Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
A r :

Vuiti
Aft Amfum

Vol 62, No. 170

FEW DISSENT
Student Senate Backs
BSU Staff Demands
.... . v

Sm Ratatad Stories, Page 3
By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
With no discussion or audible
dissent on the bill itself, the
Student Senate gave unqualified
approval to the revised demands
of the Blade Student Union
Tuesday night.
Joining its voice with BSIFs,
the senate demanded:
Recruiting and admission
of 500 black students out of the
quota of 2300 freshmen each
year, while continuing the
Critical Year Freshmen program.
A department of minority
affairs (to replace the present
office of minority affairs) under
the direction of Roy Mitchell,
who would assume the rank of
vice president.
A black administrator to
coordinate recruitment of black
faculty.
Hiring of a black assistant
manager in personnel.
Intensified recruiting and
hiring of black faculty to reflect
the ratio o r black students under
the first demand (18 per cent).
THE RESOLUTION
represented a revision of an
older list of 10 demands under
consideration by the Student
and University Senates.
Sens. Pete Dearing and Ed
Hales explained the resolution
early in the meeting. It was
temporarily set aside so that
copies incorporating the
revisions could be run off and
Voter
Registration
Deadline

The
Florida Alligator

The university says
they're looking for them
(black faculty.) Well, as
far as I'm concerned,
that's riot true. Maybe
they're looking out the
window for them."
Student Sen. Ed Hales
provided to all present.
When it came up dgain at 11:30
p.m., the question was called
immediately and the resolution
passed with few dissenting votes.
A large number of senators had
left but there had been no
quorum call.
ACCORDING TO Hales, BSU
felt a quota of black students
was needed because the UF was f

HC Slogan Picked:
'Decades Fate Theme

Gators Create New Decades
Fate.
That's the slogan for
Homecoming, 1970, Miss
Jacquie Bolling, slogan contest
chairman, announced
Wednesday.
Slogan was picked on the
basis of awareness and relevance
to the 70's.
The winning slogan was
submitted by Mrs. Reid Gregory
of 2705 Castle Oak Avenue,
Orlando. Mrs. Gregory selected
mmmm
l!
iifc
STUDENT SENATE
voted Tuesday to ask
for the halting of UC
mass testing page 3
Campus Crier 14
Clmrifleds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 18
Uttan 9
Movies 12
, 1 9
vnmt't ttappMtef ..5

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

The University of Florida, Gainesville

only paying lip service to its
obligation to recruit more
blacks.
A department-level agency is
needed because minority affairs
is a big problem on campus.
And it needs to be handled by a
man with the power of a vice
president, according to Hales.
The present director of
minority affairs has Vague
powers, Vague duties, no
access to the Board of Regents,
no staff and no funds, he said.
IN FACT, Hales charged,
Mitchell was hired by UF more
or less in a posture of fear of
HEW sanctions, as a means to
get around their obligation.
Black students want Mitchell
as department head because of
his outstanding personal
SEE *BSU' PAGE 2

the Palm Beach Playday as her
prize.
THE PLAYDAY includesa
three-day stay at the Holiday
Inn in West Palm Beach, free
meals at Howard Johnsons,
Benneys, Testes, Petite Marmite,
Juniors, Ta-boo and dinners at
Marshall Grants, Voi Sin, Palm
Beach Kennel Club and OHares.
Four activities are also
planned; Lion Country Safari, a
morning fishing trip on a sea
yacht, golf at Breakers West and
a trip to the Flagler Musuem.
Second prize goes to Ervin
Priem of 4289 NW 16 St.,
Gainesville. Third prize was
awarded tQ Miss Ruth Sweeney
of 4008 NW 13 Place,
Gainesville, and fourth place was
given to J. L. Moore of 2330
Oak St., of Jacksonville.
MOORE SUBMITTED over
200 slogans.
It was a challenge to mix up
seven words and come up with
different ideas," Moore said.
In 1962 Moore placed first in
the slogan contest with, Gators
Pace the Race in Spice.

1 K,
I K m jEPjig.
v> j|l
h
MARK BURRELL HARRY BOSMAN
.. .UF sophomore
hijacked:
So What?
By LARRY JORDAN
AIILmAm ,t,||
AlllyllUf VMM* Iwl lid
Whats it like on a plane hijacked to Cuba?
Does the Captains voice come over the intercom strong and
assuring: Ladies and Gentleman. Will you please remain in your
seats, without becoming alarmed? This flight has been
hijacked.
AND WHAT ABOUT the stewardess? Does she walk from
seat-to-seat comforting passengers with her poise and grace
under pressure?
Mark Burrell, 2UC, was flying to Miami last Jan. 28th when
the Eastern Airlines flight was hijacked to Cuba by three black
militants.
The plane he was on did not follow the what-to-do-if script
for airline flights.
THE STEWARDESS came running back and said they had
taken her into the cockpit and they had guns. The pilot didn't
say anything until we were about to land in Havana,** Mark
said.
A lot of people were dismayed when they heard this,"
Burrell said, but I was very happy we were going.
1 clapped my hands and said Wow, that's great'.*'
BACK ON THE ground in Miami the hijacking was causing
quite an uproar. The flight was the eleventh to be hijacked to
Cuba that year and two mqor airline organizations searched for
preventive measures as Made's flight winged its way towards
Cuba. ..4
The Airline Pilots Association announced a $20,000 reward
for the apprehension and conviction of arrairline hijacker. And,
in New York, the Air Transport Association offered a $50,000
reward for information about any hijacker who returned to the
United States;
Meanwhile, in the air: Things were very tense. We didn't
know if someone was going to try an be a hero," Burrell said.
THERE WAS a man next to me who kept mumbling if he
had a gun he'd show those niggers. But he didn't have a gun so
he did nothing.
The stewardess kept telling us it was a vovthw'thing. She
SEE PASSENGERS' PAGE 2

? BLUBS IMAGE
' / i-y ' 'WX.
i
The Blues Image, blues rode
group, will be performing
tonight in Florida Gym. The
show begins at 8:30 and will
include the Riff, a local band.
Tickets are $2 and are available
at the Reitz Union Box Office,
the Record Bar and at the door.
The group is presented by
Student Government
Productions.

Thursday, August 6,1970



Page 2

.The Florida Alligator, Thursday, August 6,1970

Gainesville A Guiding Light City-Kirk

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
Relevance was a key word for Gov. Claude R. Kirk in
his quarterly visit to Gainesville Monday.
After hearing reports on most of the citys myriad
welfare projects, Kirk offered NBC a chance to become
relevant by doing a documentary on Gainesville's
progress.
LATER, HE acknowledged that state university
enrollments might have to be limited, since beyond a
certain size the university Was no longer relevant to the
student.
The Gainesville Sun did not seem to grasp the relevance
of a dinner in Kirk's honor that evening. Finding no Sun
reporters present, he remadeed:
You see how interested the Gainesville Sun is in
what's going on in America today.
KIRK EARLIER summed up the days reports as
hopeful," although he was not at all satisfied with
conditions at Sunland Training Center.
We have come a long way, but we have a longer way
to go, he said.
Far nearly five hours, the governor presided over a
packed meeting room in the McPherson Community
Center while local officials reported their progress on
problems ranging from totlots to com blight.
ORAL REPORTS finally had to be cut short to allow
time for a question and answer period late in the
afternoon.
Praising the efforts of local citizens and students, Kirk
called Gainesville a guiding light for other cities.
At one point, he sent an aide out to contact NBC and
suggest a white paper on the town. NBC officials
reportedly said they would discuss the matter later.
HIGHLIGHTING THE morning session were 13
speakers reporting on UF-sponsored programs. UF
President Stephen C. OConnell and Vice President for
Student Affaire Lester Hale introduced the group.
Dr. Harry Prystowdcy, chairman of the Department of
Obstetrics and Gynecology, reported on programs at the
J. HiQis Miller Health Center. Included Was a research
program in delivery of health care, in which continuing
female health care was provided to rural low-income
persons in 13 north Florida counties.
Started as an exploratory project 11 years ago, the
program went into full scale operation in 1968. Mobile
health teams held periodic clinics at county health centers
throughout the area, providing complete pre-natal,
lying-in and post-delivery care, family planning and cancer
detection seivice and general physical examinations.
THE PROGRAM has completely eliminated maternal

Passengers Treated 'Well* During Havana Stopover

lad been hfacked there (Cuba) two timet before."
The flight landed at Cuba's Joae Marti Airport shortly after
10 pjn. And the passengers were led into the airport terminal
by Cuban Military Police.
Some of the passengers asked Cuban airport authorities for
souvenirs; posters of Argentinian Revolutionary hero Che
Guevara that lined the walls of the terminal.
One of the passengers, a GJ. just back from Vietnam, said he
did not think this was patriotic.
He started yelling that Castro was a communist and that we
were traitors for letting the Cubans take pictures of us with the
posters*
M A LONG-HAIRED kid was holding a poster; he made a

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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR I* tht official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June. July and August when It's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
i | i ji i ww iwi ijn

"===
I Democracy takes a long time
xl t 0 wor k- I on ly know two things
i v. : you can get instantly one is
P overt y > an d the other one is
death.
Gov. Claude Kirk
AA* ~*
mortality and new cases of cervical carcinoma have
declined. It has also helped to transcend the ivory-tower
image of an academic department once thought to be
unto itself and isolated from the practical problems of
society, according to the report.
Kirk suggested it would be a natural to extend the
program to migrant laborers.
My colleagues and I will be willing to assist in any way
we can. if invited Prystowskyreplied.
STEPHEN LEWALLEN, assistant director of the Legal
Aid and Defender Clinic, reported on the dime's activities
during the spring quarter. It has handled an increased
caseload, and has contributed to discemable reform in
local institutions dealing with the poor, the report said.
But it still does not have sufficient funds for full and
adequate representation for clients.
A private foundation has approved a grant for a new
prosecuter internship program to complement the
existing public defender internship program.
Joyce Beverlein, assistant director of the Suitide and
Crisis Intervention Center, reported on the activities of
the center. Forty-four of the 76 lay volunteers in the
program are college students.
WITH 11,013 hours of volunteer service during the
first six months of 1970, the center made 3,029 crisis
intervention contacts, according to a written report.
Only 18 some per cent of the cases involve a threat of
suicide, the report said. Marital or other difficulties were
involved in the largest single category of cases, but
vocational, financial, medical and psychological problems
were also significant.
In addition to its 24-hour telephone service, the center
follows up suicide attempts to insure the patient is
provided proper assistance after treatment at the hospital
emergency room. Families of suicides the survivor
victims are contacted and offered assistance.
ANNIE QUATTLEBAUM, member of the board of
directors of the Comer Drug Store, reported the store had
treated over 100 victims of bad trips since its creation
in January.
An average of six bad trips per week are seen, with an

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remark to the Gi. and that was the last straw. He attacked the
kid and started tearing up his poster."
Several passengers help separate the Gi. and the long-haired
college kid while the Cuban film makers recorded it all for
posterity. An hour later the passengers were taken by bus to
Varadero, a Cuban resort city, for their return flight to Miami
Throughout their stay in Cuba all the passengers were treated
royally by Cuban authorities, Burrell said.
"Everybody has a picture of Cuba; Castro the tyrant, Castro
the dictator, the enslaved Cuban people and what not," he said.
"But down there I realized that the political boundaries set in
Washington completely disregard the fact that humanity is just
one large group of people.
"The Cuban people struck me as islanders. They didnt
appear to be uptight or harassed. It was like going to the
Bahamas and seeing the culture there," he said.

increase during progress tests and final exams. Visitors are
encouraged to participate in unstructured social activities
to help them find away of existing without drugs.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder reported on
student governments support of various groups and
projects, including voter registration drives and other
community work, Environmental Action Group, the
Indochina Crisis Committee, Come Together Day, Steps
for Development and CLEO.
OTHER SPEAKERS included Tom Melcher, chairman;
Ernest Wards, director of Outreach; Charles Brackins, IFC
president; Debbie Amos, secretary of Panhellenic Council;
Dr. Robert Jester, College of Education; Dr. Reid Poole,
chairman of the Music Department and Mrs. Yancey
Walters, IFAS extension service.
After the morning session, the governor had lunch at
Sunland Training Center, where he expressed shock at the
overcrowded conditions.
Later he called for an end to policies designed to make
the child a good patient, and for measures to help
them stop being patients.
IN A QUESTION and answer session at the end of the
program, several questions and complaints were raised
about local programs.
Mrs. Savanna Williams, head of the Alachua County
Welfare Rights Union, complained of irregularities, red
tape and misinformation in several agencies.
She called on citizens to . .stop fooling ourselves
instead of letting the poor dangle on a string without
knowing who to turn to or where to go.
KIRK ADVISED her to take specific complaints
through proper channels and to be patient with the
democratic process.
Democracy takes a long time to work. I only know
two things you can get instantly one is poverty, and the
other one is death, Kirk said.
Addressing local Republicans at the Holiday Inn
Monday evening, Kirk said the greatest enemy in the
coming elections is complacency. Republicans will have to
work hard and be well organized, he said.
THE GOVERNOR had a new pink pipe, which he said
was a gift from UJS. Att. Gen. John Mitchell, . jt great
fighter foraU the things we believe in.
When Mitchell offered han the pipe, he said he started
to decline, but then realized he had a higher mission.
I have got to get anything pink out of the Attorney
Generals office, Kirk said.
Federal judges, he said, are involved in trying to
promiscuate pornography.
And that is just what they are trying to do, Kirk said.

BSU Asks
Department
t>ROM PAGt OHE^
qualities and the leadership he
has provided blacks on campus,
Hales said.
As for black faculty,
something has to be done to get
UF to recruit more, he said.
THE UNIVERSITY says
they're looking for them. Well,
as far as Tm concerned, that's
not true .Maybe theyre looking
out the window for them,
Hales said.



Senate OKs Re-Cycling;
Tables Postal Center Bill

By 808 WISE
AMpstor Staff Writer
In a four-hour session
Tuesday night, the Student
Senate approved $950 for the
EAG re-cycling program and
tabled a bill to pay for
installation of a self-service
postal center.
The senate also trimmed
$2,000 from the Florida Players'
budget and passed a resolution
calling for changes in the
football season ticket policy.
TRANSFERS OF funds were
approved to cover Rathskeller
debts of $2,650 and
improvements to married
student facilities amounting to
$l,lOO. 4
The re-cycling bill passed
second reading by a narrow
margin after lengthy discussion.
The program would place 100
receptacles around the campus
and city where aluminum cans
could be deposited. Cans would
be periodically collected,
crushed and stored for trucking
to a firm in Jacksonville which

Student Senate Asks
Mass Testing Halt

A resolution calling for a halt
in mass standardized testing in
the University College during
1970-71 passed the Student
Sssiate Tuesday night with only
one dissenting vote.
The resolution, presented by
Secretary for Academic Affairs
Gail Merein and John Rowe,
4AS,called for discontinuance of
testing for experimental
purposes.*' Sen. Bill Gfllmore
introduced the resolution.
PROGRESS TESTING, it
dunged, was a deterrent to
effective learning."
This is not to say that
objective testing is bad, but that
mass standardized testing
achieves few of the objectives of
the general courses.
With mass testing eliminated,
each discussion section leader
would determine grades for his
class, according to proponents of
the bill.
THE UNIVERSITY
Examiners had a 1969-70 budget
of $122,273 money that
could be better spent elsewhere
under the current bare-bones
budget, the resolution said.
The resolution cited pndings
from the Lewis report which
indicated that course-wide
objective testing was unfair
because of varying emphasis in
discussion sections, not very
thorough as a test of learning,
and short on opportunities for
personal judgement.
Sen. Gillmore called the
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win pay one-half cent per can.
MUCH OF the $950 would go
for publicizing the program.
Advertising, Raffle said, is
absolutely essential to our
program to make it a success."
After interminable debate, the
senate shelved a bfll providing
$2,500 to build a foundation
with telephone and electrical
hook-ups for a self-service postal
facOity. A copy of the bfll wi
be sent to Student Body
President Steve Uhlfekler for
consideration.
Although the senate voted
down the unit a week ago, it was
learned that the previous
Shepherd administration had
actually ordered it, and that it
was enroute to Gainesvills.
THE SITE, approved by UF
and the U.' S. Post Office
Department, is beside a gravel
path in Ravine Park, just south
of the Mechanical Engineering
building. It is directly across
Stadium Road from Graham
area.
Sen. Greg Jones complained
of emotional blackmail'* in

measure one of the strongest
steps we could take toward a
better campus."
Five specific objections to
mass testing were given:
An students in a course are
tested on identical material, no
matter what thejr classroom
instructor emphasized.
Many exams have poorly
worded, vague and inappropraite
questions."
Students dont get a chance
to express themselves in their
own words, and may be asked
for a correct" answer when
there is none.
Such tests do not
necessarily reflect the
achievements of many students.
Mass tests increase the
students' feelings of alienation in
a large, impersonal university.

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having to pay Rathskellar debts
and other bills incurred by
previous administrations.
THE SENATE cut $2,000
from the Florida Player's
budget after much discussion
about complimentary tickets,
use of Constans Theater, and the
Playersbudget.,
Ed Olowin, Florida Players
business manager, explained he
had cut bade on the use of
complimentary tickets to a
present level of about 50 per
production.
The tickets are traditionaUy
given to students who work in
the productions, and also help to
obtain goods and services the
players might would otherwise
have to pay for, Olowin said.
RALPH GLATFELTER told
the senate Constans Theater was
used exclusively by the players
for an but about two weeks of
the academic year, and that
those two weeks included
holidays and exam periods when
the campus was nearly deserted.
Glatfelter also pointed out
that although the number of
production nights would
increase by some 50 per cent in
the coming fiscal year, the
projected income from ticket
sales given in the players budget
was some S2OO less than that
received this year.
A resolution calling for
relaxation of deadlines on
footbafl season tickets was'
passed, with an amendment lb
guarantee every married student
one spouse ticket. Only 2/XX)
spouse tickets were issued this
year for the 3300 married
students and their spouses.
VOTED TO pay outstanding
debts of the Rathskellar was
$234950. Aside from money
owed SG and Servomation, the
Rat is now out of debt.
UF Service Activities helped
out by writing off a bfll of
$2,736.12, and the Arnold Air
Society voluntarily cut its bfll
from $213 to $l5O.

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Thursday. August 6,1070, The Florida Alifrtor,

Page 3



The Florida AlN>etor. Thundwy, August 6,1970

Page 4

By GAIL MERE IN
Alligator ConPMpondsnt
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew likes to criticize
students, but 11 UF students have turned the tables.
He has good intentions, but so did John Wilkes
Booth. At the same time, he is the best insurance
against presidential assassination,** Loring Starnes,
4JM, said.
BILL GILMORE, lUC, said, Spiro Agnew is a man
dedicated to the principle which has long outlived
itself.**
Several students gave reasons for their discontent,

UF AF ROTC Goes Coed

Hie UF ROTC recently announced plans to
enroll women in its officer training program. The
women will be eligible for all the benefits that the
male students receive, except they will not be
entered in the Flight Instruction Program. They are
eligible to compete for scholarships which pay for
tuition, books, lab fees, incidental expenses, and
which provide a $50.00 per month tax-free
allowance.
The young lady cadets will go to summer camp as
do the men, and they will vie for and fill leadership
positions \/ithin the Cadet Corps at the University
of Florida. Wearing the new fashionable blue

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11 UFers Talk About Spiro

including Gary Jordan, 3AS.
Hes done more harm in increasing polarization in
the country than anyone else,** Jordan said.
HE WOULDN'T be so bad, if he*d keep his mouth
shut,** Ann Sabin, 3ED, said.
Other students simply expressed their discontent.
He*s a monumental buffoon! replied Vicky Hunt.
LINDA ABBOTT said, I just dont like him. I think
hes a creep.
I think hes an opportunist, but with poor timing.
Hes another McCarthy, said Harvey Barnett, 4AS.
However, not everything was criticism. Two coeds

uniforms of the Women in the Air Force (WAF), the
co-ed cadets should add a bit of spice to some of
those squadron formations on die drill field. Upon
graduation and commissioning the new WAF
lieutenants will fill vital roles in a variety of
world-wide specialty fields: finance, personnel
management, computer science, engineering, and a
host of other challenging assignments.
Interested co-eds can obtain more details by
calling Air Force ROTC at 392-1355, or they can
enroll for MAF 101 for the fall quarter. There is no
military obligation incurred by enrolling in MAF
101.

praised the Spiro Agnew wrist watch.
JOAN BECKHAM,4ED, said, I like Spiro T. Agnew
watches. It*s the best thing hes done since hes been in
office.
Hes the most popular thing since Mickey Mouse,
said Ann-Lynne Denker, 2UC.
Pre-lawstudent, Ken Brooton, a 28-year-old former
aide to four congressmen left his reply dangling Hes
everything Mr. Nixon hoped he would be.
Harry J. Underi simply said, I have nothing to
say.

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Alachua County
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You Have been a
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Executive Committee



UF To Reach Staff
The UF Is initiating a new concept in employe communications this
summer, according to Robert A. Button, director of personnel
relations.
The program includes new and revised written communications to
employes, a series of live programs with employes and supervisors and
employe relations advisors as communication aides in certain areas.
THROUGH THIS system UF will communicate more specific
information on employment and personnel policies. Promotion
policy, hiring practices, performance review, grievance and appeal
procedures, retirement and benefit programs axe among areas covered
in the new concept.
Button expressed hope the new program will be of value to
employes and will help the administration and supervisors meet the
new challenges In the employe relations area today.
At the same time these programs should help UF fulfill its
obligations to its affirmative action plan which has been accepted by
the U. S. Department ofHelath Education and Welfare he said.
The programs will continue on a regular basis throughout the year.
Press Council Forming

By CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
A wt A
MHigaiOr 9Mils WHIM
Administrators, department
heads and student leaders are
being asked to help implement a
successful press council this fall
by recommending students, staff
and faculty to serve on the
council.
The press council is an effort
to improve communications
WHAT'S
HAPPENING
INTERNATIONALIZE: The
council of International
Organizations, representing 900
international students on
campus, will be holding a party
in cooperation with the Towers
Area Council Aug. 14 t 9.
There will be music, dancing,
free macks and lots of fun in the
Towers Lobby. Everyones also
invited by the India Chib to
attend the Indian Independence
Day celebration at the Baptist
Student Center on Aug. 15 at 7.
HARVEST OF SHAME: The
Reitz Union is presenting the
1960 production of Harvest of
Shame, narrated by Edward R.
Murrow, Monday night at 7:30.
The film depicts the lives of
migrant workers 10 years ago.
John David Gillespie, a graduate
student in sociology, will lead a
discussion after the film.
MUSIC: Sunday evening on the
Tolbert lawn, free music once
again. Its a gig. Cone at 6 and
hear the Jades and Frosted
Glass. Peace.

DAILY LUNCHEON
AND DINNER
SPECIALS
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A OPEN
in
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between the Florida Alligator
and the UF community.
THIS COUNCIL will be made
up of nine students and three
faculty or staff members and
currently letters are being sent
out to help recruit these people.
In addition to faculty and
student membership the council
will be made up of the editor,
managing editor and possibly
others from Student
Publications.
The council membership wiU
help the Alligator editors learn
which areas students and staff
feel are adequately covered and
those which need work.
THE PEOPLE recommended
wifi receive an application to
help the council in selecting
suitable members.
According to Phyllis Gattub,
fan managing editor, the council
is looking for people who are
willing to spend a great deal of
time learning about the workings
of a newspaper.
ONE OBJECTIVE of the
council is to define and interpret
the problems and possible
solutions presented to it by the
members.
Because the purpose of the
press council is to make the
Alligator representative of the
UF campus at large, Miss Gallub
stressed the importance of
finding people who will take an
active constructive part in this
'council.
Anyone interested in
becoming involved with the
press council should contact
Miss Gattub at the Alligator
office, 365 Reitz Union.

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Page 5



Page 6

i, VM Ffbrida Mliatdr, TborsdSy, August % IS7O

TO STUDY GROWTH IN FLORIDA
Urban Studies Bureau Recruiting

By Alligator Services
The need for solutions and
alternatives to Florida's urban
problems has prompted the UF
Urban Studies Bureau to initiate
a University-wide drive for the
recruitment of specialists to
conduct urban research.
By establishing a core of
senior urban specialists, we hope
to build a solid urban program
and provide a center for the
study of solutions to Florida's
urban problems, said Dr.
Elizabeth Eddy, director of the
University's Urban Studies
Bureau.
THE BUREAU recently
received a $300,000 grant from
the University's Division of
Sponsored Research to recruit
seven urban specialists and
develop an interdisciplinary
research program.
Approximately one-half of
the grant will be used for
specialists salaries, with the
remaining funds allocated for
supportive services, secretaries
and teaching assistants to aid the
researchers in their work.
The bureau already has
contracted one urban specialist
for September. He is Dr. David
Smith, an urban geographer at
the University of Southern
Illinois, who will develop
graduate level courses in urban
geography.
THROUGH AN
in t erdisciplinary research
program, the Urban Studies
Bureau hopes to contribute
knowledge concerning the
Transfer
Orientation
This Week
The third annual academic
advisement and early registration
program for transfer students
coining to UF this fall is being
held this week.
Two sessions are scheduled to
meet in Hume Hall on campus
today and Friday.
STUDENTS MUST have been
accepted for transfer to UF and
admitted to one of the colleges
to be eligible for the program.
They must apply for early
registration in order to be
eligible to participate.
During the orientation
aesskms students will complete
the Board of Regents
Questionnaire, academic testing
and foreign language tests (for
those seeking advancement in
language courses or needing to
fulfill language requirements for
the College of Arts and Sciences)
and dear physical examination
[miAiogisi
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nature of urban growth in
Florida, the kinds of urban
problems that exist and
alternatives and solutions to
these problems.
In just one decade, Florida
has moved from a population
rank of 20 to the ninth most
populated state in the nation,'*
Dr. Eddy said. Nearly 78 per
cent of Florida's population lives
in the seven major metropolitan
areas. This rapid population
growth has created
unprecedented demands for
urban services of all kinds
housing, water, electricity, waste
disposal, streets, schools,
medical care, transportation and
many others.
The Urban Studies Bureau is
working with colleges and
departments within the
University to develop a series of
teaching and research programs
to meet the needs of an
increasingly urban population.
Approximately 16 major
research projects now exist and
urban-related courses have
doubled within the past year to
116 offered by more than IS
departments in eight of the 14
colleges on campus.-
FOR EXAMPLE, the Division
of Community Health in the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center plans
to assist in the provision of
health care for the inhabitants of
a newly constructed high-rise
apartment complex in

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Gainesville. Faculty and students
in the division are active in the
adult and pediatric clinic
sponsored by the Alachua
County Health Department, and
the Neighborhood Health Center
and Duval Medical Center in
Jacksonville.
In addition, psychiatrists
within the University are
evaluating mental health needs
and services in Alachua County.
Data is being collected on social,
family and individual
characteristics in relation to the
degree of psychological
impairment.
In urban education, faculty
members in the College of
Education are seeking to
identify and interpret the
educational needs of children,
and the ability of school districts
and the state to support a
desirable educational program.
Other researchers are
investigating a home learning
center approach to education
which may increase the chances
of impoverished children
reaching a higher level of
intellectual and personal
development.
ENVIRONMENTAL
engineers are working to develop
standard test procedures for the
physical, chemical and biological
examination of municipal solid
wastes. Other engineers are
developing an economical model

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Specializing in Residential
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for the separation of the nations
combined sewer systems.
The Urban Studies Bureau
also functions as a liaison with
urban communities and agencies

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seeking help in implementing
urban programs, and attempts to
provide them with the aid of
qualified urban specialists within
the University.



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Page 7



!, Th. Florida AWptor, Thuiidey, Aunnt 6,1970

Page 8

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

. .^l]
7 fhi/ik *7*s another complaint about the Agnew watch

Nader Raider Rebuffed

WASHINGTON The
Federal Aviation Administration
is refusing to allow public access
to vital airline safety
information which is compiled
at taxpayer expense and
distributed free to the airlines
their high-powered
Washington lobby.
The architect of this
astonishing arrangement is the
FAA's legal department which
issued an opinion that this
urgent data was proprietary
and therefore should not be seen
by the citizens who pay for its
preparation.
THE SUPPRESSED
/ ,/ /
information involves summaries
of so-called mechanical
reliability reports, which the
airlines are required to file
whenever there is a major
mechanical difficulty.
The FFA receives 12,000 such
reports from the airlines every
year, which are compiled into
daily summaries and mailed to
, the airlines and to the Air
Transport Association, the
industrys Washington-based
v pressure group.
* *
The situation came to light
{ when Jerome Simandle, one of
Ralph Naders investigators,
walked into the FAA the other
day and asked politely to
examine the summaries.
HE WAS told by James
Daugherty, assistant chief of the
FAA's maintenance division,
that he could see the summaries
only with the permission of the
ATA an incredible admission
of the industrys domination Os
the agency.
This column sought an
explanation of the FAA policy
from Charles Peters, assistant
general counsel for the agency.
He said letting the public see the
data would dry up the source.
In other words, if the public
got to see the facts that the
airlines are required by law to
file, the companies would simply
stop obeying the law*
PETERS DENIED this is what
he meant but admitted he
thought the airlines would start
shading their reports. He grew
confixed and ugly when he wu
~

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Executive Editor

Merry-Go-Round
by Jack Anderson

the policy of keeping the public
in the dark.
You're so stupid you cant
even remember what questions
youve asked, he blurted at one
point after giving, an
unresponsive reply to the
question.
Americas mushrooming
education-industrial complex is
beginning to imitate the
military-industrial complex in
the great corporate scramble for
government contracts.
AS MORE defense
contractors move quietly into
the field of public education,
President Nixon is about to help
them keep their places at the
public trough.
He is expected shortly to
name Dr. Sidney P. Marland as
the new Commissioner of
Education, replacing Dr. James
E. Allen who got fired for daring
to speak out against
administration policies.
Marland is president of an
outfit with the impressive diame,
Institute for Educational
Development, which has been
working feverishly for the past
six yean to help industry get
into public education in a big
way.
MARLAND*S INSTITUTE
makes no secret of what it is
doing. Its stated aim is to close
the circle... to link education,
industry and government.
Indeed, the-institufe'itself has
cashed in on the closing of the
circle. Last year, according to
vice president Donald Barnes,
the organization did about
$200,000 worth of contract
work for the government.
Most of this, of course, was
for consulting. The fees charged
by the institute were so high on
one contract that the
organization was selected for
special mention in the General
federal consultation last year.

Las Gardieff
Managing Editor
Fred Vollrath
News Editor

THE GAO said that the
Institute had been paid
$141,884 to study the impact
of research on utilization of
communications media for
educational purposes.
Aside from the makework
nature of the contract doing
research on other research the
Institute billed the government
for consulting fees as high as
S2OO a day.
Dr. Marland, secluded like a
bride on her wedding day, could
not be reached to discuss his
philosophy.
o o
INTELLIGENCE REPORTS
claim that President Nasser
accepted the American truce
proposal under pressure from
the Kremlin. The Russians
reportedly promised in return to
support the Egyptian military
effort if the truce attempt failed.
A secret intelligence analysis
reports increasing evidence of a
Chinese-Soviet showdown over
Southeast Asia. The Chinese are
attempting to stir up revolutions
throughout the area; Thailand
has uncovered evidence, for
example, that the Chinese have
established 15 training bases for
Thai insurgents in Yunnan
Province across the border from
Thailand. This disturbs the
Kremlin, which fears that China
seeks to dominate Southeast
Asia. ''

Alligator Staff

Dave Spahr
Sports Editor
Annette Brin
Editorial Assistant
Dan Vining
Campus Living Editor

Opinions expre*e4i* the Florida Alhgtftorete thoee of the editors or k
of the writer of *e article end not thee* the Urieentty*

EDITORIAL
'Ridiculous! 1
Ever wonder what President Nixon wants to be when he
grows up?
Spiro Agnew, of course.
Even if President Nixon wont admit it, he proved it with
his recent statements about Charles Manson.
You see, Nixon said Manson was guilty of eight murders,
then later said he didnt mean to prejudge the case.
Sounds like prejudging to us.
President Nixon, as a lawyer you should know better.
. There is no excuse for violating one of the most sacred of
the canons of ethics.
No excuse, except maybe the need to hear yourself talk.
The laws in this country laws which you have sworn to
uphold state a man is innocent until proven guilty.
President Nixon, did you cut the day the professor went
over that in class?
The law is pretty explicit, but if youre having trouble
understanding it, ask any first year law student. Were sure
he could explain it.
Even a layman could probably straighten you out.
Jurors who were shown a copy of the newspaper with the
banner headline Manson Guilty, Nixon Declares, couldnt
seem to believe the President would say something like that.
The first thing I thought was thats ridiculous. I dont
believe the President of the United States would say a thing
like that. I think he has more important things to do, Mrs.
Shirley Evans said.
We have to agree, although ridiculous probably isnt
the word we would have chose to describe it.
The ironic part is the setting for the statement. Seems
Nixon was addressing a law enforcement conference in
Denver.
And talking about the irresponsibility of the press.
Maybe he was just giving an example of what not to do.
We thought that was Agnews function.
Really about the only thing we dont understand though,
is with such a large foot, how Nixon was able to get it all in
his mouth.
Guess hes been taking lessons from Agnew.
Next thing you know, theyll be making a Richard M.
Nixon watch.

Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising
offices in Student Publications
Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial Office phones: 392-1686,
87,88 or 89

Mi i mi,, ii^m
Student Publications
Business Staff
To reach Advertising, Business and
Promotion Offices, Call: 392-1681,
82,83 or 84
M.S. Davis
Business Manager
K. S. Dupree
Advertising Manager
Kathy A. Waldman
Promotion Manager
To reiMfi Circulation Department,
celt: 3921619



ifIUMMI ft
SIMHHUu
fejuuymwu
'mmm
IP B P >
'III' *"
I || I
I H
*
'^i*s3&VV;mi/'. v-S. v
There is no hope
for the complacent man.
Hypocritic
Generation
EDITOR:
As Mr. Nolle has observed,
there is some hypocrisy in the
younger generation. The
youth who professes belief in
Teace, Brotherhood, and Love
while throwing rocks and bottles
at others to convince them of his
sincerity, is as big a hypocrite as
some elders who preach Thou
shalt not kill, except when
sanctioned by your government,
corporation or religion.
PATIENT EXAMPLE is the
best way to win reforms. If we
seek peace and love through
peace and love, no one can or
will deny us. ~
FREDERICK REPLOGLE, 4FY

Fall No Time To Move

Hell no, I wont go!
This was the statement given
by Albert the Alligator when
informed that he may be set free
from his cage in accordance with
a Student Government proposal.
ALBERT, WHO is usually
very uncommunicative except
for football predictions, made
some strong statements
concerning his proposed move.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder made a campaign deal
with me to get me out of my
cage if He was elected but he
hasnt talked to me since and
Ive changed my mind, Albert
orated.
After receiving a copy of the
SG proposal, Albert had no
initial comment and
immediately devoured the entire
statement.
BUT NOW IVE had a,
chance to digest the

What Is A Raffinesque?

In the myriad of Bull
Sessions held in each dorm,
you learn many things. One
particularly interesting bit of
knowledge came to me last night
from a transfer student.
Transylvania College, in
Lexington, Kentucky, hasnt had
a football team since 1935.
Basketball, yes football, no.
IMAGINE THE loss of
tradition that those poor
students suffered when football
was taken away from them!
What do. you DO for

Dragon Slaying Disappointing

With the new political
awakening among students and
the advent of the eighteen
year-old vote, we picture
ourselves sallying forth to slay
the dragon of governmental
incompetency and set the state
and the nation on to a new
course.
We are going to be terribly
disappointed.
STRONG STUDENT support
will be the kiss of death for
politicians seeking office in
Florida this year.
We are not popular.
In a recent nationwide poll,
student protestors were disliked
more intensely than prostitutes,

I hear they want to investigate the South Vietnam jails

Staff Writings
by Dave Spicer

information. I feel that its time
to be heard, Albert said.
I just cant believe they let
me sit in this hot cage all
summer and now that fall is
arriving with cool weather and
all those tough new coeds that
come to my cage, they are going
to move me.
'Besides, what will the
R.O.T.C. Department do for
initiations if they move my
cage? Albert queried.
THE R.O.T.G Department
had no comment stating that
Albert was not in anyway
connected with the Department
of Defense. Albert is classified
with the local draft board H

excitement, we all asked the
transfer.
Unabashed by the fact that
she and her fellow students had
been denied the privilage of a
football team, she answered,
We have a Raffinesque Day.
WHAT IS A RAFFINESQUE?
Constantine Raffinesque was
one of the first deans of
Transylvania Colfege back
around 1800 or so. He innovated
and invented many things. He
innovated a lot with the wife of
the president of the college.
The wife agreed to it, the

Keep Right
by Fred Vollrath

atheists, and homosexuals by the
public at large. While all students
are: not protestors and all
protestors not SDS Weathermen,
to the public at large there seems
to be little distinction.
THE PEOPLE of the state of
Florida are going to show the
students in this state that they
dont like revolutionary rhetoric
and demonstrations on campus

I-CA, Conscientious Alligator. In
case of war, he hides and bites
the enemy on the leg.
Instead of moving me into
Lake Alice with all of those
dumb, ferocious reptiles, why
dont they just build me a
split-level cage with wall-to-wall
carpeting, air conditioning, and a
stereo?Albert asked.
That lake,is really full of
some mean alligators. If they put
me in there, the other alligators
would steal my love beads and
laugh at my sideburns. Im
happy where I am, was Albert's
final statement before going
back to sleep.

Staff Writings
by Charlotte OConnor

president didnt, and poor old
Raffinesque was one of the first
American deans to have his
tenure taken away.
WITH A name like
Constantine Raffinesque and a
college called Transylvania

and off. Theyre going to do it
by voting down the eighteen
year-old vote and turning against
any candidate who is identified
with us.
They will, in short, play right
into the hands of the
Revolutionary Radicals. But, we
must not give up because of our
initial disappointment.
Politics is a fascinating sport
to watch and a deadly serious
game to play. Politics is the
bitter struggle for the reins of
power, the power to control the
destiny of other men.
POWER IS not won by the
flash-in-pan idealist who believes
he is the savior who brings the
solutions to the peoples
problem.
Nor is politics winning the
Presidency, the Senate or the
House. Few political movements
are built from the top down.
These are the races and
elections that capture the
imagination, that have all the
glory, the publicity. Everybody
wants to work in these
campaigns because it's the in
thing to do.
YET, WHERE power lies that
effects our day-to-day life in a
much more real and immediate
sense is local, municipal and
county goverment. It is these
people who, in most instances,
interpret and enforce the rules
and regulations which control
us.
During the last few weeks I
have attended meetings of the
city council, Housing Board, and
Human Relations Board. These
meetings are open to the public
and pass rules, regulations, and
recommendations which have an
immediate effect much greater
than that of Congress.
The audience consisted of
newsmen and those who had a
vested financial interest in the
outcome of the proceedings.
THERE IS something
inherently sinister in a company,
union or other organized group,
getting governmental bodies to
pass legislation that rigs the
system in their favor.** The way
to stop this is to present a
political counter balance.
For all the talk on this
campus I hear about
involvement and changing the
system I didn't see anyone
representing the interests of UF
students. / '>*: l,i!
1* fcW'iVkttJlEfP.. t *< n >

. Thuffdty, Ayp m , Tht Florid* AJNfrtor,
i ? -s > vi'i -.try '* r-

something just had to happen.
Before they kicked Raffy off
campus, he put a curse on the
place.
Nothing specific just a
general "all-purpose" curse. Ever
since then, something ghastly
happens about every four years
(like a building bums down) and
everybody blames dd Raffy.
Theres nothing like an excuse
to raise hell. Transylvanias
students get together every year
in November and this is what
they do to compensate for
football...
FIRST, THEY dress
somebody up to look like
Raffinesque, i.e. dead. Then
they all carry him in a coffin to
the president's house where they
bum the president in effigy
while Rally screams every
obscenity he can think of plus
some thSt people suggest at the
president and his lovely wife,
who stand on the front porch
and take everything in.
Then, they stone the Pres'
house with apples. APPLES!
Thousands of apples. After that,
they carry Raffy off to
downtown Lexington, Kentucky
and at the IFC and
panhellenic association's expense
- they ransack the town.
Well, they have a street
carnival and the merchants more
or less let them walk off with
the fruit stands, etc.
THEY EVEN pay back the
president for the broken
windows. But they aU have a
grand old time with their grand
dd traditions.
Who needs football? Id pay
$7 and more to see, say, Steve
Uhlfelder dressed up in a
transylvanian cape screaming
obscenities at President
O'Connell. And I don't think
O'Connell would mind so much
- he went to school when there,
were things like tradition still
alive.
And I for one wouldn't mind
throwing ah apple 'legally" at
Tigert Hall now and then.
Perhaps there's no difference
between Transylvania's
Raffinesque Day and UF's
football everybody keeps
telling me, it's the spirit that
counts.
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed,
rtouhls apsis* end not enoood
juu worm.
Not be dgned with a
pseudonym.
addresses and
---see S -*>* - - a.- |g
uHm Will 09 WIUIIMU OfWy IT
wrier shows Just ooese. The
editor reserve ths right to sdk si
letters for spaoo.
Writers msy submit longer
ways, columns or letters to be
oonsldersd for use ss "Speaking
Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submittbui a iMubw
oakum is edoed to eontast die
tdltof and bo smasd to Ami
as hit woHKi
'
i inwei so i a, >

Page 9



Page 10

I. Tha Florida AWplor, Thurertay, fk up S, 1970

/s \ Thritasia @fifo JmEm?mMmj+j%
Ml f R ,' A '* E6K
\ ' T& j X limit 1 Shortening of Your Clioit. with $5.00 or mor. purchtue excluding cigarettes.
>. \* Ml " l v{H ( ft
WITH A >3.00 fefwfl |J
AUG. 19 BBImAUO. 4 thru AUG. 19 PURCHASE iVn>V I .1
H ruKHA'.'ior B This coupon worth *I.OO
5 s H>y
pwjq? gk tea
E.dud.ng Cigar.n.,
A fc / Quantity Righti R.wryd
46I.CANS Ak. 'Y jf WIMHOOB* irom*. me -comtem-mo 22 CUT 3H. P. MIGOS AND STRATTON ENGINE
MHHHOM. m .M \ LAWN MOWERS
WKm MUR *&.. 39%
pn#jgh| >
- A
B I Meat.. 4 *l Tissue 4 £? S I OO BiTTIIB^
L Ms 1 Food ... 4sr S I OO Towels .3 s? s l 9V %
Tarts .. 3 s l Sausage 4 & *l W||pp j B-q
""ffS ... M. i'"} 5 / MO " ,S 'T., JQc OELMONII fEUIt .NEM-ML-E. U# 1 I fl
HHLiLT 29 8 Cocktail 5 rss s l Gatorade 3s= *l BH V J
5?!feNo'cON"C?N 9C S , $ M
Twirls 2 os 59 c Creams. 39' Beans .. 5- s l Soap s l BIHBMB
l- TiHl^
tnCNNWtnMIMB HAMAISuO DEXHVaMIMO __ TMMmEA .WVItMN.
Babjr Food .. 7* Astor Salt.... ~ 9 C Cake Mixes..4*~ s l Apple Sauce. 6-T M Sausage 4 -, s l #o
Baby Food ... 9* Fancy Rice.. . 39* Beef Stew... s l Detergent ~..r 75*
HUBS AsToa vancamw/iiaih **
Tom. Wedges 2 29* :jjjiii'if^ji^rn& f <*"iomencocoas**. ... inousxno Prune Juice > 39* Chili 3 s >1
Corn Flakes ..A 22- iEj;- 4 * j lsland Dress,n 9 . 67 c ChilTSauce 5 >l~ JfSSrT 3 r *l
Qu^GriH... :: 25 j Italian Dressing ~ 39 c India Relish '? 41 c 1 4S
ivap. Milk 3 'SS 47* j j [lit J j B [ijl] |:| [ijlf iRDjiT BIITiT E%Tji?A i
M ee #% CmiMie ' 4Ac lHhs9 womanomem wottcr woocif >He wouoje.cs Twoun.wjcs
B-B-Q Sauce ,n 3 r Or*.nle*f 'HfeSv Hmlr**rPatties Steekettei 1 |BnS * W.FFI.* .' i(masst.
u*, V cTt B oooennuAue <> D 000.n5u.00 |. oooo.HW.ycw ; No 5 c ' T*ln Pop,
W.K. Corn *
MW 1
"409" Cleaner 68* 342 i WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. on on Sunday 130 N W 6TH ST
g'9Z* / i~Z\ HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS VWI N. MAIN ST. a\
Paper Plates ..



COKIANO MOT OR MILO ROLL W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF OSCA MAYirS PU SUNNYLANDVAC PAK HAM A CHEESE OR
Pork Sausnoe .. 69* Steak 79 c Beef Franks 89* Sliced Salami.... 49*
W FRESH COUNTRY STYLE FRENCH FRIED HEAT 0 SERVE SWIFT PREMIUM CORNISH Itt-11. AVG.
BUHam is: 59* Spare Ribs 69* Fish Sticks T 99* Game Hens 2 *1 M
BORDEN'S SINGLY WRAPPED AMERICAN .-RESH CENTER CUT LOIN SINGLETON'S PALMETTO FARMS
Cheese Food * 79* Poik Chops ....... . 99* Shrimp Cocktail. 3" 89* Pimento Cheese .. cu 69*
KRAFTS SLICED NATURAL AGED FRESH PORK WD BRAND LONGHORN CRACKIN'GOOD
Swiss Cheese .... 65* Shoulder Steaks... * 69* Cheese - 89* Can Biscuits ... .2 25*
BRAND CHOICE CALIFORNIA
W DB RA NDT EN^RC UB E D FUIIQUARTmOINSLKH)
WD BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF BONELESS FRESH CENT^U^^
WD BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF BONELESS LONTON WD BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF BONELESS
BBy FRESH YELLOW
PercK Dinner s l ia^Ja c
!>& mMm Mrn I Quantity Rightt irytd I U.$. NO. 1 TOP QUALITY WMITI
DIOUrPCKD MtAT w w m
PIES A POTATOES
POLY BAG FRENCH FRY REGULAR OR CRINKLE CUT LB.
Coffee Rich *2 s l Potatoes ... 3-V i WWfffflWlWl 4fcjiMEQ BAG MW
N # Creamy 2 fts. 89 c Shrimp 79 e ripedeuces oa
B Juryc^lm corn o* o. r Breaches.. 6 tos. s l Cucumbers 5 39 c
ween reus 3 <. f i dooi Mew ... pkg. yt caufornu sa NT a r OS a fruit punch or orange
sr.. 3= >r svu. *w B Mmi *- 4 5=.:
p[T Crusts 35 Macaroni g 39 c^^ Nectoriiies 39 c Lemons o 12 * 49*
IU Wile . Mil IFIUUHWIII OP# ENDIVE. RADISHES 2 39*
UPTON Y t TEA Bo BPc OR 24 CT HALF QOC SAIVO TABLETS GT 70C AmRABOC 0 4A<
Tea Bags S' 89* Softener 83* Detergent..... 79* Omens 3 49*
Tea Bags tS 67* Detergent ~*l w Cascade . 79* ,a
Tomato Paste 2 & 35* Detergent "" M 49 Cleanser ......^31 : 47
TomakTSauce ,ir 33* Detergent..... a 89* Ptfatothips ... S 59*
Soap 2 45* Detergent & 89* Tortilla Chips .
H[lllT^^S~ l wk f wlv&agAMg PliJ CwWW
WfSt ~.Z< Afajs :|M ;|| iX£ jl B IgA (M
JESS, Bnr IHf I m *C
-
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. DOZIN M
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS ST. |W K n><

Thursday, August , IS7O, Tha Florida Aligttor,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

- FOR BALE
Starao Components. Highest quality
lowest prices. StuOent owned and
operated, we sell Sansui, Sony,
Revox, Fisher, Scott, ADC and
others. 807 w. Unlv. Ave. li am to 9
prn. 376-9583 (A-4t-167-p)
1966 Cape!la 10 x 52 Mobile Home.
Air conditioned, shed, washing
machine, 2 bedroom, many extras.
See at Lot 48, Westgate Mobile
Manor. Call 378-3725. (A-5M67-P)
FREAKS
At the 1961 Cannes
Film Festival, Freaks was
selected to represent the
horror film.
A venture into the
grisly and the grotesque.
Sunday, Aug. 9 at 7:00,
8:30, and 10:00 p.m. in
the Union Auditorium 50
cents.
siHg
lUCBIHE
IS COMING!
Read the Classifieds
for more information

A mSIm
jtl fc r -arab.
The Migrant Worker
Is he any batter off now than he was 10 years ago?
The Union is presenting the original TV report about
the migrant worker, HARVEST OF SHAME, on
Monday, August 10 at 7:30 p.m. in the Auditorium.
John Gillespie will lead a discussion after the fUm.
ivii ijiimspio nas vmki sxvnsivo oofioct mfiui njujrsnt
workers in Palm Beach County.

, .I ? 1 ~' H ,4l -"" '^l ". I - II J II I H 'T w -H I ; v H I I 111
-^-^v
KINGS

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, August 6,1970

FOR SALE
Two full albums recorded onto one
8-track tape cartridge 85 Including
cartridge, high quality guaranteed
free pick-up and delivery. 1-day
service, call John 378-2004
(A-st-167-p)
Petri 35 mm Camera Model 7S cost
SBO.OO new, $400.00, or best offer.
Call 392-7923 (A-2t-169-P)
Fireball Sailing Sloop, main jib and
spinnaker, trailer, ready to race, 750.
376-0389 or 392-0811. (A-2t-169-P)
Raccoons, skunks, bob cats, snakes,
turtles, monkeys, parrots, hawks,
chicks, for sale, trade for what pet
have you, or will buy. Call 475-2546
(Local) (A-st-169-P)
VM Tape Recorder Stereo
playback, sound-wlth-sound, level
Indicator. $75 or best offer. Cell
372-1144. (A-4M69-P)
STERIO: Magnavox, 40 watt
Receiver, SIOO, Turntable, SSO. 2
Speakers, 12 Inch Bass Woofer, SIOO.
SAVE $l5O. 378-7743 after 6 p.m.
(A-2t-169-P)
TR 3 *57 runs good, motor rebuilt
$175 373-1895 (a-3t-170-p)
1969 Honda 50 for sale. In excellent
condition! $l4O. Call Toni 376-7344.
(a-2t-168-p)
Bass Man Amp with cases In new
condition, contact Wynn at
378-1895. (A-4M69-P)
V Cowboys l
i i
8:47 *r.ng y I
I Baa'Hoss/NaMUe -4f|hl
I Mocker / Fabray /V, HIM
liw r^g
I 10:41

FOR SALE
THE TAPE MACHINE is coming to
Gainesville. Discount prices on ell
tapes. A swap barrel for old tapes
your old cartridge plus 50 cents! We
specialize In tape deck Installation.
Bring your deck to us. We do It right!
Also sates and service. (a-2t-170-p)
HONDA 160 Scrambler new muffler,
tailpipes, semiknobby rear tire. Just
overhauled. Excellent condition.
S3OO. 372-9764. (a-lt-170-p)
MOVING Must sell Cheaps port,
stereo (Garrard), like new crib, couch
and chair, twin-beds, fulMgth. Mirror,
4-dr. Dresser Ph. 372-7357.
(A-st-168-p)
Honda 160 69 Good condition, Low
Millage. $290 including two helmet
Call after 5 P.M. 392-7549
(A-4M68-P)
Complete camera outfit: Mamlya
sekor lOOOdtl with 55mm fl:
8-vlvltar 85-205 mm 200 m lens
f:3:Brvlvltar 28 mm auto wide-angle
lens fz*.s All with guarantee, only 4
months old. Also filters, strobes,
aces. Must sell, one or all. Make offer.
Call Mark at 372-1385. (a-lt-170-p)
Spots before your on your new
carpet remove them with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
SI.OO Lowry Furniture Co.(a-tf-c)
FOR RENT
Available for fall .-University Apts.
Two bedroom and efflcleiicys AC,
Pool. Close to campus. 80-140.
376-8990. (B-9t-166-p)
HOLIDAY GARDENS
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C,' l bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S. w. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Rooms two blocks to campus oept.
60 & 65 pr. mth. kit. prlv. carpets.
TV larfje rooms men or women
liberal. 378-0286 or 1204 NW 3rd
Ave. (B-st-168-p)
1 --
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
Included completely furnished
Ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-ts-c)
... d
Live in luxury at The Place. Male
roommate needed starting fall qtr.
town house, Private Bedroom, AC,
Dishwasher. Call: 378-9441.
(B-5M69-P)
Female Roomate Needed Fall
Quarter Only The Place
$6 7.5 0/Month Includes Utilities,
Write or Call Glnny Culbertson, 1508
Emory Lane, Cocoa, Fla.
(B-3M69-P)
Furnished 1-bedroom apt. All
utilities included slls/month. 208
N.W. 14th St. Call 376-0195.
(b-2t-170-p)
Female roommate Hawaiian Village
now through Aug. call 3764750 for
further Information grad, student
preferred call after 5 PM (B-st,
167-p)
WANTED
Living together or thinking about It.
we'd like to share an apt. with
another guy end girl In the Fell
372*6903 after 3:00 and weekends.
(C-st-168-p)
Wanted In the fall: two mature coeds
to share new 4-bedroom apartment
with two male grad students. Board
In exchange for cooking and cleaning.
Cell now 376-3439. (C-4t-167-p)
Went a good natured roomate who is
e great cook tell quarter? I need a
piece to live close to campus. WNI
share rent. Cell 373-2730
(o-2t-170-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER j
MONDAY
BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI
ALL YOU CAN EAT 79<
TUESDAY
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN QQ
ALL YOU CAN EAT V
WEDNESDAY
JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK __
AND YELLOW RICE /v
THURSDAY
BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS OQ
FRIDAY
FISH ALMONDINE AND FRENCH
} FRIED POTATOES 89<
GAINESVILLEMAL^^.
HURRY! MM LAST 6 DAyT
|E] AIRPORT Ej3
RM BURT LANCASTER* DCAM MAITM ap
JEAN S£l£R JACQUELINE BtSSET HEM|
HUM tEDME KENNEDY lELER HAYES P
VAN KRJN MAUREEN STAPLETON I
I A UNIVERSAL HCIUtE TECRRICOLOS* Profeod to 70MN TOBOAO*
[B t tear una
AT .. 1:46 4:22 7:00 9:38
| LAST DAY!
jfcsy -I
I J'BI'L lalTjiii. "I
I Charlie Brown I
I and the I
Peanuts Gang I
in their I
SFirst cMovie! I
I IW by United Feoture Syndicate Inc 1
I cA *Boy Named I
I Charlie Thrown I
PWOOUCTKHI toaautetLL mb CNPff I
I * *** CHARLES MBCELSON and BILL MaSoZ I
| *""" JOrfli SCOTT TROTTER TECMBGOLfIR* I
I Anwwyijew. hcture> wgfe--



gator classifieds

WANTED
Looking For Hip Foma I* Roommates
Starting Fall Quartar Willing To Find
A Placa or Move Into Yours Call
snarry 376-4858. (c-2t-169-P)
Hip roommata singles or couples to
tvar lama housa naar campus,
starting now or Fan quartar Call
370.435 g Ask for Mark or Larry
(c-2t-169-P)
Aa malor naads roommata for Fall
Quartar Air cond. A heater across
stroat from Norman 1212 sth Ave.
SW Apt. 7 Call 373-2676 $67.50 mo.
(0-2t-169-P)
Girl looking for apt with llbaral
female roommata. Willing to pay
batwaan S4O A S6O. CaTSun Hjl
at 376-6083 or 392-7945 lata.
(C-st-167-P)
HELP wanted
Rasponslbla tamale student pref.
grad, pri. room, bath, board, S2O
weak, in exchange for am, pm care 2
little girls. For Information, contact
Mrs. Mlnerd, 392-1275 Student
employment, Tlgert. Must have own
transportation. (E-2t-169-P)
Good cash aamings for man to
distribute advertising to city homes,
Aug. 11 A 12. Tima flexible. Call
376-5716 Afternoons. (E-2t-169-P)
Need office girl for general office
work. 5% day weak. Pay according to
ability. Apply In parson at
Silvermans, 225 West University
Ave. (e-3t-170-p)
AUTOS
VW Bug, 1963, dean, excellent
condition. Original owner. $595. Call
372-3147 For appointment to sea.
(G-3M69-P)
MUST SELL 1970 Nova-SS, NEW
375 hp. 396 eng. Turbo-ltydramatlc,
many extras, radio-tape deck, gauges,
wide ovals. Call Debbi before 5.
392-1107 (g-2t-170-p)
GTO 1968 Clean A Fully Equipped,
Including stereo tape. $2250 Call
372-1291 (g-2t-170-p)
Corvette 66 convert., 427 High perf.
modified for street dr strlpi every
part new or perfect. Must sell by
Aug. 25. $2500 373-1524.
($-2t-170-p)
PE P T
Coeds Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair renjoval.
Edmund Dwyer elect rologist 102 NW
2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
THEYRE HEREI -* SNlypUddles
Be the first one on your block to
have one. Only three left and they're
going fast. (I have a hard time
keeping up with them) Live
entertainment. Guaranteed to please.
Phone 372-4509 (J-2t-170-p)
Free kittens, bom July 4, 376-0767
after 5 p.m. (J-St-170-p)
freei To a good home. One
pedigreed female Dutch rabbit.
Phone 372-4509. (j-2t-170-p)
tawtaalkM
$14)0
A A Wm r bbl A
II mm Mtineo* n? BiTd|l
I Ihllr Price until 7:45 p.m. SI
I Re gular Adm. $ 1.00 18
[I im ** m i"* * am
I sslslt I

Tbunriey, August 6. WO, The Florida ANiprtor,

Pis yy T
Student Organizations: Interested In
showing yourself off during
orientation this Fall? Call JWRU
Program Office 392-1655Q-st-169-P)
SSO Reward for recovery ln good
condition of bike stolen from Well
Hall on July l. Description: Men's
10-speed green 27 Inch Schwinn,
drop handle bars, rat-trap pedals,
leather saddle, hand-brakes with
adapters, chrom fenders and rear
carrier. Serial no. B E 74164. Also,
SSO for Information leading to arrest
and conviction of persons Involved in
theft. 378-1725 After 6 Q-2t-169-P)
MEN. WHERE'S HOME NEXT
QUARTER I Try Georgia Seagte
Co-op. Room and Board
$220/Qtlarter. 1002 w. University
376-8941 (J-Bt-137-p)
LOST dc POUND
FOUND: at 1417 NW Ist. Ave., a
SUPERpregnant cat. Call 372-2990.
(l-3t-169-nc)
FOUND on July 29: Ladies gold rim
prescription glasses In front of Bldg.
E. Call 378-8043 (J-3t-169-NC)
FOUND: Mans prescription glasses
In KA parking lot, (across from grad
library). Brown rimmed, black case.
Call 392-0303. (I-3M70-P)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
DoodKna .SOO pm. 2 days prior to (tatting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
AWM n
I | fl nri ODOODOOD £
- - !nil3 fs §
------ f?rjin
HZH H
Q
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H _f & & | & f 2
SI 3 3 f
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* i II
111 q> y z
R 5 f
* r*

' _ S*
m Tl O
Z]
_ z r
ZZZ Z m r
j, II -Hffrffir m ; iSi

Page 13

Happiness is getting your iyisUMi
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
BUS Station. 378-4480 (M-ts-C)
Stareo tape dub now forming!
Increase your music library at the
moat reasonable prices yeti CaM Jay
at 376-9583 for more details.
(MJEt-167-p)
AlternatorsGeneratorsStarters
Electrical systems tested and repairs
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 &
Main (M-ts-c)
Hunt N Peck Typing Service: Spec. In
theses A dissertations. Fast accurate
service work guaranteed. Please call
376-6063
ALTERATIONS by RUBY Mrs.
Ruby Mills, Apartment 217 100 N.E.
Bth Ave. near Gainesville Shopping
Center 376-8506 (m-st-170-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
thesis, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc
Prompt pick-up, delivery. 373-1984,
9-5. (M-5M64-P) h
THE COPY CENTER 5 XEROX 4
ASK ABOUT OUR CHARGE PLAN.
1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334 next to
Malones Bookstore. (M-13t-162-p)

Reiti Union Auditorium
SUNDOWNERS
Robert Mrtchum p MUL
Peter Ustinov
Deborah Kerr
Admission 50 cant* £f^j|
Sot. Aug. 8, qf 7&0 9t KMX) p.m. |
f;& i *V> r >, ... -.v- :
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| {
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{ ... Chips One Os The Years Ten Best!
-NATIONAL BOARD I
1 OF REVIEW
r m W £
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£ Metro-Goidwyn-Mayer £
2 PP Presents
An Arthur P. Jacobs Production £
starring J
j 'Peter OToole Petula Clark
UcffTtiS RTlfljinji HE! 5
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Page 14

,Tht Thursday, August 6,1970

SUMMER FLICKS AT THE
REITZ UNION
7 & 9:30 Aug. 11 NO WAY TO TREAT A LADY
7 & 9:30 Aug. 12 ... THE FAMILY WAY
-
HORSE FEATHERS
6,8& 10 Aug. 18 &19 THE KNACK
mm

ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE
TraEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY MONDAY AFTERNOON 5:00 OF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN THURSDAYS CAMPUS CRIER.
THANKS.
RODNEY MARGOL
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT

FLORIDA PLAYERS PRESENT!
Tickets are now on sale for Florida Players' summer production of Ferenc Molnar's
comedy, The Play's the Thing, opening Tuesday, August 11 and continuing through
Saturday, August 15. Prices are $.75 for students and $1.50 general admission. Call the
Constans Theatre box office, 392-1653, for reservations.
INDOCHINA SERIES CONTINUES
The series of discussions on the crisis in Indochina will continue Aug. 11. Dr. Marion
N. Walker, former attache to S. E. Asia will speak on his impressions of Southeast Asia.
This series is sponsored by the Indochina Crisis Committee and Student Govt in rooms
361-2 at 8 p.m.
HAVE YOU REGISTERED TO VOTE?
- -* .
If you are a student who: (1) is over 21; (2) has lived in Fla. for 1 year; (3) has lived in
Alachua County for 6 mon.
Than you have until AUGUST 8 to register to vote in Alachua County. Registration
tikes place at the Alachua County Courthouse on Main St If you have any difficulty
in registering come to the Student Gov't offices, 3rd floor Reitz Union.
* 1 ' - .* ...
PREFERENTIAL SEATING
-'/ >
THE deadline for applying for preferential seating has been extended by the student
senate until the Ist week of the Fall quarter. All interested groups should contact the
Sec. of Athletics.
\ .//: o
FOOTBALL SEASON CARD
Student football ticket cards have been mailed out If you have not received one and 7
you wish to attend home football games. You can personally pick one up at the
athletic ticket office, west stadium, immediately. Cards must be validated before
August 30, 1970. This can be done either via return mail or in person at the athletic
ticket office August 10 through August 28 from 9:00 to 12:00 and 1:30 to 4:30,
l Monday through Friday.

Campus; Crier

SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT

CAMPUS CALENDAR

Thursday
Student Government
Production: THE BLUES
IMAGE CONCERT, Florida
Gymnasium, 8:00 pan.
Christian Scientists Meeting. 357
Union, 7 p.m.
Orientation: Student
Development, Union
Ballroom, 7 p.m.
Friday
Muslim Students Prayer Meeting,
122 Union, 12:30 pan.
Children's Art Carnival, C 4
Union & Ravine Park, 10 a.m.

Monday
Union Film: "Harvest of*
Shame," & Lecture: "Migrant
Workers/' John David
Gillhpie, Union Auditorium,
7:30 p.m.

Saturday
India Movie: "Sarasuati
Chandra," Union
Auditorium, 2 p.m.
Union Movie: "The
Sundowners," Union
Auditorium, 7 & 10 pjn.
Sunday
Tolbert Area: MUSIC GIG,
Lawn between North & East
Hall, 6.
Union Classic Film: "Freaks,"
Union Auditorium, 7, 8:30,
& 10 p.m.



SAVINGS on things to make you (and your home) more beautiful.
extra Screen stamps
WHEN YOU CLIP AND REDEEM THE COUPONS ON THIS PA6E
mps reenSta mps reenSta mns I > ITI UwG reenSta mds I^l
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I leistlWsi j I Clourasil Medication || DiiisrMt SI Bowl Cltaaar i '""Jafih
l*B ; f r **' **' y< I f 4- l tin, B3c If r|. price f
l. || 13. ***
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tXM >ii> iii I*'.**" 1 i| Solafcaine Modication I | if $1 or More of I [fj /
Disinfectant | 3-ox. lotion, $1.29 or I Anacin Tablots '1 ony iHrtionsry J V /
I 7-D*. Cn 93 i I 4-ox. spray, $1.79 i f pkp. off 100, $1.29 ; I or School Supplio. 1
I ,4 **. *a . || 26. j f 3# 1 /ml
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Pristeen Feminine if Any Brand, Any Six# if MedJ-Ouick Spray if 11 Breil-A-Feil I
i . .. it Sunton Lotion If Modication If $1 or nort of Pi
2Vh-oz. sixo $1.29 || rag. prico If 3-ox. sizo, $1.29 || any Kmpiro Brushos oach, rep. prico
|| np RMAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAbAOAAAIHIAAAAAftftftA X*AAAAAAA sr-fulfinfinln
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Repular or Super if Ultra Brito ; f 6-12 Spray 1 Aluminum
Tampax Tampons if Tooth Pasta ;f Insect Repellent $1 or moro of any Anchor ]! Oven Uner
pkp. of 40, SI.S9 if 6%-ox. sixo, 790 | 8.5-ox. sixo, 49c Hockin* Glassware J oach, rep. prico |
84. (Inolroi OML. Att IXIWR || 16. (ln*lrot Wt*. An..l IX 1TO | | 28. (Itpim. WL. Anftrt IX l#) 40 W-phn. M,4qm IX 19*0 I J 44 rnpl-ll WtX, rrpirtt IX l*m J
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IVO-S Assorted it Medium or Hard, Adult if Any Sixo BANO-Aid Brand If I; .!?!" P ". C k 1
Nair Spray f| Popsodont Tooth Brush If Adhesive Bandapos f Any Sixo, Any Color I Miioewclde j
10-ox. pkp. SI.2S If oach, 4Sc if rop.pHco f Kama 100 Panty Hose j *ach pkp., rap. prico j
S. ((apian. WnX, *>*** IX I*7*) jf 17. (*apim. WtA, AnpnM IX !*( if 29. (tapim* WnaL. AnpnM IX t*FS| if (apim. Wo*. Aopaat IX !( J apl WnX, Airgon. IX *() £
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I 4-ox. sizo 93c i| 41/t-oz. sizo, sl.l S If pkp. off 130,65 c J rap. prico | oach pkp., rap. price
|6. || 13. ww..,t. rp, |f 30. (.-pi. wl. a.,.* ,x ..m, { 42 (*npimt wo*. AtpnM 1(, i*m | SO. (WW,iw,Aa-n.wa
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4 OX xlxe 79c nr II Oonturo Cleaner If pkp. of 125,79 c or f Toothpaste || Mildew Disk I
7-ox sizo Si 29 il 6-ox. sixo, 79c If pkp. off 170, S9c ; f mg. price || each pkp., rap. price I
2. r r A Trtl If 17. (Irtlnr Wrt., Attt.l IX lO7SI If 31. (.niro WotL Ant*. It WWI 1 i (inplrot Wod., Aw IS. 19701 v. if 51. (Snpitot Wad, Any... ttimi
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Sottinp Lotion I rT- 14-ox. sizo, 93c or || 9-oz. size, 75c or IS Polish Remover 1| Black I
B-ox. size $1.39 |i 20-ox. sizo, sl.l B I I 14-ox. sixo, 99c IS 3-ox. sixo, 39c each pkp., rap. price f
3. Unplroi (WL, Aofot. IX l*C| ] j 20. (M, Ahm) IX KN) J J 32. enylroi WoA. Aft* S. IN| || 44, (Snalrtt Wo4> liint IX Itwt J
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Capri Listeriee Johnson's Baby Oil If Vasallno
Both Oil I Mouth Wash f f 4-ox. size, 69c or Petroleum Jolly I Damp Rid
paart sixo, 69c I 14-ox. size, 93c If 10-ox. six#, $1.19 If 4-ox. sixo, 39c 3| oach pkp., rap. prico I
9. WnAlfti Wod- tMn IX lilt) | 1 21,' (in|iro< WmL Atftat IX ISSSI || 33. piroi (ML Afnt* (X WN> || (fopfru IX N| | ; 23. X l|T 1 WaA. Ili|til IX NI |
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Mavis Score If Small or Urpo Sixo || Doran's Cool Cram# if Wilsaa's Yoarwound 1
Talcum Powder 1 Hair Dressing f f Range Reflector Thin Mints f | Wild Bird Seed I
10-ox. sixo, S9c | 3-ox. sixo, 79c J I 9- P r ** r *o* P r,c 1 f *-k- kap* rop. price I
10. SehM.(waixme 22. ntl.u WoXOnwl IX WH| *O. OHm Wt*.not* 0 Wa jf 4 - aialna. WoA. Anynt.. tm | | 34. Poll I WVi exaat IX t*m I
fjii ex'ha P i, ai rjnri" n nl "e AmV jujjjj T.Y.I EXTRA |QI
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Ripbt Guard Oillotto "Hot
flatl rorspirant I I Shave Cream 1 Cutting l^ r 4
11. OapUttettiu Aoyt* (X mm 3f. 23. SglrM Wo*. Aoynt. IX Will fj 3 * *Vlm WoA~ #-** IX **() ; B
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Skin lotion 1 Sominex Tablets f Sponge Mop | I o/fr//vW3
7-ox. size, $1.19 pkp. off 16,99 c I rep. prico I -n
12. n w i ra .wM..AM..iiLiim 24. nvm. w.n A.,... >. ittoi | 36. wonu *.... ix i*roi |-
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Thursday, Aiafttt 6, I§7o, Th# Florida Alligator,

Page 15



flUHiB
LibJ jM
Price* effective Thurft* Aug. 6 thru C srm Our Slkttcatesien SHkpL
V/D||D||V\l * T Potato Salad £ 39*
K-uo.ml W Baked Beans r 39
IhttiH / \ Corned Beef VT.ll' 49*
;|i Cuban Sandwich .f 59*
fa&jUr '"v 4 \ | : 1541. bis Oyii Inti Italian liiil ar
~*-S*!*J \ (plai SO aalra IkH 0r... llaafi with canpaa)
Sliced Bacon 5585*
Iff; J(f\ \ Smoked Daisies ~..C 99*
life y .v*' m 4 \_ \ HI Swift's Preniluai Brooescfcwolear or
1 Spread .. Et4s
' r N iMHf 4 Ham, TuHcey, Beef i£ 39*
\ Copeland Franks .. V*T49
1
.7u M **. o ** M ~-i- f~.it age- I** no,*.*
sharp Cheddar... 79* Fruit Drinks 3?.t. $1 J!l?I!S !!LJ l eh
KihSmcw..t 98- F&PPeaches.. 3.: 89 Fk,ridashrimp "'
Bleee.net (2c mtn mmmtmw SAVI Sd FAF Tasty Freit
Margarine . 29* # M# Ls M :i ~.. a* ( B * ur to stock up on breakfast
S'*"*'**£* lb %W*RTUII ******** iw CLUB BREAD, bnk*d fr*sk dally!
Blue Bonnet . 47* w *-*.*.
Cream Cheese t£ 12* 1 jj^^
Fiaky Biscuits 7z i9* Armour's Tree# < 59* jgifl^HjjHjj|^^^
HtrW# B*w Frozen Florida Swt. or Uosw. Os p Sausage 4- $ 1 W^^stSrvn^LfL
~"S!* J .i 8 6 ~ M Pork & Beans a 3=45* ]Sfi££MH^SU
Srir r * cri5c00n....... ^7*vJ|^kT*^^b|
F rosea
SimpU Sum**, e* Supp*M vERtiM SW,FTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
featuring HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE
Macaroni & Cheese VC 39* .^.!LS??J?!?* t Z s^**
Casserole... *vsr69 Chuck Steaks T 89*
|w~aroniaw.. jr-79-| Lowdooroil c |~

Page 16

K Tht Ftori* AMgrtor, Thutaday, August 6,1970



M B|
I
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£Depi. mv '
SAVI Act MmliMvl, lady Batty Soltlll# 41
Prune Juice tT 39* mamm*...***,*^*. *,.^^,<
MVII FAR, Tmpy Fie vereA V- THIS WEEK'S FEATURE (AUG. 6-12)
Tomato Juice 29 c g a coffee cup
Pear Halves # ~ 39* AF\/v
Liquid Dove *£T 53* 4 l C,
SAVI 6 Asparagus Spears .... *.. 25* .^lM^.''w|HilSPPi%
SAVII FAR Whole Karaal or Cream Style ""' £?
Ripe Pitted Olives .... 3 ?. *1
Nectarine* .10. 69*
Potatoes ... 5 a 39- T ZZ
Blueberries
*n t M 00m 1 fmti\' c instant coffee !P^Hk
.... Toward Purchase of j£g££|jl
h Pikl ouiidl e publix iuponl
1 li
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Freeser Qeeee t RM leech A Ant Mirim's i; Asserted Feeey Face It ID-ee. phg. 79c X
Asserted iatrees I Killer Fever I; Preweeteeed Brisfc Mhc 11 #. oei-.e.s. ** is.aret |
Mk. 91. $1.39 I cee 39c 7-em. 93c | j six regeler pfcgs. 37c I kin
*3. wa.e.aa.awi, I S *. 57 stent |[ S 3. * v-. is mm 11371 t. /n EXTF J6
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S*of hovn 9-9 Won. tKw fri. 9-7 Sot. U/Me^llyjg.O^nlW'

Thursday, Augtvt 6,1970, Th Florida Aligvtor, I

Page 17



Page 18

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Thursday, August 6,1870

The Bearded Women/
The Six-Fingered Men
"' /
One of the most interesting films to come to town this year is
coming to the Reitz Union Sunday. Freaks is the name of it.
Its a time spent in the land of the midgets and the squashed-face
people and the land of the ladies with beards and the men with six
fingers. It stars people who are mistakes and live looking forever
wrong or busted.
OLGA RACLANOVA is the only whole person in the movie. She is
an aerialist and learns that one of the midgets has inherited much
money and {dots to many him. She fights to gain acceptance in the
freak world and succeeds. They finally chant to her, We accept you,
we accept you. Gobble, gobble, gobble. You are one of us and she is.
The director is Tod Browning whose credits include a host of
horror exploitation pictures. It comes from a novel Spurs by Tod
Robbins. The midget is Wallace Ford.
* Admission price is 50 cents. There will be showings Sunday at 7,
8:30 and 10 pjn.

ACROSS
I Right of 47 Dried up. K Lamb. 123 Bora,
precedence. 4* First wife M Scrutinize. 124 Cell an me
4 Loud naioe. of Jacob. M Fluent. .
Songwriters SO Aye. SO Fuel. 126 Shrine of
group. SI Row. 91 Facilitated. Bernadette.
13 HindmoeL 52 Garment. 93 Whirling. 12* Oocine bird.
17 Santo. 54 Emblem of 95 Hoard. 1300. T. book:
for one. the Holy 97 Wanderer. abbr.
20 Devotee. Spirit. 99 Vied. 131 Nude.
21 Rows. 56 Direction. 101 Cloth folds. 132 Tine branch
22 Demise. 57 Vases. 104 Bury. 134 NCO.
23 Silkworms. SS Ateliers. 106 Part of a 135 Errs.
24 Country 60 Irish clan. hlndguarter. 137 Waterways,
festival. 62 Theme. 106 Australian 13S Brassy.
25 Seasons 65 Account. trees. 140 Flower,
greetings. 67 Obelisk. 106 Musk . 143 Irish toast.
30 Bonds. 71 Flatfishes. 100 Turk VIPs. 146 Lap robe.
31 Dregs. 72 Blunt nib. 110 Composed. ISOUnlgue
32 Eng. gueen. 73 Infallible. 11l Acme. person.
33 Classify. 75 Uncanny. 114 Cut. 161 Wickiup.
34 Br. guns. 76 Mimic. 116 Easy gait. 152 Chart.
36 Rom. road. 77 Stretch. 117 High hill. 153 Macaw.
37 Grevious. 73 Three: 116 Largest 165 PasL
39 Reguires. comb. form. guantity. 156 Worn.
42 Ital. coins. 61 Bronchia. lit Color. 157 Chairs.
43 Eaudod sap. 83 Earth: poet. 121 Hindu 156 Otherwise.
44 Posed. 64 Edge. garment. 159 Veil.
DOWN
1 Greek 60. 18 Rubber tree. 55 Duelling 66 Bute: abbr.
2 Timber tree. 19 Live. sword. 87 Drafted: her
3 Or. coins. 26 Yearn. 57 Consumer. 66 Aromatic
4 Contends 27 Progeny. 56 Stupefy. perfume,
with. 26 Son of Sath. 59 Tight 92 Eras.
5 Simple 29 Russ. city. 61 Abound. 93 Vex.
lyrics. 34 Shrewd. 62 Emperor. 94 Muffins.
6 Metric 35 Join firmly. 63 Indian. 96 Blind a
measure. 36 Miguel on 64 Simple. hawk.
7 Book of and St. 66 the Man. 97 Lariat.
Psalms. Pierre. 66 Spruce. 96 Javelin.
6 Modify. 36 Cod of lavs. 66 Hauls 99 Ducklike
9 Perceives. 40 Vs. river. behind. bird.
10 Part of a 41 Pronoun. 69 Turk. coin. 100 Importunes
balloon. 43 Storage 70 Lampreys. for payment
II Movie dog. boxes. 72 Nail. 102 Pitch
12 Indian feat 44 Clou. 74 Oirls name. helmet.
Midlers. 46 Helper. 77 Haruepex. 103 Dsrlsivo
13 Venerates. 44 Adorn. s 76 Waste smile.
14 Before long. 46 Uniform. allowance. 106 Forfeit.
16 Tunes. 51 Speaker. 79 Part. 107 Sits.
16 Glossy 52 Pierce. SO Wading bird. 110 Lethargy,
flbsr. 53 Drives 62 Flaccid. 11l UprighL
17 Settle cau. slantingly. SS Belg. river. 112 Contraction.

Down Under Sheep, Robert
Mitchum, Deborah Kerr

The Sundowners, a story of
sheep herders in Australia thats
better than it sounds, is showing
this weekend at the Reitz Union.
The picture stars Deborah

I 7 GARNISHED WITH BUTTER STREUSEL J
ffTTi V/ R CARAMEL ICING, 1-lb. loaf |
\f | Vi Apple Cobblestone a
I xj I Breed
Kii AOt
** Ch J
YELLOW BATTER CAKE ICED WITH
HALF VANILLA FUDGE A HALF |
wSHX CHOCOLATE FUDGE, 1-lb. i
ClPr Dulclieee I
Loaf Cake j
I :
A 1--
DANISH BAKERY t
I sl7* -'A -'A|
| -'A| Gainesville Mall I
j Special Orders Call 372-3885 |
I
; < wwAv;vAW,v\vAv.w/.wAvm :v: :w:\v>:v:o:X>y<.:.y.v.v.v.v.v.v.
Patronize Gator Advertisers

i aa i p aai 11 in mi mi mm 111111111 nmi si
* |r~ Ir wr Jr
H
_ L-JM
_ UP flap
jJn Oj
tl > 44
_ aaffiTT fie is t^uais
tl 91 tx
99 finaibl 163 193
(P Pi dIP W
H Miir Lnr nr Jm WP
p ~ Hit? Hm Bn Hnr
113 Stuffs. 10 Households. 127 Declared. 135 Complacent. 142 Wildcat. 147 Masked
116 Periods. 122 Thank leas 129 Above. 136 Malignant 144 Letters. fabric.
118 We are person. 131 Father of villain. 146 Amor lean 146 Owns,
going to . 12S Minute. TV. 137 Jay. general. 149 Sun god.
119 Under- 126 Part of 133 Complaint: 119 Shriek. 146 Locks, IS4 Expressive
garments. USSR: abbr. cel I eg. 141 Mast. Fla. exclamation.

Ken, Robert Mitchum and Peter
Ustinov.
As always, it only costs 50
cents to get in. There will be
shows at 7 and 10 pjn.

The
Florida
Alligator

Blues Image In Gym Tonight

Blues Image, a topflight
blues-oriented rock group, will
be appearing here tonight in a
long show in the Florida Gym.
The show starts at 8:30 p.m.
and includes music from Riff, a
local hard rock group.
Admission price is $2 per
person.
BLUES IMAGE now has a
bestselling single release on the
charts. Ride Captain, Ride
was number five in the country
in sales in recent weeks on the

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Billboard Magazine sales chart
and is faring equally well on the
other major charts. The group
also has recorded sevenri
successful albums.
They originated in Tampa
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OFF 13th St. on 8 JV. 16th Ave.

I I
; | Tickets Now on Sale! j j
11 Florida Players Production of 11
THE PLAYS THE THING ~
|| |i
!; Tuesday Saturday, August 11-15 j j
it i;
]: 8:00 Constans Theatre \ \
|[ Box Office 302*1653 *** i|
; : ;;

several years ago with most of
the same members that now are
in the group.
The show is produced by
Student Government
Productions.
GOOD THRU AUGUST
- OFF
25< igame
* with coupon
3 BLOCKS NORTH OF MALL
POTT-PUTT GOLF
3215 N.W. 13th St.
OPEN
M Sat 9AM -1 AM
SUN NOON IAM



The
Florida
Alligator

By KEN MCKINNON
Allivator Sports Writer
Besides all that trouble over
noney with the pros right now
md the runaway by the Reds of
:incy, there sure isnt too much
o talk about around here this
innmer in the way of sports.
I did manage to come up with
l few bits of interest that may
lelp hobs you over until
teptember, however. So heres a
ew Gator Shorts.
*
Speaking of the pro player
trike, saw whew Super Steve
upported it, but hoped it would
get over with in tune for him to
et a chance to play in Tampa
ttadium on Aug. IS when the
I9ers meet the Cleveland
Irowns in a preseason
exhibition.
SEEMS SPURRIER thinks
that may be his first big chance
to move in on John Brodie, who
las overshadowed the former
leisnan Trophy winner for
three seasons now.
My guess is the same, simply
wcause Tampa is like a second
Lome to Steve and the fans their
will give him one heckuva
Lome coming.
* *
FRED GEISLER Odando
Bdgewater All-American
qpaterback bound for Florida
State, won the sportswriters
poll for the North MVP.
He was tough, hitting 8 of 19
passes for 19S yards, but my
vote went to Jacksonville
Stantons 6-foot, 190-pound
halfback Harold Hart, who
caught a 67-yard pass from
Geisler on the first {day for the
tforth, only to lose the
touchdown after an official said
le pushed off South safety Jim
UddeD of Tampa HiDsbotough
to make the catch.
Hart caught a similar pass a
couple of plays later, but the
Gesfler-thrown bullet hit him in
r lung, knocking his breath out
ind Tampa Blakes Bobby
Sennett dragged him down from
>ehind.

m A Ml gpo* of Gatfac.
1 heard from a fafciy reliable
omce that UF Head Coach
>eug Dickey called the 6-fooM,
90-pound ace after he had
igned a Letterof-Intent with
he Seminoles and asked him if
ie would like to reconsider and
naybe be John Reaves
ucccssor.
GEISLER reportedly replied
with something to the effect
hat he didn't want to see
Hckey until two years from
low, when he would beat the
nnts off the Gators.
A sportswriter askedhimifhe
Remember I
Summer I
Bowling I
Special I
REITZ UNION I
L/ySL_J.

RE!

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Insight

truly made such remarks. He
didn't given an affirmative, but
the writer said he didnt deny it
either.
I hear some of our footballers
have heard about the short
conversation. It isnt very likely
they'll forget about it either.
*
AND FINALLY, at the game
Saturday, I talked with Russ
Bobo, a UF senior in journalism
interning with the Ft.
Lauderdale News Pompano
Beach Sun-Sentinel this summer.
Russ is the writer that wrote
the original story about Reaves
being irked over the way
football mag Streit and Smith
snubbed him. It was later picked
up by the Associated Press and
released to God-knowa-where.
Since its release, Reaves told
Tampa Tribune sports editor
Tom McEwen that he never said
irked in his life and darn sure,
didnt say all those things about
some of the nations players
picked tops by Streit and Smith.
He also said that when Bobo was
their, in his room, it was after a
hard and tiring day, with
everyone asking him about the
way he felt about his treatment
by the magazine.
REAVES SAID Bobo didnt
even have a notebook and pencil
to write all those tilings down.
Bobo said he did and that
Reaves did say those things.
Well, anyway, all that really
matters now is whether or not
Tennessee running back Curt
Watson saw that thing about his
not being able to carry Tommy
Durrances chin strap.
If he did, it doesnt matter
whether John said it or not
Watson, along with the rest of
the fiery-hot Volunteers, will
have no reason to doubt that he
did.

Q. Who said: I take the strongest possible stand. Get out now. I
There is no military reason, either tactical or strategic, why
we cannot do so.' 9
A. Joel Daves I
Our country it in one of the most critical eras of its history.
Students are shot down on our Nation's campuses. Our cities are
stagnating. Our economy deteriorating.
And above the turmoil is the central issue of our time: the Indochina War.
Joel Daves is running for the United States Senate.
He feels it is time for the Indochina War to stop, because we cannot give
adequate attention to the worsening problems at home until the vast
expenditure of lives and money in Indochina is halted.
I take the strongest possible stand. Get out now."
The time for equivocation is over. The time for new leadership is now.
The time for peace is now.
JUIUU ai
I Rally with Joel Daves, Thursday
night, August 13, 7:30 p.m.,
I Plaza of the Americas. (University
I 1 Auditorium in the event of rain)
Democratic Psld PolKfoil Advertisement
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SKYDIVING
.. .on a dear day
I Intramurals I
Mmmmmmmmmmmmmm by Chuck Fessler I
The marathon softball tournament held this past Saturday was a big
success. Twenty-three dubs braved the extreme heat and entered
teams. Play started at 8:30 in the morning, with the last game being
completed at around 8:00 pm. After all was said and done, the
Tuttlingers proved they were the best team entered with Six
consecutive victories without a loss. The Tuts started off the day
with a 3-2 victory over The Gang, then bombed the Roadrunners 16-2
bumped Flavet H 12-4, edged the Civil Engineers 6-S, and the Old
Timers 2-1. The Tuts met the Civils again in the final game of the
day and handed them their second loss to earn the championship,
104. The outstanding defensive effort of the day was turned in by the
Old Timers who allowed only 10 runs in five games.
In softball action on Monday, Meat's Boys beat Agriculture Econ
9-1, Environment Engineers edged South 4 8-6, Hitmen beat the
Snudhtix 8-3, the Civils crashed the Dottbteheaders 16-9, Foul Balls
mauled the SC and BA 17-3, and the Wasps stung the Perverts 23-8,
while the Monster Men and the Meds won games by forfeit.

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Thursday, Awpt 6,1970, Tha Florida AHlpter,

| Student Special
Any car or color!
ISzA!
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 IY.E. 27th Ave.
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DAVE SPAHR
Sports Editor

UNs GmH HIM
The Buffalo Bills of the
National Football League
learned Sunday that Second Lt
Robert Kashi, an offensive
guard, has been killed in action
in Vietnam.
Kashi, on active duty with the
Army, was killed by mortar fire
July 21.
He started nine games for the
Bills in 1968 as a rookie, after
being the team's eighth-round
draft choice.
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Page 19



Page 20

I, Th* Florid* Alligator, Thursday, August 6,1970

Scholarship Rules Change

MARSHALL GALLOP
Alligator Sport* Writer
Cries of de-emphasize athletics can be heard at
many colleges across the nation. But meanwhile
athletic conferences are changing their rules in order
to allow the member colleges to spend more money
on their amateur athletic programs.
For instance, the Southeastern Conference has a
limit to the number of scholarships a member
college can use. These full scholarships can be
broken into partial scholarships so more boys can
receive aid.
A GRANT-IN-AID scholarship is a relatively
simple, yet expensive, item on an athletic budget.
The full scholarship includes tuition house, meals,
books and a sls per month laundry allowance.
Using the UF catalog as a basis of reference, the cost
of a full four year grant-in-aid would be $7320 for a
Florida resident and $10,920 for an out-of-state
resident.
These figures dont include any expenses for
summer school. Coach Jack Hall described how an
athlete goes to summer school on scholarship by
saying, If an athlete has done as he should during
the regular quarters but still needs to attend summer
school in order to maintain eligibility, he must
receive permission from his head coach in order to
attend under scholarship.
There are 77 athletes on scholarship in summer
school this year, at a cost of $450 each or a total
bill for the athletic association of about $34,650.
That would pay for 6930 student tickets.
DIFFERENT conferences have different limits as
to the number of grants-in-aid that are allowed.
Instead of yielding to the growing pressure to
de-emphasize, conferences are upping their

Special Bow Hunt Scheduled

Archery enthusiasts and
primitive weapon buffs will have
an opporunity to test their skill
and hunting ability during a
series of special hunts on St.
Vincent National Wildlife
Refuge this year.
According to the Game and
Fresh Water Fish Commission,
the special hunts are as follows:
October 24-27, bow and arrow
only; November 21-24, bow and
arrow only; December 12-15,
bow and arrow and other
primitive weapons.
HUNTERS will be allowed to
take whitetad deer of either sex,
wild hogs, raccoons and
opossums. The bag limit on deer
will be two per day or three per
season. There will be no limit on
hogs, raccoons or opossums.
Primitive weapons will be
limited to muzzle loading
percussion cap or flint lock
rifles. Muzzle loading shotguns
and cross bows will not be
allowed.
The St. Vincent National
Wildlife Refuge is located on St.
Vincent Island in Franklin
County, approximately five
miles offshore from
Apalachicola. Hunters will be
required to use boats to reach
the island, and overnight
camping will be permitted at
I glims if sty3§ jmmm

designated camp sites. No
vehicles will be allowed.
RECOMMENDATIONS for
the special hunt were made by
the United States Department of
the Interior, who owns and
manages the National Wildlife
Refuge. The Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission adopted
the recommendations and
established the hunt rules at a
meeting in West Palm Beach on
July 24.
According to Commission
Chairman, William M. Blake, this
will be the first primitive
weapons hunt in Florida, and
will give the Commission an
opportunity to determine hunter

Welcome!
FRESHMEN
LsS§2E§ls AND
P^WPARENTS
Today's the day on your busy schedule to visit
your on-campus Bookstore and meet some of the
people whose sole purpose is to serve
you .... introduce you to the textbook division
and make you familiar with the tools of your
college career here at the University of Florida.
Come in....browse around and pick up your
information portfolio with Florida decals for your
I car included.... FREE!
I
" I VnAn lr_ D
UdIHUUo t)lllHl IMrUIWL

scholarship ceiling. "The SEC changed their limit
from a maximum of 125 football scholarships, last
year, to 130 grants-in-aid for the coming season.
The UF will have the maximum of 130 beginning
with the fall quarter. There is no way that 130 boys
can play football at the same time. In order for
university teams to remain competitive they must
keep up in numbers with other schools, and in order
for one conference to maintain prestige with
another, they have to up their scholarship limit.
If the NCAA, which presently has no limit, was
to set a limit of 50 or less varsity grants-in-aid, then
more schools could be competitive and the
money used for those other 80 scholarships
(amounting to $146,000 per year) could be put to
use somewhere more constructive. There would be
fewer perennial league doormats as well, k good
athletic program has an important place on todays
college campus, but a reasonable one has a much
moire realistic one.
ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS
Sport SEC limit on No. of scholarships
grants-in-aid in summer school
Football 130 67
Basketball 25 3
Track 8 3
Baseball 5 3
Golf 3 1
Tennis 3
Wrestling 4

interest in this type of hunting.
No special permit will be
required to participate in the
special hunts on the 12,350 acre
island. Sportsmen will be
required to possess a regular
1970-71 hunting license.
The Commission also
reminded hunters that the hunt
will be for white tail deer, and
that the sambar deer found on
St. Vincent are protected at all
times. The mature sambar is an
extremely large animal with elk
like antlers; however, an
immature sambar might be
mistaken for a whitetail, and
hunters should exercise extreme
care in selecting their targets.

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