Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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UPD PHOTO
THE NEW
... modeled by W. G. Flowers

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UPDs Planning A New Look

By CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Can a policeman be a policeman and not look like
one?
The UF community may get a chance to answer
this question if the University Police Department
(UPD) is given the go ahead for their image-change
plan.
THE SOFT-DRESS uniform is in and the
hard-line look is out for certain police work." UPD
Chief Audie Shuler said.
In trying to get away from the military look, the
new uniform is a dark blue blazer with a UF crest,
white shirt, orange or blue and white striped tie, and
no hat. The trousers would remain the same to help
cut cost.
Shuler said he suspects there are some who have

Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol 62, No. 166

ACTION BEGINS

More Gun Control
Asked By OConnell

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Editor-In-Chief
In the nearly two months
since the committee to study the
removal and control of guns on
campus released its report on
June 1, students checking
parking decals at campus
entrances are the only visible
results.
But UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has not forgotten the
committees recommendations.
In letters to Vice President for
Business Affairs William E.
Elmore, Vice President for
Academic Affairs Frederick
Conner and UF Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder,
OConnell this week asked for
action in many of the areas of
the report.-
HE ASKED Elmore to
appoint a committee within the
University Police Department
(UPD) to seek ways to follow
the intent of the report
encouraging the UPD to
continually examine its
functions looking for
opportunities to handle
functions without guns. The
Committee is to report to
OConnell each quarter.
Another recommendation of
the committee called for
additional training of university
police. OConnell said he had
written the Board of Regents
about a statewide university
training program but that the
budget would not allow it.
However, he asked Elmore to
join with Conner in developing
some additional training which
would be particularly germain to
the problems of a campus
policeman.
OCONNELL ACCEPTED the
committees recommendation
that possession of firearms be
prohibited and asked Elmore to
work out details for a place for
storing and cleaning guns.
For those who desire to use
weapons for their sporting
activities, an appropriate place

The

University oj Florida, Gainesville

should be found for the storing
and cleaning of guns and this
information should be made
known to all campus residents,
OConnell said.
A policy prohibiting
possession of firearms for
faculty is being drawn up by
University Attorney Tom Biggs
for use in either the Faculty
Handbook or a Presidential
Memorandum, he said.
OCONNELL ALSO asked
Conner to explore the possibility

200 Students March/
Demand Black Faculty

See Related Story, page 5
By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
About 200 students led by
members of the Black Student
Union (BSU) marched on Tigert
Hall Monday in the latest of a
series of demonstrations calling
for admission of more black
students and faculty.
BSU Chairman Booker C.
Peek called on all students to
support the organizations
demands by joining in the
demonstrations or writing letters
liiside
. The Gator
PROTESTORS
DEMONSTRATE for more
black students and
faculty members ... page 5
Campus Crier 13
Classifieds 14
Editorials : 8
Entertainment 21
Letters "9
Movies 14
Sports 22

reservations about this change, but he would like to
see it come about very much.
THIS IMAGE .change is an attempt to ultimately
create better relations between police and the UF
community, he said.
Shuler explained that some people object to the
military look of policemen and this plan is aimed at
overcoming this adverse response. There is no
guarantee it will work, but it certainly is worth the
try," he said.
This idea isn't unique to UF the soft dress
uniform is being used in various municipalities and
universities throughout the country.
SHULER SAlDdiis department has been aware of
it for two years and during this time UPOhas done
extensive research on its success and failure in other
SEE "BLAZERS" PAGE 2

Thursday, July 23, 1970

of a study to determine whether
a firearm adds to the deterrent
value of a law enforcement
officer on a university campus.
He also asked the committee
studying ROTC to determine
whether weapons arc needed in
ROTC training.
OConnell turned to Student
Government for action on the
coin mi t tees recommendation
for incentive programs in the
UPD. He asked Uhlfeldcr if SG
SEE "O'CONNELL" PAGE 4

to UF officials and to the
Alligator.
NO STATEMENT on BSU
demands was available from UF
President Stephen C. OConnells
office Wednesday.
In an interview Tuesday, Peek
said UF should accept a quota of
perhaps 300 black students each
year who cannot meet normal
admission standards. These
would be selected from available
applicants on the basis of
motivation and humanistic
involvement, Peek said.
Once admitted, the students
would be subject to the same
academic standards as all others.
IN ADDITION UF should
hire about 15 black high school
teachers the best in the
state who do not meet
formal academic requirements,
but have shown genuine ability
as teachers and concern for the
problems of American society,
he said. These faculty members
would be assigned to teach first
and second year courses in
the University College.
Both measures, Peek said,
would help to counteract
blacks overwhelming
disadvantage in academic
SEE "MOBILIZE" PAGE 4



!. The Florida Alligator. Thuwday. July 23,1970

Page 2

18P 4 m£mm 1 g&^sz^yt%?S^ *?fe % >;> c^vs ; -v?* ;^ f^f/Jn m^<\l\Y^'
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Hands That Create
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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement; involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice-is given to the advertising manager within -(1) one day after the
advertisement appears.. Jhe Florida Alligator will snot be responsible for
more than one incorrect' insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

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Blazers For UPD Police

PAGE ONE^j
police departments.
Six months ago one such new uniform was tried
out on the UF campus. The blazer was rotated
among a few police officers at the checkpoints and
according to Shuler the majority of people
questioned responded favorably.
The main criticism of the soft look has been the
inability to identify police officers from civilians.
THERE ARE dimes when it is necessary for a
policeman to display prominent insignia designating
his position. When such a case exists the police
officer can remove his blazer and his shirt would
have the necessary identification, Shuler said.
Financing has been a problem for the UPD in
getting its plan approved. Shuler estimated the cost
of the blazer at S4O, shirt $7, and tie S 3. The only
expense to the individual officer would be for a new
holster costing under SIO.
There is no intention of hiding the weapon under
the blazer, but only making it less obvious, Shuler
said.
IT WOULD be necessary to retain the current
uniform for police directing traffic at football games

r All that meat and no potatoes? I
Not anymore I
il J 6 ?*** % f 4 > | cBvA V'itCU .vv f
I 1405 S.W. 13th St.
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THE FUN IS IN THE SHAPING
... of soft clay

so that visitors would be able to identify the
officers.
Motorcycle police would also stay with the
regular outfit because of safety requirements such as
the helmets.
ShufeHiopes to be able to outfit about 12 to 15
police officers in the soft dress uniform for a
six-month evaluation period.
FROM THIS we will find out if the change has
been effective, if students like it, and if the new
image has helped to improve police relations on
campus, Shuler said.
The whole point of this exposure period would
be to get response from the people. Shuler
emphasized that he would very much like to have
students, faculty, and staff let the UPD know their
opinions on the uniform.
If the evaluation is favorable then the UPD will
increase the use of the soft look.
Presently there is another new fashion outfit in
the lockers of UPD officers that most people are not
aware of.
It is a navy blue jumpsuit that is used as a coverall
to protect clothes and lessen identity in riot
conditions.
Thats one outfit Shuler hopes his men will never
have to wear.



fc H§MB Tpff'
>|kSH 9H J|Hi
jj| wr ..._ JHHR
MARK HAUSER
ARE YOU A BOY OR ARE YOU A GIRL ?

A difficult question. But, from all indications our
guess would be "yes." How do you vote?

Standardized Test Motion
For Elimination Tabled

See Editorial, Page 8
By ANNETTE BRIN
Alligator Editorial Assistant
In a five-to-three vote late
Monday afternoon the
curriculum committee denied
Student Governments request
to eliminate mass standarized
testing in University College.
The vote tabled the measure
until September.
SGS PROPOSAL came after
an evaluation of the
effectiveness of the testing
program.
Doty is strongly opposed to
elimination of the mass tests.
Doty and the curriculum
committee find SGs request too
negative and void of any positive
suggestions.
"I will not permit mass
elimination of standardized
testing, Doty said. "If the
testing goes, so do 1.
DOTY FIRMLY believes that
the fairest grading is done by the
department rather than the
individual instructors.
Over a period of time 1 have
seen instructors who only give
As and Bs or Ds and Es. I
think this is injurious to the
students'equities, Doty said.
On the suggestion of the
curriculum committee, Secretary
for Academic Affairs Gail
Merein and Student Body Vice
President Henry Solares met
with the UC dean to seek his
opinion,
DEAN DOTY wants to meet
with us again after we have
reorganized the proposal and
added some positive
conclusions, Miss Merein said.
His opposition to the proposal
is a big stumbling block, she
said.
We are going to draft a
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positive proposal to accompany
what has already been done,
Miss Merein added.
Solares finds the committees
tabling of the measure
unfortunate and knows of a lot
of people who have an opinion
about the mass testing but are
afraid to speak freely because of
their administrators.
WE PLAN to place a
referendum on the ballot in the
fall elections concerning
standardized testing, Solares
said.
Dr. James Hodges, chairman
of the comprehensive English
department, declined to
comment on SGs plan but has
been supervising an experimental
program in UC to test the
effectiveness of mass
standardized testing.
Beginning last September we
have had a gradual reduction of
the importance of the mass tests
in the students final grades,
Hodges said.
FOR THE fall quarter 1969,
60 per cent of the students
grades in the comprehensive
English courses were determined
solely by class performance.
During the winter quarter 75 per
cent of the grades were based on
class performance and in the
spring quarter 100 per cent of
the grades were class oriented,
Hodges said.
We have not had any official
reaction to the experiment, but
starting in the fall there will be
an extensive assessment of the
program by students and
instructors who participated in
the program.
There was a student advisory

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committee selected from a group
of freshmen volunteers in the
experimental program and in the
middle of spring quarter they
statejl that they preferred the
idea of having class performance
determine their grades rather
than mass testing, Hodges said.
Dean Doty had no comment
on the experiment.
Berner Named
Interim Director
Dr. Lewis Berner, professor
and chairman of biological
sciences at the UF, has been
appointed interim director of
the Universitys Division of
Biological Sciences.
The appointment, announced
by UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, is effective Aug. 1.
Berner, who received his
bachelors, masters and Ph. D.
degrees from the UF, joined the
faculty in 1946.
___
Senate Delayed
The University Senate
meeting originally scheduled for
today has been postponed until
July 30.
The meeting will be at 3 p.m.
in McCarty auditorium.
More JM Students
NEW YORK (UPI)
Journalism enrollment in the
nations colleges has increased
174 per cent since 1959, the
Newspaper Fund, Inc. reports.
College enrollment in the same
period rose 97 per cent.

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Thursday, July 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



i. The Florida AlUgator, Thursday, July 23,1970

Page 4

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Demonstrations To 'Mobilize

||Trom7age -j]
competition due to the legacy of
racism.
Although some 30 per cent of
Floridas population are blacks,
they are represented by only 1
per cent of the UF student body
and not even a single member of
the faculty, according to Peek.
WHAT SPARKED the
demonstrations was a dispute
over the hiring of a black faculty
member. The matter was settled
after discussions with the college
involved, but convinced BSU
members something had to be
done on a larger scale about
racial imbalances on campus,
Peek said.
The groups first move was a
OConnell
Optimistic
Pipage one 3
would consider something in the
line of an award for the
outstanding law enforcement
officer.
Something more than a
plaque is needed, Uhlfelder said
Tuesday. We would be willing
to help finance a scholarship, or
some other beneficial award.
FRANKLY, HE said, its
almost impossible to enforce
laws against guns on campus.
Uhlfelder said he is against
searcliing dorms or married
housing for weapons, and there
really is no other effective way.
The only feasible method of
enforcement is through
education in the dorms,
Uhlfelder said. Then all we can
do is hope.
Uhlfelder commended
OConnell for working toward
the committees goal, but said
OConnell is more optimistic
about enforcement than 1 am.
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march on OConnells home
Sunday night. OConnell talked
with the marchers, but spoke in
vague generalities and seemed
very much concerned about
discriminating in favor of
blacks, said Peek.
Peek said demonstrations
would go on for the remainder
of the week. Demonstrators will
assemble in Tolbert Area at 4:30
every afternoon.
ASIDE FROM the immediate
issues, the demonstrations are
intended to mobilize students,
both black and white, in the
battle against racism, he said.
Although the waiving of
admissions requirements would
constitute discrimination in
favor of blacks, a history of
flagrant discrimination against
them has created the conditions
that make it necessary, he said.
This country has recognized
that 10,000 blacks are qualified
to go to Vietnam and die for
their country, but their brothers
and sisters cannot go to UF
because of some arbitrary
standards, said Peek.
HIRING A small number of
highly qualified black high

1131 W. UNIV. AVE AND ... IN THE GVILLE MALL I
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school teachers would be an
asset to UF, he said.
Out of 10,000 black teachers
in this state, we can find 15 who
would bring greatness to the
university, in terms of teaching
anything in the first two years,
in the University College, he
said.
White students need the
opportunity to meet highly
qualified black teachers, and all
students would profit by the
hiring of dedicated, involved
faculty members, Peek said.
We are simply asking that
this university take the kinds of
steps that will not perpetuate
the evils of the past, he said.
Advanced
Registration
July 28-31
Advanced registration for the
fall quarter for students
attending the 1970 summer
quarter will be July 28-31.
Academic advisement and the
issuing of departmental
controlled section numbers will
be necessary during this period.

TOM KENNEDY
v X
V M
I Coram Gets Citation I
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$ Directing in-service training for real estate personnel over the
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!:: distinguished service ever presented by the Florida Real Estate
Commission. Coram is coordinator of the continuing education x
:$ at the UF.
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ret lucky at Mister Donut! s r s 0 n it with
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A RARE WAVE
It's not often a surfer gets a
chance at a wave like this one at
Crescent Beach.
But when he does, it's really
great.
Now that the weekend is
coming, hundreds of week day
students will once again flock to
the beach to enjoy themselves as
weekend surfers.



Demonstrators: New Faces, Old Complaints

By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
It was a coming-out party of sorts. White students have
fraternity-sorority rush, pot parties and football weekends
to break them into the swing of college life; black
students have to be more realistic.
SO MONDAY afternoon about 200 black students
began to find out part of what it means to be black at a
predominately white university. They held a
demonstration at Tigert Hall to protest the absence of
black faces in any substantial numbers at UF.
Most of the students who participated in the
demonstration are freshmen involved in UFs Critical Year
Freshmen Program. Their faces are new, but their
complaint is an old one. Others have voiced it before.
Compared to other Florida state universities, UF has
the lowest percentage of black students enrolled. Last
year the percentage was .5 per cent, as compared with 5.3
at Florida Atlantic, 2.1 at West Florida, 1.7 at South
Florida, 1.4 at Florida Tech and 1.2 per cent at FSU.

Walk-Up Post Office
Defeated By Senate
By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
A bill to provide $2,500 toward construction of a self-service postal
center between the J. Wayne Reitz Union and the Mechanical
Engineering building was defeated after lengthy debate in the Student
Senate Tuesday night.
Although the center itself would be paid for by federal funds, Post
Office Department regulations require that a site be furnished with a
foundation and electrical connections, and be located where at least
10,000 people pass by it daily.
PART OF the $2,500 would have paid for a concrete slab with
electric outlets. The remainder would have been spent for landscaping
of the site.
Sen. Ellen Corenswet said the budget and finance committee was
uncertain about the proposed location. Several senators expressed
doubt that 10,000 people actually passed by it in each day.
Others felt the facility would not be of enough value to students to
justify the expense.
A BILL to provide $950 for the Environmental Action Group for
continued recycling of refuse was struck from the agenda. The bill,
one senator explained, was being recycled for the third time.
A bill suspending the deadline for applications for preferential
football seating was passed. Florida Blue Keys application was
approved in last weeks session, after the deadline.

VP Conner Hospitalized
With Heart Disturbance

Dr. Frederick W. Conner, UF
vice president for academic
affairs was hospitalized Tuesday
after what his wife termed a
heart disturbance.
Conner was to have
undergone a medical
examination Tuesday but
became ill before his medical
appointment and was admitted
to the intensive care unit of
Alachua General Hospital.
Hospital sources say the vice
president is doing fair after a
comfortable night last night.
Conner came to UF as vice
president in 1966 and was
appointed vice president of
academic affairs in April 1968.
He served as dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences at
the University of Alabama from
1961 to 1966. Previously he had

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1 f -M
A
FREDERICK CONNER
... 'doing fair'
been in the UF faculty from
1935 to 1961 with a two-year
break for military service during
World War 11.

BLACK COMING-OUT PARTY

Analysis

A COMPLIANCE review submitted last April by the
Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW)
Civil Rights Office in Atlanta critized UF for not moving
fast enough to recruit black students or in hiring black
faculty and administrative personnel.
Progress is being made on these things, UF
administrators say. They say although they are searching,
qualified black faculty and administrators are hard to
come by. And they say luring qualified black students
here is just as hard.
There is a grain of truth in all of this. But, in the past
these arguments have been used to hide inaction. UF
never recruited black students before last year and even
now little is being done about the black faculty situation.
BUT MONDAYS demonstration was not a protest

111 111
THAXTON SPRINGFIELD
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against past injustices. It grew out of a salary dispute
involving a black teacher offered a position here.
The instructor was offered the position at a quoted
salary only' to find after she accepted the job that the
actual salary was substantially lower than the original
figure.
The people who work in Tigert were coming out just as
they normally do. It was 5. Some of them smiled at the
demonstrators, others seemed to frown to themselves, and
some just ignored the demonstrators. The people who
work in Tigert are veterans of this sort of thing, theyve
seen demonstrations before.
Roy Mitchell, the only black adminstrator at UF and
head of the Critical Year Freshmen Program, was standing
near the front steps of Tigert smiling, listening to the
brothers and sisters chant: Give our Black Teachers a
Chance to compete.
White fraternities have their Hell Week, but we've got
our demonstrations, I said to Mitchell. He doesnt say
anything, he just smiles and looks on the demonstrators
with admiration.

Thaxton Springfield,
Religion Prof, Dies

Assistant Professor of
Religion Thaxton Springfield,
55, died Wednesday morning of
bone cancer after battling the
disease for over a year.
Springfield received his
Bachelor of Divinity from
Emory University in 1938. He
was head of the University
Methodist Center from 1947 to

Thursday, July 23,1870, Tha Florida Alligator,

1968 and became Assistant
Professor of Religion at the UF
in July 1968.
Springfield received the
Presidential Medalion Citation in
June 1970 from UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
Springfield is survived by his
wife Molly Rcspess Thaxton and
five sons.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The riertdi AWlfor. Ttiiey.iety 23.1070

Slogan
Contest
Relevant

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./Av *£" *V* Y * S '£* 1 < } *4 \W*O%%
&t~ &f' -'VinWA* II ,V 'l'- /V 4 ' V % '--*
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ifttutw- r ? ,, ts^i ? J f ,
KOMODO LIZARD
.... cute, aren't I?
Number 38-The Friendly Dragon l

The Walter Auffenberg family
had $1.50 in the bank,
dragons in their backyard,
and were half-the-world
from home.
Then, they had no food for a
month on remote Komodo
Island, a dragon bite, amoebic
dysentary and a liver infection
and the nearest doctor and
grocery were three days away by
boat.
AND, THEY ALL Dr.
Auffenberg, the noted
herpetologist at UF; Elinor, his
city-born wife, and sons Kurt,
15, Garth, 6, and Troy, 8,
consider it a great year.
It was. They are safely home
here and are the worlds only
authorities on the Komodo
dragon, the worlds largest
lizard, growing up to 10-feet-long

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3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville. Florida

By RON STEVENS
AWgMar ConrMpondent ;> ,^.
Relevancy is the key word for this
years Homecoming Slogan Contest.
According to Jacquelyn Bolling,'3 AS,
chairman of the Florida Blue Key (FBK)
contest, slogans will be judged on their
ability to inform the alumni about what is
happening at the UF campus.
THE CONTEST began July Ist and will
run until July 31 with the winning slogan
being the theme for Homecoming 7O.
Four weekend trips will be awarded
with the first winner taking his choice, the
second winner his choice and so forth.
One prize is a four day Miami, Freeport
Thanksgiving holiday. The weekend will
include two nights at the Cadillac Hotel
with dinner at the Fountainbleau along

and weighing 250 pounds.
The Auffenbergs formed a
unique family-scientific
expedition to study the life
cycle of the Komodo monitor
lizard (varanus Komodoensis) on
remote Indonesia-owned
Komodo Island.
THEY SUCCEEDED with a
happy ending for them and for
the dragons.
The dragons, feared to be
nearing extinction, are in far
better shape than expected,
numbering 2,000 to 5,000 rather
than only 1,000 according to
Auffenberg, professor of
zoology at UF and chairman of
the Department of Natural
Sciences at the Universitys
Florida State Museum.
All the Auffenbergs hope to
return.

with a two day trip to Freeport aboard the
Cadillac Hotels ship.
" ANOTHER PRIZE is an all expense
paid weekend vacation to the Andros
Beach Hotel in the Bahamas.
The third prize is a three day
Colonnades Golfers Delight in West Palm
Beach. The winner will stay at the
Collonnades Beach Hotel with all meals
included and where he can play West Palm
Beachs PGA golf course as much as he
desires.
The fourth prize is a three day play day
in West Palm Beach at the Holiday Inn
with an ocean front room. Meals include:
breakfasts at Howard Johnsons, Benneys,
Testes; lunches at Petite Marmite, Juniors,
Ta-boo and dinners at Marshall Grants,
Voi Sin, Palm Beach Kennel Club,

What will they take?
Spices! sighs Mrs.
Auffenberg. We thought we
were going to spice island and
I couldnt find anything we
recognized or that they
recognized by the Indonesian
names we had been taught.

woods

Fine Arts Degree
Passes Committee
A proposal to offer a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) Degree enabling
students to study the theater as an art to theater majors has been
passed by the University Curriculum Committee.
Although the theater department would still be within the College
of Arts and Sciences, the degree would be offered through the College
of Architecture and Fine Arts.
THE PROPOSAL must be approved by the University Senate in
their next meeting, probably sometime this summer.
The new degree would be pre-professional and would concentrate
on a core of theater courses involving approximately 90 hours. Added
to this would be courses of specialization as well as in English, art and
architecture.
In essence, the theater division of the speech department will
continue as a branch of the College of Arts and Sciences, said Dr.
Leland Zimmerman, head of the theater department.
A COMPUTER AINT US
it also aint a
copy editor circulation manager
photographer business manager
artist advertising manager
creative staff writer (as you can tell by our advertising)
BUT WE NEED 'EM 'EMESPECIALLY
ESPECIALLY 'EMESPECIALLY YOU
FUHMDA ENGINEER MAGAZINE
Room: 531, Joseph Weil Hall, phone 392-0993
... or just slip a note under the door

oHares. Four activites are alio planned;
Lion Country Safari, a morning fishing
trip on a sea yacht, golf at Breakers West
and Flagler Musuem.
EVERYONE is eligible to enter except
for FBK members and their families and
people working with Homecoming.
Entrees can be mailed or brought to the
FBK office, room 312, Reitz Union.
Juding will begin Aug. 3 with the
winners announced Aug. 7. In case of a tie
the earliest postmark wins.
Judges for the contest will be Steve
Zack, ILW, president of FBK; Jeff
Warren, ILW, general chairman of
homecoming; Sherri Cox, 2UC, publicity
director; Miss Bolling, 3AS, chairman of
the slogan contest and Ed Barber,
operations manager for student
publications.



Gator Growl
Remains Free
By SOB WIS
Alligator Staff Writer
A tentative plan for charging admission to Gator Growl was
scrapped last Monday when UF President Stephen C. OConnell
pledged $2,889.13 from the concessions fund to pay an outstanding
bill to the Plants and Grounds Division from last years homecoming.
The plan was discussed in a coordinating meeting between members
of the homecoming committee and the homecoming advisory
committee.
HOMECOMING Committee Chairman Steve Zack described the
plan as a possible last resort to cope with rising costs, fixed income
and chronic overspending by participating fraternities and sororities.
For a charge of 50 cents for students and children and $1 for others,
Gator Growl would have featured a nationally known entertainer,
possibly Bob Hope.
The projected $5,000 profit would have made the difference
between having a homecoming and not having a homecoming, said
committee member Jeff Warren (prior to OConnells action.)
FRATERNITIES, sororities and other groups tend to submit the
same budget year after year, without allowing for rising prices or new
expenditures, Warren said. Accounting is stricter than in the past, and
the funds made available for homecoming have not kept pace with
increasing costs.
The committee also presented several ideas that were being
considered to make homecoming more relevant and more
successful.
One suggestion was for all campus groups to join in a
university-wide service project, to be held prior to homecoming week.
This would answer charges that homecoming as was not relevant, and
demonstrate that students can work together toward a constructive
goal, members said.
OCONNELL suggested every campus group present a program for
the alumni on the theme this is our university, to show them what
student life was really like. The Saturday morning reunion may be
replaced with individual college reunions featuring distinguished
college alumni. The idea will be presented to the next meeting of the
council of deans, Zack said.
Other suggestions included eliminating parking on University
Avenue during the parade and providing a guided tour of the campus
afterward.
Alens Short Hair
Barbers Delight
By TOMMY LANEC
Alligator Correspondent
As hemlines continue their upward flight to the dismay of
designers, mens hair length has also started to rise, to the delight of
local barbers.
The long hair almost killed us, said UF Union Barber Shop
owner, Wayne Barker. It seemed to have reached a peak last fall and
winter, he said.
BARKER INDICATED last year was his slackest year in the barber
business.
According to Ralph Davidson,also a barber at the Union, business
began to significantly increase in late January and early February of
1970.
The extremely long style is limited to probably not more than two
percent of the students,continued Barker.
STUDENTS SEEM to be more style conscious, and the latest style
from Europe is a full cut, but not extremely long.
Many students come in for a trim. They dont want short hair, but
they dont want it shaggy, either, said Barker.
When questioned about the effect of long hair on the business of
the Gator Barber Shop near the Westgate Shopping Center, owner
Curt Samples replied, It hasnt hurt us too much, because our
customers are from more urban areas.
BARBERS AT BOTH shops stressed the importance of regular
customers. Tom Phillips, a barber at Gator Barber Shop indicated
over half his customers are regulars.
Davidson, a transfer from the FSU Union Barber Shop, said. Wc
specialize in giving the customer the type of haircut he wants. If he
only wants an eighth of an inch off, that s what we take otf. If he
wants a crew cut, well give him a crew cut.
LakeWauburgs Hours
Summer hours for Lake Wauburg are 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday
through Friday and 9 a.in. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The area is
closed on Monday.
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Thursday, July 23,1370, Th# Florida AJHfator,

Page 7



Page 8

I. Th Florida AWgrtor, Thursday, July 23,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Carl Albert Has Surprises

WASHINGTON Carl Albert,
the half-pint Oklahoman who
will take over as House Speaker
next year, has been portrayed in
the press as a nice guy.
Amiable, ailing and
noncontroversial, he is expected
to serve a brief, bland term at
the pinnacle before he is put out
to pasture.
THOSE WHO believe this
dont know Carl Albert.
He has told intimates in blunt
terms that he will rule the House
with an iron hand. He doesnt
intend to let the committee
chairmen, those feudal warlords
who now dominate the House,
to tread on him.
Nor does he plan to wait
around for directions from the
White House. No matter who is
President, Republican or
Democrat, Albert intends to
teach him that Congress is a
separate branch of government.
THE 62-YEAR-old bantam,
who has recuperated from a
heart attack and trimmed down
to a fighting weight, has been
given the doctors approval to
return to full activity. He has
every intention of remaining
Speaker as long as he can be
elected and is able to serve.
Next year, a surprised nation
may find out why Carl Albert is
known back in his home town of
McAlester, Okla., as the Little
Giant from Little Dixie.
* *
The Nixon administration has
introduced a space-age
improvement over the Middle
Age practice of book burning.
At least two government
agencies have used shredding
machines to reduce magazines
they dont like to unreadable
confetti.
THE PEACE Corps destroyed
the March-April issue of its
magazine, Volunteer because
the cover, say insiders, reflected
anti-establishment sentiment. It
depicted three hands held erect
- one flashing the V-for-peace
sign, another giving the
clenched-fist black power salute,
the third showing a pair of
crossed fingers.
The memo authorizing the
dated May 11, was
addressed by public affairs
director Thomas Roeser to

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Executive Editor

Merry-Go-Round
IIM
by Jack Anderson

administrative services direct or
Joseph Czajkowski.
You are authorized,
directed Roeser, to dispose of
the 60,000 copies of Volunteer,
which are being held at Editors
Press, in the manner which you
have suggested.
THE APRIL-MAY issue of
Vista Volunteer magazine put
out by the Office of Economic
Opportunity, was also mulched
because of a controversial cover.
Negroes, Orientals, Indians and
Spanish-Americans were
photographed with their heads
peering over carnival-type
cardboard cutouts of a
businessman in a pressed suit
and a housewife in a print dress.
The graphics were designed,
presumably, to portray the
communications problems that
exist between white Americans
and minority groups.
Peace Corps spokesman Jerry
Brady denied that the magazine
was really destroyed since the
articles were used in a
subsequent issue. But he asked:
Why print a black power
symbol on the cover of a
government-paid magazine?
There are some people who
thought it would be
misunderstood on the Hill.
OEO SPOKESMAN Louis
Churchville asserted the Vista
magazine had been emasculated
because of propriety and
unrelated graphics.
He said: The graphics were
in very, very poor taste. They
were not supportive of the
articles.
* *
The Defense Department is
actively considering bankruptcy
proceedings as the best way to
save Lockheed Aircraft, the
aerospace giant, which ran up
the cost of the CSA transport
plane until it became a national
scandal* : ; i. >
THE IDEA of forcing
Lockheed into a reorganization
ui\der the Bankruptcy Act was

Les Gardieff
Managing Editor
Fred Vollrath
News Editor

Alligator Staff
Dave Spahr
Sports Editor
Annette Brin ban Vining
Editorial. Assistant \' Campus Living Editor

brought up last month at a
secret session of the House
Defense Appropriations
Subcommittee.
Chairman George Mahon,
D-Tex., confided to his
committee members that
Undersecretary of Defense David
Packard has been in touch with
us in regard to the Lockheed
Company. The company has
been mismanaged to some
considerable extent in recent
years. But the Defense
Department said we cannot
afford to see Lockheed go down
the drain.
Then the powerful Mahon
launched into a rare private
plaint: People come to the
Congress and say, We want a
certain defense program, the
ABM or CSA or the F-l 11. They
say, lt will cost so much. You
have faith, and things will work
out. Almost invariably, our
witnesses are too optimistic and
things do not work out.
FROWNING DARKLY,
Mahon continued: We got into
war in Vietnam. There are those
who said to Congress, We .can
work this out. Just have faith.
Look where we are today.
Joining in the dialogue,
Assistant Defense Secretary
Barry Shillito said: It is entirely
conceivable that should
(Lockheed) not insure the kind
of management we feel is
necessary, there may be no
choice except some kind of
reorganization.

EDITORIAL
So Long,
Dean Doty!
One hundred twenty-five thousand dollars is an awful lot
of money to waste.
Especially when, from many indications, this money is
hurting rather than helping, the UF student.
But that seems to be just what University College officials
are doing when they fork out that much money for mass
standardized testing.
Seems weird doesnt it?
University College Dean Franklin Doty said he believes
the fairest grading is done by the department rather than
the individual instructor.
This leads us to believe he doesnt trust his teachers. If
that is the case, why not just get new teachers instead of
penalizing the student through standardized tests?
One of Dean Dotys arguments has been that students are
proposing the elimination of standardized testing, but not
proposing any positive solutions.
We think a system whereby the classroom teacher
provides the entire grade for the course is positive.
Each section could be designated either an essay
section or an objective section.
Both students and professors would be made aware of
which section was which. Students who would rather take
essay tests could do so and those who prefer objective tests
could sign up for a section offering objective tests.
In most comprehensive courses, class tests and grades are
given anyway so professors wouldnt really have any extra
work.
Therefore, we just cant understand the reluctance of the
UC officials to make these class grades the entire grades.
After all, the person who can eeny, meny, miny, moe
the best isnt necessarily the best educated.
But you certainly couldnt tell that from UC tests.
'lf the theory under which they operate is the same as the
man who hits his head against the wall because it feels so
good when he stops, then maybe its time they stop.
We sure could use that $125,000.
Library and audio visual materials are only two of the
possible uses. Wed be willing to bet there are millions more.
Dean Doty said if standardized tests go, so does he.
Wed be sorry to see you go, Dean Doty, but nobodys
indispensable.
/ love you that way step back little more to the left

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89. Busi Business,
ness, Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82, 83 or 84.
Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florid* Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.



Mrs. Alma Bethea, the
Alachua County Registrar of
Voting, is one of a breed of
petty functionary bureaucrats
that permeate our federal, state
and local government. The type
who do not serve but hinder the
public. She has taken it upon
herself to deny UF students the
right to vote in this county.
I think Student Government
and Administration have been
too easy in its dealing with her.

/ mi
/JM V
f Permanent Resident'
EDITOR:
Having gone through the permanent residence requirement,
myself, last week, 1 can understand how Steve Uhlfelder, his wife and
Phyllis Gallub feel. However, getting registered is not as difficult as
they imply that it is. Getting your automobile tag in Alachua County
is a factor.
How many students pay property taxes or any other taxes to
Alachua County? But getting your auto tag or license in Alachua
County is not the sine non quo to being registered!
THE PERMANENT residence requirement is Certainly a lot less
harsh and inflexible than they say that it is.. One of Mrs. Betheas
assistants agreed with me that if I had a hypothetical job with Sears
and Sears offered me a promotion somewhere else I had the perfect
right to move from my permanent residence any time that I felt
like moving.
Under conditions this flexible, I see no reason why Steve Uhlfelder
could not bring himself to swear to the aforementioned requirement.
JOHN HARRELL

Speaking Out

Our Free Press Most Vital Asset

Republican Gubernatorial
candidate Jack Eckerd last week
told NBC to fire star newscaster
Chet Huntley because of his
unflattering remarks about
President Richard Nixon.
Eckerd, King of a Florida
drug store chain he created in
the grandest Horatio Alger
tradition, says Spiro Agnew is
right when he charges that
network news slants coverage to
discredit any conservative
thinking.
AGNEW AND his newest
Florida disciple are calling for a
sort of government or industry
induced gag to be put on
broadcast news. Apparently
newscasters should be allowed to
say only what isgood for the
country and, the
administration in office, thank
you, will make the decision on
what is good.
Obviously theyre unfamiliar
with the basic guarantees apd
safeguards of the 1 political
system which must, by its

Alma Assisting Radical Left

If Mrs. Bethea will not change
unless ordered by a court to do
so then SG and the UF
Administration should
immediately institute a suit.
It is members of the
establishment such as her,
who add legitimacy to the
radical revolutionaries cry that
the system is unresponsive. In
the fall thousands of freshmen
and transfer students will be

Ive been with Nixon socially; I've traveled with him in
his private plane; Ive seen him under many conditions. The
shallowness of the man overwhelms me; The fact that he is
President frightens me. Chet Huntley in Life Magazine

nature, tolerate theirs and any
other political thinking. One of
the most effective pieces of
built-in life insurance that this
democratic government has is a
third party in the two party
system a free press.
The constructive record of a
free and unbridled American
press is unsurpassed in world
history. The right to comment
on and criticize the government
in power is basic to that. This
very criticism has led to the
popular defeat of many
governments by a voting public
better informed through the
press.
CHET HUNTLEY obviously
feels that the Nixon sold tp, the
American people by professional
image builders' is not the real
man. The real person, Huntley

coming to campus. The Radical
Left will be competing with the
Libertarian Right to win them
over.
All the Radical Left will have
to do is say, If you dont think
the establishment is rotten to
the very core, just go down to
the courthouse and try to
register to vote. They have
made their case andAlma
Bethea has created an instant
radical.

Students Need
Princeton Plan
EDITOR:
I would like to remind President OConnell, Chancellor Mautz,
President Uhlfelder, The Florida Alligator editors, and all others
opposed to the Princeton Plan of two things.
First, many students have no way to effectively express their
opinions because they are not old enough to vote. There are two
possible alternatives to this situation. Students can collectively
demonstrate and/or try to individually influence others who are able
to vote.
SECOND, WHILE it is true that most people do not have the
opportunity to devote a week to politicking, they do have a very
successful substitute. Most interest groups, including labor, industry,
military, and professional organizations, have full time lobbies that
push their interests all twelve months of the year. So while most
individuals cant personally lobby, their interests are still being pushed
via a professional lobby in Washington.
Students are not organized and cant employ a full time lobby. The
Princeton Plan would give students one week to personally lobby for
their interests. This plan is one alternative to massive and possibly
violent demonstrations.
Are you so afraid of the effects of a one-week student lobby that
you would rather accept the responsibility for continued
demonstrations which are, at present, the only method most students
have for influencing public opinion?
FREDERICK REPLOGLE, 4FY
lAlachua County Not Worth Its
| EDITOR: $
$.
Re: the front page article on Alma Bethea, appearing in the
July 16 issue of the Alligator: Phyllis Gallub wields with
efficiency and grace the razor of delicate sarcasm. One word
::! suffices: Beautiful! As Cuthbert J. Twilly once said, Anything |:|
worth having is worth cheating for. As I once wrote, Alachua
County isnt worth cheating for.
$
::! ALLEN PIERLEONI ji;

feels, is not qualified to be
President.
As a newsman familiar with
the President and the
administration he is infinitely
more informed than a flag
waving drug store executive on
the nations political outskirts.
As a citizen and voter he has
every right to comment,
especially the right to public
expression of those comments.
Os such things democracy is
made.
Anyone who feels the
American press is a liberal
breeding ground need only read
the 19th century politics of
J acksonvilles Time-Union or
Orlandos Sentinal. A liberal,:
thinking newspipef is aYdffty. j
EVEN IF the press were
biased to the left, it would still

Keep Right

She is their unwitting ally and
will have no one to blame except
herself if the radicals succeed
and bring the government down

by Ken Driggs

compare favorably with the
Nixon administrations
think-like*we-do-or else attitude
in every level of cabinet and
administrative work. Purging of
public officials with liberal
leanings has become a regular
house cleaning chore for this
administration.
The temptations to assault
Eckerd for this and other
somewhat dictatorial thinking is
great. But the most effective
slam of all is at the polls, either
in the GOP primary or in the
general election. Any hopeful
candidate who would even
consider abridgement of the free
press is a threat to democracy as
America knows it.
It Ts hard to keep a straight
face when political candidates
scream for states rights and a
strict interpretation of the
consitiution, then ask for
controls of news comment.
Such a candidate is the drug
store 1 king. Vote against Jack
Eckerd.

Thursday, July 23,1970, Th Florida Alligator,

by Fred Vollrath

around her ears.
WHILE A law suit might be
the only way students will be
able to register, Mrs. Betheas
days of having this power are
numbered if the student body
works together.
We must begin now to prepare
for the date when 18 years olds
become eligible to vote, January
1, 1971. On that date I am sure
the county of Alachua will fall
below having fifty percent of the
eligible voters registered to vote.
Under the Voting Rights Bill
that means we can request
Federal Registrars to come into
this county and register us,
therefore by-passing the powers
that be in the local court house.
I HAVE talked briefly with a
professor of constitutional law
at the Law School who has had
vast experience dealing with the
obstinates of petty individuals.
In his opinion it would be
politically improbable that the
Justice Department under
President Richard Nixon, will
send registrars into the South
and give us the help we need.
I hope he is wrong.
Belief in Civil Liberties and
civil rights is not the exclusive
concern of the political Left.
Nothing is more fundamental to
the system or the establishment
than the right to vote.
IF THAT right is denied,
those who deny it are not in a
position to criticize the victims of
their arrogance when they go
outside the accepted channels of
power. Libertarian Right will
not be backed into the corner of
defending the denial of the right
to vote.
I am asking the local political
leaders to publicly join with
the students who wish to
register. If the local political
powers wish to deny us the right
to vote, then they have justified
many of the radicals claims.
Addiu
UiMm
j>li gnisnoriJus omsm sril
Thete is HO hope for
the complacent man

Page 9



Page 10

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 23,1970

!
\R. >X R-B %k IH.*B
*| s ~ Sg CallffffeM/iH? sS::^l
H__BttdM -il/Kv sacas; r.
1 xJi 1 ; M"hl Sul tiKT/Hl sanssa =
|pg ll lygbriH w
PUBLIX!, Jewish Rye ...... se
\JC #1 White Shrimp "' M / Orange Juice.. 3 .... 69*
,, |U TrMt
SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT. cAiflTrnlrT N .7; Q
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE .. Rj|9g{Hmaviynu|e*iapfqjniMa|Rqm K T I T [j 'y Lemon Cream Pies 7r 29
ZS!!!! Green Peas ."S: 39*
Sirloin Steaks
f re sen
Swift's Premium Preten fFish Sticks e eek 69*
Key Club Steaks z $ 1 29
_ .... _ V |A SBM Breen Stemp* Ceepee)
Premium Preten Sonelest lep
Swift's Premium Preten Grillin' Good Rem Ouut %& O^t.
Chuck Steaks z 89* 65 < -**'""' w
_ Swift'* Premiem Skinle** llilll iis:'<'l>M^^^^E i
Swift's Premium Preten Bone-In Ljllk SfIUSQ9e ,2 ***- j c [
SOU Dasiee per VOC Swift'. Premiem Beeete**
KOI # Hostess Hams 7 *1 \*&mk&iui^^B
Swift's Premium Preten Boneless Swift Premiem WefecTkin (Beef. Hen er Terkey) V
Imperial Roast r 99* -ffi
Beef Roast ::: s l 9 Sz£z? nti s : w
Swift's >remiem Preten Beef Sliced Picnic W. M O9 Ibs3|||| I
Short Ribs E. r S9 Dinner Franks r£ 69*
1111 ensWeeme^^ne BlillMu..ilii



| 1 ExTR $t
CU ,# -**- TO* mu b.n ** r **
Sharp Cheddar .. ..** /v T u#.L e MMU u-.t^ ft AntWmpiMmt
Wlhil> CkHW tar haty HOir Sprdy * 49 CmMI 3-o*. sis* M*
sffgj 1 * mi / i
Din er Ro,,s 33 / ** .crr m r 7 i * c..........
Grated Parmesan ,:: 95*
Pnwi fWiue Lane
aKSKi r&Sjfi- W0
Delicious Sweet / ""< * / Crest |
Mj>.s3li fie~ 1A AO* / '**> Pur chaM( M u q I Toothpaste I
eeeeee lw for O //Vr "** >** mIT!* 1 1 1 * / m ~ Reg. or Mint 1
U.S. No. 1 All-Purpose white I *****'*' / 6.75-os. size 79c |
Potatoes 5
Pascal Celery .sxl9* / Raj
Orange Juice .-69* / I 1 I |
r ft n n + / v sS t(v )) Yi/ : -. pk*. si.
hem. Uwi bnswuf. 1/epL. /(^isC.VTI y/ITT i 4 <- j
Garden Peas .... 5 .... 99 | \ /? I I [[iTlUwGreenStampsP l
SAVE 25c Del Monte Whole or Stewed #303 ' ** / I
Tomatoes 4 cans j | Assorted I
SAVE 9 Dal Manta
_ a 14-o*. g||( three 10>oz. cans 79c
Tomato Catsup e 2 ba.. 49 l*r
SAVE 1 7c Sweet Treat Sliced W F J eftftttftfteeaeeee^
4 C HHK| IF iflf Ml (OQ^GreenStampsg
Lima Beans 29 SM i I
Cut Green Beans. 4 .... 99*
Pork & Beans ... 7 .... 99* 4cTA~fl |p,ti n if^ji
savi io< Mn. .!. ir -*-"| 111 I l^WGrenStamps |s|
Peanut Butter V 69* J # Tfl l 4 Z f*- 4 1
SAVE ISc Assarted Caters V \ i PUBLIX SUPER MARKETS COUPON > ,7
Viva Napkins *oo 3 9 *. 99 e Jy /"S3NB 9f|c MMMN ; halt 9o"s
SAVE 6c Strawberry WHmS OuP Kr^~^^a
t M Aenwifoa ;Z/ 35* f WITH THIS COUPON WHEN WSggm N * FOSO(TVOS y U you buy a 3 oz jar of extra *---*
Chunk Tuna r." MAXIIHIV.ru o' 0 ' Ifily^H^O
%nWniL lUIHI Mae* \ AT PUBLIX SUPER MARKETS ONLV!
6J y 1 Johnson's
j j p * n r\ #fteftfeeeeaft^M>eAAe<>ftftAAeeeeeX
m&BfijKn ,. Wabwc^W,r | so* El^GreenStampsg
cookies ,4 sr 49* jewel r AMw
if. M / > Breakfast Club
1 - 4tc SAVE 14 Plain or Self-Rising Flour (limit 1, please) | Corn Oil Margarine
Cookies 45 ee. J M | s lk AO* |: 39.
Va|7 Hi quort VUia IVlvlllll G O bag "WV j; 9. |
w j.J Tomato Juice .... 29 SAVE 23t Aitorted rlpvor^Gelatin>
SSH 4 "' jell" 0 10^99* Efil^GreenStampsH
If F/Pr Doq Food O V\ v / 3 -_ n J Sara Lee Cinnamon
\L Biscuit Mix.. 39 Pear Halves 4tr 99 1;
T7 No Sue. M'tady 94*
/ \k 1 1# 2- ( _A SheltPaper " 90 .
jr* Nos # .Mi.dr ts-i-h -4* e Lmten's Teo Jke.* 99 in extra p^i
- w sheif Papery.... -43 |r l j" wil^GreenStampspi
PTTRT TY_ Sj
rI J liljl /\ kr".laik^gi^gpH
9 i" Jewish Pumpernickel Brood 1
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE MALL WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER # i IV-itji'il# 49c 1
1014 N Main Street 2630 N.W. 13h Street W. University Avenue at 34th Street \ 12. iem.M.wtnm
Stow hours 9-9 Mon, thru Fri. 9r7 Sat. II (J InenAnAAAmnAAeAnMimAAAAeAAAAAAAm^

Thursday, Ally 23,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 23,1970

Accent 7l Plans Ambitious Program

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writar
Accent 7l is still months away, but already the
foundations for an ambitious program are being laid by its
staff.
Accent will be different this year.
For the past five years Accent has been confined to
only one week in the winter quarter. This time Accent
will be split up.
WE ARE GOING to have our main program of one
week in the winter quarter, Rodney Margol, Accent
speakers chairman, said. We are also planning a

U.S. Post Office Serves
Community, Not Campus

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Students who miss their mail
on Saturday and wondered who
had done the goofing off in
the post office, might be
surprised and puzzled to find out
that the post office doesnt even
deliver student mail to the
dorms any day.
As a matter of fact, the
system used varies from area to
area. This summer, the Tolbert
and Graham dorms have
different mail deliveries from
Towers area. During the year
Murphree also has another
set-up.
THE POST OFFICE, which
will deliver mail to individual

UF Zoologist Works
On History s Puzzle

Working crossword puzzles
might be good practice for the
budding scientist.
It takes patience, tenacity and
a great deal of mental
manipulation.
Dr. Elizabeth Wing,
zoologist and anthropologist
needs all the characteristics of
the puzzle addict in her work.
She has one of historys great
puzzles to work out.
The puzzle is arranged in 35
boxes in the Department of
Natural Sciences at the Florida
State Museum. In the boxes are
bones of animals excavated from
sites in the Central Peruvian
Andes. And in the bones lie
clues to the account of mans
domestication of animals in the
new world.
Dr. Wing recently was
awarded a one-year $11,900 grant
from the National Science
Foundation for research on
mans use of animals. It is her
fourth major grant from the
NSF since 1961 for the study of
prehistoric mans use of animals.
This summer Dr. Wing had
planned to visit the Andes for
personal excavation of animal
burial sites. But the necessity to
move her laboratory to the new
Florida State Museum on
campus delayed the trip until
next spring.
In the meantime the
devastating Peruvian earthquake
caused giant mudslides in the
areas she had planned to visit.
The largest site were
concerned with was completely
destroyed, Dr. Wing said. We

departments and colleges on
campus, only sends student mail
to the mail room in Building E
(behind Tigert Hall). There,
Monday through Friday, student
mail is bagged and taken to
Simpson, Graham, North, East,
and South Halls and boxed by
University employes.
However, Towers doesnt get
the use of these employes.
The basic reason for this is
when Towers was opened the
work load and hours of the
carrier prevented that carrier
from delivering, said Housings
Assistant Director W. E.
Neylans.
WE (AT HOUSING) have a
messenger responsible for
handling inter-departmental mail

do have some material from
there, but we had hoped to
extract more bones and conduct
comparative studies of that and
other sites.

* t fih' Rularly $1.19, Our large 7-hcl Delicious
I i f! Lemon
I V [L*. Sponge
V,, ffTVLi Cake
8 9
a Assorted Danish Bakery
Large
K Cookies M
39*
j DANISH BAKERY
I *i A <*oiie*ville MoJJ, v g j (
| Special Qrtteut&iNI 372-388$^q T(
I

one-nighter in the fall and one or two days during the
spring.
The theme this year is Challenge of our Dilemma,
and it is a challenge to the problems facing this country
today, Margol said. We are going to try to bring
speakers from various fields to explain how their fields
can help influence todays society.
One of the criticisms leveled at Accent 7O by this
years Chairman Ed Boze was that the speakers were too
repetitious.
THAT IS WHY this year Accent will go after fewer
speakers there were 34 speakers at Accent 7O but
more prominent, Margol said.
Names of the speakers for the program will be released

who transports Towers mail and
the clerks at Towers put it in the
boxes, Neylans said.
On Saturday, the whole
system has been in doubt. Lately
some students have received mail
when others didnt.
The problem is that the mail
room has been hiring students to
deliver Saturday mail to the
dorms and the students either
call in sick or dont show up.
THE M AILROOM has
decided to ask its own full-time
clerks to rotate working
Saturday mornings and have an
afternoon off during the week
instead of hiring students in
September.
Naturally, the Housing
messenger gets Saturday off,
too.
We have provided funds by
which the mail room can employ
someone to deliver on the
weekend. They do the hiring,
Neylarts said.
He could not explain any of
the failures in mail delivery this
quarter because they had not
been reported. Usually, when
someone does not deliver mail
on Saturday morning, he said,
someone calls me or Director
of Housing Harold C. Riker and
complains.

in a few weeks.
Another tentative plan is to sponsor at least one debate
on some subject such as abortion, with its legal and
moral complications, Margol said.
ACCENT 71 might be more controversial than last
years.
One of the plans calls for inviting the nominees from
the Republican and Democratic party for governor and
the senate seats of Florida for a debate during October.
According to Margol, Accent 71 still lacks a programs
chairman, but the chairman will not be selected until the
fall.
Right now we are setting up the base for the
program, Margol said.

| :i
I Tolbert Area Plans |
| Sat. Come Together j
5 !
: The Tolbert Area will come together Saturday for some j:
: music and fun. j:
: Between 4 and 8 p.m. there will be free entertainment for all :
v students in the lawn between the North and East halls. The ji
v purpose: relaxing after the pressure of the summer midterm $
v
: exams. g
: THE ENJOYMENT will be for free, and there will be some j: :
soul, folk, and hard rock for all tastes. £
ij For more information call Wood Foss at 392-8008 or go by jjj
: room 332 in North Hall. §
$ V
, A # X # XvX IvIvI X I X IvXvX X I X*X XVi*i*i*iV,VA # Vtv!?'
Burger Kings
WHOPPER
> ;/
-ar
is a meal
in itself!
The two-fisted
burger at
8 N.W. 16th Ave.



I Campus; Crier I
I SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
|, SUMMER FLICKS AT THE CAMPUS CALENDAR I
I REITZ UNION W Thursday Saturday I
7 & 9:30 July 26 WHAT'S NEW PUSSYCAT? I A Meeting, 357 Union, 7 p.m. ALLSTATE CHOIR, Union I
I 6,8 &10 July 30 KING OF HEARTS 1 jf Law Dames Bridge Club Ballroom, 4 pjn.
kW Meeting, 150 D Union, 8 p.m. Music Department:
7 & 9:30 Aug. 2 SALLY OF THE SAWDUST (W. C. Fields) 1 Muslim Students Prayer Meeting, G ATORLAND FESTIVAL I
6,8 8110 Aug. 4 UPTOHISEARS 1 122 Union, 12:30 p.m. ORCHESTRA, Union I
6,8 8(10 Aug. 5 GREAT CATHERINE 1 n[ Music Department: CONCERT Ballroom, 5 p.m.
i 7 8(9:30 Aug. 11 NO WAY TO TREAT A LADY V \\ OF RENAISSANCE & Music Department: I
7 8(9:30 Aug. 12 THE FAMILY WAY 1 Vfe BAROQUE MUSIC, Union GATOR LAND BANDS
6,8 8(10 Aug. 16, HORSE FEATHERS Ballroom, 8:15 p.m. FINAL CONCERT, Union
I 6,8 &10 Aug. 18 8( 19 THE KNACK tj, Hov Ballroom, 6:45 p.m.
** Union Movie: "Stage Coach,"
Tolbert Area Movie: "A Hat Full Aud,torium 6,8, 8(
of Rain," South Hall Movie p m
Room, 5:30, 8 & 10:00 p.m.
HAVE YOU REGISTERED TO VOTE?
If you are a student who,
1) is over twenty-one
2) has lived in Florida for one year
a 3) has lived in Alachua County for six months |l
You have until August 8, to register to Vote in Alachua County. Registration takes
place at the Alachua County Courthouse on Main Street from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. every
I Tuesday in July and also August 4,5,6. Normal hours on other days is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
Monday thru Friday.
Be Prepared: Here is a sample of the requirements demanded by the election staff.
I* I
(A) Yes, but that should have no bearing on my eligibility.
2. (Q) Do you intend to make Alachua County your permanent domicile?
(A) Alachua County currently is my permanent domicile. Residence is transitory.
Your Home is where you say it is.
3. (Q) May I see your driver's license? (Be sure to have your Gainesville address on
I it. This will be your 'overt act' of intent to live here forever.)
4. (Q) Do you have Alachua County tags on your car?
(A) I haven't bought them yet, (and won't be able to afford them until after the II
I close of registration period.)
5. (Q) How old are you?
6. (Q) When is your birthdate? (You cannot register if you became twenty-one
I after February 8, because by law your residence until then was that of your parents.)
I If you need assistance call Student government at 392-1665.
I INDOCHINA SERIES CONTINUES |
The series discussing the pressing problems in Indochina continues this week with Dr.
I Richard T. Chang, from the Dept, of History, speaking on "Japan and Southeast Asia."
This 2nd lecture will take palce in the Reitz Union July 23,8 p.m. Rm. 361-2.
I A SERVICE FOR S.G. ? I
That's right. A student govt, service that's made especially for your campus || ;
| organization or club. Communication Service Bureau will hand deliver your
organizational materials each Wednesday to the dorm areas. Interested? Call Mark
Barrett, 392-1665.
I | 18 YEAR OLD VOTE I
II The Florida Student Congress is running the statewide campaign to pass the
constitutional amendment to lower Florida's voting age to 18.
Personnel is needed to work on the 18 yr. old vote movement. Secretaries, || I
administrators, and people with ideas are needed. Apply at Student Government ||
Office, 305 J. Wayne Reitz Union. H I
Interested in working in a campaign this fall? If so call 392-1665 for further
information. *1 I
I ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER, MUST HAVE I
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY MONDAY AFTERNOON, 5:00 OF EACH
I WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN THURSDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. I
I THANKS. I
RODNEY MARGOL
- -- i : DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
I j I STUDENf GOVERNMENT k i :- 1

Thunday, July 23,1970, Tha Florida AlKyator,

Page 13



I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
I LUNCH AND DINNER
I MONDAY
| BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI
I ALL YOU CAN EAT TO>
I TUESDAY V
I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
I ALL YOU CAN EAT 99<
WEDNESDAY
I JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK 79>
I THURSDAY and yellow r.ce
I BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS 99<
I FR,D^?\ fish almondine AND FRENCH
I FRIED POTATOES 89( I
r { *sT^

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainearille, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Doodn* -300 pm 2 days prior to (totting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* M n
I lI I l | £
!
. J! O TJ 3 1 J 2
B£g & S 2
|Z ~ z
Q
U1 J. w to
f g- & & & § >
; M *'S s-s -s < I
I Si I*2 lo
~~ ~ IS 3 3
o cl a
iff z
i 3 3
: TO
_ i Q > 3 z
. O 3§ § |
n z r
!a r
/
i I/I
r 30
:::: I Ip
_ _ M w
~ LA i J

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1970 TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLE
TR6R 650 CC. 2100 ml. 376-7421.
311 N.E. 10th St. Call between 5:30
p.m. & 7:00 p.m. $1150.00.
EXCELLENT CONDITION.
(A-st-164-p)
Army officers class a greens and dress
blue uniforms with hats. 250 dollar
value for $l5O call 373-1947 or
264-2856 (size 36 R) (A-2t-165-p)
1957 two bedroom trailer with patio
awning, carpeting, fuel tank & stand
SI2OO buys It all so call 378-1226
(A-st-165p)
Honda 90 1967 step-thru, very good
cond. great for classes or just for fun.
Call 376-9596, afternoons, and
evenings. $l5O or best offer.
(A-3t-165-p)
FOR SALE: Handmade driftwood
bar $125. 5 x 7 6 shelf bookcase
$35 must sell Immediately moving
call 378-7224 (A-2t-165-p)
1967 Bridgestone duel twin 175 cg.
Excellent condition only 8500 miles
S3OO call 378-0477 (A-st-165-p)
German Shepherd puppy white male
8 weeks old. Registered AKC very
friendly. Dog needs a home $75
378-0844 (A-2t-165-p)
1969 Yamaha Enduro. 450 miles.
Full knobby lowered gearing,
excellent woods machine, $650. Call
373-2226. (A-3t-166-p)
FOR SALE: Cheap transport *64
Conver Triumph Herald, $575.
Honda cycles: 305 cc $3lO, *69 90cc,
S2OO, 50cc S9O, call 376-0687 or
392-8075. (A-3t-166-p)
DON'T merely brighten your car*
pets . Blue Lustre
them ... eliminate rapid resoillng.
Rent electric shampooer, SIOO.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-61-IT-C)
THIS IS ITI Alr-conditloned
spacious, fully furnished studio
apartment; gulet area, 3 blocks from
campus; first time rented; carpeting,
cathedral celling, clean, private,
summer rates, sllO. Call 378-1569,
4pm 8 pm. (A-2t-166-p)
Scuba QR volt 3500 lb. tank,
backpack, Heathways 1440 regulator,
fins, welghtbett, tank recently
Inspected, $75 or trade for stereo
eqp. 378-1246. Bill (A-3t-166-p)
18 AND OVER!
I.D. S CHECKED li|f|
lA CL
(juL^X
wicked, at uticktl
to* aLI
leuuiMui axdi
niuJ&eL'ttAuc
wlfrUHLtl feuA

I. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 23,1870

Page 14

FOR RENT
HOLIDAY GARDENS
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1 bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S. w. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Ten rooms graduate men and older
men dose cool utilities washer-dryer
parking 135.00 single 100.00 doiMe
summer 378-8122 376-5652
(B-Bt-157-p)
5 bedroom house 300.00 spacious 2
br. apt. 185.00 2 blocks north of
campus graduate men and older men
available sept. 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)

Reitz Union Auditorium
Pater Salters Peter (Tfoote
Romu Schneider
Q___s
menmm
H BV
H M MM fIV WU Mux
tfIMVWfIvdVjBMP "* t
This Sunday only!
Be sura and see this wild comedy!
7:00 & 9:30,50 cents admission
3rd I
1 T*|>.., IW-KM LmJ I VIII
A ROSS HUNTER Production
AIRPORT I
BURT LANCASTER DEAN MARTIN I
JEAN SEBERG I
JACQUELINE BISSET I
GEORGE KENNEDY I
HELEN HAYES I
VAN HEFLIN I
MAUREEN STAPLETON I
BARRY NELSON I
LLOYD NOUN |
asm asasT I
: flp
I rF^EvK 0 Arlhlj WEY hTSJtER I
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLOR* Product ,o TODD aqfil Ml wiZno
ft Sound Track Album exclusively on OCCCA RECORDS I |lj] Qmrnrm AuJMwcm ij
1 I *o il*bl on S-Trach and Caaaatfr Tapal gfgfe
I FEATURE AT. . 1:46 4:22 7:00 9;38 I
I NOW! rgms^B
4** *-* 4
AT MLIiHiWH
1:52 3:48
5:44 7:45 9:46 W

for rent
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. for both one & two students
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
included completely furnished
Ample parkins swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer ratesl
(B-ts-c)
Available for fall University Apts.
Two bedroom and efflclencys AC,
Pool. Close to campus. 80-140.
376-8990. (B-9t-166-p)
Male roommate wanted. Point West
Apts. SSO til September. 512 S.W.
34th St. Apt. 20. 378-0272.
(B-2t-166-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
|£S;%*:*S*:%-X*X*X*X*X*X*X*X*X*SJ*SX : SSSS:
r urnlshed 1 and 2 br. apts. Quiet and
lecluded. 2901 N.W. 14th St. 2
>locks North of the Mall. Call
172-3981. (B-tfc)
WANTED
Listeners Wanted. Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
tearing. Please call Darlene Weston
>etween 1 and 4 p.m. for an
appointment. 392-2049. (c-tfc)
Two Female roommates wanted for
cool Landmark poolside apt. for fall
and/or Winter, Spring. Call 373-2240
or come by Landmark no. 106 now!
(C-4M65-P)
Law student needs male roommate to
share 1-bedroom Sin City apartment
beginning fall $62.50/mth. Call
Glenn. 373-1742 or 392-1978.
(C-3t-166-p)
Need 4th roomate starting! Fall Qrt.
Starlight Apt. SIOB per qrt. +
utilities. Nice, clean 2 bdrm., central
H/alr. Call Crickett 373-1143
anytime If Interested (C-2t-165-p)
help wanted
Girl looking for apt. with liberal
female roommate. Willing to pay
between S4O and S6O. Call Susan Hill
at 378-6083 or 392-7945 late.
(e-st-166-p)
Can you type well? But don't have a
typewriter or babysitter 8> need extra
funds? I can supply all three call
378-4952 after 6 P.M. (E-2t-165-p)
X-SStS-X
AUTOS
vi-ivXrXrir^XwrrX-XrINrXS-rvvi-x-:-:-
69 Mustang sportsroof 302 cu In V 8
auto trans excellent cond. Must sell
asking $2,200. Call 378-2693 and
leave message. (G-st-162-p)
1965 Cutlass 442', 2 dr. h. t.. Red
w/ air., full power, rebuilt auto
trans., rad., $1195, X/clean, call R.
Byrd at 378-4232 or 376-4479.
(G-3t-164-p)
Van 65 chevy automatic new tires
paint! 800.00 373-2126 call after 6
PM radio (G-2t-165-p)
67 Ford, Falrlane 500 XL, 2 dr. H. t.,,
4 speed w/ Hurst shifter, 4 BBL
Holley carb, full power, air, radio,
new tires, British green, $1895, extra
clean: Call 378-4232. (G-3t-164-p)
1966 Mustang, 289 automatic, good
shape, convertible. Call 378-7432
after 5. Open. (G-st-164-p)
wxXrwXW
>*xX:X:X:^
Having trouble with classes?
Professors forcing you to attend?
Alligator Is Investigating voluntary
class attendance rule. Call 392-1686.
23 yr. old coed wants groovy
travelling companion (s) for Fall.
Destination to be decided by mutual
agreement. 378-7311, anytime.
(J-2t-165-p)
Puppies part bassett, 5 weeks old,
$3 each, 3 males 3 females black and
tan call 378-7331 (J-2t-165-p)

better business 4 ways
Like bringing the product or service to And like making business more responsive
the student. We help thousands of to the needs of their customers. We help
students find what they want through them to find out what the student wants,
advertising.
Advertise in the Florida Alligator.
Like uniting the academic and business
communities. The two worlds most If you've got something to offer...so do we.
students live in come together on our
pages. The
Like letting the student compare before Alllcrntor
he chooses. We help students plan their lonua
time and expenses. We help them save
money. An ACP-rated All-American College Daily
xk.c* p k,t hi BliiiiiiiiiriiiiTi nmu ini i
_

PER SONA
Attention cat lovers! I need a good
home for a yellow striped cat, male,
1 yr. old, well-behaved. Call
378-0494. (J-4t-164-p)
REMEMBER KENT STATE bumper
stickers 10 cents each tax included.
Quantity prices on request. Send 7
cents for postage & handling all
orders under SI.OO. No stamps!
Many other peace, love stickers
available at lowest possible cost. Price
list on request. CUSTOM BUMPER
STICKER SERVICE, P.O. Box 338,
Havana, Florida 32333 (J-st-161-p)
Students who stutter. We need you
for auditory feedback study. Will pay
you SB.OO for 3 sessions. Michelle
Jensen 3 7 8-0104 392-2046.
(J-st-162-p)
The Bent Card Coffee House Is open
Friday, Saturday 8:30 until. Come
see The Folkies. 1836 W. Unlv. Ave.
(J-3t-164-p)
COEDS Facial Hair removed foreve
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologlst 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
figs
LOST <& FOUND
FOUND. Light brown female puppy
approx. 6 mo. old. If not claimed will
send to city pound. Very loveable.
Please call 376-2304. (L-3t-161-NC)
LOST: Brown men's prescription
glasses in vicinity of Union. Call
392-8042. (L-3t-165-p)
" [ Guns -- Guns Guns j
{ Inventory over 500. Buy j
; | Sell Trade Repair. l
, ( Reloading supplies. Layaway j!
* t plan. Harry Beckwith, gun i
] [ dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. j |

SPECIAL EARLY BIRD
125 PRICE SI.OO A CAR
I IF YOU ARRIVE
PHONE 372-9523 BEFORE 8:00
I The most magnificent picture ever! I
nrJl| l
iMffinfcVIVIEN LEIGH [SJI
I mw-lklM LESLIE HOWARD I
llPE^lJoLiva^^y^Npl
I WOTl" : PENTHOUSE 3 I
| -BUTCH THE I I

Thursday, July 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

LOST eSt FOUND
LINDSAY RAE MICKLERM You
left your student picture I.D. in Rm.
330 Union when you picked up your
Seminole. Phone 392-1681.
(L-3M64-NC)
SE RV ICES
X:X*X-X%x-x-x%x-x-x-x-x-x-x:-:-x::::-:-:
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480 (M-ts-c)
THE COPY CENTER 5 XEROX 4
ASK ABOUT OUR CHARGE PLAN.
1718 W. Univ. 376-9334 next to
Malones Bookstore. (M-13t-162-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
thesis, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
Prompt pick-up, delivery. 373-1984,
9-5. (M-St-164-p) h
AlternatorsGenerators Starters
Electrical systems tested and repairs
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 S.
Main (M-ts-c)
j >5 feCingoStarT
in'X& c MagicChristiaii I
Ilf RAQuEL WEICH TECIINICBLBB Issi
I SNO ONE UNDER 17 ADMITTED I
I PLUS COLOR DcLui.
where the heads es all natiens mee A
I 'Alice's I
[REgMJEANTj

Page 15

Km UNION AUDITORIUM
Stagecoach jfeA
(S <~ J W
John Wayne and Claire Trevor Saturday, July 25 at
6:00, 8:00 and 10:00 p.m., Admission 25
cents.

v "
Starts last day I
TOMORROW! DARLING LILT* I
MAN THE THE LAUGHTER
WALT DISNEY Productions fQ/Btlf/ffr I
. Robert MORSE Stefanle POWERS Phil SILVERS |
I toil M.W.IJth St.
I ttetvw&u 9
I FINAL S-MASH Ik f
I WEEK-END My
I D*wwtowi Gwiifivillt |
I 213 W. Umlvtnity 4 LAST DAY .'
STRAWBERRY
W£/7i WltfSmtto STA TEMENT
I i *
i imr. st\ nr. - *"****' ..... .. ?. n -m-*-



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, July 23,1970

>v GFhrjtasia 6tyr\a THRIFTY MAID^^
/J|/ .^^ l '>\ FEATURED PIECE-A-WEEK I I M A II
I 4 /* FRUIT DISH wUWHV*
\ ~**i I ilmM \ _.
* I limit One Sugor W/$5. Order Excluding Cigarette*
CORNED %0
GOOD JULY 23 THRU AUG. 19 Ky ____ M T% t*'
MI 777/s coupon worth $ 2.00 Km BEEF
II VEGETABLE i n QOc BR k I
ip BOWL 1 A 07
I 4.99 I V LBS
CHASI AND SANBORN AU GRINDS . NSH ,, ii ASTO... SAVt 300
rnCCCC "m* 39 s
pimrh aqc
limit One Coffee Order B BOX 111 l
IVORY LIQUID . SAVE 15c
M detergent 48
Two Oid.r HALF
DIXIE DARLING LARGE
MUIR SKCUU
irves 3 S I OO Towels .5 = S I OO
itoes 6 S I OO Beans . 5 1$ 1 00 Klmilir^pTf
>le \y
THHI^MAI^NIAPOIE
@ FresTener.... a 33* ft Baby Food ...... 7< ft Catsup 49* L^^JHLJ
Gatorade ... 3Ss *l* dftt Siam Milk .... " 10* iftt Cleaner ~ 68* KMujgsj|^^^^^^B
B-B-Q Sauce .. T,v 39* X Sauce.. srv *1" gj Softener / 78*
||gP Roof Boor r 49 e Ijgr Mushrooms M OO (p Dog Food .... *1
thtteis GULP HOUSEHOLD DOWNY COMET BATHROOM SIZE 4 FOR 47c
BCl3BSrn=?B Insect Spray .... m 43 c Fabric Softener. *Sr 85 c Cleanser 2 c*£v39 c
i jssmbbv El | Vanilla Wafers is; 41 c Softener....... . L$ l 21 Cleaner 69 c
[i ml *MywM m
giP*afiE4s with coupon -J§ B [lllj STAMK j I 111 iT TW* VAISTstJmW i Evl W VALUE STAMM B Ulw TOPVALUE STAMPS jI [ lIIT
|pr A an# fvbcham m -itn -e-spapeb ceu*o~ e puocnau op I -itn m-wmn coupon an* pwocnmm op J with mwspapii coupon ano puooeam op wmi SmrSSuSim
ns* ,^A)0000000000000000000000000000(Nf W XI USOACHOKE BONELESS I BxKV W-O BRAND PURI SUPERBEAND CREAMED KS9 YDIJMI 'K'tKlO SHRIMP OR CMICKIN
Bool Roost Ground Beef :& Cottage Cheeso I eSSp 8.. f st.ak.tt.. 1 BPS Chew Mein
1 1 11 1 iTftfllP 1 111 1 I N 0000 THRU JULY 3t BhV Nq ? 0000 * U JUIY 29 HHPjH 0000 THRU JULY 7* J GOOO THRU JULY 39 IHSSHf 0000 THRU JULY 39
g m p CrS j Vv(SvwwwVWWTVTVVirBVVir?TV aBI Sn i 3 *^^^^j^BTTyiTTPlhryw*inrinrs~- s~~" B 1
-ben 59 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
LAa .TMMWW 44f,0ftlGH SPRINGS



Quantity Rights Reserved
WINN OIXK STORES. INC -COPVWGHT-1970 / \
/> PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON, JULY 29
f MTtla FLA. FRESH WHOLE GRADE A" or SHIPPED
rs FRYERS %Jft
'ft WHY NOT SERVE HIM DELICIOUS vy fllBB
*"C ECONOMICAL FRYERS TONITE? LB.
FRENCH FRIED PMCH PISH FRENCH FRIED SHRIMP SUPERBRAND INDIVIDUALLY WRAPPED AMERICAN PALMETTO FARMS PIMENTO
Fillets 69' Patties 79' Cheese Food ft 69' Cheese 69'
FRENCH FRIED FLOUNDER FISH CRACKIN GOOD TENDER FORK BONELESS OSCAR MAYER BRAUNSCHWEIGER OR SANDWICH
Fillets 89' Biscuits 6 59' Tenderloins *1 Spread -49'
TARNOW SLICED COOKED OR BREAKSTONE CALIFORNIA STYLE COTTAGE GRADE "A" HINDQUARTERS OF LAND O'FROST CHIPPED HAM OR #
Baked Ham. as. 59' cheese 69' Turkey 39' Turkey 33s S I OO
COPELAND BREAKFAST LINK PORK BORDEN'S CREAM W-£ BRAND LONGHORN SUNNYLAND VAC PAK SLICED PICKLE OLIVE OR
Sausage.... 89' Cheese 23s 33' Cheese 89' Cheese Loaf As. 45'
JSRP\ W-D BRAND PURE "HANDI-PAK *
W GR. BEEF 11 JgSii.
J 1 BRAND GROUND HANDIPAK ROUND USDA W-D BRAND CHOICE BEEF CALIFORNIA -/IT
iMfil^TiSteak... 99 c Roast...
Patties 2 $ 1 69 8r0i1.... s l
1 Roast... $ 1 29 Steak...
IT r H Steak... 79' Steak... *l 3 'NHM |||
SUPERBRAND LARGE
nun SPECIALS *S , ; ftifiALfiupts
. IHHHffi!rdP 3il
Shortcake -M Chips ... ~ 59Mliil'LjimJ. War J ** JI
Sfirim >1 Bar-B-Que >
SCs , $199 S' 3 ; NS s l Cabbage.. 2 49
Shrimp .. ~ i juice .. j 77 1 § ib < rr 1A ...
MORTON 3-COUISE CHICKEN. SALISBURY. BEEF OR HOUSE * US L U Plums... 4 l.s *i #0 Potatoes. 10 79'
Dinners .. 59 c Muffins £ r J #O KAr kr 1 f^atoes.. 29' Whip T... 3 ss*i"
POLY BAG SHOESTRING SARA i ruu
Potatoes. 2# Cake EACH ***" SUPERBRAND QUARTERS 1
Nuggets 3 s l Crusts .. 35 QB MARGARINE K(
LB.
ONIONS 3 IBS Jtk |K THMfTirMAtO lVIINNA
ar. a Giant Tide 75 e Orange Juice 3"-. M OO KgP Sausage
LOWSO-.ENV.APC CatsUD .. 49 c Peaches n can 3o3 29 c AGr. Beans.. 6fSi? S I OO
Sweetner aw an wgaw e os*
Wphccnn nil In s l l3 Pears n ?an /3 53 c Fruit Drinks.... can 39 i OO
ilfeH zees: ms -s. 9 mm jxu ms xzvz. \ jzss m M,lk 10
M ;Hr N ipif H...rrrzr e A Tuna fish .. 3-ss m
9
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS ; 1401 N. MAIN ST. WWK Corn .. .trig 1 M
' MfsA w fc ,Jf

Thursday, July 23,1970, Tha Florida AMI gator.

Page 17



Page 18

i, Th* Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 23.1970

Withdrawal: 'Peace For Us Not Them

By Alligator Servicas
Russell Ramsey of the department of
history spoke on U.S. Involvement in
Indochina Monday evening at the first
of a series of six lectures on Indochina
sponsored by Student Government and
the Indochina Crisis Committee.
Ramsey an expert in guerilla warfare,
has instructed ROTC at UF and has
served in Vietnam.
THE UNITED States has not learned
that the Vietnamese are an armed social

New Regulations Effect
UF Career Personnel

Beginning Aug. 1 all new University of Florida
Career Service employes will be paid biweekly.
These employes will be placed on the current
post-certified biweekly payroll plan that is, they
will work two weeks, be certified and receive pay
for that period two weeks later.
TOTAL CONVERSION for all current University
employes, including faculty, staff and students, to
the biweekly payroll plan is expected to come in
about six months, or next January.
Currently, all Career Service employees are
pre-certified, or receive pay at the end of the
month for that months work. With conversion to
biweekly payroll, all such employes will be
post-certified and receive pay two weeks after
certification of time worked.
The Office of Administrative Affairs has said the
conversion will be accomplished over a period of
several weeks in order to alleviate any financial
hardship on employes during the period of
changing from pre-certified to post-certified
situations.
FACULTY MEMBERS, academic appointees paid
from Other Personal Services (OPS) budgets and
administrative and professional employes will be
paid on the last day of the biweekly pay period.
Standard deductions such as Federal Withholding
Tax, Social Security, State Retirement, Teachers
Retirement and Credit Union contributions will be
withheld every pay period when total conversion is
completed in about six months.
Deductions for Blue Cross-Blue Shield and
professional insurance will be withheld each pay
period except when there are three pay periods in
one month. Then no deduction for these insurances
will be withheld during the first period of that
month.
FOR THOSE persons who have accident
insurance, disability insurance, term life insurance
and variable annunity and Prudential Life Insurance
Co. annuity plans, deductions will be spread over
10 pay periods, from January through May, for
nine-month employes.
Vice President for Administrative Affairs William

Burger Chef
to please
the student!
715 NW 13th St. WffS j
* 9 &l*M trl*
and 1412 N. Main St gfig / J

PROFESSOR RAMSEY TELLS AUDIENCE

culture, according to Ramsey.
The Vietnamese more than any other
people are totally conditioned by war,
he said. Os all the people on earth, their
villages are among the best defensive
bastions of social armed defense.
Ramsey advocates the withdrawal of
American troops from South East Asia
over the period of one year, followed by
economic support for the South
Vietnamese.
THE VIETNAMESE are tough even
though they may appear to be pacifist

E. Elmore lists these advantages of the new plan:
reduction in number and types of payroll; a
single type payroll will be processed;
the timing of payroll information submission
will be on a more regular basis, stabilizing work flow
in departments;
9 cash flow to employes will be 26 rather than
12 times a year, and
9 a basic, single type of payroll system will
facilitate understanding, training and maintenance
for both employes and management.
The conversion is in compliance with various
state rules and regulations as well as the Federal
Wage and Hour Law. All other state agencies are
either currently on a biweekly payroll system or in
the process of developing such a system.
In other developments UF employes may take
up to six credit hours of course work with tuition
fees waived beginning in the fall, according to a
report from the Board of Regents office.
ALL UF EMPLOYES with the institution at least
six months who meet entrance requirements may
enroll for a maximum of six quarter hours on a
space available basis. Everyone is required to pay
the $lO application fee if he has not been enrolled
previously.
Those employes on the wage and hour law who
are required by a department head to take courses
may count the time spent in class as time worked.
Others who take courses at their own discretion are
not permitted to consider class time as hours
worked.
ALTHOUGH THE deadline for filing application
for admission to UF in the fall for the first time was
July 17, exceptions will be made for staff and
faculty members. They are encouraged to submit
their applications as soon as possible.
The deadline for applying for readmission also
was July 17, although individuals still may be
admitted beyond that date by filing a petition for
admission.
The deadline for applications for the winter for
both admission and readmission is Nov. 20.

and rather simply armed, he said.
The idea that has been popularized by
the peace movement that if we would
withdraw there would be peace in
Indochina is rather naive because they
have never had peace except for a few
accidental periods, Ramsey said.
He also felt that the domino theory of
South East Asia was invalid.
COUNTRIES SUCH as Cambodia do
not have an effective centralized system
of government. Therefore, the major
problem for a conquerer is not
overthrowing the government, but the

Two Heated, Lighted
Pools Due By January
Two student swimming pools will be built on campus, hopefully to
be completed by the end of December.
Dr. Harold C. Riker, director of housing, stated that a $126,000 bid
for the construction from Cox Craft Co. of Birmingham has been
accepted by the Board of Regents. The final cost of the pools is
expected to run as high as $150,000.
"THE CONTRACT is being written up now and if construction can
start within a month the pools should be completed by the end of this
year, Riker said.
Both pools will be heated and lighted. One will be built behind
Graham and Trusler Halls and the other near Broward Hall. The
housing office will have the responsibility of maintenance and
supervision of the pools.
Welcome!
FRESHMEN
Today's the day on your busy schedule to visit
your on-campus Bookstore and meet some of the
people whose sole purpose is to serve
you introduce you to the textbook division
and make you familiar with the tools of yQur
college career here at the University of Florida
Come in browse around and pick up your )
information portfolio with Florida decals for your
car included.... FREE!
EB Campus Shep& Bookstore
1 r * * Rotate# in
Phone 392-0194

development of a government.
If you want to call the withdrawal of
American troops a political goal,
Ramsey said, call it that, but it is not
peace.
It is peace for us, not necessarily for
them at all.
The next discussion in the series will be
held tonight at 8 p.m. in room 361 of the
Reitz Union. Dr. Richard T. Chang from
the department of history will speak on
the topic of Japan and South East
Asia.



;|i' 1
JTe Care
i

bn
1 LI. ANN PAGE*MUELLER
Egg Noodles 39C| 430 | 40
B. ANN PAGE MUELLER
Macaroni 2501 290 | 40
1 LB. ANIL PAGE MUELLER
Vermicelli 2501 2901 40
7-1/4 OZ. ANN PAGE KRAFT
Spaghetti Dinner 2901 330 i 40
is OZ. A&P COFFEE MATE
Coffee Creamer 750 \ 790 |4O
TALL AAP CARNATION
Evap. Milk 14C| 17 t |3O
21QT. ALP CARNATION
Inst. Dry Milk $2,291 52.43] 14C
m
IS OZ. SUPER RIGHT HORMEL
Chili W/Beans 390 | 47c |6O
]2 oz SUPER RIGHT LIBBYS
Corn Beef S9C | 670 | 80
15-1/2 OZ. SUPER RIGHT ARMOUR'
Com Beef Hash 450 530 80
1 12 OZ. SUPER RIGHT SPAM
Luncheon Meat 670 690 20
24 oz SUPER RIGHT ARMOUR
Beef Stew 6501 690 | 40
l/2'S A&P BUMBLE BEE
Chunk Light Tuna*34ol 450 | 110
i
IS 1/2 OZ. A&P KEN-L-RATION
Dog Food *l6o| 180 | 20
2J OZ A&P KEN-L-RATION
Dog Food *2so| 290 | 40
34 OZ. A&P PRIME
Moist Dog Food 770| 990 | 220
7 OZ. A&P PLEDGE 1
Furniture Polish 4901 930 I 440
ll'S BRIGHT SAIL S.O.S.
Scouring Pads 2501 310 I 60
i OZ. A&P WIZZARD
Air Freshner 3901 590 | 200
GALLON A&P CLOROX
Bleach 2901 610 320
14 OZ. A*P .STAFLO,
Spray Starch 390 490 100
25 CT. A&P HEFTY
Garbage Bags 3901 490 | 100
CT. A&P BAGGIES
Send. Bags 29C| 3SC | SC

:
Armour Meat Sale!
Potted 5 oz.
Meat can pUMI
Vienna 5 M for S 1
Sausage con (A only
Deviled 3 ox
Armour Corn Special!
BEEF HASH 49 'a
Delicious Special! J|||||HHrJJ J|||||HHrJJARMOUR
ARMOUR J|||||HHrJJARMOUR TREET .-61
Allsweet A a
MARGARINE .* 37
POTATO CHIPS 33 c frl m
ES CRACKERS 49 C § Pillsbur y Rout |
SALTINESi# 4T
Hivim I >k> 31 Limit 1 .w/SI.OO tr men e>4*> £
UWI U,y A"I A uL. Ceegen OeW TSn Jot, . 170 Jfi
CORN MEAL.# 21 .**.*.ewivee>

T& *PBREAKS THE PRICE BARRIER...
Low Low Prices Plus Plaid Stamps

MIB|wIBIIV J A B I BH T M
. B H I 1 B Bill B. B B B J 1 B M B
|l|lkml 111 B w b B B M 888 1 m

That has been our basic dedication for over a century. A&P has
always offered famous National Brands at money-saving prices.
Over the years, A&P has developed their own line of quality prod products
ucts products available at savings that are significant in today's economy.

Price* in this ad are good
through Tuesday, July 28,
1970. If unable te purchase
ony advertised item, please
request a rain check.
QUANTITY RIGHT RESERVED

i mmmrnmm
OZ. .A&P MINUTE MAID
Orange Juice 3301 53c 1200
110 A&P BIRDSEYE
Broccoli Spears *3OOI 390 1 90
II oz. A&P BIRDSEYE
Green Peas 2001250 I 50
12-1/2 OZ. A&P SARA LEE
Coffee Cake 750 1890 1140
3 OZ. HANDI-WHIP COOL WHIP
Whip Topping 570 650 80
esissskmlHHl EH
313 CAN A&P DEL MONTE
Freestone Peaches 3101350 |4O
21 OZ. A&P DOLE
SI. Pineapple 3901430 40
ILB. A&P MUSSELNMNN
Apple Sauce *1701230 60
1 LB. A&P DEL MONTE
Fruit Cocktail 2501290 | 40
I lb. A&P OCEAN SPRAY
Cranberry Sauce 310|330|20
4 OZ. A&P DEL MONTE
Cut Breen Beans 1401190 |SO
is OZ. A&P GREEN GIANT
Asparagus Tips 590 650 60
313 CAN A&P DEL MONTE
Lima Beans *3OOI 350 50
SS OZ- ANN r>AGE CAMPBELL
Porte & Beans 17C1 180 1 1C
313 CAN A&P DEL MONTE
Golden W.K. Com oc I mTi 90
,oz a&p 'hunts'
Tomato Sauce ,1001 140 140
II OZ. RAPID SHAVE
Shave Cream 590 1890 1300
14 OZ. A&P LISTERINE
Mouthwash 590 |936 I 340
I OZ. A&P BRECK
Liquid Shampoo 590 |l)80 / 290
4.75 OZ. W/FLUORIDE A&P CREST
Tooth Paste 490 1880 1390
7 oz. A&P RIGHT GUARD
Spray Deodorant 890 |sl.39| 500
lb. a&p parka/
Soft Margarine 3901 4901100
1 OZ. A&P KRAFT
Cream Cheese 3701 3901 20
2 LB. CHED-O-BIT VELVETTA
Amer. Cheese Spread $1.33j51.39| 60 {
0 GAL. MARVEL FARMBEST |
Marvel Ice Cream 6901 990 1 300 |
8 s This item multiple-priced at the store for even
greater savings. Single unit price used for easier
comparison.

B "Super-Right" Sirloin Tip or Boneless Special!
Rump Roast ...JV s
"Super-Right" Western Corn Fed Special!
Spare Ribs
"Super-Right" Top or Bottom "Super-Right" Boneless Special
Round Roast L ,99 c Swiss Steak ( ,T
Super-R,ght" Sirloin Tip or "Super-Right" Top or Bottom Special!
j Assorted Flavored Drinks Special l Chip Steak L 5139 1 39 Round Roast JY*
j ||| p Q 46 oz One! Super R,flht Bon#less "Super-Right" Freshly Special!
iKb 1 =£s tajMSS GramlChuck........79'
I Tide $ 2.29i Sh- 8010gna.... k ,59 All Mt. Franks... ,**s9 c
Huai's Y.G Sp.cic.il Old Milwaukee Popular Priced
Peaches 4-: $ r Beer 6;l 99 c
_.. i v Pecan Coffee Cake(Frozen Pound Cake
Sail (Limit 1 w-*5 or more food order) 1 2 oz. size 69) I I V
Detergent .st 89 c Sara Lee 79 c yjlMHlNw
100% Aspirin Special! Jane Parker Delicious Spanish J
Bayer 79 c Bar Cake 35 c WF V BBi|
Jane Parker PI. & P.S. Vienna, Pumpernickel,
Right Guard (10 c Off) Special! or Sour Rye
Deodorant tr 69 c Bread 4 js. 99
; Viva Towete 3: j
| Soft-Weve r.2ks9'| ftTb] j J TjM Pine Sol 'Sr
| Calypso Tissue 2 bm 59 j j Minute Maid Frozen Special!
j Napkins ft 2 S9'i Oranpr 53-
Colo chic. Kidney & Fish, or Treat*
[Fin IMs ..X 2 -69'j Cat Food 6 4 1 Y 89*
Bananas.! J(P Cantaloupes 3! M
Lettuce HD l9 Green Beans Jl9
Fresh Delicious Special! Fresh Delicous Special!
Nectarines.... 3 $ 1 Red Plums 3 89*
Sunshine 15' off Label! (10 lb. bag 89<)~ Sunshine 15 off label (10 lb. bag *1")
Dog Ration ss- S 2 M Dog Chunks 2 44

Whichever you choose, famous National Brands or A&P's own qual quality
ity quality brands, we guarantee your complete satisfaction unconditional
ly-
Please, come to A&P this week and let us please you.

vmMy,My £& w Iv7B v Thi PMiiAlpif 9

Page 19



K The Florida Alligator, Thursday. July 23.1970

Page 20

i^
Mr .>*|llPt'
tOOK GOOD? DOUG CASE
Summer's the time for watermelon and fun. Friday night at 9:30
on the Reitz Union Terrace there will be plenty of both, free.
Everyone's invited. There will be country music and people just
getting together after a hard week of classes and on-again off-again
studying.
It's a cool way to start a groovy weekend.

Honor System Under Study
Result Os Squire Report

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
A study of UFs honor system has been launched
as a result of the recent 60*page Squires report on
the system.
The report, actually a masters thesis prepared by
graduate student Jeff Klink, was read by UF
President OConnell who became greatly concerned.
OCONNELL instructed a committee to make a
study of the report, asking Dean for Student
Development Frank T. Adams to head the group.
Now there are Five members on the committee
which held its first meeting Monday. It is co-chaired
by Adams and Dan Stephens, chancellor of the
Honor Court.
Also in the committee are Dr. John P. OConnell,
assistant professor of chemical engineering; Pete

Senate Holds
BSU Hearing
Next Week
An open hearing on the Black
Student Union proposals will be
conducted by the Students
Rights Committee of the
Student Senate Monday.
It will be at 5:30 in the Reitz
Union. Contact Student
Government for further
information.
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Dearing, chairman of the Student Rights
Committee; and Kathy Ruppel, a member of the
presidents council. Miss Ruppel is also recording
secretary for the committee.
ACCORDING TO Stephens, the committee is
very informal right now.
Well probably evaluate both the report and the
honor system, Stephens said. Right now the
committee is in the early stages were getting our
thoughts in line without saying anything definite.
Stephens said he thought when the committee
was through they would probably compose a report
of its own.
In the future, we hope to aid to the students
knowledge of the honor system, he said.
It might be a long or short range committee
we dont know, he said. We havent got our feet
on the ground yet.

KEY TO PHENOMENA

Flume Imitates Nature

By Alligator Services $
Remember how, the last time
you stood in the surf, you sank
bit by bit into the sand as water
rushed past your feet, carving
depressions in the sand next to
your ankles?
Well, the same effect occurs
throughout Florida, wherever
bridge pilings and other supports
are sunken into sand. Moving
water swirls about these pilings
and supports, eating away at the
sand and weakening the entire
bridge.
Known as the scouring
effect, the phenomena soon
will be studied by engineers and
students at the University of
Floridas Hydraulic Engineering
Laboratory, now under
construction in the basement of
Weil Hall, the engineering
administration building.
Dr. Bent A. Christensen,
professor of civil engineering,
who is in charge of the
laboratory, said a 180-foot-long
flume the first of several
hydraulic engineering projects to
be built in Weil Hall will
provide the means of studying
this surf and sand oddity
The flume is a long trough
through which water is pumped
to simulate a river, stream or
other estuary. The middle
section of the flume, now

nearing completion, contains a
depressed area which will be
filled with the equivalent of
sand.
It will be here that models
will be built f&r bridges and
pilings wedged in sand so that
the effects of moving water on
the sand-surrounded pilings may
be observed.
Since so many of Floridas
river and stream beds are sand or
silt, the project will have special
importance for the Sunshine
State. Christensen says this
because hydraulic projects in
other parts of the nation
concentrate on the effect of
moving water on mud and other
soils which are cohesive
they stick together unlike sand
and silt.
Christensen predicts that
solutions to the scouring effect
may include placing large
boulders on the sand or silt in
which pilings are sunk. The
hydraulic laboratory and its new
flume will tell engineers how
large such boulders have to be
and exactly where and how they
should be placed about pilings.
Among other uses of the
flume will be studies of ;the
effects of bridge pilings on
pollution washout. For instance,
do bridge pilings in certain
situations prevent pollutants

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from properly washing out of a
river or stream?
The flume also will be used to
study the meandering process
of rivers. Over a period of hours,
days or years, Chrfstensen
explains, the course of a river
actually may change due to the
constant action of moving water
on its bed and banks. The flume,
set up to simulate a particular
river, will enable hydraulic
engineers to predict which way
the river will meander an
important bit of knowledge
when a waterfront project is
being planned.
Funds for the new hydraulic
engineering laboratory
(estimated cost of the flume is
SI5,000) are being acquired
from the College of Engineering
budget. Several Florida
industries already have
contributed to the project by
providing materials at cost,,
Christensen says.
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The
Florida
Alligator

Airport Is Better
Than It Should Be
By DAN VINING
Alligator Campus Living Editor
There is little decent acting in Airport, now playing at the Plaza
One Theater. It gets unforgivably didactic in several places. The staged
airplane-in-the*sky shots are poorly done. It starts off very slowly.
Yet the picture isnt bad. A majority of the critics are saying,
Airport gets off the ground. And, forgiving their characteristic
poor puns, theyre right. Heres another one thats saved by a
better-than-average story.
THE STORY IS known by all now, I suppose. Its the old
bomb-on-the-plane-for-instance-purposes story. It is traditonal in
every sense. The guy with the bomb is a poor man who loves his wife
and wants her taken care of.
That main line is interlaced with other airport-related stories. Folks
who live near the airport dont like the noise. Air controllers are tired
and underpaid. Pilots are knocking up stewardesses. And old ladies are
stowing away.
But the main story about the bomb is the only one of real interest.
It is what keeps you from leaving until its over. Youre really
wondering if youll stay after the first hour of boring and unclever
preparation for the bomb explosion.
BURT LANCASTER is the manager of the airport. He is hardnosed
and pushy and loves airports. He is made halfway likable by his
numerous stabs at the airports political establishment and at his
bitchy society-dinner-attending wife. He begins to love Jean Seberg
who is a lady troubleshooter for one of the airlines and loves airports
too.
Dean Martin stumbles through being a happy-go-unlucky guy who
is the father of Jacqueline Bissets baby and the pilot of the ill-fated
Golden Argosy airplane. Whether its a comic moment or a moment of
intensity (or anything in between), Dino manages to blow it.
Helen Hayes is the little old lady who stows away and finally nearly
saves the day. Shes tops and gives the picture spunk it lacks
otherwise. Except for George Kennedy, the rest of the actors are
unimportant in more ways than one.
BUT, SOMEHOW, the tension builds to be what it should be and
we all become a part of the action. There actually are some good
moments in which the feeling of being inside a troubled plane
happens.
So, the picture ends up doing what it set out to do and doing it
pretty well. Its open for criticism in more than a few but thats okay.
The Hills Are Alive
With The Sound Os Music

Therell be music of the
country ilk this Friday night at
the Union for free. Watermelon,
too.
Terry King will be playing
banjo as will Doran Oster and
some of his pals will do similar
things. Walt Woodward will be

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7:00 AM TIL
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there too, singing. Thats 9:30 to
midnight Friday at the Union
Terrace beneath the glistening
stars.
Another fine night thanks to
the Union Programs Office and
its stellar staff of sparkling
secretaries.

Mil MUM F OK HEART
ACROSS

I Stipulate.
6 Agouti's
cousm.
10 Sudden
squawl.
14 Absorbed.
18 Purifies.
20 Pertaining
to the
kidneys.
21 Arrow
poison.
22 One of
Sheridan's
Rivals.
24 One's whole
being.
26 Kind of
rose.
28 Football
position.
29 Resilient.
30 Arid lands.
31 Golf
accessory.
32 Colorless.
33 Void.
35 Judge.
36 Bristle.
37 Caught
sight of.
1 Dull pain.
2 Dell.
3 Decipher.
4 Spike.
5 Recorded.
6 Parasite.
7 Oiled in a
sacred rite.
8 Meeting to
select
candidates.
9 Everyone.
10 Pith.
II Single.
12 Oozed.
13 Wigwams.
14 Cheers.
15 Topnotcher.
16 Harangued.
17 Rounded.

40 Starts.
43 Relied.
45 Valid Valid-46
-46 Valid-46 In this place.
47 Masc. name.
49 Wild plum.
50 Positive.
51 American
historian.
52 Velocity.
54 Growing out.
57 Dr. Rhine's
forte: abbr.
58 Cartoon
character.
59 Antenna.
61 Old horse:
si.
63 Editors.
65 007.
66 Bazaar.
68 Slide.
69 Happening.
70 Preserves.
71 Hialeah
enthusiast.
73 Summer:
Fr.
74 Decapitates.
76 Bailey.
77 Spoil.

19 Dinner
course.
20 Thorough Thoroughfares:
fares: Thoroughfares: abbr.
23 Lieu.
25 Seize.
27 Child movie
star.
30 Depreciated
suddenly.
32 Eat the
chief meal.
34 Relaxes.
36 Moves
furtively.
37 Ancient
chariot.
38 Drench.
39 Military
decoration.

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114 Fr. author.
115 Roman date.
116 Musical
symbol.
118 Danish
weight: pi.
119 Danish
island.
120 Late dean of
American
publishers:
init.
121 Fried
lightly.
123 Delighted.
126 Illegal: si.
129 House."
Shaw play.
131 Dearest
wish.
133 Instant.
134 Otherwise.
135 Little
Orphan .
136 Traps.
137 Dutch port.
138 Colored.
139 German
actress.
140 Kind of
cereal.
60 Be "on top
of the
world."
62 Ger. river.
64 Temptress.
65 Refuse to
go.
67 Narrates.
70 Fastened.
71 Poet.
72 Pertaining
to a fixed
charge.
74 Unvar Unvarnished.
nished. Unvarnished.
75 Howe,
inventer.
77 Bare.
79 Thus.
82 Considerate.

78 Gypsum
product.
80 Beverage.
81 lowa city.
83 Towel
marking.
84 Proportion.
85 Fibber.
87 Colorless
person: si.
88 Twine.
89 Separates.
92 Challenges.
94 Exaggerate.
96 Modern
hostelry.
97 Tree.
98 1765 Act.
100 First ap appearance.
pearance. appearance.
101 Roll'' and
sheet" are
two kinds.
102 Wise men.
103 Fern. name.
105 Arnez.
106 Unctuous.
107 Hourly.
108 Adieu.
112 These make
the score.

DOWN

40 Places in
office.
41 Makes a
mistake.
42 Oriental
weight.
44 Vast ages.
46 Grief Griefstricken.
stricken. Griefstricken.
48 Heavy
jackets.
51 Merged.
53 Exclamation
of annoy annoyance.
ance. annoyance.
55 Be sensitive
to.
56 Eaglestone.
58 Sirloin.
59 Loving.

Thursday, July 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

i i 5 i s p s M lO Ti 1 1 TTBH, .is i 7T iMf
Vi
_ pr I
n mm js mm^P |t > J l^n- 4
mmw LW" n fcrf 1 bul::
!uHnyi M
iLZ^yrr;x
MW | ;; - rt
T 4 IS + BB~'"
60 ~BSdiFi
2 JfljjSa? 'I BB 1 t
I f j -T 1~*
j -i. i F 1 F
HlOfi
106 106 110 113 j i |
nr ynr || BM
120 B21 JT3T 124
_|j 0
133 l34 H~IIS BBi 36
IEIL

83 Hampers
severely: si.
86 Forcibly
takes away.
88 Jammed.
89 Voodoo
symbols.

I Ironwood
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DAN VINING
Campus Living Editor

99 Modern con construction.
struction. construction.
101 Kind of
highway.
102 Philippine
native.
104 Enticed.

90 English
composer.
91 Pleasing
expression.
93 Duck.
95 Back.
96 Kampf.

117 Plague.
119 Donkey.
121 Check.
122 Made do.
124 Emerald isle.
125 Consumed.
126 Employ

107 Firms.
108 Box.
109 Cling.
110 Retaliated.
111 Recently.
113 Atone.
114 Plants.

! Student Special
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Page 21

127 Russian city.
128 Assay.
130 American
corpora corporation:
tion: corporation: abbr.
131 Owns.
132 Tree fluid.



The
Florida
Alligator

| Halftime
By Dave Spahr~-~~xJ
In the past several months there has been a great deal of
controversy concerning the charging of UF students $5 for a home
game season ticket.
Unfortunately, college athletics today is big business. Many
students fail to realize or accept this fact. One look at the UF Athletic
Associations budget should vanish this idea from the most naive of
minds.
WITH a projected gross income of $3,579,385 and expenses
running $2,709,718, the surplus estimate is $61,497. To put this in
more simple terms, the projected income will buy almost 24,000
six-packs of beer.
According to Student Body Vice President Henry Solares the
student population contributes $407,478 to the Athletic Association.
The Athletic Association has thrown several Sunday punches at the
student body for putting up a fuss over the extra $5 ticket charge.
These people should be thanking their lucky stars that they dont have
to deal with the FSU Student Senate.
THE ATHLETIC Association is a self-supporting cooperation
operating within the university and is not supported by tax money.
But it is supported by student funds and the students should not be
shunned for protesting the ticket charge.
At FSU the Student Senate decided how much money the athletic
department will receive out of the student activities fees. The total
budget allocations of the athletic department for 1970-71 academic
year is $900,000. Os this figure the athletic department requested
$480,000 from the senate. They received only $150,000 of the
original $480,000.
The FSU senate justified this drastic cut by saying it was in the best
interests of the student body to allow other minor programs to
continue.
THE ATHLETIC Committee then submitted a report which asks
for a $lO season ticket charge per student for the five home football
games.
Thus the battle rages between the student leaders and the athletic
departments throughout the state.
1 have asked myself this question time and time again. Is a UF
football game designed for the students or for the general public? Why
must the UF athletic department persist in selling every ticket they
can get their hands on to the public and shafting the students?
IS IT BECAUSE other SEC schools have new stadiums built with
state tax money? Other SEC schools have a pool of aircraft at their
disposal but the legislature in Florida has nothing better to do than
pass laws concerning fishing with a cane pole.
1 dont believe the athletic department should critize the students
for voting down the Activities Center because they did not feel like
footing the bill. The students are only following the example set by
the legislature. When the legislature realizes the bigness of
intercollegiate athletics and takes appropriate measures to either fund
it or dump it then we have taken a giant step towards solving the
problem. But the legislature will not face reality. A typical move
proposed by the state leaders is to air condition the gym. Why do they
want to spend tens of thousands of dollars air conditioning a place
that has a hard time passing the fire inspection of the state fire
marshalls? The way their minds work will never cease to amaze me.

CheneyOK
Split end Andy Cheney has
recovered from a knee injury
and, according to offensive
coach Jimmy Dunn, will be
ready to begin practice with the
team the last week in August.
Cheney,who had an operation
after being injured in the Miami
game, tore some scar tissue
earlier this summer. He fell in an
attempt to block a shot while
playing basketball, but has been
working out to strengthen the
leg muscles and should be able
to run at top speed this season.
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Graves Answers Solares

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Sports Writer
Ray Graves, UF athletic
director, said Tuesday that,
despite the figures Student Body
Vice President Henry Solares
arrived at concerning remarks he
made about student
contribution to athletics, there
is no way we can go into detail
on every expense account on the
budget.
In a letter to the editor in
Tuesdays Alligator, Solares said
Graves was misleading the
general public on the amount
credited to student support of
the athletic program on this
campus.
SOLARES leveled his remarks
at a statement credited to Graves
that was printed in the July 18
issue of Tampa Tribune saying,
student fees represent 11 per
cent of the total budget, but
that was still far below other
SEC schools, even with the new
policy of $5 for five home games
for every student.
Compiling a new percentage,
based on his own estimates of
how many students attend UF
during a four quarter year
(70,000 in comparison to a
65,000 estimate given to the
Athletic Association (AA)
business offices by the registrar),
Solares said the percentage of
student contribution should be a
little more than 15 per cent of
the total budget of the Athletic
Association.
AA Business Manager Ray
Daniel said the only way for
Solares to get a 15 per cent
figure was to include intramurals
and the new $5 ticket policy,
estimating an average of 16,000
students attending home games
for this fall.
DANIEL SAID, intramurals
should not be included in the
figuring because the A A acts
merely as the agency for the
Student Government-funded
intramural program, adding that
SG overspent its budget last year
to the tune of $2,399.50. The
AA covered the deficit for SG,
he said.
The average student

Page 22

attendance for last years home
Gator football games was
14,571. The AA rounded that
off to 15.000 to arrive at the
estimates for student ticket
sales.
THE BIG difference between
Solares and the AAs figures is
that Solares included the $5
ticket card, bought by his
estimate of 16,000 students,
within the figures he tallied to
come up with the 15 per cent
student contribution, while
the AA includes the $5 season
ticket, bought by its estimate of
15,000 students, with other
estimated football gate receipts
- under football as listed in
the budget.
Daniel also said the AA has
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DAVE SPAHR
Sports Editor

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 23,1970

budgeted $19,500 for the band
and $4,595 for the cheerleaders
for the 1970-71 Fiscal year
budget, while SG, last year,
financed the band and
cheerleaders $5,700 and
$1,225.40, respectively.
From all indications, they
(SG) plan to cut back on that
funding this year, however,
Daniel said.
Solares was quoted in
Tuesdays Alligator as saying
that SG pays for a lot of what
the Gator Band and cheerleaders
do.
I dont see any need in
getting mad over what Solares
has said, Graves said. I just
hope that we have made the
budget somewhat clearer.
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Alvarez In Bunnvland

By MARSHALL GALLOP
Alligator Sports Writer
An all-expense paid weekend
at Chicagos Playboy Mansion.
Thats just one of the many
rewards accorded to a football
player who has, as a football
coach would say, paid the price.
UFs everybodys-All-Ameri everybodys-All-American
can everybodys-All-American pass catcher Carlos Alvarez
was one of 23 college stars
chosen to go to the Windy City
by playboy Sports Editor Anson
Mount as a member of Playboys
pre-season All-American team.
AFTER arriving by plane in
Chicago, the players got settled

Away Game Ticket Policy-

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Students wishing to go to the Duke game in
Jacksonville on September 12 will have to pay
$3.50 but they wont need the season football
card.
According to Secretary of Athletic Affairs Art
Wroble, the Duke game is on neutral territory
and is not included on the $5 card.
THE CARD only covers the five games in
Gainesville, Wroble said.
The game is termed a Home and Home Split
game in which neither side is playing on its own
field. Both Duke and Florida students will have

( Intramurals I
by Chuck Fessler li
The Marathon Softball Tournament is going to be held on
Saturday, August 1. The deadline for signing up a team is Monday,
July 27 A bowling tournament is going to be held on the afternoon
of August 5 (Wed.) Anyone interested in signing up for either of the
above activities should come by the Intramural Office at Room 229
Fig or call 392-0581.
Both Three-man basketball and summer league softball are now in
full swing. As of this time eleven teams are still undefeated in
three-man basketball. Those teams which are still high atop of the
standings are: MIXC, Trojans, Sole Survivors, Hair, Roadrunners,
B-Team, Gnicks, Dolphins, Gym Rats, Onan, and the C.H.s. There are
also eleven other teams with only one loss. There is probably a better
balance among this years teams than ever before, with any one of a
dozen teams capable of winning the championship.
All of the races in lthe softball standings are still close also. The
present leaders includeGreshamsDrugs, Roadrunners, Softball Team.
Schucht Village, French Quarter, Power Cosmic, Silver Streaks, Old
Timers, SC and BA, Wasps, The Hit Men, Smallnix, Pedagogues, and
the P.E. Petes. Eighteen other teams have only one loss and are still in
the thick of the race for this summers championship.

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into their hotels and then went
to the penthouse of the King
Playboy, Hugh Hefner, for
dinner and a complete tour of
the luxurious mid-town pad.
The mansion was really
something else, Alvarez said.
Hefner even had a bar with
large windows looking into his
huge basement pool.
Alvarez seemed disappointed
that Hefner was in Los Angeles
filming a segment of his
television show at the time of his
visit.
After the dinner and tour, the
players went to the nearby
Playboy Club. Alvarez said of

AH that meat
and no potatoes?
Mot anymore
You can have a crisp Potato Cake
with every Arbya Beef Sandwich
Try our new Arby's Potato Cake you may never
want to touch a greasy, old-fashioned french fried
potato again. You see, our Potato Cakes are baked,
not fried. The habit-forming result is a crisp,
crunchy triangle of golden potatoness the
perfect taste complement to an Arby's thick, juicy JUS
roast beef sandwich. MSB
only ~,
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to pay to get in.
Duke will be alloted more stadium seats
because the game should have been played in
North Carolina.
The Nov. 7 Georgia game in Jacksonville will
be different. Although students will still have to
pay $3.50, this time Florida will be the home
team and more seats will be alloted to UF.
UF and Georgia alternate every year for
home privileges, Wroble said.
AFTER AUG. 1, tickets for the Duke game
will be on sale in Gainesville and Jacksonville.
Only the student ID will be needed for that
game.

the treatment accorded the
players, We were treated like
kings, and best of all, we didn't
have to pay for anything. The
Club picked up the tab for the
players.
This trip really made me
look forward to a possible trip as
an All-American, after the
season, Alvarez said.
Undoubtedly, with all the
All-American teafns going
around today, the one put out
by Playboy is the most popular
with the players.
Playboys football forecast
will be in its next month's issue.

Long Hair Out
The barber shop will be the
first stop for four Martin
County, Calif., high school
students on their way to
participate in athletics.
That was the ruling by U.S.
District Judge George B. Harris,
who denied a motion for a
preliminary injuction .against
officials of Tamalpais Union
High School District.
Judge Harris noted that the
issue was in an area involved
with the sensitive, delicate and
demanding role of athlete and
coach.
He added that the
alternatives are merely to forego
athletic competition or trim the
hair above the collar and around
the ears during a particular
athletic season.

I tc Taum T>r k\i(c '
K ~
PHIL BANNISTER
MAN
.. what a dumb question
Aaron Speaks Out

Atlanta Brave superstar Hank
Aaron thinks Gene Mauch and
Harry Walker are lousy
managers.
In an interview, Aaron surveys
the current managerial scene and
makes these comments:
It burns me up a little that
theres this kind of what would
you call it managerial club,
whereby the owners seem to
have gotten together and
decided that certain men, white whitemen,
men, whitemen, should be hired and rehired
no matter what kind of failures
they have been. Take guys like
Gene Mauch or Harry Walker.
Theyve both had real good
teams at one time or another but
have never produced a winner,
and yet as soon as theyre fired
by one owner another owner
picks them up and gives them a
new chance. A second chance is
one thing, but third and fourth
chances when youve been lousy
time and again with first-rate
material seems ridiculous;
especially when youve got guys
like Ernie(Banks) and
Willie (Mays) available in the
wings.
NOW, A GUY like Walt
Alston or Gil Hodges should be
rehired again and again, because
each of them has proved that he
can work well with players, that

JOB APPLICATION
AND
PASSPORT PHOTOGRAPHS
TAKEN ONE DAY
READY THE NEXT
CALL 376-7657 FOR APPOINTMENT
TOTAL
paoToeMpav

Thuwday, July 23,1970, Th Florida AHifrtor, I

he knows the game and that he
can get the most from the team.
But there arent all that many
guys like that around.
Aaron also views his own
credentials as a potential
manager.
I believe l would make a
good manager, says Hank. I
think I know enough about the
game and about how to get
along with a whole team to
produce a winner. And Id say
the same about Ernie and Willie.
Unfortunately, no owner has
had the guts up to this point to
hire a black manager.

JjjL HIGH-DRY
fp PLACE TO BE
' HAWAIIAN VILLAGE
APTS. S/8-5905
NOW LEASING
EOR SEPTEMBER
2BROR IBR 829 SO. FT
150 00 UNF
I 175.00 FUR AS IBR
185.00 FUR-AS 2 BR
QU I i I' AIN T f N/ \ f\ ; i. L
> Rv u. [
REC -HALL. POOL
LAUNDRY, KIDDIE POOL
1 MAID SERVICE
> HOTPOINT APPLIANCE

Page 23



Page 24

\. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 23,1970

Inn mTEnnniionni mnmuni I
of soimo & FREEDom ha
Visit free north Hmerico H
In momtan, Heui Brunswick, Canada gfj|9
3 BAYS BF LBVE SUN & BEHIND
AUGUST 7 8,9
With: Chip Monck, the voice of Woodstock HH
- DELANIE ft BONNIE ft FRIENDS Jg£ no %ST' NHj
CACTUS Virgin beaches sur ounded by wild strawberry
IMlii mi i c rnrvn i o cvdiuv bushes. Pure clean drinking water, stock piles of
JOHN MILL* COCncLL SYRINX firewood. Free rice kitchens and macrobiotic foods
(MAGIC MOOG SYNTHESISER) given with ove by Penny Farth g Warriors of the
irhuiniiAAiiru Rainbow. Medical facilities, hospital tents, sanitary I
LEONARD COHEN toilets and showers throughout beach area and site.
MnilllTAlhl Florida Take Rt. no. 301 A 1*95 North to the NJ.
minimum Turnpike. Stay on turnpike untM you reach the exit for
PROCOL HARIIM the Garden State Parkway, North. Take Parkway North to I Wmmm
PI U Tlirri till w Rt 80 E*t to the George Washington Bridge, over brMga
SLY a THE FAMILY STONE 9 * ft to Rt. 95 North (Connecticut Turnpike) to Rt. no.
_ wu vr arc irrrn 495 (located about 35 miles from Boston) by-peas Boston
It PI TtAKo AMtK & rejoin Rt. no. 95 at Newberry Port. Massachusetts*.
TUP VnilllCl nnnc Continue to Houlten, Maine-then take the Trans Canada
me lUUnuOLUUUO Highway no. 20 until you reach the Trans Canada
AND MDRFI Highway no. 2. Follow this to Moncton. Air Canada
nnu muiu.. services Moncton from N.Y. (JFK). L_A., Miami. Chicago. |M|M
check papers and radio for additional acts. Boston or call Eastern Air Unas. Bus Service (Greyhound) | I
schedule subiect to change without notice from N.Y., Boston, Detroit S. Chicago For Charter bus |
Music starts at 1:00 PM till DAWN on Friday, Satur-Information call (212) 944-9397 strawberry
day and Sunday fieldswillhappen
Sand self ariifrasssn stamped envelope with $15.00 to: "'''AV'V |
STRAWBERRY FIELDS, 720 Fifth Ave., Suite 700, New :mP 'vYI
York. N.Y. 10019. HHH
The Canadian Govt, can insist that proof of of legal intention. Send self addressed stamped
legal intention for entry into Canada must be ex- envelope with $15.00 to: STRAWBERRY FIELDS,
hibited at the border. Possession of ticket pur* 720 Fifth A m.. Suite 700, New York 10019 or
chafed through advance files is sufficient proof contact your nearest TICKETRON office.