Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Uncle Sam Will Choose Again Tomorrow

With minor, but important, changes the second draft lottery will
get under way at 10 am. Wednesday to decide the fate of about 2
million men turning 19 this year.
There will be two selection drums. The birthday of men bom in
1951 from one drum will be matched with a number, from 1 to 365,
from another drum.
LAST TIME, 366 numbers were drawn. However, since 1951 was
not a leap year, and because only people bom in that year are affected
by this drawing, only 365 numbers will be assigned Wednesday.
This time, both the numbers and dates will be scrambled separately,
scrambled again in big plastic drums, and then they will be picked at
random by more than 100 delegates in Washington, D. C., for a
Selective Service Youth Advisers conference.

KM
y\ § y\w/wM

Vol. 62, No. 159

1 mWm i *'. s < 4
Jgfe ImBB m B Ky-''V Ky-''Vmm
mm Ky-''Vmm - m m
as -A f > M&m
MB > -J*XMvW'%
bBKKL.
Y gs i J|
* PHIL BANNISTER
PEACE IS OLD FASHIONED?
The clothes may be old-fashioned, but the symbol is very
up-to-date. Or perhaps the pretty coed above is trying to tell us peace
has a tradition as old as her colorful outfit.

The
Florida Alligator

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

The University of Florida, Gainesville

BY UNIVERSITY SENATE
Conduct Code Approved

See Editorial Page 6
By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Staff Writer
Members of the Student
Affairs Committee of the
University Senate were rewarded
for their labors when the faculty
group unanimously approved the
new Student Code of Conduct
Thursday.
The new document took the
Student Affairs Committee one
year and some 26 meetings to
construct.
AFTER A preliminary
revision of the old code was
attacked by student leaders for
its ambiguity, then-Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd called the proposal
unacceptable and the Student
Affairs Committee went to work
shortly thereafter.
The committee, under the
chairmanship of political
scientist professor Dr. Ernest
Bartley, received* no pressure
from the administration to rush
the code through committee and
were given all the time they
needed to come up with an
acceptable code, Bartley said.
The whole push toward a
new code has been
student-oriented anyway,
Bartley said.
The old code, adopted in
1967, was criticized almost from
its birth by Student Government
officials for its vagueness, double
jeopardy and in loco parentis.
Most of the criticism of the
old code centered around point
B-9 of the document. This
provision concerned the
violation of any city, county,
state or federal law, on- or
(%%ViV.VfTW. .v.VV*^KV...>r?W't>v!v7?iV!' v* 1
THE SLOGAN contest for
Homecoming 7O starts
tomorrow with four prizes
for the winners page 2
Classifieds 12
Editorials 6
Entertainment 11
Letters 7
Movies 13
Orange & Blue 10
Small Society 7
Sports IS
Whats Happening 2

The double chance system used this time is supposed to make the
choosing more fair. Last Decembers lottery, conducted under former
Selective Service Director Lewis B. Hershey, was challenged by some,
who charged the method used was biased against men with birthdays
late in the year.
THIS NEW system will make the drawing more tension-filled than
the last time, because the order of those drafted will also be drawn by
chance, and number one may be drawn first, last, or anywhere during
the drawing.
During the first lottery, the dates were assigned an ascending
number as they were drawn, making it easier for those whose number
had not been called to have an idea of their chances of being drafted.

off-campus.
Before, any student arrested
on any of the following charges
was subject to suspension from
UF while charges were pending
litigation.
Those charges were: assault
and battery; disorderly conduct;
unlawful assembly; indecent
conduct; manufacture,
possession, sale provision to
another, or use of marijuana or
drugs.
Members of the Student
Affairs Committee, during the
early days when they began their
work on the new code, disagreed
over point B-9. Shepherd
suggested that things
unintended were unwittingly
interjected into the new code
by the committee.
STUDENT BODY President
Steve Uhlfelder said, after the
committee had approved of the
new code at their May 12
meeting and then presented it to
the senate at last months
meeting, he thought the current
code was a definite
improvement over the former
code, but that there still needed

MMk # Mk*:
jgygifl. ffi|sK^£^l
i|s|
\
/f^:v flf ijt W&Jw* I.
taw'/, mpr -Â¥afaL
JED ZIMMERMAN
COMING TOGETHER
Andy has another Come Together success. Saturday afternoon and
evening several hundred people gathered on the Plaza of the Americas
to soak in the sun, music, thoughts, company and anything else that
happened along. Pictured above is one group in the crowd.

Tuesday, June 30, 1970

to be a clear definition of what a
person can be held liable for in
terms of city and county
ordinances.
He said that the revision of
the old codes point B-9
contained double jeopardy to a
degree, but it is not as bad as the
present one.
Located under the
off-campus conduct heading
in the new code, the revision of
point B-9 states that action by
municipal, state or federal
authority shall operate as a bar
to an action against the student
by the UF under this code of
conduct unless the offense:
interferes with the
educational and orderly
operation of UF;
endangers the health,
safety or property of members
of the academic community if
the student were allowed to
remain enrolled,
requires, under Florida law,
the UF to assume jurisdiction
over the offense.
AT THURSDAYS meeting,
where at least 14 amendments
(SEE SENATE' PAGE 2)



Page 2

!. Th* Florida Alligator, Tuasday, Juna 30,1970

MAN AND MACHINE JED Z,MMERMAN

Once more we look in on man's conquest with
machine. The student above was spotted at the
Come Together adjusting his motorcycle. Obviously

USA Plans Fall Push

By PHILIP MORGAN
Alligator Writer
With the Florida Legislature
out of session, United Students
for Action (USA) has come
upon the dry season.
But the student and faculty
lobby group, organized last
quarter to represent UFs
concern in legislative matters,
has some plans for the fall.
HENRY SOLARES, USA
member and former steering
committee chairman, said the
organization is working on
establishing a lobby group in
Washington, D. C., and to take
up the 18-year-old vote question
again in Florida.
USA was started by Student
Government last May to
provide the UF Student
Community communication
with governmental delibrative
bodies on the local, state and
national levels, according to
USAs constitution.
LAST QUARTER USA
lobbied four times in
Tallahassee, said Solares. The
primary issues were the
18-year-old vote and UF
appropriations.
WHATS
HAPPENING
SUMMER DIG: The Florida
Speleological Society meets
Wednesday in room 363 of the
Reitz Union at 8 p.m.
PEACE THING: The Vets for
Peace will hold a rally
Wednesday in the Plaza of the
Americas.
USA MEET: Thursday at
7:30 pjn. in the Student
Government offices on the third
floor of the Union. In case
youre wondering, its the
United Students for Action.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
s

Solares said he thinks the
group was effective last quarter.
I think the legislature was
surprised to see students up
there, and they were interested
in talking to us, he said.
USA is not funded by UF, so
the organization must depend
upon donations and fund-raising
activities, such as dances. Solares
said some will be planned for the
fall, but he said he has hopes of
Senate
ONeJ
were approved, Bartley offered
an amendment for Uhlfelder and
other student members of the
Student Affairs Committee
which would delete the first
subsection of the new revision.
Uhlfelder, one of the five
students who are non-voting
members of the senate, said he
thought the subsection called for
the code to handle too much
off-campus activity.
After long discussion, the
motion failed by a slight
majority.
But the student faction was
not left without some taste of
victory.
UNDER SECTION X of the
new code, a student who fails to
appear before the Student
Conduct Committee when
notified to do so is subject to
immediate suspension from UF.
An amendment proposed by
Bartley for the student faction
of the senate received almost
unanimous approval.
In short terms the amendment
changes the sections wording in
such away to state that a
student would not be
immediately suspended but

a small matter like a broken leg will not stay him
from the battle. The girl, however, doesn't seem as
enthusiastic.

the group being funded
someday.
There are about 100
members at this time, he said.
Membership in USA requires
attendence at two consecutive
meetings.
President Richard E. Gentry
said students are urged to come
to the meeting Thursday night in
the Reitz Union and join the
group.

Approves Code

would be charged with an
offense and given due process of
law.
BARTLEY OFFERED an
amendment to the students
amendment that would give
students who were notified to
appear before the Student
Conduct Committee or the
Coordinator for Student
Conduct, but could not appear,
an opportunity to give sufficient
reasons as to why* they could not
appear.
After the new code was
approved, Uhlfelder commended
Bartley and his committee.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, who is president of
the senate, told Bartley and his
committee members that he had
not yet had full oportunity to
study the new document, but
that if he had any differences,
he would send it back to them
with his grievances.
THE DOCUMENTS future
now lies in O'Connells hands.

ll Monday Thursday
E ven § n g Beef Burgundy Smothered Steak
ML . Tuesday Friday
Hf opectdis .. Veal Parmagian Seafood Dinner
I V Wednesday Saturday
AT THE Roast Leg Lamb Roast Turkey
Primrose Inn^

Slogan Contest
Starts Tomorrow

Four grand prizes will be
awarded in the 1970
Homecoming Slogan Contest
which begins tomorrow.
Homecoming Slogan
Chairman, Jacquie Bolling, said
judges will choose the four
winning slogans with the first
prize winner deciding which of
four week-end holidays he
prefers.
A MIAMI-FREEPORT
Thanksgiving Holiday will be
one grand prize.
The winning couple will have
two days at the Cadillac Hotel in
Miami Beach. After dining at the
Foutainbleau and the Gibson
Girl Restaurant, the winners will
sail to Freeport on the hotels
ship.
Another winning couple will
be spending a weekend at the
Andros Beach Hotel on Andros
Island in the Bahamas.
A COLONNADES Golfers
Delight will include a beachfront
suite for two at the Colonnades
Beach Hotel in Palm Beach
Shores. The couple will be able
to play golf at the PGA National
Golf Club.
A fourth grand prize, courtesy
of Frank Wright Associates, is
three days in an ocean front
room at the Holiday Inn of the
Palm Beaches. The couple will
breakfast at Bennys, Howard

He has veto power over the
senate.
Also in Thursdays senate
meeting:
A committee for liaison
with the Board of Regents was
formally established.
The senate also approved of
Dr. Manning Dauers proposal
that members of the liaison
committee be elected for three
year terms which will be
staggered by electing this fall
one member for one year, one
member for two years and one
member for three years and
thereafter one member each year
for a three-year term.
Dauer is the acting chairman
of the committee.
Asst, engineering Professor
Dr. Ronald Smith, Miss Anna D.
Scott, asst, professor of
occupational therapy, and David
B. Lee, asst, professor of
comprehensive logic, were all
presented SI,OOO checks for the
annual Standard Oil (Indiana)
Good Teachers Awards.

19 70
ii l i j
/
Johnsons and Testas on Royal
Poinciana Way. Thoy will
occupy their days .with dog
racing and luncheon at the Palm
Beach Kennel Club, a morning
fishing trip on the Sea Yacht and
an afternoon golf lesson with
pro Ed Foley at the Breakers
West.
Besides the four holiday
trips, said Miss Bolling, all
winners will receive passes to
Lion Country Safari.
Details and contest rules may
be picked up at the activities
desk on the third floor of the
Reitz Union or in the Florida
Blue Key office.
Budget Woes
Block Pools
Two proposed pools on the
UF campus are in a state of
limbo over budget problems, say
student government officials.
The pools, projected for
Graham Area and the
Broward-Yulee field, originally
had a budget of $150,000. Now
it seems that the budget will be
several thousand dollars short.
ACCORDING TO Brad
Raffle, Steve Uhlfelders
administrative assistant, the
Housing Division is now looking
into possible ways to cut down
on expenditures.
Several suggestions have been
made, specifically for the
Graham pool.
Housing officials are now
considering either not heating
the pool, reducing its size, or
modifying its bath house and
equipment room or a
combination of these three.
Student Government is
investigating the details and
should have the solution in a
couple of weeks, Raffle said.



New Checkpoint Guards Are Happy

wammammam hhbmmhhb m
-'**. fllli
w *& flsir
: fc pj|(ipj(ip Biun 11
1 iHf P J
.ik W
3p||gjr jap wM H|k lllfllll
mBHBm -,. I
j^^^^S^Hiiiia^^^L l i^s<^vlC''tlc^^''':3 dSSSWWIIKI..^
*%* piit
MAY I SEE YOUR LICENSE? JED ZIMMERMAN
... one of several students manning traffic checkpoints
EAG Plans Reclamation

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Environmental Action Group
(EAG) is taking steps to change
its nickname ( Environmental
Rhetoric Group back to Action.
Newly elected president Brad
Raffle reported that four
concrete programs are in the
offing for the summer and fall
quarters.
FOREMOST IN the planning
is an aluminum can reclamation
center in Gainesville. About 100
receptacles, resembling
aluminum cans, will be set up
initially on campus.
Students will be urged to
bring their empty aluminum
cans to these receptacles and the
EAG will see that they are sent
to an aluminum reclamation
center in Tampa, sponsored by
the Reynolds Aluminum
Corporation.
TTie Reynolds Corporation
pays one-half cent per can. The
money will be used by EAG to
sponsor other projects, as well as
to expand the can reclamation
project into Gainesville.
IN TAMPA, the Reynolds
Corporation will reduce the

PHOTOGRAPHIC
SUPPLY
HEADQUARTERS
for all
Art & Journalism Students
#r UN ,v. i
376-7657

aluminum and model it into cans
again or other products.
This will help eliminate the
litter problem and recycle a
precious raw material, Raffle
said.
After the can reclamation
project is underway, EAG plans
to spread into Gainesville a
magazine and newspaper drive.
Used papers can be reduced
into pulp and reused, he said.
COMPANIES pay sl6 per
ton. You dont get a lot of
money but it works on the same
principle as the can drive.
The third program under
investigation is distributing
reusable nylon shopping bags to
housewives so that paper
shopping bags wont have to be
used.
According to Raffle, women
would be urged to buy
permanent garbage bags and
return containers they have used
(such as egg cartons) to grocery
stores to avoid waste.
Finally, the group will hold
monthly environmental films
beginning July 22. These will
be hard-hitting films on
pollution, Raffle said.
EAG is looking for people to

work with them, especially
people who would like to be
paid for picking up the
aluminum cans. Theyll also be
glad to affiliate themselves with
other groups working on
environmental problems, he
said.
THE SECOND ANNUAL
ATLANTA INTERNATIONAL
laaafliagiiiflgfi
WWW
JULY 3-4-5
Featuring the following
artists performing in person.
Allman Brothers Gypsy
B. B. King Hampton Grease
Ginger Bakers 831x1
Air Force Richie Havens
Ballin Jack Jimi Hendrix
Cactus Lee Michaels
Captain Beefhart John B.
& His Magic Sebastian
Band Sly & The
Bloodrock Family Stone
Chambers Spirit
Brothers Terry Reid
Country Joe and j aos
The Fish Jethro Tu
ELECTRIC COLLAGE LIGHT SHOW
GIANT FIREWORK DISPLAY
Atlanta International
isfflsrasmm
Www
July 3-4-5 Middle Georgia
Raceway
Limited advance sale 514.00 per ticket!
None sold at the gate.
Free camping and parking
at the Raceway with ticket.
i
I iuC *
IIS £ I I
I£ p _§ J S h
- n I
I £2 <
£ t 1
: oxd z i
1 -o CO £;
I ge N *- s|
i£ g : s
i?
I? o s l
. "o- a. y |
s 1
I s!o£ ?
I 2 o J
I is?io I I |
| LL O>OL 00 0l Z < O |

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
The new checkpoint guards agree you cant beat the job for pay
and ease.
Since last Wednesday the four entrance checkpoints have been
manned by students in response to disarmament demands made by
students.
THE GUARDS, there are nine of them, were hired by University
Police Corporal E. B. Gladin, who said the program looks pretty good
so far.
The job is one of the best paying for students on campus. Hours are
arranged to fit in with academic schedules and loads.
Hot sun presents a problem to some who are unable to get into the
shade. And then theres always a friend who thinks hes an exception
to the rule.
ITS A REAL hassle for a student to turn others away, said
David Miller, 4AS. But then were here because were easier to get
along with than the police.
Sometimes its hard to teach people something new. Motorists who
dont see a policeman tend to just drive by.
If you stand in the middle of the road and wave your arms wildly,
they stop, said Archie Maldonodo, 4BA.
It gives you a chance to be on the other side of the law for once,
said John Cook, 2UC. And the patrolmen are released to do business
elsewhere.
Actually, Cook said, we do people a favor either by giving them
a visitors pass or turning them away. If they are ticketed inside the
gates its a $5 fine.
The excuses given at the main information gate get interesting,
according to Jan Lederman, 4AS.
They vary from, Im just going over to the Little Hall rest room,
to If you dont let me through, young man, Ill report you to your
superior.
Student guards? said a patrolman. Its beautiful we should
have had them all the time.
Lindsey
PRE- 4 flf
JULY SALE
Sportswear I
BAGSW' 1/3
6.00 value X Aa
$4 1/2
STYLE^^k
WJ
Crochet Beach H
>N ITALY
32QQtosQa£l
values to
Special Group of bracelets 1^
Summer Shifts Jewelry
6.00 to 19.95 values va,u JL t $ 2.00
NOW .'K
IN THE GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

Tuesday, June 30, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

Tha Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Juna 30,1970

Alligator
Farming
Sta rted

jSL I
WILLIAM B. HARVEY
... voted president

5,500 STUDENTS SIGNED

Washington Answers Petition

By ANNETTE BRIN
Alligator Editorial Assistant
After a month of waiting,
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder, has received a
response from Washington to the
petition sent by him on behalf
of the students.
A petition signed by 5,500
UF students opposing the war in
Indochina was sent, along with a
letter from UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, to
President Nixon in order to have
their voices heard and to ask

Grants And Awards Deadline;
Pick Up Checks Today By 3
Recipients of Education Opportunity Grants and pharmacy and
nursing awards must pick up their checks by 3 pjn. today at the
Student Depository in the Hub.
I. Douglas Turner, director of financial aid, said the money reverts
back to the Federal Treasury if it is not picked up today.
Cuban loan checks are also available at the International Center,
building AE.
Today is not the deadline for other types of loans, although they
should be picked up as soon as possible.
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
NOW FORMING
SUMMER LEAGUES
FOR MONDAY & THURS. NITES
CALL 392-1637 OR STOP BY
GAMES AREA & FILLOUT
j

rVo>>X*>>:o:W>.W/AW/AVAV.WA^WAV. .V.W
By JANE BEVERIDGE
Alligator Staff Writer
The alligator has come to mean more
to UF than just a mascot since the
establishment of a gator farming project
on campus.
John Street, a technologist and field
coordinator for the project, said that
gator farming will be a combination of
industry and nature conservation.
AS AN AGRI-INDUSTRY, gator
farming could yield as much as $36
million to $54 million annually, he said.
The farming will also insure the
survival of the alligator since no game
farm animal has ever become extinct,
Street said.
In describing his experience with
alligators, Street said, I grew up around
gators.
HE WORKED for the Florida Games
and Freshwater Fish Commission in the
Everglades for two years tracking

Harvey New President
Os Press Association
William B. Harvey, director of the University of Florida Press, was
voted president-elect of the American Association of University
Presses (AAUP) at the associations annual meeting held recently in
Madison, Wis.
With membership from the United States, Canada and Mexico, the
AAUP comprises over 70 university presses engaged in scholarly
publishing. Its convention was last weekend.
Under the direction of Harvey, the University of Florida Press
averages 25 publications per year.
Harveys one-year term of office as president of the association
begins in June, 1971.

immediate withdrawal of all
forces^
OCONNELLS letter
endorsed the petition but added
that he only advocated troop
withdrawal with safety of the
American troops in mind,
Uhlfelder said.
Acting for Nixon, Michael
Collins, assistant secretary for
public affairs, sent a letter and
informational pamphlets to
Uhlfelder.
His letter thanked the
students on behalf of President
Nixon for their interest and

thoughtfulness in making this
material available to him.
I know you will understand
that it is not possible for us to
comment on each of the many
submissions that we receive, but
I assure you that we welcome
them as an additional means of
keeping in touch with the
thinking and concerns of the
American people, the letter
added.
The letter was accompanied
by an estimated 20 pamphlets
on the Cambodian conflict,
Uhlfelder said.
Land Os Cattle
Queensland is Australias
leading cattle producing state.

Gresham 16th Drug Inc.
Registered Pharmacist On Duty
Victor B. Shipley
Buddy Patton
Greeting Cards
* School Supplies
Xerox Copies
Prescriptions
Cosmetics
Gifts
OPEN WEEK DAYS Mi
8:3010:00 pm We Also Cash Persoaal Checks
i nn 1605 S W. 13th ST.
f-irno-in-onm

poachers, and tor Ross Allen at Silver
Springs as a gator researcher and field
coordinator.
Street says the most difficult aspect of
gator farming is the reluctance of the
female to lay fertile eggs in nests so that
the offspring survive.
Since this mating season which
normally ends in June several gators are
showing signs of nesting at Owen
Godwins Gatorland and Froehlicks gator
farm, both of whom are cooperating with
the project by providing gators, housing
facilities and data.
THE PROJECT has received $5,000 in
initial funding from UFs Institute of
Food and Agricultural Science. Also, an
appropriations bill is in the Florida
Legislature.
Street said there has been a
tremendous reception from the
senators, but he is not too optimistic
about the bills passage this year due to
the tightness of the state budget.

EVERY THIRD
WASH LOAD
FREE
Air-conditioned Comfort
SPEED QUEEN
FABRIC CARE CENTER
SIN CITY PLAZA
OFF 13th St. on S.W. 16th Ave.

Gainesville Course Beginning July 13
SELF-HYPNOSIS
CDCC LECTURE AND DEMONSTRATION
rKEE JULY 13 8:00 P.M. HOLIDAY INN SOUTH
LEARN WHY SELF-HYPNOSIS IS THE MOST POWERFUL
AND EFFECTIVE TOOL AVAILABLE TODAY FOR SELF SELFIMPROVEMENT.
IMPROVEMENT. SELFIMPROVEMENT.
WRITE OR PHONE FOR FREE BROCHURE
INSTITUTE OF APPLIED HYPNOSIS
5445 MARINER STREET, TAMPA, PH. 872-0698
Summer (je
Twilight f
Concert I
Suite J
Gator /7 \
Summer m|/\\ I
Band \M X ( ( I I ]Vul I I
Mr. Richard M V \\\\ J/ / ))] II L
Bowles,con- / II I / I?^ n BSday
ducting / MJ //July l
Ijr Union
y/ / North
Terrace

A university site, located on property
adjacent to Bevins Arm Lake, has been
chosen for the housing and observation of jS
alligators.
AFTER FUNDING, the staff will jj:
consist of a project leader, with a ;ij
doctorate in animal physiology, and three S
research assistants in the areas of
nutrition, genetics, and economics. ;5
Also three technicians will be :
employed to teach Floridian Indians to :
farm alligators on pilot farms located on ;i
the reservations. :j
It will take five years after funding to j
know conclusively if alligator farming is §
feasible, said Street. ;jj
By then, this years offspring should be $
reproducing and reaching a marketable jji
age, he said.
The proposal for a gator farm was §
submitted in July, 1969, by Dr. George
Cornwell, associate professor of Wildlife :j:
Ecology.
**

RED PIN oA
NIGHT Jy
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA



Ii m iriIMIMWMNMI I
mSWMmmM'y? WWsm§* gj|PP p >
8 it *S*5>V \ > &'
H|K| ,'_ s'-*r
1 '" **''' 1 4
*\
1; JBp; | 8

f 11
r \tIKOHI- r 1
i 1 V sSjglS?. -B
Bk AaSgS~ ;~~a£: :B
I ;J; :
SS A I- 1|& x
JHiJf
>''
rpjjPr' ...... f
|||||gg|raran^H
BABY GATOR NURSERY
... needs money
Help Is As Near
As Your Telephone

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writer
There is a place where UF
students can find help when
they need it, and it might be as
close as the nearest telephone.
The Ombudsman project is
designed to help students find
solutions to the problems facing
them. The project is being
manned for the Student
Government by Gamma Beta
Phi, an honorary service
organization.
THERE IS a telephone
(392-1650) which students can
call 24 hours a day and even if
someone is not there, messages
will be taped, and members of
Gamma Beta Phi will contact the
students later on to help them
with their problems.
According to former Gamma
Beta Phi President Richard
Spool, 7AS, there will be no
regular hours this summer for
the Ombudsman telephone line.
The reason is that there are
fewer students at the UF in the
summer, and also fewer
members of the organization to
work. During the school year,
the Ombudsman office is open
from 1 to 5 pjn.
Spool said the cases handled
by the Ombudsman are strictly
confidential.*
NOT EVEN Student
Government knows about the
cases we handle, and many
members of the organization,
who are not involved with the
project, dont know about the
cases either, Spool said.
But also he pointed out the
Ombudsman project had been
initiated by SG.
Spool also said Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder was
interested in the Ombudsman
THE COMFORT EXPERTS
Specializing in Residential
& MOBILE HOME

project. Spool said the
Ombudsman project will be
working closely with other
projects of SG.
ACCORDING to Spool, the
Ombudsman project started
about three years ago, and it
used to be one person. But the
work involved with the project
was too much for one person.
It was not until die winter
"quarter, that former Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd asked Gamma Beta Phi
to take on the project.
Shepherd seemed satisfied
with our work, and so is
Uhlfelder, Spool said.
BY WORKING closely to
solve problems of the students,
the Ombudsman project has
learned the solutions for
problems encountered by the
students, and when similar cases
crop up, there is a solution to
these problems.
The Ombudsman project will
need help this summer,
according to Spool, students
willing to help should call the
Ombudsman telephone number.

Jw Master Charge / / II I
B Bank Americard / / / /
Balk* Charge-lt / // / J
FAU-WARDLOOKING *2O /'/ / /
FUN FAKE FURS Comp, at s2s/ / / /j
I LOOK FORWARD TO FALL WITH ill
THE ULTIMATE IN FUN AND FAKE- ]
FUR COATS Several styles to choose/ j
from. Beige, ash, navy, black, brown/ I iL J,
Sizes 6-16.
Shop BaPc Undaay in tha OalnaairWla Shayglpg jCap%y| 1 j

Fund Raising Planned
By Baby Gator Nursery

By JANE BEVERIDGE
and
CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Staff Writers
The Baby Gator Nursery is
preparing to meet its financial
difficulties by applying for a
federal research grant, and by
going to the students for
financial support.
The Student
Government supported program
for children of UF students is
faced with the need for a
continual flow of money in
order to meet its obligations.
JOHN COSGROVE, who is
handling fund raising for the
nursery, said he is planning a
fried chicken dinner for the fall
quarter to raise money for the
project.
According to Cosgrove, the
dinner will be the morning
before the football game with
Richmond, Oct. 17 at 10. He
said he is planning to invite the
nominees of the major parties to
come and speak. Also, he said he
is planning to have the Gator
Band perform.
The dinner will be held in the
Tolbert Hall Area. Cosgrove said
he hopes to make about $2,000
from the dinner, and expects
about 5,000 to attend.
COSGROVE SAID he hopes
to involve fraternities by having
them sell small items, thereby
raising money for the nursery.
Another type of fund raising,
will be the establishment of an
endowment pledge program.
People who have used the
Gator nursery could pledge to
give something for the use of the
facilities after they leave the
university, Cosgrove said.
HE SAID graduating students
could pledge a small amount
annually.
The facilities at the University
Methodist Church are small, and
county regulations demand a
certain amount of space for each
child. The church has been
donating its facilities free to the
nursery.
I would like to have a
campus site for the nursery,
Gerald Yakatan, chairman of the
board of directors of the
nursery, said because we can
only take care of 30 children in

the present facilities.
THE WAITING list for the
nursery is twice the number
permitted by the school health
department at the present
location.
According to Cosgrove, the
nursery also might start using
another building at its present
location.
YAKATAN SAID the nursery
had applied for a federal

T STflK SHHICC 1
' Student Special
| (With The Coupon) |
I Our Regular 93< Steakburger |
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90< plus tax |
i Steak n Shake 1
\J6JO
( \
SPECIAL PRICE
||t REG $12.57 Ml
K with this coupon.
HI RECORDSVILLE M
Gainesville Mall
OFF E R EXP IRES JULY r l n O |{J
I J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
I \ y BARBER SHOP
I Located Ground Floor
1 H^TRAIGHTENING
SHOE SHINE
OPEN 8-5:30
Hair cut to suit individual
WHERE CAN YOU]
GET ALLTHIS FOR
UNDER. 80?
en^lwi!?iroa ,n ~T-,,,r0 f eeedHHM
j SIRCOIN PIT
where you gat a break on steak and everything m
2445 SW 13 th Stieet 378-0946
V I wwmmvwwir

Tuesday, June 30,1970, The Florida AMgetor, I

research grant to help in keeping
the nursery open.
Research concerning early
learning has been conducted at
the nursery by the Institute for
Developing Human Resources of
the College of Education.
The institute will not fund the
nursery after June 30, but will
fund the staff. This is one of the
reasons for which the nursery
needs to raise money.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 30,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Imml

Penn Central Bankrupt

WASHINGTON The White
House sent Secretary of
Transportation John Volpe on a
confidential mission to Capitol
Hill last Monday night to
sweet-talk Congress out of 5750
million in the three days for
American railroads.
The main pitch by the earnest
Volpe at the after-hours meeting
was funds to bail out Penn
Central, which had filed
bankruptcy papers over the
U/AAIf An n
PENN CENTRALS payroll
alone is sls million this week,
Volpe pleaded with the House
and Senate mighty at the
backroom session.
Senate Majority Leader Mike
Mansfield, D-Mont., listened
skeptically to Volpe for a few
minutes, then with a humff
left the meeting. His humff
was interpreted variously as
anger and astonishment.
Not long after Mansfields
humff, Sen. Steve Young,
D-Ohio, muttered: Fantastic!
VOLPE LOOKED around
hopefully at the congressional
foes after his 15-minute
summary. There wasnt an
encouraging smile in the room.
Calm, kindly Sen. Clifford
Case, R-N.J., observed
laconically: There is an
unreality to this meeting.
He insisted that hearings
would have to be held. 1 dont
think 20 per cent of the nation's
railroad transportation got in all
this trouble in the past two
weeks, Case said, counseling
delay.
* *
HOUSE REPUBLICAN
Leader Gerald Ford, R-Mich.,
put it to Volpe straight: Youve
got a helluva public relations
problem.
The politically-minded Ford,
presumably, referred to the
exposes by this column and
others that Presided! Nixons

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Executive Editor

Merry-Go-Round
IIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH
by Jack Anderson

former law firm was in on the
Penn Central case. Secretary of
the Treasury David Kennedy and
U. S. Ambassador to Great
Britain Walter Annenberg are
also tied to the Penn Central
case through past or present
business deals.
While Volpe listened
sorrowfully, the congressional
leaders talked of maybe letting
Penn Central collapse.* Ford
said, only half-jokingly: Give
them the shock treatment.
ONLY SENATE Republican
Leader Hugh Scott, R-Pa., stood
up for the Nixon plan. He
turned to Sen. Warren
Magnuson, D-Wash., and said
firmly: Ill co-sponsor a bill
with Maggie.
But Magnuson shied away.
Itd be better if I didnt, he
said gently.
The hour-long session broke
up with the congressmen
agreeing that hearings were
needed before they could
commit $750 million of the
taxpayers* money. Volpe,
dignified in defeat, quietly
marched back down Capitol Hill.
*
JAMES FARMER, the most
prominent Negro in the Nixon
administration, may soon join
other civil rights leaders who
have quit or have been eased
out.
Farmers job as Assistant
Secretary in charge of
administration at the Health,
Education, and Welfare
Department is even now being
cut out from under him, leaving
him with lessened authority.
The former CORE leaders

Les Gardieff
Managing Editor
Norm White
News Editor

ryS

genius has been in social
planning.
HIGH HEW sources have told
this column that Farmer has let
the administrative side of his job
take second place. Now this
neglect is being used as an
excuse to switch him to a lesser
role.
But Farmer, whose bitter days
in a Mississippi jail for his
freedom-riding have been
forgotten by todays young
black militants, has served notice
on Finch that he wont step
down, that he'll quit rather
than accept a demotion.
Reached at a conference in
Aspen, Colo., Farmer conceded
only that for more than a year,
reorganization has been
discussed and I have participated
in these discussions.
Other HEW officials have said
the discussions centered on
removing such functions as
personnel, management systems
and general services from
Farmer's bailiwick. So ftr,
President Nixon's new Secretary,
Elliott Richardson, has made no
final decision on Farmers role.

Stclff Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
a w re^M Dave Spahr Editorial. Business, Advertising offices in Student
Assistant News Editor Sports Editor Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89. Busi Business,
ness, Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82,83 or 84.
Annette Brin Dan Vining Circulation: 392-1619.
Editorial Assistant Campus Living Editor opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.

EDITORIAL
A Good Code
Were finally on the verge of getting a fair and clear
Student Code of Conduct to replace the present
old-fashioned, inadequate penal code.
All we need now is UF President Stephen C. OConnells
approval.
Weve waited a long time one year -for the code, but
the wait was worth it, and the fact that impresses us the
most about the code is that UFs committees do
occasionally come up with some positive contributions to
the university.
A lot of hard work went into the formulations of the
code 26 meetings were held during this past year. But a
comparison of the old and new codes makes it obvious the<
members didnt sit around contemplating their navels:
The new code specifically lists the areas where the UF
has jurisdiction, while the old code skirts the problem with
a vague wherever they (conduct violations) may occur.
The new code is spiced with a positive slant towards
students, while the old code strongly resembles a penal
code.
The new code is much more specific as to which
groups have authority: President OConnell, the Honor
Court, Hall and Area Conduct Boards and the Traffic Court.
The new code provides for temporary postponement
of conduct hearings if the student feels the committees
decision might affect criminal or civil court decisions.
I The new code gives the conduct committee subpoena
powers.
The list of differences could go on and on. But we cant
help but notice that the committee perfected the code to
such an extent that it hardly bears any resemblance to the
old one.
The lack of both loopholes and vagueness will hopefully
clear the way for a much longer life for the new Code of
Conduct.
President OConnell now has the responsibility for seeing
that the code is given a chance to prove itself, and we feel
assured he will approve it.
Hopefully, he will live up to our expectations.
A Long Walk
Its a long walk to Lake Wauburg.
And its a mighty hot summer in Gainesville one that
almost demands a nice, cool swim. With $ 127,000 sitting in
Student Governments budget for Lake Wauburg, the
Student Senate can surely spare a small amount to provide
UF students transportation to the lake on weekends.
What good is a beautiful lake when its out of reach for so
many students who lack transportation?
PfiRetITHOOD |
CLIN/IC I
I'm fit to be tied, T



Summer People Brave The Heat

Well here we are, the summer
people. Those few who have
decided to defy the elements
and common sense to attend the
summer quarter.
Noticed any changes? You
betcha. First of all there are less
of us around. The only place
you will find a crowd is at water
fountains and the infirmary
where heat stroke cases litter the
waiting room.
AMONG OTHER things there

Vote For Change
EDITOR:
After extended debate over a period of several weeks, the. Senate
will soon consider the Cooper-Church amendment. This amendment
will show that the Senate is ready to reassert its Constitutional
obligations in matters of war and peace, and that after June 30 it
opposes any further American invasion of sovereign states in
Southeast Asia.
OUR PRESIDENTS actions in Indochina have served to escalate
and expand this futile conflict, and have showed the weakness of his
Vietnamization policy. If we will have to keep invading Cambodia,
or be drawn into a fight to preserve the present government, how can
we possibly proceed with an orderly and rapid withdrawal from
Indochina? And now that there is intensive fighting in Cambodia,
rather than merely supply and training activity for the Viet Cong and
North Vietnamese, it is unlikely that we will be able to permanently
extricate ourselves from that country.
We have sunk deeper into the quagmire of a land war in Southeast
Asia, and the effects on our country are increasing. Our economy
continues to worsen, our ghettos are restless again, and the division
and polarization between Americans, aided by our outspoken vice
president, has increased.
WHAT IS the answer to this dilemma? Immediate withdrawal of all
American forces would be best, I believe, but since today this is
politically unfeasible we should work to cut down our involvement,
and insure that it will not expand. By telling the President that the
Senate wants no further expansion of the war into Cambodia, a
crucial step in forcing the Presidents hand and ending the war will
have been taken.
We can all do our part in this effort by writing to Floridas
Senators, Ed Gurney and Spessard Holland. If we are sincere in our
desire to end the war we must do more than march and chant. By
writing to our senators, lobbying for peace candidates like Senatorial
candidate Joel Daves, and registering and voting we can make our
voices heard in a manner that can be more effective than only
one-shot rallies or marches. Changing foreign policy requires a lot of
hard work, and takes time, but if we really do give a damn we will put
ourselves out and work for peace.
MIKE HITTLEMAN, 3AS

LETTERS POLICY
Lattars must:
Be typed, signed,
double spaoad end not exosod
300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addresses and
taiaphona numbers of writers.
Names will be withhold only if

f a \Hr| v*

are fewer cars on University Ave.
and 13th St. It now only takes
five instead of ten minutes of
waiting- to cross the streets in
one piece. In fact it may even be
possible to cook an egg on the
asphalt before it gets run over.
What about clothes?
Somehow being fashionable is
less important than being
comfortable. T-shirts and grungy
cut-offs with holes for
ventilation have in many cases

writer shows Just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
letters for spaoe.
Writers may submit longer
sways, columns or letters to be
considered for use as "Speaking
Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular
column is asked to contact the
editor and bo prepared to show
samples of his work.

replaced Gants and slacks as
normal wear. The big man on
campus probably looks like a
refugee from a South Sea island.
Show me a man wearing socks in
ninety-eight degree weather and
I will show you someone who is
not playing with a full deck.
Another change is that your
class in Decorative Fig Wrapping
may not be meeting in its usual
place. During the other three
quarters it was held in the boiler
room of some old relic without
air conditioning. Because of the
heat it is now being held in the
air conditioned attic of some
obscure building no one has ever
heard of. It takes you two weeks
just to find the place.
The selection of courses
offered during the summer is
limited. There is nothing
available that you need or really

IRS Power Challenged

Challenging the Internal
Revenue Service for taking the
Constitution out of context and
expanding the authority
delegated by acts of Congress
has brought about many
interesting developments.
Drawing on the tragic lessons
of history, the founding fathers
carefully provided against direct
taxes upon the individual citizen
by the terms of Article 1,
Section 9, Clause 4 of the
Constitution which prescribed
that, No capitation, or other
direct tax shall be laid, unless in
proportion to the census or
enumeration herein before
directed to be taken.
THE RESULT was
electrifying. The age old conflict
which destroyed people and
nations did not exist. As a result,
the American people held a great
affection for their government
and its institutions which
protected them.
There were, however,
repeated efforts to abuse the
lawful powers of government.
Almost before the Constitution
could be put to work the
political effort was initiated to

by Rob Matte

want to take so you end up
enrolled in Advanced Eskimo
Nose Rubbing and The Business
Practices of Polish Stone
Cutters.
SOME THINGS however,
never change. You still cant find
a parking place near campus and
the vending machines never seem
to work. One thing you quickly
notice is that while there are
fewer students around,
EVERYONE you know appears
to be going during the summer.
Hi Rob, I thought you
graduated three years ago.
No Bill, Im going to finish

Speaking Out
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimmmiimii
fimiimmnmiiiiifflimiiiiiimiimmiiimmniiHiiiimiiiiniiHMMMiiiMiMiiMi
by Jimmey Bailey

take over and control the money
and credit of the people through
the Bank of the United States."
This bank was ultimately
destroyed by President Andrew
Jackson, and the golden age was
on.
The first effort to apply
personal income taxes was in the
Civil War. The people were so
tragically engaged elsewhere
they did not consider it a major
issue. Even so, the conflict
between the taxpayers and the
Internal Revenue Service
organized to collect the tax was
violent. Congress then repealed
the act.
Another Congress, forgetting
the lessons of history, enacted a
personal income tax in 1894.
The eruptions were vast and
immediate, and the Supreme
Court declared it
unconstitutional in 1895.
NEXT CAME the Sixteenth
Amendment to provide Congress
with the unlimited power to
lay and collect taxes on incomes,
from whatever source derived,
without apportionment among
the several states, and without
regard to any census or
enumeration.
The chains of the
Constitution were shattered!
The immunity of Americans
from the terrors of arbitrary
government were gone. The
power to tax and tax, spend
and spend, elect and elect had
been unleashed, and the road to
despotism was wide open.
The Americans were an
unruly lot because they had
never conformed to anybodys
political edicts. Consequently,
the use of this new power had to
be fnlt&ted sldwly'' jtefd toith
great caution. There would be

Tuesday, June 30,1970, The Florida Alligator,

up this summer.
Everyones going to be
here.
Yeah, weird isnt it? Maybe
its some kind of plot.
As glassy eyed, perspiring
bodies, stumble around the
campus in the sweltering heat,
one word hangs on the tip of
parched mouthes, POOL. If you
dont live by a pool you have a
friend who does and for those
who have no pool or friends
there is always a cold shower.
Yes, we are the summer
people. God bless us, everyone.
We deserve it.

time enough for the total
subjugation of the people.
IT WAS proposed that a
ceiling of ten per cent to be put
on income taxes to avoid the
inevitable abuse of this taxing
power. This idea was swept aside
by the assertion that the tax
would never exceed three or
four per cent of the income of
even the very rich. Because of
our faith in such faithless
politicians, the process of
personal and national disaster
were given an open field.
We now know the dimension
of that disaster, but have done
nothing to contain it. Federal
agencies now control more than
40 per cent of the land area and
20 per cent of the industrial
capacity of the nation without
any Constitutional authority for
it. To pay the losses and hidden
costs of these vast political
empires now consumes more
than half the federal revenue
every year.
The Liberty Amendment has
been devised to outlaw the
entire process of takeover of
land, enterprise, and property
which would reverse the blight
that has been put upon us. It
would also repeal the Sixteenth
Amendment the source of our
troubles.
Victory for the Liberty
Amendment can, however, only
come from unrelenting effort.
Although progress has been
strong, the inroads of the tax
collector and the bureaucratic
empire builders have been
mammpth because once the
bureaucracy escapes the chains
of the Constitution they assume
total power even to the
dajiafcify the
Constitution.

Page 7



I, The Florida AHifetor, Tuesday, June 30,1*70

Page 8

6
A
.j 1
-y*
*
I
p flirty
'--"..y y yHfosHions
f / | y''
C(r\ @ / ;/
@@) gr vfy
x \ a yyr T (cs^
@ @1 I \ /, Caaj \
l v A Jyy J'y
y <§jk g)/ y
V yj| / l|
w ***/ /l / >' .>y, yL .JjBjMWP^
/ I 'V y/ llfpy 1
miH
/ fgp
I B
|ltfi|BO ?**
/
1 ( / This navy and gold suit by Jerell of Texas is perfect for afternoon
\ Vy^Vy y/ " wear. The shoes are by Nina. Modeled by Terrie.
... *...*

''V:-? \M'
FIGIIIF
Our young Victorian
summer... nylon tricot that vtill
has a beaded lace trim of ofecrjj (
for this season). Sizes: pet.; sm.; ar
I
. :: sixi "S:
;? .v. S&vfiSSWfvi-'-; S
Stfsl 4w
- 1§&§bEI&B&& sffiiml .ilfll
<^ : <^---^jt£"ilm
m H
Krinkle patent makes the colie
mod fringed vest and matchi
different. For the more conser
duet. The suit-look will fill **
many more spiffy outfits to*
Misses Departments. Modeled t



1& (Ji, L- Vft '4# ''
H& V< PV ,vj
|| ink IIJm.
,HL ~"
I-;-., i S
k 1 B %
(xWF WkxL, ,\J*
Hr M Be **g*jMm£*Mmm
: M laP||B|
8k : ; ... HL.'. X&..&&J&
li
lijx
GtjjE FAIR
ajama is really going places this
will travel well anywhere. The pajama
cry on wild plum (the very newest color
n.; and med. Modeled by Kathy.
''
I v Jr ''' : 'i* | '§sS |,
I ~ < S' i I .>... t'i r
I I I
II | |
n 1 II
p\
*JliwJ. iii >%l f l / r
_, IK. mm >.! Wss It '' %'* 1 >
f s s f k s -Ini .
s£ I |g||l#- 1C ? I
|m v *>. .>£ f
->s **:' ? &$: .*';
V mjQB 3!
I ImH i
BiBBBS |
'ra> SI
Sj|
rp i smSSmmmmmP 1 >. ~
W%
'v- I ,- / -
: $£
HP fl x
j Tt j
SEARS
ollege scene in styles for every mood. The
ching skirt satisfy anyone's whim to be
sefvative... there's the long vest and skirt
I the in-between moods. Find these and
for summer in Sears Junior Bazaar and
id by Judy, Bonnie, and Sharon.

P^^HBSpfig^r
. .:. i.viv >(< iii ~. ?'' . : :-
. jikk st : i*' .... :^ s **. .v~ 4p t '* : .-
-*f&tSioQ&>. ;% afa( "V ; x : x-
*4 <&&* ~ -0*
' p BELK LINDSEY
Roberta is ready for a fun fashion summer in this Thermo-Jac shirt
and skirt outfit accented by the batik print. Let Belk Lindsey help
you embark on a fun summer fashion excursion.
I £ '
i >
lIC If I % I 1
a& g fib- s fizfcr "'4.y,- o m s- 7,
# '-.;:%:&';<:; 35: y.v - 'v.
& i f '#?K# !ii^£illit:i i I .-''>
P J
VL f i I T,
IV I i t l
>;m ' B % > jp
*'St > s i ft
I i 1 | : fidmSKS{mMsm&'. : %..
'^l^''- J "'' y'
jA|z|| P w, : <7m W*m Hk
I w k a.^
SILVERMAN'S
Judy models the latest in summer wear from the collection of
Country Set pant sets. The outfit features a navy and gold jacquard
print in washable acrylic. Tte perfect outfit for a smashing summer!

VA m ,*t|^
w. ?* a > '2**^^^^BlNlbl'
* v iHJV
*- t f
: HgaBHBBBBra :
Sk?
y -w ,^^ y
Kwh l|H|^H.lm *ss** S
t§ b
B | B
Hn|
B- 5 B
-
SUSAN SCOTT
Have a blast this weekend. Judi is sure to in this sleek, white pantsuit.
It's sleeveless and super. This and others are waiting for you at Susan
Scott.
>
. -j ;: '' ~.v ; it
i *m
;|
B|B
J||
MAAS BROTHERS
Give off cool vibrations this summer in this cool, cool, shorts set.
Show off your bare skin in this tiny rib tickler, and cotton shorts with
a hip-hugger belt. Tanya found this "sun-sational" outfit in Maas
Junior Terrace.

Tnaariay, Aim 30,1070, Tkt Florida AMpar,

Page 9



i. The Florida Alligator, Tuoaday, Juno 30,1970

Page 10

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRA ADMINISTRATIVE
TIVE ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF
INFORMATION SERVICES

UNIVERSITY SENATE
ADOPTED A NEW STUDENT
CONDUCT CODE at its meeting
Thursday, June 25. This replaces
the code in existence since 1967.
The new code gathers
together in one place the sources
of authority, standards to be
used in administering authority,
various violations with clear
indications of the judicial body
administering the specific
violations, specific
administrative procedures and
types of penalties which may be
imposed.
Among the offenses dealt
with in the code are furnishing
false information to the
University with the intent of
deceiving; forgery,
alteration ..and misuse of
University documents, records
or identification cards;
destruction of property;
disorderly conduct or disruption
of University operations;
housing area violations and
unauthorized use of taking of
public or private property.
The senate-approved measure
goes to the University President
Stephen C. O'Connell for further
study and approval.
In other action the senate
adopted a resolution that a
standing committee for liaison
with the Board of Regents be
elected for staggered three-year
terms.
UNIVERSITY SENATE
QUESTIONNAIRE: The returns
from the questionnaire on the
size and structure of the
University senate have been
summarized and were reported
in the Information Section of
the agenda for the June 25
meeting. Many comments
concerning the subject of the
questionnaire and the
questionnaire itself were also
received but are not yet
summarized. Dr. Charles F. Eno,
chairman of the senate
constitution committee, said the
questionnaire was sent to all
faculty members. Copies of the
report may be obtained by
contacting a senator or
department chairman.

d lEEtSs? BECOME A CHEF... ~
j r- in your own back yard Let us he, P
I Q /} ' Iyj[y II 1 you build that new patio you've been
7 wishing for. We'll even let you include
rfK rjjm-~r the world's fanciest grilL.and outdoor
y^teyWyAQj^iS/ x ** v cooking lessons too!
JU J|v GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
\k A kM\i ( rVlh At Attvt* \ t- r J

EXPENSE REFUNDS: The
Office of Finance and
Accounting has said that
effective immediately, the
following guidelines from the
Board of Regents must be
adhered to in determining
whether cash received should be
treated as an expense refund:
1. Reimbursement Would
include a refund which can be
specifically identified with a
prior disbursement. Ex.
refund of duplicate payment,
reimbursement of travel
expenses.
2. Student Convenience
Refunds Would include
reimbursement to an
instructional or research
department for materials
provided at cost to students for
their convenience. Ex. wood
for industrial arts students,
publications not available at
bookstore which were ordered
by department.
3. Refunds to an Account
Used for Clearing or Distribution
Would include reimbursement
to an account which has, for
administrative advantages, paid a
charge which must be partially
borne by other accounts. Ex.
fleet auto insurance paid by one
account to be reimbursed when
distribution in known.
ONE OF THE
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH,
EDUCATION AND WELFARE
AUDIT FINDINGS was that
some departments and colleges
were given by the Personnel
Division or requiring selection
criteria above the normal fdr
classifications.
This includes such as, but is
not limited to, giving typing or
shorthand tests to applicants in
departments in which they are
interviewed. The University tests
have met the validation
requirements of HEW, which has
ordered the University to desist
from any additional testing has
been performed as part of the
internal procedure, the
Personnel Division would
appreciate it if the deans,
directors and department
chairmen would explain to those
people who administer testing
that this screening device is no
longer permitted by the
University.

BLUB BULLETIN

EMPLOYEE COMMUNICA COMMUNICATIONS:
TIONS: COMMUNICATIONS: During the recent
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare audit it
was pointed out that the
University should communicate
to employees more specific
information on employment and
personnel policies including such
things as the University's
promotional policy, hiring
practices, merit performance
procedure, grievance and appeal
procedures, and retirement and
benefits programs.
I n answer to these
observations, the University is
carrying out a revised employee
communications program this
summer and plans to continue it
on a regular basis. Beyond these
recommendations, there is a
great need to communicate
policies to all employees which
affect them and give them an
opportunity for a deeper
understanding than can be
received through written
notification.
The new concept includes not
only revised written
communications of various
types, but a series of live
programs with employees and
their supervisors which will
cover the major policies
affecting employes.
PICK-UP DEADLINES FOR
FEDERAL GRANT AND
LOAN FUNDS: Recipients of
the Education Opportunity,
pharmacy and nursing grants,
and all other federal grants
designated for the summer
quarter must pick them up at
the Student Depository by 3
p.m. Tuesday, June 30. Such
monies will revert back to the
.-federal treasury after this time.
NATIONAL. DEFENSE
EDUCATION ACT LOANS
must be picked up at the
Student Depository by 3 p.m.
Tuesday, June 30.
CUBAN STUDENT LOAN
checks for the summer quarter
are available at the International
Center. Bldq. AE.

Campus Calendar

Tuesday
Richard Bunger, Pianist, Concert
Preview and Question/Answer
Session, University
Auditorium, 2:30 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C 4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Concert: Piano Music of Our
Time, Richard Bunger,
University Auditorium 8:15
p.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C 4
Union, 10:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Twilight Concert North Terrace,
Reitz Union, 6:45 p.m.
Florida Speleogical Society
Meeting, 363 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Yoga Class, 243 Union 7:30
p.m.
Dairy Science Association
Meeting, 357 Union, 8:30
a.m.
Swimming, Camp Wauburg,
Project SAMSON, 9:00 a.m.
Thursday
Union Movie, 'The Ghost and
Mr. Chicken", Union Aud.,
7:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Association Meeting, 346
Union, 7:30 p.m.

free expression
H / '>
for $1.25?
read
florida quarterly
V

Friday
Notice! Classes will be in session.
Friday, July 3, 1970 is a
national holiday for staff
members only.
Saturday
Reitz Union Dance, Band: The
Frosted Glass, Union Terrace
9:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "I Love You,
Alice B. Toklas", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30, & 11:00
p.m.
Sunday
University Film Series, "C.
Chaplin and Laurel and
Hardy", Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:30 p.m.
Notice: Printing Division will be
closed all day, June 30,1970
for inventory.



The
Florida
Alligator

' fc J V "' 11 '.V...-v '' ; '"'7y. - ,/ > '.; .: .;
WmSmm
§s§P>-.; "SKS
:W xA w?
,i < 5 JR jf
yl
STACKED UP OVER LA GUARDIA

"Unto These Hill/' a pageant of the Cherokee
Indians is now in its 21st consecutive season at
Mountainside Theatre, Cherokee, N.C. Performances
are scheduled each evening except Monday through

Take Lace Shirts
For Instance, Men

NEW YORK (UPI) Fashion
designers can do their daffiest,
but one place where you will
always be able to tell the men
from the women is on the beach.
Advocates of the unisex
look can deck men out in the
kind of tank suits that ladies
once wore in Mack Sennett
movies and thats what they
are doing but it wont work.
The human body, unlike tank
suits, just wasnt built for a
unisex look.
THE DESIGNERS ALSO are
pushing bikinis for men
topless, of course, except for an
occasional matching beach shirt
and if there ever was an outfit
designed to underscore the
difference, thats it.
For after-beach cocktails or
what-not, the peacock look
Tryouts Set
For Summer Ploy
Tryouts for the Florida
Players summer production of
Ferenc Molnars The Plays The
Thing will be held Wednesday
and Thursday from 7 to 10 pjn.
in the Constans Theater.
Scripts are available in room
363 of the Arts and Sciences
Building (the old Florida
Union).
Also, there will be a
production meeting for the show
Tuesday, July 7, at 7:30 pjm. in
the Constans Theater.

JUL BTEAK hOUBB k
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320

B mm |H| 9B HbHI

carries on in designs that once
would have been found only in
womens wear.
Take lace shirts, for instance.
Theyre big this year, giving men
the sort of elegance they havent
had since before the French
Revolution.
Or men can lounge about in
bright-colored print shirts that
are sash-tied at the waist.
Sometimes the shirt colors are
brighter than the tropical foliage
of the exotic resorts in which
they are worn.
MEN WHO ARE looking for
something new that is more
easily recognized as masculine -r -r---even
--even -r---even when its still on the hanger
- neednt abandon hope and
drag out last years duds.
There are still plenty of plain,
trim-tailored boxer style
swimsuits for male beach wear.
But even among these, you can
find a new twist.
The new idea one hesitates
to say wrinkle consists of
conventionally cut boxer or
mid-thigh length suits with
matching shirts that the
manufacturer made of a sheer
polyester and cotton fabric that
is supposed to be tan through.
And theres nothing that isnt
strictly masculine about this
years shirt suits flap-pocketed
shirts worn out over
straight-tailored slacks. The news
is in the fabric that most
comfortable summer terry.

September 2.
The original drama by Kermit Hunter utilizes a
cast of 140 and is staged in two acts and 14 scenes.

I CLEARANCE SALE \
OF INCOMPLETE ASSORTMENTS AND BROKEN SIZES £
U FROM OUR REGULAR STOCK 'J
I I
X t
$ CLOTHING
Q (HICKEY-FREEMAN SOCIETY BRAND NORMAN HILTON NOTTINGHAM) Q
Fj Regular $89.50 to $245 0
jj NOW $654195 /
K ONE GROUP NOW */i PRICE 3
8 SPORT COATS 8
fl Regular $65 $145 f }
NOW-... $50495 P
H ONE GROUP NOW H PRICE H
i i
0 HABERDASHERY Q
8 SHIRTS y
i t X
* £ Schiaparelli & Eagle Shirts Long Sleeve 'J
ft Deep Tones French Cuffs Q
,< Button Down and Short Point CoUan A
y Regular $12.50 rt
| now y 2 PRICE Q
l SWIM SHORTS & WALKING SHORTS X
|X Regular $12.50 516.00 Q
I NOW $7.50411.00 0
II SALE STARTS TODAY |
I
8 1
Q Number 6 Main Street South Q

Tuesday, June 30,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Dont Pamper Pop Stars
Bill Graham Says
PALMA, Majorca (UPI) One of the important figures in pop
music believes its time the public began to demand the respect due it
from some of the pop superstars who have come to believe in their
own legends.
Bill Graham of the Fillmore Corp., of San Francisco, told the
International Music Industry Conference at its annual meeting here
that it is a terrible thing to say but a little booing on the right place
might do some good.
Graham said the rock music scene was afflicted with what he called
too much too soonism. Some stars had achieved the status of God
Jr., with their fans before they had had a chance to develop either
personality or professionalism and this was reflected in their attitude
to audiences.
Graham said it was up to the public to insist that all its idols give
good value. He urged music executives to be more forthright in
dealing with pop stars dare tell him hes wrong take the risk of
alienating him, tell him hes not a god. Why apologize when youve
given him SIB,OOO for 45 minutes and hes late?
He said the present trend was for pop stars to pretend they were
not interested in money. He quoted Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones
as saying We do nothing for money. He gets plenty, Graham
added.

DAN VINING
Campus Living Editor

Page 11



Open 7 days
Pizza £<\
Clip the
Pizza Inn
Buck
below for a special treat! 1 I I
S~ZZA INN DOUGH N Redeemable with the JJ JL
. \ pvrtha*e es ony
\ ler 2 medium piua.
limit 1 Rixie Inn ot
OeNar per family / Th Rina Inn L ^
Offer peed \ U/ / 3 16 S.W. Hth Ave. /VVVr'EfN
June 30-A (ON EJ
July 4, 197(0/ Ssa::^
NE PIZZA INN BUCKF^
-
i i jf
I
I
I
Ipwl
I MOBILE I
I NEW ORLEANS I
I FT.MYERS I
I Tamtam! Tniilwayt
U 527 W. Univtnity Avo. PHONE 372-6327 f
I MW*!
ante tmmf an earth
From Gainesville 1-way
TAMPA $4.80 m
H Only 2% hours Non-Stop H
SARASOTA $6.65 j
l The only Thru service
I PENSACOLA $12.45 K
Thru Express service
NEW ORLEANS $21.00 I
i ne only Thru service M

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

aaaa*aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaeatataaaaaaaaaa*<
aaaaaaaeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa _ a a a a a
aaaaaaaaaaa.aaa.aa #_ a a.a_a,a a a a_a aa^a^a,-
FOR SALE
yyvXyvXvXvXWX^^
Pul, Siamese boy kitten, February
litter, Blue-point mother. Seal-point
father. Curious, smart, naughty,
terrific purr, loves and wants loving.
Bargain, had shots Still $20.00 Call
376-9911 after 5:00. Any time
weekends. (A-lt-159-p)
For Sale: G. E. Solid State Stereo.
Excellent condition. S3O. Call
373-1814 or 376-0802. (A-lt-159-p).
King-size bed, firm matress. IV2 year
old with 10 year guarantee. Must
sell, leaving country, new: S4OO,
asking $225. Call 376-7088.
(A-4t-159-p)
Human hair, ash blonde, full length
wig. Worn 3 times. New $lO, asking
$24. Call 376-7088. (A-4t-159-p)
MGB 1966 Roadster white with
black top and wire wheels, leather'
upholstery, SBOO. CRII 376-7088.
(A-4M59-P)
Elect roph onlc Stereo good
condlctlon $200.00. New must sell
$140.00 AFC AM/FM radio
multiplex with circular soundsystem.
Danny 5 SW 12 Ave. (A-Zt-159-pT
AKC Registered Basset hound
puppies, tricolor, red & White. Call
after 5 P.M. Phone 378-3735.
(A-2t-159-p)
SCUBA GEAR White Stag 72 tank, 4
yrs. old, with U. S. Divers boot and
back pack. Sportsways Malibu single
hose regulator. Espadon mask. Super
Rondlne fins, size 5-6. All for SIOO
or will sell- separately. Call Ed
376-5400. (A-2t-159-p)

URGENT.
Pick-up Deadline
LOAN AND GRANT FUNDS
Recipients of the Educational Opportunity Grant Pharmacy and
Nursing Awards, designated for the Summer quarter, MUST
pick them up at the student depository by 3:00 PM today. Such
funds will revert to the Federal Treasury after that time.
Loan recipients should make every effort to pick up their
releases by the same date.
I
bb i mbiiimhmiVlMiTTi
n i iiiiikiaiiv.ii r ,
l .r. M i>i BIUISBIUiIUSSUMI igp]
jmj kb,
B-1 -1 1 - I | Bjj^
KX
Xvivi Xv/X'-ivXvXvX'iyilijHMXv-xiv;-: :-::-:-;-: :- : : : r ';r-;-:v4; 'v/'-X;. :;
w-* I K
y.-yx+y**; &
sin^^HTiTTlplvFTiii^^^O
'.Ota *. Wff'Zfi sSfr> .ss& r
ml
ShitJn V v
LUsri^' x*:
Jean Simmons John Forsythe Shirley Jones
Lloyd Bridges Teresa Wright DickSh wn Nanette Fabray
Robert Darin Tina Louise Writtcnandn* 11 T> I,_ Musicby
Kathy Fields Karen Steele Directed by Richard DTOOKS Michel Legrand
Photography Conrad Hall, A.S.C. Pana vision* Technicolor* Umtad ArfnYa I I
LAST DAY THE SICILIAN CLAN" *g 9;M
7j479j4^^

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 30,1970

Page 12

x-XvX-XvX-x-:*:-:-:v>;%>v:v^nx-:-:-* : : :
FOR SALE
BSA Victor 441, 1968, Excellent
Condition. Need Money Fast.
376-8982. S6OO or Best Offer.
(A-2t-158-p)
FOR RE BIT
:-X:-:-:-x-x-:-: ; :-: ; :-: ; x-: ; : ; :-:-: ; : ; : ; : ; >: ; : ; : ; : ; : ; : ; : ; : ; : ; : ;
Several 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd Ave.
372-7111 Grad students preferred.
Special rates for summer quarter now
In effect. (B-2t-157-c)
Ten rooms graduate men and older
men close cool utilities washer-dryer
parking 135.00 single 100.00 double
summer 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
5 bedroom house 300.00 spacious 2
br. apt. 185.00 2 blocks north of
campus graduate men and older men
available sept. 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
STUDENT couple w/wo child to
share air. cond. home with gentleman
(46). & boy (16) Free rent, utilities &
board Much privacy 378-0572 or
392-1852. (B-4t-157-p)
Your own room In a nice 3 br home,
swimming pool, air conditioned.
SIOO summer qtr. + V 2 utl. Call
378-9239. (B-2t-158-p)
TWO BLOCKS TO CAMPUS. AIR
COND., extras. Men or women.
Wood paneled. SSO & S6O. Call
392-0700 for apt. or 378-0286. See
1204 N. W. 3 Ave. (B-st-158-p)

FOR RENT
Trailer space 3O acres privacy,
panoramic view of Orange Lake. 15
ml. so. UF. 20 x 40 pool. Ideal for
grad. stud. Call collect 591-1245.
(B-3M58-P)
TWO BLOCKS TO CAMPUS. Two
bedroom, air, carpets, wood panel.
Newly decorated. $125. Call
392-07Q0 for aptt. 378-0286 or
372-3277 after 5. (B-st-158-p)
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
included completely furnished
Ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-ts-c)
SINGLES: Swing into summer In a
luxurious air conditioned poolside
apartment. Private bedroom. Walk to
campus. S7O including utilities.
378-7224. (B-15M48-P)
1 Female roommate wanted for
summer quarter. Poolside Landmark
No. 53. SIOO entire summer. Phone
378-1927. Damage deposit* Included.
(B-lt-159-p)
Furnished, clean comer room S3O
per month. Boys and upperclassman
only. 1614 N. W. 3rd Place. Call
372- for appointment.
(B-lt-159-p)
ROOMMATES for lg. 3 br. house.
One block from campus, own
bedroom, private entrance sBs for
whole summer. 1128 S. W. Ist Ave.
373- (B-2t-159-p)
HOLIDAY GARDENS
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C,' 1 bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S. w. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Sublet for summer. Available July 1.
One bedrm; air conditioned;
furnished; slOl mo.; pool; wash
room; Sin City area; call John days
392-0418. (B-2t-159-p)
Available 'lmmediately one-two
bedroom apts. $95-sllO a month.
Seeing Is believing. A/C, pool, close
to campus. 376-8990 or 376-2317.
(B-3t-159-p)
Hip roommate to share large air
conditioned house close to campus.
Call 376-4858 or come by 618 S. W.
10th St. (B-4t-159-p)
WANTED
CAMELOT. Need one male
roommate for 2 bedrm. deluxe apt.
priv., gas, bar b q, A/C, dishwashr.
Call 373-2396 after 6 P. M., apt. No.
247. GREAT!I (C-2t-159-p)
Female roommate needed:
Williamsburg poolside apartment. Air
conditioned, dishwasher, etc. Please
call 378-6394 * Glenna. (C-2t-159-p)
Three need one more to fill the
Victorian monstrosity on S. E. 7th
SL SSO per month, share utilities.
Call 378-7479. (C-3t-159-p)
Roommate for summer qtr. Have
your own room In a house 10 blocks
behind Norman. S7O + utilities for
the entire summer. 373-1748.
(C-2t-158-p)
Need 2 coed roommates for
Williamsburg Apts. No. 11 for July.
Can move In anytime. Contact
376-1253 (Manager), A/C, poolside,
townhouse, dishwasher. (C-3t-158-p)
Roommate for summer, small 2-story
apt., AC, 3 blks. from campus,
$37.50 + utilities; physics grad,
student; 2048% N. W. 3 Ave.,
372-6929. (C-2t-158-p)
Children's
Ballet
Interpretive
Dance
$12.00 8 weeks
Mrs. Gail Scott instructor
Sign up at first lesson June 30
10:00 11:00 am 4-6 year
olds
11:00 12:00 noon 7 and up
room C-4 f Union
sponsored by JWRU



4r \V
I Beginning |
I Bridge I
I Lessons dfc I
L JA
Instructor: Dorothy Pate
$7.50 8 weeks
sign up at first lesson July 1
7-9 pm
room 118 Union
sponsored by JWRUnion

FAMILY NIGHT
, AT THE UNION
& ch- T
7:00 in Union
Auditorium
Cafeteria Special
Children Under 12-Half Price
BOWLING SPECIAL-
Games Area
Family Rate of $1.20/ hour
all children must be accompanied
by an adult
Sponsored By The JWR Union
I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
I MONDAY
BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI
ALL YOU CAN EAT J£ +
I TUESDAY
GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
ALL YOU CAN EAT 99<
WEDNESDAY
I JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK 79<
I THURSDAY AND YELLOW R,CE
I BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS 99<
I FRIDAY FISH ALNIONDINE AND FRENCH
I FRIED POTATOES 89*
V
Patronize Gator Advertisers

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
c
Coed to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Girl needs roommate to share large
apartment. S6O for the summer.
Close to campus. Private room. Call
373-1184. (C-2t-158-p)
Female roommate to share luxury
apt. in Sin City. Low rate of $46.25
monthly. Call now 378-3667.
(C-4t-159-p)
ROOMMATE WANTED, male.
Summer qtr. Share 2 bdrm. apt. with
3 guys. Pool, air-cond. $42 per mo.
plus Utilities. 376-0354. (C-2t-159-p)

Tuesday, June 30,1970, The Florida Alligator,

***************%"********#"*"****
HELP WANTED
x-x-x-x.x.x.xXxXrivivXsvXvrvXvXv:
Widower with three children needs
mature person to live in and run the
home. Call Mr. Poole, 376-3468
anytime. Must have references.
NEED men of all trades for NORT*
SLOPE, ALASKA, up to $2600.00 a
month. For complete information
write to Job Research Centre,
Point-Roberts, Wash., 98281. Enclose
$2.00 to cover cost. (E-3t-157-p)
Part time and full time salesmen for
mens retail clothing store. Some
experience preferred. Apply in
person Silvermans, 225 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-2t-159-p)
HELP WANTED. TYPIST II
positions open in Student
Publications to operate IBM MTSC
typesetting equipment. Will train.
Two shifts, 8-5 and 1-10 pm. High
school education required.
Permanent work. Apply to Mr.
French, Room 330, J. Wayne Reitz
Union. Phone 392-1681. An Equal
Opportunity Employer. (E-tfc)
Women! Learn to enhance your own
natural beauty and share these secrets
with others. Part-time, full time, &
distributorships available. Call Cindy
392-7672. (E-st-159-p)
Wanted: Hours: 5:30 7:30 10-15
hours per week. Pay: Hourly wage
plus commission. Type work:
Telephone solicitation. Call 372-2130
for interview, more information.
{E-4t-159-p)
SPORTS WRITERS for Alligator
staff. Experience helpful. Salary is
flexible. Call 392-1686 In the
afternoon. (E-4t-159-p)
AUTOS
**********
66 Corvair great shape
economical but sporty asking $575
-372-1272. Mike (G-2t-159-p)
1967 Triumph Bonniville 650 cc.
Excellent condition only S7OO. Call
Fogle 378-0293 or see cycle anytime
after 6 P. M. Delta Chi Frat.
(G-4t-159-p)
Corvette Convertible, 1960. Superb
condition. A real collectors Item.
Superior interior and body, great
engine. Reduced, only $895,
376-5962. (G-3t-159-p)
65 Olds-442, red, 2 dr. ht., P. S.,
P. 8., rebuilt A/T, A/C, 1 Rad & Rev,
49,000 miles, call R. Byrd, 378-4232,
morning or evening. Student.
(G-4t-159-p)
Triumph TR3 Gd condition,
overdrive, new trans., relined brakes,
9 mo.-old paint job, many extras
Included. S6OO. call 372-7178 after
5:00 P. M. (G-4M59-P)
Mustang, 289 VBV 1966, convertible
black top & Interior w/ excellent red
finish new tires, top condition. Ask
$1,295 call Jim Sherby @ 378-7432.
(G-st-157-p)
Your love gone for the summer?
Kittens need your love. Call
378-5460 after 5:30 P. M. for free
bundle of love. (J-lt-159-p)
David, my favorite commentator. I
wish I was there to Huntley your
Brinkley. Have a very, very Happy
2 Ist Birthday! 4-ove, Chet.
(J-lt-159-p)
COEDS Want to do something new
this summer? Photographer needs
models for photo studies. No pay,
but fun and travel. No experience
OK. CRH 376-1387. (J-2t-159-p)
IBe at Peace I
I with yourself I
I Yoga Lessons I
instructor: Steve Sheridan I
$1 5 for six IVz hour sessions I
call 392*1655 before July 31
for information
1 sponsored by the JWRUnion Jl

Page 13

>X*X&X*X-XX*X;X< PERSONAL
DENISE the photographer. Your
help needed. Call Les at Alligator
office In the afternoon. (J-4t-159-p)
PHOTOPORTRAITS. RICK
376-6028. (J-st-159-p)
COEDS Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32M37-P)

DECOUPAGE
% 3-D
ASSEMBLAGE
(Lessons)
Instructor: Mr. Paul Burdick $6.00 6 weeks
Sign up at the first lesson. June 30 7 9pm
room C-4, Union sponsored by the JWRUnion
BHHN now SHowiiT
EXCLUSIVE
NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA
ENGAGEMENT!!! bve
people
M 1111 IHj Hlllillpiia Mi
anal ID I MESTRICTCO Urxtor 17 raquirM /"ym i /?/'*
accompanying Parent or Adult Quartan | | \\_JJ l^,
BL Jm
R Agrafe
H&. : a
hiaa#l#l#i#Bi
WPVWW ww%n
starring joon boez joe cocker country joe & the fish
jimi hendrix santonaejohn Sebastian sho-no-noesly&lhelam9y stone*
* crosby, stills & nosh ark) guthrie e ricbie havens
'ten years after* the who* and 400,000 other beautiful people.

::>XxXx:w
SERVICES
Del-Ray Typing Service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
Prompt pick-up, delivery. 373-1984,
9-5 (M-st-159-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480 (M-ts-c)
ALTERATIONS Mrs. Ruby Mills
moved near Gainesville shopping
center 100 N.E. Bth Ave. Apt. 217
Phone: 376-8506 (M-st-157-p)
Alternators Generators starters
Electrical systems tested and repairs
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 S.
Main (M-ts-c)



Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 30, 1970

Books
Americans And Violence
Topic Os Book Os Essays

American Violence, edited by Richard Maxwell
Brown.
(Prentice-Hall, $5.95)
H. Rap Brown said violence is as American as
apple pie. The analogy may be disputed, but some
support for it can be found in American Violence,
almost a catalog of turmoil, edited by Richard
Maxwell Brown (not related).
The editor says the Revolutionary war was the
supreme lesson to Americans that, in practical
terms, violence pays. Paying or not, the country
has a long, bloody record of both individual and
collective violence, as laid out in Browns book. And
much of the carnage relates to racism. Indians
massacring whites, soldiers massacring Indians, slave
uprisings, Ku Klux Klan activity, the New York
anti-draft riots of the Civil War and much of the
countrys labor violence have had racial overtones.
The editor draws no conclusions along racial
lines. He contends that for. all our rhetoric, we
have never been a very law-abiding nation. He
claims comparative studies show that violence has
increased in America since World War II and some
studies now show us to be among tne most violent
of nations. Yet, for all the turmoil, Americas
government and its institutions have not been
greatly affected by the violence yet.
Tony Profumo (UPI)
* *
Vendetta, by Charles Durbin.
(Coward-McCann, $5.95)
Charles Durbins Vendetta is a new entry in a
growing genre the Mafia novel. There are flaws in
a mirror it holds up to life, but it is a fast -moving
and very readable thriller.
This is the story of a Sicilian-American deported
for another mans crime. As unpopular with the
Sicilian underworld as with the police, he is
betrayed, tortured, framed and shipped off to a

ZOOLOGY mmmmmmmmm~mmmmmmammimmmm
across 1 s 7 ** 10 Tr FT ir h I' 5 1 117I 17 1 1 f* ¥§
1 Aims box. 45 Puff up. 76 Hockey. 103 Group* of 3
5 Incite. 46 Throng. player. tent*. Wm. fIK
9 Curved, 47 Poisonou* 77 Sandarac 105 Lily: Fr. 15 ~ 27
electrically. make of tree*. 106 Cut. mK:
14 Hypothetical India. 78 Wild rage. 107 Sent a H
progenitor. 50 Roman 79 Longfellow message HB
20 Implement fiddler. creation. over*ea*. IHMBaHBBrT HK7 mm rr
21 Ancient 51 Green 80 Boon. 108 Macaw*. SEgSagBSK JJH ifist
goal poat. plants. 81 Playthings. 109 Limestone. HB BH ! HH
22 River of 52 Magindanao. 82 Large bird. 111 Plunge. 88 88 88 83 18
Sweden. 53 Eggs. 83 Type of 112 Ballerina* piHHL piHHL-23
-23 piHHL-23 Hit and 54 Short sleep. intelligence skirt. *5 8 1 p 8
rebounded. 57 Stir colors test. 113 Prohibit.
25 Gem. in calico 85 Yale man. 114 Italian *0
26 Often seen printing. 86 O.T. Book. island: abbr. jHB H
at rodeos. 58 Horse food. 87 Roadster. 115 Hoarseness. 57 sa eo
28 Harsh. 59 Corm. 88 Symbol of 122 An or the. HB HB 8B
29 Chihuahuas 60 Rabbit. peace. 124 Biggest 63 BBRa *5
61 Season: Fr. 89 Slave. portion.
31 Follow* 62 Make a call. 93 Japanese 125 Sullen. gw-
OPQ. 64 Arctic. 126 Arranged 87 88 88 70 71 73
32 Pilfer. inhabitant. 94 People according
33 Security. 66 Diminish. generally. to a plan. 19 78 78 38
34 lowa town. 67 Pacify. 95 Fruits. 127 Concur.
35 Iroquoian. 70 Charge for 96 Less 128 Charity. 11 HP 7
37 Java a privilege. roasted, as 129 Hebrew. jm ££ BB
almond. 71 Asiatic sea. meat. prophet. 61 ~1M862 13 lls
38 Injury. 72 Lawful. 130 South
41 Hautboys. 73 Service 98 Type of African fly. mm n; in Fi
43 Oriental warfare. 131 Spars. 85 " M B7 H B9 13
title. 74 Applause. 101 Sorts. 132 Occident.
44 Unspoken. 75 Glide. 102 Twentyone. 133 Tide. 83 94 95 86 97
MnT hoo iioi HHnoz
DOWN 103 104 IHMBBTo? mt^^T
1 Whit. 14 Mites. 40 Horse. 64 Types of mm mm mm
15 Temporary 41 Harangue. hair-do. HHHB
3 Wheedle. stop. 42 Foreman. 65 Border. Hfl HfBBBMHV
4 Avocados. 16 Formerly. 43 Modern bus 66 Mule or ox. 1,3 114 116 111 110 119 130 111
5 Winding 17 Pithy equipment. 67 Marbles. 188
pathway. remark. 44 Builder's 68 Word of 1 33 333 75
6 European 18 Bird of prey. beam. honor. flB
capital. 19 Orange oil. 46 Wading 69 Valuable Jg ETa'
7 Base in 24 Opposite of bird. insect. JHB
Greenland. credit. 47 Tropical nut. 70 Indian corn. hHBiTs ~ HIT
8 Weaverbird. 27 Feline cries. 48 Marine 72 Gold deposit.
9 Roused to 30 Tiger's zoo substance.. 74 Wheel
home. 49 Above.
10 Russian 36Tatter. 51 Mother. 75 Mediocre. 80 Donates. 90 Pertaining 99 Prosperous 104 Biblical. HOMountain 117 Melt,
monetary 37 Golfer's 52 Pulverize. 76 Infatuated 82 Cupid. to a period states: si. mountain. crest. 118 Drag,
units. goal. 55 Get. one: si. 83 Wrinkle. of time. 100 Indisposed. 106 Official seal. 111 Portals. 119 Seep.
11 Hints.. 38 Slight 56Came off. 78 Ground 84 Destructive 91 Storm. 101 Edits. 107 Most 112 Names. 120 Invisible
12Congers. .impression. 59 Audacious. grain. insect. 92 Absconded. 102 Ritualistic attractive. 114 Mac. emanation.
13 From the 39 Nautical 60 Ray. 79 Kitchen 86 Affirmatives. 95 Humbug. declaration. 109 Genus of 116 Baltic 121 Snare.
sign: mus. term. 63 Witches. utensils. 88 Palm tree. 96 Blackbirds. 103 Junto. apple trees. seaport. 123 Food fish.
JoQ! Burger Chef
mm 1 1 goes all out
to please
the student!
/ 1 w JH
715 NW 13th St.
and 1412 N. Main St /

prison where the local Mafia intends to kill him.
He is saved because the New York Mafia family
which handed him his ticket to Sicily has a new use
for him to smuggle shipment of heroin, then
collect a big debt on the West Coast.
The latter half of the book is almost pure private
eye in the classic Hammett tradition the ruthless
loner against the organization, or at least its
subverted Las Vegas branch with corpses all over
the place.
Only at the very end does a more or less
inevitable twist return the book to the true Mafia
category.
Some of his allegations about the American
underworld probably would not bear close scrutiny
but who expects an adventure novel to be a
treatise? Set disbelief aside, and enjoy!
Doug Anderson (UPI)
* *
The Truth Game, by John Hallowell
(Simon and Schuster, $5.95)
This is a collection of some of the niftiest writing
and best interviews about Tinsel Town.
Hallowell, a 28-year-old Harvard graduate and
onetime Life magazine reporter, writes like a
talented Rex Reed. Hes a catch-everything observer
with a fine knack for putting it down in writing.
Its not just a series of I-said, she-said
interviews but a well-put-together blend of
behind-the-scenes activities and pieces where the
headliners talk about themselves. To wit:
Raquel Welch, reclining somewhat sensuously
on a sofa and commenting, Actually, its
extraordinary that I exist.
Melina Mercouri, impressible spirit from
Greece, commenting on Sophia Loren: Italy and
Greece what do you expect? Love? Hallowell
asks if the comment is off the record and she
reports, With Mecouri nothing is off the record.

Answers To Thursdays Puzzle
ninTTTITnfIBBrATDTTIMIsWMI Alsisi aJalh'a'b
A I |r|f|i|tHt 0 B I tBo N T A pgim_L
E S |j| A M pfU T_A
TmBMo a cTebt a alleTdam.
MI E R TMfP U R R AM L I _E
fTIEIE N A G E rM IMPEND
1y! e1 dHT l l eBT e e swm
ElflirF R E eMf I N E S Sj
Tsps A V EBBT R OpHOD
u P 0 OBIT H A NBBL PNG
II |A IT |H IE IS MP AN I Bf E M E nTBBIA R G E
T AST BMl' I A RMA D A x|bh*|s SBl
Irle r t Hlc a l l TMiT I N EOISUIE|N|D|
Wjl V nip 0 S eUt[alc TBBDmLIEBBM A R
lul I BBslh I mBBMIuIsIeBBMII ISIT T| A | P I AI
imetl^tia r~br[eiatpMio|u|slrA|n|[rTvi
Pr eTals It me Is It 1 1 |v|a It |e Mba geMe s_s_
Illa ghip l lTybbsii Inlebbtli efowN e e
bTTh Wmu a obbsltja tbbsle r 1 Ibp r n t
[HToIgm/u dlgieelllTtihie slpli r i t
|p |o Is [e Me r 111 alnMl[e fv ele tTaTn' S' t T
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
Igi AND SALES
"CORVAIR SPECIALIST"
' GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 376-7771
SAII -13", 14", & 15" thru Size 775
14 &15 Size 825 8. larger $9.95 M
tax 359 559 plus
complete car care center recapable Casing Vir
jS T c. B m v T i r ;
ROBBIES
For The Best In Steaks,
Meals & _Jofljjjandwiches
TV & BILLIARDS^!
I 1718 W University Are. I
I f On The Gold Coast I
Welcome!
FRESHMEN
Today's the day on your busy schedule to visit
your on-campus Bookstore and meet some of the
people whose sole purpose is to serve
you introduce you to the textbook division
and make you familiar with the tools of your
college career here at the University of Florida.
Come in.... browse around and pick up your
information portfolio with Florida decals for your
car included FREE!
SES Campus Shop & Bookstore
located in the Hub
phone 392-0194



The
Florida
Alligator

- jH
m :;?&.
MflHHjy s yJfr -Jj
* v\
HK s
WILL HARMAN
... hit .315

Baseball Scholarships Rare?

By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Editor
Baseball, unlike other major
sports programs at the UF, does
not recruit the majority of its
players, according to Head
Coach Dave Fuller.
Fuller said, We usually
recruit only pitchers and
catchers since 85 per cent of
winning in baseball depends on
the pitcher and good catchers
are hard to find. According to
Fuller it is not hard to come up
with good infielders and
outfielders out of a student
body of 20,000 plus.
MOST ALL of the Gator
baseball players start as
non-scholarship athletes. The
usual procedure is for a
freshman to try out for the team
and if he makes it he will play
for the freshman squad for a
year. Then if the coaches feel
that he is varsity material after
his freshman year they will
approach him with a scholarship
offer.
The athletic department gives
scholarships to about three men
each year who have tried out for
the team on a non-scholarship
basis. Some of the best athletes
who have ever played for the

| Intramurals \
Chuck Fessler llllliwi
ATTENTION: The Intramural Department will be operating during
the summer quarter, and will offer a program which will be widely
diversified with something for everyone. Activities will include
softball, 3-man basketball, handball, bowling, a free-throw shooting
contest, and a marathon softball tournament.
Now is the time to sign up a team for either softball or three-man
basketball. Deadline for signing up a team for softball is 5 p.m. on
Wednesday. Deadline for basketball entries is 5 p.m. July 8. There will
be only ONE LEAGUE this summer an independent league. Any
student can play on any team he wants to, no matter where he lives.
To sign up either come by the Intramural Office at 229 Florida Gym
or call Chuck Fessler, Bill Mathews, or Bob Fessler.
ID'S MelurKitroM
4308 N.W. 13 th ST
Gainesville,Fla. 904-372-7044

: B : S ?Bf *' l^Pvl; ;<* *.
sVW S w fl| m mW, B Is m S

t X
TOMMY BLANKENSHIP
... ace shortstop

Gator nineballers were
non-scholarship men.
The two big bats for the
Gators last season, Tony Dobies
and Will Harmon, started their
UF careers without financial aid
from the athletic department.
Dobies had the sixth best batting
average in the SEC last season
with a .345. He got 49 hits in
142 attempts and batted in 20
runs as an All-SEC outfielder.
Harmon had the 14th best
batting average with a .315 and
swatted in 46 hits in an SEC
high of 146 attempts and batted
in 19 runs.
REGULARS LEON
Bloodworth, Rod Wright, Larry
Sheffield, and Tommy
Blankenship were among some
of the men who started out
under Fuller without
scholarships.
At the end of last season
Fuller gave out scholarships to
Dennis Banks, a junior, and
Glenn Hurst, a freshman. Banks
is counted on heavily next
season barring injury.
Even though the UF does not
actively recruit the majority of
its baseball players, the Gators
still have the second highest
won-lost percentage in the SEC.
Recently Fuller signed Doug

H88&-. -
Y 1
' -Bfefe -*sm
\ A
iHi i
mmp I I
UP!PHp
ROD WRIGHT
... hot corner man

Corbett, a right-handed pitcher
from Sarasota High School, who
was named the most valuable
player in the state North-South
All-Star game. Corbett follows
Nick DeVirgilis and Guy
McTheny, two top UF baseball
players from Sarasota High.
*
] \ Guns Guns Guns j
l Inventory over 500. Buy j
* Sell Trade Repair. i
. ( Reloading supplies, Layaway j
j plan. Harry Beckwith, gun 1
1 [ dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. j
HAVE YOU BEEN THINKING
ABOUT LEARNING TO FLY?
We will teeeh you for
S2OO
Solo course in *69 Cessna 150,
includes grounds school & 10 hours
of flight instruction.
$l6O
Solo course in Piper J-3, books,
ground school & 10 hours of flight
instruction.
FLYING HAWKS
STENGEL AERODROME 376-0011

iflMa Siiv&matt'-i Siiv&matt'-i---
-- Siiv&matt'-i--- 225 w UNIVERSITY AVE.
pV\ PRE-4TH
<4l SHE
43 J |\ 600 OFF wnH A B-A-N-G!
/ U ... SAVE ON
Py ~rj DRESSES
/ / ( COSTUMES
l J [ COCKTAIL DRESSES
//PANTS SUITS V 3 KNIT DRESSES
//swimsuits JUNIOR DRESSES
ii
SKIRTS -* OFF BAGS

Tuesday. June 30,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Remember I
Summer I
Bowling I
Special I
REITZ UNION I
LANES |

iA,#ggmL {mm
; vSs%4ijsS^
::, J. Jw&
FEATURES INCLUDE Front Parcel Shelf Comfortably Seats Five Persons
Heater Normal Fuel Consume,on 33 35 MPG
All Art Leather Interior Four Speed Shift Windshield Washers Acceleration 0-55 MPH In 9 8 Seconds
Wall To Wall Carpet Fold Down Rear Seats Reversing l.iohts Top Speed 90 Miles Per Hour
Safety Glass Lined Luggage Compartment Independently Adjustable Ventilation Engine Air Cooled Transverse
Adjustable Hear! Restraints Bumper Guards Overhead Cam Shaft
ED'S MEHARI CITROEN
4308 N.W. 13th ST.
GAINESVILLE, FLA
904-372-7044

DAVE SPAHR
Sports Editor

Ironwood
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMRERSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 4.TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For information call
376 0080
& IZONWOOP
coif ciw
N I Jth AVKMUf

Page 15



i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 30,1970

Page 16

Cheney Hurts Knee, Gridders Draft Problems

ANDY CHENEY an
outstanding sophomore flanker
for the UF, reinjured his knee
according to Head Trainer Chris
Patrick.
Chaney, who caught 38 passes
for slp yards and 5 touchdowns
last season, injured his knee in
the Miami game and again last
week while running. The extent
of the injury is unknown at this
time and no further information
is availible on his condition.
* *
SEVERAL GATOR
FOOTBALL players are in
school this summer in order to
avoid the grasp of Uncle Sam in
the fall.
Like every other physically
able male at the UF, eight
varsity gridders would have been
eligible for the draft if they
didnt attend the summer session
in order to get back in phase.
* *
VARSITY LETTERS WERE
AWARDED to 33 UF spring
sports athletes according to
Director of Athletics Ray
Graves.
Letters went to 19 baseball
players, as follows: Tommy
Blankenship, Leon Bloodworth,
Fred Bretz, Nick DeVirgilis,
Tony Dobies, Jim Gruber, Will
Harman, Larry Kiezzek, Rod
Macon, Ray McHale, Guy
McTheny, Glen Pickren, Wayne
Rogers, Rick Scarborough, Bill
Seagraves, Tom Seybold, Larry
Sheffield, Lauris Vidal, and Rod
Wright.
Tennis letters went to Bruce
Bartlett, Ralph Hart, Greg
Hilley, Buddy Miles, Will
Sherwood and Kenn Terry.
Golf letters were awarded to
Ron Mahood, Wendell Coffee,
Andy North, David Bames, Mike
Killian, Stacy Russell, Joel
Eastman, and Tony Kindred.
* *
TOM SEYBOLD, UF left
handed pitcher, was drafted in
the 28th round by the Baltimore
Orioles. But reliable sources say
the chances are that Seybold will
play out his final year of
eligibility with the Gators.
* *
EVER SINCE GEORGIA
TECH dropped out of the
Southeastern Conference after
the 1964 season the UF hasnt
faced them in basketball.
The Gators and the
Yellowjackets will be foes again
next Dec. 28, when they square
off in the opening game of the
annual Gator Bowl tournament
at the Jacksonville Colliseum.
Tech will pit All-American
star Richard Yunkus against his
former Illinois high school
teammate, the Gators Jerry
Hoover.
THE LAST TIME the UF
played Tech, the Gators coasted
to an easy 92-73 victory.
In the second game of the
tournament St. Bonaventure and
Bradley will meet and the
winners of the two games will
Gtnifor%
f OVERHAULED Soedall
i$ 4 50 I
ikwcSjw**'
GENERATOR SERVICE
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARO.
. Mon.Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm
378-4011

compete in the final game of
Dec. 29 for the title.
* *
ACCORDING TO West Coast
Bowl Assn, officials, sponsors of
the Southeastern Conference
game between the UF and
Kentucky, ticket sales passed the
15,000 mark last week.
Bowl Association Secretary
Tom McDonald said that sales
were over 4,000 tickets more
than had been sold at this time
last year for the UF-Tulane
which drew 40,000 fans to
Tampa Stadium.
The advance sal-e in
Gainesville made a big difference
and we encourage those who
want to attend to get their
orders in quickly as we plan on
putting the actual tickets on
sales about July 1 said
McDonald.
* *
Car Owner Roger Penske and
driver Mark Donohue were
second in the Indianapolis 500
but theyre first in line at
Ontario Motor Speedway.
Penske was the first to turn in
a formal entry for the inaugural
California 500 at the new
Ontario track on Sunday, Sept.
6. The race will be run on a
214-mile oval patterned after the
Indy course.
Donohue earned $86,427 for
his runnerup finish to A1 Unser
on Memorial Day in Indiana.
Hell be driving the same blue
number 66 Sunoco Special, a
Ford-powered Lola, when
qualifying is staged at Ontario
the weekend of Aug. 29-30.
Practice at the new $25.5
million total-view auto racing
facility opens Aug. 22.
Penske is a member of the
OMS board of directors. He is
one of three of the tracks
governors expected to submit
entries for the first California
500.
Also entered is Pamelli Jones,
who had the winning
Indianapolis car with Unser at
the wheel.
* *
Professional golf is shopping
around for a super bowl.

KE GOLF zsxl ~
S RENTED FOR PLAYING COURSE
ICC BUCKET OF 25 BALLS FOR DRIVING
RANGE WITH GREEN FEES
DRIVING RANGE (CLUBS LOANED FREE)
7 30 AM TO MIDNIGHT 7 DAYS
Tee Off Before 11 AM Play Til 6P M
Monday thfu Friday
GOLF COURSE

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
raldwih^^A
I STARKE, FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

S I*OUTS SHOWS

The touring pros want to
crown a world champion each
season, as is done in practically
every other sport.
The closest thing to it at
present is the World Series of
Golf, which pits the reigning
champions of the Masters, U. S.
Open PGA, and the British Open
in head-to-head competition in
mid-September.
But Golf Commissioner Joe
Dey wants more impact, a
greater crescendo. He envisions a
limited field of leading players
(perhaps 64) meeting in a series
of elimination, stroke-play
matches for a record purse.
He is already searching for the
right sponsor and a suitable
super course.
It could come as early as next
year.
* *
EX-GIANT star Kyle Rote
tells of an incident in which the
rarely penalized Roosevelt
Brown was called for
unnecessary roughness.
It wasnt my fault, Rosey
explained to Rote. It all started
when he hit me back.
* *
LIKE EVERYTHING else in
sports these days, the Olympics
are being automated.
For example, an
electroop tical instrument for
measuring distances will be used
for the first time in the 1972
summer games at Munich.
It will be placed in front of
the grandstand along the center
line of the playing field. At the
point of impact of discus,
javelin, or hammer, a reflector
will be set up manually.
A modulated beam of infrared
rays will then be flashed in the
direction of the reflector. In
seconds the instrument will
record the distance of the throw
to the nearest millimeter. The
reading can then be fed directly
into a computer.
Only the shotput will
continue to be measured by
hand.
* *
IN THE MODERN game of
baseball there are only a few

iron men left in the game.
Only Cub Billy Williams,
Matty Alou of the Pirates and
Felix Millan of Atlanta played in
all of their teams games during
the 1969 season. Williams
current streak is at 982
consecutive games, the National
leage mark.
* *
NATIONAL LEAGUE
president Chub Feeney asked
Stan Musial what would happen
if he took a swing at one of the
experimental lively
yellow-stitched baseballs used
this spring training.

BRASINGTON IS TK BBT PUCH IN
TOWN TO BUY A PK-OWNB) AUTO
1969 CADILLAC ELDORADO $5795
Two door hardtop, front wheel drive, full power, air conditioned. Silver
with dark blue interior.
1969 OLDSMOBILE "98 $3795
Luxury sedan. Popular four door model. Air conditioned, power steering,
power brakes, automatic transmission. Choose from 2 in stock.
1969 CADILLAC COUPE de VILLE 45295
Two door hardtop. Maroon with matching interior. Air conditioned, fully
powered. Sold and serviced by Brasington.
1968 CADILLAC ELDORADO $4595
Beige with matching leather interior. Front wheel drive. Air conditioned
full power.
1968 CADILLAC SEDAN de VILLE $4195
Four door hardtop with bucket seats. Black vinyl over turquoise. Air
conditioned, full power, factory warranty.
1968 CADILLAC $4295
Sixty Special. Four door sedan. Turquoise with matching interior. Air
conditioned, full power, new belted tires.
1968 OLDSMOBILE..... $2295
Delmont 88. White four door sedan. Air conditioned, radio, heater, power
steering, power brakes, locally owned and serviced by Brasington. Choose
from two in stock.
1968 CHRYSLER NEWPORT...... $2295
Custom. VB, automatic transmission, a conditioned, power steering,
power brakes, radio, heater, blue with matching blue interior.
1968 PONTIAC GTO.. $2495
Two door hardtop, VB, automatic transmission, radio, heater, power
steering, power brakes, tilt steering wheel, bucket seats with console.
Electric windows. Beige vinyl top over white.
1967 OLDSMOBILE $1795
Cutlass four door sedan. Blue with matching blue interior. Air conditioned,
radio, heater, power steering, power brakes, automatic transmission.
1967 FORD "T BIRDS $2195
Pick from 2in stock all air conditioned, full power and automatic
transmissions.
1966 OLDSMOBILE "98 ...,..$1695
Four door sedan, white, air conditioned, automatic transmission, power
steering, power brakes, electric seats, tilt telescoping steering wheel. Local
owner. Serviced by Brasington.
1966 MUSTANG $1395
Two door hardtop, light green. Automatic transmission, radio, heater, air
conditioned.
1966 BUICK RIVIERA $2295
Two door hardtop. Turquoise with matching interior. Air conditioned, full
power, cruise control, tilt steering wheel.
1966 BUICK ELECTRA 225 $1995
Four door hardtop, air conditioned, full power, tHt telescoping steering
wheel. Local owner. Nice car.
1966 CHEVROLET II ...$1395
Station wagon, V 8 with automatic transmission, radio, heater, power
steering, power brakes, air conditioned. Local owner.
1966 COMET $1595
Two door hardtop, VB, automatic transmission, white with blue interior.
Air conditioned, power steering.
1966 VOLKSWAGEN...... $1095
Radio, heater. Blue, runs good, looks good.
1967 VOLKSWAGEN $1195
Red bug nice car and just reduced in price!
1969 VOLKSWAGEN $1895
White bug" automatic stick-shift, low mileage. Very dean car in mint
condition!
BRASINGTON
Cadillac-Oldsmobile, Inc.
SALESMEN
Bronce Roberts Bud Miller Buford Brunson
Ceorge Bradley, Used Car Manager
2001 NW 13th Street 378-5301

Musial replied: Youd
wonder where the yellow went!
* *
PIRATE THIRD BASEMAN
Richie Hebner reveals why he
gave up his off-season job
digging graves.
Its a nice job, says Rich,
except for the damn widows.
They say they want it trimmed
here, and trimmed here, and
here, Theyre never satisfied.
Finally I said to one of them,
Lady, you put him in there but
youre not going to put me in
there!