Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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ONE STUDENT KILLED
Shootings Hit UF

Three shootings within a
12-hour period left one dead and
one wounded at the UF campus
during the break between spring
and summer quarters.
The shootings came a week
after UF President Stephen C.
OConnell endorsed the
recommendations made by the
Committee to Study the
Removal and Control of
Weapons on Campus.
THE RECOMMENDATIONS
range from suspension of
students for possession of
firearms in the dormitories to a
study of a new system for the
University Police Department
(UPD), including more training
for UPD officers.
The first shooting was June
15, when 42-year-old Stanley
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JOHN ROWE heads summer
traffic court in the absence of
Kathy Spellman who will
return in file fall page 13
Orange & Blue 10
Classifieds 11
Editorials 6
Letters 7
Small Society 7
Sports... 14

Keith Glasgow, agriculture
graduate student and lab
technician, from Spanish Town,
Jamaica, was shot in the back
and killed.
His wife, Mrs. Rose May
Glasgow, 32, a former UF
student, was charged with first
degree murder, and is being held
without bond in the Alachua
County Jail.
A FEW HOURS after the first
shooting, Michael Mitchell, 19, a
non-student from Wildwood was
shot in the chest while
confronting four persons who
allegedly were trying to steal the
battery from his car.
The incident occurred in
Diamond Village, Where Mitchell
was visiting some friends.
Mitchell has been reported to be
in fair condition at the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center.
Arrested in connection with
the shooting were Robert Lee
Reed, 17, and Rafe L. Johnson,
17, both from Gainesville. The
third suspect is a 16-year-old
juvenile.
THE FOURTH suspect has
been identified as Nathaniel
Lewis, of Windsor, also 17. A
warrant has been sworn out,
charging him with assault with
intent to commit murder.
According to police reports,
(SEE 'SHOOTING' PAGE 2)

ISSHHHHHIHHHHHBHHHHHmHHHHHHHHBMHHI

Graduation signaled the end of one journey and
the beginning of another for the 2,232 students
receiving degrees at Florida Field ceremonies, June
13.

Florida Alligator

Vol. 62, No. 157

There is no action taken on gun control until
somebody gets shot on campus.

Campus Crises Draw
More Gun Control Talk

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Staff Writer
Three shootings on UFs
campus during the break have
brought into focus the
recommendations made by the
Committee to Study the
Removal and Control of Guns
on Campus, and gun control
measures will start this quarter.
Vice President for Business
Affairs William E. Elmore said
Friday he agrees with the
recommendation to suspend
students who possess guns on
campus. However, he stressed
that the shootings last week
came from people not
connected with the university
community.
UNIVERSITY POLICE
Department (UPD) Chief Audie
Shuler said it would be hard to
say if the shootings could have
been prevented by enforcing
existing or new regulations.
According to Shuler, the gun
which killed Stanley Keith
Glasgow, a 42-year-old graduate
student, was purchased at a
pawnshop, and the other two
shootings were not concerned
with people from UF.
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder said Thursday there
is no action taken on gun
control until somebody gets shot
on campus.
HE SAID THE time to
enforce regulations against guns
is now, before anything
happens.
Uhlfelder called the
committees recommendations
excellent and said he would
like to see guns removed from
the dormitories.
One of the problems facing
the UF will be enforcing some of

END OF A JOURNEY

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder

these regulations.
SHULER SAID Friday the
UPD will not search the
dormitories looking for guns.
The responsibility for enforcing
rules keeping guns from
university housing rests with the
Housing Division.
According to Harold C. Riker,
director of the Housing Division,
a letter will be sent to students
who will live in UF housing
starting in the fall, telling them
of the regulations against
keeping firearms in the
dormitories.
I believe students appreciate

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ONE CAP FOR PEACE
- At lead one femele graduate used her cap as a peace symbol porter.

William King Skinner, (left) 64, was the oldest
student receiving a Bachelor's Degree. Discarding
the "generation gap," Skinner sported a flower and
peace medallion for the occasion.

The

Tuesday, June 23, 1970

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the importance of this
regulation, and will assist in its
enforcement, Riker said.
HE SAID THE committees
recommendations will be
disseminated by the housing
staff to the students living now
in the dorms, and to the
incoming students. But as of
now he believes searching for
guns will not be necessary.
Uhlfelder earlier had said he
will oppose any search for guns
in the dormitories.
According to Shuler, effective
(SEE 'REACTION' PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 23, 1970

Mon Murdered At Krystal

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SCHOOL DAZE SCHOOL DAZE
Time to quit your lazy daydreaming school's open again. Above,
two unidentified students soak in the view at an area lake while
contemplating the horror of spending sunny days in a classroom.
Reaction To Shooting

B^mnmbeoneJ
gun control will be good for the
UF.
IT WILL SOLVE emotional
shootings, he said.
In a letter sent to committee
co-chairmen former Alligator
editor Raul Ramirez and UF
attorney Thomas Biggs, UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
Shootings
JTromfageo^|
he was believed armed and
considered dangerous.
Around 2:30 a.m. last
Tuesday, John T. Morgan of
Jacksonville was driving through
the UF campus, when the car in
front of him stopped.
Morgan said two youths
jumped from the car. Two more
joined them, and he said they
began to hit him. Morgan said he
managed to get his gun out of
the car. He said he fired into the
air to scare the alleged assailants
who then fled.
University Police Department
(UPD) Chief Audie Shuler said it
would be hard to say if the
shootings could have been
prevented by enforcing existing
or new regulations.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors.'Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

praised the committees work,
and endorsed its recommenda recommendations.
tions. recommendations.
On the question of having
students at the traffic
checkpoints, Uhlfelder said he
favors having students at the
four checkpoints.
THIS WILL provide an
opportunity for students to
obtain a part-time job,
Uhlfelder said. He pointed out
the possibilities of doing this
during the summer are not too
good, but he expects the
problem will be worked out by
the beginning of the fall
quarter.
Shuler said he also favors
having students man the
checkpoints. This will give us
four more men, he said.
Other recommendations by
the committee were:
Suspension of students
possessing firearms on campus.
(Firearms can be owned by the
students, but they must be
registered and kept with the
UPD)
Prohibiting staff personnel
from bringing guns on campus.
i Creation of a training
program for UPD officers.
Uhlfelder said this last
recommendation would further
their (UPD officers) education
and make them aware of what
students are really like.

A fourth shooting in
Gainesville left one person dead
five days after a UF graduate
student was killed in front of
McCarty Hall.
Allen Phillip Wasdin, 24, 434
SE 7th St., was shot and killed
about 10 p.m. Saturday at
Krystal, a restaurant on West
University Avenue and 15 th
Street, across from the graduate
library.
ACCORDING TO the police
report, Wasdin was shot in the
back of the head with a 12 gauge
sawed-off shotgun.
Witnesses said the subject fled
immediately in a burgundy red
1961 or 62 Ford Falcon.
Police say the suspect,
Johnnie Rayburn McMunn of
Gainesville, turned himself in to
the police in Cross City, a town
north of Gainesville, early
Sunday morning.
It was reported McMunn had
his three children with him at
the time. His wife, Mrs. Betty
McMunn, is an employe at
Krystal.
According to police sources,
the suspect was to be brought to
Gainesville for arraignment
Monday.
Tubers Face
Summer Trial
Thirty-five UF students
arrested after a tubing trip on
the Rainbow River will
apparently stand trial July 28 in
Ocala despite efforts by their
attorneys to have the date
postponed.
One member of the group,
mostly Sigma Phi Epsilon
brothers, said the attorneys were
doubtful if the trial date
could be changed.
SEVERAL OF the students
arrested live out of state and
would have to return for the
mid-summer trial.
Ten UF coeds were also jailed
after all 35 were arrested by
Marion County Sheriffs
deputies.
The group appeared in Marion
County Court May 4 and
pleaded innocent to disorderly
conduct charges.
SIGMA PHI Epsilon President
Mike Hawley, 2UC, has charged
the arrests just werent handled
properly.
Don Moreland, captain of the
patrol division, Marion County
Sheriffs Office, claims the
students were obstructing the
flow of river traffic, were
trespassing and used
uncooperative words while
talking to deputies.
I RED PIN oft I
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

REGENTS
WRAP-UP)
v 0 v
(EDITORS NOTE: The following are some of the most g
j: important developments from the June 8 meeting of the Board ijj:
:j of Regents.) * :$
V w
j: BECAUSE THE EXTENSION of the six-hour free course g
i privilege by the Secretary of Administration has lapsed and Gov. g
: Claude Kirk has not yet acted upon the legislative bill g
|i: continuing this privilege, the state university system cannot g
implement this authority during the summer quarter. This g
means there will be no free course privileges during the fourth g
|:i quarter. $
v The bill now awaiting the governors signature authorizes the
v f ree course privilege on a space available basis for those who are g
j? academically qualified and have been employed in the university
5 system for at least six months.
£ * i:|:
g A UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS political activities outside g
:j the classroom will be considered in granting him pay raises and g
:j promotions, according to the latest board policy. Chancellor g
:j Robert Mautz declared that many university professors g
g political activities are in excess of that guaranteed by the First g
> Amendment. $
* * :*
* >;
g INSINUATIONS BY THE U. S. Department of Health, g
Education and Welfare (HEW) that Florida state universities g
have not been aggressive enough in recruiting black students was g
disclaimed by the board. Former Regents Chairman Chester H. g
Ferguson said, We never have discriminated. We have a firm g
g policy against it. HEWs accusations are completely £
g unfounded.
Sigma Nus Break
Earth For House

1

Next January, less than two
years after their 45-year-old
house burned down, Sigma Nu
fraternity members at the UF
will move into a modem,
quarter-million dollar home.
More than 150 members,
alumni and friends of Sigma Nu
watched Sunday as Dr. Ike
Ganey, president of the
fraternitys house corporation,
turned the first shovelful of dirt
at groundbreaking ceremonies. It
was the spot where the old
house stood, 2012 W. University
Ave., until it burned on April 4,
1969.
THE NEW HOME, to be
ready for occupancy by January
1971, will not be without
memories of the old. A fireplace,
in memory of the late Mom
Mason, Sigma Nu housemother
for 20 years, is being donated by
Mrs. Masons sons, Joseph
Mason, a central Florida banker,
and Dr. William Mason, a
physician.
The construction of the new

| 1 BRING THIS AD~ : ~I ~ ; ; |
j j TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY SPECIAL j
j ALL 8 TRACK STEREO
11 Ess j j
ij REG. LIST jm QQ
< 6.98 each /|77 §
k Limit 5 HiHI each i
(3 No Dealers H
2 O
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! jOPEN SUNDAY 6 PM f|
| I Sat. Til BPM Other days 10 AM 9:30 PM I
j j 8 TRACK CAR UNIT ;;
j j BSpi FUIL YEAR U 3 A S? TEE
I L!4 NW_l3lh St. Phone 373-2333 : |
bring this adh:~ 1 1

home began a week ago and will
cost $251,070, just $1,070 over
the estimated cost. Construction
is being financed through a loan
and contributions, arranged by
the fraternitys house
corporation.
The home, of red brick
construction, will house 40 men
and serve meals to 80. It will be
built in two sections, a
dining-living room area and
bedroom area, separated by a
courtyard, but sharing a single
floating roof.
Gainesville architects Moore,
May and Harrington designed
the home, which is being built
by Gainesville contractor George
Wright.
Present at Sundays
groundbreaking were Gainesville
Mayor Perry McGriff Jr. and
City Commissioners Courtland
Collier and Ted Williams. In
addition to Ganey, members or
directors of the house
corporation attending were
Charles Williams, Jay Gebhardt
and James Anderson.



DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI RECIPIENTS

The University of Florida presented three
distinguished alumni awards during commencement
ceremonies June 13 at Florida Field. Pictured with
James L. Ade (left) of Jacksonville, president of the
Alumni Association, are (from left) Dennis K.
Stanley of Gainesville, dean emeritus of the

New State Insurance Law Praised

By Alligator Services
Amidst the clamor in Florida
about the present open
competition automobile
insurance law, one scholar at UF
said it has benefited both
insurance companies and Florida
drivers.
Robert Lowes Brown, who
received his doctorate degree
June 13, says that since the open
competition law became
effective Oct. 1, 1967, the
nature of the automobile
liability insurance market in
Florida has changed materially.
The motorist who is in the
market for automobile insurance
and the insurer who is interested
in a stable and predictable
market have benefited
significantly, Brown states in
his doctoral dissertation for the
Department of Finance and
Insurance in the UFs College of
Business Administration.
DST THE PERIOD 1965-67,
the Florida automobile
insurance industry and Florida
drivers were plagued by the
many problems of a system
which did not allow competition
to thrive.
Insurers, Brown notes,
experienced many problems
because of the unpredictability
of future costs and revenues due
to the necessity (under the old
law) of getting prior approval for
rate increases.
The problems of companies
under a law that demanded prior
approval, Brown said in a recent
interview, were transferred to
the Florida driver.
WHEN INSURANCE rates are
set, or require approval, by the
state many companies simply
stop selling, Brown says.
During the period 1965 67
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many motorists seeking
automobile liability insurance in
the State of Florida experienced
difficulties in meeting their
liability insurance needs because
the market... was thin.
Brown, who intends to
copyright his dissertation,
approached his study through an
investigation of assigned risk
applications from 1966-69.
He measured the change in
the total number of risks in the
assigned risk pool relative to the
total number of Florida drivers;
the change in the amount of
insurance in substandard
classifications relative to total
insurance written, and the
number of insuring companies
entering and leaving the business
in Florida before and after
enactment of the open
competition law.
HE FOUND the following
results since enactment of the
open competition law:
A smaller percentage of
Florida drivers have been
relegated to the assigned risk
pool.
A smaller percentage of
substandard insurance has been
written.

IBRING THIS AD I I I I, |
j TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY SPECIAL j j
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11 Hfemni 11
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< 6.98 each %
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fIOPEN SUNDAY 12n..t.6 PM M
j j Sat. Til BPM Other days 10 AM 9:30 PM j j
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University's College of Physical Education and
Health; Mrs. William C. Lantaff of Miami Springs,
who accepted the award presented posthumously to
her husband who was a distinguished lawyer and
U. S. congressman.

BY UF DOCTORAL CANDIDATE

More standard liability
insurers have entered the market
and fewer have left since the
effective date of the law.
As a result, the thin liability
insurance market was fattened
by open competition, and more
and more Florida drivers are able
to purchase insurance today
from standard rate companies
rather than being assigned to a
high risk pool, Brown says.
Although Brown does not
approach the problem of rate
structures in his dissertation, he
says that open competition in
the long run will keep rates at a
minimum. He cited two leading
companies which in 1969
captured almost 50 per cent of
all the new automobile liability
insurance written in the state.
They were practicing price
competition, and thats
something the consumers
appreciate, as evidenced by the
business these companies
wrote, Brown says.
AS FOR ARGUMENTS
during the recent legislative
session that Florida insurance
laws should be rewritten to again
require prior approval of rates,
Brown argues such a move

Alumni Leaders Plan
Lauderdale Meeting

Alumni leaders of UF will
gather in Fort Lauderdale June
26-27 for the annual summer
Executive Council meeting at
the Pier 66 Hotel.
Nearly 200 Alumni
Association members and their
families will attend the
combined business-social session.
Broward, Dade and Palm
Beach County alumni clubs will
co-host a reception from 8 to 10
p.m. June 26 in the hotels
Tickertape Lounge. The
Executive Council will meet at 9
a.m. the next day.
Other events on the June 27
schedule include a golf
tournament at Plantation Golf
Club, a luncheon and fashion
show for wives and a dinner
hosted by the past association
presidents.
James Ade of Jacksonville is
president of the association this
year. President Stephen C.

would simply dry up the
liability market.
If standard liability companies
felt they could not operate
within a certain rate structure,
they would simply stop selling in
Florida. At the same time, many
individuals now buying
insurance at standard rates
would be delegated to

I STU-FAX League j
I Will Meet To Organize I
| For Summer Bowling |
[ Weds., June 24 AT 7PM j
| Rm 118 REITZ Union I
. m
| For More Information |
1 Call P.J. Day 392 1637 I
I Or Contact Les Peters. |
mpg
WEDDINGS xjjKgjljL
ANNIVERSARIES
BIRTHDAYS
ANY OCCASSION
SAVE!
We have an expert baker with a
During June Only world of experience at creating
special cakes . cakes you will be
- proud to serve for any occasion.
m Try us, you'll be glad you did.
I Place your order 48 hours in adv-
I ance.
I PHONE 372- 1049
0 OPEN 24 HOURS
Mister
Donut.*

Tuesday, June 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

O'Connell and Athletic Director
Ray Graves are expected to
attend the weekend program at
Fort Lauderdale.
Architects Plot
Future Rise
Professional architects in the
state are joining architectural
schools in efforts to improve the
educational experience of the
student architect
With the recent formation of
an architectural guild, they hope
to improve both the education
and the relationship between the
students and professional
architects.
The guild organization was
begun by the Department of
Architecture at UF and
representatives from the Florida
Association of the American
Institute of Architects.

substandard companies and end
up paying higher rates than they
pay now.
Brown contends that if the
Florida Legislature and those of
other states desire to combat
high insurance rates, they should
attack the problem of poor
drivers rather than rates
themselves.

Page 3



Thm Florida Alligator, Tonday, Mum 23.1970

Page 4

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DAN VINING

Uhlfelder Pledges Fight
Against New Ticket Policy

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
The Athletic Association
(AA) has made its decision on
student football tickets, but
Student Government is still
fighting.
Disappointed with the
decision to charge students for
tickets, Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder cut SG funds for
cheerleaders and the rifle team
from next years budget. Funds
for Gator Band activities in
support of football may be cut
also, he said Friday.
I DONT SEE why I should
be a stooge for the Athletic
Association, making things easy
for them while they take
advantage of the students,
Uhlfelder said.
Uhlfelder said he would push
to have the AAs portion of the
activity fee abolished and to
have more students on the AA's
decision-making councils.
Cutting the activity fee might
raise student ticket prices, but
hurt
(MfChk
CIMIMT MIHKKII*
THREE MONTHS EOR S2S TAX
SPECIAL RATI
WEEKDAYS $2 AU DAY
WEEKENDS $3 All DAY
for information toll
376-0080
& reoivwoo
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would be more equitable since
only those who attend the games
should have to pay, according to
Uhlfelder.
UF PRESIDENT Stephen C.
OConnell has already agreed to
put two students on fire Athletic
Council of the AA, Uhlfelder
said. The council makes the final
decision on ticket prices and
similar matters.
SG will continue to fund
intramural athletics since
student participation and
interest are high, hut will not
fund activities which support the
AA, said Uhlfelder.
Information circulars and
application forms for the $5
season ticket will be mailed to
all prospective students in July.
The season ticket must be shown

REITZ UNION LANES
Summer Special
Bowling
Weekdays 9:00 AM 4:00 PM
$ 1.20 Per Hr Per Lane
Min. 30 Minutes
Weekend & Evening Rates
Remain As Usual.

Here Comes
The 'Gator
Old and new blood male and female went into the selection of
this summers editors.
KAREN ENG, the first woman editor-in-chief since the Alligator
became a daily in 1962, has appointed six editors to complete her
summer staff. The summer Alligator is only published two days a
week Tuesday and Thursday.
PHYLLIS GALLUB has been appointed executive editor. Miss
Gallub has been a staff writer for the Alligator and will be managing
editor for the fall and winter quarters.
She is from Miami and is starting graduate school in
communications this quarter.
NORM WHITE was appointed news editor. He has worked on the
Daily Highlander in Lake Wales, his hometown, and on the Gainesville
Sun.
He is also the editor of Mr. Mrs., the married student newspaper
on UFs campus. He plans to graduate from the College of Journalism
and Communications in Augusst.
FRED VOLLRATH will be the Alligators assistant news editor.
Vollrath graduated from UFs School of Journalism and
Communications in 1967. He was wire editor and columnist for the
Alligator last quarter and is currently a freshman in law school.
DAVE SPAHR is the Alligators new sports editor. He was a sports
writer last quarter and has worked on the Gator Growl Magazine.
Spahr is a public relations major from Ft. Myers Beach.
ANNETTE BRIN is the Alligators editorial assistant. Mrs. Brin has
worked on the Alligator as a staff writer as well as writing a weekly
column for the Palm Beach Post in 1966.
Mrs. Brin is from Lake Worth and will graduate from the College of
Journalism in August.
DAN VINING will be entertainment editor again this quarter. He
has held this job for the past two quarters.

to obtain seating assignments for
each game
AA EMPLOYES refused to
comment on how students
would get seating assignments
for the first home game, which
will be played before fall classes
begin. Ticket manager Ray
Dorman was out of town and
could not be reached for
comment.
Tentative plans for the season
ticket called for the student to
identify himself at the gate with
fee card, season ticket, student
ID card and pass. Uhlfelder said
he felt only the pass should be
required at the gate, although
this would encourage students to
sell their tickets.
If a student has to buy a
ticket, then he should be able to
sell it, like the alumni, he said.

First sounds of summcr ... B
.WESTON PRIM
on the Union Terrace r*\
Wednesday, June 24 at 8:00 p.m.i
A_
sponsored by JWRU
Open 7 days
/=s^Mt7
Clip the
Pizza Inn
Buck yzj)
below for a special treat! (| I
gN N DO~U^_jgT E |#|
i* ns@\ /Jt
Inn
wily *
- \ \rtl*JS£sin^ldzfr.
lune 25, 1 970 \QNUE/
LZZA IN!TBUrK ,^3

'Sis' 'Sis*:
*.& ..
viiS
PHYLLIS GALLUB
DAVE SPAHR
Vpil v /:
ANNETTE BRIN



ACADEMICS
news and views ...
DR. EDMUND F. ACKELL, provost of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, has been appointed to the National Advisory
Council on Education for Health Professions for a term ending
February 1974.
The council, composed of leading authorities in health
professions, education and highly qualified representatives from
the general public, advises Director of the National Institute of
Health (NIH) DR ROBERT Q. MARSTON, and DR
KENNETH M. ENDICOTT, director of its Bureau of Health
Professions Education and Manpower Training.
* *
The Florida Division of the American Cancer Society has
awarded a scholarship to BELINDA KAY JONES, a UF nursing
student.
* #
DR. H. A. BEVIS of the UF Department of Environmental
Engineering has been awarded a $63,543 grant to continue the
departments program of ... | ri|f r| ,. ;it^^rr .^ T r ..
environmental health
training.
The funds, awarded by the
NIH will provide fellowships 'V.: -..V- I
for eight graduate students
during the year beginning
July 1.
FRED L. GILLETTE JR.,
an engineer now studying law
at the UF, has received a
special Federal Water
Pollution Control
Administration grant to study DR E- F ACKELL
and propose new legislation
controlling artificial ground .. .igggg mm m |
level recharge of water
tables. HRS|||^:
* * J||^||rei|ra|
DR. BRYSON L. JAMES
has been appointed as * jrf&ffljji
professor and head of the
Plantation Field Laboratory
in Fort Lauderdale by UF OV£'/ ; JfBHHE
President Stephen C. .HmSpi' y *ffeagMl
OConnell.
* * mmmmmmgmmk
The American Meat HHHBHHHRHHmHI
Science Association will
convene for their 23rd M. B. CHRISTIAN
Annual Reciprocal Meat s
Conference today at the Reitz Union. The purpose of the
conference is for exchanging ideas, information and techniques
in regard to meat research and teaching including consumer
education. About 200 scientists from agricultural colleges and
universities, industry, and government are expected to attend.
* *
The American Nuclear Societys Education Division has
named the UFs ANS student chapter the best in the nation.
* *
DR MELVIN GREER, professor and chief of neurology in
the UF College of Medicine, has been awarded the Hippocratic
Award for Teaching Excellence by the medical class of 1970.
* *
MILTON B. CHRISTIAN, assistant professor of
comprehensive logic and an advisor in University College, is the
winner of the 1970 Thomas Jefferson Award for teaching
excellence. The SSOO Jefferson Award, established in 1965 by
the Robert Earll McConnell Foundation, honors the UC teacher
jjvh^bestexemplifiesth^
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
TgVjJ AND SALES
"CORVAIR SPECIALIST"
GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL' CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
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10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
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I Advertise
I its good business

FOR HIGH SCHOOLERS
JM College Hosts Meet

High school newspaper and
yearbook staffers from
throughout Florida and the
Southeast will be on the UF
campus June 21 July 4 for the
12th Annual High School
Journalism Institute.
The institute, sponsored by
SAMSON Plans
Summer Camp
This summer again, SAMSON
is holding its summer camp for
the underprivileged children of
the Gainesville area.
One week sessions will be held
between June 15 and July 24.
Groups of 50 children will be
given the opportunity to spend a
week at Lake Wauburg and on
various field trips.
These children will be 300 of
the poorest children around
Gainesville, Chairman Tom
Melcher said.
The Neighborhood Youth
Corps and the Alachua County
Welfare Agency will aid
SAMSON in this project,
Melcher said.
Students who want to help
should either come to room 315,
Reitz Union, or call 392-1608
for further information.
Melcher said the SAMSON
summer project will hopefully
provide a meaningful
experience for the
underprivileged children.

Qftef/c Lindsey
SOUND THE HORNS!
Outstanding shoe values
SEMI ANNUAL
Shoe Sale
* Reg^
SIMILAR 18.00 to 20.00 21.00 to 23.00 similar
ILLUSTRATION NOW NOW ILLUSTRATION
ILLUSTRATION J £ 80 1 5 80
MENS FREEMAN SHOES
VALUES TO NOW
20.00 13 8Q
23.00 .16 80
34.00 22 80
37.00 2 5 80
WINGTIPS, LOAFERS
I STRAPS. MOC TOES
I LADIES ITALIAN SANDALS f ( LADIES NAME BRANDS
YOU KNOW 4 ;I
REG ___ NOW MISS AMERICA SANDLER
6 0010 800 500 ISSwiSm AIRIER
9.00 to 13.00 7.00 SAVE NOW
14.00 to 15.00 9.00 ON THESE FAMOUS SHOES
SHOP BELK LINDSEY IN THE
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

the College of Journalism and
Communications and the
Division of Continuing
Education, is designed to help
high school students develop a
well-rounded background in
publications.
In addition, it will permit
broad exposure to various
instructional techniques and
allow students to exchange ideas
with contemporaries across the
Southeast.
The first week of the
institute, June 21-27, is for high
school newspaper staffers, who
will receive instruction in
newswriting, editing, feature and
sportswriting and
photojournalism.

"'Sjerosa
JUL 1 STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320

TiMaday, Jum 23, WO, Thd Florida Alligator,

Students on high school
yearbook staffs will be here
during the second week, June 28
- July 4, to study photography,
editing, layout and copywriting.
Both newspaper and yearbook
participants also will be able to
take a special course in
publications problems and
policies.
Housing for students will be
in Jennings Hall, a campus
dormitory. Classes will be in
various UF classrooms and the
Reitz Union, where offices for
the Alligator and Seminole are
located.
In the past 11 years, more
than 3,500 student journalists
have attended the institute.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida AttlgatdrVTuMday, Juna 23,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

j f > :
and of course, I never make a move without my advisors
Bus Drivers Overworked

WASHINGTON
Investigators for the Interstate
Commerce Commission have
caught the Trail ways bus line
illegally overworking its drivers
on more than 8,000 occasions
since 1960. Yet die commission
has repeatedly refused to act
against the company.
For safetys sake, bus drivers
are prohibited from working
'more than 70 hours a week. Yet
even this limit, which would
keep bus drivers going at the
exhausting pace of 10 hours a
day for seven days a week, has
been ignored by the company.
WORSE, MORE than 1,000
of the infractions occurred after
the ICC had ordered the bus
company to stop the violations.
The case, involving Safeway
Trails, Inc., an eastern subsidiary
of the vast Trailways system,
dates back to 1961 when ICC
investigators found that drivers
had been compelled to work
beyond the 70-hour limit 3,399
times over a two-year period.
The commission finally got
around to issuing a cease and
desist order in February, 1963.
The order was lifted 20 months
later after Marvin E. Walsh, a
corporate vice president,
solemnly swore in an affidavit
that the law had been obeyed.
NO ATTEMPT was made,
apparently, to determine
whether Walsh was telling the
truth. Inieed, the staff
discovered 1,066 violations
during a three-month period
while the compliance order was
still in effect.
* *
The following April, John
Bush, then the ICCs vice
chairman, ordered an
investigation into this apparent
flouting of the commissions
order. But two months later,
without explanation, Bush
suddenly ordered the
investigation discontinued.
Reached by this column, the
commissioner said he couldnt
remember the case. A member
of his staff, however, explained
that Bush decided to stop the
probe because the commission

Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief
Phyllis Gallub
Executive Editor

Merry-Go-Round
IIIIM^
by Jack Anderson

staff had informed him that
Trailways was making an effort
to stop the violation.
BUSHS AIDE read from a
private memo from the ICCs
bureau of enforcement, which
asserted that Trailways was
making a substantial effort to
curb its scofflaw behavior. In
other words, the aide
acknowledged, Bush decided to
call off the investigation not
because Trailways had started
obeying the law, but because the
company was trying.
Since the company started
trying, staff investigators have
uncovered more than 3,000
further violations. Most of the
evidence is based on the
companys own monthly
hours-of-service, and the
infractions are not seriously
disputed by the company.
The Department of
Transportation, which has taken
over the ICCs safety
investigation functions, has now
asked the commission to
suspend Trailways license to
operate between Washington and
New York for two months.
THE REQUEST, filed in June
of last year, was turned over to a
hearing examiner last February.
Commission spokesmen dont
expect the hearing examiners
decision for several more weeks.
* *
Significantly, Charles Webb, a
former ICC commissioner who
now works for the bus lobby,
filed a belated intervention in
the case which raises a serious
ethical question.
As a commissioner, Webb
took part in the previous
proceedings involving Trailways.
THE ICC Practitioners Code
states that a retired
commissioner should not

Lfes Gardieff
Managing Editor
Norm White
News Editor

accept employment as an
advocate or advisor in the same
proceeding or as to the same, or
substantially the same, facts as
were involved in any specific
question which he investigated
or passed upon... while in such
office.
Yet this seems to be precisely
what Webb has done. Repeated
efforts to reach him for
comment have brought no
response. The brief he filed
which the commission accepted
although it came in after the
deadline for arguments is shot
through with contradictions.
We express no opinion as to
whether the violations alleged in
the complaint have been
competent evidence, he says at
one point.
THEN LATER, the brief
respectfully submits that the
complaint should be dismissed
on the ground that the violations
have not been proved.
Nevertheless, there is some
hope for Trailways millions of
passengers. Jonathan Rowe, one
of Ralph Naders investigators,
has made a detailed inquiry into
the case and is expected to
follow it up in the next several
days w'ith a letter to Commission
Chairman George Stafford
demanding a public accounting
of the issues.

Alligator Staff

Fred Vollrath
Assistant News Editor
Annette Brin
Editorial Assistant

EDITORIAL
Were Convinced
Last weeks freak concentration of shootings on and
around the UF campus was undeniably tragic. But, in a time
when no one seems to be able to agree on much of
anything, they may have given last quarter s Committee to
Study Removal and Control of Guns on Campus a rallying
point for its recommendations:
No one wants more shootings.
The committee was appointed a month ago by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell in response to Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelders request for the study. And
Uhlfelders request was a result of a week of striking and
demonstrating following the Kent State and Jackson State
killings.
But nothing does more to emphasize a problem than
bringing that problem right to ones back doorstep.
OConnell responded rapidly and positively to the
committees recommendations. Much more than a simple
agreement is needed, however. How many committee
recommendations have been approved only to become lost
in a maze of red tape?
The committee called for immediate suspension of any
sudent possessing a firearm in UF single or married housing
units anywhere on campus and in the fraternity and sorority
houses located on the periphery. The report said students
who want to use firearms for hunting would have to make
arrangements to store their guns off campus.
OConnell disagreed with prohibiting storage of guns
on campus and we see his point. The University Police
Department (UPD) should provide a safe storage space for
guns if students are to be prohibited from keeping guns.
Perhaps banning guns on campus for anything other than
certain specified activities will not give us ah iron-clad
guarantee that shootings will not occur. But, as UPD Chief
Audie Shuler said, it will have considerable effect on the
number of emotional shootings.
OConnell has urged the Committee on Student Conduct
to recommend extension of the present housing regulation
prohibiting guns in residence halls to other areas of the
campus as well and to make violation of that regulation a
suspension offense.
We hope student conduct committee chairman Earnest
Bartley needs no more prodding than the recognition of the
seriousness of last weeks shootings to establish controls on
student possesion of weapons. And we hope President
OConnell will take any other steps necessary to insure that
guns are kept off campus, except for university-approved
instances.
We dont need another shooting to convince us.
This ain t a demonstration its an unemployment line

Dave Spahr
Sports Editor
Dan Vining
Campus Living Editor

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88 or 89. Busi Business,
ness, Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681,82,83 or 84.
Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are thoae of
# r s os the writer of the article and no* thoae
of the University of Florida.



PEACE pes ln./
freedom from civil clamor and
confustion: a state of public
quiet.
So says Websters famous
book.
The word peace has been
bandied about so much lately,
this writer thought a trip to the
dictionary was necessary.
IN ALL, there were seven
definitions of that one word.
One might say Webster provides
a definition to fit everyones
desires. But one thought stood
out.
... a state of public quiet.
Its obvious Spiro Agnew
never read that. Neither did
many of the radical leaders on
this campus.
AGNEW FIRES verbal

Dont Get Sick On Sunday

The room was quiet. Not a
sound could be heard except for
the nurses chatting, the
maintenance men cleaning and
me.
I filled out my admitting card
with a lengthy description of my
ailments, showed my ID card to
the receptionist and sat down
among a lobby of vacant chairs,
empty ashtrays and old
magazines.
A PLEASANT, middle-aged
nurse clutched my folder, called
my name and told me to enter
the first room on the left. She
read my card and then asked me
what was wrong. I explained
that everything was on the card
but her frown indicated Id
better explain. So, I verbally
explained my problem. (If she
had looked on the card she
would have seen I gave her the
words verbatim.)
Without examining me she
handed me some antiseptic
ointment and told me to leave. I
stood there with the medication
in hand and politely asked if I
could see a doctor. I was told to
come back tomorrow and then I
could see a doctor.
BUT YOU havent even
examined me. What if I were
dying or something? I asked.
Come back tomorrow, was
the reply.
I didnt give up.
I AM A STUDENT at this
university, I pay my fees for
medical services and when I am
sick I want to see a doctor. I am
not sick tomorrow, I got sick
today.
Come back tomorrow, was
the reply.
I left the empty lobby and
drove to the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center in search of relief.

the small society

Moo-goY/ HOTUIU&
&rr violence violence-
-- violence-

Shouting For Peace

Little Green Apples
IIIIIIIHIIIIIIIII
by Norm White

missiles at any person or concept
that doesnt jive with his
thinking. If we follow Websters
insinuation, Agnew is not a
peaceful man.
But are the radical leaders any
less guilty? One so-called leader
was heard to shout at a rally last
quarter: Lets shut this damn
school down. We can show those
pigs in Tigert who really runs
this campus!
Such shouting is frightening.

Staff Writings
by Annette Brin

ALTHOUGH POLITE and
sympathetic, my greeting left a
lot to be desired.
Have you been to the
infirmary? We cant take
students before 11:30 p.m.
unless they are referred to us by
the infirmary that is without a
sls fee, the receptionist said.
All I want to do is see a
doctor, I explained.
AFTER A FEW minutes, the
receptionist at the Health Center

Maxis Offend
MR. EDITOR:
These are the times that try mens souls. In this period of delirium
and chaotic human events characterized by boisterous and heated
conversations about such trivial matters as strikes, student rights,
revolution, war, killing, crime in the streets, law and order, pollution,
inflation, drugs, a sick sex society, a decaying nation, and the
polarization of the generations, Americans have overlooked the most
important issue of this tragic decade.
People must face the honors of reality. Therefore, I bring this vital
issue to your attention with this heart-throbbing plea.
In order to promote domestic tranquility and to bring peace of
mind to the tired, overworked, melancholy male student, I hereby
emphatically denounce the operation and use of such pinko,
communistic, anti-American, non-religious trash as the maxi. With our
proud country rapidly becoming filled with useless waste, our blue
sky being polluted constantly with smoke and dust, plus our rolling
rivers made unlivable, even for the fish; please let there be one happy
sanctuary on earth where the tear-filled eyes of our brave male gender
can still observe something as majestic and beautiful as the slender
tibias of the noble beast known throughout the world as the Florida
female.
In the name of justice and humanity, woman; please save our
beloved campus from this toxic alien force which blackens the hearts
of all loyal, homy men everywhere the maxi.
JULIAN HERZOG, 4AS

Pfe(2SoMALLY
i felt a Lot
SAFeJZ WHEN
ALL I MAP TO \
FEAK WA-S
FEAfZ ITEELF-

4
Agnews big mistake is his
condemnation of those who
disagree. This is also the mistake
of the fellow quoted above. He
wanted to close a school of
20,000 students. Little did it
matter how the other 19,999
felt. He, like Agnew, closed his
mind to other opinions.
...a state OF PUBUC
QUIET.
At another rally, a so-called
leader accused those who were

called the infirmary to see if
there was a doctor on call.
Even she could see I was sick
and needed a doctor today
not tomorrow.
Guess what she found out?
There was a doctor on call at the
infirmary, but the doctor had
gone home for the day and
couldnt be reached.
It was Sunday on the UF
campus. By this time I was really
scared ... what if I were dying
or something?

by Brickman

not by his side of not being
concerned not caring.
What a mistake!
ONE DOES not have to shout
and preach turmoil to be
concerned. It is wrong to think
only people in the streets care.
I care. I, too, think the war is
tragically foolish. I, too, am
disheartened by minority
suppression. I, too, want
changes.
But taking to the streets
violently is not my bag. It is my
opinion that established avenues
to change are still the best roads.
Why cant the radicals respect
that view not agree with it,
just respect it?
The ballot box is still more
powerful than a homemade
bomb. You can blow Florida to
pieces and Claude Kirk still
wont listen hell just become
more deaf. But if you threaten
to work on his vote base, to ring
doorbells, to register, to
persuade, youll find good ol*
Claude coming to you with open
arms and ears.
Shouting is not peace. The
shouting of these days does
nothing but create hate. Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelder
may have read Websters
definition. In the heat of last
quarters turmoil, he pleaded:
persuade, not dictate. Makes
sense to me.
... a state of public quiet.
Peace.

K
ITEM: The Supreme Court affirmed that the right to
wear one's hair at any length is a personal freedom
protected by the U. S. Constitution

LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
t B typed, signed,
double spaoed end not exceed
900 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addresses and
lalaohone numbers of writers.
'Names will be withheld only if

Tuesday, June 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

writer shows just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
letters for space.
Writers may submit longer
sways, columns or letters to be
considered for use as "Speaking
Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular
column is asked to contact the
editor and be prepared to show
ttlnpNNl OT HIS WOIIC

There is no hope
for the complacent man.

Page 7



Page 8

i, Th* Florida Alligator, Tuday, Juno 23,1970

Maas takes you on a fashion pSrilX
safari with this all-outdoors jB ia
outfit. The khaki jungle jacket SB iIB dtt\ I
features pockets trimmed with H* jBB * J B
simulated snake skin. Top the 1 -->... JB 1 % 4P|B
outfit off with a hat and scarf IB
and you are ready to go after the w
big game!
Hi > t
H 'i
Soft, soft blue and white trim # /Jsi> *lwlSK' P
are the feminine features of this *|Jr BPBllff§ljfe I?;
charming dress. For an extra
special touch ... silver buttons | vJj
frame the pockets and one 4 -f"
shoulder. A narrow, white belt :' C Jp|
loops through silver chains to fl ''
the waist
looks. Sears Junior Bazaar. BBMBHHBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBMIBBI
Modeled by Rita. BBBIBfIHfIHffIiBBfIHBBBBiHiHBfIHfIHBBi
B^avj'V^l?''%*?''^-v v? '-'\i-v v> - ,% f ;* r -*s fVPv^*.//. ,f
Hf .881 |jpisy| l-. *, 7 yy. s y-, x.yj|vsl?v y~^,y '*t'^]/* s7'?, y- ;,: " v 1
'IU K j[
wl. iy f
HHH. JHHHt. jM xjj£
i&slir ..'-;?m-i%BHr
'v BBBBliii yBBB£^B&*
/t >; ""
- f-\ S
jimL
sfea.lr* .jiiJM
c*
Thisjs a muslin the June Bride's
-pfakyaptuf- by- ; >
/Miac/uido qeAMdo ;:/; ;' waist has an adjustable nylon
bodice
insets. The puff sleeves also have
tucks lace



SwMOM£/l_ fashions

. -IMMm
a s #' H
v ..^ : > PM
>3*. cSjflSr
Bk.
I SMM? is&^§&§||i^a|H^BHH9H§SE
§;MM i i
Ur JH mp gKSH.
r j[ P m
lAitrMra! EjAjaMaapial

Colony Shop
Bobbie Brooks begins summer
fashions with this white, dressy
slacks suit of 100% polyester.
The outfit features a diamond
patterned top over the slinky
slacks. Shoes by Diviana.
Modeled by Terri.
Silverman's
Kathy models a new super
knit . "bouclette." Pranx
fashions designed this great
feeling one piece jumpsuit with
long sleeves, muted dark tones,
and accented by a soft leather
belt. Find this and many more
exciting summer fashions at
Silverman's

41 k
Jht K
pH JK; v
ih WUm
|Pr Jgjm x
' r^' / r 1- ***
fISB
> i
9k '4 W&&
|k W
. V
%#| .. M
jgjr &* % TMM|
Hr

Su4M. Scott
Judi models a backless top ... a
cinched waist... and belled
bottoms the fashion
components for this great look.
It's perfectly purple and made
for any great time.

*&?2pps. iH

| Belk (indsetj
I Cool white sets the Summer scene with this Dune Deck bathing suit
I from Belk Lindsey; and to top-off Roberta's Hawaiian tan she's
I chosen a "lacey"cover-up by Catalina. Make a cool white splash this
Summer, with Swimwear from Belk Lindsey.

I
fcA J
Li HU
E^a

W ... ... re&
jj
3
*M
-J
J

Tnaarisy, Jmw 23,1970, Ths Florida AMllor.

Page 9



Page 10

i, i M Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, June 23,1970

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

THE UNIVERSITY SENATE
will meet in McCarty Hall
Auditorium at 3:30 p.m. ( June
25. The following items are on
the agenda:
Presentation of Standard Oil
(Indiana) Good Teachers Awards
Introduction of recently
elected Senate members
ACTION ITEMS
1. Proposed Student Conduct
Code
2. Recommendation from
Senate Committee on Liaison
with the Board of Regents
INFORMATION ITEMS
1. Summary of the Returns
of the Constitution Committee
Questionnaire on the size and
structure of the University
Senate
2. Current elected members
of the University Senate
3. Annual report of the
Honors Committee
4. Annual report of the
Committee on University
Libraries
5. Annual report of the
Committee on University
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Members of the Senate are
asked to bring copies of the May
28 agenda to the June 25
meeting.
ALL REQUISITIONS,
JUSTIFICATIONS AND
AUTHORIZATION TO
PURCHASE FORMS FOR
" VEHICLES for fiscal year
1970-71 must be submitted to
the Purchasing Division 204
Tigert Hall, not later than July
1.
Be sure to furnish the Request
for Authority to Purchase Motor
Vehicles form completely filled
out in duplicate. When giving
mileage of trade-in include
estimated mileage to December,
1970.
At present, use the 1969-70
specifications. They are basically
the same with a few changes in
options on some models.
Complete new specification
sheets will be supplied when
made available by the State
Motor Vehicle Division.
It is suggested that point of
delivery for all vehicles delivered
to campus be the Transportation
Department or the I FAS garage
for the proper check out.
There will be one bid for the
year. If there are any questions
or need for Vehicle Request
Forms, please contact
Purchasing.

PANS dont do it.
W Jf N CT Especially during our summer months.
// / X This s your year to a r condition...
v V /y? you owe it to yourself, and to make it
tfiTTir /rSr/ easy let us help you with the financing.
CREDIT UNION FjR

PREMEDICAL,
PREDENTAL AND
PREVETERINARY STUDENTS
must register with the Office of
Preprofessional Education, 105
Anderson Hall, June 29 through
July 17. Be sure to bring the full
names of all instructors and the
course and section numbers.
F U L B R I GHT-H AYS
PROGRAM FOR 1971-72 is
announced for U. S. citizens
with a doctorate or college
teaching experience. Lecturing
or advanced research
opportunities are available in 45
academic fields in 100 countries.
Contact Glenn Farris at the
I ntemational Center or the
Committee on International
Exchange of Persons, 2101
Constitution Ave., Washington,
D. C. 20418.
*

THE SECOND PHASE OF
THE TAX REFORM ACT OF
1968 will be implemented as
follows:
%
Payroll Period
Biweekly Pay period ending July 3
Monthly June Supl. paid July 15
Monthly (Regular) Paid July 31
b-
The taxes will be computed
by the University in accordance
with instructions furnished by
the Internal Revenue Service. In
this phase of the Tax Reform
Act, the remaining surcharge tax
is dropped and the amount for
personal exemptions is
increased. These factors should
cause at least a small decrease in
the amount of tax withheld for
all employees.
Any questions pertaining to
this change should be addressed
to Pay roll, extension 2-1231.

BLUE BULLETIN

SOCIAL SECURITY
MATCHING CONTRIBUTIONS
for employers will increase from
4.8 per cent to 5.2 per cent on
Jan. 1,1971.
Therefore, on contract and
grants budget worksheets, it will
be necessary to compute Fringe
Benefits (in the Salary Category)
at 9.2 per cent (4.0 per cent for,- N
State Retirement and 5.2 per
cent for Social Security) of
non-academic (Career-Service)
salaries.
The rate for academic
employees under Teacher
Retirement remains at 6.25 per
cent.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Tuesday
Chess Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
.Bridge Club Meting, 150 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Games Area: Bowling League
Organization, Union 118,
7:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 346
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Dance, The Weston Prim Show,
Union Terrace, 9:00 p.m.
Thursday
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Teacher Evaluation, C 4B Union,
8:00 a.m. & 5:00 p.m.

Sag| *> §j
I $1.25? I
h f> m

1 (J We 11... yes.
I But it's not for us.
I It goes for paper and ink
1 and production work and
1 other things you need if
I you're going to make a
I magazine.
1 So the expression is free.

Campus
Calendar

Friday
Comer Drugstore Conference,
150 Union, 1:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Cool Hand
Luke," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
*
Attention! Camp Wauburg is
alive and will be living in
Micanopy, Florida. Visiting
hours are as follows: 1:00
7:00 p.m. Tues. & Thurs.
9:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Sat. &
Sun.
Notice: Printing Division will be
closed all day, June 30,1970,
for inventory.

The magazine is $1.25. I
That's not so much to I
pay for free expression.
florida I
quarterly I



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
Across street from campus. Studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
included completely furnished
Ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace apts. 1224 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-ts-c)
Male roommate wanted for summer
quarter 1 block from Norman Hall
private room & central air $112.50
quarter + utilities. Call 372-1272
(B-2t-157-p)
Several 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 S.W. 2nd Ave.
372-7111 Grad students preferred.
Special rates for summer quarter now
In effect. (B-2t-157-c)
Ten rooms graduate men and older
men close cool utilities washer-dryer
parking 135.00 single 100.00 double
summer 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
5 bedroom house 300.00 spacious 2
br. apt. 185.00 2 blocks north of
campus graduate men and older men
available sept. 378-8122 376-6652
(B-Bt-157-p)
STUDENT couple w/wo child to
share air. cond. home with gentleman
(46) & boy (16) Free rent, utilities &
board Much privacy 378-0572 or
392-1852. (B-4t-157-p)
FOR RENT: SINGLES: SWING
INTO SUMMER IN A LUXURIOUS
AIR CONDITIONED POOLSIDE
APARTMENT. PRIVATE
BEDROOM. WALK TO CAMPUS.
S7O INCLUDING UTILITIES.
378-7224. (B-15t-148-p)
I Children s
Ballet
Interpretive
Dance
$12.00-$WMte
Mrs. Gail Scott instructor
Sign up at first lesson June 30
10:00 11:00 am 4-6 year
olds
11:00 12:00 noon -7 and up
room C-4, Union
sponsored by JWRU

*-vssMsffifc
$ >£ W&#& ,y/\ /s.
I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
I BAKED MEAT SAUCE AND MACARONI
ALL YOU CAN EAT 79< I
I GOLDEN FRIED CHICKEN
I ALL YOU CAN EAT yW(
WEDNESDAY
I JUMBO BAKED CHOPPED STEAK 79^
I THURSDAY and yellow rice
I BAKED HAM AND CANDIED YAMS 99<
I FRIDAX. fish ALMONDINE AND FRENCH
I FRIED POTATOES 89<
1 GAINESVILLE MALL

WANTED
WANTED-.COED TO SHARE
LUXURIOUS AIR CONDITIONED
POOLSIDE APARTMENT.
PRIVATE BEDROOM. WALK TO
CAMPUS. S7O INCLUDING
UTILITIES. 378-7224. (C-15t-148-p)
MALE ROOMMATE TO SHARE
LUXURIOUS AIR CONDITIONED
POOLSIDE APARTMENT.
PRIVATE BEDROOM. WALK TO
CAMPUS. S7O INCLUDING
UTILITIES. 378-7224. (C-15t-148-p)
One roommate needed for summer
qtr. Summit house, F-5, call
3 7 8-8105 make deal on rent.
(B-2t-157-p)
Live in Landmark this summer for
only $92.50. Two men desired to
help enjoy pools, gym, sauna,
dishwasher, Bar BQ, a/c, Call
378-2098. (C-3t-154-p)
Sft*:*:*x*x ; xtt^
HELP WANTED
Widower with three children needs
mature person to live in and run the
home. Call Mr. Poole, 376-3468
anytime. Must have references.
(E-6t-157-p)
"NEED men of all trades for NORTH
SLOPE, ALASKA, up to $2600.00 a
month. For complete Information
write to Job Research Centre,
Point-Roberts, Wash., 98281. Enclose
$2.00 to cover cost. (E-3t-157-p)
AUTOS
(
Mustang, 289 VB, 1966, convertible
black top & Interior w/ excellent red
finish new tires, top condition. Ask
$1,295 call Jim Sherby @ 378-7432.
(G-st-157-p)
Leather Goods, all handcrafted, belts,
watchbands, suede bugs, If you can
draw it, we can make it. Demians
1634 West Univ. (J-2t-157-p)
COEDS Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave. Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-32t-137-p)
BONES 10 cents EACH! Only at
Demians Leather Shop. Your Choice,
fine, domestic cattle bones
exclusively 1634 West Univ. Ave.
(J-2t-15?-p)
SERVICES
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480 (M-ts-c)

Tuesday, June 23, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

SERVICES
vXv:-:*:vX*:-x*X*:-:-:-:-:*:-:-: ; : ; : ; : ; : ; : ; : ; : ; :
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested and repairs
Auto Electrical Service, 1111 S.
Main (M-ts-c)

Union Auditorium
rauL NEWiuaiv
aSCOOLHaNDUIKE
Friday, June 26 & Saturday,
June 27 at 5:30, 8:00, & 10:30 P.M.
sponsored by JWRU

I LmjTTj EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT! 1
I STARTS FRIDAY JUNE 26 th
wood/t^ch
BfoXx .ME..
I ( ujlth a little help From our frienck) I
I FILMED WHEN IT ACTUALLY HAPPENED!) I
I HAVE All THE THRILLS OF BEING IHEREI I
I starring joan baez joe cocker e country joe & the fish crosby,stills & nosh e arlo guthrie
I richie havens jimi hendrix santana*john Sebastian e sha-na-na* sly & the family stone* ten years after I
I flm by the who and 400,000 other beautiful people. I
I micnael wadleigh produced by bob maurice I
I a wadleigh-maurice,ltd. production technicolor from |
I i r- L r /sf. rV I MDTNICTiD Und*r 17 requires copyright (c, 1969 mofnum photos, inc. I
[ lied I JjlUo. | iccompKiying Pprent or Adull Guwdun by charlts hirbutt, burk urrle and elhott lindy
Try GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

Page 11

SERVICES
ALTERATIONS Mrs. Ruby Mills
moved near Gainesville shopping
center 100 N.E. Bth Ave. Apt. 217
Phone: 376-8506 (M-st-157-p)

KE393iK r l FEATURE AT
UliSj I 1:54 3:53
i| e r 11? j _ggg_J D.DZ /IDO
'j 9:54
The story of
a beautiful girt's lifetime
between the ages of 19 and 22.
iWM&hmpper
_ JACQUELINE BISSET
oMtwmt IOSEPH COTTIN
,J 5 JIM BROWN I
As tommy Marcott
no ** colo ** NO ONE SEATED DURING
LAST 15 MINUTES ... DO NOT
REVEALTHEENDINC^^^
| FEATURE
AT ...
2:06 3:55 5:45
7:38 9:33
WAIT DISWCYB
Darby ofaiUand m
the Little #|
TVoble >
V TECHNICOLOR



Page 12

!.TN Florida Alliaator. Tuaadav. Juna 23.1970

"j
.. r HU
'Sp^'& > '~v' lc '^' X ft J %W J S -V \oo%ffi K / A
Hf
w&
EVERYTHING BUT .. PH,L BANN,STER

A resident of Fletcher Hall was caught, by an
ambitious photographer, moving everything but
the kitchen sink from his dorm room at the end

Pill For Male
Is Unlikely
It is unlikely that methods of
systemic fertility control
currently under investigation
with laboratory animals can be
modified to provide a suitable
human male contraceptive in the
near future, according to the
National Society for Medical
Research.
The society based its
announcement on a recent
report by the World Health
Organizations Group on
Developments in Fertility
Control.
Apparently the agents are
not promising because of
hazards of known or potential
toxicities or side reactions,
they said, and in the female,
there art more steps in the
reproductive process which
appear to be susceptible to
regulation than in males.
Census Shows
Alachua Top
Area County
In the latest figures released
by the U. S. Census Bureau there
are now 103377 permanent
residents in Alachua County.
This makes Alachua the most
populated county in North
central Florida just edging out
Leon County for this position.
Tallahassee, the county seat of
Leon, still outranks Gainesville,
county seat of Alachua in
population with 74,074 to
63318 respectively.
The present population of
Gainesville shows over a 200 per
cent gain in the past 10 years
which is one of the highest in
the state. The metropolitan
population of Gainesville is now
estimated at about 78,000.
This dramatic rise in the
population ,of Gainesville places
it in a very favorable light for
future retail and industrial
expansion, U. S. representative
Don Fuqua (D-Alachua) said.
EVERY THIRD
WASH LOAD
Air-conditioned Comfort
SPEED QUEEN
Sin City Plaza
OFF 13th St. on S.W. 16th Aw.

of spring quarter. Note the decal on his
car reading: 'This is Fletcher Country.

(This "Subjective valueanalysis pertains to another remarkable,
if controversial, feature ofKLH stereo equipment:)

A recent survey sponsored by KLH has proven
beyond doubt that when you buy KLH stereo equip equipment
ment equipment you will love your wife (or husband) more.
Admittedly this is a flamboyant claim. How However,
ever, However, let us review the facts:
This survey asked each respondent to assume
that he was for some reason to be deprived of his
wife (or husband), and to assume that dollars could
somehow prevent the catastrophe.
We asked how many dollars it would be worth
to keep her (him). Well gentlemen, the findings
showed that owners of KLH equipment said, on
the average, $541,616.23.
Owners of other sorts of equipment said a mere
$362,615.59. There
w \ K is, then, a difference
of $ 179,000.64 in
} sC *i' favor of the average
KLH spouse.
Now if this differ difference
ence difference in marital value

Ml 10 Mm high fidelity center me.

KLH & LOVE


John Rowe Heads {
t Summer Traffic Court J
j: g
j: The summer traffic court will be headed by John Rowe, 3AS,
I Traffic Court Clerk Mrs. Nell Parker said.
i Rowe will serve as interim student traffic court chief justice in >;
ithe absence of Kathy Spellman, elected chief justice. Miss Spellman £
became ill during the spring elections, according to Student Body
j:President Steve Uhlfelder. She withdrew at the end of last quarter. >
$ It is expected that Rqwe will join Jack Pankow in the fall as an j;
:j associate justice when Miss Spellman returns. j;
j Candy Caputo, Student Senate secretary, spoke with Miss Spellman |j
lover the break and reported that the elected chief justice is feeling £
ji-much better and plans to find a job in the Gainesville area over the j:
There is no doubt that Kathy will return in the fall, Mrs. Caputo
vsaid.
ft 8
The summer traffic court will handle only written appeals. Open >:
court hearings will resume in the fall. X
! *!'
.v.vjy.y.>V.y

is not attributable to the fact that KLH owners
become more loving people, then what is it attrib attributable
utable attributable to? The statistics offer us no other answer.
Oh, there will be cynics who will rationalize that
these scientific findings are inconclusive.
But to us it is abundantly clear that when you
buy a Model Twenty-Four three piece stereo sys system
tem system at $320, or a Model Twenty at $ 400 and the
full dynamic range of a symphony orchestra or a
rock and roll group, as the case may be, or a
crooner, even, is heard, as if for the first time,

throbbing out from our famous
speakers, you are bound to be a
happier and more loving person for
it, arent you? You certainly are.
Yes.

The center section of a
KLH Twenty system appears
beside the casual couple in the
above picture. The back of
two KLH Twenty speakers can
be seen below. The fronts look
better.
You can sec them at our?
store.



Fla Writers

Open Union Conference Today

By LES GARCHEFF
AHigrtor Managing Editor
UF will assert its leadership
role among Florida universities
once more when the first annual
Florida Writers* Conference
convenes in the Reitz Union
today.
The conference, which will
continue through Friday, is
expected to attract at least 100,
and possibly many more,
participants, according to UF
Assistant Professor Harry Crews,
co-director of the event.
AN IMPRESSIVE GROUP of
well-known short story writers,
poets, essayists and novelists
gathered from throughout the
nation will give nightly lectures
and work individually with
conference participants.
This group consists of four
lecturers and five fellows,

(IrOKSHOnI lly Manfrril /olliiii l.emmo
TIIB INCOKKIUIH.BS p ^.
M 15 Ilf 111 lit lit lit
M
Si 1
mmu
BBB~'.
.
4
|HH|
51 52 j
57 1

jiHin I
1
mm 74 mm/Bm \
___MBBBB|
79 ao
la
n

I
money from. lO3 Brat. writer. 90 "" vv
38 So long: Brit. 73 French 106 Storm. 140 Host yir* BB BB .BB
39 Fr. river. numeral. 110 Stuff. 141 Tuesday. I* 109 109
HF 11 M
1 Sprightly. IS Finnish lake. 43 Juniper 59 German ~~BBP 119
2 Italian 16 Ascent. trees. river. .Bn
delicacy. 17 Siouan. 44 Pungent 60 Jet setters. 123 |88124
3 Kurd. e.g. 18 Herbert 46 Mr. Chips'* e.g. HH BB
4TV bear. operetta. Oscar 61 Triolet, e.g. 12* 129 ~~TBBbT30" 131 132 ~|113
5 Off ship. 19 oneof**My Winner. 62 Astronaut's |
6 Comique or Three Sons." 47 Wight, e.g. fine.'' pyi m VTST
buffa. 20 Golf cup. 48 Comic strip 63 Eng. poet. ;^^B
7 Brasilian 26 For tyke. 67 Show self- rr-j
city. example. 49 Mountain satisfaction. ,4 I
8 Summer: 27 Moroccan nymph. 68 Duplicity. J 1, .l .....I ULI BBL 11 I I
69 Music for
9ln piercing 33 Doggone it! 5' *wi*. two 79 Pur.ue. 86 Gloomy. 97 Tiber 104 Learned. IHStrmged 120 Jacob ton.
tones. 39 Ecclesiaiti- 52 Black 71 Indonesian 80 Being: Sp. 87 Twaddle! tributary. 105 Crazes instrument. 121 Power.
10 Fr. river. calvest- 54 Threatener s island. 82 Kind. 88 Detest. 99 Gampus VIP. 107 Mean. 115 Gem weight. 124 Peace
11 Surround ment. phrase. 72 Wme center. 83 Crowd. 89 Large game 100 Flipped. *, 108 latnc. 116 Fern. name. adherent.
closely. 41 Makeup man 55 Fern. name. 74 Elect. together. fish. 101 Smallest 109 Cathedral 117 Separate. 129 Nonsense!
12 Lamprey. West- 57 Dossier. 77 Indian 84 Factory. 90 Draws. part of a endowment. 118 Madam 131 Fern. name.
13 Agreements. more. 58 Movie flop: guitar. 85 Resembling: 94 Curve. line. 1.11 Best duds. Yokum. 132 Between: It.
14 Clergyman. 42 Macaw. colloq. 78 Slav. tuff. 96 River rapids. 103 Reformer 113 J.m dance. Il9Nappery. 133 or,ginal

UF Student
Still Critical
UF student Thomas Bernard
Palko was still listed in critical
condition Monday in the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center after he
attempted to jump into a
swimming pool from a third
story roof Friday night.
Palko, 20, 914 SW Bth Ave.,
suffered head injuries after
failing to clear the patio area and
landed short of the pool. The
accident took place at the
LaMancha apartments.
Hot Statistic
HELSINKI (UPI) There are
more than 1 million sauna hath*
in Finland, or about one to
every fifth Finn, according to a
survey.
Remember I
Summer I
Bowling I
Special I
REITZ UNION I
LANES|

representing a variety of current
schools of writing.
The lecturers are:
John Crowe Ransom, a
Rhodes Scholar, Guggenheim
Fellow, founder of the Kenyon
Review, poet, essayist, editor
and publisher of The Fugitive.
Andrew Lytle, editor of the
Sewannee Review, two time
recipient of the Guggenheim
Fellowship for creative writing,
and a lecturer of creative writing
at UF between 1948 and 1961.
(At least 25 UF students who
studied under Lytle have since
written and published one or
more novels apiece as well as
numerous short stories and
poems.)
Peter Taylor, professor of
English at the University of
Virginia, a Guggenheim Fellow
and the 1950 recipient of the

Welcome!
FRESHMAN
Todays the day on your busy schedule to visit
your on-campus Bookstore and meet some of
the people whose sole purpose is to serve
you .... introduce you to the textbook division
and make you familiar with the tools of your
college career here at the University of Florida
Come in .... browse around and pick up your
information portfolio with Florida decals for
your car included .... FREE!
H Campus Shop & Bookstore
located in the Hub
phone 392-0194

Tire
Florida
Alligator

National Academy Award for
fiction. Often compared with
Chekhov, many critics consider
Taylor the foremost short story
writer in America today.
Cleanth Brooks, a Gray
Professor of Rhetoric at Yale,
the author of The Well
Wrought Urn and numerous
articles and a champion of the
sophisticated and classical style
over idiom and corrupted
English.
The fellows, although
younger, are unusually talented.
They include:
Donn Pearce, author of
Cool Hand Luke.
Jonathon Strong, author of
numerous short stories,
including the collection Tike
and Five Short Stories. The
youngest member of the group
at 25, Strongs youth recently

:: iiiVi : i : ii : riiVTTi^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiktfitti^^

made him the subject of a Life
Magazine feature story.
Robert Pack, author of
Irony of Joy,** A Strangers
Privilege and Home From the
Cemetery.
t Henry Van Dyke, author of

I TAKE THE 30 AIINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
I STARKE. FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM -6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLEJPHONEJ372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
BACK TO SCHOOL
CASSETTE TAPE SALE
"SCOTCH HIGHLAND LABEL
H-C-30-30 MINUTES- $1.05
H-C-60-60MINUTES- $1.30
H-G-90-90MINUTES- SI.BO
NO DEALERS SUPPLY LIMITED
IN STOCK- SCOTCH 3M co
8 TRACK -RECORDING TAPE
-40 MINUTES & 80 MlNUTES MlNUTESsavet^p4o%
savet^p4o% MlNUTESsavet^p4o% ON SCOTCH
RECORDING TAPE AT COUCH S
WHEN YOU BUY IN QUANTITY LOTS
GAINESVILLES LARGEST SELECTION
OF RECORDING TAPES
OSSETE 8 TRACK -REEL
SAVE UP tOAf\Of
/o OR MORE
Naiw oeam
TAPE RECORDERS
BMBB 9RMR BMi mh
mm mm mm m
SEE OUR LARGE SELECTION OF
WOLLENSAK SONY
LEAR JET
TAPE PLAYERS RECORDERS
DIRECT FACTORY DEALER
* Buy it From A Specialist
mi iru^c 608 N ma|n sT
tUUtn O PH-378-1562
I v ..-

Tudv June 23 1970 Tlw Florida AHhwtor,

Ladies of the Rachmaninoff
Eyes and Blood of
Strawberries.
Merrill Joan Gerber, a 1959
UF graduate and student of
Lytle, author of Stop Here My
Friend and An Antique Man.

Page 13



The
Florida
Alligator

Gator Opponents Look Tough In VO

By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Editor
If ole Albert hopes to bring
the SEC football crown to
Gainesville this year he better
become acquainted with some of
the people who plan to throw a
monkey wrench into the UFs
master strategy.
Alabama coach Paul (Bear)
Bryant is madder than a hornet
with the results of the 1969
season. The Crimson Tide placed
Bth in the conference and lost to
Colorado 47-33 in the Liberty
Bowl. The Bear has searched
the country from coast to coast
for players to improve things
quick and will have some
transfers and junior college
graduates to help replace 10
starters lost, including
All-America Alvin Samples and
All-SEC Danny Ford.
BAMAS 1970 TEAM
promises to produce the finest
passing game ever. Triggered by
Scott Hunter, it is kept potent
by a swarm of receivers
including aces George Ranager
and David Bailey.
Johnny Musso keys the
running game along with power
runner Dave Brungard and
speedster Joe Laue.
The Tide is better than last
year on both offense and
defense. Improved running,
linebacking and pass defending
blend with the excellent passing
attack. They will need
everything they can get and
maybe more with their schedule.
THE UF FACES the Tide on
September 26, and some of the
fire might be knocked out of the
Tide after their opener with the
mighty Trojans of Southern
California.
The UF will have its hands
full in Knoxville when Albert
goes up against the Volunteers
of Tennessee. Ever since head
coach Doug Dickey came to
Gatorland Tennessee has been

UF Signs SMU Game
The UF and Southern Methodist University will meet in football
September 23, 1972, in Gainesville and in two later years, according
to Director of Athletics Ray Graves.
In addition to the 1972 game, which is the UFs eleventh game of
that season, the Gators will face SMU September 13, 1975, in
Gainesville and September 16,1978, in Dallas, Tex.
WE ARE PLEASED to have an opportunity to play SMU again,
said Graves. They have an excellent football program and an exciting
team. This should be an interesting three-game series.
Florida and SMU met in 1964 in Gainesville with the Gators
winning, 24-8, behind the field generalship of another past super soph,
Steve Spurrier.
Florida has one of the best football programs in the country and
we are happy to be part of their future schedules, said SMU Athletic
Director Hayden Fry. I believe over this coming period of years the
Gators are going to be one of the top collegiate teams anywhere.
Fry, who is also head football coach at SMU, was on the same
Arkansas coaching staff with UF Head Football Coach Doug Dickey
under Frank Broyles.
DECOUPAGE
$ 3-D
ASSEMBLAGE
(Lessons)
Instructor: Mr. Paul Burdick $6.00-6 weeks
Sign up at the first lesson. June 30 7- 9pm
room C-4, Union sponsored by the JWR Union

GATOR SPORTS

bent on knocking the UF out of
SEC athletic competition.
The Vols will be led by the
youngest coach in SEC history,
Bill Battle. Trying to follow
Dickeys winning ways may
prove to be extremely difficult.
UT retains all of its offensive
starters except ends Gary Kreir
and Ken Delong, but the loss of
eight defensive regulars and
punter Herman Weaver is
critical. It will be next to
impossible to replace
All-American linebackers Steve
Kiner and Jack Reynolds.
BATTLES SUCCESS in
defending the championship
obviously depends on the
strength of the new defensive
unit he must mold. The passing
game will definitely be hurting
and power running will hot
outscore many SEC teams.
Tennessee will have the home
game advantage in the contest
with the Gators plus the fact
they are still very unhappy over
Dickeys move to the UF.
Albert beware!
The Homecoming contest
with the Auburn War Eagles
promises to be a battle royal. It
will be a cold day in hell when
the Gators forget the nightmare
in Cliff Hare Stadium last year.
The Auburn defense humiliated
the highly toted UF offense with
nine interceptions, and
administered the only defeat of
the year.
THE GATORS WILL go into
the game with blood in their
eyes but they must remember
the old adage, never
underestimate your foe.
The 1970 Auburn team is
well-balanced, as compared to
last years when most of the
experience was with the defense.
Auburn lost eleven starters,
including All-Americans Buddy
McClinton and David Campbell
but the sophomore offense of

69 matured under pressure and
led the SEC in scoring, 36.3
points per game. If the War
Eagles come to Florida Field
gloating over last years win they
will surely get their plows
cleaned.
Remember the last time a
team stopped the Gators when
they had a winning streak going?
North Carolina paid for that
mistake to the tune of 52-2
shellacking.
BY-THE-WAY, that was the
Homecoming game last year.
Georgia was favored to win
the SEC crown in 1969, but a
rash of injuries depleated the
Dogs at mid-season and they
finished sixth in the conference.
Georgia lost ten starters, with
them flanker Dennis Huges and
All-SEC punter Spike Jones.
Coach Vince Dooley has
fourteen returning regulars,
seven on offense and seven on
defense. Dooley has a bumper
crop of quarterbacks, several
who are seriously challenging
two-year starter Mike Cavan.
The Dogs acquired the UFs
head offensive coach who
developed the UFs pro-style
offense, Fred Pancoast, at the
end of last season. Pancoasts
ability will greatly aid Georgia in
developing a potent
well -balanced offensive. The
defense is up to par again,
which, by Georgia standards,
means tough.
THE UF FACES the Dogs
November 7, in Jacksonville on
neutral ground. The Gators are
still smarting from the 51-0
thumping in 1968, and the
13-13 tie last year. This years
tilt in Jacksonville could prove
to be rather embarrassing for
Dooleys Dogs.
The top contenders for
the SEC crown according to the
experts are the University of
Mississippi, Louisiana State

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Page 14

University, Auburn, and Florida
in that order.
The Gators dont play either
Mississippi or LSU. Therefore it
is a must the UF defeats these
other SEC teams that will face
Archie Manning Inc. and LSU.

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, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 23,1970

Head Coach Doug Dickey said,
our scheuule is difficult. We
must win the tough games on
the road, defeating Alabama and
Tennessee in their home
stadiums is not going to be
easy.



-
lSSgHnH|nnK#
CARLOS ALVAREZ PH L C PE
... ready for the fall
Baseball, Football:
Cheap Fun Today

By STEVE SNIDER
UPI Sportswriter
Remember baseballs 50-cent
bleacher seats? Not many ball
parks even have bleachers these
days and the few thatre left go
for 75 cents or sl. But $1.50 or
$2 will get you into almost any
major league baseball game and
for an extra dollar youre in a
reserved section.
Despite some inflation this
season, baseball still remains one
of the best buys in sports or
the entertainment field.
Thats particularly true in
New York where the pro
basketball Knicks and hockey
Rangers, who rarely fail to pack
Madison Square Garden, decided
this week to put a sharper bite
on their customers for the
1970-71 season.
Top price for both clubs
zooms from $7 to $8.50.
Increases in other sections for
pro basketball range from $1 to
$1.50 and hockey increases
range from 50 cents to $1.50.
Cheapest seat for a Knicks
game at the Garden, when they
return to defend their National
Basketball Association title, will
be $4.50. Cheapest seat for
hockey will be $3 and there
wont be many at that price.
Out at Shea Stadium, where
the world champion Mets play
baseball, the scale runs from
$1.30 to $4. The Yankees pop
you $4 for their best seats but
they also have old-fashioned
bleachers for the $1 crowd.
The long, long season of 81
homes games naturally
contributes to baseballs
willingness to keep ticket prices
within reason.
Pro football, however, holds
on well even with a short season.
We had to raise our prices
last season for the first time in
16 years, apologizes a
spokesman for the New York
Giants. Theyre the same for
1970-$5, $6 and $7.
The Jets, like the Giants,
personally sell out. But the Jets
are holding the line for 7O at
$6.50 to SB.
Considering other prices in
New York, baseball and football
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are almost a steal.
This is a town where most
auto parking lots hit you $1.50
for the first half hour. If youre
heading for a restaurant, take
heavy money but eat lightly.
If the theater is your dish,
you can catch Katherine
Hepburn in Coco, Lauren
Bacall in Applause or study
the costumes in Hair for a sls
top if you can find a ticket at
all.
And a closed circuit telecast
of the current World Cup soccer
has a $12.50 price at Madison
Square Garden.

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Alvarezs Knee Heals OK

By Alligator Services
All-American sophomore Carlos Alvarez is
expected to be ready for action next fall after
missing spring practice, said head trainer Chris
Patrick.
Alvarez, one of the nations top flankers last year,
took the Gators to a 9-1-1 season and a bowl game.
Early this spring Alvarez was injured while
running track. He hurt the lining of his knee cap,
said Patrick. The injured Alvarez had missed all of
spring practice and there was some doubt as to
whether he would be ready to go in the fall.
DR. KISSAM said that the best thing for my
knee is rest. He thought I should lay out this spring
to give my knee a chance to recover, commented
Alvarez.

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Tuesday, June 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Patrick said An injury like Alvarezs can irritate
the knee for a long period of time if not treated
properly.
Alvarez said, The coaches realized the
circumstances of the injury and have been
understanding. The super sophomore said he hasnt
had a real chance to go full speed since the injury
occurred and this had hurt him in making
adjustments to the new coaching staff and offense.
Alvarez said, I hope next season will be a good
one but I cant judge next seasons outcome on a
short performance this spring. In the off-season
Alvarez has been bicycling to help strengthen the
injured knee.
Head football coach Doug Dickey said he was
confident Alvarez would be ready to go next fall.

Page 15



Page 16

I. The Florida Alligator, TuMday, Juno 23,1970

Everyday Low Discount Prices
Get The Quick Save Habit
Save on Every Item Not Just Specials
Checks Cashed Master Charge

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Regular Our Regular Our
Price Price Price Price
Copper Tone $.92 $.83 Tampax $1.79 $1.39
Tanya Lotion 1.65 1.23 Listerine 1.14 .87
Ban Cream .79 .63 Scope 1.19 .87
%
Excedrine 1.59 1.25 Colgate 100 l.ig 1.05
Crcst *B3 .63 Visine discounted
Colgate 1.29 .96 No Ooz discounted
Contac 1.59 1.09 Clearasil discounted
Barnes 8i Hines wetting solution Phisohex discounted
Baby Oil .79 .63 Head & Shoulders Sahmp Shampoo i.os 95
Alka-Seltzer 1.59 1.27 Breck 1.15 g 2
Cigarettes .50 .39 Gillett Foamy 1.19 07
Kodak Film ( r low discount prices Rise 119 g 3
Shick Injector Blades Tame Creme Rinse 1.79 143
Gillete Razors & Blades Prell Shampoo 115 91
Wilkinson Blades Sun In 1.79 13g
Living Curl Hair Spray Revlon Band Aids .77
Adorn 1.50 1.09 Right Guard Deoderant 1.09 33
Maybelline Eye Make-up 1.00 .77 Arrid Extra Dry 1 1.79 1 43
Uof F soap dishes .39 .17 Color Photo Prints 14 cents each
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