Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
COME TOGETHER
.' \
Summer quarters really the time to come together and
Andys holding another.
Unofficial UF Come Together Coordinator Andy Kramer
has planned a come together for Saturday afternoon.
The event will be on the Plaza of the Americas, from 4:30
until 8:30 p.m., Andy said.
We dont know yet which bands will be playing, but therell
be music and lots of people rapping and having a good time,
Weather reports predict a sunny day, and Andy says
everyones invited.

Va&fl
At! A K U'IIUUL

Vol. 62, No. 158

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JED ZIMMERMAN
WHOS THAT HIDING?
Maybe the youngrter is hiding or maybe he is plotting to push his
companion into Lake Wauburg. At any rate, the above two were
having fun. They are part of 300 Gainesville children enrolled in Camp
Concern, sponsored by SAMSON. For the story and more pictures,
see page 2.

The
Florida Alligator

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THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

The University of Florida, Gainesville

18-Year-Old Vote Plan
Headed To High Courts

BY ANNETTE BRIN
Alligator Editorial Assistant
The courts now have the final
say on the new 18-year-old
voting legislation that President
Nixon signed into law Monday.
The 18-year-old provision was
attached to a measure extending
the Voting Rights Act of 1965
for five years.
NIXON HAD reportedly
supported lowering the voting
age but only through
constitutional amendment.
Because the basic provisions
of this act are of great
importance, I am giving it my
approval and leaving the decision
on the disputed provision to
what I hope will be a swift
resolution by the courts, the
President said.
Floridas November ballot will
contain two constitutional
amendments, one to give
18-year-olds the right to vote
and the other to give
18-year-olds all additional adult
rights.
DR. ERNEST Bartley, UF
political science professor, said
he favors lowering the voting age
but has serious doubts about its
constitutionality on the federal
level.
The proper way to approach
the matter would be to follow
the same course as the 15th,
19th and 24th constitutional
amendments. These stopped the
states from restricting voters on
the basis of race, poll taxes and
other stipulations, Bartley said
Sunday.
Polls taken in states with
lower voting ages have shown
that the younger groups have the
IMlliUllll
FRATERNITY TAX bill dies
in Tallahassee; re-introduc re-introduction
tion re-introduction is expected in the next
house session T. ...... .page 5
Campus Crier 16
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment ...6
Letters 9
Movies 13
Small Society 9
Sports 19

lowest percentage of voters,
Bartley said.
ALL THIS talk about the
generation gap is ridiculous. The
lowered voting age wont make
any difference, he said. UF
students voted on the University
Activities Center the same way
their 65-year-old counterparts

i LEAPIN LIZARDS! i
By SUSAN SELMAN $
Alligator Writer >:
X
iy Leaping lizards! And a six-foot, 35-pound one at that.
ij: A wild lizard chase led to the capture Tuesday of a giant >:
:$ Water Monitor lizard which had been stalking Gainesville for
two days.
§ THE REPTILE was spotted about noon Tuesday in a 60-foot £
| oak tree near 402 NW 2nd Ave. About 250 spectators had
gathered when local police and William Thacker, the lizards £:
owner, arrived at the scene of the excitement.
According to Thacker, Michael Com, 3308 NW 10 St.,
| climbed up the tree in pursuit of the prehistoric-looking g
§ monster. The lizard fell halfway down when Com shook the g;
I tree. $
$ As Com took the slower way down, his prey flew to the £;
ground, and Thacker jumped on his prize while police captured
$ the lizard in a net. $
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IT HURTS SO MUCH
Anybody can get a meal in a restaurant. But eating wild berries,
well that's another thing. Photographer Mike Henson found some
berries near Gainesville and he and his party ate their fill. Os course,
he didn't mention how his stomach felt the next day.

Thursday, June 25, 1970

voted in Pinellas County on the
school bond issue.
The measure giving
18-year-olds the right to vote
does not affect this years state
and congressional elections,
since it doesnt become effective
until Jan. 1. The act covers all
federal, state and municipal
elections.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 25,1970

SAMSONs
Camp Concern

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Student Special
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I Our e 9 u ar 93< Stealcburger
Luncheon And Any 15C Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90< lus tax |
i Steak n Shake 1
? 16105. W. 13th St. THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

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By Alligator Services
SAMSON, a student-volunteer organization at
UF, has joined with the City of Gainesville and
Alachua County to sponsor the third annual
summer day camp program, Camp Concern.
Camp Concern extends its program to 300
underprivileged children in the Gainesville
community. The camp runs from June 15 through
July 24, and is divided into six one-week sessions
serving 50 children per week.
The camp program is similar to most day camps.
The children are picked up by bus, supplied by the
Alachua County School Board, at 8:15 in the
morning and are delivered to Lake Wauburg at 9.
The campers are divided into groups and
participate in softball, football, swimming, and
other game activities until 11:30. A half hour each
day, from 11:30 until 12, is reserved for guest
speakers, such as Agricultural Extension service
representatives, UF officials, and city and county
personnel.
At noontime the children are taken to Idylwild

Burger Chef
& OGS a H out
to please
- the student!
715 NW 13th St. rmliHaSfj
end 1412 N. Main St J g

Elementary School where they are served a hot
lunch. After lunch, they are taken to different areas
of the community for the afternoon program.
On Monday and Thursday afternoons the
children do arts and crafts work, which centers
around a leather-work project. Tuesday afternoon is
reserved for bowling and movies at the Reitz Union.
Wednesday is field trip day. Friday afternoon the
children participate in games competition such as
group relays, watermelon eating, and ball-throwing.
Winners of the afternoon events are presented
ribbons supplied by the Gainesville Recreation
Department.
Major assistance in the organization and
operation of Camp Concern has been supplied by
SAMSON, Alachua County School Board, Alachua
County Commission, City of Gainesville,
Neighborhood Youth Corps, VISTA, and many
interested private citizens of the Gainesville
community.




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NEW GENERATION BARBER?

Just because Bob Gould doesn't fancy the idea of
getting his hair cut doesn't mean he's against cutting
other things. For example, the university has hired

Shuttle Service
Cuts Five Buses

By CAROLINE ZIMMERMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
UF shuttle bus service is
operating on campus for the
summer term along the same
routes as previous quarters, with
the number of buses being
reduced to three from the usual
eight due to decreased
enrollment.
In addition, a new off-campus
route is tentatively planned to
begin June 29, with buses going
to Norman Hall.
Blue buses will be going to
Norman Hall on an experimental
basis for two weeks, Lee
Burrows, parking and traffic
coordinator said. Two possible
routes will be used to determine
participation as well as
advantages and disadvantages,
according to Burrows.
WE WANT TO service
Norman, and to determine the
best route we will have to run
buses in opposite directions, he
said.
It is necessary to obtain the
City of Gainesvilles permission
since these buses will be
operating on public streets. This
permission has not yet been
granted. The bus stop signs will
be put in by the city but not
until a definite route is chosen,
Burrows said.
Hours of service for both
Orange and Blue buses are
between 7:30 a.m. and 5:30
pjn. The Blue and Orange A
buses originate in the parking lot
behind Hume Hall, with Orange
B originating at the Spessard L.
Holland Law Center. Orange B
runs on a 30-minute schedule
and Blue and Orange A every 20
minutes.
BURROWS REMINDS
students that if they want to
park on campus between the
THE COMFORT EXPERTS
Specializing in Residential
& MOBILE HOME
2702 N.E. HUH DRIVE 378-1578

hours of 7:30 a.m. and 3:30
p.m. they must have a parking
decal. Students without this
decal must register their car with
UF for a fee of $6 in order to
park on campus.
Parking decals issued last fall
are good through the summer.
Freshmen and sophomores living
on campus may not register their
cars unless they are 21 or older,
or are living in married housing.

Would You Spend S I OO 1
FOR-A-NEW-FIGURE
THAT | S THE 1
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OF ONE WEEK ON A 4 MONTH PLAN AT THE I
Elaine Powers Figure Salon
todoy Ju . I SPECIAL OFFER I
IF you are a size 14 YOU CAN be a sze 10 by July 26 I 4w p,e e $1 oo I
IF you are a size 16 YOU CAN be a size 12 by July 31 Plan On I V P f 1
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IF you are a size 20 YOU CAN be a size 14 by Aug. 15 To The Firtf 45 To Call I
IF you are a size 22 YOU CAN be aszel6 by Aug. 15 | 372-9372 I
GUARANTEED or 372-1744 I
If For Any Reason You Fail To Receive The 4
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9 am 9 pm
L 9AM- 4PM Bank Americard Master Charge! 240 N*\W 21StAVE. E- P Mang. Inc. 19701

Gould to cut grass while he is temporarily out of
school. It's one more chapter in the courtship of
man and machine.

Palko Dies
Thomas Bernard Palko, 20,
died Tuesday afternoon at J.
Hillis Miller Health Center,
hospital officials reported.
Palko, a UF student, had
attempted to jump into the
La Mancha apartments
swimming pool from a third
story roof Friday night. He
failed to clear the patio area
and landed short of the pool.
He was rushed to the Health
Center with serious head
injuries.
Palko was assistant
business manager and head
arrmintant fnr thp Allioatnr

Senate To Review
Conduct Code Report

By KEN McKINNON
Alligator Staff Writar
UFs Student Affairs
Committee is presenting the
results of over a year of work
and controversy to the
University Senate today -a
proposed new Student Code of
Conduct.
The senate meets today at
3:30 p.m. in McCarty
Auditorium.
The committee approved the
proposed revision at its May 12
meeting and presented the
proposal to the senate at last
months meeting, where it was
then put on todays agenda.
THE PRESENT code,
adopted in 1967, has been
criticized by Student
Government officials for its
vagueness, double jeopardy and
in loco parentis.
After a preliminary revision of
the code in the summer of 1969
caused a furor among students,
then-Student Body President
Charles Shepherd called the
proposal unacceptable and
complained about its ambiguous
nature.
Clyde Taylor, student body
president before Shepherd,
ordered a commission to study
certain words and phrases in
the present code which he said
made a student liable under the
code for an offense after he has
been charged by civil authorities.
STUDENT BODY President
Steve Uhlfelder said, after

Thursday, June 25,1970, The Florida Alligator,

reviewing the proposed revision,
that it was a definite
improvement over the present
code, but there still needed to be
a clear definition of what a
person can be held liable for in
terms of city and county
ordinances.
The senate will also vote on
the recommendations from the
Senate Committee on Liaison
With the Board of Regents.
After being notified June 3 by
D. Burke Kibler, chairman of the
Board of Regents, of an interest
in establishing better
communication with students
and faculties at the various state
universities, the liaison
committee, Uhlfelder, Omicroa
Delta Kappa (mens leadership
honorary) President Ralph
Glatfelter, UF President Stephen
C. OConnell and Regents
Chancellor Robert Mautz met on
the matter June 5.
Mautz Rejects
Credited Quote
Board of Regents Chancellor
Robert Mautz said in making
recommendations for professors
pay raises and promotions
off-campus activities could be
taken into account.
However, he said Tuesday, he
doesnt recall ever having said
that many university
professors political activities are
in excess of that guaranteed by
the First Amendment, as
reported in Tuesdays Alligator.

Page 3



Page 4

h The Flawda AlKgrttor/TlNwday, June 25,1970

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PHIL BANNISTER

Everybody has problems especially new
students. The two freshmen above are caught in a
maze of buildings and sidewalks. Quit laughing,
seniors. The Alligator photo files are filled with
shots of you in the same pose. At right is a student

I STUDENT APPRECIATION DAY
WHOPPER
I clB AND save this coupon I
* SATURDAY JUNE 27, ONLY GOOD SATURDAY JUNE 27, ONLY |
I BURGER KING 8 N.W. 16h Ave I

A BED OF ROSES?

who uses a bench to work out her schedule. She is
one of 8,500 attending summer classes, the largest
enrollment ever. But then, the parking lots are just
as full and the sun is even hotter. Whoever said
summer was a bed of roses?

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JED ZIMMERMAN



By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writar
An ad valorum tax bill that
would enable Alachua County
Commissioners to tax
off-campus fraternities and
sororities was passed by the
Florida Senate and a House
committee, but never reached
the floor in the House of
Representatives.
The bill will have to be

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MIKE HENSON
DECISIONS, DECISIONS

"Let me see ... did the instructor tell me to toss
her over my right shoulder... or over my head."
While this student seems to ponder on the decision.

Study Planned
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale Wednesday
appointed three additional
students to a committee
designed to study the existing
structure of oiganization and
responsibility of student
publications.
The additional students were
requested by Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder.
the Newly-appointed
members are Ken Driggs, former
Seminole editor; William Maher,
editor of the Law Review, and
Tom Tworoger, president of the
Student Senate.
They join other student
committeemen Harvey Alper
and Barry Diamond, Board of
Student Publications members.
The other members are
College of Journalism and
Communications Dean John
Paul Jones, chairman; John S.
Detweiler, chairman of the BSP;
Gus Harrer, director of libraries,
and David West, UF coordinator
for student conduct.
Hale said he hopes the
committee will be able to make
a progress report by the end of
the summer.
KARAT!
New Summer Courses
for Beginners at
Universal Karate Dojo
2045. E. IstStreet
M W F 9-7:30 P.M.
T TH 7-e P.M.
Instructor: Dirk Mosis, 4th Dan
Best Coach of the Year
Black holt Champion
START TODAY!
For information call 379-4IIS

Frat Tax Bill Dies In Committee

reintroduced next year if it is to
become a reality. The bill would
also affect religious
organizations, civic and service
clubs.
FRATERNITIES ARE a
small drop in the bucket, but
when added to other
organizations, this would
represent a fairly large sum of
money, said Interfratemity
Council Faculty Advisor, Dean

.o.a.a.a.a.a.a a.a.a.a.a.o.a.a.a. -.-..o.a.a.a a a F
Loan Pick-Up Deadline
; Friday is the last day for students to pick up loan money, :
; says Ira Turner, director of student financial aid. :
j Our fiscal year ends June 30 and these loans must be picked :
j up by Friday or they will be cancelled and the money will divert :
) into the U.S. Treasury, Turner said. :
| Loans may be picked up at the Student Depository, located j
: in the Hub. Closing hour for the depository is 3:30 p.m. ;
--.0.a.a.a.a c.a a. a.o.a a.a a.a a.a.'
Welcome!
FRESHMEN
Today's the day on your busy schedule to visit
your on-campus Bookstore and meet some of the
people whose sole purpose is to serve
you introduce you to the textbook division
and make you familiar with the tools of your
college career here at the University of Florida.
Come in browse around and pick up your
information portfolio with Florida decals for your
car included.... FREE!
HMSM Campus Shop & Bookstore
.... located in the Hub
phone 392*0194

AFTER PASSING SENATE

the girl seems to be enjoying the practice too.
Actually, the two were just enjoying a day in the
Florida sun.

Jay R. Stormer.
Statewide, wed be the only
large group of fraternities to be
affected, Stormer said.
According to Clyde Taylor,
now with Bud Dickinsons
Tallahassee office, the bill was
originally introduced by Dade
County delegates as an ad
valorum tax reform to close
loopholes and due away with as
many exemptions as possible.
TAYLOR SAID that the

committee reviewed the bill and
found possible problems such as
in classification. How do you
really determine if a fraternity is
an educational organization or
not? Does the house have a
library? Is it used for study?,
Taylor said.
After debate and research, the
committee decided that the bill
would stipulate that all
organizations would be taxed
unless the County Commissioner
decided that the organizations
were oriented to their purpose.
I Figured the bill would be
killed this year, Taylor said. It
still has a lot of problems and
this is an election year.
He cited the biggest problem

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Thursday, June 25,1970, The Florida Alligator,

as the exemptions having to be
reviewed each year. Differences
of opinion in different
Commissioners could reverse
exemptions with every change of
office.
Also, the area people would
be pressuring the Commission to
tax university organizations.
It would also be possible for
fraternities at one state
university to be taxed while
others are exempted from taxes
by their individual County
Commissions.
If the IFC is serious, they are
going to have to do a lot of
advance work and researching
every year it would be a
difficult position, Taylor said.

Page 5



The
Florida
Alligator

"Self Portrait: Dylans Latest Is Magic

By DAN VINING
Alligator Campus Living Editor
Bob Dylan is full of magic and
has been for a good long time.
Weve come to expect amazing
things from him and weve not
been let down.
Dylan has a new album, Self
Portrait, that should be in the
stores within the next few days.
Its an exciting thing.
THE ALBUM HAS two
records and is packaged nicely

Writer's Meet Continues;
Public Lecture Tonight

Today is the third day of a
writers conference on campus.
The schedule of events for both
today and Friday is packed.
The conference began
Tuesday afternoon. There are
four famous writers here as
lecturers to the conference
John Crowe Ransom, a leading
poet, essayist, editor and
teacher; Andrew Lytle, editor of
the Sewanee Review and a
novelist and teacher; Cleanth
Brooks, editor of the Southern
Review and an outstanding critic
and scholar; and Peter Taylor, a
top story writer and a professor
of English at the University of
Virginia.
IN ADDITION TO the
lecturers, the conference has five
fellows all of whom have
become distinguished as writers
in the country. Theyre Robert
Pack, a poet; Jonathon Strong, a
story writer; Henry Van Dyke, a
novelist; Donn Pearce, a novelist
and screen play writer; and
Merrill Joan Gerber, a novelist.
Most of the events of the
conference are open only to
those who pay the conference
tuition charge, but there are two
free public lectures tonight and
Friday night. Anyone whod like
to may come.
Taylor will discuss fiction at 8
tonight in the Union Auditorium
in one of the public lectures.
Ransom will lecture on poetry at
the same time but in the Union
Ballroom Friday. A reception
will follow both talks in the
Union first floor lounges.
Events for conference
students today include a lecture
by Ransom at 10:30 this
morning in the lounge. At 1:30
this afternoon Brooks will
EVERY THIRD
WASH LOAD
RB
Air-conditioned Comfort
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with a self portrait on the front
cover and pictures of Dylan on
the back and throughout. The
pictures are soft and casual and
the music is too.
The rumors began about three
months ago that Dylan had cut
some sessions featuring some
personnel from The Band and
featuring some songs written by
others. The rumor was true. This
is the record that came out of
those sessions.

discuss language in the lounge. A
symposium and group discussion
will run from 3 to 5 this
afternoon with all the fellows
participating. Its in the lounge
too.
Fridays schedule includes a
lecture on fiction by Lytle in the
lounge at 10:30 a.m. and
another group discussion by the
fellows from 1:30 to 5 Friday
afternoon.
The writers conference is the
first of its kind on campus and is
directed by English Professors
Smith Kirkpatrick and Harry
Crews, both of whom are writers
and teachers. Its being
sponsored by the College of Arts
and Sciences and the Division of
Continuing Education.
Sports Stadiums
BUENOS AIRES (UPI)
There are 10 sports stadiums in
Buenos Aires for more than half
a million spectators. Some
stadiums in the city and its
suburbs have capacities ranging
from 40,000 to 100,000
spectators.

PHOTOGRAPHIC I
SUPPLY
HEADQUARTERS
for all
Art & Journalism Students

RECORD COMMENTARY

First, to talk about some of
those non-Dylan songs. About
the nicest on any of the four
sides of the record is, in my ears,
Early Morning Rain, by
Gordon Lightfoot. The tune has
been recorded by many people;
Judy Collins, Joan Baez, and
Peter, Paul and Mary included.
Dylans version is soft and lyric
and fun and the sidemen are
incredible.
Other found tunes on the
records are Let It Be Me, from
the Everly Brothers; I Forget
More Than Youll Ever Know,
a country classic of sorts and
Take Me As I Am Or Let Me
Go, ditto another down
home classic. Copper Kettle
and Gotta Travel On are both
semi-classics from the folk
world. Blue Moon (heres a
real treat) is a Roger and Hart
song that has been done
effectively by Bing Crosby and
others. Dylans version is funky
and warm.
SIMON AND
GARFUNKELS The Boxer
gets a good treatment with
Dylan sharing the vocal work
with another man. It could be
Robbie Robertson although its
too soon, much too soon to tell.
Among the Dylan tunes on
the thing are two Golden Oldies
Like A Rolling Stone and
She Belongs To Me both of
which were recorded live at
Dylans Isle of Wight concert last
year, and a third Golden Oldie
The Mighty Quinn that he
never put on an album til now.
Living the Blues is another
thats gotten some previous
attention and is recorded here
for the first time. It originally
was heard on Dylans appearance
on Johnny Cashs first show.
The other material on the
album is all new. The songs are
all good; some are as good as

Page 6

anything hes done. One,
Belle Isle has as good lyrics
as Dylan has done and the music
is completely new and fresh. In
many of the songs there is a
distinctive John Wesley
Harding sound. The Nashville
Skyline sound is particularly
heard on one instrumental,
Woogie Boogie.
For a Dylan album, it really
isnt necessary to convince
anyone to buy it or not to buy
it. An ad for the recording in
Billboard several weeks ago just
showed a color print of the
painting of Dylan on the front
cover and said, In four weeks
this self portrait will be in a
million and a half homes. Os

t I
CARTOONS
ARE TOPS
Tee-hee shirts of
white cotton knit spotted
with stuff right
out of the comics. Like
Supermans shield,
pow from Batman, Indian
sunrise and, of
course, the peace symbol;
sizes S-M-L, $5-$6.
Jr. Sportswear, Gainesville.
Mem B/iofAm
GAINESVILLE MALL

DAN VINING
Campus Living Editor

, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, June 2S, 1970

course it will. Dylan could come
out with a recording of his dog
spitting up and wed buy it. It is
good that Dylan has the
integrity to only record
worthwhile material. This new
album is certainly no letdown.
On the inside of the album
theres a picture of Dylan in
simple clothes on a farm bending
over looking at a chicken, and
another with his little boy
crawling around under his feet in
the studio. Hes come a long way
from the days of Blonde on
Blonde and the nervousness
that was in him and in his music
in those days. He seems so calm
and cool and so so so very real
now.



BOOKS 1
Jerry Rubin Does It
- a
Do It! by Jerry Rubin
Simon and Schuster, $5.95
Jerry Rubin was trying to lead 10,000 persons in a gross chant
against Yale President Kingman Brewster Jr. in New Haven. When
asked why, Jerry said that Brewer, as he called him, snubbed him
earlier in the day.
A real mind bender for an answer. Thats probably what you will
say when you read this feisty chronicle of the so-called youth
movement. Anybody with a question about todays youth might find
enlightenment, insight, amusement. Or get real angry.
Police chiefs and college presidents might digest it for tactical
reasons. Rubin talks about the need to radicalize cops at protests and
contends any negotiations are futile.
Jerry maintains he is anti-establishment, but here he is carrying the
youth message via the establishment method, the print media.
The question is can Jerry Rubin be trusted? Hes got the answer for
that and it can be found in the body of the book or in the 100
pictures and cartoons by Quentin Fiore, another mind zapper.
James V. Healion (UPI)
* *
When the Fire Reaches Us by Barbara Wilson Tinker
Morrow, $6.95
When the Fire Reaches Us is the conscience of white Americas
silent majority in the guise of a novel. It is the story of a group of
people who are impoverished and persecuted because of what they
call a sin that of being black.
The story is narrated by Danny Sands, a product of the black
ghetto. His language, although not always grammatically correct, is
honest, perceptive, compassionate, and yet brutally shocking a
shock, however, that is ineffective to black Americans to whom
misery and hopelessness is nothing new.
Mrs. Tinker sets her story on Pine Street in a Detroit ghetto before
and during the summer of the 1967 riots. The people who live there
are shackled to a life of poverty and injustice, locked away from the
pursuit of happiness that to them seems a right exclusively for Mr.
Charley.
Some bitterly adapt, others turn to crime or suicide and, finally,
those whose patience cannot endure rebel with bricks, bottles, guns
and fire.
The fire finally reaches Pine Street and the whole block is
devastated. When the smoke clears, the young leaders of the
community lay dead and their hopes of peacefully bridging the chasm
between the races dead with them.
Carolyn A. Bowers (UPI)
* *
The New Latins: Fateful Change in South and Central America by
Georgie Anne Geyer
Doubleday, $7.95
On the very first page of The New Latins, Miss Geyer observes,
Like every national in the world, the Latin American evokes a
certain image in the minds of other peoples.
For the next 319 pages, the author defines and explains this image,
then relates the changes in attitude and politics that are altering the
reality of Latin America.
This is not a book for the casual Sunday afternoon reader. It is,
however, a worthwhile undertaking for the thoughtful reader who
wishes to understand the sometimes bewildering and contradictory
behavior of the United States neighbors to the South.
Miss Geyer, a syndicated columnist for the Chicago Daily News and
a long-time resident of Latin America, first deals with The Old
Latins, the peasants, strongmen, and their customs that have
contributed to the image of Latin America as a slumbering giant.
In the next two parts of her book, the author first relates Three
Case Studies of Change Cuba, Chile, and Bolivia. From this
background, the final and really meaty part of the book, The New
Latins, emerges.
The New Latins is a big book, and a major undertaking on a subject
close to, but often ignored by, many Americans.
John Battenfield (UPI)
DECOUPAGE
$ 3-D
ASSEMBLAGE
(Lessons)
Instructor: Mr. Paul Burdick 56.00 6 weeks
Sign up at the first lesson. Jane 30 7 9pm
room C-4, Union sponsored by the JWRUnion

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Thursday, June 25,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

t. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 25,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

WASHINGTON President Nixons
former law firm has been retained by
Penn Central Railroad in an effort to get
the taxpayers to guarantee a S2OO million
loan.
Mudge, Rose, Guthrie & Alexander,
are retained for the purpose of
handling the loan guarantee, Robert
Minor, a company vice president,
confirmed to this column. Minor said the
relationship went back several years.
HE CONCEDED that the firm, where
both the President and Attorney General
John Mitchell were once senior partners,
was specially retained to handle the
complex and lucrative loan-guarantee
effort.
Increasingly, the Presidents former laW
film is appearing in cases that involve
feitial aif ** 4k Nmm Nmmadministration.
administration. Nmmadministration.
Besides the Nixon-Mitchell ties with
the law firm, a second Cabinet member,
Secretary of the Treasury Dmad
Kennedy, is linked to dm *mn Csntnd
financial crisis.
Penn Central owes about $440 million
to some 77 banks, according to a high
Penn Central officials estimate. Os that
sum, about $26.8 million is owed to
Continental Illinois National Bank and
Trust, where Kennedy was chief
executive officer before he joined the
Nixon team.
THE S2OO million is being sought by
Penn Central to stave off collapse. The
House Banking Committee, headed by
Rep. Wright Patman, D-Tex., is
investigating whether the taxpayer is
putting up the money simply to make
sure that the banks get paid off first.
The Nixon administration itself
proposed the S2OO million bail-out. How

Nixon-Mitchell, Conflict of Interest?

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Executive Editor

much of the S2OO million or a
proposed future loan guarantee of $750
million more for sick railroads would
go to Kennedys old bank to keep it from
taking a loss is not known.
Nor would Penn Central vice president
Minor say how big a fee Mudge, Rose
would get for its work in smoothing the
way for the taxpayers to keep the
railroad from going into receivership.
* *
BLUNT, BRUSQUE Walter Hickel, the
embattled Secretary of the Interior, is
furious enough to write another scorching
letter to the President.
Within the confines of his baronial
office, he has been fuming lately over a
reorganization plan that will strip him of
Li, fuinHU
MS %
preserving das wilderness and cleaning up
the environment. Yet all his
environmental work will be taken away
from him and put under a new,
independent Environment Protection
Agency.
OTHER PARTS of his bureaucratic
domain, such as the Bureau of
Commercial Fisheries, will be transferred
to a new National Oceanography and Air
Agency.
Secretary of Commerce Maurice Stans
has maneuvered this choice agency,
known informally around the White
House as the wet NASA, away from
Hickel into the Commerce Department.
Hickel has been bellowing in the
backrooms like a wounded bull moose
from the Alaskan wilds. Privately, he
suspects that the emasculation of the
Interior Department may be President
Nixons revenge against him for writing

Les Gardieff
Managing Editor
Norm White
News Editor

t <>

the famous letter in behalf of the nations
young people.
BUT WALLY HICKEL, a former
Golden Gloves boxing champ, has
demonstrated in the ring and in politics
that he isnt an easy man to knock down.
*
A federal grant of $182,000 to pamper
the aging anti-Semite, Gerald L. K. Smith,
km* kitted tty of
Transportation fofenVttlpe.
The pulpit-p ound i n g
hate-thy-neighbor Smith with his
customary ballyhoo, prompted the
construction of a Christ of the Owhi
statue and the production of a fasti mi
Play outside Eureka Springs, Aik. The
project must be a mockery to the
Scriptural Savior who preached a gospel
of love and brotherhood.
SMITH SOUGHT A tourist road to his
statue and got the backing of local
merchants and politicians, eager for the
tourist business.
The Ozarks Regional Commission, a
creation of the Commerce Department,
eventually approved the $182,000
expenditure to build Smiths road. Most
of the money, however, would have to be
put up by the Transportation
Department.
This column learned about the
$182,000 grant and reported that the

editorial
Talk Is Cheap!
Its easy to talk.
All one has to do is part his lips, wiggle his vocal cords,
flex his tongue and presto he talks.
Os course, its different to do something. That requires
time, dedication, and sense of purpose.
Weve heard a lot of talk lately. People keep muttering
about how messed up everything is. Its hard to get through
a conversation without someone coming out with Why are
things this way? or Something has to be done.
It all sounds good but then, it s just talk.
Maybe the time has come to back some of this lofty
discussion with action. Its been known to happen.
Take SAMSON, for instance.
SAMSON is a student-volunteer organization here at
UF. Its purpose is to work at improving the community
through the youth.
Camp Concern is a SAMSON undertaking. Under this
project, 300 of Gainesvilles underprivileged children will
receive a week of planned summer activity. The student
volunteers will provide the supervision.
It may not sound like a whole lot, but it is a start.
Tom Melcher, program director, says SAMSON could do
so much more with additional helping hands.
At the most we have 25 active volunteers this summer,
he said.
What? Did he say 25? Why, 20 times that many marched
in one demonstration last month. Where are they now? We
doubt they have all left Gainesville for the summer.
What could Melcher do with more volunteers. He says
SAMSON wants to start a project similar to the Big Brother
system. Under this, a concerned student would sort of
adopt an underprivileged child in Gainesville and spend
some time with him. It is harder than talking, but then ...
Lets face it. The time has come to put up or shut up, to
substitute talk with action.
Is it really worth it?
Ask one of those kids.

Merry-Go-Round
iIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
by Jack Anderson

taxpayers were going to build a road for
Gerald L. K. Smith. The story caused a
furor in the backrooms of the Nixon
administration.
E. L. STEWART, the federal
co-chairman of the Ozarks Commission,
sanctimoniously condemned Smiths
racism but said this cannot legally
constitute the basis for rejection of this
jpvhlic project.'*
But Arfcactaass Governor Winthrop
Rockefeller hurried to Washington for
conferences with Transportation and
Commerce officials. He said that he was
privately opposed to building the road
but that he didnt want to take a public
position for fear of antagonizing the local
interests.
Secretary of Commerce Maurice Stans
said he didnt like the idea of spending
public money to help a Gerald L. K.
Smith promotion. But the final decision
was left up to the peppery little Volpe,
w ho sent down orders the other day to
his Federal Highway Administration to
kill the project.
Footnote: When Smith learned that
the grant had been cancelled, he ftimej
that a conspiracy of organized Jews
had killed his pet project. Actually, this
column was tipped of the project by a
Protestant in Arkansas, and Volpe
happens to be a devout Roman Catholic.



The policemans club is a
magic wand I was once told.
With a single stroke it can turn a
liberal, moderate, or even
conservative into a militant
radical.
In the political crisis this
country is experiencing it is the
police, with whom the
demonstrators first and most
dramatically come into contact.
How they conduct themselves

the small society

HCo-OoY/ ev&izy
. 1 B%CBFT
WjlWmfStar Svaawau Inc _JQ

College Students Can Teach

EDITOR:
I am writing because I want to
insure a continued high quality
in the Federal work force. Many
high school students will be
going to college and upon
graduation from college will seek
employment in State, city and
Federal governments as well as
in private industry. We want
people who are physically and
mentally able to hold jobs no
matter what sector they choose
and to be the caliber of
individual who would be an asset
to any employer.
I am writing this open letter
to you because I am very much
concerned about the persistent
growth of drug traffic among

// *
// V f ;
l m
\ V
V, \
W/wr dissenters lack is depth

Policemen Wield Magic Wand

will largely determine whether
the radicals win or lose.
IN WASHINGTON, D. C.
they have lost the battle for the
hearts and minds of the people
to borrow a phrase from the
Vietnam War, in large areas of
the city.
One of them is around Du
Pont Circle.
Hey, come back here you
pig. I want to make a citizens

our high school students and I
am convinced that todays
college student can be the key in
putting an end to the lure of
drug use.
COLLEGE STUDENTS are
looked up to by their younger
companions. It is with this
thought in mind that I urgently
encourage you to carry the truth
about the effects of drugs back
this summer to the high school
students in your home
communities and in the
community where you now live.
Your message about what you
have seen and about what you
know of the eroding effects of
drugs can be the single most
effective deterrent to drug
experimentation among our high

arrest, George yelled at the
police car as it sped up the
narrow street in front of his
house.
THE POLICE car didnt come
back.
It didnt really have to.
Georges house is on one of the
narrow streets which is a branch
of Washington, D. C.s Du Pont
Circle.
Its a pretty neighborhood.

by Brickman

school students.
This is an effort you can
undertake on your own
initiative. All that is needed is
your own desire to help protect
our high school students from
the damaging effects of drugs
which you have seen or know
about.
FOR ADDITIONAL
information write the Public
Information Branch of the
National Institute of Mental
Health, Chevy Chase,
Maryland 20203.
NICHOLAS J. OGANOVIC
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
UNITED STATES
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION

Keep Right
lIIIHHM
by Fred Vollrath

The street is lined with large
shade trees and old houses. It
has attracted a large community
of hip people and large numbers
of police.
ITS A CONTRADICTION.
This street is probably one of
the most heavily policed and
least protected areas of the city.
The police dont like the people
living in the neighborhood and
the people dont like the police.
Neither one makes much of
an attempt to hide its contempt
for the other.
A friend of mine and I
decided to split Gainesville over
the break. Him to lobby his
congressman against the war in
Vietnam and myself to get out
No Flowers
EDITOR:
you must have heard
they gave a war
and nobody came
invitations were wasted
old generals grow tired
the young have healthier
things to do
such a shame
tanks rusting in the rain
cannon pointing at
nothing but the sky
what a pity
empty graves
and fancy medals
slowly tarnishing in
unopened boxes
you must have heard
they gave a war
and nobody came
if you wish to send
your condolences
they prefer bullets
flowers are
too much like life
ROB MATTE

There is no hope for
r\ f the complacent man.
LETTERS POLICY writer shows just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
Letters must: letters for space.
f Be typed*, signed. Writers may submit longer
double-spaced and not exceed essays, columns or letters to be
300 words. considered for use as "Speaking
Not be signed with a Out", columns. Any writer
pseudonym. interested in submitting a regular
Have addresses and column is asked to contact the
telephone numbers of writers. editor and be prepared to show
Names will be withheld only if samples of his work.

Thursday, Jum 25,1970, Th Florida Alligator,

of Gainesville for a week or so.
WE HEADED for Du Pont
Circle, which is the unofficial
center for hip activities in the
city. There we found directions
on where to go to find a place to
stay for a couple of days.
It was George and his friends
that took us in.
I sat on his front porch for
part of the afternoon and
watched tl\e same three
policemen on motor scooters
run up and down the street
stopping people, checking the
cars in front of the houses, and
looking over the parked
motorcycles.
THEIR EFFORTS were not
appreciated.
None of them live in the
District, George explained.
They live in the Maryland or
Virginia suburbs. They just come
in here to get their kicks.
Theyre occupiers.
The ones on the scooters
arent the worst either. In fact,
their biggest kick is getting to
give somebody a parking ticket.
Its the CDU who are the real
bad ones.
The CDU is the Civil
Disturbance Unit of the
Metropolitan Police Force.
I SAW them in action once,
said a visitor to the house, a
political science major at George
Washington University. There
were a bunch of people going
down to the Watergate
apartments to protest. Thats
where most of the high
government officials in the
Nixon administration live.
They werent militants or
anything. But the CDU literally
ambushed them. Ill tell you, it
soured me on the whole damn
thing.
The visitor told me he worked
in the Youth few Nixon
campaign and had transferred
from a school in the Midwest to
Washington so he could work in
some capacity for the Nixon
administration in 1968.
He walked up the street with
a large clenched red fist on the
back of his shirt in 1970.

Page 9



Page 10

), The Florida AlHgetor, Thursday, Juno 25,1970

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/ \\]u / 1 \V(m Pineapple ... 4** s l j
SAVS 6c Lo6y Aeftfty ftftoalftllftfl <4AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA^OAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA-Hf
* # I Prune Juice .. tr49* [plil^GreenSiampsS
SAVE 11c Welch.de Tasty, Refreshing r~~~~ HPSfI Singleton's Family-Pack
Crape Drink 3 ~r $ l I ,0,,u rnsMiva I ,?,TJ *l. sh *rr.
Cat Food BV.r $ l 25 301 Kfni L ri ...,.....n..>>,.....nn ar J
Liquid Detergent... '£ 53* Isl U^M^FO
Detergent vr 69* o *cX. o ?h~. r ; ,h i
SwMCeh ><-M< W*" ,C ' t
PT SIOrIH bot J (* ( (h purchj**. "'"C"*/ *'**' D.lici.u. jjx SCAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAIhAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAk
SAVE 16c Green Giant Tender White m h / ke CreOlTl Sandwiches rk 49* ITI EXTRA IfJ^|
Shoe Peg Corn Classic Grem J ch^rAhoy -- jilli^GreenStamps^
SAVE 22Vsc Van Camp's Snackin' Good, Y\ VWWwir I PS r/ a OJ
Pork & Beans T $ 1 / T^TTY/ Hi-Ho Crackers 47' 1 coc.onu or J *lld9*"cok. I
Sweet Chips'T.Y. 3JT $ 1 Fudgies [ ~ . .L?,:;. p k .!,:. 1
.V,. eo ((
peanuts ]%JJ )) oc W pWGreenStampsP ]
Seedless Raisins.... X 27 Kpco s 89' I |
Peach Preserves ... 39* £igV , j
E^j pJiJ^GreenStamps^
WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER BP I I
W. University Avenue at 34th Street RIIRI ft haiigai. sec |
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER l| MllnllX ipay***^*^^ finnfi
1014 n. Main street L\ *, |ill|4tfGreenStampsp*|
GAINESVILLE MALL | |
2630 N.W. 13th Street .V 1 four pre-sweet pkgs. SSc 1
Store hours 9-9 Mon. thru | r... J
VeeAAAAAeeAAAAAAAAbRARAARMRSSSRRRAIC

Thursday, Juno 25, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
BSA Victor 441, 1968, Excellent
Condition. Need Money Fast.
376-8982. S6OO or Best Offer.
(A-2t-158-p)
60 Comet station wagon automatic
transmission. Call 372-7550 or come
204-A N. W. 15 Terr, after 5 p.m.
(A-lt-158-p)
FOR RENT
Traller space 3O acres privacy,
panoramic view of Orange Lake. 15
ml. so. UF. 20 x 40 pool. Ideal for
grad. stud. Call collect 591-1245.
(B-3t-158-p)
TWO BLOCKS TO CAMPUS. Two
bedroom, air, carpets, wood panel.
Newly decorated. $125. Call
392-0700 for aptt. 378-0286 or
372-3277 after 5. (B-st-158-p)
'vXv!vXvXv/Xv/XvXvXvXv/XvXv!v!*Jv!v!*X
|X.X X% X*XvX !X X!*XX'XvX"X*i*i^!y/^X'X'X

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 25,1970

FOR RENT
SINGLES: Swing into summer in a
luxurious air conditioned poolside
apartment. Private bedroom. Walk to
campus. S7O including utilities.
378-7224. (B-15t-148-p)
Your own room in a nice 3 br home,
swimming pool, air conditioned.
SIOO summer qtr. + V* utl. Call
378-9239. (B-2t-158-p)
TWO BLOCKS TO CAMPUS. AIR
CONO., extras. Men or women.
Wood paneled. SSO & S6O. Call
392-0700 for apt. or 378-0286. See
1204 N. W. 3 Ave. (B-5M58-P)
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
included completely furnished
Ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-ts-c)
One roommate needed for summer
qtr. Summit house, F-5, call
3 78-8105 make deal on rent.
(B-2t-157-p)
Several 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd Ave.
372- Grad students preferred.
Special rates for summer quarter now
In effect. (B-2t-157-c)
Ten rooms graduate men and older
men close cool utilities washer-dryer
parking 135.00 single 100.00 double
summer 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
5 bedroom house 300.00 spacious 2
br. apt. 185.00 2 blocks north of
campus graduate men and older men
available sept. 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
STUDENT couple w/wo child to
share air. cond. home with gentleman
(46) & boy (16) Free rent, utilities &
board Much privacy 378-0572 or
392-1852. (B-4t-157-p)
WANTED
Coed to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious air
conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Girl needs roommate to share large
apartment. S6O for the summer.
Close to campus. Private room. Call
373- (C-2t-158-p)
Roommate for summer qtr. Have
your own room In a house 10 blocks
behind Norman. S7O + utilities for
the entire summer. 373-1748.
(C-2t-158-p)
Need 2 coed roommates for
Williamsburg Apts. No. 11 for July.
Can move in Contact
376-1253 (Manager), A/C, poolside,
townhouse, dishwasher. (C-3t-158-p)
Roommate for summer, small 2-story
apt., AC, 3 blks. from campus,
$37.50 + utilities; physics grad,
student; 2048>/2 N. W. 3 Ave.,
372-6929. (C-2t-158-p)
M NTED
NEED men of all trades for NORTH
SLOPE, ALASKA, up to $2600.00 a
month. For complete information
write to Job Research Centre,
Point-Roberts, Wash., 98281. Enclose
$2.00 to cover cost. (E-3t-157-p)

s Northwest
P|Mbv American
&AIMBS V/LLE
y\J I EMD TOViG-UPS
\PLJ =: I EKiGlOi: VAJOGiK. 'FRj^MT
R)0- INJJCT(OM Alia CLANOm bKS&kS
Specializing... I aeweeAL iserai i?s &_.ct£ical -ft£PAifcs
fa V ALL WOfefcr (SUAgAMTEEb Ffe|-e ESTIMATES
VOLKSWAGEN REFAIR 'Phone: 376-gu£
MMTesjAKCi OF S lO 00 .on Moee "Peovioes me* O L euA/uce i> iveetoiffo*)

HELI 3 WANTED
Widower with three children needs
mature person to live in and run the
home. Call Mr. Poole, 376-3468
anytime. Must have references.
(E-6t-157-p)
AUTOS
.VAV.W.V.V.V.V.W.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.
Mustang, 289 VB, 1966, convertible
black top & Interior w/ excellent red
finish new tires, top condition. Ask
$1,295 call Jim Sherby @ 378-7432.
(G-st-157-p)
PE R SONA JL.
Free Kittens. 6 weeks old. Litter
trained. Tabbies, calico, black and
white. Call 376-5691. (J-lt-158-p)
UNION AUD.
THAT MAN
FROM RIO
fid
JEAN-PAUL
BELMONDO
FRANCOIS DORLEAC
JEAN SERVAIS
Sunday, June 28
at 7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
admission 50 cents
SPONSORED BY JWRU
IBe at Peace I
I with yourself I
I Yoga Lessons I
instructor: Steve Sheridan I
lsls for six IVi hour sessions I
call 392-1655 before July 3l
I for information
K sponsored by the JWRUnion 1

'
HAVE A PARTY!
iff / Hamburger!
% r Ua / Bun*
**-29*
\ DELICIOUS 8-INCH, SINGLE LAYER §
German
Chocolate
BAKERY i
Gainesville Moll
Special Orders Call 372-3885
r I
I : ': A *' f' :; l|i|||
I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
I LUNCH AND DINNER
I BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI
ALL YOU CAN EAT J
I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
ALL YOU CAN EAT 99$
WEDNESDAY
I JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK 79*
THURSDAY and yellow rice
I BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS 99$
I FRID^\ FISH ALMONDINE AND FRENCH
I FRIED POTATOES 89* I



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

PERSONAL
BONES 10 cents EACH! only at
Demians Leather Shop. Vour Choice,
fine, domestic cattle bones
exclusively 1634 West Univ. Ave.
(J-2t-157-p)

ROBERT REDFORD 1
KATHARINE ROSS
m ROBERT BLAKE
PANAVISION- SUSAN CLARK
I TELL THEM WILLIE I
| PLUS BOY IS HERE |
TUWIadi ji I
BBlr
IN.W. 13lh St. al 23r4 RD (* Vl I
T.Uahawt 37* 2434 T | I
"FIRST CLASS ENTERTAINMENT! A FLAWLESS
CHILLER! THE SUSPENSE IS EXCRUCIATING
FROM FIRST TO LAST. Playboy Magazine
i' i
every industry has its tint family
feature r the 1
SICILIAN gg
I 15 49 1 CLAN J h
| JEAN PAWN | I ALAIN OCLOH 1 I UNO VENTURA | IRINA DEMICK
Blast feature at...
DAY 2:05 3:55 5:45 G
.nrM
MeS^k'm
I
1 STARTS FRIDAY!
WHAT DO YOU SAY
TO A NAKED LADY?'
I about finding a roommate? I
| Alligator 'WANTED* ads are goid_|

Thursday. June 25, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL
>X;.:X::>:>i:::>::::>X;:::y:;:;Xv:y: ; :.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.y.
Leather Goods, all handcrafted, belts,
watchbands, suede bugs,, if you can
draw it, we can make it. Demians
1634 West Univ. (J-2t-157-p)

Page 13

PERSONAL
COEDS Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p>
SERV ICES
x'x-xvx-x*x*x-x-x-xvx-x:::x ; ::: ; :: ; :
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480 (M-ts-c)
ALTERATIONS Mrs. Ruby Mills
moved near Gainesville shopping
center 100 N.E. Bth Ave. Apt. 217
Phone: 376-8506 (M-st-157-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested and repairs
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 S.
Main (M-ts-c)
fTT 1
l Beginning |
I Bridge j
Lessons I
tJ
Instructor: Dorothy Pate
$7.50 8 weeks
sign up at first lesson July 1
7- 9pm
room 118 Union
sponsored by JWRUnion

LMXffi&J EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT!!
STARTS FRIDAY JUNE 26
uuood/l^pch
>i|^ > mBHB iiWBwBUwWHr 4HBHBMHHHr>.VB!
(uuith a little help From our Friendc) I
FUMED WHIN IT ACTUALLY HAPPENED!! I
HAVE ALL THE THRILLS OF BEMG THERE! I
starring joan baez joe cocker country joe & the fish crosby, stills & nosh arloguthrie
richie havens jimi hendrix santana john Sebastian sha-nana sly & the family stone ten years after i
O film by f^e an< other beautiful people. |
micnael wadleigh produced by bob maurice I
a wadleigh-maurice,ltd. production technicolor from |
\Ajnrnar U\r/\c <&&&> PdFI "*t**ctid uno*f w iwr cwtitM £ iw> im(m pmim. <. 1
WUlllt?! U!UO. 'S&3& I JR.I .ccomp.oy.nflP.rtm o Mu.. G u**> ***,**, b, CX..IM h*Wtt. W.I * mt MMt imt, 1

|'d S CHECKED
I 4s LJ9DV eODM rides!
SEE HER AS SHE REALLY WAS I
Union Auditorium
raUL NEWMaiM
as cool HaiMP iuke
wF r J
Friday, June 26 & Saturday,
June 27 at 5:30, 8:00, & 10:30 P.M.
sponsored by JWRU



Page 14

L The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Juna 28, 1970

Gr. Beans
"r 29 c G Don t miss this Offer! Kleenex jumbo paper
29
2 r37 c W f # J ll '\ PLATE
Chow Mein W i |L ONLY oir A A"ST
"ST A"ST 23 c iA> 7 Viiim
ASSOTf D Quantity Right* Raiorfad
FACIAL WINN-OOIf stows. iMC-comwm-iwt r \ g&fflZ/duf V/JErlljfWt
Tissues py.i.mt'ATJTaaMyjiMi ipiaumwjJiiUJJuiiJiiiiaii tmii.jjiU'Ajj.uii.-iiUiiiii AH
PKG F)C C R3 JUWHS-AUO.IP junhs-auo. i g& \
200 oO H This coupon worth *1.00! i". 8118 This coupon worth *1.50.- HBH TWs coupon worth *1.50] H \ I
CHUN KING H TWO DESSERT §9 ||] hppmh 12" §3l} SUGAR &1 Hi
Soya Sauce H dishes oy platter creamer lj
, 3-o, ooc 2 LUf -1 *2. 49 ~p,cf fly ] $ 4-49 i|§i m JUMBO ROLLS
on. 23 H J *I.OOEaE3 L J *I.SOHH & i 3 *l.sossks?- H v wl,t
I BBdl $ 1.49553. II *2.99 || BBhbr'di *2.99 SS2U | uumt4.ouspi.as.,
Beef Cubes WIHBHIBrHIMHiIMHM BHMMlMWyHirtrkniTTim'Mr3
WHITE ARROW / KLEENEX ASSOtTED FAMILY CRACKIN'GOOD TACO OR REGULAR
39 c Bleach 29 Napkins ... 4s& 49* Corn Chips .. 'is 49
NABISCO COCONUT DIXIE DARLING PRESTIGE CARNATION CRACKIN GOOD TWIN REGULAR OR DIP DIXIE DARLING
Cooties Bread 2 59* Coffee Mate. -59 c Potato Chips. St 49 c Dinner Rolls 2 29<
REGULAR OR SUPER NAPKINS CRAOCIN'GOOD PINEBREEZE FRESH FLORIDA GRADE A" All WHITE DIXIE DARLING
;= 53 c Kotex 69* Cheese Curls 39* Med. Eggs..
ZT ASTOR COOKING M
potato 'vraT ... ;' utR-inn L /I KLEENEX BOUTIQUE ASSORTED BATH 1
nil -6S 36^^ TissuE 4 1
RW> GOLD TWIST Hf
dawn
chunking lI L lil 3 I I I H|H l| I yj J! I I 333 H
o o o oo o o o o o
bmM| friskies fish, uver, chicken or meat thrifty maid green lima HHMHMBl^^^BMHaaiaiaaa
500-* Cot Food 8 *l Beans.. 6 s l 200^t***
* m >* W" "*
11 -c U ,^ ou eH ,e, "u. Pears 4 *l Tissue 3 00 cu o b~c n
RRniRIR-Rir All HIPEM FRISKIES LAMB. UVER. CHICKEN. KIDNEYS BACON OR REGULAR THRIFTY MAID CUT CLJEETC
44 "Mr* Dog Food 8 s l Asparagus 3 ~-" i l 00
WEB CHAISE WEB PANTY STAMpj 100
B OO a i OO OR OR m mm 4R gOO OO V SHORT SLEEVE NEVER IRON SPORT
LOUNGE CHARS HOSE cuirtc
jnilmld CANNON NO-IRON
S A 99 SQ99 QOa $179 PILLOWCASES
|Uf ~ EACH I ASSORTED COLORS
lfT if BE XTWA : jj" j~~l~ lZl3' r
Illl] w i B*! 1 J TOP-VALUE STAMPS KLaJJT TOPVALUE STAMPS I TOPVALUE STAMPS j TOPVALUE sRmPS j B [ill J '
mm 'Mm mm Hr ~ inf ;|r ~£HC i
EcnS Vanilla Wafar* Bowl Claanar ; Hgg&t' In-A-Drum liquid Claanar PBBfjSff Baas Roast HBfc:SW' Quarter Lain Ground 5..1
' ? WBr 0000 IHU JOLT 1 ;B3ai =OOO tM.u JUU I BgZm '"> *** \ No 4 000 ^ 0000 M U | |BB No. 6 GO M U ? Has GOOD THRU JJSTI
a* .b^ iaf ., i t **< local ipw OTi£3Qb ** t **^*** ,it J S3S3K3HBa *o iocal w< M mmh< No. 7
..L..iiL..ILL XU* lIA I IL4BIIB.
COOL AND CREAMY /*#\ aFuIUID 07c 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday |3O N.W. 6TH ST.
PUDDING-79 e COOL WHIP -37 HIWAY 4 4i, high springs 40 i n. main st.



4 ROLL PACK \y| PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON JULY 1
W D BRAND GROUND ROUNO W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF TOP ROUND OR SIRLOIN
Hi Steak .. 99' Steak.. S I M "NATURALLY AGED"
VU^Sv^ CHOICE/ W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEFSHOULDER W-D BRAND USDA CHCMCE PORTERHOUSE OR T-BONE M
Roast. 99'fcntewSteak.. 5 1 39 gggtKn- Mu jC(
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF FUU CUT ROUND W D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF NEW YORK STRIP
Steakrr $ l $ 1 69 LB 9 L^f^o
MERKO BUTTER ME NOT PILLSBURY HUNGRY JACK W-D BRAND LONOHORN TASTY FRENCH FRIED FLOUNDER
Biscuits 2~0 29 c Biscuits Ss 23* Cheese . 89 e Fisa Fillets 89*
BORDEN'S PROCESSED AMERICAN SLICES OSCAR MAYERS PURE BEEF PALMETTO FARMS TAOTY FRENCH FRIED
Cheese Snack Puck S£ 59* Franks 89 c Pimento Cheese .. 69* Shrimp Patties... 79*
TARNOW SLICED COOKED OR SWIFT PREMIUM CORNISH... lVi-lb. Avg. EAT-RITE SLICED AU MEAT PATTI'S
Baked Ham 59* Game Hens 2. M** Bologna ....... 58* Hush Puppies ... 39*
COPELAND All MEAT TASTY FRENCH TOED PERCH SUNNYLANDPORK ROU HOT OR MILD FRESH BOSTON BUTT
** " ' RAMtat . * Sm*. '.* **" 5,
o o o o o o o o o o
FLORIDA SUNKIST YELLOW BREAKSTONE All FLAVORS FROZEN FRENCH
Lemons .. .12 . 49* Onions 49* Yogurt 2 PINT 49* Fry Potatoes ' PKGS. 10*
SALAD BASKET FRESH GOLDKIST WHOLE CUTUP MORTON
Tomatoes .. 29 c Lettuce head 19 c Fried Chicken each *1" Bread Dough 55 c
FRESH CRISP BLUE BONNET SOFT TASTE O'SEA MORTON PARKERHOUSE ROUS. DONUTS OR BLUEBERRY
Celery .... 2 33* Margarine .. 41* Flounder ... 79* MufFins .... 3 S I OO
HARVEST FRESH IMPERIAL JIFFY CHICKEN CHOW MEIN. BEEF CHOP SUEY OR SLICED TURKEY A ASTOR MIXED VEGETABLES, SUCCOTASH OR
Cabbage.... 12* Margarine . > 49* Sliced Beef 2 >. 99* Baby Limas 4S£ *l
GOLDEN BANTAM DELICIOUS RIPE ESKIMO ASSORTED a LIBBY LIMEADE OR A
CORN TOA PEACHES i|Q TWIN POPS LEMONADE
10 EARS D9* 4 LBS. fi!r 2 8
BtkLHNUI >IHAINtU h to jk jm . AA
dflSS&k Bnbv Food 7* ifiaTom. Sauce -1 /ffftfr Detergent 3 s l i
'Sr Milk 10* 'SF 4 Beans .10* Shortening s 71*iBB_-S3?.
IWJo,BORDEN'S 18-oi. Bo* JACKS LUNCH BOX ... H, IDNCO O/OOC [
Cremora ..... 79 c Favorites 59 Sea Shells 2/33 ;ETillxtra I fififextra i
2R-.*. ...COMET 5 j-oi. PLgi. FRENCH'S AU GRATIN 1> *r NABISCO CHEESE A SESAME ;KM MVVJ |
Fancy Rice 45 c Potatoes 45 Twigs 47 \MM ;BSz
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. i.W lB \
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.

Thursday

Page 15



Pkmkb 4HBg*tw, TiMmdsy, Jvnm 20, 1970

Page 16

Campus Crier
. > .-
LETS LET OUR VOICES BE HEARD!
If you are a student who: (1) is over 21; (2) has lived in Fla. for 1 year; (3) has lived
in Alachua County for 6 mon.
Then you have until AUGUST 8 to register to vote in Alachua County. Registration
takes place at the Alachua County Courthouse on Main St. If you have any difficulty
in registering come to the Student Gov't, offices, 3rd floor Reitz Union.
S.G. NEEDS YOU!
Any student interested in working in student government should fill out an
application in the S.G. office. Many positions are open for the summer quarter
especially for girl typists.
HOMECOMING POSITIONS AVAILABLE
I V /'l V V p
Anyone interested in holding a major position for the 1970 Homecoming Program can pick up an application in the
Florida Blue Key Office, 3rd floor, Reitz Union.
SAMSON NEEDS VOLUNTEERS
SA.YISON IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR SUMMER RECREATION VOLUNTEERS: Call 392-1608 or
Come by room 315, JWRU.
I BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE

Bulletin Board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it. Bring your material, 20 copies of each
sheet, to the Student Government office and you will get free publicity for your organization. No personal material will be
posted.
I INTERESTED GIRLS ...
Any girls interested in doing secretarial work for Accent'7l during the
summer quarter should contact the Accent office Mon. Fri. 3:30 4:30,
3rd floor of the Reitz Union.
I WHATS THE OMBUDSMAN?
It is a special S.G. sponsored agency designed to help students with any type
problem with courses, housing, legal, personal etc. Let the Ombudsman help you. Call
392-1650 anytime.
I INDIA CLUB SPONSORS BAN DIN I
The India Club will be sponsoring Bimal Roy's famous movie "Bandini" on Sat.,
June 27 at 2 p.m. in the Union auditorium. The film will have English subtitles and will _.
star India's most famous actors.
I ec
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY MONDAY AFTERNOON, 5:00 OF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN THURSDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER.
THANKS.
RODNEY MARGOL
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT



rrrovsrara r rt. .. -*
check.
"SUPER-RIGHT' HEAVY WESTERN TENDER Spec ; a |,
Beef Rib Roast 'FM 99 SjfflM
GRADE "A" FRESH FLORIDA OR GEORGIA Specia l!
Split Broilers S. 35* lli['|[>f
"SUPER-RIGHT'HEAVY WESTERN TENDER Special!
Beef Chuck Steak ... T. 69 c jjjt£jj
"Super-Right 'U S D.A. Grade "A" 10 to 12-18-Bog Super-Right' Western Beef Copeland AH Meat Sliced
Young Turkeys 49* Cubed Steak u s l o9 Bologna Z 69*
B oftt RigM" Boneless Chuck or Oscar Mayer All Moat or Pur. B~f )4k Q Sliced KCWCS wiX'oWolf 49*
Headless Shrimp .....km it 89 Swiss Steak ...i.....mi...ii 88 Franks m.ne..i(8e.........i... fk* *8 suitn t w
Cop'eJohn* Quick Frozen "Super-Right" Beef Freshly American Koeher Pure Beef Franks or POt PieS Frozen 4 Pkg. 89*
Shrimp Creole ................ 9 Z 39* Ground Chuck e.ee..n......n.i879 Knockwurst . pv*. 85 _. c ~, su P r
Cap'n John's Frozen Fried Hi-BrondQuick Frozen (Bacon weappery Sear-est Frozen (in the shell) vUDOII jtyl jQnQWICn6S Right EACH 39*
Fish Sticks...... ST 39 Chop topped Beef Steaks 2£ , .39
EXTRA SPECIAL! (Limit 1 with $5.00 Order Excluding Cigarettes)
Wesson Oil' ...ss 79* §||p| *2*
I-LB Q 0 Jane Parker Golden, Sugared or Cinnamon
HIX r tlvTlCtr m can OX) Cake Donuts 3 K T9 9
A& P FANCY CHUCKS OR CRUSHED HAWAIIAN SPECIAL! Jane Parker Delicious
.I gy 111 c 20-oz 91 uu Jane Parker Danish Almond
rmedlJlJie O CANS I Coffee Cake :r k 43 c
SPECIAL! Jane Parker Delicious Pie
mel-o-bit American, pimento or swiss Orange 49*
tS wB A A -lane Parker Delightful
r 7 jrKt Sli. Cheese ....
_ Bit' 81" SPEOM Smoked or Regular Special d^K^jdfifedhid£dSF^DQ!]Slj!9§!WninHni^^^&
LUX Liquid B.X 49 c A& P Plastic Wrap .tX 39 c Heinz BBQ Sauce ff 39 e W 1 Vff
Everyday Low Price Special! a& p FANCY Hawaiian NEWITEm EVERY Day to* price 31 SAV6 IOC WLfi
A& P Bleach Gallon 00 9 Pineapple Juice £* 35' Quickick 8rink5............... 3 89 e jol w h h ' oupo
Smg§ MB Jy Coupon good thru June 27,1970 l^a
Fresh Peaches lb zo 9
BAB Ijl With this coupon when you buy K
Watermelons .... 88 c | 1
Firm Crisp ioecioi! FRESH VINE RIPENED Special! jjM l*l. 39< a I
New Long white a. Soeeoi! A47 Weed & .eeJLr St Augj.rine Special! Shw Coupon good th#u Jane 27 1970 t
POTATOES 10 & 99 c Fertilizer B2C *? Mile>* b* r dl
. . ... SHOP A4 P WHERE PLAID STAMPS ARE ISSUED WITH EACH MJKCHASE
yWJH PL A/D 5/ AMP S ITS OUR WAY Os saying -thank you FOR shopping with us.
I
Rooc oi dAM J cieor W;op 1 AtFSFtAY
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Thursday

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 25,1970

A Hummingbird, For Example, Is All Heart

PORTLAND, Ore. (UPI)
Dr. B. Marlowe Dittebrandt has
performed an autopsy on a
hummingbird, taken blood
samples from elephants and
pried a bone from the mouth of
a Bengal tiger.
She is not a veterinarian. She
is a doctor of medicine and a
clinical pathologist.
HER JOB as laboratory
supervisor for the Portland Zoo,
however, covers a multitude of
chores.
She has found, for example,
that a hummingbird is all heart
and liver and birds in general

SPIRITS AMI SPIRITS
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name. problem. 78 Ananias.. through
11 Italian 45 Menace. 79 Edenite. summer: 2 3 o jBHTI
marble 47 Memorable 80 Happen.
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11. Athaliah s 18 Watched. compart. 118 Fall behind.
father. 49 That one: ment. 119 Yule symbol. ___BBL_ HB PH
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fish. 65 Skin 98 Haze. quantity. HHL_
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3 Maltreated. 16 Commedia chains. 66 Entangle. 130 132 JBBkkT 134 135
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6 Greek. Galloping 48 53-D's 69 Endure. j^^B
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have a high blood sugar. She
added, That shouldnt be
surprising. They have a higher
metabolism rate than humans
and would need more sugar.
Portland Zoo is famous for its
elephant herd, one of the rare
places where elephants have
been born in captivity and
survived. It boasts 10 births
since 1962. Dr. Dittebrandts
studies have included a sperm
count on Thonglaw, the father
of the growing younger
generation, and vaginal smears
from the cows along with efforts

SAY AHH, THONGLAW

to determine the gestation
period of elephants.
ITS SORT of a joke around
here, said Dr. Dittebrandt. I
havent been very successful in
my predictions.
When Dr. Dittebrandt was
called to the tiger cage one of
the giant cats had a bone stuck
in his mouth. The huge fangs
had clamped into a soft portion
of the bone and were stuck.
Tranquilizers are considered a
last resort with cats, said the
doctor. So 1 got a broom
handle, Dr. Dittebrandt

recalled, and stuck it in his
mouth.
He put up his paw and
pushed on the handle as if to
help. The top tooth came loose.
I stuck the handle in his mouth
again and he lifted his paw and
helped me pry. The other tooth
came loose. He still speaks
kindly to me.
DESPITE HER friendship

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with the Bengal tiger she finds
the cats among the more
difficult animals to work with.
Theyre all claws, she said.
Her other cases have included
a lioness with breast cancer and
many accidents. She is appalled
at what people will throw at
the animals and in their cages.
Animals have choked on balls
and balloons. Some are bruised
by stones.

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The
Florida
Alligator

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DIRK MOSIG
... 28th karate trophy
Crown In Sight
By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Editor
What some football fans call the magic of Dickey may appear at
IF in the form of a Southeastern Conference football crown.
With lettermen returning at every position except four, at least
ight potential all-conference players, a sprinkling of promising new
ilayers at just the right positions, a new head coach with a
hampionship record and an impressive schedule, there ought to be
ome midnight oil burned in a few opposition athletic departments
his fall.
HEAD FOOTBALL COACH Doug Dickey says the team has the
lalf-dozen super players necessary to form a nucleus, and about 25
>layers who should be able to hold their own. After that, however,
ye can get out-personneled in a hurry. I think you need about 35
oys who are capable of starting for you. My championship teams
lave had this. This team is a little thin in this respect.
With the return of the All-American combination of
teaves-to-Alvarez, with the intimidating presence of Tommy
)urrance and Mike Rich, the spring discovery of Jim Yanceys hands
nd legs at tight end, with the wild free-wheeling linebacking of Mike
kelley, Fred Abbott and Richard Buchanan, probably the best trio in
lie SEC, the pincer power of defensive ends Jack Youngblood and
Robert Harrell...
The Gators will have a few headaches too. Dickey faces what is
'robably the toughest schedule in a decade with road games in
dabama, Tennessee and FSU, an 11th game with Duke in
acksonville, Kentucky in Tampa, and arch rival Georgia in
acksonville. The home games against Tangerine Bowler Richmond,
rap roving Kentucky, always tough Miami, the jinx teams from
lississippi State and North Carolina State, and last years spoiler
kuburn are not going to be any lead pipe cinch.
If the Gators can make it through those 11, perhaps a tougher 12th
>pponent will await them on New Years Day.
~ ROBBIES
The Best In Steaks^^^ 1
Meals &
TVS BILLIARD^H
I 1718 W University Ave. I
LOn The Gold Coast 1 I

Gator Sports

Mos/g Fourth In Nation

By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Editor
Dirk Mosig, UF graduate
student, took fourth place in the
heavyweight division of the
Grand National Karate
Championship in Anderson,
Ind., June 18-20.
Mosig and several of his
students from the Gainesville
Universal Karate Dojo were
among the 1,200 contestants
entered in the major karate
event of the year.
THERE WERE over 150
entries in the black belt division,
an unusually large field, and
they were divided into four
classes (nugs) according to
height and weight.
Mosig won his bracket but
lost in the semi-finals to Victor
Moore, the professional
middleweight champion of the
U. S. Moore was in turn defeated
by Bill Wallace who went on to
Color Gators
Blue In Fall
According to Head Football
Coach Doug Dickey, the UF fans
can color the Gators blue in the
fall.
Dickey announced the UF
will wear blue in nine games and
possibly 10 in the fall.
The UFs appearance in white
jerseys will be against Alabama
in Tuscaloosa, Sept. 26. The
jersey color for the Tennessee
game has not been decided yet
because the game will be
televised Oct. 24 from
Knoxville, Term.
The Gators will continue to
wear orange helmets with UF on
the side and white pants.

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Thursday, June 25,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

defeat the world professional
heavyweight champion, Joe
Lewis.
Most of Mosigs bouts were
against men considered to be
professionals and his
performance before a crowd of
over 10,000 was one of his best
yet. Mosig and Wallace were the
only students competing in the
black belt division.

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Sports Editor

ELIMINATED EARLIER in
the contest were the national
champions of Korea, Japan and
Canada.
The only other UF student
entered in the championships
was freshman Dan Fryer. He lost
in his bracket but was promoted
to Shodan (first degree black
belt) by the Board of Directors
of the U. S. Karate Association.

Page 19



Page 20

K The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 25,1970

BRUCE WILLIAMS
.. three time AA

Nine Gator Swimmers AA

The UF swimmers finished another great season
with the naming of a school-record nine
All-Americans for 1970.
Three-time winner Bruce Williams heads the list
of Gator tankers by earning All-American honors in
four events. Williams honors came in the 100-yd.
freestyle, 400-yd. medley relay, 400-yd. freestyle
and 800-yd. freestyle relay.
FRESHMAN GARY CHELOSKY was named to
the honor squad in three events, 200-breaststroke,
400-yd. medley relay and 800-yd. freestyle relay.
Named in two events were Steve McDonnell, Jim
Perkins, Mark McKee and Kevin Kierstead.
McDonnell placed in the 100-yd. fly, 400-yd. medley
relay; Perkins, another three-time All-American
from Gainesville, placed in the 100- and 200-yd.
breaststroke. Kierstead, a freshman from oreland,

'PIDDLING THING CARLSON

UF Officials In Dark Over NCAA

No comment is the only
reply that NCAA officials will
make in regard to their
investigation of the UFs
supposed violation of the NCAA
constitution.
UF officials said Wednesday,
June 10, they still dont know
why the NCAA is looking into
the schools hiring of Head
Football Coach Doug Dickey or
even who is accusing them of
being dishonest or
unsportsmanlike, or both.
THE UF WAS NOTIFIED it
allegedly had violated section
A-6-3, a section of the NCAA
code dealing with conduct of
coaches and players in regard to
honesty and sportsmanship.
Assistant Director of Athletics
Norm Carlson said, The NCAA
wont give you any idea who is
making the charge or exactly
what the charge is. Os course,
this doesnt mean well be
investigated ... its really a
piddling thing.
Carlson said he and Graves
Game Tickets
Despite the supposedly
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Florida Field by the student
rock festival the UF football
stadium is getting greener
everyday.
Regardless of higher prices,
season tickets to UF football
games next fall* are selling at a
record pace.
Sales have reached 20,672,
Ticket Manager Ray Dorman
reported. This is 5,000 more
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are up from $6.50 to $7 a game.
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GARY CHELOSKY
... super freshman

have discussed the situation but
had not been able to come up
with any conclusions as to the
identity of the accuser.
Thats the problem, Carlson

Boutons Baseball Career
May Be Hurt By His Book

Jim Boutons baseball career
could be in jeopardy because of
the revealing book he has
written, warns Houston Astro
teammate Norm Miller in an
article in the current issue of
Sport magazine.
Bouton, author of the
controversial baseball diary Ball
Four, has already become a
marked man and a pariah in
some quarters. Another Astro
teammate, Joe Pepitone, has
told him to keep his distance,
and a number of former Yankee
teammates are denying some of
his allegations in the book.
COMMENTING ON the

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Pa., received recognition in the 400- and 800-yd.
freestyle relays and McKee was named in the
400-yd. individual medley and 400-yd. relay.
Steve Hairston, Pete Orschiedt and Bill Domey
received All-American honors in one event. Hairston
was a member of the 400-yd. freestyle relay,
Orschiedt, the 400-yd. medley relay, and Dorney, in
the 400-yd. medley relay.
Williams, Perkins, McKee, Chelosky and
McDonnell were invited to participate in the 1970
World Student Games Competition, to be held in
August in Turin, Italy. They must qualify for the
United States team before being able to take part in
the games. The games are held every four years and
an athlete must be registered in a college to
participate.

JIMMY PERKINS
. Gainesville great

said. It could have been
anybody, a man in the street
with no connections whatsoever
to athletics. The NCAA looks
into everything.

effects of the books publication
on the Houston front office and
a possible reaction, Miller says
they cant just fire him. That
would get the public on his side.
But they can ease him out of the
starting rotation, use him as a
mop-up man in the bullpen. At
the end of the season they can
release him and nobody else will
pick him up. They can phase my
roomie out, thats what they can
do.
Among the revelations in
Boutons book are his
contention that half the players
in the major leagues take pep
pills.

MARK McKEE
... second time

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... top f rosh