Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Voting Privileges Depend On Intentions

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Students in Alachua county
who wish to vote here have to
show more participation in
county business than just going
to school according to Mrs. Dot
Glisson, chief of the Bureau of
Elections in Tallahassee.
The term resident when
used in the statutes relating to
sufferage is used in the sense of
legal residence. That is to say,
the place of domicile or
permanent abode as
distinguished from temporary
residence, Mrs. Glisson said.
THE WORD residence
when used as a qualification for
voter registration, carries with it
an element of permanence.
She went on to explain that
it does not mean that there is
an absolute intention never to
leave the place of residence
But it does mean there is a good
faith intention of the voter to
make the place his home for all

DECAL OWNERS FREE
$8 Bus Pass
OKd For Fall
By CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
Alligator Staff Writar
The free bus ride on the UF campus will become part of history
starting this fall quarter.
In response to student and faculty complaints, this year everyone
riding the UF shuttle buses will be required to have a pass, Lee
Burrows, parking and traffic coordinator, said.
THE MAIN criticism of the bus system was that not all passengers
were paying.
The source of funds to run the service was solely from the sale of
parking decals.
Therefore many dorm students were riding the buses, while
commuter students, faculty, and staff were doing the actual paying
through the purchase of parking decals, Burrows explained.
STARTING FALL quarter anyone wishing to ride the buses will
have a choice of purchasing a $4 pass good from September through
March, or an annual pass for SB.
Visitors will be issued bus passes free of charge.
There will be no charge for shuttle bus passes to those students,
faculty or staff registering their automobiles and purchasing UF
parking decals, Burrows said.
SIX MONTH commuter decals cost $6, while the annual decal is
$lO.
Burrows mentioned that as a result of the new pass system there is
the possibility bus service will be slowed down.
He explained that in the future all passengers will have to enter j
through the buss front door to have passes checked by the driver. All
passengers will be required to exit by the rear door.
IN AN EFFORT to combat this slowing down process, three bus J
stops will be eliminated.
To help students become familiar with this future system shuttle 1
bus maps with route and schedule information will be made available.
IN A SURVEY last fall, Burrows said 35,000 passengers were using
the shuttle bus service weekly. Next quarter there will be a minimum
of eight buses operating to accommodate the riders.

SG Criticizes UC Standardized Test Costs

(EDITORS NOTE: Student
Government officials are
requesting the elimination of
mass standardized testing in
University College. Their request
'''<*B denied by the curriculum
committee late Monday
afternoon, as the Alligator
went to press.)
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Executive Editor
One hundred twenty-five
thousand dollars is a lot of
money.
Especially when UF is being
forced to operate below what

purposes.
All purposes means that if
one is going ( lo use a county for
voting, he should be prepared to
buy license plates, drivers
licenses and do business in that
county, she said.
THE MERE presence of a
student at a place where an
institution of learning is situated
is not sufficient to entitle him to
vote there, Mrs. Glisson said.
She stated that whether a
student has voting privileges
depends, again, on the

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 62, No. 165

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell termed a bare
bones budget.
BUT THATS how much it is
estimated UF will pay for mass
standardized testing in
University College in the fiscal
year 1970-71.
The cost this year was
$122,273. SG Secretary for
Academic Affairs Gail Merein
said it will cost at least three to
five per cent more this year.
This figure includes all the
costs for the tests, such as
printing, proctors and grading,
Miss Merein said.

ELECTION BUREAU CHIEF SAYS

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville'

intention of the student.
She also stressed that, It is
firmly established that a voting
residency is not acquired by one,
who even though emancipated
from his parents, resides in a
place for no other reason that
that of securing an education.
ABOUT THE 18-year-old
vote, for which some counties
have started registration, Mrs.
Glisson said, We feel that since
the law does not go into effect
until Jan. 1, we should not
comply with it until then.

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Japanese tea doesn't taste quite like what this young lady is used to
and she's registering her complaint the way all little girls do with a
wrinkled nose. See page 4.

SHE SAID SG feels this
money is being wasted, as class
tests are given in most courses
anyway.
Why couldnt class tests
make up the whole grade, rather
than just a portion as they do
now? They couldnt give tests
more often than once a week,
which is what some UC
professors do now.
The money saved could then
be used for audio visual
materials, Miss Merein said.
STUDENT BODY Vice
President Henry Solares said
widespread debate about the

The bill itself may be
questioned and repealed by
then, she said.
SUPERVISORS have
complete control over their
records. We dont have any
enforcement process, she said.
EIGHTEEN-YEAR olds are
now registering in Hillsborough
County. However they wont be
able to vote until Jan. 1, 1971.
According to the supervisor of
elections in Tampa, they are
registering 18-year-olds but
withholding their voter

Tuesday, July 21, 1970

testing procedures in UC led SG
to evaluate the effectiveness of
the testing.
Results indicate:
§ objective tests are not very
thorough tests of learning
course-wide examinations
are unfair because its emphasis
may be different from the
emphasis in the students section
there is little opportunity
for personal judgment when
course-wide examinations are
employed
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder said the elimination of
(SEE 'ASK' PAGE 2)

registration cards until January.
They will not be able to vote
in this years primaries and
general elections.
Hillsborough officials have
been registering the 18-year-olds
who have come in since
President Nixons signing of the
bill.
When asked about the
pre-registration of 18-year-olds,
Mrs. Alma Bethea, Alachua
County Supervisor of Elections,
said, Not until the law goes
into effect January 1.

How To Get
An Absentee
Nov. Ballot
V
By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer

Students who find it hard to
register to vote in Alachua
County but want to participate
in the November elections can
still vote by obtaining absentee
ballots from their home
counties.
According to Mrs. Alma
Bethea, Alachua County
Supervisor of Elections, the law
requires voters to apply for
absentee ballot 45 days prior to
5 p.m. the day of the election.
TO OBTAIN an absentee
ballot, a person must write to
the supervisor of election in
their county of residence. The
supervisor will then send an
application which must be filled
out, notarized and signed by two
witnesses. Upon receipt of the
application the supervisor will
send a ballot to the voter.
In case there is not enough
time, the supervisor will mail the
application and ballot at the
same time. According to Mrs.
Bethea, this is permissible under
existing Florida law.
She said it is very important
to have the applicants signature
on the application, since only
the applicant can apply. No
person may apply for another.
THE REASONS listed on the
application for obtaining an
absentee electors ballot are:
being physically disabled,
being absent from the
county at the time the election
takes place,
not being able to go to the
polls because of religious
reasons,
if a person will be an
inspector or poll worker in a
different precinct than they are
(SEE 'BALLOT' PAGE 2)

GLADYS KAMMERER UF
political science professor,
died Friday at Alachua
* General Hospital page 2
Classifieds .. 12,13
Editorials..; 6
Letters 7
Movies . 12,13
Sports... 15,16



Page 2

'. Tha Florida Alligator. Tuesday, July 21,1970

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JED ZIMMERMAN
A LONG JOB
It's a summer-long job preparing Florida Field and tries to repair a bleacher seat damaged by an
the stadium for fall football crowds. This worker over-zealous (or overweight) fan last year.

Ask Revamped Testing

these tests would serve two
purposes it would save money
as well as allowing the student to
obtain a better education.
IT IS THE position of SG
that progress testing is a
deterrent towards effective
learning, Uhlfelder said. Mass
standardized testing achieves few
of the objectives of the general
education courses.
SGS criticisms of these tests
fall into five categories:
All students in the course
are tested over identical material
regardless of what their
classroom instructors have
stressed.
Many of the examinations
contain numerous
poorly-worded vague and
inappropriate questions.
§ The student has no
opportunity to express himself
in his own words and is
frequently asked to give the

* y
correct answer for a question
which requires or contains
subjective opinions.
These tests do not
accurately represent the
achievements of many students.
t Nothing makes more of an
impression on a student than the
size and impersonal nature of a
large university. Mass
standardized testing increases
these feelings.
THE ACTION Conferences

Remember I
Summer I
Bowling I
Special I
REITZ UNION I

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August wherf its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

Task Force on Curriculum
reported:
UC faculty find their
students indifferent to matters
not tested in comprehensive
examinations and in response to
this turn class meetings into
coach sessions for the prog and
final.
Also, often students in UC
are not provided ample
experience in writing essay
examinations and term papers,
and therefore, do not have an
opportunity to express
themselves in correct and
coherent English. Further, this
testing is inappropriate to social
science, English and
humanities.
Because of these things, Miss
Merein said, SG proposes for
experimental purposes, mass
standardized testing in UC for
the academic year 1970-71 be
discontinued.
am m

Ballot Applications Obtained From Supervisor

EfBOM MttE OWEJ
registered to vote
In Alachua county, the
absentee ballots have not yet
been received at the supervisors
office. I dont expect my
ballots until after the 15 of
August, Mrs. Bethea said.
After that date, the ballots

THE COMFORT EXPERTS
SpKteliztn, in RwidantM
& MOBILE HOME
AIR CONDITIONING
am
L .. Hi'JL **J
Free Estimates
2702 N.E. 19th DRIVE 378-1578

UF Professor
Dr. Kammerer
Died Friday
Dr. Gladys Kammerer, UF
professor of political science,
died Friday at Alachua
General Hospital.
Dr. Kammerer was bom in
St. Louis, in 1909, and
received her Ph. D. from the
University of Chicago in
1946. From 1947 until 1955
she taught at the University
of Kentucky. From there she
came to the UF.
DR. KAMMERER was
director of the Public
Administration clearing house
and regarded as one of the
most prominent women
educators in the United
States.
She had received a
presidential appointment to
the Advisory Council of the

will be sent to the voters in the
next mail after the applications
have been received.
THERE IS A warning,
however, for those who do not
take care in filling out their
applications.
If an application comes back
not property filled out, they will
not be counted, she says.

Burger Chef
goes all out
to please
the student!
715 NW 13th St.
k & ,T 1 I
and 1412 N. Main St TO / M

FQg THREE BUILDINGS
Fuqua Announces
Interest Grants
Another interest subsidy grant for UF in addition to two
earlier-announced grants has been approved, Congressman Don Fuqua
told UF administrators Thursday.
The three grants awarded by the U.S. Office of Education to assist
in financing three buildings under construction will total $1,865,450
over a 30-year period.
THE ANNUAL interest grants include $18,926 for the music
building, $25,857 for the psychology building and $17,392 for the
graduate and international studies facility.
The three buildings, all scheduled for completion in 1971, already
have received federal assistance in the form of construction grants.
The $1.7 million music building previously received a grant from
the Office of Education in the amount of $458,976. The $2.4 million
psychology facility has construction grants in the amounts of
$440464 from the Office of Education and $250,000 from the
National Science Foundation. The $1.6 million graduate and
international studies facility construction grant is $400,000, also from
tne Office of Education.
STATE FUNDS allocated to these projects come from the proceeds
of bond sales under currently authorized programs.
According to W. Ellis Jones, associate director of physical planning
for the University, the interest grants represent the difference in
interest rates for which the bonds were sold and the federal

Bp"' jB
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mm .. : ; '" v
H jfl
wk j"9
DR GLADYS KAMMERER
... died Friday
National Institute of Health
in Washington D. C.
Dr. Kammerer has been
known as an authority in
welfare administration,
having written a comparative
study on British and
American child welfare
administration. She has also
written more than 15 books,
monographs, and more than
50 articles.

A voter who brings the
application in person to the
office, is usually helped by the
staff.
WE ARE NOT required, but
we do it, says Mrs. Bethea. If
the application is sent by mail, it
is more difficult.
Teachers or students who will
be absent in November, if they

rate of three per cent.
The interest grant program is
authorized by the Higher
Education Facilities Act of
1963, as amended in 1968.
According to Jones, the program
is intended to maximize the
participation of private lenders
in providing higher education
institutions with long-term
financing needed to construct
academic facilities and to assist
in reducing the cost of
borrowing by making federal
grants during the life of the loan.
Bus Added
To alleviate the overcrowding
of the morning runs, an
additional bus is now in
operation following the Blue
route via the Tigert Hall route.
The bus will begin at 7:40 and
every 30 minutes on the hour
and half hour until 11:30.
Step Out Bud
President Truman relieved
Gen. Douglas Mac Arthur of his
command in the Far East on
April 11,1951.

are registered in Alachua
County, should leave an address
with the office so they can
receive the applications, Mrs.
Bethea said.
According to Mrs. Bethea, the
supervisors office is expecting to
send probably 2,500 ballots,
to people who have to be
outside of Alachua in November.



3? ij, "" s *§?
JED ZIMMERMAN
EAG SAYS HELP
If you went shopping Saturday, chances are you saw a poster
similar to this one. They were hanging in local grocery store
windows, as part of the Environmental Action Groups EAG
drives to dean up our environment.
Saturday, EAG members distributed information to food
shoppers explaining how they can help in improving our
surroundings.
According to one EAG member, although 1,500 fact sheets
were handed out, most shoppers weren't interested in learning
how they could help.
LISTEN TONIGHT
Tonight Dialogue features on the Indochina Crisis
Committee.
Participants will be Dr. John K. Mahon, chairman of the
history department; Charles Ansell of the Record Bar, and Paul
Saluk.
The program is on from 10:30 pjn. until 12:30 ajn.
Welcome!
FRESHMEN
Today's the day on your busy schedule to visit
your on-campus Bookstore and meet some of the
people whose sole purpose is to serve
you .... introduce you to the textbook division
and make you familiar with the tools of your
college career here at the University of Florida
Come in.... browse around and pick up your
information portfolio with Florida decals for your
car included FREE!
EZ D| Campus Shop & Bookstore
located in the Hub

Critical Year Program
To Help Disadvantaged

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligrtor Staff Writer
More than 191 students are
participating in UFS Critical
Freshman Year Program,
designed to help students from a
disadvantaged background.
The students black and
white come from cities all
around the state, from Miami to
Jacksonville.
WE HAVE TO cleanup our
own backyard before we go
elsewhere, Roy Mitchell,
director of disadvantaged
students said.
The students are participating
in what Mitchell calls a new
concept in teaching and
counseling, trying to bridge the
gap for high school students
coming to college.
The program is for students
who scored below the acceptable
mark for admission to UF on the
Florida Senior Placement Test.
THE PROGRAM looks more
at the academic achievements of
the students while they were in
high school, Mitchell said.
Other factors are also present
in the selection of the students.
We look at jobs they have held,
at their family background, at
their motivation, work and
study habits, and other special
talents which they might have,
Mitchell said.
THE RESULTS so far,
according to Mitchell, have been
reported by teachers as beyond
their wildest expectations.
The classes for these students
are regular college classes for
regular credit. The only
difference is that these students

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in 21 seconds. a
So \\e don't hand cpn*
the keys to just any
that comes along. Mjm
SEE THE "FLY NAVY* TEAM
ON CAMPUS'- July
Outside game room A
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y

spend more time in class.
This way the students can
have what they did not have in
high school.
The students are now taking
English, math and logic or
institutions, with some taking
physical science.
There are no outside activities
planned for these students.
WE HOPE they will be
integrated in the mainstream of
the university, Mitchell said.
One slight difference has been
the orientation.
Instead of large groups for
orientation, we have small
groups of students who attend
counseling, Mitchell, said.
ANOTHER NEW concept
introduced with the program is
that of living and learning.
Students in the program have
been housed in Tolbert area,
living together if possible. This
way they can reinforce each
other, Mitchell said. Studying

TpDBROSA
JML f STEAK HOUgg
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378*3320

Tuesday, Juty 1970, The Florida AlHgrtor,

together, and attending tutoring
sessions together.
THE TUTORING is done by
junior and senior students. The
object is that since these tutors
have gone through University
College recently, they can relate
more to the students in the
program.
According to Mitchell, 17
faculty members are
participating actively in the
Critical Freshman Year Program.
Some of these teachers have set
up office hours in/ the dorm
areas to be closer to the
students.
I believe if these students
experience success we are going
to have successful students in
the fall, Mitchell said.
US. First
The first nation to recognize
Israel as a sovereign state was the
United States, on May 14,1948.

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuoaday, July 21,1970

Florida Probe
*
Plans For Fall
Publication Date

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JED ZIMMERMAN
BEAUTY IN THE UNADORNED
... illustrated in traditional tea ceremony.
Press Council To Form In Fall

By CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
Alligator Staff Writ*
To facilitate two-way communication between
the Florida Alligator and the UF community, a
press council proposed by Alligator Editor-In-Chief
Karen Eng will take shape this. fall.
We felt the campus has become so large and
complicated that it is almost impossible to provide
complete coverage with such a small representation
of the campus connected with the paper, Miss Eng
said.
THIS VOLUNTARY council acting in an
advisory capacity, comprised of nine student
members, three faculty or staff members, and
Alligator editor and managing editor, will try to
solicit opinions from the academic community.
Bren# G. Myking, director of Student

Travel Spending
WASHINGTON (UPI) Am Americans
ericans Americans dont skimp when it
comes to foreign travel. They
will be spending more than
$lO billion a year on trips
abroad before the end of the
decade, says the American
Automobile Association. This
will be twice the 1969 record
expenditure of $5.2 billion.
II I 1712 W. University H
111 TEXTBOOKS In
I SCHOOL SUPPLIES H
1 I ART SUPPLIES
flll ENGINEERING
11 SUPPLIES 4
Customer Parking In
mm Tho Roar K
|II WoWoleoma:
-J II

WHATS A
>
* HOT! HAM & CHEESE!
ONLY AT THE HOME OF THE WHOPPER
8 N.W. 16 th AVE. 'LI.

Publications, believes the council to be a very
worthwhile effort and commended Miss Eng for her
recognition of the need of a such a council.
Alligator Fall Editor Sam Pepper Said he is
hopeful the council will provide a better
understanding between the paper and students.
THE PRESS council will be as diverse a group as
possible in order to give the editor a closer and
wider knowledge of the campus and what students
are thinking of the paper, Miss Eng said.
Constructive criticism by council members will be
the means to attaining this better understanding
between readers and paper.
One objective of the council to define and
interpret the problems and possible solutions
presented to it by the members.
The value of the council will be determined by
the enthusiasm of the people on it, Myking said.

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
The Florida Probe, an off-campus news magazine,
will publish again next quarter.
The Probe plans to start the year with a freshman
orientation issue which will be given to all incoming
UF freshman, anil circulated on the campus.
CRAIG HEYL, former Probe business manager
and now a staff writer, said the Probe will continue
in the same format as it did in the first three issues.
It will be a news magazine, with more in-depth
and feature-type stories, he said.
The Probe cannot evaluate news in a day-to-day
basis, said Heyl. It is published every two weeks.
THE MAGAZINE'S staff is rather small this

Japanese Tea
Ceremony Success
You must turn the cups face away from you, she whispered,
rotating the bowl of green tea. It is impolite to drink from that
side
Following instructions given by hostess Masako Okabe, 26 people
participated in a Japanese tea ceremony at the J. Wayne Reitz Union
last Wednesday.
Holding their tea and red sweet-bean cakes, the guests watched Mrs.
Atsushi Kanai perform the ritual (cha-no-yu) while Mrs. Kazutake
Imani prepared her flower arrangements (Ikebana).
The three ladies are from Japan, in Gainesville while their husbands
finish studies at the UF.
The tea ceremony is a highly stylized way of making tea with
simple but carefully chosen utensils. In earlier days the ceremony
illustrated the finding of beauty in the unadorned the utensils are
beautiful but make no assertion of beauty.
Now it is used more to honor important guests and special
occasions.
Reitz Union officials termed the program successful in every
way. They turned down nearly one hundred callers.

Iroawood
Golf Club
STUDfNT MEMBERSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 + TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For information coll
a 376 0080
gr t&ohiwoop
*ir cry*

r STflK SHftKC "!
Student Special
I (With The Coupon) |
I Our Regular 93< Steak burger
I tuncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90* plus tax |
1 Steak n Shake 1
*l6lO S.W. 13th St. Gainesville i

summer, about 12 people, Heyl said. But we
expect this number to shoot up in the fall quarter
with new people.
The Probe, according to Heyl, is now
contemplating an increase in circulation by the fall.
WE HOPE to deliver door to door in the married
housing areas, Heyl said. Also, some increases are
planned for the dorm areas.
One downfall of other off-campus publications
has been finances, or the lack of them. This is not a
problem with the Probe, Heyl said.
The magazine, which is supported exclusively
by advertising is currently in good financial shape,
he said.
We are very much in the black, Heyl said.

THE CANDY SHOPPE
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Gift Fruits
Westgate Shopping Center
3311 W. Unhr. Ave.
phone: 376-6806



No Word From State Personnel Board

By PHILIP MORGAN
Alligator Writer
Reitz Union Recreation
Supervisor Patrick Day said
Friday he had not yet received
any comment from the State
Personnel Board about his letter,
in which he criticized the raise in
pay of the janitorial staff but
not raise clerk and supervisory
positions.
He did say, however, that he
thought either University
Personnel Director Robert
Button or Reitz Union Director
William Rion must have
received some response.
BUTTON SAID he had not
r
had any reply from the State
Personnel Board but that he had
asked them to contact Day when
he received a copy of the letter.
Rion also said he had received
no official response.
The only response I have
received, he said, is general
talk around the office and
telephone conversations with
Mr. Button.
DAY SENT the letter,
date-marked July 3, to the
governor and the State Personnel
Board. On July 14, he sent
copies to the legislature and five
Florida newspapers the
Jacksonville Florida
Times-Union, Tampa Tribune,
Gainesville Sun, St. Petersburg
Times and the Alligator. On the
15th, he sent a copy to the
Board of Regents.
In the letter, he criticized the
base level raise for custodial,
laundry, and food workers to
the same salary as a clerk II
sl.Bl per hour while not

Fulbright-Hays
Deadline July 31
Faculty members wishing to apply for 1971-72 awards under the
Senior Fulbright-Hays Program have until July 31 to file completed
forms. No applications will be accepted beyond this date for research
awards, although requests for lectureship positions will be accepted as
long as such grants are available.
Persons interested in teaching in Latin America, Australia and New
Zealand are definitely encouraged to apply during July. Forms for
awards, or additional information, may be obtained from the
Committee on International Exchange of Persons, 2101 Constitution
Ave., Washington, D. C. 20418
I DAILY LUNCHEON
AND DINNER
SPECIALS
gj
I Meat, 2 Veg, A a
I 2 Rolls and Butter, C
I Coffee or Tea W
I only at
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I J* 3:00 AM

raising the salary of clerks &
supervisors, especially the clerk I
who makes $1.69 per hour. His
main complaint on this is that
clerk Is must have one years
experience before they qualify
for the promotion to Clerk 11,
whereas custodial workers start
at the Clerk os salary level.
In his letter, Day said, I
request that a study be
undertaken to show that the
Clerk 1, Clerk II and Union
Recreation Supervisor positions
here are renumerated
sufficiently such that we should
not be underpaid. If, as a result
of your unbiased study it is
decided that the pay and
wonderful fringe benefits are
sufficient for these jobs, please
consider this letter my
resignation effective the date of
completion of your survey.
DAY SAID he talked to Rion
and Rion said he would say
some things supportive and some
things that were not about
Days case.
Rion said Friday he
understands Days complaint,
but I disagree with his
concept. He said the reason for
the raise in pay for custodial
workers is that before the raise it
was difficult to get and keep
them.
If I have a position open for
a clerk I and a custodial worker,
theyll send me a clerk and not
the custodial we need to raise
salaries to keep people, he said.
RION SAID he is unhappy
about the situation of the
clerks, but that in the past he
has noticed that when one
segment of the UF receives

ABOUT SALARY COMPLAINTS

preferential treatment, the
other segments are raised
following them. He said it may
not be soon, but that he thinks
they will be raised.
1 think they ought to raise
clerks* salary, he said.
Button said the question of
salaries and appropriations is an
age-old problem because you
have to deal with people that are
Blood Needed
A sharp decrease in the
number of blood donors during
the summer has created an
extreme shortage of blood,
according to officials at the
Shands Teaching Hospital Blood
Bank.
Those wishing to sell blood
should sign up for the donors
list.
Blood Bank hours are 8 a.m.
- 8:30 pjn. Mon. Fri. and 8
ajn. noon on Saturday.

I LET A TRANS-WORLD WIG I
GO TO YOUR HEAD!
I THE BUDGET ErrHER |
Always ai Hand washable... never needs setting...
choose from the state's P er f ect f or class ft * beach Poolside or
largest quality hairgoods dealer c my OCCOS ion.
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[ COCOA BEACH & TITUSVILLE. CENTRAL CHARGE

150 miles away from you.
THE STATE just cant
respond fast enough to meet
the problems, he said. They
say, well, everybodys got
problems, you are not unique.
In response to Days publicity
- in file Alligator and the
Tampa Tribune Button said
the man is individually
frustrated. I told the Regents
that they ought to get someone
EVERY THIRD
WASH LOAD
FREE
Air-conditioned Comfort
SPEED QUEEN
FABRIC CARE CENTER
SIN CITY PLAZA
OFF 13th St. on S.W. 16th Avo.

Tuesday, July 21,1970, The Florida AipHr.

to sit down and talk to him
face-to-face. Rion and I cant do
anything because it is a state
problem.
Day said had he run his
complaint through the normal
channels, it would have been
buried.
This will probabjy be my last
job with the university, he said.
After this nobody will touch
me with a ten-foot pole.
HAVE YOU BEEN THINKING
ABOUT LEARNING TO FLY?
Wi will tiMh you for
S2OO
Solo course in *SS Cosum ISO,
includes grounds school A 10 hours
of Right Instruction.
$l6O
Solo course in Piper J-3, books,
ground school A 10 hours of Right
instruction.
FLYING HAWKS
STENGEL AERODROME 376-0011

Page 5



i. The Florida All ip tor. Tuesday, July 21,1970

Page 6

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.


Toms Denies Charges

WASHINGTON The story
has been leaked to the press that
a frustrated Douglas Toms is
quitting as the nations highway
safety chief because he cant pull
the auto safety program out of
the bureaucratic mud.
The truth is that hes under
pressure to leave because of a
muddy relationship with Dek
Processes, a firm that makes
auto permits and other
specialized cards.
HERE ARE the awkward
facts that have now caught up
with Toms:
While he was motor
vehicles director for the State of
Washington, he worked with
Dek Processes to get pictures of
drivers put on permits. At 22
cents per driver, the contract
came to about SIIO,OOO a year.
Afterward, he was offered a
position with the firm.
Toms put off the job offer
from Dek Processes to accept
the auto safety post last
January. There was an
understanding he would run the
safety program for a year or
two, perhaps longer. Yet he
bought a home in Fort Wayne,
Ind., the home office of Dek
Processes.
AS FEDERAL auto safety
czar, Toms plumped for the Dek
firm during his numerous
meetings with state highway and
safety directors.
Toms confirmed that Dek
Processes had been interested in
him at the time he came to
Washington and that he is
discussing a job with the firm
that would lead to its presidency
after the outgoing president
retires. But he said nothing had
been settled. He also conceded
that he had talked about Dek
Processes to other state motor
vehicles officials. But he insisted
that he had spoken only to those
who were personal friends.
Toms denied that he had used
his federal office in any way to
help the company get federal
contracts. The earlier contract
with Washington state, he said,
had been awarded on a low-bid
basisatqsi to siemib b atEtnj
rr fcMNS ihyHteutV 0
these kind of rumors get

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Executive Editor
. f .. %

Merry-Go-Round
IIIUIIIIIIIIIIIM
by Jack Anderson

around, he snorted. There is
absolutely no conflict.
Through a spokesman,
Secretary of Transportation
John Volpe said he had faith in
Toms, who has been a tough
highway safety administrator.
But other administration sources
said Volpe has ordered a careful
study of Toms relations with
Dek Processes. Volpe also felt
that Toms had been
injudicious, they said, in
talking about the Dek job while
he held high federal office.
* *
Sergeant Major James H.
Palmer skimmed in his
helicopter 100 feet over the
Vietnam jungle on April 27 to
draw fire from communist'
troops so his men on the ground
could attack.
THE STRATEGY worked too
well. Deadly fire from the
ground struck the helicopter,
which banked, tumbled and
exploded, killing him instantly.
A grateful government
recommended Palmer for the
Silver Star for gallantry and, at
the same time, abruptly ended
payments to help keep Iris son in
a special school for children with
learning difficulties.
Mrs. Palmer, with two other
children to raise by herself now,
must pay $205 a month to keep
her 15-year-old son in a special
school in Falls Church, Va. If
her hero husband had lived, they
would need to pay only $65.
I HOPE and pray you will
print my story, she pleaded.
Our investigation shows there
are 55 wives like Mrs. Palmer
who have lost government aid
for their handicapped children
because their husbands were
killed in action. Payments to
help 11Q retarded children were
Sm 'mmthWMmm
for thrif courtly, Bnt
This cruelty is the result of a

Las Gardieff
Managing Editor
Fred Vollrath
News Editor

legislative goof. When the law
was passed setting up the
Civilian Health and Medical
Program of the Uniformed
Services, the payments were
restricted to men still oh active
duty.
The 165 wives and children
who have been suddenly stricken
from the program could be put
back on the rolls for only about
$250,000 a year, mere chicken
feed in Pentagon parlance.
*
DAVID E. K. Bruce, the
distinguished, 72-year-old
ambassador who has been asked
by President Nixon to represent
the United States at the Paris
truce talks, has been subjected
to the indignity of a security
investigation.
Until his retirement over a
year ago, Bruce had served his
country with distinction under
Presidents Truman, Eisenhower,
Kennedy and Johnson. He was
called back into the diplomatic
service by President Nixon, who
wanted a man of international
stature to head the Paris
delegation.
Bruces neighbors in the
fashionable Georgetown section
of Washington, therefore, were
astonished when a callow young
State Department security agent
Hashed his identification and
started questioning them about
the eminent old mans habits.

Alligator Staff
Dave Spahr
Sports Editor

Annette Brin
:: Eft rtbHd^Assis^iHt
Ol tVLJ tl

EDITORIAL
Where's Home?
Incompetancy is not her excuse.
We dont think Alachua County Supervisor of Elections
Alma Bethea is denying students the right to register
because she cant handle the job.
She must have other reasons.
Unfortunately they escape us.
We dont think she is denying us our rights through
anything but her firm belief that she is legally only doing
what the law requires.
But we question whether her firm belief is enough.
Legally, she may be able to deny us the right to register.
However, we feel if she is genuinely concerned with
legality, she will request an opinion from the state Attorney
General Earl Faircloth.
Then both Mrs. Bethea and the students would know for
sure
Or maybe UF Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder
should take her up on her offer to share the costs of
litigation.
Taking the case to court ought to prove something.
If we are not entitled legally to register and vote here,
then we should stop talking with Mrs. Bethea and speak to
the legislators.
The law isnt infallible and if the law can be interpreted
to disenfranchise college students, it should be changed.
The present situation definitely denies us one of the most
cherished privileges of citizens in a democracy the right to
have a say in our government.
August 8, the registration deadline for the November
elections, is approaching rapidly. If Mrs. Bethea genuinely is
concerned with citizens right to vote (being supervisor of
elections, we assume she is) then she wont hesitate to get a
legal opinion on her antics during the past few years.
Perhaps some of us could vote in our home counties.
But, how may of us have the intent to make the
counties from which we came our permanent residence?
How many of us have spent the last six months in .our
home county? Or even the last four years?
How many of us keep up with the local issues in Dade,
Broward or Palm Beach Counties?
People are naturally more concerned, and more exposed,
to those things which are occurring right around them.
We understand residents may fear the influence 20,000
students could have on local elections.
All we can say to them is it just might be the best thing
in<
You escaped from a North Vietnam jail? I just broke
out of one in South Vietnam

Dan Vining
I .rJfMtUWv
Oarrfcus Living>Ei&t6fc :

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89. Busi Business,
ness, Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82, 83 or 84.
Circulation: 392-1619.
§ pimOni exoressecl Hr til's 1 Florida those of
W4rr s not those
: b¥b?tao?ffra*wik baitea



Speaking Out "~j
Fence-Sitting No Answer
i. '; ,J i '"-by Rod Tennyson=i

Congressman Don Fuqua
representing Gainesville, would
bring the troops home
tomorrow, but he feels the war
in Indochina is the Presidents
problem not the Congress.
Fuqua feels the Presidents
no win policy does not justify
a continuation of the war. If
we are not going to win, we
should bring the troops home as

There is no hope
for the complacent man.

r i
| Teenagers Not Responsible
$ EDITOR: 3
5 S
jjj The lowered voting age wont make any difference, says :j:
$ Dr. Ernest Bartley, UF political science professor, quoted on the :jj
j;j: front page of June 25,1970 Alligator. :!
ijj: UF students voted on the University Activities Center the :jj
same way their 6 5-year-old counterparts voted in Pinellas iji
6 County on the school bond issue, Dr. Bartley added. Did Dr, jjj
jj*: Bartley take the trouble to Find out where the UAC issue was jjj
§ : supported and where it was defeated? How many 18-year-olds jjj
jijj voted at the Law Library and how many at the dorms? Does he jjj
jjj remember the high proportion of lUC and 2UC signatures on ;j
11 letters to the Alligator in support of the UAC? ;j:
i THE DEFEAT of the proposed UAC was accomplished jj
i largely by the efforts of mature students who pay their tuition ji
i and living expenses out of their own pockets, by taking on jobs j:
i i and assuming loans. It was the teenagers who get their tuition, j;
i sandwich additional monies, their mommies and daddies who j:
j were in favor of the UAC proposal. \
How many 18-year-olds have held jobs steadily enough to jj
j actually pay taxes at the end of the year and not get a refund? j
I j How many have fought the draft or put up with it? How many :
j have been forced to take on some serious responsibility other i
than attending a learning institution?
Should we change our voting laws to appease the vociferous, ;
i inexperienced youths? Id rather see a Constitutional j
j ammendment allowing only those citizens who have worked and j
j payed taxes for three consecutive years to vote. i
I HUMBERTO JIMENEZ, 3 AS j
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
0 Be typed, signed, double-spaced and not exceed
41 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer shows just
cause. The editor reserves the right to edit all letters for
space.
Writers may submit longer essays, columns or letters
to be considered for use as Speaking Out" columns.
Any writer interested in submitting a regular column is
asked to contact the editor and be prepared to show
samples of his work.

soon as possible, tomorrow if
possible.
AS TO what a congressman
should do to change a policy he
feels is wrong Fuqua replied,
The Congress in no way should
tie the Presidents hands in
dealing with the war. If I was
President and Congress restricted
me in such a situation I would
resign. Fuqua said he would

Hoarding
EDITOR:
Have you ever tried to read a
daily paper at the main library?
It is no trick if you bring your
own paper or if you want to
read the three-day-old confetti
made available to all students
without request.
IF YOU want to read
yesterdays paper you can
usually get it by request at the
main desk, they dont usually
put up much of a Fight for
yesterdays paper.
If you want todays paper, be
prepared for a disappointment. I
dont know if a rule prevents the
paper from being put out before
the staff (morning and evening
shift) has read every line, or if
fear of trusting a university
student with a ten cent item is
the root of the newspaper
hoarding, but I do know if you
want to read todays newspaper
today, buy it baby.
JIM GALLOWY, 3FY
.>

i
not vote for either the
Cooper-Church nor the
Hatfield-McGovern amendments.
The Cooper -Church
amendment calls for a ban on
financing any future military
operations in Cambodia. The
Hatfield-McGovern amendment
seeks to stop financing of any
military operations in Indochina
after the end of 1971, sometimes

Solares: Half Truth
Is Same As Lie
EDITOR:
As you are aware the UF Athletic Association for the first time in
its history has released its 1970-71 fiscal budget. According to an
article in the Tampa Tribune on July 18, Athletic Director Ray Graves
is credited with saying that student fees represent 11 percent of the
total budget, but that was still far below other SEC schools, even with
the new policy of $5 for five home games for every student. This is a
flagrant misrepresentation of the amount credited to student support
of the athletic program on this campus. A half truth is as good as a lie,
so lets set this straight.
Computing the income to the Athletic Association from student
fees utilizing the Figures of a student population of 20,000 for the fall,
winter and spring quarters at $3.75 will give $225,000. including a
student population of 10,000 for the summer quarter will add
$37,500. In addition the Student Senate appropriated $64,978 for
intramurals which is included in the Athletic Budget as $65,131 but
there is no mention of it coming from the student body. Further, if
you estimate that 16,000 students will purchase the football card at
$5.00 you add another SBO,OOO. There is no input here for spouse
cards which cost $15.50 and there are approximately 4,500 married
students on campus therefore I too will ignor this for the time being.
Simple arthmetic of the figures presented will give a total of $407,478
from student sources. This is significantly more than that accredited
to us by both the Athletic Association and the press. If a new
percentage is compiled it will reveal that students contribute a little
more than 15 per cent of the total budget of the Athletic Association.
HENRY SOLARES
STUDENT BODY VICE PRESIDENT.

The Indochina Aftermath

Pulling out of Indochina in a
manner resulting in a
Communist victory will have
dangerous internal consequences
in this country far beyond the
problems created by remaining.
The news media is full of
articles and statements by
columnists, commentators,
educators, and politicians on
what is going to happen
internally if we do not cut
ourself free from Indochina
now, and the consequences be
damned if the Communists take
over.
BUT,NOWHERE have I heard
discussion of the consequences,
if after spending $l5O billion
and 50 thousand lives, we lbose
to the North Vietnamese, j
I dont think the majority of
Americans will psychologically
accept a total defeat in
Indochina no matter what
sugar-coated term is used.
When we lost China to the
Communist in 1949 and fought
to a stalemate in Korea the
reaction in this country was
frightening. It gave rise to
Joseph McCarthy and a
Communist witch-hunt whose

referred to as the amendment
to end the war.
A fence-sitting policy, the war
is wrong but it is not my
responsibility, is good political
thesis but it cannot be justified
on a constitutional basis.
FROM ARTICLE I, Section 8
of the Constitution: Congress <
shall have the power to raise
and support armies, but no

Keep Right
llllllflH
by Fred Vollrath

lingering effects we still feel
directly today.
AMERICANS, unfortunately,
ate great believers in the
conspiratorial view of history.
The Left thinks the cause of
every problem is a fascist
conspiracy spearheaded by racist
politicians, Pentagon generals,
and captains of industry.
The Right often thinks every
problem is created by agents of
the International Communist
Conspiracy, whose agents are
most active on the university
faculties, civil rights groups, and
the Supreme Court.
IF WE do loose, I fear there is
going to be a wave of repression
unlike anything we have seen
when the Hard Hats and the
Silent Majority in their
bitterness over Americas defeat,
rise up and demand vengence.
They will forget the
frustration of protracted war

V r '
TttMdar.'sltrfr 8 V>99e i *7h Florida Adigotor,

appropriation of money to that
use shall be for a longer term
then two years. Our founding
fathers intended for the
Congress to maintain an
effective purse string control
over the armed forces. The
constitution also provides that
only Congress shall declare war.
From a strict constructionist
point of view, it is obvious the
Constitution gives Congress
power to control the Armed
Forces and their engagement in
armed conflicts. If the
Constitution gives this power
then it is apparent the founding
fathers expected the congress to
use it.
It is absurd to think the
Presidents power as
Commander-in-Chief can in
effect negate the Constitutional
powers of the Congress.
SINCE OUR current foreign
policy results in involving large
numbers of our forces in long
term armed conflicts, in areas
which the Constitution gives
Congress the control, it is time
Congressmen like Fuqua
exercise their constitutional
right and duty.
If a congressman feels a policy
costing billions of dollars and
resulting in thousands of dead
American soldiers is wrong, then
he should vote to remove funds
supporting the policy.
The House just voted down
the Cooper-Church amendment
with less than an hour of debate,
in contrast to seven weeks in the
Senate. Many congressmen are
not taking Constitutional duties
seriously. A question of
financing militry operations that
could easily widen our
commitements is one important
enough to warrant more than an
hour of debate.
Too many congressmen find it
earier to duck Constitutional
duties for their own political
profits.

after the troops come home, but
the bitterness will remain. I fear
they will raise up the cry that we
were not defeated on the
battlefield by the North
Vietnamese Army, but, stabbed
in the back at home by
dissenters.
There is a real danger they
will turn their frustrations
inwardly on these people
demanding that Something be
done to punish them, stamp
them out, and assure that
nothing like them is ever
permitted to rise up again.
THEY WILL not be
questioning the anti-war
protestors judgement, like I do,
but rather their motivations.
If a stalemate in Korea could
create a climate of repression
like it did, it is terrifying to
contemplate the results a
genuine defeat could produce.

Page 7



Page 8

l Th* Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, July 21.1970

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MAAS BROTHERS
Have you mini and midi, too! Top a rust striped mini dress with a
matching midi skirt. Button a little, or button a lot! From our Junior
Terrace Department, modeled by Pat.
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BELK LINDSEY
Even old sleepy "Albert the Alligator" opened his eyes to this "thing
by Dune Deck. Jo Ann models the latest in fashion from Belk
Lindsey; the new Fall washable acrylic knit pantsuit, accented with
that reptile look. For Gainesville's fashion leader, shop Belk Lindsey
in the Gainesville Shopping Center.

j]B
SILVERMAN'S
Judy enjoy's a summer afternoon in this simply tailored dress by
Lansford. Made of 100% polyester, and available in maroon or navy.
The outfit features a V-neck and collar of solid color which joins a
striped skirt at the hips with a belt.

SEARS
Step into Fall fashion in a swinging herringbone tweed suit. The green
and navy tweed vest is trimmed with a navy band and gold buttons.
The green long-sleeved blouse ties at the neck in a bow or scarf affect.
If you want a more casual look replace the skirt with matching
bell-bottom slacks. Sears, Junior Bazaar. Modeled by Rita.

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COLONY SHOP
Bobbie Brooks introduces the longuette look in this bone-colored,
wide-wale corduroy skirt and bolero top. The outfit is accented by a
now look yellow blouse and shoes by Nina. Modeled by Malinda.

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SUSAN SCOTT
For the look that woos them all, try "Funky." This "Harlow-girl"
pantsuit is a fashion must. It's halter-topped, backless, and waiting for
you at Susan Scott. Modeled by Judi.
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FIGURE FAIR
Be as sweet as peaches & cream in your peach-colored lace over nylon
tricot Baby Doll pajamas. The outfit features a V-neck in front and
back, elastic waist band and dainty satin ribbon bow. Bikini to match.
Sizes: petite; small; and, medium. Modeled by Kathy.

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Tnaaday, July 21,170, Thu Florida Allgrtor,

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 21, 1970

Orange and

SEND ALL NOTICES TO
DIVISION OF INFOR INFORMATION
MATION INFORMATION SERVICES,
BLDG. H

CBS 261 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, July 28,
at 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
CMS 171 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, July
29, at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CHN 251 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, July 30,
at 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
i
COURSE FEE WAIVER for
faculty and staff members to
take up to six credit hours has
become law without the
governor's signature, according
to a report by the Board of
Regents office. All- University
employees who have been here
six months and meet admission
requirements may enroll on a
space available basis. Everyone is
required to pay the $lO
application fee if he has not
been previously enrolled at the
University. Although deadline
for fall applications has passed
exceptions will be made for
faculty and staff members, and
they may petition for
readmission.
PROPERTY CONTROL: In
order to assist in procedures
concerning the acquisition,
disposition and control of items
in various departments, the
Property Accounting Section is
compiling a roster of
departmental personnel who will
serve as liaison on property
matters. These individuals will
be furnished property procedure
information and policies and will
be in a position to facilitate
communication with this office.
Deans, directors and
departmental chairmen have
been asked to submit contact
names to Property Accounting,
Room 321, Tigert Hall by July
31.
NON-FLORIDA FEE
WAIVER FOR GRADUATE
ASSISTANTS AND
FELLOWS: Departments have
been requested to supply
Students Accounts, in the Hub,
with a new list or card for each
graduate student eligible for a
Non-Florida Tuition Waiver for
the fall quarter. All students will
be requested to pay registration
fees early by mail. Names should
be sent to Student Accounts no
later than Aug. 10.

PUTTING HUBBY THROUGH ?
/ Ever need professional advice on private matters that
require financial help. That's what YOUR CAMPUS
\ ( (/ k # Y\ CREDIT UNION is for. Remember...something can
V y V u JVu always be worked out...especially to help your man
/ i flet his degree!
Y q 1200 S. W. Fifth Avenue 302-0903

TEACHING RESOURCES
EQUIPMENT: Faculty and staff
members are reminded that
when checking out audio visual
equipment from Teaching
Resources the department
assumes financial liability for the
equipment in case of loss or
theft The hand signed receipt is
guarantee that delivery and pick
up of the equipment has been
made. The TRC has been
authorized to initiate an
interdepartmental billing for the
replacement of any item of
equipment reported to be lost or
missing while in the custody of a
department.
CANADIAN STUDENTS
interested in learning about job
opportunities in Canada may
consult the Foreign Student
Advisor, International Center.
FOREIGN STUDENTS may
get a booklet and application for
the Graduate Record
Examination to be given Oct. 24
from the Foreign Student
Office.
CHANGE TO BIWEEKLY
PAYROLL: Beginning Aug. 1,
all new Career Service employees
will be placed on the
current-certified biweekly
payroll plan. Those employees
-currently on the plan will
experience no change.
In about six months, or
January, all employees will be
changed to the biweekly payroll
plan. This will affect employees
as follows:
All Career Service
employees and all other types
of employees who are
non-exempt will be changed to
post-certified biweekly payroll.
This will be accomplished over a
period of several weeks in order
to alleviate any hardship on
employees.
- Faculty members, academic
OPS appointees and
administrative and professional
employees will be paid on a
biweekly basis and will receive
checks on the last day of the
biweekly pay period.
THE BOARD OF REGENTS
approved a pilot project on basic
medical science during its
meeting July 10. The program, if
funded by the Legislature, is
planned to begin in 1971 at
Florida State University and
Florida A & M University.

BLUE BULLETIN

Students who have had five
years of college experience
would be first transfers to come
to the University of Florida in
the fall of 1972, based on their
progress of the through the
program. Some 20 students are
expected during the first year,
with an increase up to 50 by
1974.
Vice Chancellor for Medical
and Health Sciences Kenneth E.
Penrod said by taking advantage
of existing competence in the
physical, biological and social
sciences, it should be possible to
provide the equivalency of the
first year of medicine in the
university setting. In that way
the students can begin medical
school at the time of the
beginning of the clinical program
in the second year. Thus, it
ought to provide an increase in
the number of graduates in
medicinal schools without the
necessity of major expansion of
the existing medical school.
The Board of Regents also
approved a recommendation
from the Council of Presidents
which says:
"Several presidents have
received inquiries regarding the
possible revisions of state
university academic calendars to
permit student participation in
the national election process.
The Council of Presidents favors
active participation on the part
of students in the orderly
process of democratic
government, and participation in
political campaigns is an
important part of this
procedure. However, few if any
segments, of society has the
privilege of being completely
relieved of their normal
responsibilities to allow for such
participation. Interest in and
commitment to political
campaign action on the part of
responsible citizens must be
sufficient to cause these citizens
to carry on this activity in
addition to other activities. Our
state universities encourage
students to participate in
political campaigning on the
same basis as other citizens.
"The published academic
calendar of a state university is a
statement of intent to the
public. It is worked out with due
reference to accredition
standards and synchronization
with other public and private
educational institutions and
scheduled activities. The Council
of Presidents recommends to the
Board of Regents, therefore,
that the regular instructional
schedule of the State University
System be observed during the
period of the hill elections and
that the published academic
calendar remain in effect."

Campus
Calendar

Tuesday
Faculty Lecture Series:
'Teaching Reading to Black
Children, "Dr. Ruthellen
Crews, Norman Hall
Auditorium, 1:25 p.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C 4
Union, 10 a.m.
Union Movie, "Will Penny,"
Union Auditorium, 6,8, &
10:00 p.m.i.
Tau Beta Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C 4 Union, 7 p.m.
Tarot Card Reading, Union
Lounge 122-23,7:30 p.m.
UF Stamp Club Meeting, Doyle
Corner Building, 7:30 p.m.
Bridge Club Meeting, 150 D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Engineering Dames Meeting,
Perry House, 8 p.m.
Music Department: GERARD
SCHWARTZ, Trumpeter &
KIM POFAHL TUTTLE, at
the piano, Union Ballroom,
8:15 p.m.
Lecture: 'THE ROLE OF
BAND MUSIC IN
AMERICAN CULTURE,"
Lecturer: Col. Harold B.
Bachman, 1:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Union Movie: "The Magician,"
Union Auditorium, 6,8, &
10:00 p.m.
Black Student Union Meeting,
349 Union, 6:30 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union, 7
p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 363 Union, 7 p.m.
Young Democrats Meeting, 362
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 347
Union, 7:30 p.m.

free expression
for $1.25?
read
florida quarterly

SEND ALL CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC
FUNCTIONS, 101 REITZ
UNION

Thursday
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7 p.m.
Law Dames Bridge Club
Meeting, 150 D Union, 8 p.m.
Muslim Students Prayer Meeting,
122 Union, 12:30 p.m.
Music Department: CONCERT
OF RENAISSANCE &
BAROQUE MUSIC, Union
Ballroom, 8:15 p.m.
Friday
Tolbert Area Movie: A Hat Full
of Rain/' South Hall Movie
Room, 5:30, 8 & 10:00 p.m.
Saturday
Music Department: SUMMER
ALL-STATE CHOIR, Union
Ballroom, 4 pjn.
Music Department:
GATORLAND FESTIVAL
ORCHESTRA, Union
Ballroom, 5 p.m.
Music Department:
GATORLAND BANDS
FINAL CONCERT, Union
Ballroom, 6:45 p.m.
Union Movie: "Stage Coach,"
Union Auditorium, 6,8, &
10:00 p.m.
Sunday
Tolbert Area Movie: "Far from
the Maddening Crowd,"
South Hall Movie Room,
5:30,8, & 10:30 p.m.
Bridge Club Meeting, 150 D
Union, 7 p.m.
Union Movie: "What's New
Pussycat?," Union
Auditorium, 7 & 9:30 p.m.



*i VS jodASWA***' j i jjnAJMyjBBSOf BSB V VyA c c vMCv* * OPPL 0% AQ% jJVA \ i 5 i SAr 11 iAci i *%'iAni*" QOC*
i i j I JV AAilo V 5 VCj i m.OjWAJ A*%%%** **| 1 1 Jjj 1 KS 1 KSI rrvi HAf nyciyi oVA- jmJ ijO? X C i 1 ci l r 2 veij i ** Beg XW{ 1
Jr STUDENT
i[ ORGANIZATIONS 1
ym INTRODUCE YOUR ORGANIZATION 'M
| Fall the fall terms new
)11 Florida Alligator jI /
11/ MAILAWAY EDITION M
llv ADVERTISING DEADLINES >W
fj IF Campus Living | jlntroduction to Campus| mLN
ll( | Mine | | | )|l
V| | July 29,1970 | August 12,1970 ||| F
J I f 100 pages with color, to be distributed yl m
j I y on campus the last day of classes, and IJ W
1 Iff mailed to the summer addresses of all ~jl f
1 I k" new incoming students for the Fall j IN
yl 111 Call the Advertising Department: 392-1681 I
or write: Room 330, JWRU I |

Tuesday, July 21,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
For Sale: Belmont Mobile Home 50 x
10 Located on extra nice large lot in
Pinehurst Park with pool and many
extras. 376-1122 after 3:30.
(A-160-6t-p)
Honda 305 Scrambler, 1967, Mint
condition, S4OO, 373-2718 between
4-8 p.m. (A-4t-161-p)
DONT merely briten your
carpets . Blue Lustre
them .. eliminate rapid resoilirg.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
1968 HONDA 50. Excellent
transportation. Only $65. Call
378-6277. (A-lt-164-p)
1970 TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLE
TR6R 650 cc. 2100 mi. 376-7421.
311 N.E. 10th St. Call between 5:30
p.m. & 7:00 p.m. $1150.00.
EXCELLENT CONDITION.
(A-st-164-p)
Summer fun is a 1968 Honda 450.
Only asking $599 includes shop
manual, tools, 2 helmets & other
extras. Call Bill 378-7082. See at 118
N.W. 36th Terr. (A-2t-164-p)
Triumph Roadracer lOO%
Street-legal. Modifications too
numerous to mention. Absolutely
perfect condition. Call 378-3705 up
to midnite. (A-lt-165-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -300 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* *
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FOR SA LE
Army officers class a greens and dress
blue uniforms with hats. 250 dollar
value for $l5O call 373-1947 or
264-2856 (size 36R) (A-2t-165-p)
1957 two bedroom trailer with patio
awning, carpeting, fuel tank & stand
SI2OO buys it all so call 378-1226
(A-st-165-p)
Air-conditioned convertible impala
1964 new paint and equipment $750;
bookcase bunkbed and set $74;
swivel desk chair; rocking chairs;
378-4153 (A-lt-165-p)
Almost new Maytag portawasher,
used 4 wks. Perfect condition. New
$lB9. Sacrifice for $169 or best
offer. Call 378-8020. See at 2000
S.W. 16th St. 47 (A-lt-165-p)
Honda 90 1967 step-thru, very good
cond. great for classes or just for fun.
Cali 376-9596, afternoons, and
evenings. $l5O or best offer.
(A-3t-165-p)
Gerts a gay Girl ready for a whirl!
after cleaning carpets with Blue
Lustre Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-62-c)
FOR SALE: Handmade driftwood
bar $125. 5 x 7 6 shelf bookcase
$35 must sell immediately moving
call 378-7224 (A-2t-165-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 21,1970

FOR SA LE
1967 Bridgestone duel twin 175 cc.
Excellent condition only 8500 miles
S3OO call 378-0477 (A-st-165-p)
German Shepherd puppy white male
8 weeks old. Registered AKC very
friendly. Dog needs a home $75
378-0844 (A-2M65-P)
FOR RENT
5 bedroom house 300.00 spacious 2
br. apt. 185.00 2 blocks north of
campus graduate men and older men
available sept. 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
HOLIDAY GARDENS
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C,' 1 bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S. W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Ten rooms graduate men and older
men close cool utilities washer-dryer
parking 135.00 single 100.00 double
summer 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
included completely furnished
Ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-ts-c)
Your own room in a nice 3 br. home.
Swimming pool, air conditioned. S4O
a month + V 2 utl. Cali 378-9239.
(B-3t-162-p)
Furnished 1 and 2 br. apts. Quiet and
secluded. 2901 N.W. 14th St. 2
blocks North of the Mall. Call
372-3981. (B-tfc)
WANTED
Listeners Wanted. Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and 4 p.m. for an
appointment. 392-2049. (c-tfc)
Need 4th roomate starting Fall Qrt.
Starlight Apt. SIOB per qrt. +
utilities. Nice, clean 2 bdrm., central
H/alr. Call Crlckett 373-1143
anytime If interested (C-2t-165-p)
Two Female roommates wanted for
cool Landmark poolside apt. for fall
and/or Winter, Spring. Call 373-2240
or come by Landmark no. 106 now!
(C-4t-165-p)
MELF* WANTED
Can you type well? But dont have a
typewriter or babysitter & need extra
funds? I can supply all three call
378-4952 after 6 P.M. (E-2t-165-p)

I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
I MONDAY
I BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI
ALL YOU CAN EAT TO>
I TUESDAY V
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
ALL YOU CAN EAT 99<
WEDNESDAY
I JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK J 9>
I THURSDAY and yellow r.ce
I BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS 99<
I FR,D^\ F,SH ALMONDINE AND FRENCH
I FR,ED POTATOES 89< I
I GAINESVILLE MALL

j.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.
AUTOS
# ********#** # ***"**#******* **"** # ** # ***"**"****"*
1965 Cutlass 442, 2 dr. h. t., Red
w/ air., full power, rebuilt auto
trans., rad., $1195, X/clean, call R.
Byrd at 378-4232 or 376-4479.
(G-3t-164-p)
69 Mustang sportsroof 302 cu in V 8
auto trans excellent cond. Must sell
asking $2,200. Call 378-2693 and
leave message. (G-st-162-p)
62 Bahama blue V.W. convertible,
right-hand drive probably only one In
Fla., new battery, good radio, heater,
7 tires, needs engine repair, firm
S3OO. Call 378-9891. (G-2t-164-p)
67 Ford, Fairlane 500 XL, 2 dr. H. t.,
4 speed w/ Hurst shifter, 4 BBL
Holley carb, full power, air, radio,
new tires, British green, $1895, extra
clean: Call 378-4232. (G-3t-164-p)
1966 Mustang, 289 automatic, good
shape, convertible. Call 378-7432
after 5. Open. (G-st-164-p)
Van 65 chevy automatic new tires
paint! 800.00 373-2126 call after 6
PM radio (G-2t-165-p)
[ Guns Guns Guns j'
C Inventory over 500. Buy j.
] | Sell Trade Repair. J
, t Reloading supplies, Layaway]!
' I plan. Harry Beckwith, gun J
1 ] dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. ]!
Union Auditorium
WILL
PENNY
with:
Charleton Heston,
Joan Hackett, Donald Pleasance
and Lee Majors
TONIGHT
at 6:00,8:00 & 10:00 p.m.
Admission 50C

PE Ft SON A L
::>:::::;:::::;: : :::;:::;:;:::>::::::-:::;:T:*::W^3fe:;:->:r:r:v
Wanted: One expert on Tarot Cards
for demonstration in the fall. Call
392-1655 or come by the Program
Office in the Union. (J-3t-162-p)
mEXEESBH from mallt
I AMERICA'S MI6HTIEST ADVENTURE! I
1 WINNER 3 ACADEMY AWARDS J
T n, ..e BEAVER k
f PLUS VALLEY
T PENTHOUSE 2 I PENTHOUSE 3 I
f B UTCH CASSID Y MIDNIGHT
WAND SUNDANCE COWBOY
4 KID 4
\wnTw im st v ly]
THIS SUMMER'S ONE AND
ONLY TOTAL FAMILY
ENTERTAINMENT!
Jl&Xvxfc J* A BIiAKE EDWAROS *
f
*V A PARAMLiiWIPIi.Ti'M _' £
v-4? SUIT,ESTEP FOR ft V*---
fif.NFJUi ArniFNrf'-
y 1 LAST
liais nU *, Vfct/1 FEW
A COCKEYED
MASTERPIECE!
t/'
OgwHwMilwitJ
.... NOW!
They re young and feel
everything more deeply.
Jm rf^nrr rf^nrrthe
the rf^nrrthe ~
strawberry
statement



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PE F* SONA L
COEDS Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32M37-P)
23 yr. old coed wants groovy
travelling companion (s) for Fall.
Destination to be decided by mutual
agreement. 378-7311, anytime.
(J-2M65-P)
iillmiili! I!
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PERSONAL
Students who stutter. We need you
for auditory feedback study. Will pay
you SB.OO for 3 sessions. Michelle
Jensen 378-0104 392-2046
(J-st-162-p)
Attention cat lovers! I need a good
home for a yellow striped cat, male,
1 yr. old, well-behaved. Call
378-0494. (J-4t-164-p)
Having trouble with classes?
Professors forcing you to attend?
Alligator is investigating voluntary
class attendance rule. Call 392-1686.
The Bent Card Coffee House is open
Friday, Saturday 8:30 until. Come
see The Folkies. 1836 W. Univ. Ave.
(J-3t-164-p)
Free pretty black and white kittens,
litter trained, five weeks old.
378-1041. (J-2t-164-p)
28 year old SEG would like to meet
mature coed. Please call Bill after 7
PM. 392-0980 or 372-4921.
fJ-2t-164-p)
Puppies part bassett, 5 weeks old,
$3 each, 3 males 3 females black and
tan call 378-7331 (J-2t-165-p)

Ny Open 7 days
\ 0 a week
i~>&7
Clip the
Pizza Inn
Buck Vl!i
belouifor a special treat! (| /
XI) O UGH N O TE~^Pjy\
\ *d.mobl. with th# JJ ~~/C
-^SaSeSm^i ' / < \ purcha*# as any // /h*'
ljFl' |,| f*kr; large fit* piixa /
7&~ \ lor 2 medium pinat.
Limit 1 Pino Inn i 0 I r
Oollar per family I The Piixa Inn
Offer good \ II 316 S.W. 16th Ave. //WTITN
uly 21 July 24 376-4521 VVJUVIL/
NK PLZZA INN BUCK^^^
;* fiSSi'
mil NOW IN rrs SECOND
EpISJI RECORD BREAKING WEEK!
THE #1 NOVEL OF THE YEAR-NOW A MOTION PICTURE!
Pw AIRPORT a
§& M a mi l^PS^ft
4 LANCASTER-MARTIN L~'^jrj
JEAN SEBER6 DEAN MARTIN
kMJih 'm JACQUELINE BISSET hHKI
ft A UNIVERSAL PICTURE ftp
SHel *** TECHNICOLOR*
mm . :|aH Produced in TODD AO Jgm
It §SM Til LL C£S AOMITTEO ~r : fr.. jam
Vi M *-* Genera l ps 'V"'
FEATURE AT . 1:46 4:24 7:00 9:38
,
HrJ FEATURE AT ..
1 : 42 3:38 5:34 7:40 9:46
This time... OfY Ls )
they've really gone c.H,u.T.rox
Beyond the BFStSPM
Valley of the Polls ikaV^fli
k lm Meyer Production panavision* color by deluxe* (X)B

Tuesday, July 21,1970, The Florida Alligator,

LOST Sc FOUND
FOUND. Light brown female puppy
approx. 6 mo. old. If not claimed will
send to city pound. Very loveable.
Please call 376-2304. (L-3t-161-NC)
Found: Black & white puppy about
six weeks old in matherly hall on
Thursday. Please call 373-1564 or
392-1686. (L-3t-163-nc)
LINDSAY RAE MICKLER!! You
left your student picture I.D. in Rm.
330 Union when you picked up your
Seminole. Phone 392-1681.
(L-3M64-NC)
LOST: Brown mens prescription
glasses in vicinity of Union. Call
392-8042. (L-3t-165-p)
SERVICES
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480 (M-ts-c)

Page 13

SERVICES
THE COPY CENTER 5 XEROX 4
ASK ABOUT OUR CHARGE PLAN.
1718 W. Univ. 376-9334 next to
Malones Bookstore. fM-13t-162-p)

8 INGMAR BERGMAN'S
Q JEWELED HORROR TALE
|WIM
A Wed. July
| at 6:00, 8:00, & 10:00 p.m.
V the Union Aud.
5 Admission 50< IHDH9ii
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadlino -300 pm. 2 days prior to slatting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
*WM O
| l| 1| r-| on £
- - *ffif§ £
s?|i a i l o
z
* rnammm mmmmmm mmmmm &
P ' rnmm
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_
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Sg. _r jr i
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"< 2 0 5
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£ >
N m
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SERVICES
.v.......................
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested and repairs
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 S.
Main (M-ts-c)



Page 14

[, Tha Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, July 21,1970

The
Florida
Alligator

*
New Three Layer Jello:
Its A Gustatory High

By DAN VINING
Alligator Campus Living Editor
There are only a few items of
good in this World of ours that
have true charisma and pazzazz.
Yogurt is one. Peanut butter bon
bons are another.
But, alas and alack, there is a
new super food that approaches
a gustatory high, a tongue trip.
ITS JAY-EEE-ELL-ELL-OH
and its in three layers now. No
foolin (it was sneaked by night
into the stores) its here and
there are three layers to it.
The dull brand name is Jello
1-2-3 Desert Mix which is a kick
in the pants and doesnt come
close to portraying the actual
thrill and mystic experience
involved in the contestation and
gesticulation of this quivering
and quaking delight. It is to Jello
(in the normal sense) as
Kool-Aid is to a Singapore Sling.
In short, its good.
Jello 1-2-3 costs 29 cents
which is more than regular Jello
but who cares. It comes in all
the flavors the dull kind does
and one package makes the same
four servings.
HERES WHAT the three
layers are:
Number One Layer (or
Number Three Layer, depending
on whether you start at the top
or the bottom) This is the
layer of a stuff that
approximates whipped cream
but isnt. Os course since its
mixed in with the other layers
initially ( and theres the magic),
it tastes a little like whatever the
flavor is but it is, for the most
part, like whipped cream.
Number Two Layer This
layer is in the middle, positioned
cleverly between Layer Number
One and Layer Number Three. It
approximates a mixture of Jello
(in the normal and now
antiquated sense) and whipped
cream. It is my favorite.
Number Three Layer
Bringing up the bottom is Jello
in the old sense, though not
precisely as Jello has been. Its
gamier.
SO, THATS it. Now heres
how to make it. To make four
2/3 cup servings, empty the
contents of the package into a
deep, narrow bowl. I dont know
why it has to be narrow and
deep, but it does.
Now come the boiling water,
2/3 of a cup. Dump that in with
the stuff and mix for a half of
minute at a low speed.
Turn up the mixer and whip it
now at a high speed for four
minutes. The instructions say
DO NOT UNDERWHIP and the
I Student Special
| Any car or color!
! I
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
I 2017 N.E. 27th Ain. ]
! Ph. 373-1665

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wm 1 : BB[ S' I'ff p IB Bl
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velocity with which they say it
makes you wonder what
happens if you should in fact,
underwhip. This is a particularly
ominous warning if youre
working with a hand mixer that
has a crank. Anyway, assuming
you can avoid underwhipping,
blend in one and a third cups of
cold water. Quickly.
Now, IMMEDIATELY pour
into your serving glasses, filling
each half full and then coming
back and filling them all the way
up. Let them stand in the room
(or sit if they prefer) for about
ten minutes and then stick them
in the fridge.
SHORTLY AFTER the time
when youre fighting to keep
from underwhipping, youll have
the initial mystic experience.

Answers To Last Weeks Puzzle:
< I 1 11 IN l("i If 111 BM| I 111 'I SB I) 111 pi 11 111 AI Wl II HI
A M 0 E B{A Ba TAP BBa IT I PWh U Ml A n| El
a[G epdojpFM S E 1 R H s n£l T hrl
[a |^BjP |E |A|TpMpip^o|L Itlueinldlelrl
I N E
UTT?
TYT
IJBB
TT "T
TUT
TT T

TT r
WHERE CAN YOU
GET AILTHIS FOR
UNDER 2.00?
iuicy, tender
Strip Sirloin, broiled
to your order
Baum*
SIRLOIN PIT
where you gel a break on steak and e/ery'h,ng eiv eiv-2445
-2445 eiv-2445 S.W. 13th Street 378-0946
wed. special Beef stew

The Separation. The Old
Separation Caper. The layers will
slowly divide probably much
like the planets each must have
split) off the sun. You can never
be sure just how big each layer
will be until the whole thing
sets, so dont lick your top layer
until the other is solid or you
may just be cutting down on
your middle sections, you
scurrilous underwhipper you.
Os course, like sex and drugs,
there is a chance to experiment
and I trust you will. For instance
what would happen if you
mixed TWO boxes of stuff in?
Would you get SIX layers? If
you put a half a box in would
you get a layer of chiffon and a
half a layer of foam? Ah well,
such are the mysteries of life.

ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
* jSc, .. "CORVAIR SPECIALIST"
zm GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 3767771
1969 CADILLAC ELDORADO $5795
Two door hardtop, front wheel drive, full power, air conditioned. Silver
with dark blue interior.
1969 OLDSMOBILE "98 $3795
Luxury sedan. Popular four door model. Air conditioned, power steering,
power brakes, automatic transmission. Choose from 2 in stock.
1969 CADILLAC COUPE de VILLE $5295
Two door hardtop. Maroon with matching interior. Air conditioned, fully
powered. Sold and serviced by Brasington.
1968 CADILLAC ELDORADO $4595
Beige with matching leather interior. Front wheel drive. Air conditioned
full power.
1968 CADILLAC SEDAN de VILLE.... $4195
Four door hardtop with bucket seats. Black vinyl over turquoise. Air
conditioned, full power, factory warranty.
1968 CADILLAC $4295
Sixty Special. Four door sedan. Turquoise with matching interior. Air
conditioned, full power, new belted tires.
1968 OLDSMOBILE..... $2295
Delmont 88. White four door sedan. Air conditioned, radio, heater, power
steering, power brakes, locally owned and serviced by Brasington. Choose
from two in stock.
1968 CHRYSLER NEWPORT. $2295
Custom. VB, automatic transmission, air conditioned, power steering,
power brakes, radio, heater, blue with matching blue interior.
1968 PONTIAC GTO $2495
Two door hardtop, VB, automatic transmission, radio, heater, power
steering, power brakes, tilt steering wheel, bucket seats with console.
Electric windows. Beige vinyl top over white.
1966 OLDSMOBILE 98 $1595
Black vinyl top over silver, air-conditioned, full power, tilt steering wheel,
signal seeking radio.
1967 OLDSMOBILE DELMONT $1995
White with red interior, radio, heater, air-conditioned, power steering, and
brakes.
1967 OLDSMOBILE $1795
Cutlass four door sedan. Blue with matching blue interior. Air conditioned,
radio, heater, power steering, power brakes, automatic transmission.
1967 FORD "T BIRDS $2195
Pick from 2 in stock all air conditioned, full power and automatic
transmissions.
.... sl3^^s
Two door hardtop, light green. Automatic transmission, radio, heater, air
conditioned.
1968 FORD $1695
Fairlane SOO V-B, fourdoor sedan. Green, air conditioned, radio, heater,
power steering S> brakes, automatic transmission.
1966 BUICK ELECTRA 225..... $1895
Four door hardtop, air conditioned, full power, tilt telescoping steer
wheel. Local owner. Nice car.
COAAET M....M......H,..M,....,..,..,.. n ,,a, tt ttaH $1595
Two door hardtop, VB, automatic transmission, white with blue interior.
Air conditioned, power steering.
1966 VOLKSWAGEN $1095
Radio, heater. Blue, runs good, looks good.
1969 VOLKSWAGEN $1895
White bug" automatic stick-shift, low mileage. Very clean car in mint
condition!
1966 CHEVROLET IMPALA .... $1395
Two door hardtop red with black interior, air conditioned, power steering
and brakes, big engine, Radial tires.
1964 BUICK SPECIAL $995
Two door hardtop, V-8 automatic transmission, black vinyl top over silver
gray. Radio, heater, air conditioned. Bucket seats.



The
Florida
Alligator

"T
Solares Blast Graves

(EDITORS NOTE: See Student
Body Vice President Henry
Sol ares letter, page 7.)
By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Sports Writer
UF Athletic Director Ray
Graves made public for the first
time his departments fiscal year
budget and the former Bull
Gator may have Student Body
Vice President Henry Solares
breathing down his neck for
some of the remarks he made
concerning student contribution
to the athletic program at last
Wednesdays budget-releasing
press conference.
The Athletic Association AA
hopes to be in the black by the
end of the 1970-71 fiscal year.
With a projected gross income of
$3,579,385 and expenses
running $2,709,718, the exact
surplus estimate is $61,497.
ALL FIGURES on the budget
released by Graves are estimates.
The success or failure of the AA
to be above the red line next
June 30 depends almost
exclusively on football ticket
sales.
With football and SEC
football, as listed in the budget,
representing a projecting plus
operating result of $1,041,097,
the number one money-getter on
the new budget, and student
fees, $243,750, being the second
largest income figure on the
budget, Graves said that student
fees represent 11 per cent of the
total budget.
Solares said that this was a
half-truth and was outraged by a
statement in Saturdays Tampa
Tribune that credited Graves
with saying that the 11 per cent
contribution was still far and
below other SEC schools, even
with the new ticket policy of $5
for five homes games for every
student.
THAT STATEMENT and
the budget they released all seem
to imply that the UF student
body is not contributing its fair
share to the financing of the
athletic program here, Solares
said.
Solares said that the budget
Astroturf
The UF will install a strip of
astroturf on the football practice
field before workouts begin next
month.
The athletic department
decided to install the fake grass
to enable the players to get the
feel of it before playing pn it at
Alabama and Tennessee.
Athletic Director Ray Graves
hopes to cover Florida field with
the artificial turf by the 1971
season.
>
?' Your Generator \
$ OVERHAULED Special ft
I* ASO ;
%.. INC.UIOX
alachuA*co6nty
generator service
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARD.
Mon. Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm
- 378-4011

I BimrMV ft ft|-|Yh7vi>r ,Y\X

does not reveal where the $5 for
five home games, even for an
estimated average number of
students attending the games, is
included in the figures.
Its true that student fees
($3.75 out of each students
tuition goes to athletics)
represent 11 per cent of the total
budget, but they fail to note
that Student government
finances the intramural program,

c >
| Budget
:j Lets
Gamo
> Guarantee* >
i Groat Stadium Budget Operating
> Description Income Rental Expense + Result >
I Football ; SEC Football 171,766 + 171,766
I Basketball 31,300 133,727 102,227 \
Baseball 37,032 37,032 >
I Track 6,000 55.580 89,580 \
> Swimming 25,300 26,300
I Golf 16.400 18.400
> Tennis 22,650 22,650
: Wrestling 14,122 14,122 >
> Intramurals 65,131 65,131 0 >
.* Cross Country 5,250 5,250
> Student Fees 243.750 + 243,750 >
.' Interest 30,000 -t- 30,000 £
Sales Tax 2,500 + 2,500 >
. Postage 4,500 + 4,500 £
. Car Taos S.noo + 5,000
> Yon Hall Dormitory 32,000 -f 32,000 £
! Radio 59,500 30,580 + 28420 >
! Football Programs 66,500 44,100 + 22.400 £
I Golf Course 126,100 v 115,840 + 10,260 >
; Scholarship Funds 407.00 n 515,193 108,193 ;
I Miscellaneous 19,000 + 10,000 >
> Concessions 125,0C0 71,750 + 53,250 ;
I NCAA & SEC Travel 13,500 13.500 >
> Training Room 76,000 76 OO ?
% Dining Room 4,450 4. 50
> Maint., Repairs, Etc 244.000 244,000 ;
I EmployeesFlCA 46,759 46,759
> General Administrative 330,130 330.130 :
SDorts Publicity 49,590 49490 ;.
; Promotion It Public Relations 58400 58,900 .*
Debt Service 172410 I72JIQ
; Permanent Improvements 20,000 20,000
Permanent Equipment 23487 23487 ;.
Totals $3,57948$ $886,176 $2,766,718 + 161.497
> >
£ . M. 44 fOdssasss ss s-oVs-#Vo-o-sVs*o*o*.-o*oV.*o*s-.A

GOOD THRU AUGUST
A OFF
23C 1 game
with coupon
3 BLOCKS NORTH OF MALL
PUTT-PUTT GOLF
3215 N.W. I3th St.
OPEN
M Sat 9AM -1 AM
SUN NOON lAM

|B
I SEA SQUAB OR GROUPER
ALL YOU CAN EAT! 75
Including ADULTS
French Fries
Hush Puppies Pirates'Slaw CHILDREN $1.15
I PIRATES COVE LOBSTER HOUSE
I -SEAFOOD FRESH FROM THE SEA"
SERVING DAILY FROM 5 P.M.
OCALA CAINESVILLi
I HWY. 301,441 OPEN SUNDAY 5-10
27 SOUTH 3500 S W. 13th ST.
11 "inn ON lIVAN ARM LAKI
PHONC 371.2931

that SG pays for a lot of what
the Gator Band does, or that SG
finances the cheerleaders,
Solares said.
This is a flagrant
misrepresentation of the amount
credited to student support of
the athletic program on this
campus. A half-truth is as good
as a lie, Solares added.
Graves could not be reached
for comment.

I RED PM qX I
MIGHT (V
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

XEROX
copies as low as 4c
at QUIKWAY
copy center
rFre^Offer^n
I GRAD STUDENTS NOW PREPARING |
I thesis and dissertations
bring a copy of this ad to
I Ouikway copy center and receive a 9
12 month supply of watch calendars.
Limit one set per customer
for graduate students only. I
THESIS AND DISSERTATIONS BOUND
FREE OF CHARGE FOR OUR XEROX
CUSTOMERS. Binding service available 7
days a week to help you in meeting deadlines.
(1) XEROX COPIES OF THESIS OR
DISSERTATIONS:
A. Ito 9 copies of one original 5 cents
each
B. 10 or more copies of one original 4
cents each
C. ALL THESIS AND DISSERTATIONS
done on 100% rag paper per Graduate School
specifications.
D. FREE collating
E. FREE parking
(2) REDUCTIONS AND ENLARGEMENTS
ALL DONE TO GRADUATE SCHOOL
SPECIFICATIONS
Use our convenient charge plan. Charge your
rough draft, final copy, reductions, etc. and
pay when completed. Or, make one charge
with MASTER CHARGE when all work is
completed.
Hours: Monday through Saturday 8:30 A.M.
to 10:00 P.M. Sunday 10:00 A.M. to 10:00
P.M.
MMHH Specialists In Duplicating
Thesis & Dissertations
University Plaza
1620 West University Avenue
Phone 376-2533
% % I t*RKiN6 Ouikway
I jj
West Universih/ Avenve

Timdoy. July 21.1*70. Th. Florid. A Honor.

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 21,1970

,*x*x.3x<-x-x*x.x.v.v.*.v.v.*.v *. v.v.v%x.v.x.v.x.v.v.v.v.v.vv.v.*.v.v.v.v.v.
j Halftime
By DCIVO Sp(lhrv.v.v.v.:i:
If there ever was a darkhorse candidate in the SEC it will come
for the blue grass state of Kentucky.
Coach John Ray had more than his share of problems with the Cats
last year (2-8) and the future doesnt look bright. Ray has 15 regulars
back, 7 on the offense and 8 on the defense. The defense includes
All-SEC tackle Dave Roller and returns all three linebackers and all
three defensive backs from last years squad.
THE WILDCATS are stronger for 1970 on experience alone. Their
chances of upsetting the Gators will depend on the development of a
breakaway runner and a capable field general. It should be
remembered that the Cats beat Archie Manning, Inc. last year.
Being the doormat of the SEC for the past several years is a
tradition the Mississippi States Coach Charley Shira would be more
than happy to break. State loses only 7 regulars from the 1969 team
which dumped on Richmond, Southern Miss., and Texas Tech. Those
losses could be critical however. Ace quarterback Tommy Pharr and
All-SEC defensive end Gene Wood will be sorely missed.
Wide receivers Sammy Milner (128 catches for 1,654 yds. in 2
years.) and David Smith lead the 9 regulars on offense. In the tilt
between the UF and State last season Milner created havoc in the
Gator secondary.
JOE REED, who made 536 yds. in total offense in 1969, though
playing only half the games due to injuries, succeeds Pharr at the
helm.
This is the Bulldogs strongest squad since 1964, with better
balance and more depth. Shiras aim next year is a winning season
which may be accomplished if the irrepressible Tommy Pharr is
replaced.
The Gators should not find Kentucky and Miss. State as
insurmountable opponents. The UF juggemuat rolled over the
Wildcats last season but the Bulldogs put up one helluva fight. When a
team is favored over another there are just too many ifs involved. The
underdog has a mental edge. State and Kentucky will have this
advantage over the Gators. I doubt if this mental handicap will hobble
the UF to the extent these teams will upset the Gators, though. One
factor that always looms into the picture when least expected is
injuries. If the Gators stay healthy there should be no great problem.

UF Rated No. 11
The UF was rated number 11
in the nation this fall in football
by Football Roundup magazine.
Its top twenty consists of:
Ohio State, Texas, Southern
Cal., Arkansas, Nebraska,
Mississippi, Stanford, Notre
Dame, Penn State, Michigan,
FLORIDA, Purdue, Houston,
LSU, Kansas State, Auburn,
Colorado, Missouri, Memphis
State and Arizona State.
The mag picked the Gators
second in the SEC behind the
Rebels of Ole Miss.
Heres
the
Hall
A ttMT BUL IKS BEEN
BfIHE TB BUB IBBK
IB HAKE YOB LOOK INTO
OUR 6REAT Bill
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ance resistance and turbulence. One reason
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to 29 mpg economy. Come in and
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Citroen
EDS M!iari-Citroii
I GAINESVILLE, FLA |
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n=: 1 BRING THIS AD~~Z Z ,"|
I | TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY SPECIAL j j
II ALL 8 TRACK STEREO j j
REG. LIST jm QQ
< 6.98 each <
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: : : bring this ad h : zn : nz: zz:nJ

The Amazing Dr. Cade

By MARSHALL GALLOP
Alligator Sports Writer
Dr. Robert Cade, UFs Man from Gatorade, has
decided to stay at UF instead of going to a small
hospital in Tanzania under the subsidation of the
Episcopal Church.
Dr. Cade was ready to move to the small African
country but several events nearer to home caused
him to stay at UF. The main reason I didnt go was
the Episcopal Church just couldnt come up with
the money, Dr. Cade said.
MONEY MIGHT have been one of the reasons for
his not going, but he has built an excellent renal
medicine program here and he would hate to see his
nine years here at UF go down the drain.
Another very good reason for staying is called
Hoppin Gator. This is an alcoholic beverage Dr.
Cade mixed up in about ten minutes. The drink is
aimed at those who dont like beer but would like


SAVE!
RALDWJN^^ii
I STARKE, FLORIDA I
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
WEEKDAYS BAM-6PM I
SATURDAY BAM IPM
G/klNE^^LlJE^RH^^^37Z^o3^^/^^iEJ^^APPO^NinM^Tj|

something of the same alcoholic content, yet still be
light. Dr. Cade predicts that after it has a chance to
be introduced to the public, every major brewery
will want to sell something like it.
A small Pittsburg brewery has been test
marketing Hoppin Gator, and then just this past
week they put it on the open market a& ova the US.
In the early test marketing 90 per cent of those
non-beer likers who tried Hoppin Gator, liked it,
while the regular beer drinkers who tried it, didnt
like Hoppin Gator. The beverage contains 4.9 per
cent alcohol, whereas there is 3.2 per cent to 4.0
percent in regular beer and 4.4 per cent in malt
liquors.
While driving to work one morning Dr. Cade
thought of a revolutionary design for football
helmets. The design involves bags of a viscous fluid
in bags shaped like a maltese cross. When impact
occurs these bags in the crown of the helmet absorb
the most of the impact.