a-3t-170-p)
idb
a
a&CBIHI
IS COMING!
Read the Classifieds
foLmore information
§p|
* !**%% t\ *% "% *\^**?Jk*** %************ *
jtJiJVVJtVtVV,*,V,% VV%*,VV*'jXvyAV,V %*,

AUGUSTCLEARANCE
MODEL 1720 FEATURING DETACHABLE
SPEAKERS FOR FULL STEREO SEPARATION
Reg.
AUGUSTCLEARANCE
PRICE *199 95 I
Rag. Prica
$l9O jos NOW
Modd 1719 with $179.95
bfuiltin speakers
MODEL 61 OX THE ONLY CROSS 6ft FIELD
STEREO BATTERY/AC PORTABLE
RECORDER /.
Rag Prto'fmOfL. f y
AUGUST CLEARANCE PRICE $179 95
JJAM 3J JIVSH/.SAD *
COUCHS* I* 1 * 'j
Serving Gator Country Since 1933
60S N. MAIN PH. 378-1562

FOR SALE
VM Tape Recorder Stereo
playback, sound-wlth-sound, level
indicator. $75 or. best offer. Call
372- (A-4t169-p)
Bass Man Amp with cases In new
condition, contact Wynn at
378-1895. (A-4M69-P)
THE TAPE MACHINE Is coming to
Gainesville. Discount prices on all
tapes. A swap barrel for old tapes
your old cartridge plus 50 cents! w*
specialize In tap* deck Installation.
Bring your deck to us. w* do It right!
Also sales and service. (a-2t-170-p)
MOVING Must sell cheap; port,
stereo (Garrard), Ilk* new crib, couch
and chair, twin-beds, full-tgth. Mirror,
4-dr. Dresser Ph. 372-7357
(A-5M68-P)
Honda 160 *69 Good condition, Low
Millage. 8290 Including two helmet
Call after 5 P.M. 392-7549
(A-4t-168-p)
Divorce sale Saturday Aug. 15, 9
a.m.-5 p.m. only. Everything goes,
furniture, tv, toaster, lamps, and
stuff. Priced to sell. Apt. 142
Camelot. (a-7t-171-p)
MOBILE HOME, 10 Wide Schult 1
br with screened porch, ac, storage,
located In nice park 15 sec. campus,
$2850. 378-0660 (a-3t-171-p)
Nikkor 200mm f 4 tense w. case
$139. 2 nlkon close-up lenses sl2.
; vlvltar 1100 tripod $lO ; book
Ike new must sell. Call 378-4126
(a-2t-171-p)
Am having to dispose of about S3OO
of electronic odds & ends. Selling
most at one tenth of cost. Come by
No. 60 Village Park If Interested.
Postlvely first come first served.
(a-lt-171-p)
GE solid state portable stereo,
detachable speakers, great sound, at
the low low price of S3O. Call
373- or 376-1891 anytime.
(a-3t-171-p)
*67 Honda Scrambler 305 cc very
good mechanical cond $350.00
372-5489 after 5 p.m. or see at No.
10 French Quarter (a-2t-171-p)
THIS IS IT TROOPS The dregs of
an entire lifetime are for sale:
Records, books, furniture, etc. Grant.
304 SE 3rd St. 378-3746 (a-lt-171-p)
Bass man Amp 1966 model complete
with top and bottom, only $145.
Must sell call 378-9730 and leave
message. (a-2t-171-p)
Sony 500 Tape recorder/playback
. system. Selling for less than half
price. Believe it? If not see It. No. 60
Village Park. Positively first come
first served, (a-lt-171-p)
FOR RENT
HOLIDAY GARDENS
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance o*
campus. A/C, l bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Cali resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S. w. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
2 BR House l block East of campus
sublet August only 378-8122
$135.00 376-6652 Furnished.
(b-4t-171-p)

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. August 11,1970

FOR RENT
Girl looking for apt with liberal
female roommate. Willing to pay
between S4O A S6O. Call Susan Hill
at 376-6083 or 392-7945 late.
_(c-st-167-P)
Live In luxury at The Place. Male
roommate needed starting fall qtr.
town house. Private Bedroom, AC,
Dishwasher. Call: 378-9441.
(B-5M69-P)
Female Roomate Needed Fall
Quarter Only The Place
$67.50/Month Includes Utilities.
Writ* or Call Ginny Culbertson, 1508
Emory Lane, Cocoa, Fla.
(B-3M69-P)
Female roommate Hawaiian village
now through Aug. call 378-4750 for
further Information grad, student
preferred call after 5 PM (B*st,
167-p)
Furnished 1 and 2 br. apts. Quiet and
secluded. 2901 NW 14th St. 2 Blocks
North of the Mall Call 378-2076
(b-ts-c)
Rooms graduate & older men
students central heat & ac kitchen 2
blocks north of campus S6O month
year leas* washer dryer 378-8122 or
376-6652. (b-4t-171-p)
Across ptreet from campus. Studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
included completely furnished
Ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Av*.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-ts-c)
WANTED
VV'V**VVVVVV*VV#VVtVV%VV
V.VAV.V.V.V.%V,SV # V.V.V.V.V.V%V/.V.V
Living together or thinking about It.
wed Ilk* to share an apt. with
another guy and girl in the Fall
372-6903 after 3:00 and weekends.
(C-st-168-p)
Want a good natured roomate who Is
a great cook fall quarter? I need a
place to live close to campus.. Will
share rent. Call 373-2730
(c-2t-170-p)
Law student needs male roommate
for absolutely fantastic wood-paneled
pad, one bedroom, ac, $45/mo. Call
372-1294 nowl (C-4t-171-p)
Need roommate for 2 bedroom apt.
Own room. Private, dean, 6 blocks
from campus, next to many stores.
Llvlngroom, ig. kitchen. 376-4778
Lyn About $55 mo. (c-lt-171-p)
Dec. grad? Need male roommate for
fall qtr. only. New 1 bedrm. duplex
apt. wooded area, air cond. SSO mo.
Call Neal, 376-1006, or Sunny
372-4157 (C-4t-171-p)
IaSSTcS1 aSSTcS- A3SH DON'T
MiSfiaPc 11 MISS
KjsrS l this
1
fc i I -M
*sl Theirlast tggSthtrfjSs
United Artists m*
***m++ ¥
1 LAST
LmSsSi 3
MSEIWSiy DAYS
OWE Os fear's t$ last! £1
M -*CWSWU LJjd
Peter OToole \
5 Petula Clark
Mettocebr
*******
LAST
3
iwaiffi days
| mW. UmhmnMr
* The story of
* a beautiful gifts
li + lifetime between
V JIM BROWN*
**IIOSEPH COTTEhT

WANTED
Available for fall University Apts.
Two bedroom and efficiency* AC,
Pool. Close to campus. 80-140.
376-8990. (B-9t-166-p)
Furnished 1-bedroom apt. All
utilities induded slls/month. 208
N.W. 14th St. Call 376-0195.
(b-2t-170-p)
HELP WANTED
Need office girt for general office
Work. 5Vi day week. Pay according to
ability. Apply In parson at
Silverman's, 225 West University
Av*. (e-3t-170-p)

UNIOJ^UDJTORIU^^
m yK,H|H
f \ xwKmUtKMMm
Hk.
MOULTING^^
the family way cy
MILLS JOHN MILLS HYWEL BENNETT MARJORIE RHODES
Wd, August 12 7:00 A 9:30
50< spomorgd by JWR Union
. ;'vi ~y-~ *-v" -<& :J kfiji l -: j- A r* '' Jf ~~ "' [ ' .-: >
Mil ENDS TODAY: AIRPORT"
m
KJ£mm£ml2ml£i£~~SS£J
B^WWW^WW^WWiW
... ff A 1 a
OUOT EASTWOOD
H£!ai
A MAR I IN RACKIN PRODUCTION
TWO MULES FOR SISTER SARA'
(Msslv ky *LKT NALTZ Sy k, BUOO BOETTICHEB OktcM k, DM St6£L Nm k, ARTIB RACKIN
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLOR* PANAVISION*
IGPI * AO ** T P>c " ul niiM-fk tilMO.U.i/fpiTtx
m:".i
IHiyt NOW AT . "I
Ly aa^1 | 2:05 3:58 5:48 7:41 9:35
* /
Hamits* Gang
rt Ac 1 y\vfr
*-' V- t ._
ctoji Named Charlie Brown


Remember I
Summer I
Bowling I
Special I
REITZ UNION I



gator classifieds

iaahalWlU
WO PUCE
jP/ i^RL
ftr
PENTHOUSE 2
HELD OVER
Butch Cassidy And The
Sundance Kid"
. PENTHOUSES
What Do You Say To A
Naked Lady
50 CENTS AOM. MAT ANO EARLY
BIRD PRICE UNTIL 7:45 PM

AUGUST CLEARANCE
iS)ROBEkTS
Rag. riii nunc an. wft
AUGUST CLEARANCE |HM|HyI
PRICE *l79 95 EHU
" MODEL 450 -3-HEAD TAPI DECK
Reg. PriceTl9o.B6.
wmtJTSSS" AUGUST CLEARANCE
mm*- PRICE $17095
WITH WOTS MUSIC POWER If 7
COUCHS INC
Serving GATOR COUNTRY SINCE 1933
608 N. MAIN PH-378-1562

WHAT MAKES
THE FLORIDA QUARTERLY
A GOOD MAGAZINE?
fiction
f ' * '* ",:>: *; £
poetry
photography
graphic arts

They're basic.
Things that interest the student of today.
Then we added a few more. 1
Like pride, imagination, hard work.
We hope you'll like it*

AUTOS
SELL lO7O Nova-SS, NEW
375 hp. 396 ang. Turbo-hydramatlc,
many extras, radlo-tapa dock, gauges,
o'**- Call Dabbl bafora 5.
392-1107 (g-2t-170-p)
QTO 1968 Clean A Fully Equipped.
'n£u 372-1291 (g-2t-170-p)
Corvette 66 convert., 427 High perf.
modified for street or strips every
part new or perfect. Must sell by
Aug, 25. $2500 373-1524.
(9-2t-17Q-p)
VW. 1363, dean, excellent
S"?* 1 "- 2 rl#,nrt own r 6S*- Call
372-3147 For appointment to see.
(0-3t-169-P)
Chevrolet Impale 1961 Clean, Quiet
Vi, Auto. Best offer over S4OO
392-1760 or 378-3555 after 5 p.m.
(g-2t-171-p)
DEAL 64 Spitfire w/tebullt engine,
dutch. Many extras. SSOO or best
offer. Also spitfire hardtop, trailer
hitch, Sep. 373-2912 after 5 p.m.
(g-3t-171-p)
Army forces sale 1962 Porsche 356 B
Excellent mechanical condition, good
tires, am-fm radio. Call John at
378-3323 Best offer over SI2OO.
(g-3t-i7i-p)
61 Plym Belv. Radio Htr. Automatic
Exc. Tires. Dependable Local Transp.
$175 Call 3724277 Anytime
(g-2t-171-p)

Tuesday, August 11,1970, The Floride AMfaior,

*" pwusQIWJL. ir.
THEY'RE HEREI -* Slllypuddles
Be the first one on your Mock to
have one. Only three left and they're
going test. (I have a hard time
keeping up with them) Live
entertainment, Guaranteed to please.
Phone 372-4509 (]-2t-170-p)
Free kittens, bom July 4, 376-0767
after S pjn. Q-6t-170-p)
FREEI To a good home. One
pedigreed female Dutch rabbit.
Phone 372-4509. (j-2t-170-p)
Coeds Facial Hair removed forever
fist low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer electrotogist 102 NW
2nd Ave. call 372-9039 for appL
(J-32t-137-p)
Student Organizations: Interested In
showing yourself off during
orientation this Fall? Call JWRU
Program Office 392-1655(J-st-169-P)
MEN. WHERES HOME NEXT
QUARTER! Try Georgia Seagle
Co-op. Room and Board
$220/QUarter. 1002 W. University
376-9941 (J-tt-137-p)
Do you need a roommate? Female
transfer desires apt. for fall. Phone
collect Ellen 305-771-7479.
G-4t-171-p)
Urgent. Moving away. Must find- good
homes for 2 kittens and their mother.
All affectionate, healthy. Have had
Shots. Call 379-5655. Desperately need good home for 3
beautiful, trained, well cared for,
affectionate cats, gray, orange, and
calico. 379-0660 (J-3t-171-p)
LOST dc FOUND
FOUND: at 1417 NW Ist. Ave., a
SUPERpregnant cat. Call 372-2990.
(l-3t-169-nc) :
FOUND on July 29: Ladles gold rim
prescription glasses In front of Bldg.
E. Call 379-9043 (l-3t-169-NQ
.FOUND: Man's prescription glasses
In KA parking lot, (across from grad
library). Brown rimmed, black case.
Call 392-0303. (l-3t-170-p)
LFMCS MIA .. ZRRR N.N. W
Hello HI lloveyoulamyouareland
youlovemesndhlcoconutsrlvala m an
shaadlnslzehltlmel WILL return
from Balbganla soon. (L-2t-171-p)
AlternatorsGenerators Starters
Electrical systems tested and ranahs
wwwvvwwh egeveMie sniw i epuiis
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 &
Main (M-ts-c)
Hunt N Pack Typing Service: Spec. In
theses A dissertations. Fast accurate
service work guaranteed. Please call
376-6063
ALTERATIONS by RUBY Mrs.
RubyMMs, Agattannt2l7 100 N.E.
901 Ave. near Gainesville Shopping
Center 376-9506 (m-st-170-p)
THE COPY CENTER 5 XEROX 4
ASK ABOUT OUR CHARGE PLAN:
1719 W. Unlv. 376-9334 next to
Malones Bookstore. (M-l3t-162-p)

Page 11

SERVICES
Stereo tape dub now formlngl
Increase your music library at the
most reasonable prices yeti cad Jay
at 376-9583 for more details.
(M-6t-167-p)

Reitz Union Auditorium
ROD STEIGER
JQ J plays: Irish priest
/ german plumber
' f 'fKS r M H transvestite
'\n fi Italian waiter
[VA Jewish Cop
/ \ r also: George Segal & Lee Remlck
NOWAY TO TREAT A LADY
Witty and bizarre!
Tonight only! 7.00 & 9:30 50<
Z555E5552555555535EE555
Think
about a few things.
>
Think about your career.
Think about getting married.
Think about raising a family.
x t:
Think about living a full, happy life.
Now think about Vietnam.
Think about it.
Joel Daves thinks ft is time to stop the war.
Rally with Daves Thursday night, August 13,
7:30 p.m., at the Plaza of the Americas (University
Auditorium in the event of rain).
Joel Dares
Democratic Candidate for the United States Senate.
Pd. Pol. Ad.
MORRISONS CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
MONDAY
BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI
ALL YOU CAN EAT 79t
TUESDAY V
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
ALL YOU CAN EAT Yt{
WEDNESDAY
JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK
AND YELLOW RICE 79{
THURSDAY
BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS AA J
FRIDAY
FISH ALMONDINE AND FRENCH
FRIED POTATOES 89<
i R U IJ O i m §
igifeWHwflHiMlwilliMiJ
t >, -. s r T

mmfflfflMsmftm/msswsst
BBRVICfiB
Hap pin to petting your ayaglaapaa
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own watting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 840
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
BUS Station, 378-4480 (M-ts-C)



!. The Florida AMltor, Tuaadsy, Auput 11,1070

Page 12

B l p^"

SEND ALL NOTICES TO
DIVISION OF INFOR INFORMATION
MATION INFORMATION SERVICES,
BLDG. H

PROCESSING OF GRADES
FOR AUGUST DEGREE
CANDIDATES: Following the
currant practice as established
by the Council of Deem and
President O'Connell, the
faculties of the various units
should aoorova candidates for
degrees for the August
commencement according to the
following schedule.
(Commencement is Aug. 29, at 7
pm)
1. Special grade sheets for
degree candidates will be
distributed by the Office of the
Registrar to colleges and schools
during the ninth week of classes.
2. These grade sheets will be
completed and returned to the
UTTICB or mo tiegistrar oy noon
Thursday, Aug. 27.
3. Grades for degree
candidates will be available from
the Office of the Registrar by 9
am., Friday, Aug. 28.
4. College faculty meetings to
pass on degree candidates,
Friday, Aug. 28.
5. Final report of colleges on
candidates for deorees due in the
Office of the Registrar by 3
pm, Friday, Aug. 28.
6. Colleges will post lists of
graduates by 9 am. in Saturday,
Aug. 29. These lists should
indicate those graduating with
honors or hipi honors.
may be made to University
policy on scheduling final
examinations for degree
candidates only.
FAILURE TO TURN IN
GRADES FOR A CANDIDATE
COULD CAUSE HIM NOT TO
GRADUATE.
PAYROLL PROCEDURES
FOR NEW FACULTY
MEMBERS: It is Important that
all new faculty members
reporting for duty for the
1970-71 academic year sign the
nooessary payroll documents by
Mpu o it uwy wisn no rocoivs
half a month's check on Sent.
30.
itb meuny HBiiMJB i mourn
ga to the Personnel Division,
Room 217 of the Hub except
for faculty at the Health Center
who dtould report to the
f\gft u " -jg
WwOiWWI Ullleei seOOfee H*/ OT
the Teaelilm Hospital. At those
locations new faculty members,
(in addition to signing the
vurnvi, win do
advised about the hospital
insurance and retirement
benefits avail thle to them.
The Personnel Division is
forced to observe the Sept 8
deadline because warrants are

TO HECK WITH JONES...GET ONE TOO!
WHAT'S YOUR DESIRE IN MOTORCARS? IF IT
- CAN BE BOUGHT IT CAN BE FINANCED! WHY L H v
W WAIT...GIVE YOUR CAMBHfIRBDn UNftSW >, AN iolbEl k^ l3 .gQ'bsn J
OPPORTUNITY TO HEIONm 1 S' JM

written in Tallahassee and
forwarded to the University.
If the Sept 8 deadline is not
met, new faculty members will
not receive their half month's
checks until the supplemental
payroll comes out on Oct. 18.
FINAL EXAM
SCHEDULES: Widespread
scheduling of final examinations
prior to the time provided in the
published Schedule of Courses
results in disruption of the final
week of classes and hardships to
the students involved. Therefore,
the following policy is in effect:
-No examinations, dess
quizzes, special projects or term
papers shall be given or assigned
during the final five days of a
regular term. Take home
examinations shall not be due
prior to the regularly scheduled
examination period.
-All changes in the
published examination schedule
must be approved by the
Sub-Committee on Variations
from the Published Schedule of
Courses and Calendar
Committee. Requests submitted
to the sub-committee for
changes in the examination time
must be justified and include a
specific statement ot tne enacts
on the students of such a
change.
lt shall be the
mponbHity of department
cjaor, am end deans to enforce
UltS pollvya
l. id oratory sections or
many courses may be exempt
mum AlkM bLjmm bbbblSbmb
xrom tne aoove policy provioea
such exemption has been
approved by the Sub-Committee
on Variations. In the case of
laboratory sections, such
requests shall specify: 1) that
the laboratory final examination
requires uses of laboratory
equipment; 2) that the final
laboratory examination
traditionally has been given at
the last meeting of the lab, and
3) that the laboratory final is
not a substitute for the final
examination in the course.
In the case of
laboratory-type courses, the
request shall state that
. traditionally no provision has
boon in the final examination
schedule for such courses.
In some cases, a policy of
continuing exemption may be
WCTDUIIBQ Wlul rospOCt TO
laboratory sections and
laboratory-type courses.
CUBAN STUDENT LOAN
BORROWFRS who are
departing from the University
this month must have an exit
inxerwow wiui uni rmsiyii
Student Advisor at the
International Center.

BLUB BULLETIN

Campus
Tuesday Calendar

Homecoming Committee
Meeting, 118 Union, 3:30
pm
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7 p.m.
Union Movie: "No Way to Treat
a Lady," Union Auditorium,
7 & 9 p.m.
Music D apartment:
UNIVERSITY SUMMER
SYMPHONY CONCERT,
University Auditorium, 7:30
p.m.
Bridge Club Meeting, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Young Republican Club
Meeting, 355-66 Union, 8
pjn.
Lecture: "Impressions of South
East Asia," Dr. Marion
Walker, 361-62 Union, 8 p.m.
Florida Player's Production:
"The Play's the Thing,"
Constans Theater, 8:15 pm
Wednesday
Black Student Union Meeting,
349 Union, 6:30 pm
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 363 Union, 7 pm
Bridge Lessons, 118 Union 7
pjn.
Union Movie: "The Family
Way," Union Auditorium, 7
&9pm
Music Department: GATOR
BAND CONCERT, Union
North Terrace, 7:30 pjn.
M E N S A Group Meeting,
Winnjammsr, 9 pjn.
Florida Player's Production:
"The Play's the Thing,"
Constans Theater, 8:15 pm
Thursday
Lambda lota Tau English
Honorary Fraternity
Organizational Chapter
Meeting, 150 D Union, 12
noon
Students for Daves Press
r Conference, 118 Union, 1:30
pm
ml# Dial mm -
Kappa rni nooor oocmy
B 8 IbbXbBBB j| MB Ml
waWwiyi union, o pisi
Family Night Film: "Sammy the
Way-Out Seel," Union
Auditorium, 7 pm.
Student Contracted & Duildcn
Association Meeting, 346
Union, 7:30 pjn.
Students for Daves Rally, Plaza,
7:30 pm
Florida Player's Production:
"The Play's the Thing,"
Constans Thaatar, 8:15 pjn.

Friday
Muslim Student's Prayer
Meeting, 122 Union, 12:30
p.m.
Opera Workshop, P. K. Yonge
Auditorium, 8:15 pm
Florida Player's Production:
"The Play's the Thing,"
Constans Theater, 8:15 pm.
Saturday
Alice Hastings, Democratic
Candidate for U.S. Senate
340 Union, 7 pjn.
Opera Workshop, P.K. Yonge
Auditorium, 8:15 pm.
Florida Player's Production:
"The Play's the Thing,"
Constans Theater, 8:15 pm.

V
$1.25?
t
V ,
We 11... yes. The magazine Is $1.25
But it's not for us. That's not so much to
It goes for paper and ink pay for free expression,
and production work and
other things you need if tlflfiiifl
you're going to make a /ft? UW.
quarterly

SEND ALL CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC
FUNCTIONS, 101 REITZ
UNION

Sunday
Union Movie: "Horse Feather,"
Union Auditorium, 6,8, &10
pm
Veterans for Peace Meeting,
Bench & Bar, 7 pjn.
Science Fiction Club Meeting,
356 Union, 8 p.m.



Transfer Students Face Registration

By STEPHEN NESTLING
Alligrtor Corrapondwit
Confused faces peppered the
halls of the Reitz Union
Thursday night as transfer
students struggled to learn the
ways of UF during the summer
registration program.
This is so confusing that I
dont see how anyone gets
registered," said Suzanne
Thevenet, a bewildered transfer
student who came to the
Alligator offices looking for
directions.
HOWEVER, UF
administrators were working
overtime to help the 1,500 new

ijL >
' :
~ isl b w .. M I
' -v' : : r>~ ?- 5 S; M *f ?- \ ; |ijg ~-
1111 l J fj %
B : 'jE'*
I
:l j-a^bHIIHHIH i'.JySv? s%tets&h&f&' : 4!i!&.'.&ffi% <'t'i^S^j^^^.sjf'vSjfj* '?&
TRANSFER ORIENTATION IL BANNISTER
DoiWi prspofation

Soul Talk Program Sparks
Campus Christian Surge

By DONALD CUE
Alligator Writer
Instead of a summer slump,
Campus Christians seem to be
experiencing a summer surge in
many areas.
One of these areas from the
Campus Evangelism and Campus
Advance Programs started about
two and one-half years ago.
A NEW CONCEPT of
evangelism among college
students, these talks were
initiated at UF by Charles H.
Chuck Lucas, minister of the
14th Street Church of Christ.
Soul Talks at UF consist of
varying Christian and Bible
topics, discussions and just
throwing out questions and
getting other peoples views.
Soul Talks are led by
non-students who are invited to
help others understand Christ
and express their experiences.
On-campus Beverly Ross, 3AS
and McKesson McCorvey, 2UC
are helping students in their
search for Christ.
SOUL TALKS on-campus are
HAVE YOU BEEN THINKING |
ABOUT LEARNING TO FLY? I
w will twKSh you for
S2OO 1
* $l6O
Soto eourw in Mp*r j-i, books,
eromme rtwl 16 Hours of
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.STENGEL AERODROME 376-0011

transfers adjust to their new
surroundings.
"People who attend the
program during the summer are
better prepared then those who
jump into the swirl in the fall,
according to Donald D. Mott,
assistant dean for student affairs.
Proper transfer of records and
accreditation for courses taken
in junior college are the main
concern of these students, Mott
said.
ALL TRANSFER students
were broken into two groups for
the main program of the
evening. University College
transfers met in the Union
ballroom for a talk by John

scheduled for women on
Mondays at Tower A, room
1108, Tuesdays at East Hall,
room 326, Thursdays at Craham
Hall, room 411 and for men on
Mondays at Simpson Hall, room
133 and Thursday at North Hall,
Room 108. All Soul Talks are at
10 p.m.
A convert of Soul Talks Miss

AUGUST CLEARANCE
SoU SUM
19" SUPER SCREEN PORTABLE TV
OIAQ. 184 sq. in. picture
I*l4Bs
189ns ¥3060
Check the August tleerance price on other Zenith
jpoducts portable radios, dock radios, stereo*,
COUCHS ,NC
Serving Gator Country Since 1933
608 N. MAIN PH. 378-1562
-

THIS IS SO CONFUSING

Dunkle, assistant dean of
physical science.
Students with a junior or
higher classification met in the
Union Auditorium for a skit on
registration procedures at the
UF sponsored by the Transfer
Student Organization (TSO).
TSO is a group of UF students
who were not satisfied with their
orientation program and decided
to see if they could improve the
orientation procedure for the
present group of transfer
students.
AFTER THE initial meetings,
students broke into smaller
groups to discuss problems with
members of TSO and other UF

Ross, started attending last
summer.
Soul Talks helped me to see
Christ and forced me to consider
being added to the body of
Christ, Miss Ross said.
The followers of Soul Talks
urge anyone having questions or
in doubt about Christ to come
and see for youraelf.

students.
A final meeting with members
of the faculty of their respective
colleges was aboon the agenda

I STAK SHAK
Student Special >
I WW (With The Coupon) |
I X%mm/ R*9ular 93< Steak burger i
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I AUGUST CLEARANCE
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Ulollensak 3001 tape recorders
S'j|P >r f|§ * is r ' ft n I % t % -.~ v ; mI />v j r l 'J J I
HiHHHHBH
Modal 6300 .JL
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"Serving Gator Country Since 1933
608 N. MAIN PH. 378-1562
Welcome!
FRESHMEN
Barents
Today's the day on your busy schedule to visit
your on-campus Bookstore and meet some of the
people whose sole purpose is to serve
you .... introduce you to the textbook division
and make you familiar with the tools of your
college career here at "the University of Florida.
Come in...... browse around and pick up your
information portfolio with Florida decals for your
car included.... FREEI
ci \mmmj\Ao uoy aviD./riAw stl*
JE 1
Mm H| Campus Shop & Bookstore
3|| ESI c^wthelM

Tuesday, August 11, 1970, The Florida Alligator, Page 13

for Thursday nights program.
The program was topped by a
scheduled dance at Hume hall
for all transfer students.

Page 13



VTtte Fterid. Mmm, Tuesday, U. iiib'

Page 14

Quarter System Highly Unpopular

By DAVID SPICER
Alligator Staff Writer
A survey of UFs transition to
the quarter system has recently
been completed by Steve A.
Anderson, special assistant to
the chancellor of the State
University System of Florida.
Anderson compiled a list of
all courses at UF and polled
professors from each college to
determine their feelings about
the way the quarter system was
operating at UF.
THE FACULTY and
administration in almost all
colleges were unananimous in
their disatisfaction with the
quarter system here.
Except for the College of
Nursing, there was not one
flattering or optimistic
statement,'* the report said.
The various college deans
were unhappy with the way the
quarter calenders were set up
and cited the failure of the state
legislature to support it's
mandate for year-round
university operation with proper
financing and statutory support.

i ft
VH Pv : WE
m .ajgyj.* | if B
./
m
. i v-JH-;ifejjJa-^v./ :
HUMAN RESOURCES

Two off Hw participants in tha education school
workshop being hold under tha sponsorship of tha

Musk Bldg.
Theft Thurs.
The construction site of the
new music building was broken
into Thursday night and an
undetermined amount of
equipment was stolen.
According to the police
report, thieves broke into the
office trailer, the materials
office, and the 'lock up room
inside the music building.
University Police Department
investigating officer, Sgt. J. A.
Smith was not available for
comment
Ibrnmi 1
I Golf Clak I
SUMMIT MSMHtSMF
I ; THRU MONTH* I
SHOAL MU
WEEKOAVS $2 Mi OAY
WEEKENDS S 3 AU DAY
I 376-OOtO I

This was named as one of the
major obstacles to UF's
complete adaptation to the
quarter system.
THE DEANS polled also said
there was a need for a more dear
and firm position on the quarter
system by the Board of Regents.
With the political and
legislative set-up now in effect,
the deans expressed absolute
pessimism" of ever developing a
satisfactory quarter system
calendar.
i
A large majority of the
students polled were completely
dissatisfied with the quarter
system and maintained they are
rushed and over-loaded with
semester-type work crammed
into a 10 week quarter.
THE GREATEST problems
seem to be in the College of
Architecture, College of Law,
and University College.
All of these colleges have a
predominance of three-hour
courses. .'*'
The survey showed that the
three hour courses were still set
up, in many cases, to cover the

AUGUST CLEARANCE
200 WATT RECEIVER
u. 4290. NOW 299 00
COUCHS wc
Serving Gator Country Since 1933
60S N. MAIN PH. 378-1562

WITH STUDENTS, FACULTY

g.. m aln r> mniA jug Uibimam Daajummmm
institute tot tne usvwpinivn or nunian nesouron
hum uiMF vuhkh to pts uiwr xoacnovs mw unMur

same amount of material that
had been covered under the
trimester system.
THE BREAKDOWN of course
hours for all courses for UF is:
One credit courses ... 3
percent
Two credit courses ... 3
per cent
Three credit courses
...34 per cent
Four credit courses ... 36
percent
Five credit courses ... 18
percent
Six credit courses ... 0 per
cent
All others ... 7 per cent
with a total of 3,931 courses in
all colleges at UF.
According to Gail Merein,
Student Government secretary
of academic affairs, the Regents
are the only ones who could
make any drastic changes in the
UF calendar and they have
dismissed any change from the
quarter system as. being too
expensive.
The major changes being
made now in the colleges are

attempts to do away with many
three hour courses and
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F^S,%7 adults 51
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2445 SW 13 th Street 378-0946

supplement them with four and
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P Student Special H
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~ 12 mo. Guarantee
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1 Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017N.E.27thAve.
J Ph. 373-1665



The
Florida
Alligator

Heres The Film Lineup
For The Union Next Fall

There'll be some good movies
coining to the Reitz Union this
Fall.
They include The
Graduate," Downhill Race,"
Juliet of the Spirits," Dr.
Strangelove," What Ever
Happened to Baby Jane," and
If..

Answers To Last Weeks Puzzle:
llP'lA IS WclL lalp fcA|S|C|AIP WR[E| A | R rt| c |U| B |

Play'Play Opens
In Constans
The Florida Players'
production of The Play's The
Thing" opens tonight in the
Constans Theatre at 8.
The play is a bright little look
behind the scenes of the drama
scene.
The production, the Players'
only this Summer, runs through
Saturday night.

AUGUST CLEARANCE
SONYMATIC TC-8
STEREO SOLID-STATE
8-TRACK CARTRIDGE §^
RECORDER
135 00
5 B-track cartridges FREE with purchase
a MODEL 252-D
SOLID-STATE
DECK RECORDER
sll9 5 reels 201 Scotch
Free with Purchase
Sony TC-18 portable cassette recording player
$4995
m v*J-.io iuot ol
CWM *WMHW e
COUCHS ,NC
Serving Gator Country Since 1933
60S N. MAIN PH. 378-1562

CAMPUS LIVING

SOME OTHER treats on the
screen next fall will be The
Beatles' first, Hard Day's
Night and The Pawnbroker,
a Rod Steiger film about an old
Jewish store keeper and young
hoods.
Also, Divorce American
Style,'' Accident, Dirty

GOOD THRU AUGUST
mb OFF
25< lOAME
with coupon
3 BLOCKS NORTH OF MALL
PUTT-HJTT GOLF
3215 N.W. 13th St.
OPEN
M Sat 9AM -1 AM
SUN NOON lAM

Dozen, In the Heat of the
Night, etc.
All the films, as in the past,
are in the Reitz Union Theater
on the second floor of the union
building. Admission is SO cents
except for special shows.

t (jlje J&ijop |
4 1620 West University Avenue University Plaza J
4?
I AUGUST CLEARANCE
n .4
I. i/2 off :
* j|
t Slacks I
| Permanent Press waist sizes 28-34 £
regular $6.00 10.00 £
| N0W.... .....$3.00 5.00 I
t Slacks 1
4 Tropical Weight waist sizes 28-36 I
4 regular $12.00 -24.00 I
l NOW $6.00-12.00 I
*: I
t> Belts I
*! Fine Leathers sizes 28-40 I
I
regular $4.00 6.00 M
|| NOW $2.00 3.00 j
Billfolds {
4 Two-fold, Tri-fold, and Pocket Secretaries jj
J, regular $5.00 8.00 ij
j: NOW ......$2.50 4.00 j
J; Walk Shorts I
|' Permanent Press I
4[ regular $5.00 8.00 |
t NOW 52.50 4.00 j
j; Swim Suits
f regular $5.00 10.00
N0W.;;....5~ $2.00t 1-5.00 j
T i 7 3TM
b (gw. * m
m /** g* m m *** *o**. *.. rt g ,Jm
Women's Department Sale |
j; Still In Progress |

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daluyv in mm

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oe*i&w&s Patronize Gator Advertisers

Tuesday, August ft. 1070, The Florida AWpstor, j

Page 15



The
Florida
Alligator

Wanted: Fall Linemen

With the opening of
practice only a shade over two
weeks away it is becoming more
and more obvious to Florida
Head Coach Doug Dickey how
important athletes like Bill
Dowdy are going to be to 1970
Gator hopes.
Last season Dowdy was an
exceptional sophomore tight end
who wound up catching 30
passes for 317 yards and two
TDs, third best record in pass
receiving for the Gators. 1"
CAME spring and a
combination of events sent West
Palm Beachs Dowdy to
offensive tackle, where he
earned a first team berth and
now figures as one of the key
figures in a questionable
offensive line situation.
The play of boys like Dowdy
will mean a great deal to this
football team, says Dickey.
We want our best 11 athletes
on the field with the offensive
team and when two of them are
at the same position, as Dowdy
and Jim Yancey were at tight

k 1
I I 9 Bjj 1; gm
ISB 'll BB
PROTECTION PHIL COPE
personified
WATCH FOR THESE PRODUCT
additions Soon at COUCHS
lAMPEX 1
IeIEMPIREI
If 'Vii . " .. ' ...
British Induttrieo Co.
Serving Gator Country Since 19$$
COUCHS wc
> W. MAIN PH-378-1562

- 1 6 > *,. *> 'MX' "^i^F 3 iSna^^nf.
s* a ., ,'^K> >

end, you've got to do some
switching.
Bill did a good job for us at
tackle the last two weeks of
spring practice and we think he
can get the job done this season.
We had so many problems in the
offensive line, caused by injuries
and inexperience, that it is really
important that people like
Dowdy come through in order
for us to have the kind of
protection we must get.
WHILE DOWDY and
non-letterman senior Bob
Stephens of Sarasota head up
the tackle slots there are several
other candidates hoping to make
the grade, all of whom will be
closely watched by Dickey and
his line coach Bill Fulcher.
Behind Stephens at strong
tackle are a pair of veterans who
must overcome knee injuries,
seniors Mike Field of Hollywood
and Jim Kiley of Brandon. Both
missed spring practice but open
the 1970 practice August 24 in
strong contending roles.
Dowdy's mayor competition
will likely come from junior Ray
Pilcher of Panama City, who has

not lettered but who had the
finest spring of his Florida
career.
In the Dickey 3-D offense
Dowdy and Pilcher play quick
tackle.
All of the top five offensive
tackles have the size, Dowdy is
6-3, 224, Pilcher 6-2, 222,
Stephens 6-2, 233, Field 64,
235 and Koey 6-3,237.

I -jSjf-' BIG SELECTION OF PRE-OWNED CADILLACS I
_ .-. . . -t .' "

1969 ELDORADO .$6795
Two door hardtop, front whoa! drhro, full powor, air
conditio nod. Silver with dark blue Interior.
1969 CADILLAC CPE de VILLE 2 DR
HT .$5395
Gold with matching gold Interior. Ahr condition, full
power, factory warranty lew than $7,000 miles.
1969 COUPE diVILLE 46296
Bee Gaew eepaanwMAn awld nw4 eewtftpMl Anon'
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1968 SEDAN de VILLE 8.... .$4195
Pbur door hardtop with bucket teats. Black vinyl
over turquoise. Air conditioned, full power, new
betted tires.
1968 SIXTY SPECIAL. .$4295
Pour door sedan. Turquoise with matching interior. Air
conditioned, full power, new belted tires.

|£jL3 44 OTHER FINE LATE MODEL USED CARS IN STOCK) I

1969 MUSTANG MACH 1.... ...$2995
Green w/blaek interior, 301 VO w/4 bbl. Belted thus,
ahr conditioned, radio heater, power drive power
brakes and steering, stm In factory warranty.
1969 FORD LTD 4DR HT .....$2795
Lime Gold with matching interior. Air condition,
power steering power disc brakes on front, radio 6
heater. Split front reclining seats.
1968 FORD .$1895
Pairlane 500. VO, four door sedan. Green. Ahr
conditioned, radio, heater, power steering, A brakes,
automatic transmission.
1968 OLDSMOBILE 4-4-2 .$1995
VO, throe speed transmission, radio, heater, new
tires, buofcst seats.
1964 BUICK SPECIAL .$995
Two door hardtop, VO, automatic transmission,
black vinyl roof over silver gray. Radio, heater, afar
conditioned. Bucket seats.
$986 9UIOIC 4 ####.# de # ## r £s96

' w ' 11 w W ~~~

Page 16

Open 7 days
Clip the
Pizza Inn
Buck
below for a special treat! |
PIZZA 1 Nl A \ Redeemable with the Jf "/t.
flk \ purchase *f any // /A* 1
\S,
\V j or 2 medium pixies.
\\ Limit 1 fine Inn I I t
J ]| Deliar per family l I The Pixzo Inn
Offwawd \ / 316S.W.6faAve./>*vrT\
(ONE/ *- \ £J/. win (ONE;
PIZZA INN BUCO^flj
Patronize Gator Advertisers

DAVE SPAHR
Sports Editor

i. The Florida AlH>ator, Tuaeday, August 11,1970

1969 OLDSMOBILE .$3795
Luxury sedan. Popular four door model. Air
conditioned, power steering, power brakes,
automatic transmission. Choose from 3 in stock.
1966 CALAIS .$2195
Pour door hardtop, turquoise with matching
interior. Air conditioned, full powor, clean.
1966 SEDAN de VILLE $2395
Choioe of two four door sedans, both air
conditioned, fully powered. Both M exoeffent
condition.
1964 CADILLAC ........... .$1195
Light green four door hardtop. Ahr conditio nod,
fully powered. Choioe of 2.
1968 OLDSMOBILE ....... £2295
Oelmont White four door sooan. Air
conditioned, radio, heater, powor steering, powor
brakes, locally owned, serviced by Braslngton.
Choice of 2.

1966 VOLKSWAGEN'......... ..$1095
Blue Bug, radio, heater, now paint, runs good.
1966 BUICK RIVIERA ...... .$2295
Two door hardtop. Turquoise with matching
interior. Air conditioned, full power, cruise control,
tut steering wheel. oonwo^
1967 OLDSMOBILE £1796
Cutlass four door sedan. Blue with matching blue
interior. Air conditioned, radio, heater, powor
steering, power brakes, automatic transmission.
1968 VOLKSWAGEN BUS W/AC52295
Maroon, RIH. Good condition.
1966 CHEVY II .41195
*
f dr Ration wagon s cylinder, automatic
transmission, radio, heater.
1966 COMET .$1595
55, 5 ffiSSLSErSS!