Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

The University of Florida, Gainesville

EDITORIAL
What a choice!
Love or leave M
they say. | J
Just what do these r Love It Or K
people think love*" of L Ltavm Itl A
country reaUy is? Do V
they involves
only flag-waving and
back-slapping?
Waving a flag is fine, but patriotism falls far short if
; .t stops there.
Cant the love-it-or-leave-it syndrome see that the
nations young dissenters love America also?
Out of love, the youth are actively seeking to
correct the countrys ills. A loving mother would do no
less for her child.
i
The young seek peace where they now see senseless
killing. The young seek equality where they now see
minority oppression. The young seek brotherhood
where they now see division and hatred.
They seek these things because love of country
demands no less. *, v
These young have chosen not to sit back and watch
America trod undesirable paths. They have chosen to
act... out of love for America.
Is that really so hard to understand?

\ J

Thursday, July 2, 1970



Page 2

\, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 2,1970

Summer Students Rejoice
Lake Wauburg Is Open

jr
WMttP i:
GEORGE SMITH
... Lake Wauburg Beach Lifeguard

Gainesville Course Beginning July 13
SELF-HYPNOSIS
CD EC LECTURE and demonstration
rIVCC JULY 13 8:00 P.M. HOLIDAY INN SOUTH
LEARN WHY SELF-HYPNOSIS IS THE MOST POWERFUL
AND EFFECTIVE TOOL AVAILABLE TODAY FOR SELF SELFIMPROVEMENT.
IMPROVEMENT. SELFIMPROVEMENT.
WRITE OR PHONE FOR FREE BROCHURE
INSTITUTE 0T APPLIED HYPNOSIS
5445 MARINER STREET, TAMPA, PH. 872 0608

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August wherf its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
Lake Wauburg is open again for swimming, boating, fishing
and picnicing, and the possibility of bus service from campus to
the lake is being discussed.
Re-opened May 30 with limited facilities, the camp has
restrooms and a refreshment stand, but no bath house.
THERE IS a swimming area with a dock, a slide and two
floats; canoes are available and, according to Camp Manager
Lavane Scott, fishing is good along the lakeshore.
Between 350 and 400 per day used the camp
facilities on recent weekends, and 100 to 150 per day on
weekdays, according to Scott. Attendance should rise
considerably with students returning from the spring break, he
said.
Student Senate President Tom Tworoger said the senate
would look into the feasibility of providing bus service to Lake
Wauburg if there appeared to be sufficient interest.
TWOROGER asked all those who felt bus service was needed
to call the Student Government office, or the Pulse radio forum
on Tuesday and Thursday nights, or to write to the senate or
the Alligator.
Bus service to the lake was provided by Florida Union
through the summer of 1968, when it was dropped for lack of
student interest. Buses were carrying 10-15 passengers during
peak periods and were virtually empty at other times, according
to Bob White, president of the Reitz Union Board of Managers.
Only two canoes are left at the camp for use by visitors.
Several canoes were stolen last summer, and the rowboats were
all unserviceable, according to Scott.
NO POWER boats were allowed on the lake except those of
the UF ski club, but visitors are welcome to launch their
rowboats or sailboats or canoes from the camps ramp, Scott
said.
The rule against power boats was made by the Wauburg
Committee with an eye to curbing pollution of the lake.
Fishing is good near the shore, yielding bream, speckled perch
and other panfish, according to Scott.
ONLY THE UF picture ID card is required for admission to
me camp. Faculty and staff were previously required to buy a
$2 Wauburg ticket, but no tickets are needed this year.
The camp normally opens in February, but did not open this
year until plans for a new facility on the opposite shore of the
lake bogged down.
The old camp, with run-down buildings and a condemned
bath house, was not to have been opened again. But as
controversy on the proposal for new construction dragged on,
the senate voted SSOO to re-open the camp.
LIFEGUARDS were hired, and chemical toilets and a mobile
refreshment stand were provided.
Hours of facility are 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
and 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. The camp is
closed on Mondays.

the student!
715 NW 13th St. mSd
and 1412 N. Moin St / /

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Greetings Greetings Greetings

WASHINGTON (AP) Here
is the order of call, listing each
birth date with the number
assigned to it, for the 1971
military draft as determined by
the lottery drawing held today.
The first draftees will be those
with the lowest numbers.
The birth date and the oidei
of call:

Sept. 16: 139
.'.pril 27 : 235
Jan. 18: 185
Oct. 21: 005
Oct. 3: 134
July 12: 257
April 4: 037
Oct. 10: ISO
May 4: 240
Aug. 18: 109
July 9: 001
Aug. 31: 275
March 25: 121
Oct. 6: 078
Dec. 12* 019
Feb. 21: 213
May 25 : 026
May 28: 009
Feb. 7: 025

Use Funds Carefully,
Uhlfelder Tells Senate

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Managing Editor
The approval of a
controversial $1,200 loan to the
Rathskeller and an admonition
by Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder to handle funds more
carefully gave the summer
quarter's Student Senate a shaky
tart Tuesday night.
The loan to the Rathskeller,
passed after a hot debate, is
specifically designated to pay
Your Fathers Moustache, a
group which has not been paid
for their performance at the
Rathskeller last year.
ACCORDING TO SENATOR
Ellen Corenswet, chairman of
the Budget and Finance
Committee and author of the
bill, the Rathskeller actually
owes the group $2,000 but the
group will settle for $ 1,200 if it
is paid within 10 days of the
senate meeting.
Moves to make the loan an
appropriation or to send the bill
to a committee for study were
defeated.
Early in the session Uhlfelder,
in the presidential address
required at each quarters initial
senate session, chastised the
senate for being careless with
funds in the past.
UNLESS WE learn how to \
handle our funds efficiently they
will be handled for us and not
by students, he warned.
He also criticized the previous
SG practice of pushing the
n |MAIONiS|
I Book and Supply I
1.1 I 1712 W. University B
(I TEXTBOOKS B
I I SCHOOL SUPPLIES HI
|| ART SUPPLIES
II ENGINEERING
It SUPPLIES'
H Customer Parking In H
The Rear
We Welcome: M
I) aak J
y jj

Ju'y 19: 316
March 28: o>*
June 2: 304
Jan. 30: 112
March 11: 3: : ?
July 6: 164
March 27 : 254
April 7: 142
Jan. 7: 15i>
May 9: 35V
Sept. 10: 130
Aug. 12: 320
March 31: 038
Jan. 20: 211
Nov. 19: 252
Jan. 13: 330
June 3: 135
June 7: :E)
July 24: 350

Feb. 25: 325
Oct. 8: 045
Nov. 8: 119
April 14: 202
April 30 : 358
Nov. 4: 039
Dec. 3: 110
May 27: 122
Nov. 22: 253
May 14: 040
Aug. 33: 167
April 5: 124
Aug. 5: 064
April 26: 137
Jan. 6: 285
Dec. 2S: 080
Oct. 4: 256
Nov. 24 : 081
April 8: 267
March 10: 150
Oct. 22 : 036
Jan 8: 116
Aug. 11: 230
Oct. 9: 302
June 17: 289
Aug. 23: 010
Nov. 2: 205
Sept. 22: 088
Feb. 19: 331
Jnly 23: 172
Jan. 12: 152

burden off the people who
succeed you and urged greater
responsibility.
In other action, the senate
passed an appreciation
resolution to Jack Vaughn for
his five years of service in SG. It
also appropriated $16,400 for
Accent and $220 for SAMSON.

Would You Spend *l ~
FOR-A-NEW-FIGURE
THAT IS THE
COMPLETE PRICE
OF ONE WEEK ON A 4 MONTH PLAN AT THE
Elaine Powers Figure Salon
| Today I. J. 25 I SPEQAIOfFH
IF you are a size 1 4 YOU CAN be a size 10 by July 26 Complete $4 00 B I
IF you are a size 1 6 YOU CAN be a size 12 by July 31 I p| an Only MB I
IF you are a size 18 YOU CAN be ize 14 by* July 31 I M
IF you are a size 20 YOU CAN be a size 14 by Aug. 15 To Tho First 45 To Call
IF you are a size 22 YOU CAN be a size 1 6 by Aug. 15 372*9372
GUARANTEED or 372-1744
If For Any Reason You Fail To Receive The J
Results Listed, Elaine Powers Will Give You : jjl
6 MONTHS free; I
CALL NOW
Absolutely No
HOURS- B
thru J
9 am-9 pm
9AM- 4PM Bank Americard Master Charge! 240

Raprintad by parmWon from tha GainawHla Sun

Nov. 15: 362
Jan. 27: 173
Oct. 7: 131
Jan. 24: 177
Jan. 14: 071
Jan. 22: 132
April 15: 182
Aug. 8: 049
Nov. 1: 243
Jan. 19: 188
April 29: 111
May 5: 301
Nov. 30 : 067
March 1: 014
Oct. 25: 017
Aug. 10: 359
Nov. 3: 294
Aug. 24 : 274
April 20: 118
Sept. 30: 018
Dec. 4: 305
March 17: 220
Feb. 5: 097
March 16: 258
Aug. 29 : 032
July 14: 158
April 11: 178
July 27: CBS
April 1: 224
June 22: 307
Feb. 15: 201

Aug. 4: 300
Sept. 9: 313
Dec. 8: 323
Nov. 20: 098
Sept. 28 : 309
March 25: 298
March 20: 170
July 8: 106
Dec. 10: 204
Oct. 28 : 028
March 5: 299
Dec. 11: 073
March 4: 117
April 13: 143
Jan. 17: 054
June 29: 154
April 10: 165
Juy 5: 287
March 22 : 269
May 30: 239
May 11: 293
Sept. 3: 185
Jan. 1: 133
Aug. 19: 083
Nov. 10: 063
Feb. 11: 227
March 30: 056
Seot. 6: 021
July 21: 358
May 25: 148
Nov. 17: 006
Feb. 27 : 086
Sept. 29 : 303
Jan. 18: 136
July 10: 158
Aoril 6: 312
Oct. 1: 306
Aug. 14: 103
March 19: 189
Mav 10: 145
Sept. 14: 247
Feb. 18: 337
Aug. 2: 102
May 24 : 022
March 29: 147
Dec. 9: 114
March 21: 246
June 5: 233
Aug. 3: 279

July 30: 015
Jan. 21: 129
Sept. 25: 107
July 17: 341
June 23: 044
May 13: 353
July 22. 282
Oct. 30: 332
March 15: 15*
March 2: 077
Ncv. 28: 052
July 11: 174
Feb. 6: 016
Dec. 16: 041
March 13: 241
Aoril 18: 138
April 9: 223
Dec. 31: 126
June 21: 113
Ju'y 1: 104
Sept. 21: 068
May 29: 061
April 22: 256
Feb. 26 : 086
Feb. 23: 351
Nov. 5: 286
March 24 : 203
Sept. 8: 108
Feb. 24: 226
Aug. 26 : 091
Aug. 9: 125
May 1: 179
July 25 : 003
Oct. 24: 149
Jan. 28: 348
Juy 20: 120
Oct. 31: 311
Feb. 17: 345
Dec. 2: 321
Oct. 11: 084
June 28: 215
Oct. 5: 166
March 6: 296
June 10: 076
June 9: 352
Oct. 23: 339
April 21: 008
Jan. 4: 099
Oct. 14: 115
Feb. 10: 046

Oct. 17: 290
Jan. 9: 053
June 19: 163
Nov. 12: 255
Nov. 16: 197
Sept. 7: 255
Oct. 28: 184
Mav 20 : 242
July 28: 190
April 25: 328
Nov. 18: 280
Aug. 1: 326
June 27: 055

Nov. 21: 035
Dec. 22: 194
June 30: 217
Feb. 1: 335
Sept. 18: 333
Nov. 25 : 023
Jan. 15: 075
Oct. 12: 070
July 7: 365
Ju'y 15: 273
Aug. 16: 329
Mav 8: 105
Nov. 11: 123
Nov. 14: Olt
Oct. 29 : 259
Dc. 1: 347
Sept. 17: 200
Dec. 29: 145
June 12: 051
July 13: 349
April 23 : 292
Nov. 6: 245

Thu reday, July 2,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Feb. 9: 187
May 23: 222
April 16: #3l
Aug. 7: 263
May 16: 175
Aoril 12: 089
Feb. 14: 2 C O
Ncv. 9: 176
March 12: 024
A-r,H 17: 264
March U: 141
May 17: 212
Fab. 12: 232

Aug. 28: 248
*ev. 27: J? 3
Oct. 18: 340
June 6: 1I!>3
P:c 13: m
Ncv. 23: 324
J me 25: 327
Jan. 3: 336
A-nril 19: C 32
Jan. 31. 050
May 3: 171
Ncv. 13: 272
May 2: 0?3
Jan. 2: 195
Jan. 25: 057
June 20: 043
June 18: 214
July 29: 004
Dec. 19: 249
Dec. 23: 219
Oct. 27: 318
Dec. 14: 348

July 2: 322
Sept. 27: 438
Nov. 7: 072
Jan. 23: 048
Aug. 27 : 232
June 1: CBS
May 19: 255
Aug. 21: 030
Jan. 5: 033
Aug. 6: 251
Oct. 23: 092
Feb. 8: 127
June 4: 042
April 25: 244
May 18: 180
Nov. 23: 193
Dec, 15: 087
July 18: 090
Sept. 1: 283
Sept. 15: 291
Feb. 16: 334
Dec. 20 : 228
Dec. 30: 192
June 14: 363
June 13: 342
Nov. 29: 100
July 3: 030
Sept. 13: 238
June 15: 276
July 4: 059
Oct. 10: 074
Oct. 19: 074
Dac. 17: 315
Aug. 25: 364
Aug. 20: 069
Dac. 21: 101
Oct. 15: 310
Sept. 23: 206
Sept. 11: 288
Dec. 6: 198
June 28: 308
Feb. 2: 354
May. 21; 225
Jan. 26: 140
May 15: 344
Sept. 24 : 237
Sept. 2: 101
Dec. 24: 002
May 31: 350

Page 3

Aug 17: 343
March 14: 012
Aug. 13: 058
June 16: 229
April 2: 216
Jan. 11: 144
Oct. 2: 121
July 16: 284
Dec. 18: 208
July 31: 221
Dec. 27: 239
May 6: 268
June 8: 007
Feb. 28: 234
Feb. 13: Cl 3
March 8: 079
Feb. 4: 094
Sept. 20; 261
Aug. 15: 270
Dec. 7: 162
June 11: 355
April 28: C 32
Feb. 20: C2O
Feb. 20: 020
April 3: 297
Oct. 20: 193
March 23: 231
Sent. 25: C 33
June 24: 236
May 12: 210
Sept. 19: 228
Cct. H 3: 034
March 3: 207
Aug. ?2: 250
Jan. 29 : 277
Dec. 28: 128
Fdb. 3: 188
Jan 10: 101
Sent. 5: 296
July 28 : 047
March 18: 319
May 7: 029
Sept. 12: 314
May 22: 199
Sept 4: 231
Dec. 25: 361
March 9: 278
Dec. 5: 027
Feb. 22: 271



Page 4

Thwid#, li

Please Don't Burn This Card.

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
Some 23,000 applications for
student football season cards are
being mailed out to all
prospective students by the
Athletic Association.
Anyone who has a been
accepted for the faH quarter will
have an opportunity to buy a
season ticket for the five home
games. All applications must be
returned by Aug. 30.
ONLY 2,000 spouse tickets
are to be sold, although there are
about 5,000 married students on
campus, according to Student
Government Secretary of
Married Students Gary Jordan.
All single coeds who plan to
attend any games should buy a
season ticket card, SG Secretary
of Athletics Art Wroble said.
The card costs $5. Students who
dont buy a card will have to pay
$7 per game for a seat.
Heres what to do when you
recieve your application form:
SINGLE STUDENTS: Fill out
the card and put the correct
mailing address on the reverse
side. Mail the form with a check
or money order for $5 to the
ticket office at the address given
on the card.
Be sure the address is correct.
The validated cards will be
returned at bulk rates, and under
postal regulations they cannot
be forwarded.
You will need the validated
season card and your validated
fee card to pick up tickets for
each game. At the gate, you will
need season card, fee card,
picture ID and ticket to get in.
MARRIED STUDENTS. If

VISIT BURGER KING
m B I I H I S H
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HOME OF THE WHOPPER
8 N.W. 16TH AVE.
.
j MOa I

FOOTBALL TICKET ORDER BLANK 1970
STUDENT FOOTBALL SEASON CARD 5.00
SPOUSE SEASON TICKET BOOK 15 50
AMOUNT ENCLOSED
DEADLINE AUGUST 30, 1970
1970 FLORIDA FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
Sopt. 12 DUKE JACKSONVIIU 100 EOT
Sapt. If MISS. STATE OAINESVIUE 2:00 EOT
Sap*. 24 Alabama Tuscataata 1:10 CDT
Oct. 2 N. C. STATE GAINESVILLE 2:00 EOT
Oct. 10 F.S.U. TaNahattoa 2:00 EOT
Oct. 17 RICHMOND OAINESVIUE 100 EOT
Oct. 24 Tan nano Knoxville 2.00 EDT
Oct. 21 AIMURN(HC) OAINESVIUE 2:00 EDT
Nav. 7 GEORGIA JACKSONVIUE 2:00 EST
Nov. 14 Ketitudry Tampa IJO EST
Nav. 22 MIAMI OAINESVIUE 2:00 EST

both you and your spouse are
students, you can save money by
each buying a season card as
outlined above. If not, you will
need a spouse ticket:
First buy your season card.
Then mail your validated season
card back to the ticket office
along with your validated fee
card and a check or money order
for an additional $15.50
This means you will have to
mail your season card
application promptly and pay
your registration fees well in
advance of the deadline in order
to get the validated fee card
back in time. The deadline for
spouse tickets is Aug. 30 and the
registrar will not mail out fee
cards until mid-August.
IN YOUR final letter from
the ticket office, you will
receive, along with your season
card and fee card, a book of
couppns. To get tickets for

TICKET CARDS
.. mail them in

yourself and your spouse, you
will need your season card, fee
card and the coupon for the
particular game.
If you dont get an
application or miss the deadline
contact the ticket office.
If you live in Gainesville, you
can save time on the fee card by
paying fees in person at the Hub,
according to Robert Palmer,
supervising accountant for
student accounts at the Hub.
IF YOU must mail the fee
card, mail it early because
processing cards can take up to
four days during peak periods of
activity, Palmer said.
Jordan said he would have
preferred to have more spouse
tickets available, and to have an
arrangement which did not force
married students to pay their
fees early.
Its going to be hard on a lot
of people who are working

RETURN WITH PAYMENT FOR VALIDATION
KEEP THIS CARD FOR
ACQUISITION OF 1
ATHLETIC TICKETS V
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA ~ IV/W~
STUDENT FOOTBALL SEASON CARD
NAME
SOCIAL SECURITY NO._
SIGNATURE
OFFICIAL WHEN VALIDATED
j 1 | 2 3,4,51617

during the summer to earn
money to pay their fees,
Jordan said.
THIS YEARS season card

'MAN OF YEAR
The annual Man of the Year award sponsored by the Florida
Alligator will be presented once again this summer.
The award is given to the person who has contributed the
most to public higher education in the state of Florida during
the past school year. The nominee may be involved in politics,
education or private business.
NOMINATIONS should be sent to the Alligator offices, room
330 Reitz Union. No nominations will be accepted after Friday,
Aug. 14.
A committee composed of Advertising Manager Kerry
Dupree, Alligator Editor Karen Eng, Managing Editor Les
Gardieff and Executive Editor Phyllis Gallub will choose the
winner from the nominations. The award will be announced in
the new student introductory issue of the Alligator on Friday,
Aug. 21.
Nominations become property of the Alligator and should
include the persons name, title and reasons for the nomination.

sales will provide a base figu re
for raising prices on cards for
subsequent years. Either 18,000
or the total number of cards
purchased, whichever is greater
will be the base figure.
For each increase of 1,000
cards sold over the base figure,
the card price will go up $1 f O J
the subsequent year.
The automatic price increase
is being used by the Athletic
Department as a hedge against
rising enrollment, according to
Wroble.
Ticket Manager Ray Dorman
was not available for comment.
Tickets for the Jacksonville
game will be sold here and at the
Gator Bowl at $3.50 each.
Details will be published in the
Orange and Blue Bulletin.



Hyacinths Chopped From Lake Alice

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writar
Water hyacinths are gone
from the surface of Lake Alice,
and the lake is back to normal in
appearance anyway. But its
waters still receive the full
outflow of the campus sewage
treatment plant, and one of the
few remaining wooded areas on
its shore may give way to a new
access road.
These are two central
problems facing the Lake Use
and Preservation Committee,
according to committee member
Dr. John H. Kaufmann, associate
professor of biological sciences.
THE NINE-member
committee was created last fall
by UF President Stephen C.
OConnell to recommend plans
for the use of the Lake Alice
area. Chairman is Dr. George K.
Davis, head of the Division of
Sponsored Research.
Lake Alice, in its natural
state, is rich in organic nutrients,
supporting large numbers of
plants and animals, and
relatively poor in oxygen. But
this natural richness is magnified
many times by phosphates and
nitrates from the sewage
effluent, producting a critical
state of over-fertilization.
As long as this enrichment
continues, the lake will be
choked with aquatic growth of
some kind, according to
Kaufmann.
ONE SOLUTION discussed at
length by the committee is to
pipe the effluent into the
campus sprinkler system. It
would be expensive, but would
avoid delivering fertile effleunt
into the sources of the citys
water supply.
Sewage effluent is relatively
clean and odor-free, and a
suitable fertilizer for lawns and
shrubs. Many municipalities may
be driven to dispose of it in this
way in the future, according to
Kaufmann.
The hook-up could handle a
major proportion of the UFs
output, possibly all of it. But
cheaper solutions may be found.
THE EFFLUENT could be
channeled into a sinkhole
adjacent to the plant treatment.
This outlet was used in the past
but was abandoned when
effluents turned up in the city
water supplies.
With the city of Gainesville
looking into new sources of
water, it might become usable
again. There is also the
possibility of UF using city
treatment facilities in the future.
The committee is working on
a land use plan to include a
route for the proposed access
roads. When completed, the plan
will go to the Land Use and
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Planning Committee for
consideration.
ONE PROPOSAL routes the
road well away from the lake,
leaving nearly all the woods
intact. Wooded areas are vital to
the wildlife value of the lake,
Kaufmann said.
But, to avoid the woods, the
road cuts through the commuter
parking lot on Radio Road,
recently constructed at state
expense. However, officials of
the Florida Department of
Transportation have given
assurances that the route will be
determined by UF.
I feel sure that, if we can
determine a centerline we are
happy with, the state will build
the road wherever we want it,
commented R. William Munson,
UF architectural planning
manager.

Student Publications
Central Business
Office Will Be Closed
Friday, July 3,1970.

Ur .... \
JM
H r. l r'V \
fly ni^iWrt'
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AND THE YOUNGER
... contributed elbow grease to the job

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BOTH THE YOUNG
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Photos By Jed Zimmerman

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Thursday. July 3,1970. Tb# Florida H*tor,

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 2,1970

Infirmary Provides
Student Medical Care

EDITORS NOTE: This is the first of a two part
series on UFs infirmary.)
By CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
Alligator Staff Writar
To many students the UF Student Health Service
(infirmary) is either a building they pass on the way
to classes or a place theyve gone for treatment of a
cold, sore throat, or a bad sprain.
Although 60 per cent of the student body uses
the infirmary at least once a year, many aspects of
services, costs, and funding remain unknown to the
majority of its users.
IN 1966, the administrative responsibility for the
infirmary was given to the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center and with this change the infirmary became
an auxiliary enterprise. This made it necessary for it
to generate all its own revenue.
The major portion of this revenue comes from its
participation in the student activities fee of $32.50
per quarter.
THE INFIRMARYS current share of this fee is
sl3 per quarter per student. But infirmary business
administrator, Stephen J. Pritz said, in the four
and one-half years Ive been here we couldnt
operate only on student activities fees.
Last year the infirmarys operational cost was
$829,000 of which $700,000 came from the
activities fee, according to Director of Student
Health Service Dr. Wilmer J. Coggins.
Nominal charges to students for drugs, special
treatment, and room rent helped make up the
difference. Students may not understand why they
should be expected to pay anything toward their
health care because this is already provided for in
the activities fee. However, Pritz said, Whatever
these charges are, they are not a profit value to us.
FOR INSTANCE, when a student is charged $5
for an X ray, the infirmary turns around and pays
the same amount to the Health Center to interpret
these X rays.
Students are also given a considerable break on
drugs by charging them only 35 per cent above cost
to the infirmary, Pritz said.
Another area of student charge is the $lO fee for
allergy testing. There has been an increase in allergy
testing over the last few years, and currently this
$lO charge is less than the supply costs the
infirmary.
IF A STUDENT were to go to a community
doctor for the same thing he would pay $75-100,
Pritz said.
The infirmary medical clinic which operates 24
hours a day seven days a week has felt another
financial burden in the form of students using its
services after 5 p.m. There is one resident doctor,
three or four nurses, and one orderly on duty
between 5 p.m. and midnight.
Both Coggins and Pritz said they feel students
often use these hours as an extension service of
regular clinic hours.
ANY MEDICAL treatment after 5 pm. is
considered emergency treatment. The question may

Cfik Don t missArby's An Arby S& A Shake
BB| July 4th Only

arise about why a burden exists if a doctor is on
duty anyway, and need not be called on specifically.
Some students may also want to know why there
has been the recent change in emergency treatment
after midnight.
Both the answers are found in the fact that the
infirmary was served a notice stating the salary
standard it was paying to Health Center interns
serving as residents during emergency hours at th£
infirmary was inconsistent with resident salaries
elsewhere.
PRITZ SAID the infirmary was unable to pay
more, and therefore had no alternative but to cut
the number of working hours. Previously a resident
had been on duty between 5 pm. and 8 a.m.
Now the night resident works from 5 pm. to
midnight and recieves the same pay as before.
Because it was too costly to have a doctor on all
night, another arrangement was made to provide
treatment for students after midnight. Students
coming to the infirmary after this hour are screened
by a nurse who decides if they require a physicians
care.
IF SO, the student is referred to the Shands
Emergency Room in the Health Center, with the
infirmary obligated to pay sls for every student
who goes to Shands.
There are numerous cases where students come
in for minor problems that could wait till morning
when a full staff is on, but if a student feels hes got
an emergency then hes got one, Pritz said.
You cant tell students not to do this because if
one student doesnt come for treatment when he
needs it the results could be very serious, Coggins
explained.
ANOTHER AREA the infirmary feels it is
operating in with a financial loss to them is the
Mental Health Clinic.
People dont realize we get research money
especially in mental health and this does provide
some additional support, Coggins said.
There is a staff of four psychiatrists and five
psychologists which provide long-term
psychotherapy some students need without any
charge to the student.
SOMEONE using a private psychiatrist would
pay between $35 and SSO per visit, Coggins said.
The 13 offices which house the Mental Health
Clinic were once the attic of the infirmary.
The Mental Health Program is growing by leaps
and bounds. Students find someone who is really
willing to listen to them, said Pritz.
Remodeling, providing additional services,
extended current ones, the general accelerated cost
of living, plus the growing student body all come
into focus when the infirmary attempts to project
its budget for the coming year.
In order to continue on the same or better level
of service, we must increase our flow of revenue,
Pritz said. With that in mind, in light of the recent
decision not to allocate more funds to the
infirmary, it will be necessary to make some changes
with regard to the policy of charging students he
said.

Plan Atlanta Trip
A caravan to the Atlanta Pop Festival will leave from the
parking lot behind Tigert Hall at 5 pjn. today. People looking
for rides or having transportation available to take riders are
urged to call 378-1256.
The festival is scheduled to last from July 3-5.

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With your Lunch or Dinner
lB \< Noon 1 ,:3 - 2:o
Nigh> S;00 9:0
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and make you familiar with the tools of your
college career here at the University of Florida.
Come in.... browse around and pick up your
information portfolio with Florida decals for your
car included.... FREE!
M Campus Shop & Bookstore
located in the Hub
phone 392-0194



* > 2X>h*y
'& ~
Drugstore
Opens Again
By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
The Comer Drug Store opened its doors again Wednesday after
being closed for three weeks except for bad trips with a new
outlook, and a few changes.
The new house manager of the Drug Store is Toby Calloway, a
22-year-old former UF student. He says he would like to see the Drug
Store become an open, free-flowing self.
THE DRUG STORE philosophy of helping people with drug
problems is still the same, and the same informal is also alive.
Susan Hermon, public relations director for the Dmg Store, said she
would like to see the Dmg Store act as an educational place to teach
people about drugs.
SHE SAID the Dmg Store needs more organization. This was one
of the reasons why it remained closed for three weeks to get our
heads together Mrs. Hermon said.
The Dmg Store is planning to move in September to larger
facilities, according to Mrs. Hermon, this will permit groups to meet at
the place.
At the present facilities, located at 1823 N.W. 2nd Ave., the Dmg
Store does not have enough room to allow groups meeting space. Last
quarter several organizations, such as the Aquarian group and the
Befrienders, met at the Dmg Store.
THE FLORIDA Experimental College also used the facilities at the
Dmg Store to hold classes such as candlemaking and tie die but the
meetings interfered with the operation of the Dmg Store, and these
groups had to stop meeting there, officials hinted.
Hopefully, the larger facilities will permit these activities, while
letting the Dmg Store continue helping people who have dmg
problems.
But the move to a larger building will come only If money we
expect comes through, temporary coordinator Mark Freedman said.
FREEDMAN SAYS the primary function of the Dmg Store is to
help bring down bad trips, with a secondary emphasis on dmg
educations.
Mrs. Hermon says the Dmg Store problems are mostly financial.
Right now the Dmg Store is operating on a limited budget. But the
Dmg Store has received money from community organizations, and
that is how it has remained open.
Police relations are no problem. They think we are doing a good
job, Calloway said. According to Freedman, the Dmg Store has
honest and open communication with the various police departments
in town.
THEY LEAVE us alone, and we leave them alone. They know it
(drugs) is not their problem; their job is law enforcement, says
Freedman.
In the secondary role concerning dmg education is also shaping up.
According to Freedman, the Alachua County public schools have
contacted the Dmg Store to help them in their dmg education
program.
WE FEEL we can give the kids in school a more realistic
information than what they are getting from friends or from their
folks, says Freedman.
Another part of the dmg education, is the construction and
distribution of dmg information.
Freedman says he would like to see people from the Gainesville
community, or from the university, help them work with information.
Those people can either write the information they have, or come by
the Dmg Store and help them in preparing dmg information.
THE DRUG Store is also going to have a clinic on how to bring
down a bad trip, Freedman says. In these clinics, people will be
trained to help those who have drugs problems.
But the Drug Store is not only a place when help is needed.
The Drug Store is a place to go in out of the rain, says Calloway.
A place for people to talk to people if they do not want to do
drugs.
FREEDMAN SAID the Drug Store can function too as a rap house.
We can only offer, but not beg, he said.
The Drug Store will also offer another service. According to
Freedman, the Dmg Store has at its disposal & laboratory, where drugs
may be analyzed.
He says there are no questions asked to those who bring in the
drugs. This is being mn as a service to the community, because some
bad add has been passed out.
Japanese Tea Ceremony
and Flower Arranging Demonstration
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July 15, 7:30 pm |
Due to the nature of the ceremony attendance must
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Thursday, July 2,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

All Jiliy

The
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

and for a finale, while the band plays the National Anthem, we set fire to his hair,
stuff him in a cannon and shoot him over the Washington Monument
Americans In Israel

WASHINGTON Israel is
host to a strange invasion of
American volunteers. Many,
ironically, are draft dodgers
unwilling to fight for the U. S. in
Vietnam but raring to fight for
Israel against the Arabs.
They are signing up in the
Israeli army despite an explicit
State Department warning that
they may lose their U. S.
citizenship by serving in the
armed forces of another
country.
THE NUMBER of Americans
in Israeli uniform is a secret that
neither country wants to talk
about. The U. S. is anxious to
avoid the slightest impression of
American involvement in the
Mid-East fighting. And Israel,
having raised a holler about
Russian pilots in Egypt, doesnt
wish to advertise that Americans
are fighting on the Israeli side.
An estimated 2,000
Americans came to Israel to
enlist during the 1967 Six Day
War. Probably most of them
have now drifted back home,
but others have shown up at the
recruiting offices.
There are an additional
20,000 U. S. citizens who have
taken up residence in Israel. The
majority are young enough to be
subject to military service under
Israeli law.
* *
IN PRACTICE, Israel wont
draft anyone who makes an issue
of his American citizenship, just
as the U. S. Embassy in Tel Aviv
shuts its eyes to the violations of
those who take up arms for
Israel. Both countries would
rather avoid any action that
might attract attention to the
Americans in the Israeli army.
My associate Les Whitten, in a
report from Tel Aviv, writes:
The American volunteers arrive
here with dreams of dashing
Israeli soldiers wearing berets
and carrying Sten guns, against a
background of stirring music
from Exodus. More often, they
wind up on K. P. duty amid the
glamor of pots and pans.
put
the *Sabras, as*iiiore-boApv

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Executive Editor

Merry-Go-Round
by Jack Anderson

Israelis are called, on the firing
line. The Sabras, who make up
44 per cent of the population,
know no other land. The army
theory is that they have no place
else to call home, therefore, they
will fight more ferociously for
Israel.
* *
BROOKLYNS BATTLING
black congresswoman, Shirley
Chisholm, has failed to tell the
House Ethics Committee about
thousands of dollars she earned
from speaking last year.
The pert, 45-year-old lady
legislator, at first, insisted to this
column that the SB,OOO she
declared in her official filing was
all she netted from her
whirlwind speechmaking in
1969.
Then, confronted with reports
that she had accepted speaking
engagements almost every
weekend for fees as high as
$1,500, she amended her
answer. The SB,OOO constituted
only the net fees, minus
expenses, from the big
universities, she contended.
EVEN THIS total, she
conceded, might be closer to
$9,000. She estimated that her
additional honoraria from
smaller institutions might add up
to another $3,000 to $4,000.
When you consider what
other Congressmen take in from
their law practices, under the
table, it just gets me mad, she
said snappishly when questioned
about the money she withheld
from her declaration.
Mrs. Chisholm explained that
she had lifted the SB,OOO figure
from one section of her tax
returns. The other fees, she said,
were listed elsewhere on her
forms. Under the House rules,
she should have listed all her fees
in atateoteittVthittoQaHousebi
'Ethics Committee.

Les Gardieff
Managing Editor
Norm White
News Editor

IT SHOULD be added, in
fairness, that Mrs. Chisholm has
won the respect of her
colleagues for her hard work,
sharp mind and political
courage. Even skeptical
conservatives have been
impressed with the way she does
her legislative homework.
She has carried her full load in
the House at the same time that
she has made flying trips all over
the country to lecture.
Incidentally, she has often
turned down big fees to speak at
small black gatherings for
nominal fees or nothing at all.
* *
The latest intelligence reports
out of Cambodia confirm the
worst fears of President Nixons
critics.
IT IS now clear that the bulk
of the North Vietnamese forces
escaped from their sanctuaries
and took plenty of ammunition
along with them. They
immediately dispersed into
small, independent units and
scattered all over Cambodia.
Thus the Presidents
Cambodian operation has
succeeded in turning all of
Cambodia into a checkerboard
battlefield. Enemy forces, which
previously kept scrupulously
inside the narrow sanctuary
strip, now make military strikes
all over Cambodia.

Alligator Staff

Fred Vollrath
Assistant News Editor
Annette Brin
Editorial Assistant

poiTomAL ~
111 V rlag rad |
* Band c|||§§ts, fH|i|orks, parses
lili flagiilii: Hi ili^llliillllllilill
llUe Fodi&bf Jbipvhen fffiiiiill!
ll||d the thrill iilfelt
Uptime illy sh|§!gnd
||Hkt thlliiie time learned saitttrtcJ-tlie flag,
Mss pled||liiegiiiii to thee flag United States ofi
America, a||ib th£||public for ilillllilll. ]
li||D ifflSte r|§||| bli c ||||ll|l!!l||l|il||
Have we ..forgotiillthese wbrds salute?
|||||y theiilfiht m£pi|ty of H^g^averS;critivi2e
the-vocal ipiibrity ;l|;|lag w||||||||§| p&ttts,
|i|;;|nd tiii mi 3-
And yet the
lllibws H;||eir cars, fly the. flag ||||||§ night in front of
||||;: homes and w|||;flag pihs |h then sit
HP selflalSfted, in their fake leathi.fbsk&g chairs while
;|j|i!ag wiiilrs sit||||k, dis|^plibi|||| :: f^i||pf
can be doii§out illtlag ||||
The th||||f wailing th|i;||herid||||}ag \|||§|g ove||
|||§>l bi||||| or ib 3.parad|||i§ beei;|||led b||§§)etitiil
m|he a pol|§||l syn||||iand ||||iant f|||
iili for |i|i|ag w||i|fs it is||i:|nuch|p|e. ||||
!|||it pei|||j|s the|H|g wea|§j§i; in |||Si ||§
lili to Hie res||||us soi||l|ing. |jjj
l|§§r ccs|f|y is |j||h, m|§§|mor|||||n afjg| It i§|§
i|ii|jLti||bver i|s| yea||||)ld |s|| a |||j|tion ;||
||||i|crac|i;;;i|d fr||l|peech||||id t||||;; ide|||;|re w|if|
§|||§er n||i||ieir sypgigL |||| |||| |||| |||
llll§eyV|||§j|ing ufi|§|s, buf|||ne to;|||
:|H||ing. gas||litions ;|H| awapliiag i§l
||i|||anieiiii|d the||||Ut wi|||||eir t||pthe |f|l§| behi|||
lilag aillt for §§ flag ship. |!||
llilat i||||is dov|t||o is tHj|f§|he t|i|
|||||n d|||ihce a||ip surj|i|§ pat|||i|m ai||;3the f|||
s|§§|s di|||Sy the :|||| in ||||§nce |||§|st o|i||ii>untr|||
||||. Tllilhew nulling blllM o||||§ag #Bll to §§§
llict ahillsunitjliil |||| §§|§§ ||||
lid s<||||ir Foh|||;:i;of Ju||||yish ||||§at \#||j|ay on|||
see|§§j|| Ames§§§i flai|;||thou|i|||rryiii||i!bout its
||i||nerci||;i|iyic
||i||i'hap|||||re ask|||;ioo m||||We l|p!;not.i||||i
* VIII I §
Mml At illr CJP a ill n
Terribly sorry, Wilson. Thought this was 10 Downing Street."

Dave Spahr
Sports Editor
Dan Vining
Campus Living Editor

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89. Busi Business,
ness, Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82,83 or 84.
Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
' ftSSSWttHC ** *^ wd no ,ho



Sikes Calls For $ 70 Billion

A minimum of 70 billion
dollars a year, even after the war
ends, will be required to prevent
the U. S. from becoming a
second rate military power
and to counter the communist
goal to destroy us Congressman
Bob Sikes told me in an
interview over the quarter break
in Washington, D. C.
Bob Sikes, of the first
congressional district in Florida,
is a member of the House
Appropriations Committee
which gives him an influential
voice on how federal funds are
allocated in such areas as defense
and domestic programs.
WHILE INTERVIEWING the
Sikes, I began wondering if
perhaps he was over estimating
the threat to this country of the
world wide communist
conspiracy and greatly under
estimating the countrys
domestic problems when it came

Coggins Answers
EDITOR:
I must protest the unfair allegations in the article by Annette Brin
in the Alligator of 23 June 1970 criticizing the service she received at
the Infirmary. Mrs. Brin neglected to mention that the incident
occurred on Sunday, June 14th when the University was closed. The
Student Health Service has no obligation to provide any service during
such times.
The fact that we do remain open with a limited staff available is
simply because we feel an obligation to provide some service to the
many students who remain on campus or in the Gainesville area and
who customarily come here for their health care.
CONTRARY TO the statement in this article, the doctor on call for
the Infirmary was immediately available and could have come in
promptly if the situation had warranted it.
1 think the Alligator does a serious disservice to those students who
have not yet had personal contact with the Student Health Service
when it publishes material without a thorough investigation of the
applicable facts. The vast majority of students who do come here for
health care seem quite pleased and appreciative of the service they
receive.
W. J. COGGINS, M.D.
DIRECTOR

Police
EDITOR:
In his column of June 25,
Mr. Vollrath describes the
activities of police in the
Dupont Circle neighborhood
of Washington, D. C. and
conveys the impression
(intentionally or not) that the
cops chief objective is the
malicious harrassment of
political activity.
IN POINT of fact, the
environs of Dupont Circle
accomodate much of the
citys illegal drug traffic, and
the presence of police can, to
a large extent, be related to
their classical (but often
overlooked) role as law
enforcement agents.
DONALD R. GREENLEE,
7EG

LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
f B typed, signed,
double-spaced and not exeeed
300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Hava addraesas and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names wIM be withheld only if
.sbnoii iti v

to priorities in appropiating
funds.
Sikes feels we need at least 70
billion a year increasing with
inflation, to maintain a strong
conventional force as well as a
nuclear deterent force. He
believes a large conventional
force will be needed to combat
future Vietnam type
communistic aggressions all over
the world. Congressman Sikes
also wants an A B M system, a
new manned bomber, and a
strong offensive missle system.
Sikes told me we are
currently solving our domestic
problems fast enough. Sikes
feels the money left after
defense is paid for, will be
adequate to solve our problems
at home. His statements stuck in
my mind as I later walked the
streets of Washington watching
the traffic jams, breathing the
polluted air and wondering what
the little black kids playing in

SAMSON
EDITOR:
Re your editorial about
SAMSON: Several quarters ago I
volunteered to give some
teaching help for the program ;
roughly ten weeks after this, at
the beginning of the next
quarter, I received an apologetic
phone call from SAMSON
inquiring about my availability.
By then my schedule had
changed.
THE same thing happened to
a friend of mine. It seems that
this dampening of enthusiasm on
the part of interested people
might partly explain their
present troubles.
HARRY FINLEY

writer diows just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
letters for speoe.
Writers may submit longer
essays, columns or letters to be
considered for use as "Speaking
Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular
column is adeed to contact the
editor and be prepared to draw
samples of his work.
ovin itfi? 1o

Speaking Out
by Rod Tennyson

the streets had to look forward
to while growing up in this
decaying city.
CONGRESSMAN SIKES
believes the communist
conspiracy is involved in campus
unrest. He feels many students
are against the war because they
are given a one sided view from
liberal professors, professional
agitators, Communist organizers,
and others of various and
sometimes smelly backgrounds.
While receiving an honorary

the smoli society

j UOO- I M M£=
- UEi&OOfZ
Tsw Y

"Only Necks And Freaks

One of my favorite eating
places in Gainesville and
outlying areas is Macs Waffle
Shop (often called Macs
Redneck Shop). Macs always
contains a unique combination
of clientele, about 60% rednecks
and 40% UF long-hairs. No one
there seems to be located
anywhere between those two
extremes; no semi-straights go
there, only necks and freaks.
The beauty of this place,
besides the good food, consists
of the presence, in The
University City, of a small
section of Kissimmee. After all,
Gainesville is pretty
sophisticated for a small
southern town; Gainesville is to
Alachua County as Atlanta is to
Georgia. Incidentally, I dont
want to sound like Im knocking
Kissimmee. I spent two years
there one Friday afternoon.
ANYWAY, THERES a
jukebox in Macs that is straight
out of Hee-Haw. It has songs by
Buck Owens and his Buckaroos,
Sons of the Pioneers and
Daughters of the American
Revolution and Charlie Pride,
featuring Ferlin Funky. Very
heavy sounds. Well, the other
day I was eating breakfast at
Macs with a friend. I was clad in
tank-top shirt, bell-bottoms, and
sandals; my friend wore a body
shirt, wide glasses, bells, and
sandals.
We were almost finished
eating when someone played
Merle Haggards Okie from
Muscogee on the jukebox,
trying to teach my mod friend
and me a lesson. Though the
song nauseated me somewhat, I
managed to catch most of the
words. The song starts out:
We dont get our kicks from
mar-i-juan-a;
We dont take our trips on
LSD.
We dont bum our draft cards
i ~. rwr-,i "fji*''

degree at the University of West
Florida, Sikes told me of this
hippy type who organized a
protest against him. The young
man was from New York.
Sikes said now why would
anyone from New York want to
come all the way to Florida to
go to college and then protest. It
is as if someone sent him and
then told him what to say.
Sikes was especially offended
because the bastard didnt even
spell my name right.

Raving Dave
by David Miller

AND FROM there it gets
worse, with a reference or two
to the Hippies. By the time
Merle and Co. chortled the
refrain, IM PROUD TO BE AN
OKIE FROM MUSCOGEE! I
realized just how proud I was to
be a Jew from the Bronx.
I dont particularly mind a
wretched song such as that one.
What really irritates me is the
fact that Dick Nixon personally
asked Johnny Cash to sing Okie
From Muscogee at the White
House, along with Guy Drakes
typically Republican Welfare
Cadillac, which makes me laugh
whenever Nixon boasts about
being sincere about welfare
reform. I can just see President
Nixon, dressed in blue overalls
and sloppin a hog, slapping his
side with laughter as Johnny and
Spiro and Jerris and Strom join
voices in a chorus of Benign
Neglect Blues.
The June 26 Gainesville Sun
contained letters to Top
View, Clarke Williamsons TV
column, and Id like to show
you readers the two letters
concerning TV talk shows:
1. MOST OF Carsons and
Griffins guests the hosts, also
- like nothing better than to
knock the President and our
Vice President. They fawn over
the rabble rousers until I turn
off my TV in disgust. They
contribute to the declining
morals of our youth.
2. How long do we have to
put up with M. Griffin, D.
Cavett, and J. Carson, who
benefit only anti-American
terrorists? Sickening.? jru -u
These beloved

VmatWsMv 2, WO. Tfl* EJflridfcAlptpr, I

******* aw. iwirfi A
Atblia
UIMML

There is no hope for
the complacent man.
by Brickman

Middle-class Americans, the
hate-filled psychotics that
overturn school buses and beat
up demonstrators and vote for
Max Rafferty. And our
leaders in the White House
applaud these know-nothings.
What these readers write isnt
much worse than Spiro Agnews
pronouncements concerning TV,
newspapers, and dissenters.
Dick Nixon sent a
congratulatory telegram to Peter
Flanagan, leader of the hard
hats and later invited several
hard hat leaders to the White
House, where he was made an
honorary hard hat as a reward
for pointing out the bums
that exist in this country. If that
isnt sanctioning violence and
rewarding violence then Ido
not know what is. And G.
Harrold Carswell, running for
the U. S. Senate (He figures that
if Ed Gumey can make it,
ANYONE can make it), says
that a vote for Carswell is a vote
for Nixon. Is this all Nixon
represents?
HITLERS GREATEST
internal maneuver was to make
the nobodies of Germany
Middle Germanys Silent
Majority feel that they were
important, powerful people,
ruling rather than being ruled.
The man who shouts Sieg
Heil! or says My country,
right or wrong; love it or leave
it! deludes himself into
thinking that he is being saluted,
that HE is giving the orders.
Actually, Things are in the
saddle, as Ralph Waldo
wrote, and ride
IN|IM n z£ .rr.u? 1 cd

Page 9



Page 10

V: J#-n- )i VA-O U *.£%***.** *JV- x<\
I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 2,1970

Campus! Crier
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT I
. T rh/>c+ nH Reitz Union Dance, Band: The!
) Union Movie, The Ghost and Ci . ri .. I
1 M r# Union Aud Frosted Glass, Union Terracel
Christian Science Organization Uni IL 0 M< ri /? U, I
1 Meeting 357 Union, 7:00 Alice B. Toklas Union!
1 Student Contractors & Builders p m I
y Association Meeting, 346 I
University Film Series, ,J C. I
Notice! Classes will be in session. n A La Urel and |
Friday, July 3, 1970 is a Un,on Aud 7: 00 & I
k members only.
SAMSON provides summer recreation for the underpriveleged
SAMSON IS DOING SOMETHING ABOUT IT
I Many people complain about the problems facing us today. While other people talk
SAMSON is doing something about it. Besides sponsoring a summer camp for
underpriveleged kids they have created a Big brother-Little brother program.
SAMSON needs your help!
They are now accepting applications for their summer programs, and are in urgent
need of persons who can provide transportation once a month for various activities.
Call 392-1608 NOW!
STUDENT VOTER REGISTRATION
If you are a student who: (1) is over 21; (2) has lived in Fla. for 1 year; (3) has lived
in Alachua County for 6 mon.
Then you have until AUGUST 8 to register to vote in Alachua County. Registration
takes place at the Alachua County Courthouse on Main St. If you have any difficulty
in registering come to the Student Gov't offices, 3rd floor Reitz Union.
CONSUMER AFFAIRS ... I
The Consumer Affairs department of S.G. needs personnel to work as
under-secretaries and to assist with consumer protection. Anyone interested should see
Lee Schwartz, Sec. of Consumer Affairs, S.G. Office.
UNIV. COMMITTEES OPttl ... I
Several University committees are still open to students. If you are enrolled for the
summer and are interested in serving fill out an application in the Student Govt, office.
WHATS THE OMBUDSMAN I
It is a special S.G. sponsored agency designed to help students with any type
problem with courses, housing, legal, personal etc. Let the Ombudsman help you. Call
392-1650 anytime. I
BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE I
Bulletin Board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it Bring
your material, 20 copies of each sheet, to the Student Government office and you will
get free publicity for your organization. No personal material will be posted. I
.
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER mi it u awe
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY MONDAY AFTERNOON q-nJi nc caXw
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN THURSDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. tACH
I I
THANKS.
RODNEY MARGOL v
1 1 DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
I ~ .oj., w I



-^V/^
Grade "A" Fla. or Ga. Fresh Lag or Breast
FRYffi QIRS 1.39(
SPLIT BROILERS 35e I I
J* HI I/liVllmii# a a a a LB. */*#y I All Flavors Yukon Club (Limit 15 w/$5 or more order)
Freshly _ d|e/\/\
GROUND BEEF.. .L .59t1 Beverages 15s^$lP|
| Beer or Ale 6-B9{|
I nn Bfl ran l Big Swinger l
m3mm K JHr I Polaroid CAMERAS $0 9 si
I VIMI VIM Reg.s24.9s...AAP'sPrice M%
(Limit 1 w/ $6 or more order) I
i New Laundry Detergent
-. G r:.tr' . I Punch 3-Lb. 1-oz GUNTIOX 59(1
BANANAS 10c
Long White Baking >y^
POTATOES .... 10 bag 99c potato chips
wSbons.... .* 88c 59(
W WITH THIS COUPONI OM IMUUI WITH THIS COUKM WHmMTOU MIT a* d o d Ssjv
1 11 >WOnt >S * ,hr a | Srtur
/' v
Jane Parker Sandwich Sliced jgg^ataMl Bgyy^raeeawMnn
WHITE BREAD 2 ££ 49( SWrUf.iiiTJmii SwrifiiilJkAis pg'raf.iiif.iHjjgi
Jne Parker Delicious I AA P Spray Lm I Reach A Ant Killer LmJ Frlsldes Meat Flavor feSJjLf
ADDiC DISC OQ> {Disinfectant 69c"| { Hot Shot £; 95c j Dog 27c ****]
Arm no i-u.. su. tv.- mv* ussmjSmujiii ** \ .£2it.(

Thursday, July 2,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!,Tft Florida AlUaator, Thur*4ay, July 2, Sft7ft

PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON JULY 8
e miss this Offer! crackin' good pip chips or potato
rutnc
Iwf FEATURED PIECE-A-WEEK ft VVIpF
ft M wl 111
WITH "TUflkl DArif //
Quantity RlgfcH Rrvd PURCHASE lmn rAtlv
wnntpcui ticw, iNC-corraoKT-iyya 1 ft
GOOD JULY 2 THRU AUGUST It Es 9 P/f 0000 JUIYITHBOUOH AUGUST II |?S K1 0000 JUIY 2 THRU AUGUST 18 g} W
H This coupon worth *I.OO BETS, gg This coupon wthKOOTSSSSSi, ||g This coupon worth *1.50 VXZjtl*
Bk. *:*rjd uoo wuje w 881. B hop wuue N II ||g^ ; : ; ; : ; HSP B oz.
COUPON *1.99 COUPON *4.49 COUPON P| BAG ft
CHEK ALL FLAVORS SOFT p*-.
DRINKS? ASTO.^^ 1
V A A|f||A|i fill
BA fl too King mi.. -oo
M Dog Ration.. $ 1"
fti
DIXIE DARLING HAMBURGER & WIENER
DIXIE DARUNG FRIED
FLOWER CART T^BI
Panty Hose q PAIR 88 c P T OB K,yonnai * yowr choic * Hrt w 00 or mor pur ha *
CRACKIN GOOD Wfl | A DEEP SOUTH f '-^lix
Cheese Curis -- 39' WM f U MAYONNAISE Mg
CRACKIN GOOD TACO
VAN CAMP VIENNA
Sausage ... 5 S I OO Napkins .. .10 $ 1
Dill Pickles. 3 S I OO Green Beans 6 - 3s 1 00 EL 7j|
Cocktail... 6 N s l oo Beans .... 10 N s l oo Wm fII
CRACKIN GOOD SANDWICH THRIFTY MAID GREEN
Creams.... 4 Lima Beans. 8 -t $ 1 00 RHP
THRIFTY MAID THRIFTY MAID PORK A
Q 0 Catsup.... 4 ss*! 00 Beans 3 as*! 00 Q Q
GERBER CHOPPED BLACKBURN MADE COMSTOCK BLUEBERTY 33c OR REG. BARS 3/37c
Baby F00d... .3 49* Syrup S> 69* Peach Pie Mix .. <£? 49* Camay Soap. .2 SU 35 e
Lemon Extract.. TS. 1 19 Pie Fining ftiU39 e Soap 2 tSS 45 e Ivory Soap ... .4 33 e
lulwi,B[lll 1 sww iltllTwySSmuft i
s 77t~*7 H§ SUREST : M£3 ,X£,£U .K3a. jIHR i
IMM Sv mat 'Msf : mMf- .o o ** 55 5
ll^mwiiiiiiiiniiTm'L'm^^WYTnw'mii7i7i.mn^ffiwiiniinu2i : vr.2t.A^^YTnuiriiii; : i., -LffiMuuiiiiiSlwTiTiTwi IntfttfwrrrrrwmwtiSSmtltSmmwm
£!£,ne7 ~ 69 c 3421 WEST UN.VERS.TY AVL
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.



PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON JULY 8 /
Quantify light* Ntmtd AiaWHlnllnwy
WIW>I llr WOMh C.-COrrmOMT-IWO "'ifrwjbii
SWIFT'S PREMIUM i 4ftOUR LOCAL^k
dHfi&HAMS 'T W
% juLY4th Jf
for your convenience
' #. "LB.
W-D BRANDPURE CAM PORK <3 I. 5 Lb. Af.J '"iW ""
GROUND BEEF 3 *P Tl SPARE RIBS 69<
KRAFTS PHILADELPHIA BORDEN'S PRPCESSEO AMERICAN PLUMROSE COOKED (IMPORTED) W-D BRAND UCT.
SSSSL"* " 39* Sliced Cheese .... is 69* Sliced Ham is 59* Hamburger Patties * *1
Sliced Ham S I M Cottage Cheese.. 2 & 69* Med Chicken £? *1 All Meat Bologna .. 58*
TAENOW WHOLE HOO ROU W-D BRAND GROUND HANDt-EAK c CRACKIN' GOOD WAGON WHEEL SUNNUAND VAC-RACK PKKIE OLIVE OR CHEESE LOAF
Poric Sausage 79* Round Steak 99* Canned Biscuits.. 28S 29* Lunch Meat at 45*
C *Jk AN FRESH FROZEN GRADE A" TURKEY W-D MILD DAISY STYLE TAIMAOOf FARMS COUNTRY Vt OR WHOLE
All Meat Franks... SS49* Drumsticks 39* Cheddar Geese ... 89* Cured Hams 99*
RB W O BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK OR
Shoulder Roast .\ 0N 1L . 99 c
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF
London Broil.. \ 0N .. $ 1 29
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF FUU CUT
Round Steak . s l l9
CHICKEN N* DUMFUNOS. CHOF SUEY, CHICKEN CHOW MEIN, BEEF STEW S SU. TURKEY W/ORAVY
Banquet Suppers .. 2 99*
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF
Rump Roast. .TTS*.. $ 1 29
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF EYE
Round Roast.. - $ 1 39
itSKSHrie A
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF TOF ROUND OR SIRLOIN
THRIFTY MAIO ORANGE SANTA ROSA o MUM Steak $ P
m m n | .. AA M l flT I W-0 BRAND USDA CHOKE BEEF FORTERHOUSE OR T-BONE
Drink ...~89 c P1um5....3 ..*lmyijH i_ $139
SALAD
p Aih. #B| e fdfc*. W4> BRAND USDA CHOKE NEW YORK CUT STRIP
Tomatoes... 29 c Cherries... 59 c Coamltc $169
Beans ...2 39' Lemons 49 KMI c*__L 70c
Margarine. 4 s l Watermelons -99 e
Hilim' nun skims flMw
ESKIMO BORDEN'S
Thin Mints.... 2 s l Cake Roll s 39IMHHflB
B9S Lemonade.... 9 99* Fry Potatoes.. .3 S I"BS| 111 IV
JIFFYBKFSTEW, SAUSRURY STf AK OR W/ORAVY UMY OIEAM CORNOR s|oo Ml
TASTE OSEA ASTOR FEAS A CARROTS, CHOFFED OR LEAF SPINACH OR wt
Seafood Plattef 59 c Cut Corn 5 *l
M Fried Shrimp.... 89* Pound Cake...... 59*
rax DELUXE CHEESE
Ivory Soap 2 * 25 c Detergent . 63 c Detergent *ls 37 Detergent *5? *4*
UquicTDetergent 85* & 89* Ivory Snow Iff 89* Cleaner? S> 99*
wmsm S|y!jg||p& mj^^\
m* F~.~l~\ IK l^l
BLEEaEEEHEiiEiiijMWUda Rwhdi
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
mi 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.
fAGMU? no M 390 ,3VA YTI2R3VIHIU T23W IStt zox
t? 141 AM M HOiH fKI YAWfH w,c 19HDeD

ThwMtay, July 2,1970, Tlm HwM AMgatw,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
MGB 1966 Roadster White with
black top and wire wheels, leather
upholstry S9OO. Call 376-7088.
(A-4t-159-p)

I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA j
| ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES I
LUNCH AND DINNER
I MONDAY I
I BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI 1
ALL YOU CAN EAT JQx
I TUESDAY V I
1 GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN 1
I ALL YOU CAN EAT 99{ I
WEDNESDAY I
I JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK 79* I
I THURSDAY and yellow rice I
I BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS 99{ I
I FR,D^\ fish ALMONDINE AND french I
I FRIED POTATOES 89< I

THE IEBO
W
John Wayne bX^um
fbnestlixkerChristopher Gecxgeen johnson-Bmce Cabot
Glenn Gorbett- Ratric KrwwtesAndrew FVine*Richard jaeckel
lynda Day And htroduaig£eol^
Executive Producer Michael Wayne Written and Produced by Andrew j.Fenady
Directed by Andrew V M c Laglen ANAVISION TECHNICOLOR agBBS&S I
ENDS TODAY
"THE SICILIAN CLAN"
L * - M 1:30 3:35 5:40 7:49 9:59
I NOW! RinHHI I
mil t?n 11 iu ni
I WOW! I
r w,,. Am : \Jw

*%VV*V*V*VVVVVVV*VVV.'V**VV
*
FOR SA LE
AKC Registered Basset hound
puppies, tricolor, red & white. Call
after 5 P.M. Phone 378-3735.
(A-2t-159-p)

Page 14

1, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 2,1970


*
a*
FOR SALE
12 x 48 Mobile Home Located In
Gainesville. No down Payment.
$72.00/Mo. If seriously interested
call collect; Art Deane, Miami,
233-6798. (A-160-st-p)
RECORDS rock albums, large
variety, Zepelln to Youngbloods,
singles. 82.00 each, cheaper over ten.
Call 373-2520 Mark. (A-160-2t-p)
1969 Kawa 250 cc sidewinder 2,200
ml. Make cash offer or $75.00 equity
and take over $29 mo. payments.
Call 378-0953 will call back.
(A-160-3t-p)
For Sale: Belmont Mobile Home 50 x
10 Located on extra nice large lot in
Ptnehurst Park with pool and many
extras. 378-1122 after 3:30.
(A-160-6t-p)
G E Portable components stereo,
excellent condition, used only 7
months slls ($165 new). An
excellent stereo. Steve 378-4850.
(A-160-2t-p)
White German Shepherd puppy 6
weeks old, AKC registered, very
friendly, SIOO. 378-0844
(A-160-3t-p)
Newly-recorded and never used
WOODSTOCK TAPES $9.50, 8-track
only. Call Chuck 372-7707
afternoons only. (A-160-3t-p)
Human Hair, ash blonde, full length
wig. Worn 3 times. New S4O. Asking
$24. Call 376-7088. (A-4t-159-p)
SCUBA GEAR White Stag 72 tank, 4
yrs. old, with U. S. Divers boot and
back pack. Sportsways Malibu single
hose regulator. Espadon mask. Super
Rondlne fins, size 5-6. All for SIOO
or will sell' separately. Call Ed
376-5400. (A-2t-159-p)
t Gum Gum Gum 3 |
Inventory over 500. Buy j,
j Sell Trade Repair. 3
I Reloading supplies. Layaway j!
j plan. Harry Beckwith, gun 3
{ dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. j |

FOR SALE
*:*:*:*:r:*^
King-size bed, firm matrass. lVi year
old with 10 year guarantee. Must
sell, leaving country, new: S4OO,
asking $225. Call 376-7088.
(A-4t-159-p)
Elactrophonlc Stereo good
condiction $200.00. New must sell
$140.00 AFC AM/FM radio
multiplex with circular sound system.
Danny 5 SW 12 Ave. (A-2t-159-p)
FOR RENT
Furn. 1 br. apt.. Room for one or
two, with air conditioner, five
minutes to campus, one person
SBO/mo., two, S9O. 372-6591 before
6,372-0034 after. (B-160-4t-p)
Private room, double bed, across
street from campus, $41.25 mo. 919
S.W. 13tn St. 378-9043. (B-160-4t-p)
Ten rooms graduate men and older
men close cool utilities washer-dryer
parking 135.00 single 100.00 double
summer 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
5 bedroom house 300.00 spacious 2
br. apt. 185.00 2 blocks north of
campus graduate men and older men
available sept. 378-8122 376-6652
(B-8M57-P)
STUDENT couple w/wo child to
share air. cond. home with gentleman
(46). & boy (16) Free rent, utilities 81
board Much privacy 378-0572 or
392-1852. (B-4t-157-p)
HOLIDAY GARDENS
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C,' 1 bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S. W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Sublet for summer. Available July 1.
One bedrm; air conditioned;
furnished; slOl mo.; pool; wash
room; Sin City area; call John days
392-0418. (B-2t-159-p)
Available 'lmmediately one-two
bedroom apts. $95-sllO a month.
Seeing Is believing. A/C, pool, dose
to campus. 376-8990 or 376-2317.
(B-3t-159-p)
Hip roommate to share large air
conditioned house close to campus.
Call 376-4858 or come by 618 S. W.
10th St. (B-4t-159-p)
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
Included completely furnished
Ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-ts-c)

FAMILY NIGHT
AT THE UNION
July 2nd HHIESBUH^
The Ghost
Auditorium
50<-Adults
Under
Cafeteria Special
Children Under 12-Half Price
BOWLING SPECIAL-
Games Area
Family Rate of $1.20/ hour
all children must be accompanied
by an adult
Sponsored By Tho JWR Union
I about renting an apartment? H
| Alligator FOR RENT* ads are g ood I
, o

FOR RENT
TWO BLOCKS TO CAMPUS. AIR
COND., extras. Men or women.
Wood paneled. SSO & S6O. Call
392-0700 for apt. or 378-0286. See
1204 N. W. 3 Ave. (B-st-158-p)
ROOMMATES for Isl. 3 br. house.
One block from campus, own
bedroom, private entrance sBs for
whole summer. 1128 S. W. Ist Ave.
373-2268. (B-2M59-P)
Trailer space 3O acres privacy,
panoramic view of Orange Lake. 15
ml. so. UF. 20 x 40 pool. Ideal for
grad. stud. Call collect 591-1245.
(B-3t-158-p)
TWO BLOCKS TO CAMPUS. Two
bedroom, air, carpets, wood panel.
Newly decorated. $125. Call
392-0700 for aptt. 378-0286 or
372-3277 after 5. (B-st-158-p)
SINGLES: Swing Into summer in a
luxurious air conditioned poolside
apartment. Private bedroom. Walk to
campus. S7O Including utilities.
378-7224. (B-15t-148-p)
WANTED
CAMELOT. Need one male
roommate for 2 bedrm. deluxe apt.
priv., gas, bar b q, A/C, dish washr.
Call 373-2396 after 6 p. M., apt. No.
247. GREAT!! (C-2t-159-p)
Female roommate needed:
Williamsburg poolside apartment. Air
conditioned, dishwasher, etc. Please
call 378-6394 Glenna. (C-2t-159-p)
Need 2 coed roommates for
Williamsburg Apts. No. 11 for July.
Can move In anytime. Contact
376-1253 (Manager), A/C, poolside,
townhouse, dishwasher. (C-3t-158*p)
Coed to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Female roommate to share luxury
apt in Sin City. Low rate of $46.25
monthly. Call now 378-3667.
(C-4t-159-p)
ROOMMATE WANTED, male.
Summer qtr. Share 2 bdrm. apt. with
3 guys. Pool, air-cond. $42 per mo.
plus Utilities. 376-0354. (C-2t-159-p)
Student help needed for voter
registration drive In Black
neighborhoods. Information, call
392-0453. (C-160-lt-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS



help wanted
Part time and full time salesmen for
mens retail clothing store. Some
experience preferred. Apply in
person Silvermans, 225 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-2t-159-p)
HELP WANTED. TYPIST II
positions open in Student
Publications to operate IBM MTSC
typesetting equipment. Will train.
Two shifts, B*s and 1-10 pm. High
school education required.
Permanent work. Apply to Mr.
French, Room 330, J. Wayne Reitz
Union. Phone 392-1681. An Equal
Opportunity Employer. (E-tfc)

iriftiif Mniniftm
muL ncwnnn
ROBERT REDfORO
KATHARINE ROSS
WBiffl OF I ACADEMY AWARDS!
JL Eluding BEST SONG
2M CENTURY-FOX PRCSEMTS
ffl BUTCH CASSIDY AND
A THE SUNDANCE KID m
PLUS mwym nr
,
\ffliss9ean e rodie AUUMVIT
i i mm
Smith
I IN COLOR FOR BEST ACTRESS I
fl 11 Jk m / H M& I M m g I I fill A V
IP* rl L'lll ll I I liii Mll M NNIIfI
Union Auditorium
One of the best comedies in years certainly
Peter Sellers best since Dr. Strangelove!
Hollywood Kopoiior
Peter Seiiers
v % v
fe* v vI
I vI Love Vdu.
Alice B.To Kias
Spend your 4th of July laughing Shows at 6:00, 8:30 and 11:00
with Pater

.%WeV.%v/.v.%v.v.\v/.v/.%v.v.vXv!v;v
HELP 'WA NTED
Widower with three children needs
mature person to live in and run the
home. Call Mr. Poole, 376-3468
anytime. Must have references.
(E-6t-157-p)
Listeners wanted: Will pay $2.00 for
1 hr. session. Must be native English
speaking and have normal hearing.
Please call Miss Weston between 1
and 4 p.m. for appt. 392-2049.
(E-160-3t-p)
SPORTS WRITERS for Alligator
staff. Experience helpful. Salary Is
flexible. Call 392-1686 In the
afternoon. (E-4t-159-p)

Thursday, July 2,1970, The Florida Alligator,

HELP WANTED
Women! Learn to enhance your own
natural beauty and share these secrets
with others. Part-time, full time, &
distributorships available. Cell Cindy
392-7672. (E-st-159-p)
Wanted: Hours: 5:30 7:30 10-15
hours per week. Pay: Hourly wage
plus commission. Type work:
Telephone solicitation. Call 372-2130
for Interview, more information.
(E-4t-159-p)
AUTOS
66 Corvalr great shape
economical but sporty asking $575
-372-1272. Mike (G-2t-159-p)
1967 Triumph Bonnlvllle 650 cc.
Excellent condition only S7OO. Call
Fogle 378-0293 or see cycle anytime
after 6 P. M. Delta Chi Frat.
(G-4t-159-p)
Corvette Convertible, i 960. Superb
condition. A real collectors Item.
Superior Interior and body, great
engine. Reduced, only $895,
376-5962. (Q-3t-159-p)
65 Olds-442, red, 2 dr. ht., P. S.,
P. 8., rebuilt A/r, 'A/C, Rad & Rev,
49,000 miles, cell R* Byrd, 378-4232,
morning or evening. Student.
(G-4t-159-p)
Triumph TR3 Gd condition,
overdrive, new trans., relined brakes,
9 mo.-old paint Job, many extras
Included, S6OO. Call 372-7178 after
5:00 P. M. (G-4t-159-p)
Mustang, 289 VB, 1966, convertible
black top & Interior w/ excellent red
finish new tires, top condition. Ask
$1,295 cell Jim Sherby <8 378-7432.
(G-st-157-p)
Classic Porsche 3568 1961. Good
Mich X tires, Blaupunkt AM rad. 3/4
Howard cam, stinger exhaust. Other
extras. SI7OO. 372-4179.
(G-2t-160-p)
TAPES RECORDED. 4 and 8-trgck
tapes recorded for only $2.00 each
plus the cartridge. Cell Chuck at
3 72-7707 any afternoon.
(M-160-2t-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
Prompt pick-up, delivery. 373-1984,
9-5 (M-st-159-p)
Happiness Is getting your/eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglase office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
BUS Station, 378-4480 (M-ts-c)
COEDS Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologlst 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
COEDS Want to do something new
this summer? Photographer needs
models for photo studies. No pay,
but fun and travel. No experience
OK. Call 376-1387. (J-2t-159-p)
PHOTOPORTRAITS. RICK
376-6028. (J-st-159-p)
I Be at I
I with yourself I
I Yoga Lessons I
instructor: Steve Sheridan I
lsls for six V/z hour sessions I
I call 392-1655 before July 3l
for information
gponeored by the JWRUnion Jj
wav.v.vavanx*x:w>:
Patronize Gator
m Advertisers

Page 15

SERVICES
Alternators Generators starters
Electrical systems tested and repairs
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 S.
Main (M-ts-c)

RiH. Sn?\ I A fl / STARTS
[Â¥ FRIDAY!
MAE WEST HUSTON
~ RAQUEL 1 WELCH
V\i.
hGORE VIDAL'S
MYRA BRECKINRIDGE
As MW
£v*Ayt&4~£ y&uvi *tcut My** %xtci(JihA*/fr li true!
REX REED FARRAH FAWCETT ROGER HERREN CALVIN LOCKHART JOHN CARRADINE
ROBERT FRYER MICHAEL SARNE MICHAEL SARNE * DAVID GILER GOReVidAL cLX'STJTf (^JT. ~'-SET.
** ' * corn rrt all or mi nt ir mi ~maio Vp maholc mx cmffa Y~^
w^mmm
MASH IS THE BEST
AMERICAN WAR |A
COMEDY SINCE TP m
SOUND CAME %jf
IN! (w Yorker /
20ttiCM*ryFoa promt!
HASH ngo Preminger Production Ip 1
MNALD SUTHERLAND ELLIOTT GOULD-TOM SKERRITT M Tk
uamauteioauautiiMu oammu-wiMaus § HK
| Pew stew* MeetviMe |
i
\ T T people I
woodl/todi
(uuith a little help I
From our Friendc)
starring joan baez e joe cocker country joe & the fish crosby, stills & nosh
arloguthrie richie havens jimihendrix santana *john Sebastian esho-na-na
sly & the fomily stone ten years after* the who and 400,000 other beautiful people.
oiiimb/michael wadleigh produced by I
bob maurice a wadleigh-maurice,ltd.
production technicolor from warner bros.
NCSTMCTCO Under 17 requires c#w,i M e i*s Mi. Me.
**3*l JKJ accompanying Parent or Adult Guardian * *., m .m me mi My

SERVICES
ALTERATIONS Mrs. Ruby Mills
moved near Gainesville shopping
center 100 N.E. Bth Ave. Apt. 217
Phone: 376-8506 (M-st-157-p)



Page 16

. Tbs Florida AlUgstor, Thursday, July 2,1970

Snack Crackers S 47*
(Bacon Thins, Wheat Thins, Twigs, Cheese A Sesame)
)
) Charcoal Lighter r 39*
Grill Liner Q9 C
SiiF- '*
, Bucket Olives ~r39*
<
SAVE 4c, Cairo Beauty Hamburger Slices or
Dill Pickles 39
Almtfaium Fell 59*
Souffle 39
Fillet of Flounder 39 c
FryeHJvers 3 *ke* *1
mimmmmm SAVE 16c, Libby's Sliced or Halved Yellow Cling Stick Cheese pk 79 C
m Miss Wi.cen.in Medium
Peaches 3 89* Biumcheese
save 24c, Libby's Sliced American 69 c
Fruit Cocktail # 4 cans 1 Cottage Cheese £ 37 c
BPIIB Apple Sauce.... 3 *1
I SAVE 14c, Penny-Saver New Pbiladulphiu Brand
Detergent -AT 49* Cream Cheese .
Tomato Ketchup .. 39*
Tea Bags r 99* jp jtfft \
Beer In Pop-Tp Cans, jK 3MM& Jg X
nfc>
Garden Peas 19*
Baby Food 8* Ke Pm. 1 P Pj^^Md
Instant Tea 99*
Sterling Salt 10* Cucumbers MMBSK
Vienna Sausage 5 J.V; $ 1 3.., 29 e BTr^nP
SAVE 12c, Realemon Reconstituted Bell Peppers B / | PB
Lemon Juice 39 Tropicana Florida
ftnldan Cam ie Orange Juice 69 PDB|.
UFOIUOII %Vl II can Idr (Flu. Ixtra BAN Breen Stamp. Cevpen)



INCREDIBLE ... Itgont dinntrwor* that'* ovanpraof Shop for the long
M This week's (July 1-8) a Air an #4
JdL Coffee Cup W ee na<<
Pub,ix closed
purchases you may buy p.ece f^tc
| m<) (oliec mate j
' DINNERWARE LIMIT ONE COUPON PER FAMILY CASH VALUE 110 OF 1 Swift's Pramium Tasty Lean | Off Insect
Sliced Bacon 79* I Repe, an
jtJ\ yj \ ) \ % 6V2 ox. size 89c
Rath Black Hawk Boneless = W/ |
Smoked Dainties 99 e mKMifMai Ga> Compl ter p| *<* NOw
swit?; I KSE" *.
(Rickie Pimento, Olive Pimento,
Swift's'Premium Wafer Thin Sliced r Any Brand
Lunch Meat *, k 4s -V.!X"
Beef, Ham, or Turkey ...i35 c £^s?*-***T**^i
CookodHani 'iv .|.l* BMSHSSSpS
SWIFT S PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT. I Falser'. Instant Coffee |
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE #ffl[k | 3 |
Sirloin Steaks $ 1.29 V^_
Key Club Steaks ~5 1 .29 4 : i
Swift's Premium Beef Steak, I A 9 F J|m EXTRA P^^V
London Broil . $ 1.39 PREI I fffm V
| right to limit nahdmdn wuh this coupon mo purchase o OhMOi
Swift's Pramium Boneless Top ( a---.-a c va ah
a a y Banquet
Round Steak . .. $ 1.29 jfe IIKm Quantiti ss j ,'sssss;
Swift's Premium Tasty l*rt* wed., jr*. istsi
£* to IBi* If a#.fEafllc WO DBHSOf. Ma\k!T/ X XAftftAtULAftftaaAaaAWftAAAftAftaftAAft&aaaAlT
unwen eicaii >- rri, extra IPN
mm Jgjjfik* EllfofGreenStampspl
Bathroom Tissue <|
Wieners * 49 Prices effective Wednesday 11
noon July 1 thru Wednesday |
Tarnow P 9 P 9 P nOOn July 8, 1970 .. *************** f ****
Bologna 29 c 49 c 69 c rTl a extra P^l
n n lilll^GreenStamps[ mn j
H* 1 W MjSfmm BiHI i i
Seafood Treat, Florido O 1 LV I *<>-. P k 9. 35C |
Small Shrimp n>. By k. | 7 |
Grouper Fillets - 99 A 9.1 i extra pp"*
jiill^GreenStamps^J
Fur Oiw. (Mcdeuai Dept. ssTUi^S,
1 lb. Potato Salad ot no Extra Cost xAAAAAnanA^^gaAAAjMtfg^M^gnnnanftnn
1L {]> \ |,l| With a Pwrchaso R M V EXTRA BP^M
Cooked Ham tillldJvfGreenStanipsFf* l *!
TjH 1 lb. Potato Salad at no Extra Cost Staid I
i I Corn Oil
Boloana ib*l.o9 Margarine
Tasty Kitchen Froth
Potato Salad 39 c
HcaftK & Bcautu. Au(l Spfciflfi ,?y^,? ns lk JjflldJwGreenStampsp^
f#TD -^nrnif^'- >|T I
jHair spray *i*e 99 Bar-B-Q Fryers h. 69 | coffee cake
Mouthwash, | large 89c
Listen 9 c ___l? .' i
pfij^GreenStampsP^
p K £. CBmR BD rmiDU^S.. I
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTE ; PUdUX^^*SSS.n.ps@
GAINESVILLE MALL (/ 1 nJStfsrjtu.
2630 N.W. 13th jot V |

Thunder, July 2,1970, Thu Florida Animator,

Page 17



Page 18

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 2,1970

jgHHn
I knew President Richard M.
Nixon way back when. Nixon
was one of my first employes.

Law School Hosts Black Professor
&

By CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
There probably arent too many people who can
say, I knew President Richard M. Nixon way back
when, and even fewer who can say, Nixon was
one of my first employes, but law professor
Charles W. Quick Jr. can rightly make both
statements.
That was back during World War II when Quick
was working as assistnat general counsel in the
rationing division of the Price Administration and
Nixon had just graduated from Duke University.
NIXON WAS a liberal then, Quick said.
Likeable is the way one of his students
described him, and thats just the feeling one has of
the man after meeting him.
Opening the door of his office his students are
greeted with Quicks smiling face and hearty
welcome.
UFs Spessard L. Holland Law Center will be the
summer home for Quick as a visiting professor this
quarter. This is also the first time he is teaching in a
law school in the south.
QUICK HAS traded the courtroom for the
classroom and his reason is, I enjoy the educational
and intellectual life of the university. The students
are highly motivated they are going into their
lifes work, he said.
Quick, who is teaching a seminar on law and
poverty and a constitutional law class, has served as
a consultant and assisted in constitutional

Computer Courses Offered

By MIKE JOANNOU
Alligator Staff Reporter
This summer the Computer
Center is offering the following
computer language courses:
APL, BASIC, PL/1 and
FORTRAN. These courses are
free, non-credit and open to the
general public as well as to
students, staff and UF faculty.
APL is a terminal-based
language. The class will meet
Tuesday and Thursday
afternoons from 12:15 to 1:15
in the Terminal Lab (room 319),
of the Engineering Building
beginning June 30. There will be
a very limited enrollment so
plese check with the Computing
Center.
BASIC, IS A SIMPLE basic
programing language. This
course is a prerequisite for all
other Computer Center Courses,
with classes being held on
Thursday evenings from 7-9
PM, for 6 weeks starting July 2,
1970 in Bless Auditorium
(Williamson Hall Room 133.).
The text will be Richard Nolan:
An Introduction to Computing
Through the Basic Language.
PL/1 (Programing
Language/One) is a high-level
course designed for the IBM 360
THE COMFORT EXPERTS
Specializing in Residential
& MOBILE HOME
AIR CONDITIONING
fiml
/ t met /* /
Fraa Estimates
2702 MJE. Wh DRIVE 378-1578

..... A
Law schools have shown a
greater awareness of social
problems than universities
generally.

computer. It will meet on
Wednesday Evenings from 79
P.M. in Bless Auditorium for 8
weeks beginning July. 1. BASIC
of FORTRAN is a prerequisite.
FORTRAN IV (FORmular
TRANslation) is a high-level
computer language developed
for all major computers. Classes
will meet on Tuesday evenings
from 7-9 P.M. in Bless
Auditorium for 6 weeks

I f 'ifjJ: i w.T'A I
\fj Vi TASTY S-lneh
I\J J ] j Apple Crumb Pie I
DELICIOUS 12-oz. DATE-HUT
Coffee Cake I
EglSprJi ..> 59< I
HOLIDAY SPECIAL!
Hamburger Buns ;
i ,,r is* i
I DANISH BAKERY
1 Goinesville Moll j
j -Speciol-Ordete Coll 972-3SS* |

development in East African governments.
He said he feels it is very important to participate
in the current social revolution.
LAW SCHOOLS have shown a greater awareness
of social problems than universities generally, and
act as social engineers in the communtiy more
often, he said.
In fact, his law and poverty class is making an
assessment of the Gainesville Communitys social
assets and liabilities. This will be used as a base for
further legal action to remove impediments to
progress, Quick said.
Quick, who received his law degree from Harvard
Law School and graduate law degree at New York
University, is presently a member of the University
of Illinois law faculty.
MARRIED AND the father of four, Quick is very
involved in civil rights activities. He is a consultant
for the National Association for the Advancement
of Colored People (NAACP) Defense Fund and the
American Civil Liberties Union.
He has tried several cases before the U. S.
Supreme Court and was one of the counsels for the
1954 school desegration case. A
When asked what direction civil rights will take,
he replied, I hope we are going toward equality.
Though Quick hasnt been at UF long enough to
evaluate it, he said, faculty and students have been
most cordial.
Law is more than a profession to Quick. Law is
my hobby, he said.

beginning June 30. BASIC is the
prequisite.
Enrollment in any of the
courses is achieved simply by
attendance. Texts may be
purchased at the HUB. For
further information please
contact Frank Towers, Room
233 Bryant Space Sciences
Research Building, telephone
392-2061.

,
I enjoy the educational and
intellectual life of the university.

I" STCAK* SHAME ~!
Student Special
| (With Jhe Coupon) |
I Our Regular 93< Steakburger |
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90< pus tax |
i Steak n Shake 1
{l6l0 SM. _Gamesvillej
Reitz Union Auditorium
f
SUN. JULY 5
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
J ADMISSION 50 cents /H|fl
Laurel & Hardy in the Blockheads plus
Charlie Chaplin in The Jitney
Elopement, Easy Street, and The
Woman

r to a Pan, %
TACO
FIESTA
July 15, 1970
DELICIOUS AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD
00X70300
826 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
SUN. THRU THURS. 10:30 TO 11:00 PM
e '" tv r>M Ml> # itf vrartft n on am

m
I hope we are going toward
equality



Students Dream. Learn While Sleeping

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
A UF professor has taken up a study
that has been virtually ignored in America
for the past 15 years.
Dr. C. Michael Levy assistant professor
of psychology, is experimenting with
students to see if it is possible to learn
while one is asleep.
THE STUDY has long been an interest
of the Russians, who claim that
complicated knowledge, mathematics,
and languages can be taught to a sleeping

Consumer Protection Plan
New Commitee Objective

Students may be able to get
better goods and services from
Gainesville merchants in the near
future thanks to a new Student
Government committee on
consumer affairs.
Were trying to get a
consumer protection plan here,
said Lee Schwartz, SGs
secretary of consumer affairs.

Dairy Scientist Exchange
Latest Findings In Field

By FRED VOLLRATH
Alligator Assistant News Editor
The effect of the intravenous
infusion of either flucose of
Lmethionine on lactating cows
exhibiting symtoms of ketosis
may not be of much interest to
the layman, but this topic and
others like it have brought 1,400
delegates and observers to the
65th annual convention of the
American Dairy Science
Association (ADSA) being held
at UF.
The above topic is one of the
170 scientific papers and 12
symposiums which will be
presented to the dairy scientist
from every state and several
foreign countries. The
convention is this week and
deals with the latest scientfic
findings in the marketing,
production, and consumption of
milk and other dairy products.
RESEARCH workers are
given an opportunity to give
their recompleted work to their
colleagues and exchange
information on projects they are
currently working on, said
V. H. Nielsen, the associations
president from the University of
lowa.
Most of the delegates are
representatives of universities,
but industry, government and
private consultants are also
attending.
We have an opportunity to
recognize members who have
done outstanding work from the
previous year, said Nielsen, Os
course, it also gives us a chance
to meet old friends and socialize
with them.
Iroawood
Golf Club
STUDENT NHKKRSHr
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 +-TAX
SPECIAL RATI
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For information coll
376-0090
irohwoop
*nr
jaaoimM

person over a matter of weeks and
months.
Research in America has been slow
since 1955, when two psychologists failed
to produce noticeable results with
subjects under study for only one night.
Levy, whose subjects remain for three
to seven nights, exposes them to Russian
words with their English equivalents and
then measures their retention of the
language the next morning.
EACH VOLUNTEER sleeps in a
dorm-like room with a roommate. An
electroencephalograph (EEG) is attached
to the subject by small wires glued to the
scalp. The EEG can tell when the person

UNDER JHE program, if a
student has some problem when
he is buying in the area, he can
tell it to the committee.
Schwartz described the service
as Like the Ombudsman but
more specific.
f The committee is planning a
manual for fall publication that
would be the culmination of
student complaints and surveys

BUT, NIELSEN said the
ultimate beneficiary is the
consumer who is assured a
uniform quality product
throughout the country at a
reasonable price.

a mister a
GfiMi)
<3
Come in for the freshest donuts ever
coconut, cinnamon ones Donuts plain
brownies and the world s best cup of
money-saving open house coupon
OPEN 24 HOURS
r"~
I f SAY HELLO TO 1 {T I
I MISTER DONUT |
Get a real good buy* cc muster
IO Alt off -* Donut
M m. M MISTER DONUT won T YOU PtEASE come home
IJmm l II take a down'
PER DOZEN ) ADDRESS
a --------*

UF PROF WORKING ON IT

of consumer treatment in the
city.
WE ARENT planning to
serve ultimatums to the
merchants, he said. Right now
the only action we plan to take
is in talking to the individual
businesses and getting their
reactions.
But, you cant fortell whats
necessary, he added. It
depends on how the merchants
react everything depends on
them
Not only prices will be
investigated. Services, such as
banking, will be looked into.
Right now volunteers are
needed to make the committee a
success. People are needed to
make price comparisons in their
home towns when they go home
for a weekend, Schwartz said.

is asleep and how deep the sleep has
become.
Then, when the subject reaches a
certain stage in sleep, the Russian tape is
played through small earphones into the
ears.
Tests administered the following
mornings show that a subject is capable
of learning 20 to 30 per cent of the
program.
IT DOESNT disturb sleep or cause
any side effects, Levy said. But, of
course, its not as efficient as daytime
learning.
Levy and his workers have a lot of
analyzing to do this summer. In his last

Sounds for July 4th
by the band
9:00 1:00 a.m. on the Union Terrace i( \ \
sponsored by JWRU I / \ \
WSQWB'
[UO MBWvhy rslri rflfnnifl Jnfy
vOLK*wotM or ahCric*, mi.
' ~ v ***. Jiml*
Volkswagen with air conditioning.
The truth is the inside of the bug gets
just as hot and clammy on a 90-degree day
as the inside of any other car if you don't
have something to cool it off.
Hence the VW air conditioner.
It's a quiet, trim, 3-speed unit that won't
cut down on your leg room or luggage
space.
And it wont cost you a bundle.
The minute you turn the knob to colder
it starts saving on wrinkled collars and
crumpled suits (not to mention antiperspir antiperspirants).
ants). antiperspirants).
But the thing that really saves you
money is the package it comes in.
The Volkswagen still delivers better
mileage than any domestic air-conditioned
car.
It still runs on pints, not quarts, of oil.
And since the engine is cooled by air
instead of a radiator, there's no need for
antifreeze at 10 below or cool water at
HO above.
The result:
It cant boil over on the hottest day of
the year.
Which is more than you can say for the
driver if hes not air-cooled.
DEALER
MILLER-BROWN MOTORS
4222 N.W. 13th St. 376-4552

Thursday, July 2,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

experiment, 18 subjects for seven nights
equaled 105 miles of tape from the EEG
which has to be checked inch by inch.
His work is restricted because,
although the payment that the subjects
receive isnt too much, when all
expenditures are taken into account it
takes roughly SIOO per night per subject.
In the fall, hell gather data to
determine whether the resistence of a
person to hypnotic suggestion
corresponds to their resistence to sleep
learning.
Also, he is going to compare sleep
learning to well known variables in
daytime learning.

Page 19



Page 20

!, Th* Florida Alligator. Thursday, July 2; 1970

Accent '7l Program Theme Chosen

Challenge of Our Dilemma was chosen as the theme
of Accent *7l by General Chairman Ed Boze and his
committee.
After debating three or four weeks on a number of
themes, we finally decided on this one for two main
reasons, said Boze. The program itself will be changed to
a year-round presentation of speakers and we needed a
theme broad enough to encompass any number of
topics.
THE SECOND reason was to allow students a greater
chance to expound on issues and / help develop
alternatives. The theme, according to Boze, is a good way
of representing society groping in the dark. It will
prompt debate on a wide range of events.
The Accent program itself will be modified from the

Gainesville Police Switch
To Computerized System

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writar
At midnight Tuesday, the Gainesville police
changed over to a computerized system of
communications which does away with cramped
record files and a lot of radio traffic.
According to Officer J.M. Bates, Supervisor of
Communications with the Gainesville Police, the
system is linked up with thfc Florida Crime
Information Center (FCIC) in Tallahassee.
IT ENABLES the police to obtain information
about suspects, stolen cars and other objects in a
matter of minutes.
The FCIC is also linked to the National Crime
Information Center (NCIC) in Washington D.C. If a

Unitarians Provide Eleven Black
Students With New Opportunity

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
Eleven Black students who
were suspended from a
Jacksonville high school are
attending classes at the Unitarian
Universalist Fellowship and are
living with white families in the
Gainesville area.
The program to help these
students was initiated by Booker
C. Peek, a UF Ph. D. candidate
in French.
AT FIRST Peek thought he
would have to take complete
responsibility for the students
housing, feeding and clothing
them.
But with the help of people
from UF and from the
Gainesville community, the
program has been a success, Peek
said.
We have set some goals for
our program, says Peek. We
want to improve their
self-esteem, strengthen their
academic skills the students
have to attend classes everyday
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
better their image of the white
world.
THE STUDENTS are being
taught English, French and
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mathematics. The time after 2 is
spent in recreational activities,
bowling, swimming and trips.
The organization involved
with the program, of which Peek
is president, is Toward American
Togetherness (TAT). It has set
these long range goals:
Increase their (the
students) understanding of both
their responsibilities and
privileges in our society.
Prepare them to meet
UFs normal admission standards
four years from now.
Continue to make UF
more relevant to the ghetto.

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'CHALLENGE OF OUR DILEMMA

usual five day range of speakers to an introduction of
speakers throughout the school year.
We will also be acting as a type of speakers bureau to
book less-well-known speakers during the year, Boze
said.
The Accent committee is also looking into different
major speakers who they could bring to campus in the fall
and in the spring.
**WE WANT to bring at least one very prominent
personality during the first quarter, aid Rodney Margol,
speakers chairman, and at least one for the last quarter
which lacks any kind of presentation of this type.
The winter week of Accent will also see a change in the
reduction of the number of speakers and perhaps an
extension into a week and a half or two weeks.

person is wanted in any state, NCIC can report who
he is and what he is wanted for in a similarly short
space of time.
Basically, the computer is like the teletype
machine which it is replacing. However, there will
be no need to file the countless bits of information
that would come over a teletype.
Instead, the information is stored in the
computer in Tallahassee ready at any time it is
needed.
Also, Gainesville Police will no longer have to
depend on radio communications, crowding the
airwaves, to obtain the information in Tallahassee,
leaving more space for urgent calls within the city.

Help has not only come from
organizations, (American
Federation of Teachers,
Gainesville Women for Equal
Rights and Uniterarian
Universalist Fellowship), but
also from individuals.
ACCORDING TO Peek, Dr.
Frieda S. Brown, associate
professor of romance languages,
has helped in the tutoring and
the organization of the program.
Peek says the students, while
not attending classes or other
activities, spend their time with
the Gainesville families they are
living with.

There were thirty-four speakers at Accent 7O and
students were unable to see near that number in less than
a weeks time and still keep up with their studies, Boze
said. Since we will be presenting speakers throughout the
year we can cut down the speakers during the actual week
to just the most prominent ones.
LIKE ALWAYS, Accent 7l will hold panel discussions,
continue bringing high school delegates to the campus for
Accent week and continue to schedule as many speakers
at night as possible to enable more students to come.
The only other change that the committee is planning
at this time is a more representative view of both sides of
an issue.
If we present a speaker from the extreme right we
want to present an equally qualified speaker from the
extreme left, Boze explained.

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Page 21



The
Florida
Alligator

By DAN VINING
Alligator Campus Living Editor
Regardless of the heat both
temperature-wise and legislative
- pop festivals are happening all
over the country this Summer.
Many kids are preparing for long
drives and fun. Many townsfolk
are preparing for hordes of
people they don't like and for
noise they dont understand.
One of these things is going to
be close enough for us to go. Its
the Atlanta Pop Festival which
isnt in Atlanta at all, but rather
in the Middle Georgia Raceway.
The Middle Georgia Raceway is
just west of Macon and about 90
miles from Atlanta.
THE ROCK AND ROLL
derby starts tomorrow
probably at night sometime
and runs through Sunday. The
dates are July 3 through July 5.

Answers To Tuesdays Puzzle:
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44 Sheriff's
helpers.
49 Senior.
50 Theologian
Scotus.
51 Fencing
sword.
53 Having saw
teeth.
55 Seaweed.
56 Chinese
dynasty.
57 Lamenta Lamentation.
tion. Lamentation.
58 Animal.
59 Deduced.
61 Chair
coverings.
63 Circuitous
ways.
64 Obtain
again.
65 Layout.
66 German
gentleman.
68 Macerate.
69 Apparitor.
71 Persian
money.
72 Fateful.
73 Alleged
force.

I Greek epic
poet.
6 Incite to
action.
11 Annie
Oakley.
15 Renowned.
20 Harangue.
21 Light wood.
22 Bitter herbs.
24 Vaqueros
gear.
25 Rob Roy
author.
27 Author of
"Leaves of
Grass."
29 Understand Understanding.
ing. Understanding.
30 Article.
31 Eunuch.
32 Spanish
hall.
33 Decad.
34 Pavilions.
36 Cross
one's self.
38 Family,
members.
42 Extraction.
43 Fruit
decay.
1 American
poet.
2 Algerian
port.
3 Beer
ingredient.
4 Feminine
suffix.
5 Enroll.
6 Norwegian
poet.
7 Scot.
8 Concocting.
9 Feminine
name: pi.
10 Concealed.
II Chess
pieces.
12 Wings.
13 Dissovable.
14 Pay (a bill).
15 Calendar
abbreviation.

16 Small
islands.
17 Baby word.
18 Latin
abbrevia abbreviation.
tion. abbreviation.
19 Two years
Before the
Mast"
author.
23 Candies.
26 Highways:
abbr.
28 Box score,
abbrevia abbreviation.
tion. abbreviation.
35 American
Tragedy
author.
37 Edible fish.
38 Nigh.
39 He: Lat.

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Florida Quarterly:
The thrill of a lifetime
51.25

lx; 1H VL. H IB 1W- B| Hr 9| JR

Despite The Heat, Atlanta Pops

AHTnORS
ACROSS

105 Peripheries.
106 Obstacles.
107 Lamp slave.
108 Bed linen.
109 Vous .
111 Corundum.
113 Arm joints.
114 Colo. park.
116 Negated
verb.
117 Serpent.
118 Applaud.
122 Entrance.
124 Alas! Ger.
125 Intelligence.
130 Author of
A Boys
Will.
132 Coriolanus
author.
134 Greek,
princess.
135 Strong point.
136 Genuine: si.
137 Chemical
substance.
138 Brown .
139 Hindmost.
140 Paradises.
141 The Waste
Land
author.
56 Turn up
one's nose.
57 Prophet
who is like
God.
60 Stare,
amorously.
61 one: odds.
62 Coruscates.
63 Attracted.
65 Away from
centsr.
67 Energy
units.
69 Conjunction
70 Interval of
an octave
and a fourth.
71 Depression
72 Couch.
74 Juiceless.
77 Inquisitive.
78 Nightshade.

75 Thors
stepson.
76 Death in
the After Afternoon"
noon" Afternoon"
author.
81 Mongrel.
82 Far off:
comb. form.
84 Aware of:
si.
85 Peace,
advocates.
86 Jury's
verdict.
88 Transport.
89 This: Sp.
90 Screen of
tapestry.
91 Sweet: It.
92 100 years.
94 Type of boat
sail.
96 Shrieked.
99 Opens.
100 Sully.
101 Sluggish
state.
102 Middle:
comb. form.
103 Fictitious
narratives.

DOWN

40 Hervey
Allen's
Israfel.
41 Discon Discontinued.
tinued. Discontinued.
42 Embank Embankment.
ment. Embankment.
43 Well: comb,
form.
45 Two Two(numerous).
(numerous). Two(numerous).
46 Author of
"Life on the
Mississippi."
47 Begin.
48 Morays.
5? Composition
for two.
52 Two Kings,
for example.
54 Cuchulain's
wife.

THE RIGHT TO ROCK AND ROLL

The cost for tickets and you
have to get them before you go
- is sl4. There are lots of places
here in town to buy them.
It's hard to say who's
headlining the show. Jimi
Hendrix will be there. His
sidemen change from day to day
anymore so who knows who
hell bring with him.
From Hendrix on, its pretty
much a matter of personal taste
as to who is more impressive an
act than the others. So, here's
who else is coming: Richie
Havens, Jethro Tull, Terry Reid,
Hampton Grease Band, Ginger
Baker's Air Force, Spirit, B. B.
King, Captain Beefheart and His
Magic Band, Allman Brothers,
Chambers Brothers, Tacos,
Bloodrock, Lee Michaels,
Cactus, John Sebastian, and
Ballin Jack.

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TO
25 26 + '2B
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33 35 37 |
38 39 40 41 42 iHF* 15 6 17
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WM ~
_ 60 6 l ;
M 64 6 s 166~ 67 6 B
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87 -1
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ITS
_ rTT
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79 Greek
assembly.
80 Christmas.
83 Perfect.
87 Part of a
Caesar
quote.
89 Gaelic.
90 Whit.

ROBBIES
For The Best In
Meals & J^Sandwiches
TV & BILLIARD^H
I 1718 W University Ave. I
I 'On The Gold Coast I

97 Blue-pencil.
98 irae.
101 Ancient
African city.
104 Light, as a
firecracker.
105 Compensate.
106 Removed
from a game.

91 Service dec decorations:
orations: decorations:
abbr.
92 Use bad
language: si.
93 Concatenate.
95 Unchanged.
96 Vitriol-in Vitriol-infused
fused Vitriol-infused earth.

Naturally as pop festivals
ate wont to do some of those
probably won't show and others
who haven't been promised will
appear. The list is impressive
enough to make the drive and
the ticket price worthwhile, I
suppose.
IN THE LIST of acts there are
several worth taking come time
and space to talk about. Captain
Beefheart and His Magic Band is
one. Beefheart is a guy named
Don Vliet and there's no real
way to describe his music. He
sings Blues and has an incredibly
strong voice. His sidemen
indude The Mascara Snake and
Antennae Jimmy Semens and
some others and theyre good
very strange but so very good.
What they do can best be
described as California.
Also listed but maybe not
noticed immediately are Terry
Reid and Lee Michaels who both
are exceptional lead guitarists
whore travelling as single acts.
Both have been with major
groups and should provide some
good things.
The Allman Brothers are one
of the top unknown groups in
the country. Perhaps the one
place where they Ve gotten some
of the recognition they deserve
is Atlanta. The men live and
work out of Macon now after
living and working together on
the West Coast. Duane Allman,
one of two lead guitarists in the
group, has been called by Eric

107 Hold.
110 Extreme
fright.
112 Tapeworm
larva.
113 Heartaches.
115 Boston, for
one: abbr.
116 Change.

126 Eye: Fr.
127 Indian
princess.
128 Musical
group.
129 Oispatched.
131 Spanish
king.
133 Relatives.

117 Author
Harte and
others.
118 Nursery
item.
119 Wisdom.
120 Instigate.
121 Confined.
123 Movie dog.

Page 22

Clapton one of the most
impressive players anywhere.
Ginger Baker's Air Force is
built around Ginger Baker who
was the drummer for Cream,
Blind Faith, etc. There are a
couple of other drummers in his
group and their sound is as
you might imagine heavy,
heavy, heavy. There is some
question in some folks' minds
whether hell show as he was
supposed to have cancelled his
American tour on account of the
politics of the place.
AND SPEAKING OF politics,
the promoters of the Atlanta
Pop Festival have had some
rough times with the local Law
and Order-ites. The usual
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PHONE 622-6556 PHONE 378-2931

DAN VINING
Campus Living Editor

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 2,1970

Citizens Committees to Stop
Pop Festivals have been formed
and working hard to get the
thing killed. They havent
succeeded. As Rolling Stone
magazine says, they have won
the right to rock and roll.
And rock and roll they will.
Bring a hft and some water if
you come. It will be hot. You
mean it will be hot? Yes it will
be hot. Let me assure you that it
will be hot.
High Taxon
Texans paid $18.9 million in
taxes on liquor during fiscal
1969.
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Author Takes A Look
At Hip Newspapers

The Open Conspiracy, by Ethel Grodzins Romm.
(Giniger/Stackpole, $6.95)
Long before Democratic delegates began to arrive in Chicago for
the presidential contention in 1968, the underground newspaper
Rat had published Yippie demonstration plans and the trouble they
were running into with Chicago officials.
Long before several would-be bombers killed themselves in a
Greenwich Village Town townhouse, underground newspapers had
been printing crude directions for making bombs. (It is not impossible
that some of these crude directions were responsible for the groups
fatal blunder.)
Mrs. Romm, wife of a newspaper editor in Middletown, N.Y., has
been keeping a close watch on the radical and underground press since
it first began to appear (depending on which papers you classify as
underground) about 1964.
The result is a collection of underground art, polemic and reporting
which typical of the genre gives only a sketchy idea of what has
been happening during the last six years, but a very good idea of what
the radicals are like and of the passions that move them.
More important than the articles reprinted, since there are a
number of good anthologies, are the reproductions of political
cartoons and other drawings, many of which would have been
unavailable without Mrs. Romms book.
Thomas Powers (UPI)
* *
The Eve of Saint Venus, by Anthony Burgess
(Norton, $4.95)
The ancient love goddess takes on the welfare state in this slight,
very charming novel, and emerges victorious.
The book was written in 1950 but not issued until 1964 in
England, and now here, because it was feared Burgess lacked the
reputation to carry off such lack of earnestness in these serious
times. Now, with several of what he calls welterweights to his
credit, Burgess is casting his work upon the waters.
What makes the book such fun is that in it Burgess retells an
ancient story from Burtons The Anatomy of Melancholy with the
cast of an English farce and in prose parodying T.S. Eliots and
Christopher Frys poetic drama of the day.
He carries it off perfectly.
The story is easily told. A nervous bridegroom slips the ring on the
finger of a statue of Venus the night before his wedding. Venus comes
to life to claim him. The bride runs off with a rival, a lesbian journalist
(the only nonstock character).
All ends happily and much more lustily than it began, thanks to
Venus with the reunited lovers and their friends singing a rondelay
of love. The poor lesbian quotes, appropriately, from Eliots The
Waste Land.
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Between Landlords, Tenants

SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
Something new is in the wind in
the age-old and often stormy
relationship between landlords
and their tenants.
A new attitude of cooperation
is signified by the signing of a
unique Landlord-Collective
Tenants Agreement which
provides for certain obligations
on the part of a landlord and his
tenants.

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JAMES NELSON, through
whose efforts the agreement was
made with the help of the
Neighborhood Legal Assistance
Foundation, told the San
Francisco Human Rights
Commission of the pact which
now exists for the 30-unit
apartment building where he
lives.
He said the agreement

Thursday, July 2,1970, Thu Florida Alligator,

provides for obligations of
maintenance and repair, for
arbitration of differences,
establishment of a building
operations fund and written
notice of intention to vacate.
Probably the most innovative
part of the agreement is a clause
providing that rents will not be
raised except for demonstrably
higher operating expenses.

Page 23



The
Florida
AI Heritor

' '-mi- IBHlgSyflilpll. MM> J&W jf m k iLm 1*

Have you ever wondered what is said in the team
huddle before the start of a football game?
This picture was taken before the start of the
Miami game by Phil Cope. If you have ever
experienced the feeling it is something you won't
forget. There are butterflies as big as ostriches in
your stomach and you rarely hear what the coaches

Graves, Ellenson Inc.

By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Editor
In this modem day and age
there have been many prominent
sports figures who have engaged
in sideline business activities. At
UF, Director of Athletics Ray
Graves and his former Assistant
Head Coach Gene Ellenson,
operated a sports camp over the
quarter break as a private
business enterprise.
Graves and Ellensons camp is
the oldest of its kind in the
state. The camp was run for
boys age 8-16 and cost one SIOO
per week.
THE CAMP featured such
outstanding athletes as Larry
Smith, Steve Spurrier, Larry
Rentz, Richard Trapp and Andy
Owens. They all served as
instructors is various sports and
taught the boys the techniques

Computerized Baseball
In a computerized series of baseball games being televised by the
National Broadcasting Company every Saturday before the
Game-of-the-Week telecasts, the 1927 New York Yankees defeated
the 1963-Los Angeles Dodgers.
Waite Hoyt hurled the Yankees past the Sandy Koufax led Dodgers
5-1.
The Yankees scored four in the ninth to break a 1-1 tie resulting
from home runs by Babe Ruth and mound ace Koufax. The big hits in
the ninth were a double by Lou Gehrig and triples by Joe Dugan and
Earle Combs.
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TURN THE PAGE

and basics of football,
basketball, and physical
development.
Also participating in the
program were baseball coach
Dave Fuller and track coach
Jimmy Cames.
Ellenson said, the camp is
designed to provide a place for
youngsters to learn the
fundamentals of football,
baseball, basketball and track.
We have a complete schedule of
activities each day and have an
Orange and Blue competition
period every afternoon. The
boys are divided into groups
according to age, ability and
size. In the evenings we provide
training films and football films
for entertainment in the
evenings. This is definitely a
money-making business but we
also do provide a useful service

said because your mind is in a whirl, thinking of the
coming action.
But as soon as you make contact all the
butterflies are gone and a relaxed feeling creeps
through your body. It has been said that the game
of football is the closest contest to actual warfare in
our modem society. Enough said.

that boys otherwise might not
receive.
THE GRAVES and Ellenson
camp is the most economical
and largest in the state. Johnny
Unitas operates a similar camp
for $135 a session and Bob
Griese runs one modeled after
the Graves camp for $125 a
session.
Several underprivileged boys
attended this years camp with
funds provided by private
citizens. There were two sessions
conducted over break, the first
was held at Melbourne and 161
boys attended and the second
was at Ft. Lauderdale with 182
youngsters in attendance.
There are no contact sports at
the camp and anyone who has
completed any part of his senior
year in high school is ineligible.

fl&TSsrvHiawMwgs7-
rT~rrmiriMBiMaMaMitfteriBMHMMMHMMMMMMMBaMMh*MMiftdM^ M .A^^

PHIL COPE

Page 24

All- Star Balloting
Major league baseball is fastly approaching the midway point of the
1970 season and for the followers of the national pasttime this can
mean but one thing... All-Star game time.
This years game is set for Cincinnatis new Riverfront Stadium on
July 14 and will mark the first time that an All-Star game will be
played on an all-synthetic field. It will also be the first time since
1957 the fans from across the nation have had the opportunity to
vote for the players they want to see represent the respective leagues
in this annual confrontation.
THIS PROCEDURE of having the fans select the players is not
new. It had been the policy up until 13 years ago when Cincinnati
fans stuffed the ballot boxes and had all of their own players
selected because the fans in the other cities had lost interest and
simply did not vote.
After that incident baseball Commissioner Ford Frick abolished the
fans voting rights and gave the privilege to the players themselves.
With critics of the game continually making the sad statement that
baseball is dead, present Commissioner Bowie Kuhn had gone out
on a limb is giving the selection of All-Stars back to the fans.
AS A MATTER OF FACT, his future might depend on it. Should
fan interest increase, Kuhn will likely remain popular with the owners.
Should it fail, then so will Kuhn.
In introducing his new computer balloting system, Kuhn feels more
people will feel closer to the game. Over 28 million ballots will
distrubuted among the various ball parks across the country. So far
over 25,000 ballots have been counted and early returns show the
average fan of the game is concerned about who represents them.
The only hang-up in this computer balloting system arises over the
selection of candidates. Because the IBM cards are only so big, all
players names cannot appear in print and Kuhn decided that only
player representatives and managers could select the names of the
nominees. As a result, Atlantas Rico Carty, the majors leading hitter
and A1 Kaline of Detroit, a perennial All-Star were missing from the
ballot.
KUHN SEEMED to solve the problem temporarily when it was
there was a space provided for write-in votes. The real problem is
whether or not the fans will take the time to write the names of
players like Kaline and Carty on the ballot.
The answer to this question will not come until all of the ballots are
counted and the final results released.
It is hard to tell at this time whether the computer balloting system
has increased fan interest. Lets hope the new system is a complete
sucess and fan interest increases anually. Baseball needs it.

NITE GOLF
CLUBS RENTED FOR PLAYING COURSE
Swk CDCC BUCKET OF 25 BALLS FOR DRIVING
1 rrvfcfc RANGE WITH GREEN FEES
B DRIVING RANGE (CLUBS LOANED FREE
730A MTO MIDNIGHT 7 DAYS
B Tee Off Before 1 AM Til 6P M
Green 51 SO ncGdes
', bolls tor
HK IBBjrSBL Monday Friday
I i WEST END GOLF COURSE
JB 1 Ml WEST OF I 75 ON SR ?6

DAVE SPAHR
Sports Editor

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, July 2.1970