Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Vol 62. No. 163

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PHIL BANNISTER
WHO IS THIS?
This hand belongs to someone "hundreds" look forward to meeting
every Saturday night. Sound enticing? If it does, you can always turn
to page two for the complete story.
Swimming Pools
Move Step Closer
By PHILIP MORGAN
Alligator Writer
A $126,950 bid to construct two swimming pools on the UF
campus was awarded Friday to Cox Craft Co. of Birmingham, by the
Board of Regents at their meeting in Jacksonville.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder said Sunday "they should
be able to start construction of the pools right away, if our earlier
plans still hold. Weve been trying to get this through for two years.
UHLFELDER SAID the plans are for two pools, one behind
Graham and Trussler Halls, and the other near Broward. Both pools
are to be heated and lighted, he said.
"I presume we can work it out so that all dorms will have access to
the pools once they are completed, he said.
Brad Raffle, a student appointed by Uhlfelder to investigate the
planning of the pools, said the earlier bids had been too low for the
construction, and that Director of Housing Dr. Harold C. Riker was
looking into the matter.
RIKER COULD not be reached for comment.
In other action Friday, the Regents gave a final approval for a $6.5
million grant from the Office of Economic Opportunity to UF for a
family planning project. The project, to be directed by Dr. Harry
Prystowski of the College of Medicine, will involve health services for
41 counties in Florida.
Regents also set the limit for 2,800 for entering freshmen in the
fall. This has been the limit for the past five years.
DR. RAE 0. Weimer, special assistant to UF President Stephen C.
Connell, said the UF does not have the facilities to accomodate any
more than 2,800, and does not see any change in the limit for next
year.
j JAZZ AND MELONS j
ig Free watermelon and music will be available from 2-3 p.m. :
ig today on the south terrace of Reitz Union. Union officials say a |:j
11 'Dixieland Jazz Combo" will provide the melody to accompany £
|"lots of free watermelon."

The
Florida Alligator

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Board Os Regents
Rejects Princeton Plan

By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students will get no
official time off for politicking
next November.
The State Board of Regents
Friday approved a
recommendation from the
Council of University Presidents
not to close schools next fall to
allow students to participate in
the November elections.
The recommendation places
Floridas State University
System in opposition to the so
called Princeton Plan.
THE PRINCETON PLAN;
born of campus revulsion over
the Vietnam war, the Cambodia
invasion and the shootings at
Kent State University, suggests
that universities rearrange their
academic calendars to permit
students and faculty to
participate in the fall
congressional elections.
Princetoft has already
rearranged its academic calendar.
Many other universities around
the country are expected to
follow its lead, but UF will not
be one of them.
UF PRESIDENT Stephen C.
OConnell was one of the first to
oppose the plan.
OConnell warned that
involvement in politics could
result in the loss of tax
exemptions for educational
institutions. He said no other
segment of American society is
granted leaves of absence from
their jobs in order to campaign.
State University System
Chancellor Robert Mautz also
opposes the plan. In a recent
interview Mautz said:
WE BELIEVE students
should not be placed in a special
category that other citizens
dont have. If other citizens
participate they must do so on r
their own time and whenever
they can obtain leave from
business activity.
We see some danger in
politicizing the universities,
Mautz said. If a student wants
to cut classes, hes free to do so.
Theres no reason to
inconvenience all the students
for the sake of those who want
to participate.
One major objection to the
Princeton Plan is the fact that
too much political activity may
jeopardize the tax exemptions
enjoyed by American
universities.
THE AMERICAN COUNCIL
on Education and the Internal
Revenue Service now offers
guidelines to protect institutions
from losing their tax exemptions
if there is political activity on
their campuses.
Both the tax exemption of
the school and the tax deduction
available to donors, the
guidelines say, would be
jeopardized by any substantial

activity of a college in carrying
on propaganda, or otherwise
attempting to influence
legislation.
But rearrangement of
academic calendars to permit
student-faculty participation in
the election process as
Princeton plans to do would
not be deemed participation by
the school itself, the guidelines
say.
NEITHER WOULD this
constitute prohibitive legislative
activity, assuming that the recess
period substitutes for another
period and the university itself
does not intervene in a political
campaign.
Underlying the debate over
the Princeton Plan is the fact
that youth is beginning to have
an impact on American politics.
The exploits of former Sen.
Eugene McCarthys youthful
supporters is recorded history.
But no one knows what political
activity by the young will bring
to this years congressional
elections.
IF THE U.S. Supreme Court

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PHIL BANNISTER
WANT A UFESAVER?
Summer days at school are HOT I There's no other word for it.
Relief can be found, however, at such places as Florida pool.
Lifeguard Bruce Page (above) keeps an open eye on coed swimmer
Suzanne Benavides. Os course, Suzanne isn't near the water, but Bruce
probably reasons one can never be to carnful. Pool Hours are 12-5
Saturday and Sunday, and 12-8 every other day.

Tuesday, July 14, 1970

upholds the 18-year-olds right to
vote just what will they do to
American politics?
Harried candidates around the
country are saying privately that
they dont know whether
zealous students will help or
hurt them. Publicly, most
candidates are too cautious to
say anything.
Florida, with 119 state House
seats, a post in the U.S. Senate,
seats on the State Supreme
Court, cabinet posts and the
governors office up for grabs
may get little political activity
from its young.
Student Body Vice-President
Henry Solares submitted a plan
to UFs Academic Schedules and
Calendar Committee which
would have given UF students
time off to participate in next
falls elections. The proposal was
turned down.
NOW THAT the Board of
Regents has said no, theres not
much more we can do, Solares
said.
Even if Florida students were
(SEE PRINCETON PAGE 2)



Page 2

!/ Tm thorida Alligator, Tuesday, July 14, 1970

Ernie Johnson Blasts Away With

Funky SOUL
By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Say! This is old soul brother Em back again. This is the Funky
Soul Show. Hope youre feeling good cause I am.
Music filled the transmitting room of the station and soul brother
Ernie Johnson traded his beret for earphones. He smiled and swayed
to the music. If you dig soul I think I can move ya he said. Get
it!
THEN THE phones started ringing. Howre you doing, Joyce. Are
you listening to the show?
Requests came in from all over Gainesville. People had written to
the show from as far out as Melrose and Ocala.
Clarence and Ron were having a party they called in and
requested certain songs for their background music.
THATS HOW the Funky Soul Show started at 10 p.m. on
Saturday night on WRUF. Its a two hour soul show created mainly
for black students.
Ernie Johnson, 4AS a pre-med student, took over the show at the
beginning of summer quarter and added a lot of personality and
records.
He had no previous radio experience before a friend, Bill Ransom,
introduced him to the show last quarter. Ransom was the first
announcer for the program.
ERNIES HOBBY since high school has been electronics.
The main thing is we black students feel we should have
representation on the radio, Ernie said.
We need to appeal to the whole black community because
Gainesville doesnt have any black stations. If I dig a record by a
group, I play it but mostly, this is soul music.
HE RECALLED a black station in Ocala that had gone off the air.
Its like something was taken away.
Asked if any whites listen in he said, Every once in a while they
call and say they like it part of the silent majority, maybe?
Listeners gave the show its name. At the end of last quarter Ernie
and Ransom held a contest to find the title Funky Soul Show.
Possibilities were Color Us Black and Up Against The Wall
Soul, among others.
ANOTHER WRUF black announcer, Willy Dozier, came in with
more records. Most of the records used during the program are Ernies
or borrowed from his friends.
Were working on getting some WRUF money to buy soul records
for the show, he said. Theyve helped so far and Im hopeful that
theyll continue.
Some records are donated by the manufacturers, now.
Like everything else the show needs money.
DOZIER, OR soul brother Willy, also helps out on the announcing.
Occasionally, hed spin the records while Ernie, true to the promise to
his listeners, danced in the background.
Itd be nice to get a black show on WGGG, Ernie said. Were
looking for someone with the right license.
Asked if hed consider leaving medicine for broadcasting Ernie said,
I dont know. But, Im considering a minor in it.
IT WOULD BE a good income if I needed money for school.
In the future, Ernie would like to add an additional two hours of
jazz after the show from 12 to 2 a.m.
Id also like to interview the black athletes and Frolics
entertainers, he said.
The only problem he finds in the show now is technical. It blows
your mind to push a button and get no sound, he said after having
trouble with a taped commercial.
At the close of the show, his parting comments were to his theme,
Stainless Soul by The New Apocalypse.
I enjoyed being with you. Get it! Bye now.

THE CANDY SHOPPE
We Specialize In
Hand Dipped Chocolates
Also
Greeting Cards
Gift Fruits
Westgate Shopping Center
3311 W. Univ. Ave.
phone: 376-6806

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several -tfmas, 'Mottos foiicorrection must be given before the next
Insertlorv^

Remember I
Summer I
Bowling I
Special I
REITZ UNION I

Hk|||||||' Mill-
JIB IPS mm,
M iff
! PHIL BANNISTER
ERNIE JOHNSON
... rocks out with WR JF's Saturday night soul

Princeton Plan
given time off to politic next
fall, the number who would
actually do so is debatable.
The Princeton Plan is fine in
Princeton, UF Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder said,
Its not that important down in
this area.
UHLFELDER SAID Florida
politics offers the voter a
choice between status quo and
backward candidates.
Theres not much difference
between Carswell and Cramer,
Uhlfelder said. You cant get
students fired up against these
guys.
Uhlfelder has some objections
to the Princeton Plan, however.
Id like to see some sort of
process that would allow
students who want to participate
time off without being
penalized, Uhlfelder said, But
why should we (students) be
allowed to do it while the rest of
society cant?
On the other hand, what
about the people working in
Tallahassee? Theyre out
campaigning for their bosses,
he said.

Burger Chef
goes all out
to please
the student!
--- /*>
715 NW 13th St.
and 1412 N. Main St

we lend
to nice
9irl f (1^
At
TO/|

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
1200 S.W. sth Avenue Branch: HI2 Teaching Hospital
Exclusively for Uof F Families Organized in 1935
Assets over 6 Million Dividends: 5 3/4% Per Year



Women Plan
Conference
By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
New coeds will get a close look at all kinds of campus organizations
in the Womens Campus Life Conference Sept. 17 at 7 p.m. in the
Reitz Union Ballroom.
Its really a unique opportunity for all the womens organizations
to join together for one day and let all these new women see what
they have done on campus, said conference chairman Mary Tunstall.
ALL ENTERING coeds are invited. With representatives of all
womens organizations and groups of interest to women, the
conference will fill an information gap for new women on campus,
according to Miss Tunstall.
Even if you read about a group in a student handbook, you really
dont know what it is like until you meet some of the people in it and
get some first-hand information on its activities, she said.
In addition, new coeds will have a chance to meet the dean,
assistant dean and associate dean for student development without the
traditional stigma of a visit to the deans office, said Miss Tunstall.
MOST IMPORTANT, the event is by women and for women, she
said.
We want the new students to come together with the UF through
the women student leaders, organizations and activities planned for
women students, she said.
Thirty-four groups, including residence halls, colleges, honorary and
service organizations, will have information booths at the conference.
Eleven will provide speakers.
MRS. STEPHEN C. OConnell, UFs first lady, will speak as a
special guest of the conference. The Gator Pep Band has been invited
but may not be able to attend because of a tight schedule, Miss
Tunstall said.
After Mrs. OConnells speech and the introduction of the steering
committee, 30 to 40 minutes will be devoted to short speeches by
group representatives.
Speakers will include Carolyn Jones, Miss UF; Nancy Wolfson,
president of Mortar Board; Dr. Frank T. Adams, Jr., dean for student
development; Susan Johnson, president of Savant-UF; Phyllis Meek,
associate dean for student development and Vicki Jay, president of
Alpha Lambda Delta.
ALSO SPEAKING will be Loyce Katz, assistant dean for student
development; Leslie Lott, president of the panhellenic council; Susan
Jacobs, president of Interhall; Kathy White, secretary of the Gator
Band, and Susan Stratton, coordinator of Womens Cheerleaders.
Afterward, formal activities will conclude with an Orange and
Blue cheer and the singing of the Alma Mater, leaving guests free to
visit the booths and get acquainted with organization members.
Groups not represented by speakers but having booths will include
the Department of Music, Phyettes, Florida Players, Angel Flight,
College of Engineering, Cicerones, College of Medicine, College of
Nursing, College of Health Related Professions, Black Student Union
and the College of Agriculture.
Also represented will be the College of Physical Education and
Health, Army Sweethearts, Student Government, Gamma Beta Phi
(service honorary), Theta Sigma Phi (honorary journalism), Sigma Tau
Sigma (honorary tutoring), the University Religious Association,
Gamma Alpha Chi (womens professional advertising), and Phi Chi
Theta (professional womens business).
Acting as assistant chairmen of the conference are Gwen Jones and
Sally Finlay. Entertainment chairman is Kathy White and publicity
chairman is Brenda Gevertz.

BURGER KINGS
WHOPPER enougTto
; ;/*y 8 N.W 16th AVE.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
DATES 6/23
MEMO TO: Door Molester
from: Jean Chance
SUBJECT: Here is my summer schedule
for you to rip off and inconvenience
countless thousands of JM 301 students.
MONDAY By appointment
TUESDAY -1-2:30
WEDNESDAY 12:30-1:25
THURSDAY -By appointment
FRIDAY -11-noon or so
RIPPERS, BEWARE
Ever wondered why your teacher's office hours weren't posted on
the door? Maybe a door molester" ripped it down. Journalism
Instructor Mrs. Jean Chance has posted a memo to such rippers on her
office door. Oh well, at least she tried. And the sign's still there.
ROBBIES
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Tulay. July K, 1970, Thu Florldu Alligator, I

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Page 3



Page 4

Th* Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 14, 1970

New Budget Bad For UF
Says Academic Affairs VP

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
A report on the new budget
from Vice President for
Academic Affairs Frederick W.
Conner topped the agenda at the
Wednesday meeting of the
Council of Academic Deans.
Summarizing the meeting
later, Conner characterized the
state of the budget as bad.
FOR INSTANCE, the state

OEO Releases Largest
Grant In UF History

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writar
The division of sponsored
research has announced that last
month the Office of Economic
Opportunity (OEO) released a
grant of $787,802 to UFs
Department of Obstetrics and
Gynecology for family planning.
It is the largest grant to a
singfe department in university
history and is the first such
university department to receive
a grant from the headquarters of
OEO in the country.
THE AWARD is effective for
one year beginning July 1. It is
part of a $1.7 million package
release for innovative family
planning projects. Other
recipient agencies in the package
are in Texas, Virginia, and North
Carolina.
The award names Dr. Harry
Prystowsky, chairman of
obstetrics and gynecology, as
project director. We are looking

(q LADIES JULY
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has budgeted a total faculty
increase of 14.6 full time
equivalent positions for general
education, in the face of an
expected increase of 1,000
students. Last year, general
education received about 100
additional full time equivalents,
Conner said.
Also discussed at the meeting
were proposals for distinguished
service professorships and the

to Dr. Prystowsky to introduce
an innovative pilot program. All
four awards issued are designed
specifically to give further
impetus to family planning for
the poor in both rural and urban
areas,** Donald L. Brown,
program specialist in the Family
Planning Division of the OEO in
Washington, said.

1.
JML < STEAK HOUCB
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OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
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cost of endowed chairs.
The rank of distinguished
service professor would be
awarded in recognition of service
to UF such as outstanding
teaching, service on
extracurricular committees and
other little-recognized activities.
The title of research professor
now provides similar recognition
for outstanding research.
Such a rank might or might
not include an increase in salary.
The proposal is still under
discussion, according to Conner.
In response to inquiries about
the possibility of endowing
professorships, J. Hillis Miller
Health Center Provost Dr.
Edmund Ackell had written to
several colleagues for
information, Conner said.
Replies indicated the cost of
endowing a chair is extremely
high. At Harvard, for instance, a
sum of $1 million is considered
adequate, Conner said.

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9
GRAD STUDENTS NOW PREPARING thesis
and dissertations bring a copy of this ad to
Ouikway copy center and receive a 12 month
supply of watch calendars. Limit one set per
customer for graduate students only.
THESIS AND DISSERTATIONS BOUND
FREE OF CHARGE FOR OUR XEROX
CUSTOMERS. Binding service available 7
days a week to help you in meeting deadlines.
(1) XEROX COPIES OF THESIS OR
DISSERTATIONS:
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B. 10 or more copies of one original 4
cents each
C. ALL THESIS AND DISSERTATIONS
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D. FREE collating
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(2) REDUCTIONS AND ENLARGEMENTS
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Hours: Monday through Saturday 8:30 A.M.
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DESPITE DIFFICULTIES IMPOSED
Student Registration Increases

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Although still facing some
difficulties, UF students are
registering to vote for the
November general elections.
Students in the past have had
difficulty in registering to vote.
Flbrida law requires a person
over 21 to live in a county for
six months before they can
register to vote.
BUT UF STUDENTS had
complained in the past that the
Alachua County registration has
been hard for students. Among
the problems is the intent of
residence.
According to Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder, UF

Slogan Contest Rules
The following are the rules for the Homecoming 7O slogan contest:
Slogan should have a general Homecoming theme and have a
maximum length of seven words. The theme should be relevant to
current world affairs.
t In case of ties, the entry with the earliest postmark will be
awarded the prize.
The contest runs from July 1 to midnight July 31, 1970.
t All entries must be mailed or delivered to Homecoming Slogan
Contest, Florida Blue Key Office, Reitz Student Union, University of
Florida, 32601.
All entries become the property of Florida Blue Key.
i Members of Florida Blue Key and their immediate families and
members of the Homecoming staff and their immediate families are
ineligible.
CAMPUS TWIG MALL TWIG
AND
AT 1131 W. UNIV. AVE. NEXT TO MAAS BROS.
dgsMaj
JULY JUBILEE
SWIMSUITS
ENTIRE SUMMER STOCK OF SUITS 1/4
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OFF
DRESSES PANTDRESSES
SUMMER DRESSES AND PANTDRESSES, 1/ A
VALUES FROM sl2 TO SSO NOW / --
' OFF
SPORTSWEAR ..
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PANTS, SKIRTS, SHIRTS, PANTSUITS, TO / A^
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HANDBAGS, SCARVES, AND ASSORTED /4 to l/9J
LINGERIE ITEMS NOW AT / *-OFF
DONT MISS THESE GREAT VALUES!

students have been registering to
vote at the rate of 10 to 15 a
day.
Uhlfelder said flyers urgng
students to register to vote have
been sent to UF students.
Student Government (SG)
representatives are being sent to
the married students villages
today to urge them to register to
vote.
SG, ACCORDING to
Uhlfelder, will provide
transportation for students who
need it.
Gary Jordan, secretary of
married students, said earlier it
was easier for married students
to register to vote because they
have their families in Alachua
county and is easier for them to

proVfe residence.
When it is hard for students to
register Uhlfelder said those
students who have difficulties
should register in the counties
where they come from.
ACCORDING TO Uhlfelder,
SG is talking to the State
Attorney to get an opinion on
the intent of residence which has
been used to prevent students
from registering.
But the law is on our side,
says Uhlfelder. Some cases
would have to be taken to court,
but that takes a long time and it
could be costly.
The deadline for registration
is August 8. The Alachua
County elections office at the
courthouse will be open until 9

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Tuesday, July 14, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

EVERY THIRD
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FREE
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FABRIC CARE CENTER
SIN CITY PLAZA
OFF 13th St. on S.W. 16th Ava.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 14, 1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

. 'r. r .< <
- "V

f"
IK
Only The Trees Know

WASHINGTON The
super-secret story can now be
told how the U. S. has seeded
the Indochina jungles with
millions of electronic listening
devices, costing about $2,500 to
$3,000 apiece.
Most of these sensitive,
air-dropped sensors landed with
such a jar that they never
worked at all. Others picked up
jungle noises of interest to no
one except nature lovers. A few
detected the movement of
people, presumably enemy
soldiers, down the infiltration
routes into South Vietnam.
EVEN THE hardiest of the
detection devices seldom
continued to transmit their
mysterious sounds for more than
six or seven days.
Sen. William Proxmire,
D-Wis., has now ripped the
secrecy label off the story in a
Senate speech. He charged that
$2 billion had been spent on an
electronic detection system,
which cant tell the difference
between enemy soldiers and
innocent civilians.
But he barely scratched the
surface of the scandal. He called
upon Secretary of Defense Mel
Laird for the details, which
remained deeply hidden. It so
happens, however, that this
column already spent weeks
digging into the story. We can
now publish some of the facts
that Laird may be reluctant to
furnish;
* *
IN THE first place, the
taxpayers* investment in this
great electronic boondoggle is
closer to $4 billion than $2
billion. The funds have been
hidden under innocuous titles in
the budgets of the three armed
services. Some of the Navys
expenditures for sonar
equipment, for example, really
went to buy jungle listening
devices.
The devices were mounted
inside 30-inch flare cases and
launched by EC 121 planes
through their regular flare tubes.
Most were equipped with
parachutes, which were
supposed to drop the delicate
devices gently into the trees.
Thus the very trees developed

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Sallub
Executive Editor

Merry-Go-Round
llllllllllllllllllliltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllin
by Jack Anderson

ears to listen for approaching
infiltrators;
Most of the ears, of course,
turned out to be quite deaf.
Others failed to pick up the soft,
Indian-like footsteps of the
guerrillas. To make their
approach more audible, the brass
hats hit upon the idea of seeding
the jungle with explosive
devices. The theory was that the
guerrilla would step upon the
devices, which would crackle
and pop loud enough to be
overheard by the overhanging
electronic ears.
* *
ACCORDINGLY, AN
estimated S7OO million worth of
gray-green button-size explosives
are scattered around the jungle.
Unhappily, the infiltrators
quickly discovered what caused
the popping noise under their
feet. Thereafter, they simply
avoided the gray-green buttons
or sent a diversionary unit to set
them off purposely along the
wrong route.
Meanwhile, it occurred to
someone in the Pentagon that, if
they were going to all the
trouble of sprinkling the jungle
with explosives to detect
infiltrators, the charges may as
well be powerful enough to kill
the intruding enemy soldiers.
Thus a new batch of
explosives, disguised to look like
animal droppings, have been
scattered along the infiltration
trails. The only difficulty is that
innocent civilians and our own
observers also operate in the
same areas that have now been
seeded with lethal animal dung.
INDEED, GREEN Berets have
been sent into these areas to
plant special listening devices
and to make visual observations.
Presumably, they will be warned
not to step on innocent-looking
animal droppings. But it also
shouldnt take the enemy long
to learn that the droppings may

Les Gardieff
Managing Editor
Norm White
News Editor

be booby traps.
The manufacture of the secret
detection devices began in 1966.
These have been refined as the
program has progressed through
three phases. Seismic devices,
equipped with heavy nose cones
so they will stick in the ground,
are designed to pick up
footsteps. Some are so
sophisticated that they can
identify vehicles that move
down the jungle roads.
Others are equipped with
magnetic energy that can detect
what weapons the infiltrators
may be bringing with them. Still
others use heat energy to detect
approaching people.
THE SIGNALS from the
seeded devices are monitored by
- planes and helicopters, which
hover overhead. Sometimes they
remain in the air almost
constantly to listen for enemy
movements, but usually they
monitor the signals for short
periods.
The most agonizing problem
is that the expensive devices
usually dont work. Those that
do put out a signal must be
replaced within a week.
All the money that has been
wasted on this program may
never be uncovered. For
example, 20 experimental units
were shipped to Vietnam
recently in two lots. After the
first lot was air-dropped into the
jungle, not a single unit operated
more than two to three hours.

Alligator Staff

Fred Vollrath
Assistant News Editor
Annette Brin
Editorial Assistant

EDITORIAL
No Favorite
Democracy has no favorites.
Not children. Not builders. Not the Silent Majority. And
not college students.
Every U.S. citizen who feels deeply about certain public
policies, who wants desparately to participate in choosing
his leaders, should be and is allowed to do so.
And every university student whether he be Democrat
or Republican, for or against the war has the same right.
But simply because Americas college population may be
caught up in a deeply-felt need to speak out and take action
against our national policy in Southeast Asia, we cant
expect our kindly administrators to lead us by the hand.
Life just isnt that sunny.
The Princeton Plan doesnt politicize campuses; it just
rearranges campus calendars. And if the Board of Regents
had approved the plan, we would not have protested, for
the decision to politick would still have been ours.
We would have somehow endured the inconvenience of a
shorter Christmas or summer vacation. The vacation jobs
which so many of us take in order to earn money for school
may have been shortened by several weeks, and our budgets
would shrink accordingly.
But the Regents elected not to change the campus
calendars. And we let out a sigh of relief.
For the small minority of UF students who honestly
want to work for peace candidates or war candidates wont
be discouraged from becoming involved in the elections. A
light course schedule or a quarter out of school will solve
that problem.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder has raised the
question of just how many students would actually
participate in the campaigns if the Princeton Plan had been
approved.
And we cant foresee an overwhelming increase in the
amount of politicking, either.
So the majority of UF students who would use the two
weeks to rest and play, or would rather have Christmas and
summer vacations to earn money, wont have an
oddly-placed vacation forced on them.
If the concern is deep enough, we feel assured students
will find away to express it without inconveniencing others.
\ *** f M

Dave Spahr
Sports Editor
i
Dan Vining
Campus Living Editor

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications. A
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89. Busi Business,
ness, Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82,83 or 84.
Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are. those of
theeditors orof the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida



Trumpets Herald King Richard

Ever since our invasion
(Excuse me shouldnt I have
used the word incursion?) of
Cambodia, writers have been
having a field day
psychoanalyzing Richard Nixon,
the man who made Martha
Mitchell a household name. Pete
Ham mi 11 was the first of many
writers to suggest that the
invasion (Excuse me shouldnt
I have used the word
incursion?) of Cambodia was
a sexually symbolic act on the
part of the President, away of
proving his manhood.
This may be a very accurate
appraisal. Nixon and LBJ
repeatedly insisted that they
would not be nervous nellies
and pull out. But I think there
can be other explanations for
Nixons recent actions, and these
need not be necessarily Freudian
explanations.
SEVERAL WEEKS ago I

Speaking Out
Sheer Bliss In Atlanta
by Ken Driggs

The Atlanta Pop Festival was
many things to many people. So
many things, the only word to
describe it has to be carnival.
It was a freaks holiday. Dope
was plentiful and cheap, the
bands were possibly the best
selection ever presented, the
crowd was friendly and
concerned for itself and a good
time was had by almost all.
ATLANTA WAS the first big
pop festival Id ever attended. I
was suitably impressed by the
music. A lot of relatively
obscure bands made names for
themselves that weekend. Rare
Earth, Cactus, Ballin Jack,
Gypsie and Capt. Beefheart and
his All Grease Band, all wowed
the crowd long before the big
name performers hit the stage.
When the names did play,you
could be disappointed with
Hendrex and not feel cheated
because Alvin Lee, Lee Michaels,
John Sebastean, Johnny Winter
and dozens of others performed
like they never had. Theres no
record in the world that carries
the emotional impact of being
there.
But the best feeling of all had
to be the people. Friday night
the water supply broke down, so
your neighbor offered you a
drink until even his supply ran
out. The sun was hot, so you

UF Sidewalks Reflect History

Read any good sidewalks
lately? That may seem like a
strange question to ask but then
this column has been known to
be a little strange at times.
You see there is something
about wet cement which really
flips a lot of people out. People
use sticks, fingers, switch blades;
anything handy to etch in a few
immortal words like Joe
Slobnik wuz here or Cathy
loves Jane.
IN THE old days (pre 1960),
sidewalk graffiti dealt mainly
with who loved whom or what
and dates. Sometimes an
individual would express dislike
for a fellow being; i.e. Randy is
a fink. Hpwever, as Dylan said,
The times they are a changing.
,, > Here, on .campus we have some.

declared that Richard Nixon
thinks he is a king, not a
President. Nixon thinks he is
Louis XIV of France. Louis
XIV, at the close of the 17th
Century, started what was to
eventually become World War I
and, in the process, managed to
deplete the French treasury. One
does not have to listen to Arthur
Burns or Creighton Abrams to
draw the obvious parallel. Nixon
is Louis XIV, John Mitchell is
Cardinal Richelieu, and Spiro
Agnew is Torquemada and
Goebbels rolled into one lovable
package.
Louis XIV said: Letat, cest
moi! meaning I am the state!
Nixon, who does a great
imitation of David Frye, repeats
incessantly: I am the President.
Make no mistake about that. I
am the President. Let me make
one thing perfectly clear: I am
the President. Rumor has it, by

stripped to your skin and
splashed water with perfect
strangers in the river.
WHENEVER YOU pack
500,000 people in and around a
24 acre soybean field they either
get along or you have trouble.
The people talked and learned
something about each other.
They got along.
This kind of cooperation had
to be. Festival producers had
groosly under estimated their
drawing card. Jiffy Johnies
were not cleaned, water ran out,
shade ran out, food ran out, and
your money ran out before all of
these. But, your patience never
ran out, nor did your generosity.
The magic words Free
Festival brought a lot more
than every freak within 24
hours of Atlanta as one
promoter put it. They brought
Byron, Georgias very own out,
and most of them didnt try and
shoot a hippie. Some looked
very nervous, but most stayed
for a while and tried to
understand. A few even sat
down and enjoyed it.
EVEN GEORGIA State
Troopers, whom I was certain
would be eager to defend good
sound democracy in Georgia by
jailing us all, were civil. Some
even nice, even smiled a little.
The great variety of different

pretty neat sidewalks to read.
One of the best strips of cement
is between the University
Gallery and Fine Arts Building.
Along with the usual names and
greek letters are found the
following: apathy solves
everything; seaweed saves; grow
a rock; vomit; life is a terminal
disease; hello alien; mad dog
and Rudy were here; Squeege I
love you!
Another fertile bed of cement
graffiti is the Plaza of the
Americas. Some harried soul
expressed his feelings of the
moment very succinctly:
registration sucks. We are urged
to, come to Pollys Pros. That
one I havent figured out yet.
Tom has left his name all over
the. .place. whv. *Qthet .PUa.

the way, that Richard Nixon,
upon meeting Raquel Welch,
stared at Miss Welchs plunging
neckline and said: Let me make
two things perfectly clear.
Richard Nixon thinks he is
living in the Versailles Palace,
not the District of Columbia.
The White House guard has been
given new white uniforms,
furthering the illusion that
Nixon is King Richard the
Thurmond-Hearted, complete
with palace guard. One expects
the officers to take off their caps
and sing an aria from The
Student Prince. Sigmund
Romberg lives!
JACK ANDERSON wrote
(The Miami Herald. July 7):
Just as a king of old used to
enter his throne room, President
Nixons entry into the East
Room for the state dinner is
heralded by the blast of
trumpets. The Marine buglers,

kinds of people who showed up
for the sheer bliss of Atlanta
seemed to be getting along, even
at ease with each other. The
food scalpers profited off us all
and the dope peddlers made
money off most of us.
But the biggest profit of all

Two Cents Worth
EDITOR:
In the last few issues of the Alligator there have been articles pro
and con, if you care to call it that, on the infirmary and its services
and I wish to add my two cents to the argument.
I, for one, feel that the infirmary does a good job of caring for the
University ill. I went in last fall and the doctors there had to make use
of the hematology division at the med center to diagnos leukemia and
it was an extremely alert physician who first notice d abnormal cells.
LIKELY IM highly prejudiced, because I was very much a big
(46?) frog in a little pond during my two week stay at the infirmary,
what with nearly dying and all, (Ole brilliant had let the leukemia
process go on for quite a while before being talked into having this
mess checked out.)
I noted that the other patients got pretty good care, too. As few
nurses as there were they did manage to keep up beautifully. Doctors
could be reached quickly on a moments notice in emergencies.
Mrs. Boyd, the dietician, really works at seeing to it that everybody
gets what they like and need to eat, practically taking orders each day.
Even the orderlies liven the place up with talk of footraces and you
better eat up if you want to get well.
There were so many little niceties for all at the infirmary that
surely cancel any little inconveniences like the after 12:00 p.m.
policy. The above and beyond the call of duty things that the
infirmary does makes me and perhaps others feel the same way.
BERNADETTE ROSE HALL

View From The Crowd
by Rob Matte

jewels are: power to the people;
be a David; smoke and freak
now; I hope your children live to
read this.
THERE IS a great section of
1948 sidewalk between The Rat
and Murphree Area. Someone
really took a chance and put in
the word swear. Also there is
the admonition to freak
obviously carved out by a lone
hippi wandering in the dark ages
of twenty-two years ago. I think
.the best comment from 194&i5.,

Raving Dave
by David Miller

with banners draped from their
elongated trumpets, play a
fanfare. At this signal, the
President descends the grand
staircase, with the First Lady on
his arm, while the Marine band
plays him down with
processional music. Nixon takes
deliberate, measured steps,
beaming benevolently in the
manner of monarchs. He is a bit
stiff and awkward, however, not
having as much practice as most
monarchs.
That aint all, folks. Thomas
B. Ross recently wrote (Chicago
Daily News): President Nixon

was divided evenly amongst
everyone who was willing to
share in it. Communication. The
excuse was music, me method
was sharing and cooperation, the
result was inner warmth.
Atlanta was a gas and Im going
back.

Sh Boom!. That says it all.
In any case I know there are
many of you who keep a corner
of your eyes peeled for wet
cement. How else can you leave
a permanent part of yourself
here once youve gone:
I would like to close with my
favorite sidewalk graffiti found
somewhere on campus; love is
too important to play with and
too great a glittering mansion to
take someone, in for.the. night.

TuMday, July 14, 1970, Th* Florida Alligator,

is lavishly praising the movie
Patton to friends, advisers, and
visitors, stirring speculation that
he is emulating the celebrated
World War II General in his
conduct of the war in S.E.
Asia ... Nixon reportedly went
on to cite that part of the film
Patton in which the general
sent for the chaplain and
ordered a prayer for good
weather so that air power could
come to his aid during the
battle. We have every chaplain
in Vietnam praying for early
rain. the President is said to
have declared. You have to have
the will and determination to go
out and do what is right for
America.
Nixons apparent absorption
with Patton was first reported
recently by Hugh Sidey in the
current issue of life Magazine.
Sidey said Nixon saw the movie
with his family on April 4 and
again with Henry A. Kissinger,
his national security adviser, on
April 25, five days before the
Cambodian intervention. Sidey
also reported that a special
16-mm. film of the movie was
carried aboard the Presidents
plane when he flew to his home
in San Clemente, Calif., shortly
after his talk to the businessmen.
Presidential Assistant H.R.
Haldeman, Sidey said, has
advised White House staff
members to see the movie to get
a better understanding of
Nixon.
There you have it, folks.
Richard Nixon is a man who
considers himself a warrior-king,
both George Patton and Louis
Quatorze are one at the same
time. Too bad he doesnt try to
be Marcus Aurelius, the
philosopher-king. Anyway, you
might like to know that Pattons
son was in Vietnam until 1968,
when he left as a colonel. That
year he sent out Xmas cards
reading: From Col. and Mrs.
George S. Patton 111 Peace on
Earth. Attached to the cards
were color photographs of
mutilated Viet Cong, stacked in
a neat pile. At a farewell party
upon leaving the war zone, he
danced around holding a
polished VC skull with a bullet
hole over the left eye. The
Senate promoted him to general
last year.
' 1
There is no hope for
the complacent man <

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 14, 1970



Fashions

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nK >#<.' 11 1' 1 1 W || l Mila r^,-
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. +'* 4!*- NBHr
w l *^*'v^* l /V r" ~; %£.* -V /
BELK LINDSEY
Think and feel fashion; the "in" fashions from Belk Lindsey. Vikki
| models a new White Stag midi skirt and short vest flipped over a cable
; print skirt. Get a head start pn yoOr fall wardrobe with fashions from
. Belk Lindsey. )

p* ''
\

pH
,s v;
v x "----' : -
mB
-
> fS(i wys&
SILVERMA
"Country Set" shows up on the c
two-piece tennis dress that zips up the
it with a polka dot scarf. Modeled by D
jfigjjji l
v < Hh
' -X- ' >£*&&<. V"' Jgj&§a]fi
FIGURE F
"Going on vacation?" Then this lou
perfect thing. The tunic top of navy a
as a mini. The white pants have a cuff
small, and, medium. Modeled by Katfy



\
...
' IS
fp ; v.|M BBT : :
ERMAN'S
the court with a white polyester
up the front. Stitched in navy, we top
id by Donna.
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3URE FAIR
his lounge suit by Miss Elaine is the
navy and white stripes is ideal to wear
ea cuff to match the top. Sizes; petite,
/ Kathy.

(**&;** V
jBBfI^BniI^SBHHIS^HSH^^SR
?a. i i- '^iWBIIBIMPr" ffl w v £ y /<, r & §*|. yJ JssM£:,, />Ta v >
- : : ;
.^JHter
/. {Wst. zJm§StMtm
I
MAAS BROTHERS
Lace up a cummerbund and be a summer gypsy. We've got tons of
different prints and colors for you to choose from in our Junior
Sportswear Department. Modeled by Kim.
. < _, ,-£- v '# &&' /&tvx&> %,s §5 #s|§s2B^
'I >fy/\ '"/#&* $ '},^ v lls|§iil
***.' -y.:...-v v
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JB EsT jB IB JH& mL\ B HhJVj^
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SEARS
SNAKES ALIVE and on the go to update your fall wardrobe! Snake
Is going to take the lead in the 1970 fall fashion scene. You will
certainly be in style be in high style in this snake skin pantsuit. For
double wardrobe pleasure the tunic top makes a stylish mini. Sears
Junior Bazaar. Modeled by Pat.

. *> % i \ iw.o*'/^ l *, *' *'L
* jjf
ii i 'ipi
4 ir^y*^!i£ii3l^99r
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SUSAN SCOTT
Be beautiful and free in this black, laced up the sides pantsuit. The
midriff top and hip-hugging pants look like leather, but the price tells
you differently. Modeled by Judi.
k
MHHM |
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" 1
llllPw-SP % _.
p -/;" ~< |^j|HH|^^^^^^^HHE^|^^£9^HKxpl|pF
COLONY SHOP
Start fall off with this knit outfit by Marty Gutmacher... a colorful
striped top with solid gray pants. Crushed patent shoes by Miss
America. Modeled by Linda.

TuMday, July M, 70, Tlm Florida AMprtor,

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

DIXIELAND JAZZ
&
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TODAY 2:00 3:00 %\>j/
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don't miss it!
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Page 10

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July M, 1970

FOR SALE
12 x 48 Mobile Home Located In
Gainesville. No down Payment.
$72.00/Mo. If seriously interested
call collect; Art Deane, Miami,
233-6798. (A-160-st-p)
For Sale: Belmont Mobile Home 50 x
10 Located on extra nice large lot in
Pfnehurst Park with pool and many
extras. 378-1122 after 3:30.
(A-160-6t-p)
*67 Mustang, 3-speed, 6-cyllnder,
radio, heater, top condition! $1395
or best offer. Call 373-2179 after 5
PM. (A-162-2t-p)
Having to dispose of over SIBOO. of
stereo gear. Will sell most at 1/5 of
original Cost. Call 372-6265.
POSITIVELY FIRST COME FIRST
SERVED. (A-2t-162-p)
Yamaha 50, 1969, 570 miles, 2 new
helmets, S2OO or best offer.
372-4015. (A-2t-162-p)
For Sale: Stereo Components
Garrard turntable, Scott amp. Huge
Marble top Speakers. Must sell S6OO
Call 373-2467 before 5:00
(A-3t-161-p)
Honda 305 Scrambler, 1967, Mint
condition, S4OO, 373-2718 between
4-8 p.m. (A-4t-161-p)
We're holding now that everyones
gonet So were putting our
belibottoms on sale; 20% off for the
next two weeks. The Spanish Main,
1642 W. Unlv. Ave., open 10-10 Mon
Sat. (A-2t-162-p)
Three drawer steel filing cabinet, in
good condition call 372-2021 around
6:30 PM student. S4O. or best offer.
(A-lt-162-p)
1966 MG-B wire wheels radio rebuilt
transmission and clutch $750 921 NE
16 Ave 376-8806 after 5
(A-2t-162-p)
FOR RENT
5 bedroom house 300.00 spacious 2
br. apt. 185.00 2 blocks north of
campus graduate men and older men
available sept. 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
HOLIDAY GARDENS
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1 bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S. W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Private room, double bed, across
street from campus, $41.25 mo. 91
S.W. 13th St. 378-9043. (B-160-4t-p)
Ten rooms graduate men and older
men close cool utilities washer-dryer
parking 135.00 single 100.00 double
summer 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
included completely furnished
Ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-ts-c)
Your own room In a nice 3 br. home,
swimming poftl, air conditioned,
SIOO Vi utl. Call
378-9239. (B-3t-162-p)
Large furnished apartment close to
everything. Available now. $l2O.
Phone 376-6671. (B-2t-162-p)
HELP WANTED
Women I Learn so enhance your own
natural beauty and share these secrets
with others. Part-time, full time, &
distributorships available. Call Cindy
392-7672. (E-st-159-p)

[about getting a message across?l
Alligator TERSONAI ads ]J
Family night at the Union
VOYAGE to the BOTTOM of the SEA
plus a short yfT }\|
at 7:00 Thursday night Xfcar.-Tjp* / j|
254 kids under 12 / H
504 adults I
also
Bowling is $1.20 a lane for 1 hour.
Cafeteria special children under 12, half price
sponsored by JWRU
Open 7 days
a week
Clip the
Pizza Inn
Buck
below for a special treat! \\ j
yj
R*dmabU with lK
/Wi C-X AJr
\V .. . |or 2 medium pizza*.
]| DoMar parfamity \ / Th Pizza Inn tLJLI
/rvsjTrv' off#r,od M / 3I*s.w.i6thAv./fviwrth
(piXjj/July 14^ July. 17 W 376-4521 \ONJK)
PIZZA INN BUCK^^g
wJ ~
FMjit!Trtn!Tw| f ,! I Iw l|
I T.37S 7414 L mr l j I Ikl W I I | B
I THE FI RST Os THE SHOCK ROCK!
Russ Meyer promised to make the wildest, craziest, funniest,
the farthest out Musical-Horror-Sex-Comedy ever released.
He has succeeded. Lot Angeles Herald Examiner
|MM|||fl| This is not a seouel seouelthere
there seouelthere has smcW
Jgg Haa^Ucir
MRm v X aMMBWR WBV)
wtK BtfXvX >jy TWXWftn^b
Fnn 20li oM*ay#M Meg DOUY READ/CYKTHA MVERS'IIMCK MCBROOM/ JOHN LAIMt/MKHNB. BUDGETT
OMD6URMM/ Mail EDYIMLUM6 / nm msaMMlf RUSS
tor bROGBt EMIT < RUSS MEYBt/PIIIMSOroav by OELUir -s-j --a-- 1 (X)
ICgMSI liaenusn euui uir.lL .^_-7=^=n



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
Ford Galaxy 500, 1965 Tudor
hardtop. Radio, heater, all power,
V-8. Very clean. Mechanically
excellent. Body perfect. Sacrifice.
$865 372-7531. (G-3t-161-p)

Wmm
at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
MONDAY
BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI
ALL YOU CAN EAT 7OA
TUESDAY V
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
ALL YOU CAN EAT 99$
WEDNESDAY
JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK 79^
AND YELLOW RICE
THURSDAY
BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS 99$

Watch
for special advertising
supplement coming in
The Florida Alligator
THURS., JULY 21
I Special 200th Anniversary Offer I
from
ENCYCLOPAEDIA
BKITANN^A
I Preview
IflJk -d Limited Time I
1 WMSKm I | j | j on this new edition in the
| M. J wA Popular Anniversary Binding I
J Final 200th Anniversary Offer

AUTOS
1963 Chevrolet Impala convertible
327 V-8, power steering and brakes,
radio, air conditioning, wire wheels
A-l. Best offer. Call 378-0503.
(G-lt-162-p)

Tuesday, July 14, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

AUTOS
1969 Mustang. Mach I Good shape.
Call any time. 376-1006 (G-3t-161-p)
69 Mustang sportsroof 302 cu In V 8
auto trans excellent cond. Must sell
asking $2,200. Call 378-2693 and
leave message. (G-st-162-p)
X;y:y;y>:X;XxX££X;IvX;X:;;X;I:XvX:Xv
PERSONA L
PHOTOPORTRAITS. RICK
376-6028. (J-st-159-p)
COEDS Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
Free male kittens 3 months old one
grey one black ph 378-3093 after
5:30 (J-2t-162-p)
Wanted: One expert on Tarot Cards
for demonstration in the fall. Call
392-1655 or come by the Program
Office in the Union. (J-3t-162-p)
I J
The bizarre world you met hminet 01 Tin Apes vis enljl
the beflinnim-.WHAT UES BENEATH WAY BE THE ENDI |
PRICE 1.00 A CAR IF
ARRIVE BEFORE 8.00
cohit UNDEFEATED ""
PENTHOUSE 2 I PENTHOUSE 3
"THEY SHOOT HORSES I MIDNIGHT COWBOY
PONT THEY j X RATED

Page 11

PERSONAL
Students who stutter. We need you
for auditory feedback study. Will pay
you SB.OO for 3 sessions. Michelle
Jensen 378-0104 392-2046.
(J-st-162-p)
FREE LOVE! Four kittens on their
way to the pound. Take your pick of
Pumpkin's progeny **-- Boots,
Jennifer, Peachers, Tigen 378-5460
(J-lt-162-p)
Have you been looking for Kosmic
Dust, Beads or Bells by Landlubber.
Now you have to look no further
than the SPANISH MAIN 1642 W.
Unlv. Ave. Open 10-10, Mon Sat.
(J-2t-162-p)
LOST Si POUND
FOUND. Light brown female puppy
approx. 6 mo. old. If not claimed will
send to city pound. Very loveable.
Please call 376-2304. (L-3M61-NC)
Prescription glasses found near
Research Library. Call to Identify.
392-0352 and ask for Mrs. Hester In
Catalog Dept. (L-3t-161-nc)
Found: Black & white puppy about
six weeks old in matherly hall on
Thursday. Please call 373-1564 or
392-1686. (L-3t-163-nc)
SERVICES
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
Prompt pick-up, delivery. 373-1984,
9-5 (M-st-159-p)
THE COPY CENTER 5 XEROX 4
ASK ABOUT OUR CHARGE PLAN.
1718 W. Univ. 376-9334 next to
Malones Bookstore. (M-13t.-.162-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480 (M-ts-c)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested and repairs
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 S.
Main (M-ts-c)
' [ Guns Guns Guns j'
.( Inventory over 500. Buy j,
] Sell Trade Repair. l
, ( Reloading supplies, Layaway j!
4 i plan. Harry Beckwith, gun )
1 [ dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. j

Reitz Union Auditorium
led
PETER COOK, DUDLEY MOORE,
RAOUEL WELCH, ELEANOR BRON
/ The many targets in this social satire range from theology to
sex and the methods of attack range from subtle farce to pure
burlesque. A mod devil, sporting metal-rimmed glasses and aided
by his employees, The Seven Deadly Sins, acquires the soul of a
love-sick cook in exchange for seven wishes.
TODAY at 7:00 & 9:30 pan.
Admission 50^

[W|JInOW
you've 6cm/
aIouX My+*
*4 t*uef
\v* 1 W.
y l
20TH CENTURY- FOX Presents
MAE JOHN
WEST HUSTON
ANO
RAQUEL WELCH
..GORE VIDAL S-
MYRA
BRECKINRIDGE
PANAVISION* /^\
CokKby D LUXE* (/L)
I* .t iti tsi
RKilf Wls /| lylyj
I W* m7 W.IM $f \ jNOW!|
M*A*S : H is a
cockeyed masterpiece
see it twice.
I Qww3rlwn
A HURRY!
JK HURRY!
LAST FEW
kM 4 y.l IS DAYS
HI
WFWWW' 1
SHOWS-1:30 Rf
5:05-8:40 O
-SORRY -SORRYNO
NO -SORRYNO PASSES 3P



Page 12

', Th* Florida Alligator, Tuasday, July 14, 1970

Orange and

SEND ALL NOTICES TO
DIVISION OF INFOR INFORMATION
MATION INFORMATION SERVICES,
BLDG. H

PREMEDICAL,
PREDENTAL AND
PREVET ERINARY
STUDENTS must register
with the Office of
Preprofessional Education,
Room 105, Anderson Hall
before July 17. Be sure
to bring the full names
of all instructors and
your course section
numbers.
ETS FOREIGN
LANGUAGE EXAMINATION
will be given Saturday,
July 18, at 8:45 a.m.,
Room 207 Leigh Hall.
The examination is in
French, German, Russian
and Spanish.
MID-TERM TESTS: All
students are expected to
report for these tests and
each must bring a No.
2 pencil and will be
required to use his Social
Security Number.
CPS 122 MID-TERM
TEST will be given
Tuesday, July 21, at 7
p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CPS 123 MID-TERM
TEST will be given
Tuesday, July 21, at 7
p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CLC 144 MID-TERM
(practice) TEST will be
given Wednesday, July 22,
at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CSS 111 MID-TERM
TEST will be given
Thursday, July 23, at 7
p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CSS 112 MID-TERM
TEST will be given
Thursday, July 23, at 7
p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
OMBUDSMAN CAN
HELP YOU with any
problems personal, legal,
housing, and academic.
Any time during day or
night you can call
392-1650, and leave a
message so that we can
contact you, or come by
Room 232, Reitz Union
any weekday from 2 to
4 p jn. Your identity and
problem are confidential.
Ombudsman is a Student
Government project and is
run by Gamma Beta Phi
Society.

, YQUR NEXT CAR LOAN...
balance and do you ever save when you
| (nJI u|) trade or pay ahead!! Call 392-0393 for cost
before signing papers anywhere else.
Payroll deduction available for share and
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Qk A
sth Avtnm of Hi corner of 12th Styt Hours:BK)oo.m. 3:3opj. Mowdkiy through Fridqy V

OPERATIONS FOR
1970-71: The Office of
Administrative Affairs has
released a memorandum
which says the University
has received instructions
from the Secretary of
the Department of
Administration that no
new or improved programs
should be implemented
until the Operating Budget
for 1970-71 has been
approved.
Financing and Accounting
reports that Budget
Commission approval of
the 1970-71 Operating
Budget is not expected
until September or
October. As of July 8
allocations for Expense,
Operating Capital Outlay
and Other Personal
Services have not been
finalized, but should be
forthcoming within the
next few weeks. Until
that time, tentative First
Quarter Release for
1970-71 in the Education
and General and Health
Center Budgets will be as
follows:
Expense 4O per cent
of 1969-70
OCO 3O per cent of
1969-70 ..
OPS 100 per cent of
1969-70
The basis for releases
in other budgets will be
the 1969-70 Operating
Budget and the amounts
released will be
coordinated individually
with the effected
departments.
FURNITURE NEEDING
UPHOLSTERY can be
done by the Florida
Correctional Industries.
Samples of upholstery
material available are
located in the Purchasing
Division.
Departments needing this
service should (a) obtain
sample material from the
Purchasing Division and
(b) submit requisition
(expense account) for
work to be done. The
requisition should include
the following information:
type and number of
upholstery selected, items
to be upholstered, decal
numbers, if any, and
specific location of
furniture. Prices quoted
will include pick up and
delivery.

BLUE BULLETIN

IDENTIFICATION AND
INVENTORY OF
PERSONAL PROPERTY:
Effective July 1 the
minimum value of fixtures
and tangible personal
property that must be
identified and inventories
is increased to SIOO.
Each agency has been
granted permission to use
its discretion relative to
the continuance of
recording property valued
at less than SIOO.
Therefore, specific
attractive items such as
these listed below will
continue to be purchased
from the OCO account
and a decal will be
issued. Other items
normally purchased from
OCO funds below SIOO
will continue to be
purchased in the OCO
account.
Office Desks
Swivel Chairs, Sec'y &
Executive Arm
Adding machines
Bicycles
Binoculars
Blenders
File Cabinets
Dictaphones
Drills, Electric
Record players
Projectors
Tape recorders
These are not to be
considered the only

Campus Calendar

Tuesday
Children's Ballet Lessons, C 4
Union, 10:00 a.m.
Homecoming Committee
Meeting, 355 & 356 Union,
3:30 p.m.
Union Movie: "Bedazzled",
Union Auditorium, 7:00 &
9:30 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Student Florida Education
Association Meeting, 174
Norman Hall, 7:30 pjn.
Bridge Club Meeting, 150 C& D
Union, 10:00 p.m.
Student Senate Meeting, 349
Union 7:30 p.m.
Young Republicans Club
Meeting, 355 & 356 Union,
8:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C 4 Union 9:00
p.m.
Law Dames, Dean Maloney's
House, 1823 N.W. 10 Ave.,
8:00 p.m.
Faculty Lecture Series, 'The
Community Junior College,"
Dr. Joe Fordyce, Norman
Hall, 1:25 p.m.

exceptions to the SIOO
minimum but are used to
illustrate the type of
equipment which will
continue to be decaled
and accounted for.
In addition, the policy
of assigning one property
number to groups of 10
or more similar items
will be discontinued.
Questions should be
addressed to Property
Accounting.
THE FINANCE AND
ACCOUNTING QUESTION QUESTIONNAIRE
NAIRE QUESTIONNAIRE which was
conducted recently
produced changes which
have been initiated.
Among these changes
are:
A monthly analyse
of outstanding Purchase
Orders will be distributed
to all departments. The
computer listing will
facilitate reconciliation

Wednesday
Student Publication Meeting,
330 Union, 2:30 pjm.
Union Movie: "Pretty Poison",
Union Auditorium, 6:00,
8:00, & 9:30 p.m.
Black Student Union Meeting,
349 Union, 6:30 p.m.
Music Department: Twilight
Concert, University
Auditorium Lawn, 6:45 p.m.
Florida Extension Homemakers
Banquet, 233-34A Union,
7:00 pjn.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting. 363 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Japanese Ceremonies: Flower
Arranging, Arts, Crafts Patio,
7:30 p.m.
Music Department: Gator Band
Concert, North Terrace,
Union, 7:30 pjn.
Gator Ski Club Meeting, 346
Union, 8:00 pjm.

SEND ALL CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC
FUNCTIONS, 101 REITZ
UNION

between Finance and
Accounting ledgers and
departmental records. This
became effective May 31.
Combining budgetary,
revenue and fund balance
ledgers. Work on this has
begun and the format
will be designed for
simplicity and completeness.
Coordinated effort
between Finance and
Accounting and the
Administrative Computing
Center to more effectively
schedule input and output
of computerized ledgers
will result in a more
timely distribution of such
ledgers. ~
The Handbook of
Business Procedures is not
always available to all
levels of employees. It is
suggested that appropriate
excerpts from this manual
be distributed by the
departments to the
employees who work with
day by day transactions
such as vendors, contracts
and grants, payroll and
travel.
ln May a series of
personal visitations by the
general Accounting Staff
to various departments was
begun to facilitate better
communication on a
personal basis concerning
business problems, policies
and procedures.

Thursday
Union Movie: ''Voyage to the
Bottom of the Sea", Union
Auditorium, 7:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Friday
Muslim Student Association
Prayer Meeting, 122 Union,
12:00 p.m.
Saturday
Music Department: ALL STAR
"BIG BAND" JAZZ
CONCERT, Union Ballroom,
8:30 p.m.
Sunday
Uiion Movie: "The Maltese
Falcon", Union Auditorium,
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Music Department:
PERCUSSION ENSEMBLES
AND SOLOS, Union
Ballroom, 8:00 pjn.



Northern New Jersey Plans Festival

PHILADELPHIA. After
several delays, the
Philadelphia-based producers of
the highly successful 1969
Atlantic City Pop Festival
announced the presentation of
the 1970 Harmonyville Festival
on a 800-acre site in Sussex
County in North Jersey from
August 4 through August 9.
The producers are the Spivak
brothers Herb, Allen and Jerry
- and Larry Magid, who also
operate the Electric Factory
youth nightspot in Philadelphia
and produce concerts at the
Spectrum there during the entire
year.
THE HARMONYVILLE
Festival will be held on an
800-acre farm site in Sussex
County between Flatbrookville
and Wallpack Center in Wallpack
Township along the Delaware
River across from Bushkill, Pa.
The tract was leased from Dr.
A. D. Ratcliffe, a Sparta, NJ.
physician, and the land will be
under water in a little over a
year when it becomes part of the
Tocks Island Dam project -a
140-billion gallon reservoir
which will provide the water
needs of the Trenton
-Philadelphia area into the 21st
century.
Negotiations are underway by
the quartet of producers to lease
additional acreage in the vicinity

WHATS I
HAPPENING
MUSIC TODAY: The UF Summer Band, conducted by Richard
Bowles will present another twilight concert on the north terrace of
the Reitz Union Wednesday at 7:30 p jn.
Midsummer Gatorland Music Festival will be this Saturday at 8:30
p.m. in the Union Ballroom. Sunday there will be a percussion
program also at the ballroom.
BAR THING: John Marshall Bar Association will sponsor a social
for law students at the Phi Delta house Thursday at 9 p.m. There will
be champagne, punch and Beer; plus The Riff to play. All coeds
invited.
PEACE BENCH: The Student Peace Union will meet Thursday at 8
pjn. at the Bench and Bar. Next to the Flagler Inn on University
Avenue.
DEGREE SEEKERS: The applications for a degree to be conferred
at the end of this quarter are in the mail. If you do not receive the
materials, you should report to Room 40, Tigert Hall before July 17
to apply to graduate.
DAILY LUNCHEON I
AND DINNER
SPECIALS
\
Meat, 2 Veg, I
Cole Slaw SB JL I
2 Rolls and Butter, IW C I
Coffee or Tea
only at I
gijfiP 1225 W. UNIV. AVE. I
/xt/Z'Z&O 7:00 AM TIL I
I ~ AM I

ON 800-ACRE SITE AUGUST 4-9

for extra parking and for
campsites for the up to 100,000
persons attending the 1970
Harmony ville Festival.
PARKING AREAS will hold
20,000 cars with complete
security arrangements being set
up for the prevention of
incidents and for the protection
of those attending. In addition,
there will be ample turnstiles
and ticket gates to enable the
crowds attending to move
rapidly into the festival area.
Spring water from wells on
the property will be available in
various locations and ample
sanitation and infirmary
facilities will be set up to handle
the thousands of persons
expected during the week of the
festival.
When finished, Harmony ville
will be a miniature city.
THE SIX-DAY event will be a
true music festival with
workshops, seminars and
symposiums featuring well
known personalities in the
entertainment field. Contracts
are now being signed with the
biggest names in the pop field
and announcements of those
personalities will be made
shortly.
Admission will be $20.00 for
the weeks events and they can,
be purchased at all Ticketron
locations and at the Electric

Factory, in Philadelphia. Mail
orders should be sent to
Harmonyville Festival, 2201
Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa.,
19103.
In addition to .the
p, [
Student Special
Any car or color!
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373-1665

COMING SOON

| | .. X
i i 1
v j ...
'f
i It! i i
|} j | |! I
- *
** on. jfl IL \ J
ONLY $1,736*
sh. Q & .v -V,. " ;
y: \ X o' ....
*
DATSUN
- ...
*P.O.E. Plus tax, tag, local freight, D&H
A STRAIGHT SHOT FROM THE UNIVERSITY ON 2ND AVENUE 378-2311
j -*'

entertainment features, the
Harmonyville Festival will be
concerned with the current
national interest in ecology and
there will be demonstrations and

ELROD S AUTO REPAIR
TgVji AND SALES
"CORVAIR SPECIALIST
GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 376-7771

i unday, July 14, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

discussions of various cults.
There will be many campsites
set up for those attending and
they will be open from August
1.

Page 13



Page 14

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 14, 1970

By DAN VINING
Alligator Campus Living Editor
Everybody sure takes off from Gainesville on the weekends these
days. I dont know where youre all going, but here is an idea about
making the going there easier and the staying there cheaper and more
fun.
A camper. About four or five years ago Ford Motors started making
a panel-type van to compete with Volkswagens Microbus. Most of the
other car makers have followed and built their boxes on wheels. If
youre so inclined, its pretty easy to sleep in that box once you get
where ever youre headed.
1 WOULDNT KNOW as much as I do about vans and buses and
panal trucks if I hadnt just undergone three months of shopping for
one for myself. I didnt find one. Actually I found one but couldnt
afford it. But thats a problem well put aside now.
There are several routes to getting a camper. One is to buy outfitted
by the company. Thats for rich folks so Im assuming you arent
interested.
Our major alternative to getting a factory-outfitted camper is to
(natch) outfit one yourself.
So, first well talk about Your Basic Van.
The major makes are these: Ford (Econoline), Chevrolet (Chevy
Van), GMC (VanDura), Dodge (Panel Van or Sportsman), and the
Volkswagen (Kombi or Microbus).
THE PRICES AND BASIC features on all of those makes are
different. Some are closer to others but its hard to see actual values
because some dealers seem to be more ready to deal than others and
the prices are very flexible. But, to give you an idea what to expect,
here are the list prices for all of the makes vans. Each listing is for the
suggested retail price for the cheapest model available with only
standard equipment. Here goes:
Chevrolet $2764
Dodge $2730
Ford $2681
GMC $2764
Volkswagen $2585
Now let me explain what these prices mean. Youll have a hard time
getting a car dealer to quote you these prices and thats due to several
things. For one thing, all of these prices are for the smallest van the
company makes. Often car dealers wont tell you about the cheapest
van, but rather will spend their time trying to sell you on a more
expensive one. The reasoning is obvious. If you want to get the
cheapest van, ask for the shortest wheelbase, the smallest motor, the
simplest transmission, and the emptiest interior. And watch that the
dealer doesnt attempt to tack on positraction rear end or something
else you arent sure you need.
So, if you can get a dealer to quote you a very basic price on the
model you want, you can begin to think about what can be added on
to make it what you need.
THE FIRST THING to think about is windows. All of the vans can
come with windows all the way around and the buyer can decide on
whatever combination of them he wants. I would suggest two
windows in the back doors and windows in the side doors. Without
them, its real to change lanes. And for ventilation purposes, Id
suggest getting the kind that open out. An alternative is to order the
thing without windows and have your own jalousies put in by a metal
worker.
Next you can begin to think about what youre going to put inside.

WED. NITE SPECIAL^
SEA SOUAIErOR GROUPER
, ALL YOU CAN EAT! #1 75
fSw. adults 51
Hush Puppies Pirates'Slaw CHILDREN $1.15
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HERE ARE SOME TIPS
Vans: The Going Is Nice

You ought to know that, save for the Volkswagen, the vans have only
one seat up front the drivers. That basic price for the Volks also
includes a long one in the back but the rest of the vans are bare in the
back.
So, if you want a seat for your wife or girlfriend, youll have to buy
one. A good idea is to get a pair of used seats from a wrecked car and
put them in yourself. Its not too hard and you can get better seats
that way. Volkswagen seats for example, have the necessary frames to
fit in most vans and there are plenty around in junk yards.
FROM HERE ON it depends quite a bit on how much camping you
intend to do. If youre just going to go out occasionally, you dont
want a lot of cabinets and beds and things nailed down in the back.
Im going to leave all that unsaid. There are many ways to outfit the
back but you have to think about what you need and want. I would
say to be sure you have one good-sized cabinet and a really
comfortable bed. And whatever you do, figure out some way to
secure it all. A quick stop can bring all the stuff down on you.
As far as a bed goes, you can count on having to spend a little over
twenty bucks for a foam mattress that will sleep two, side by side.
Other expenses depend almost entirely on how extravagant you are.
You could spend SI7OO on the back alone or you could spend $lO
and sleep on the floor. Its up to you.
I wont try to make any suggestions about which make and model
is the best buy but I can say a little about each one.
t The Volkswagen is nice. Os course there are many of them
around and that must mean something. Theyre nice inside, not as big
as the others, but with plenty of room. The main drawback is a small
-57 horsepower motor. Driving up a mountain can be an all day
experience. But the gas milage is comforting.
t The Ford is a good thing. It ends up being cheaper than the
others (except Volkswagen), the power is adequate, the milage is
good, and the inside is roomy enough. Its really important here not
to let the dealer talk you into the Super Van a long wheelbase van
- if thats not what you want. The difference in price is about 200
beans.
The Dodge is my pick for the best looking. It, too, is jiice inside
(they all are, I guess) and the motor is bigger than Ford or Volks. The
seats, should you decide to buy the factory ones, are more
comfortable than any others available.
The Chevrolet and the GMC are the same for nearly all purposes.
The price is about the same and the motor and transmission is equal
too. The feature of the van is a sliding side door (like the
Volkswagens but with an inside step thats handy). The interior is
very nice and the motor, again, is a good-sized six.
All this technical crap bores me. But its necessary to go through it
or youll end up taking a van you dont want and paying more than is
necessary for it. So, just look at all of them; and look with your
defenses up.
And one final tip: check prices out of town if you are able. That
isnt to say youll get a better deal out of Gainesville, but in my case I
was offered a model exactly equal to one that was priced to me here
at S3IOO for $2900 in Melbourne and you have similar good fortune.
Some dealers are just more anxious to get rid of their cars than others.
Its all supply and demand and apparently dealers in Melbourne are
hurting for sales.
Have fun if you decide to get one, whatever you get and where ever
you get it, and whatever you do with the inside. Its more than worth
the trouble.

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The
Florida
Alligator

UF Signs 41 Frosh Football Players

By MARSHALL GALLOP
Alligator Sports Writer
The UF has signed 41 boys
for freshman football next
year, according to Jack Hall,
head recruiter.
This final figure, even though
the SEC has upped the allotment
of new signess to 45.
SOME OF THESE new
recruits have very impressive
credentials. All of the recruits
have won some kind of All-Area
or All-State honors with nine
boys receiving some kind of
All-American honors.
Joel Parker, a 6-5, 200-pound
flanker from Clearwater is a two
sport All-American, having won
these honors in basketball and
football. Hank Foldberg, a 6-5,
200-pound Atlanta product was
selected as Lineman of the
Year for the state of Georgia,
for his prowess at end. Donnie
Crowder, a 6-1, 185-pound
quarterback from Lakeland was
an All-American at that position
in 1969. Rick Browne, a 6-2,
210-pound Longwood, Fla.

Bartlett Gets Aide
UF head basketball coach Tommy Bartlett will get assistance from
one of the nations most outstanding small college coaches next year,
Gator Athletic Director Ray Graves announced Saturday.
Bill Henry, 32, producer of the finest era of basketball in Union
Universitys history, will join the Gator basketball staff as an assistant
coach.
With an overall record of 9146 at the small Jackson, Tenn. school,
Henry is credited with wins over Memphis State and NCAA Small
College champion Kentucky Wesleyan and with pulling his team into
the Top 20 ranking among small college teams in the nation.
Henry played for Bartlett at Lenoir City (Tenn.) High School, went
on to earn Little All-American honors at Carson-Newman and received
a Masters Degree from the University of Tennessee in 1962. His
coaching background includes Loudon (Tenn.) High School, North
Georgia College and freshman coach at Tennessee.
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fullback, was All-State,
All-Sou them, and All-American
Honorable Mention. Mark King,
a 6-3, 200-pound State shot put
and discus champion at Florida
High, won All-State and
All-American honors as a
fullback. Chris McCoun, a 6-2,
190 pounder from Atlanta,
received All-City honors as
linebacker. Mike Moore, a 6-2,
190 pound Ft. Lauderdale
product, won All-County honors
in the southern Florida metro
area.
The following is a list of the
signees other than those already
mentioned:
Adams, Larry Coral Gables
Anderson, Kris Orlando
Azeredo, Danny Riviera
Beach
Boardman, Hollis Orlando
Boedy, Rick Roswell, Ga.
Booth, Ken Sarasota
Brown, Ray Marlboro, N. J.
Cahalan, Pat Daytona
Craft, Mike Key West
Dorminy, A1 Lakeland
Drawdy, Howard Ocilla,
Ga.

Gailey,Chan Monticello
Garrett, Mike Savannah
Geiger, Carey Savannah
Griffith, Clint Baker
Hitchock, David Winter
Haven
Hobbs, Walter Tampa
Kendrick, Vince Miami
Kmse, Kim Ft. Lauderdale
Lacer, John Brandon
Langley, Greg Ft.
Lauderdale
Lucas, Lenny Daytona
Beach
Mallory, Roy Redington
Beach
McCravy, Danny Miami
McDowell, Jim Vero Beach
Moore, Mike Ft. Lauderdale
Nugent, Scott Coral Gables
Padgett, Gary Jacksonville
Pope, David DeFuniak
Springs

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Tuesday, July 14, 070, The Florida Alligator,

Price, Jimmy Tenn. Military
Inst., Lenoir City, Tenn.
Rebol, Bill Ft. Lauderdale
Revels, Jim Merrit Island

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WATCH THURSDAY'S ALLIGATOR
FOR OUR SPECIAL SALE!
606 N. MAIN
COUCHS, INC. 378-1562

DAVE SPAHR
Sports Editor

Sheppard, Joe Orlando
Troup, Jon Daytona
Whitaker, Trippe
Tallahassee

Page 15



Page 16

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 14, 1970

McAshan To Lead Georgia Tech

By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Editor
Eddie McAshan, Gainesville
High Schools all everything
graduate will be the first black
quarterback in a major
southeastern universitys history
according to Georgia Techs
Assistant Director of Athletics J.
Schultz.
McAshan will be the starting
field general of the Yellow
Jackets in the fall. He moved
from fourth string quarterback
to the first string after the first
week of spring practice.
SCHULTZ SAID, Eddie
played in five controlled game
scrimmages this spring and did a
yeomans job. He completed 52
of 101 passes for 526 yards for a
51.5 completion percentage.
This completion percentage is
equal to his freshman record of
68 connections out of 132
attempts. Eddie played only 4 Vi
games of his freshman year
because of a knee injury but he
managed to throw 7 touchdown
passes and gained 789 yards in
the air.
When asked in the telephone
interview of how McAshan felt
about being the first black
quarterback to start for a major'
southeastern university Schultz
replied, Eddie is one in a
million. He is one of the coolest
individuals under fire that has
ever been my pleasure to be
acquainted with. He doesnt
worry about the racial aspect of
the situation but only wants to
play ball. He is extremely
popular with all his teammates.
Eddie isnt the loud vocal type
of player, he is a quiet and
intense person.
McAshans only real
competition for the starting job
is Charlie Dudish, the highly
publicized and controversial
Tech quarterback from last
years team. Presently Dudish is
still under athletic and academic
suspension. Schultz said,
Dudish is, as far as we are
concerned, scratched from the
football team next year.
HEAD FOOTBALL Coach

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Bud Carson said, McAshan is
our answer to the offensive we
have lacked at Tech for the past
three seasons. He is one of the
finest athletes in the country.
McAshan was seriously
recruited by over 100 major
universities including the UF.
Schultz commented, we
should have one of the finest
defenses inJhe country with the
return of last seasons entire
defensive unit. We do have
problems with the offense line
but they should be ironed out
by the fall. The big problem at
present is our receivers. Our best
receiver and probable
All-American Mike Oven of
Tallahassee injured his knee in
the spring. Other than Oven we
do not have any outstanding
receivers to work with
McAshan.
JIM NIBLACK, McAshans
high school coach, said, Eddie
holds virtually every GHS
record. His senior year he won
All-State, All-Southern and
All-American prep school honors
in football and basketball. We
feel (GHS athletic department)
he is the finest athlete ever
produced in the state. Eddie
started his sophomore year at
quarterback and did an
outstanding job all through his
high school career. His senior
year led the team to a 10-2
record and averaged 500 yards
total offense and over 40 points
a game. He was voted one of the
ten outstanding athletes in the
United States that year.
Wherever McAshan goes he
leaves a lasting impression.
Everyone who has ever

associated with him has nothing
but praise for him.
Niblack said, Eddie can
throw with either hand and has
thrown TD passes both ways.
When he played basketball he
shot with his left hand but
favors his right when
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quarterbacking. McAshan is
simply tremendous, he can kick
well, and with either foot, how
can you beat him!
That question will be asked
over and over again in the
coming months as the

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Rambling Wrecks opponents
size up the magnitude of the
McAshan problem. Techs
answer to the UFs John Reaves
may just live up to the stories
going around Atlanta about
a return to the golden age of
Tech football.