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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Tt> *' Interesting |

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 62, No. 156

CAUGHT BY FBI
Man Hijacks Jet,
Demands Ransom

WASHINGTON (UPI) An
angry Arizona taxpayer who
hijacked a commercial jetliner as
hostage for a SIOO million
ransom demand on the
government was lured back to a
Washington airport by bags of
phony money and captured by
FBI agents.
The original pilot of the Trans
World Airlines 727, Capt. Dale
C. Hupe, was shot in the
stomach by the hijacker, a
Phoenix bakery truck driver
named Auther G. Barkley, but
was reported in good condition.
BARKLEY himself was shot
in a thumb while grappling with
an FBI agent, about IVi hours
after the disgruntled taxpayer
commandeered the jet with 58
persons aboard over Las Vegas,
Nev., and directed Hupe to fly
him to Washington.
A TWA pilot who watched
the incident at Dulles
International Airport in Virginia
said all but four of the
passengers had been removed
from the plane on buses when
Barkley was captured. The seven
crew members remained on the
plane.
The plane had landed at
Dulles originally at 3:40 pjn.
EDT. It was refueled and TWA
officials delivered $100,750 in a
canvas sack for Barkley.

Action To Come On Report Recommendations

The report of The Committee to Study the Removal and Control of
Guns on Campus was released last Sunday, but comment and
subsequent action on its recommendations will not be heard until this
summer.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell received the report Sunday, but
said he would need time to reflect before making a decision on the
proposals.
UNIVERSITY POLICE Department (UPD) Chief Audie Shuler said
the committee addressed itself to considering all sides of the issues.
Shw said the report would be helpful in the functions of the campus
police.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder said, The gun committee
did an excellent job in listening to both sides of the arguments. They

University of Florida, Gainesville

At 7:18 the pilot radioed: He wants you to get the
vehicles off the runway. He says he's going to kill us if you
don *t get them off right now.
Then the hijacker came on: Youre stalling. Get the
vehicles off the runway.
The Dulles Airport control tower replied: Negative.
We are trying to contact the people in the vehicles and get
them off.

NEARLY AN hour later, the
plane took off with a new pilot
and Barkley complained he
wanted the rest of the SIOO
million.
After a flight
northward and back, the
hijacker had the plane land again
at Dulles.
FBI agents, fearful that the
hijacker was carrying explosives,
shot out the tires of the
commandeered Trans World
Airlines 727 shortly after it
landed for the second time at
Dulles International Airport in
the Virginia countryside. A fire
truck pulled up in front of the
craft.
AUTHORITIES HAD placed
100 sacks stuffed with paper
along the approach end of the
runway in the hope of luring the
hijacker out of the plane to pick
them up.
Some of the 51 other
passengers started running out of

Friday, June 5, 1970

the plane shortly after the FBI
shot out the tires.
As the Boeing 727
approached Dulles for the
second time the hijacker had
radioed ahead: The Justice
Department better not have any
trick or scheme. If there is, there
will be some lives to pay.
AT 7:18 THE pilot radioed:
He wants you to get the
vehicles off the runway. He says
hes going to kill us if you dont
get them off right now.
Then the hijacker came on:
Youre stalling. Get the vehicles
off the runway.
The Dulles Airport control
tower replied: Negative. We are
trying to contact the people in
the vehicles and get them off.
TWO DOORS of the plane
were open and some passengers
were getting off. Someone heard
a voice shout: Close the aft
door.
(SEE 'HIJACKER' PAGE 2)

spent approximately two weeks in researching and developing
findings.
Uhlfelder accepted the committees recommendations as plausible.
"The recommendations should be implemented as soon as possible. I
think President OConnell has had time to reflect now its time for
action, he said.
COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRMAN Raul Ramirez said I hope
President O'Connell will implement all of these recommendations and
not yield to the pressure of any group wanting to be an exception.
Ramirez discussed the committees feeling that guns must be
removed from the hands of those who have no need for them.
Several calls from students living in married student housing have
reached the offices of Uhlfelder and University Attorney Tom Biggs.

Awareness Comes
To UF Campus
By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF campus has taken small strides this year in reaching a new
awareness of events and issues affecting the university community.
These strides are evident in the issues of the year, often prompting
student comment and concern.
CONTROVERSY WAS centered early in the year on a required
loyalty oath for faculty and staff members threatened resigning if
mandatory signing of the oath remained.
Students voiced their concern on the issue and Florida Blue Key
(FBK) sent a letter to legislators against the oath. The letter argued
that the oath serves to benefit only those who it is directed to.
Good professors were offended by the necessity of the oath as it
tended to discourage free thought and expression, according to FBKs
letter.
THE TOLBERT Incident involved black students who allegedly
forced three white students to clean up trash in a UF dormitory. The
students bringing charges against the blacks dropped their case
claiming that justice will best be served if investigation on the issue
was halted.
Subsequent action by UF President Stephen C. OConnell called for
a ban against guns on university campuses in the state. This plea was
made to Florida legislators and was to later be raided again.
(SEE 'STRIDES' PAGE 2)
Apathetic Students
Become Involved
By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students, often criticized for their apathy, became strongly
involved in contemporary issues this past year, culminating their
activism with a massive protest to the Cambodian offensive and the
Kent State slayings.
The first major event was the Vietnam Moratorium held on October
15.
THE SG AND Student Mobilization Committee (SMC) sponsored
program of music, discussion groups and refreshments coincided with
the national Vietnam Moratorium Day.
Although then Student Body President Charles Shepherd refused to
sanction the SMC proposal to call off classes, SG did agree to share
the Plaza of the Americas with the moratorium backers.
The moratorium program, endorsed by UF President Stephen C.
OConnell except for a provision asking students in individual classes
to vote on holding sessions that day, drew an approximate maximum
crowd of 3,500 during an antiwar skit on the plaza.
THIS WAS followed by a quiet, but emotion-ridden, demonstration
in which about 2,000 UF students locked arms and chanted Give
peace a chance.
(SEE 'WOMEN' PAGE 2)

HiBHiBMBIg
SOME TOP writers
will visit the UF
this summer for a
four-day conference .. .page 5
Classifieds 10
Editorials.. ; 8
Entertainment 19
Letters 9
Movies .. 10
Orange and Blue 14
Sasafi Society 9
Sports..; 21
Whotfs Happening 3



!, Ttw Florida Alligator, Friday. Juaa 5,1970

Page 2

Bloc Seatina: Frats Down, Others Up

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
Drawing for bloc seats
Wednesday night left fraternities
with the lower part of the east
stands, south of the fifty yard
line and all other campus
organizations and living units
with the upper half.
After each game, the blocs
will rotate to give each group a
chance at the best seats,
according to Art Wroble,
Student Government secretary
of athletics.
INDEPENDENTS will be
seated in the upper northern
quarter of the stands for the
entire football season.
Also allotted at the drawing
were positions within the major
blocs for individual fraternities,

Women Environment Topic

Class attendance meanwhile
was below average although a
majority of students did attend
classes.
IN NOVEMBER, a second
national protest against the
Vietnam War was scheduled in the
form of a March Against
Death in Washington, D.C.
An estimated 400 UF
students, most of whom were
sponsored by SMC, attended the
mass rally in the nation's capital.
On March 8 it was the turn of
UF women to become involved.
On that day the Ad Hoc
Committee recognized
International's Womens Day
with a program designed to
acknowledge the fact that
women have been active
throughout the years and have
played a part in the country's
development. The two main
points stressed were equal rights
for women and control by
women over their own bodies
through legalized abortion.
ON APRIL 20, the
Environmental Action Group
(EAG) sponsored a campus-wide
Earth Day. Although consumer
watchdog Ralph Nader made a
last minute cancellation and rain
forced the rally from the plaza
to the University Auditorium, an
estimated audience of 250
students remained to hear four
local speakers discuss
environmental problems.
THE CLIMAX of UF
involvement came with a strong,
response to the Kent State
slayings and the Cambodian
operation.
May 6, declared an official
day of mourning by
administrative and SG officials, a

FREDRICK
GARDENS
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published.semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion. ' ' --if?? v#;:

organizations and living units.
A representative of the
French Quarter apartments was
denied bloc seating in the
living units section on the
grounds the apartments were not
a campus living unit within the
meaning of the student body
constitution.
KAPPA SIGMA fraternity was
given a bloc in the
organizations section, as its
membership in the
Interfratemity Council has been
suspended.
Only the approximate
locations of seating blocs were
alloted in the drawing. The
upper limit on the number of
seats that may be alloted each
bloc for any game will b set
later. The limit is based on a

requiem memorial service was
held on the plaza. Afterwards,
an estimated crowd of 3,000
peacefully marched to the
ROTC building to hold
discussions over the role ROTC
should be allowed to have on
campus.
The crowd then marched back
to Tigert Hall, which by this
time was locked and guarded by
members of the University
Police Department (UPD).
THE FOLLOWING day
approximately 800 students
occupied Walker Auditorium
from 1:30 pan. to a 7 pan.
deadline set by OConnell. As a
result of this incident, O'Connell
decided to dismiss classes for the
next two days (Friday and

Strides Taken On Awareness Os Issues

Early in spring, student attention turned to the Athletic
Associations (AA) decision to charge students and faculty for
football games in the fall. Student protest on the issue culminated in a
rally after a walkout of the annual Orange and Blue game.
A FIERCE Student Government election campaign found
candidates and students discussing issues and offering concrete
alternatives to present policies. It was a campaign that focused on
more widespread concerns than any in recent years.
Student Body President Stever Uhlfelder pledged to make his
administrion one of involvement for himself and students.
The chance to get involved was not far off. On May 4 four students
were killed and several others wounded in an eruption of violence at
Kent State University. Students on campuses across the nation raised
their voices in protest and demonstration. The issue was too great to
pass the UF.
THE CRY FOR a student strike spread led by SMC and Vets for
Peace. Outraged and concerned, students and faculty gathered in areas
of the campus to share their feelings and convince others to join them.

3 passport photos 3.50
SNEERINGER PHOTOGRAPHY
101316 W. Univ. Ave. 378-1170

GROUPS Will ROTATE

comparison of the number of
seats requested by each
organization and its actual
membership, according to
Wroble.
The total number of seats
alloted to students in the east
stands will be determined by the
Athletic Association based on
the number of $5 student season
tickets sold, Wroble said.
AN AREA generally south of
the fifty yard line is divided
roughly into four blocs
designated I-IV. These blocs are
drawn for by IFC A, IFC B
(each consisting of 14
fraternities), organizations
and living units, according to
Wroble.
According to the student
body constitution, IFC A

Saturday), for the safety of the
students.
Dissent reached an all-time
high the same night when an
estimated 6,000 students walked
in a candlelight death march
around Fraternity Row, past
numerous dormitories and
ended at President OConnells
house.
Although the Kent State and
Cambodian protests quietly
subsided over the long weekend,
a remnant protest survived in the
form of a hunger strike by 48
students.
The students, who camped
out in front of Tigert Hall,
disbanded only after 10 days
and 16 hours when they felt
their demands for gun control
on campus were receiving proper
consideration.

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if TEXTBOOKS B
I I SCHOOL SUPPLIES H
II ART SUPPLIES
11 ENGINEERING if
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|H 11 Customer Parking In
jH : The Rear
; I We Welcome:

always draws first, and IFC B
automatically gets the next bloc
in numerical order. After the
first game and each consecutive
game, the blocs rotate in a
clockwise direction.
Wroble said he is working on a
proposal to shorten the lines at

Nixon Wants Watered
Cambodia Legislation
WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon will support efforts to
water down legislation intended to prevent future uses of American
forces into Cambodia, well-informed Senate sources said Thursday.
Nixons decision, expected to be announced shortly, is a switch
from his original position in opposition to any legislation dealing with
the Cambodian operation he ordered April 30.
THE SOURCES said Nixon will actively endorse a proposal by Sen.
Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., which would allow the President to
dispatch troops to Cambodia again if he finds that action necessary to
protect American troops in Vietnam.
Byrds proposal now before the Senate is an amendment to the
proposal of Sen. John Sherman Cooper, R-Ky., and Frank Church,
D-Idaho, to deny the President any funds for retaining American
forces in Cambodia beyond July 1.
Church, Cooper and their supporters say Byrds conditions would
make their proposal meaningless.
The Byrd amendment is expected to come to a Senate vote next
week, after the return of a delegation of senators, congressmen and
governors from Southeast Asia for an on-the-spot evaluation of the
Cambodian operation.
Both sides expect a close vote.
Hijacker Wanted 100 Million

tTnOM PAGE ONE^
The hijacker had asked that
the bags be left at the approach
end of the runway.
That would mean that the
plane had to land and then taxi
back to them.

The numbers grew. Expanded concern was taking place on a
campus where the most controversial issue had been the raising of
prices to football games.
Hundreds eventually found their way to the protestors ranks, and
perhaps the biggest moment was on May 7 when over 6,000 students
held a candlelight march.
I
UHLFELDER released a statement the following week expressing
his desire to keep the campus concerned. The strike is over, but the
involvement has just begun.
Positive results of the strike included the establishment of
committees to study the removal and control of guns, demands of the
Black Student Union and the place ofROTC on the UF.
The new awareness for the UF was different to student experience.
Often typified as merely the free and highly social Gator Country,
the UF was taking its place as an institution concerned with the
problems of the day.
Student Government is changing its perspectives. Innovations in all
areas of campus life are creating what Uhlfelder calls, an atmosphere
conducive to discussion, education and ultimately changes that are
needed.

Alfred
...THE BIRDS
Wednesday night 7:00 A 9&0
Union Audilorh/m I

ticket windows by using service
organization members to run
additional ticket booths.
Only full-time students are
eligible to buy the new $5
student season tickets. Guest
tickets for non-student dates are
$7 per game.

they were prepared to fill his
request for more fuel for the
three-jet plane.
REPORTERS WERE not able
to see all that went on around
the plane, but they were able to
monitor conversations from the
tower, which was relaying
messages from the pilot.



Communists Blast Nixon

PARIS (UPI) North Vietnam and the Viet
Cong Thursday accused President Nixon of
inventing imaginary victories to justify U. S.
intervention in Cambodia.
The change, made at the Vietnam peace talks,
was an apparent reference to President Nixons
statement Wednesday night that the U. S.
intervention in Cambodia has been the most
successful operation of this long and difficult war.
THE COMMUNIST accusation came after U. S.
delegation chief Philip C. Habib presented the
Communists the text of Nixons speech and urged
them to consider it.
Nguyen Van Tien of the National Liberation
Front responded. Nixon has not ceased inventing
imaginary victories, regarding the devastation of
Cambodia and the killing of Cambodians by Gls as
real achievements, he said.

Slogan Contest Winner Gets Trip

Think up a good slogan, and it
may win you a weekend in West
Palm Beach.
The 1970 Homecoming
Slogan contest is being held July
1-31.
RULES FOR the contest are
as follows:
The slogan should have a
general homecoming theme.
The slogan may have a
maximum of seven words.
Originality and clarity are
necessary.

Antiwar Organization Plans
Emergency Ohio Conference
There will be a National Emergency Conference Against The
Cambodia-Laos-Vietnam War in Cleveland, Ohio, June 19-21 to
organize opposition to the Indochina War.
The conference will be hosted by the Cleveland Area Peace Council
(CAPAC), which hosted the conferences which gave birth to the April
15,1969 and November 13-15 1969 anitwar demonstrations.
The purpose of the conference is to plan antiwar demonstrations
and other activities of the most massive kind centering on the issue of
withdrawal from the war conducted in a peaceful manner.
A statement issued by CAP AC said this is the way to involve
immense masses of ordinary people, trade unionists, Gls and their
families, students, moderates, liberals, and radicals, young and old,
and all those who oppose the war regardless of their differences on
various other matters. Many unions have already endorsed the
conference.
Anyone interested in attending should write to SMC, Box 13157
University Station, giving their name, address and phone number or
call 378-9219. Low cost transportation and accommodations will be
arranged.
FREE DANCE
in
Tolbert Area
By: Cottonwood
from Miami
JUNE 6th, 9:00 P.M.
FREE COKES
BY
UNION BARBERSHOP
SPONSORED BY:
RAWJUNOS & TOLBERT
AREAS COUNCILS** now
PfIRBBDEBEBBBDDBSfIBDDDBOSDBIBQBEBDBBBDOBXISBBS

AT PARIS TALKS

The decision of the judges
is final.
All entries become the
property pf Florida Blue Key
(FBK), which sponsors the
contest.
IN CASE OF a tie, the earliest
entry to reach the FBK office
wins.
All entries must be mailed or
delivered to the following
address during the month of
July: Homecoming Slogan
Contest, Florida Blue Key

He seeks every means to cover up bitter U. S.
failure all over Indochinas theaters of operations.
TIENS COLLEAGUE on the North Vietnamese
delegation, Nguyen Minh Vy added the Nixon
administrations present path of seeking a military
victory and a postition of strength will not get the
United States out of the quagmire in Vietnam, but
instead will sink it deeper into the larger quagmire
of the whole Indochinese peninsula and will lead it
to heavier defeat.
Habib told them once again today you have
made no constructive contribution to our
deliberations ... Therefore I see no reason to
prolong the session.
The meeting broke up after four hours, but the
negotiators agreed to meet again next week.

Office, J. Wayne Reitz Union,
University of Florida.
Active FBK members and
their families, and members of
the homecoming committee are
ineligible to participate in the
contest.
Some of the past winning
homecoming slogans include
Happiness is Being a Gator
(1967), Gators Reign in the 6B
Campaign (1968) and Gators
Cheer An Historic Year (1969).

take the flap
out of camping
with | Sears |
foot lockers and trunks
sale! metal Footlocker ideal for off to camp
/
Baked enamel and plywood
frame. Tongue-and-groove
closure seals moisture,
pests. Black with two
leather handles. Two keys.
Use Sears Easy Payment Plan
... t
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'l^B &M. S E AgB : 4HD SAVE TOP OF THE MALL N. W. 13th at 23rd
SatisjactionJjuarQnteea. > OvCIIm Shop eV&rv niffht
ney seaes, ROEBUCK ahd co. Pnone 378-2531

KunstlerTo Visit UF UFYAF
YAF UFYAF Will Picket Talk
Chicago Seven Defense Attorney William F. Kunstler is still
expected to speak at the University Auditorium 3:30 pjn.
Monday, and the Young Americans for Freedom (YAF) will
picket outside the building to protest his remarks.
There was a possibility Kunstler would be called to testify in
a Jacksonville court Monday, but his attorney says he will be
free to speak at UF.
YAF urged UF take all steps possible to prevent any
outbreak of violence and disruption on this campus in the wake
of Kunstlers speech in a resolution adopted May 28.
WHAT'S HAPPENING
EARTHQUAKE: Anybody interested in helping victims of the
Peruvian earthquake should contact Dr. Martha Hardman-de-Bautista
at the Department of Anthropology.
MOVIES: At the University Auditorium. Two bits.
Friday: Rebel Without a Cause and The Wild Ones at 7 and
9:30 pjn.
Saturday: A Few Dollars More 5:30,8, and 10:30 pjn.
Sunday: Union Film Classics Experimental Films at 7 and 9:30
p.m.
STUDY: The following rooms will be open 24 hours a day
beginning Friday, June 5 until Friday June 12.
Little Hall, rooms 109,125 and 127.
Mechanical Engineering Building, rooms 227,229 and 230.
CONSPIRACY: William Kuntsler, famed attorney for the Chicago
Conspiracy trial speaks Monday, 3:30 p.m., University Auditorium,
under Student Mobilization Committee sponsorship.

Friday, JmvS, 1970, The (ferMa AWfafeor,

Page 3



t, Tto Florida Alligator, Friday, June 5,1970

Page 4

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Fraternity Collects 'Pennies For Pollution

More than 20,000 pennies
were collected last week by Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity for its
Pennies for Pollution
campaign.
A total of S3OO was collected
in the week-long drive from
students and local businessmen.
The money will be turned over
to the Balance Fund Foundation
in Baltimore which will use it to
fight pollution.
THE BALANCE Fund
Foundation is a non-profit
organization which collects
money and gives it to
conservation groups around the
country. The foundation is
sponsoring a proposal to have

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PROPOSES POSTAGE STAMP

the man in balance with
nature environmental button
adopted on a U. S. postage
stamp.
The man in balance with
nature button was designed by
UF student Hal Barcey. Barcey
feels the symbol has a good
chance of being adopted on a
stamp. If the stamp is adopted,
the foundation which holds the
copyright on the symbol, will
receive no profit from the
royalties. All profit will be
channeled back into the fight
against pollution.
The postage stamp will help
legitimize the environmental
symbol for nationwide usage,

Barcey said. It will also help
produce a market for the
products the foundation sells
raising money to fight pollution.
IF CHRISTIANS had a
penny for every cross ever made,
or if Jews had a penny for every
star of David, they would have a
lot of money to promote their
causes, Barcey said. We hope
to make money this way with
the environmental sign.
But the foundation wont
keep any profits. Profits will go
to individual conservation
groups to help fight pollution,
he said.
Frank Pelaez, the chairman of
the Pi Kappa Phi Pennies for
Pollution drive collected more
than SIOO himself. About S7O
was collected outside of Florida
Gym Frolics night.
BROTHERS IN the fraternity
collected money in teams of two
in dorm areas, cafeterias,
fraternity and sorority houses,
and from merchants. The team
which collected the most, won a
prize.
There was general
enthusiasm for the drive in the
fraternity, according to Barcey
with more than 30 brothers
participating. The fraternity
plans to continue the drive again
next year.
Barcey said there was a reason*
why the drive to raise money to
fight pollution was called
Pennies for Pollution. He said
people are willing to give pennies

and loose change they have at
the end of the quarter. Students
arent usually willing to gi ve
more because they just didnt
have the money.
AN AVERAGE donation was
eight cents.
Fewer than 100 people
argued about giving pennies for
pollution, Barcey said.



Conference Brings top Writers To UF

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Nine of the nations top
writers both fiction writers
and poets will be here this
summer for a four day writers
conference.
The conference, sponsored by
the College of Arts and Sciences
and the Division of Continuing
Education, will run from
Tuesday, June 23, through
Friday, June 26.
THERE WILL BE various
lectures and meetings
throughout each day. Those
meetings will be open only to
those who pay the conferences
S3O tuition charge. But, in
addition to the closed meetings,
there will be nightly lectures on
the art and craft of writing that
will be open to the public. There

Coeds To Attend Anniversary

Four UF coeds will go to
Washington, D.C. next week to
participate in the U. S.
Department of Labor sponsored
50th anniversary of the Womens
Bureau.
The program, American
Women at the Crossroads
Direction for the Future, will
be presented at the Washington
Hilton Hotel June 11 through
13. Featured will be everything
from workshops and addresses
to a banquet Friday, where
possibly President Nixon will
speak.
THE FOUR coeds attending
are Caron Balkany, co-chairman
of -Student Government
Productions and Womens
Commission member; Linda
Roberts, secretary of Public
Functions; Pam Ibanez,
secretary of Student Affairs; and
Maryanne Gillis, an Accent
worker.
This is the first time the

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will be no charge for these
public lectures.
All the meetings of the
conference will be held in the
Reitz Union. All of the public
lectures will be in the Union
Auditorium on the second floor.
Those lectures begin at 8 pm.
Directors of the conference
are Smith Kirkpatrick and Harry
Crews, both of the English Dept.
Kirkpatrick has headed the
writing program here for some
time. Crews is one of the
teachers of fiction in the
program. Both are writers.
WERE REAL pleased with
the list of lecturers who have
agreed to come to the
conference, Kirkpatrick said
early this week. These men
have had an incredibly
important involvement in the

Womens Bureau has invited
students to attend. We were
invited because the Womens
Bureau was pleased with the
Association of Women Students
(AWS) convention that was held
here last month, Miss Ibanez
said.
A lot of the program time is
given to workshops, she said,
that will relate to womens
rights such as birth control
and abortion laws.
MISS IBANEZ said she*
intends to incorporate
information and ideas she may
learn in Washington into a
campus birth control program
planned for next year.
Well also be lobbying, she
said, on everything concerning
women's rights and
responsibilities, especially the
abortion laws and birth control
programs.
At the banquet Friday night,
cabinet members and

JUNE 23 TO 26

growth of literature both in the
South and in the nation in our
generation, he said.
John Crowe Ransom, Andrew
Lytle, Cleanth Brooks, and Peter
Taylor are the conferences
lecturers. All are distinguished in
several areas and have been for
some time.
Ransom has been recognized
everywhere as one of the
nations most significant poets,
and a respected essayist, editor
and publisher. He has been a
teacher all his life.
Lytle has been the editor of
The Sewanee Review since 1961
and professor of English at the
University of the South
Sewanee, Tenn.
Cleanth Brooks is the editor
of The Southern Review and the
author of several books on the
craft of writing. He wrote
Understanding Fiction,

government leaders, including
the President, are expected to
attend.
We had to get cleared for
security purposes in order to
have White House privileges,
where part of the convention
may be held, she said.

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FrM ay, Jure 5,1870, Tha Florida Allifetor,

English at the University of
Virginia. His stories have
appeared in The New Yorker,
Harpers, and The Sewanee
Review.

Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida AMigolar, Friday, Aina 5, WO

Maddox Turns To Become A Protestor

ATLANTA (UPI) Gov.
Lester Maddox, accompained by
his wife and mother plus
uniformed and plainclothes
police, picketed the Atlanta
Journal Constitution Thursday
in defense of freedom of the
press.
Maddox, who autographed a
sign carried by a hippie along
with copies of the afternoon
Journal thrust at him by some of
the several hundred bystanders,
vowed to continue a parade in
front of the newspapers until
they start being honest with
their own employes and other
people.
IN A CARNIVAL-LIKE
atmosphere, the governor arrived
a half-hour late to begin his
well-publicized picketing of
Georgias two largest newspapers
in the climax to his long-running
feud with them. s
After an hour of walking up
and down in front of the
building, he left but promised to
return the first chance I get.

Help Comes For Quake Victims

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Writer
The Peruvian Earthquake
Relief Committee (PERC) has
formed in the United States to
help victims of last Mondays
earthquake in Peru.
At UF, the effort to send help
to the quake-striken zone is
being coordinated by Professor
of Anthropology Dr. Martha
Hardman-de-Bautista. She is
requesting donations to help
thousands left homeless in the
quake area.
ACCORDING TO figures
released by the Peruvian
government 1,000 people have
lost their lives, although
unofficial figures say the
casualties could rise as high as
30,000.
More than 500,000 people
live in the area hit by the
disaster, Dr. Hardman said.
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ytcvejnmr peace mi innss more iovt.

Maddox had Atlanta
newspaper vending machines
removed from capitol and state
office buildings last weekend
because of their opposition to
his plans to call a special
legislative session, charging them
with printing untruths in news
columns.
MADDOX WAS joined by his
wife, Virginia, and his mother,
Mrs. Flossie Maddox, and they
were accompained by two
Georgia state troopers, several
Georgia Bureau of Investigation
agents in plain clothes carrying
printed signs.
While a crowd of people kept
police busy trying to avoid a
traffic jam, Maddox walked past
the newspaper offices and
crossed the street where a big
sign hung in front of the
American Civil Liberties Union
office saying This is First
Amendment Country. Welcome,
Lester. ACLU.
He returned to the newspaper

She has done extensive work
in anthropology in Peru and
Bolivia.
Contributions for PERC
should be sent to Suite 310,
1755 Massachusetts Ave.
Washington D. C. 20036.
Dr. Paul Doughty, director of
the Latin American studies
center at the University of
Indiana told Dr. Hardman
Thursday he will go next week
to Peru to coordinate the
groups efforts to send aid to the
peasants.
ACCORDING TO Dr.
Hardman, contributions will be
handled through Dr. Mario
Vasquez, former field director of
the Cornell Peru Project, with
the Directory of Peasants
Communities in the Peruvian
Ministry of Agriculture.
Members of the group include
Sen. Edward Kennedy, Sen.
Birch Bahy, James Loeb, former

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side again smiled and waved at
pressmen who peered out
windows at him, saying, those
fellows in there are for me.
MADDOX, WHO ignored a
gold and black throne set out
for his comfort by the
newspapers, stopped to
autograph a placard carried by a
long-haired youth which said
support the right to dissent for
all.
There will never be any
peace until theres more love,
Maddox said.
The fiery governor got into a
brief debate with a white man
who asked how about the
tyrants in the state, and this
means you.
MADDOX SNAPPED back,
You are a liar, you are a
bald-faced liar. If you havent
got a job, go on upstairs and
they will give you one.
He said he was really
picketing in defense of freedom
of the press.

U. S. ambassador to Peru,
columnist Frank Mankiewicz
and others.
All contributions made for
the relief fund are tax
deductible, a PERC spokesman
said.
Dr. Hardman said PERC is
seeking to bring aid to the
Peruvian peasants in as short a
time as it is legally possible.-
She said there will be no
overhead in the program, since
the people handling it are
donating their time.
Proud Launching
MONTREAL (UPI) Robert
Shatillas wife gave birth to their
first son and Shatilla, president
of Quebec Starcraft,
boatbuilders, used the event for
some business publicity. Instead
of cigars, he handed out toy
boats.

When asked how he arrived at
that, Maddox replied: If I can
get them to print whats honest
and truthful then we can save
this country.
HE SAID of the throne
that it ought to be for the
champion liar. Go up and get the

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publisher and editor and let
them sit in it.
The signs carried by his group
urged people to cancel their
subscriptions to the newspapers
and Maddoxs followers also
passed out leaflets urging
businessmen to stop advertising
in the Journal and Constitution.

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Students Learn
Black Problems
By 808 FRASER
Alligator Editor In Chief
The students ten University Policemen (UPD), four black
undergraduates, one white undergraduate and four white graduate
students sit in a circle. The professor, Dr. Joseph Vandiver of the
sociology department, delivers a short lecture on the subject of police
prejudice.
On the basis of available research, Vandiver says, police are like
anybody else. The mean scores on prejudice scales of police are similar
to the scores of the residents in the city (Denver) the police serve.
NO RESPONSE.
Vandiver continues, There is an intensification of some hostile
stereotypes among experienced police. But, he notes, experienced
police dont believe outsiders stir riots.
No response.
THE LECTURE delivered, Vandiver throws the class open to
discussion.
Is it so hard to understand, a policeman asks, that a policeman
likes to be liked while performing his duties?
The statement gave rise to a discussion marked by laughter and
serious discourse.
BUT ANGER WAS also present during a class break.
You want to send me back to Africa, a policeman was accused
by one black student.
The course, Special Study in Sociology: Problems of Black
America, meets once a week for a three-hour seminar. It is sponsored
by UFs Division of Continuing Education, which provides a graduate
assistantship t 6 the sociology department for Vandivers participation
in the course.
THERE HAS been 4 Vandiver, an ability to accept the
perspective of another class member in the class discussions and a
good measure of respect shown between students.
Lt. Vernon Holliman of the UPD explained the reason for police
participation in the course.
Some of them are dyed-in-the-wool segregationists and thats why
we wanted them in the course. Some never will change but theyre
moving over, in their attitudes.
Our men would be furious sometimes, Holliman said when asked
how policemen responded to the course, but they would go back.
OUR MEN have admitted blacks have not been well-treated by
police, in the past, he said.
Patrolman Everett Stevens, a class member, said he has learned a
great deal about the black race and termed the course very
informative.
It makes me think more about what I say, Stevens said. I
choose my words more carefully when dealing with blacks and
students.
JOHNNY WHITE, 3AS, a black who plans to attend law school
said, This course helps break down sterotypes. I think more courses
of this nature would serve to bring blacks and whites closer together.
White estimated a majority of black students would take
advantage of more courses like this. Black staff members would also
profit, he said.
David Chafin, 3AS, said he restructured his entire schedule at the
beginning of the quarter to add the course but never regretted it .
THE SOCIOLOGY Department should definitely continue the
course, says Chafin, because it provides an opportunity for blacks,
whites and policemen to meet and talk as human beings.
Chafin said he learned about police problems. Pretty raw things
happen on campus that I didnt know about, with which police must
contend while paid a $5,580 a year starting salary.
The reason the UF sponsored the course was explained by W. T.
Coram, who heads the Department of Special Programs, a branch of
the Division of Continuing Education.
LINES OF communication have been weak between law
enforcement and the public, Coram explains, which has been the fault
of both sides. The seminar, then, serves as a vehicle of exchange in
which animosities fall by the wayside with communication.
Coram points to the lack of funds appropriated in the Omnibus
Crime Bill now being considered in Congress for the in-service training
of police officers in institutions of higher learning. Hence, his
organization subsidizes the course.
Youve got to start somewhere, he says. We have to break down
the artificial walls weve built up between people.
THE COURSE is conducted as a Seminar, Coram says, because we
wanted a minimum of structure and a maximum of exposure.

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Friday, Aim 5,1970, Tho Florida AWfrtsr,

Page 7



Page 8

t. The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 5,1970

tfaeaHA ibiwii !*'i SI
The
Florida
Alligator

The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Tow wouldn't want me to upset the delicate balance of arms, would you?"
-Laos Eyes Cambodia

WASHINGTON The ouster of Cambodias
Prince Sihanouk has stirred up plots in Laos to
dump Prince Souvanna Phouma and set up a 1
Cambodian-style military government. This could
repeat the Cambodian crisis all over again in Laos,
with dangerous consequences for the U. S.
Intelligence reports warn that rightist Laotian
leaders have been encouraged by the Cambodian
experience to attempt a similar takeover in their
country. They are weary of the aging Souvanna
Phouma who, like Sihanouk, has put on a show of
outward neutrality. But just as Sihanouk permitted
secret incursions by the North Vietnamese,
Souvanna Phouma allowed the Americans to
operate in Laos.
The Kremlin had promised both leaders that the
North Vietnamese would leave their countries after
the Vietnam war was settled. But as the
encroachments increased, the two princes lost faith
in the Soviet promise and concluded that the North
Vietnamese would never clear out voluntarily.
Souvanna Phouma turned increasingly to the
U. S. to save Laos from the communist crunch. But
Sihanouk flew to Moscow and Peking to enlist
support in getting the North Vietnamese out of
Cambodia. While he was on this mission, he was
deposed by the generals he left behind. Now he has
joined the same forces, ironically, that he had tried
to remove.
* *
Washington and Moscow reached a secret
understanding, meanwhile, to keep still about the
U. S. intervention in Laos. As long as the U. S.
didnt officially acknowledge its clandestine
operations, the Kremlin agreed to ignore them.
The Russians, as they had promised Sihanouk and
Souvanna Phouma, also guaranteed there would be
no North Vietnamese takeover in Laos and
Cambodia. Both the Soviets and Americans agreed
to endeavor, at least, to confine the war to South
Vietnam.
At no time did the U. S. wish to expand the
Vietnam conflict into a fullscale Indochina war.
Restricting the battlefield to South Vietnam,
however, also had advantages for the communists. It
meant that the U. S. could never really win the war.
For it is impossible to defeat an enemy who can
escape across the border into sanctuaries.
In 1964, the North Vietnamese began enlarging
their sanctuary privileges in Laos by attacking the
Plain of Jars and increasing the infiltration down
the Ho Chi Minh spiderweb of trails.
The U. S. countered by stepping up its
clandestine activities and bombing the infiltration
routes. After the bombing of North Vietnam was
halted in 1968, the U. S. simply moved the sorties
across the border and concentrated the full fury
upon Red targets in Laos.
* *
The Central Intelligence Agency, meanwhile, has
subsidizerstfS&fciPsp- V W
Pao, WmMi whose)
14,000 fighting men have been recruited largely

& anut,. ye&n 4
Robert Fraser Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors

Kerry Dupree
Advertising Manager

Mike Davis
Business Manager

Merry-Go-Round
illlllllllillllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllim
by Jack Anderson
from the minority Meo tribes.
The secret army is headquartered at the
multi-million-dollar CIA base of Long Cheng. A
steady stream of Air America and Continental Air
Services planes, under CIA and AID contracts, haul
food, munitions and the monthly payroll for Vang
Paos troops.
Stories have now leaked out above this
clandestine army, describing it accurately as the
only effective fighting force in Laos on the
American side. Yet my reporter in Indochina, Les
Whitten, reports from Vientiane:
The sad fact is that all the millions expended
upon Vang Paos mercenaries have not convinced
one responsible U. S. official in Saigon or Vientiane
that this land of 2.8 million people can be defended
for more than a few weeks by the secret army
against a determined communist attack.
The communist Pathet Lao and North
Vietnamese control half of Laos and clearly could
take over the other half almost at will.
Whitten adds that the fabled CIA forces, which
liberal Senators regard as some kind of powerful
presence in Laos, are made up, in fact, of time
servers, a few brilliant intelligence men and a larger
number of ex-servicemen who are as harassed as any
Washington bureaucrats simply trying to carry out
routine duties.
* *
Much of their time is spent going to Lao units
like traveling salesmen taking orders for ammunition
and guns. At other times, they are paymasters,
making sure that Vang Paos officers dont pocket
the pay that is supposed to go to the soldiers.
The CIA agents also wearily stress to the
Laotians on the U. S. payroll: No boom boom, no
rice. If they refuse to fight, in other words, they
will get no food or pay.
While the secret army is at least classifiable as a
military force, some of the other Laotian army units
are hardly more than poorly trained and homesick
militia. Their pay is as low as $6 per month,
compared to about $25 for Vang Paos riflemen.

Alligator Staff

Phyllis Gallub
Assignment Editor

Dan Vining

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor

Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor

EDITORIAL .. i
'Removing
Passivism
Two weeks ago, Rep. Don Fuqua made a surprising
about-face.
The normally hawkish Fuqua called for a complete
withdrawal of American forces from Southeast Asia. This
amounted to a rather drastic reversal for the Alachuas
congressman, who has consistently supported the war.
The evidence is incomplete, but we would like to believe
the pressure of a proposed FSU-UF student campaign
machine moved Fuqua to see the evil of war. If the
cause-effect relationship is near-valid, the possibilities of
students working in politics are indeed bright.
Fuqua has a long way to go, however, before he has our
support. His voting record on other issues dear to our heart
has not been the most illustrious.
In fact, his record has been almost unbelievably passive.
He voted against the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the
expanded minimum wage in 1966. In 1968 he opposed
urban renewal, school desegregation, open housing and
anti-poverty legislation. He has opposed legislation aimed at
saving our environment. He even opposed medicare.
In short, Fuqua has managed to oppose possible remedies
to the social ills of our time with our previously tacit
approval.
In the past he has been safe in office. He represents 23
predominately rural counties whose 450,000 constituents
are not the nations most demanding, reform-minded
citizens.
Therefore, Fuqua is an outstanding target for the
FSU-UF campaign drive. We urge Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder to mobilize support for any candidate who
can recognize the need for social change and the role of
Congress in that change.
We also urge UF President Stephen C. OConnell to
support student political activity with something more than
spoken approval.
No, we do not endorse closing the university for a week.
But we do not believe anything would be lost by offering a
two hour course for political campaigning, including our
tax-exempt status. Removing Passivism may be an apt
course title.
Considering Rep. Fuquas record, it would also be a truly
appropriate course.
- perfectly clear

Jeff Brein ;

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
of tlio ii


rMovement Left

Wait until I put aside my beard,
for that never committed
treason.
Thomas More
to the headsman
So it goes for another year
and so, too, for my last
Movement Left column. I
guess I am faced with the plight
of any columnist at a time like
this how does one comment
on a whole year without
becoming maudlin or tiresome
with trite truisims.
So Ill forget it. Nothing
about this year and how great or
lousy its been. Except, the
radicalization that has
blossomed and swept through
America (even ol UF) and the
deepening of that radicalization
among those of us who have
been at it for awhile it has
been beyond expectations.
Well, for the rest of my
allotted 30 inches, I am going to
comment some on ROTC, that
great academic foundation of
UF (incidentally, I am proposing
to ROTC and its eloquent
proponents, like Joe Wehby,
that that bastion of liberalism on
campus be named the William
C alley Memorial Brigade in
honor of a great ROTC cadet
who gave his all for freedom and
democracy).
Then, to fill up the rest of the
space, I am going to quote some
other people (youve heard
enough of me, Im sure) and,
finally, I am printing my
cherubic countenance so my

Not All Wrong Intentions

MR. EDITOR:
The unfortunate ODK teaching
evaluation ad on the last page of your
Monday June 1 edition is a small but
significant reason why the university is
taking steps to institute faculty accepted
systems of evaluation.
The students who used this tactic
failed to point out that this is only the
third evaluation in three years and their
system is not the best either operationally
or philosophically. I hope this ODK
action will not alienate from better
evaluations in the future the faculty on
the list who did not volunteer for such
justifiable reason as not having been
invited, experimenting with college (or
their own) questionnaires, campus mail
mixups, not wishing to take away a
period from educating students (classes
occasionally dont feel it is worth the
time), etc.
We all should realize that failure to
cooperate is not necessarily because of
wrong intentions. Involvement is, in
the long run, best gained by hard work
and sufficient communication to
the small society

We'fZe oiss*nizin<& A eUlg
RoP FEoFLB.
TOI r

Our True Nationality Is Mankind

backward, reactionary friends
can bum it at midnight with the
proper incantations.
* *
To understand why ROTC is
opposed, we have to understand
that it is not an isolated
phenomenon but, rather, an
integral part of the planned,
methodical genocide of a people
and the devastation of an entire
area of the world. Does the U. S.
ruling class do this for a just
peace?
Hardly. As Sen. Gale McGee
of Wyoming has very clearly
expressed, That empire in
Southeast Asia is the last major
resource area outside the control
of any of the major powers on
the globe ... I believe that the
conditions of the Vietnamese
people, and the direction in
which their future may be going
are at this stage secondary, not
primary.
Or, as former Kennedy and
Johnson aide, Richard Goodwin
(a dove), put it, We made the
decisions (war escalation similar
to Nixons latest atrocities)
because in the judgments of the
Presidents, American power and
interests demanded it. Thus,
when the French colonialists
were defeated (although the
Uj. S. footed the bill), the
American government installed
the Diem dictatorship and, since
then has propped up whichever
whores will do Americas
bidding (all but one of Thieus
generals were Japanese
collaborators).
Anyway, back to ROTC, the

convince others of our efficacy. Ads like
this work to the detriment of our
community, not its development.
J.P. OCONNELL
CHAIRMAN, UNIVERSITY
COMMITTEE ON TEACHING
EVALUATION
Blacklist
MR. EDITOR:
I seriously question your acceptance
and printing of the ODK advertisement in
the June 1 issue. The ad was headed,
Why is it were never asked to evaluate
the teachers we think need it most? This
is followed by a listing of faculty by
college or department who have not
chosen to participate in student
evaluation. I dont need to comment
more about the twisted logic and
vieiousness of this.
I also would check into the facts
before publishing a blacklist. Three
persons were listed under the College of
Journalism as declining evaluation. One
man was hired at the beginning of this
by Briclcmcm

lHi IH i 14111^111^1
I It I jfr^iSt
M B I M
HB. a, I
JOHN SUGG
... well, that's all folks

U. S. maintains about 1.3
million troops (1968) overseas
and about 3,000 bases (did you
know that old yellow peril,
China, hasnt any).
ROTC is the main source of
officers for an army whose main
objective is protecting the U. S.
financial interests overseas.
Col. Pell, former head of
Harvards ROTC, has said,
Today, reliance upon
colleges... for officers is greater
than ever... It is very evident
that the present mission of
ROTC is the production of
officers, not merely to expose
students to military training.
The function of an institution
cannot be higher than its
purpose. The purpose ofROTC
is the production of officers for
the war machine that continues
to fatten American businesses.
They dont want officers who
question society but rather,
ones the Calleys and Medinas

quarter and was never contacted; the two
others have resigned to take new
positions elsewhere next year, and saw no
reason to be evaluated. The three are
considered good teachers.
JOHN L. GRIFFITH,
CHAIRMAN, COLLEGE OF
JOURNALISM COMMITTEE ON
TEACHER AND COURSE
EVALUATION
Field Work
MR. EDITOR:
The students enrolled in GPY 605,
Field Work in Geography, would like to
thank those individuals on campus,
residing in Archer, who contributed their
time in responding to a questionnaire.
Because the information was intended
to remain anonymous, it is not possible
to thank each cooperating individual. The
help of these university employes
demonstrates the goodwill that exists
towards students and illustrates the unity
and strength of the UF. Your response
helped all in the class in a practical
exercise of field work.
CLARK CROSS
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
Workers
MR. EDITOR:
A description of the war by an
American participant was recently noted
by I. F. Stone, we are the unwilling, led
by the unqualified, doing the ; v
unnecessary, for the ungrateful. Your
editorial of Friday, May 29, which notes

- who blindly obey the criminal
commands of this nations
leaders. The arguments about
so-called academics in ROTC,
civilian army, etc., fall flat in the
face of the actual function and
purpose ofROTC.
And the really big joke, is
about ROTC liberalizing the
army. Lieutenants dont run the
army. The major business
interests, the Pentagon, Nixon,
et. al. are the ones who decide
which country to invade next.
The often brutal crushing of
dissent within the army is
witness to the degree that
expression of opinion is
allowed in the army.
Whatever the universitys
function, it certainly isnt
complicity in the most
monstrous crimes of our time.
Hence, ROTC OFF CAMPUS;
WAR MACHINE OFF CAMPUS.
* *
Finally, let me leave you with

FORUM: .
C Aim. ml VMt J
hope for the rnmnXall^* 00^

Friday, Juna 5,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

By John Sugg

some words to live by (I tried
this a year ago with some
success, so here are some old
ones and some new):
Our one true nationality is
mankind (H.G. Wells)
Laws grind the poor, and
rich men rule the law. (Oliver
Goldsmith)
We have no more right to
consume happiness without
producing it than to consume
wealth without producing it.
(George Bernard Shaw)
There is nothing more
common than to confound the
terms of the American
Revolution with those of the
late American war. The war is
over but this is far from being
the case with the American
revolution ... nothing but the
first act of the great drama is
closed. (Benjamin Rush, 1787)
Those who won our
independence by revolution
were not cowards. They did not
fear political change. They did
not exalt order at the cost of
liberty. (Louis Brandeis,
Supreme Court Justice, 1927)
I am opposing a social order
in which it is possible for one
man who does absolutely
nothing that is useful to amass a
fortune ... while millions of
men and women who work all
the days of their lives secure
barely enough for a wretched
existence. (Eugene Debs, 1918)
Tis the last rose of summer,
left blooming alone. (Thomas
More)

the underfunding of the VA hospitals and
the lack of volunteer workers at the local
VA hospital, emphasizes the last phrase
quite well.
However, it is a source of puzzlement
that the invitation to voluntary work by
the editorial was addressed only to that
portion of the community which is
publicly most opposed to the war and its
expansion, the marchers, strikers, sitters
and talkers for peace.
A. R. TODD, 7AS
Abolition
MR. EDITOR:
In his June 1 Speaking Out, F.
Richard Nolle very wisely observed that
he who knows how to put out a fire,
best knows how to start one. Although
the logic of such a statement may be
suspect, Mr. Nolle is right. Consequently,
1 urge the immediate abolition of both
ROIC and the fire departments of all
universities.
Since it is equally obvious that he
who knows how to cure cholera or the
measles best knows how to start an
epidemic,'* let us demand the
proscription of all medical doctors and
medical schools. In the spirit of a writer
who assured us that war is not inevitable,
and who implied that the demise of
ROTC would bring about a world-wide
cessation of hostilities, I am firmly
convinced that when the medical
profession has b< jn eradicated, death and
disease will be more. (!) Happy Day!
BRIAN MICHAELS, 7AS

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS



*.*
FOR SALE
HONDA 250 SCRAMBLER.
Showroom condition. Cali 378-1895.
(A-2t-155-p)
Slingertand Drums. Full Set. Silver
Sparkle. S3OO. Call Chuck 373-1443.
(A-2t-155-p)
Honda 300 Dream, windshield and
racks. Best offer. Golf clubs and
stereo, albums, headset, camera, &
aquarium also. Call Gary 373-1835.
(A-2t-155-p)
1968 Honda 90 Sport, only 2,000
miles. Excellent condition, must sell.
Best offer. Call Ken 392-8328.
(A-2t-155-p)
Sofa-bed, sls; rediner, $10; chair,
$5; lamp, $2.50; Bxlo rug, $8; 9x12
rug, $6; other great buys. Come see
919 S.W. sth Ave. or call 373-2570.
(A-2t-155-p)
Bargains VW sedan trailer hitch S2O.
Color TV antenna $25. 1968 125 cc
Benelll $125. 28 Issues of Playboy
$5. Call after 5 pm 378-6389.
(A-2t-155-p)
Triumph chopper new engine new
paint new tires, going to Europe,
must sell, call 378-7727 ask for Neal.
(A-2t-155-p)
Motorola color TV 12 Inch screen 3
mo. old for S2OO. Call 378-8010
btwn 12-1 pm or after 6 evenings.
(A-2t-155-p)
1967 Detroiter mobile home 12x45 2
bedroom air cond. utility shed good
cond. on nice lot. 378-3827. $2995.
(A-2t-155-p)
Refrigerator, big, good shape. SSO.
Graduate In June. Available June 6.
Call 372-8823 after 5 pm.
(A-3t-155-p)
REFRIGERATOR, large, $25 or best
offer. Call 392-7002. (A-3t-155-p)
TACHOMETER FOR SALE. 6-8
cylinder, 0-10,000 rpm solid state,
excellent condition for information
call 392-7991. (A-3t-155-p)
GUITAR, Yamaha FG-150 Folk.
Excellent condition. Beautiful sound.
Call 392-9829 ask for Lynn.
(A-2t-155-p)
SCUBA GEAR White Stag tank with
J valve, boot and U. S. Divers back
pack. Sportsways Malibu single hose
regulator. Small Parkway wet suit
jacket. Espadon mask. Super
Rondlne fins, size 5-6. All for $125.
Call Ed 376-5400. (A-2t-155-p)
Motor Scooter $65 spare parts &
helment Included 19" fall md brown
S3O bedroom suit S3O desk 3 drawer
$lO aqua 9x12 rug $6. 378-3324.
(A-2t-155-p)
1966 Honda 90, good condition,
$65. Call 378-7537 or 392-7953.
(A-2M55-P)
*65 VW, new tires top shape. Call
378-6912 Bill or Pat. S7OO or the
best offer. Must sell Immediately
It's a fantastic deal. (A-2t-155-p)
Stereo system: Scott 342 C receiver, 2
12" speaker systems, never used.
Garrard tt with base, cover, & M9IE
cart. Cost $563, now $439.
378-9192. (A-2M55-P)
SICK of EATING OUT? Refrigerator
perfect condition! 5W x 3 big
freezer must sell $35 372-9177 ask
for Ryan or Steve (A-3t-154-p)
SPARTAN Imperial Mansion, 8 x 45
two BR mobile home,
originally, now only $2200 A/C and
furnishings. CALL 373-1775
(A-3t-154-p)
Honda C 8350 700 ml. 1970 still on
warranty with helmet only $650 call
378-7943 after 11 PM (A-3t-154-p)
Trailer with large cabana A.C. In a
nice park with pool for sale or rent
SI2OO or 75 a mo. H. B. Williams
392-0939 or 376-3322 (A-3t-154-p)
1966 Honda 50cc 5700 ml
Automatic clutch Recently
overhauled New rear tire Saddle bags
Helmet All For SIOO Call 392-7363
(A-3t-154-p)
REFRIGERATOR CHEAP must sell
by June 10. Perfect for apt. or dorm
room. SSO or best offer Call
392-7700 soon please! (A-3t-154-p)
DONT PASS UP THIS DEAL, Stero
Phonic 4-Track Solid State Tape
Recorder by Panasonic plus two
Lafayette 860 Microphones plus 9
reels of tape. All for only $l5O. Call
392-8734 (A-3t-154-p)
FROM wall to wall, no soil at all, on
carpets cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-159-c)
Refrigerator 4 cu. ft. Ideal for dorm
room. S6O Call 392-9301
(A-3t-154-p)
MOTORCYCLE TRAILER custom
made can carry 1600 lbs. alum, rail,
good tires, like new $125 see at
Gatortown apt. 100 (A-3t-154-p)
Honda 50 Sport, Must Sell. Excellent
condition With ffeiitfet #nd too**. Best
offer. Call J**f 392-8320.
(A-st-152-p)

_ '
FOR SALE
1967 Honda CB 160, 4700 miles,
perfect condition, bell helmet, used
very little, must sell, would like
$325. Call 373-1253 or 392-0128.
(A-6t-150-p)
Available September 10x47 New
Moon; 2 bdrm; central heat; AC; new
shag carpeting. Excellent condition;
near Unlv., shaded lot. S3OOO.
378-7667. (A-st-152-p)
NEW, USED, ANTIQUE AUCTION,
something for everyone. Saturday
night, 7:30, June 6th, C&J Auction
House, Archer. (A-2t-155-p)
2 12" speakers handbullt custom
upholstered seats on top unbelievable
bass minimum distortion yours at a
steal S7O call for Mark 392-9506.
(A-4t-153-p)
Women and speed are two
transtltional things we carry them
both In our bodies. Myers type dune
buggy available In all colors and
metalflakes for only $195 Mike
Sullivan ATO house 372-9427
(A-151-6t-p)
Headquarters for Cypress Garden
skis. Dunlop tennis balls 1.50 can.
Handball gloves 3.00. Barbell set 110
lb. 29.50. B & B SPORTS CENTER
1406 N.W. 13th St. (A-st-152-p)
8-track car units $38.95 lots of tapes
on sale everyday at $4.99. All others
$5.88 Muntz 14 NW 13th Street.
(A-Bt-149-p)
Labrador pups AKC registered top
breeding 8 weeks old females SSO
each Day 372-2547 Nite 376-2827
(A-st-151-p)
Cozy, economical living, 8 x 28
mustang trailer, furnished, full bath,
will consider renting, cabinets,
housetype appliances, hitch available
373-2714 (A-3t-154-p)
1970 Bridgestone, 200cc, low
mileage, Just tuned, SSOO, call
378-8480 after 11 AM or 378-9084
after 7 PM. (A-st-152-p)
1968 Yamaha 350 4600 miles red
excellent condition 372-0333 $525.
(A-156-lt-p)
9"x12" green rug sls twin green 8>
yellow bedspreads sB two green
curtains $4 392-9404. (A-156-lt-p)
250ccatlyamahaenduro. 851 miles,
lexactraspocketanditrlalstire.
$700.00 phone 378-3744 after
400p.m. (A-156-lt-p)
MUST SELL: 1965 comet, stands arc
shift, v 8 engine, new brakes, starter,
very reasonable, call after 5 p.m.
372- (A-156-lt-p)
Golf clubs sl4 good 14 In. tire on m
$4. 150 lbs wieghts SB. ice chest $3.
ladder $5. bunk bed frames wood $6.
metal book shelves $6. etc 376-7402.
(A-156-lt-p)
For sale: bar, formica and wood
panel must see to believe! call
373- for fantastic details.
(A-156-lt-p)
69 Honda 50cc low milage, good
condition, best offer call David
373-2852 or 372-9353 5 + 0 12.
(A-156-lt-p)

I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
I FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
I Fish Almondine
I and French-Fried Potatoes

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 5,1970

Page 10

FOR RENT
Experience CO-OP LIVING at its
very best. Call Georgia Seagle Hall for
the summer qtr. Only $220 per
quarter. Call 376-8941. (B-4t-153-p)
Village Park Apt. only SSO per
person for entire summer. One, two,
three or four person occupancy. Call
376-6587 after 8 p.m. (B-2t-15S-p)
2 bdrm duplex 5 blks from campus.
Sublet summer or longer A/C carpet
furnished. Call 376-8119.
(B-2t-155-p)
Two blocks to campus room men or
women liberal carpets kit. priv. air
prlv. 60 semi 45 new T.V. wood
paneling. See Dave 1204 NW 3 Ave.
378-0286. (B-2MSS-P)
FRENCH QUARTERS apt. poolside.
Sublease for summer, only S3OO. Call
376-5412. (B-2t-ISS-p)
BARGAIN! Landmark Apt. no. 26
Sublease 4 people SBO per person
for entire summer. Call 378-1074
anytime or stop by. (B-2t-155-p)
FRENCH QUARTER. Sub-lease 2
bdrm. apt. on POOL, many extras.
Asking $300.00 for summer. Call
373-2381. (B-2t-155-p)
Men Live In Landmark all summer
for only S9O. June 15 thru Aug. 31.
Air, pool, girls. Call now 376-2768. If
not taken by weekend best offer.
(B-2t-155-p)
1 bedroom apt. within walking
distance to campus SIBO for summer.
378-3341. (B-2t-155-p)
Here it is. Just what you Ye been
looking for. Luxurious two bedroom
apartment fully carpeted air-heat
$145 per mo. Call Jeff or Tom,
373-1573 or 373-2747. (B-2M55-P)
Live In La Mancha sl2O/summer
Includes utilities private room, a/c,
pool, gas grills, free newspaper.
Campus 2 blocks, apt. no. 5 or
373-1815. (B-2t-155-p)
FREE JUNE RENT, Landmark Apts.
1111 SW 16 Ave., Apt. 56. Excellent Excellentcondition!
condition! Excellentcondition! Call anytime. 378-4849.
(B-2t-155-p)
S7O for entire summer In Village Park
Apt. A/C, pool, 2 bedroom, only 2
other roommates besides you. Call
378-8243 (male). (B-3t-154-p)
Large 3 bdrm. house to sublet for
summer 1 blk. from law school.
Furnished, a/c, color TV. Quiet
street, large yard, pets ok. Call
378-4154. (B-2t-155-p)
Hawaiian Village Luxurious 2
bedroom, 2 bath, carpet, dishwasher,
air cond., $lB5 per mo. or best offer.
Available furnished. Call 376-8366.
(B-2t-155-p)
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
SAVE $2lO 4-man Village Pk. apt. to
sublet for summer. Fum., balcony
over pool, end apt. for spacious
parking. S3OO for entire summer. Call
373-1347 anytime. Apt. 94.
(B-2t-155-p)

for re bit
1 br apt. for summer term 3 blocks
from campus AC. See at 328 NW 14
St. after 4. Several 1 br apt l bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet $l2O mo. Colonial Manor
apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave. 372-7111
Grad students preferred. Special rates
for summer guarter now in effect.
(B-ts-109-c) _____
Unlv. Gardens 2 bdr apt. by pool
You split July-August $250 up to 4
pars. We pay remaining S9O plus June
Save $260 Summer Q Ap.
718-310. Ph 372-7640. (B-4t-153-p)
For rent for fall, air-conditioned
apartments near campus. SBO to
$145 per month, pool. University
Apartments. Call 376-8990 evenings.
(B-8M49-P)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus, A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Sub-let apt. //illage Park no. 60 2
bedroom phone anytime available
June 15. (B-st-152-p)
Across street from campus studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet c cable tv utilities
Included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace Apts. 1225 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-109-ts-c)
POOLSIDE F.Q. APT. Sublet
summer June rent FREE Call
372-5246 Ask for Susan or KJ
(B-3t-154-p)
Trailer, 10 by 50. 2 bedroom,
furnished, air-conditioned, summer
quarter, $55/mo. 378-7131
mornings. (B-3t-154-p)
One to three guys can rent our
Landmark apt and have a pool,
sauna, a/c, dishwshr, and neat
neighbors for only $46.25/per.l apt.
126 378-6277. (B-st-152-p)
Sublease summer qtr Landmark apt 2
br 2-4 persons A/C dishwasher grills
poolside. Dishes, pots, pans, kitchen
utensils left for you. 378-3851.
(B-st-152-p)
Three apartments; Private bath, living
room, kitchen. Available at beginning
of summer quarter. Call 372-9855 or
Inquire at 102 NW 15th St. or 1508
NW Ist Lane (B-3t-154-p)
JUNE RENT FREE. Hawaiaan
Village apt. 2 bdrm. townhouse pool,
patio, free maid service, central A/C,
dishwasher. Call 373-2520 no. 140
(B-3t-154-p)
WILL DISCUSS PRICE on our 2
bdrm., AC Sin City apt. can rent
from one to four persons. Good
location and great neighbors. Call
372-1272. (B-3t-152-p)

DONT BE CURIOUS CEE
DONT BE YELLOW
THE MOST CURIOUS OF THEM ALL!
THE ULTIMATE EXPERIMENT IN HUMAN SEXUALRESPONSEI
NIW YORK DAILY NIW* I
' -" ; *. '' _' : S?. yv*rr?jl.'l $
-PLUS- IN COLOR
THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF GIRLS

FOR RENT
VILLAGE PARK summer sublease 2
bdrm. poolside apt. no. 108. Come
by late afternoons, evenings
(B-st-152-p)
1 male rm. to share lux air cond
mobile hm your own rm SSO mo. call
373-1690. (B-st-152-p)
3-bedroom apt., offstreet parking
full bath, kitchen, living rm, 16,500
B.T.U. A/C. Min. of 1 qtr lease. $l3O
rno. 408 NE Ist Ave 376-0317
(B-5M49-P)
Sublet or rent 1 brm furnished air
conditioned patio Village 34
slls/mo call 373-1080 or 376-4807
(B-st-148-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-C)
sllO. Mo for luxury at Mt. Vernon
apt single br. carpeted A.c.
finest furnishings pool all
electric apli. close to campus
evenings 378-4877 (B-3t-154-p)
WILLIAMSBURG apt. 41 can be
yours for the summer. Spacious 2
bed. 2 bth, full equipped kit. for 4 or
5 call 378-7670 after 5 (B-3t-154-p)
Apt. 167 Landmark to sublet for
Summer quarter. Two bedrooms.
Need to sublet entire apartment so
male or female group accepted.
(B-3t-154-p)
Sublet for summer: 5 room furn.
house, 1 brm, den, large storage rm, 2
baths, AC, TV, pets OK. June 15
Sept. 15 S3OO. 373-2398
(B-3t-154-p)
Sublease Duplex Modern Quiet
Alrconditioned A Good Place
Call Nights 376-9513 1009 NW 31st
Ave (B-3t-154-p)
$75 for entire summer 2 bdr. AC on
pool Village Park unusually furnished
available June 15 378-3747
(B-3t-154-p)
LIVE ALL SUMMER FOR $55 AT
HAWAIIAN VILLAGE APTS!!
HURRY!! CALL 373-1103
(B-3t-154-p)
One to four roommates needed for
Landmark apt. 138. $92.50 for the
summer. June rent paid. Call Joanne
376-0687 (B-3t-154-p)
1 Bedroom Apt. available June 23
Paneled AC Private Patio Pets
Allowed $lO5/mo. Some Utilities
Call 373-2165 (B-3t-154-p)
Your own private bedroom for the
summer. Fully furnished 3 bedroom
house to sublet. S4O a month. Call
373-1162 or 373-1968 after 7 PM
(B-st-153-p)
Luxurlus Williamsburg Poolside
townhouse apt. Sublease for summer
for appointment call 378-3323
(B-3t-153-p)



gator classifieds

FOR RENT
BSS@SSS!SWSSWSf??SSSSSSSSSSJSS!??fS?
Village Park sublease 1 bedroom apt.
for summer A/C pool enjoy the
summer In the sun apt. 24 call
378-3554 live in sin city over the
summer (B-3t-154-p)
Live 3 mos. La Mancha $l3O Inc.
util. pvt. bedroom pool ac. Save S2O
move In now. Please call 373-2973
(B-3t-154-p)
Free June Rent sub-let Landmark apt
summer quarter Female only 2 steros
1 -TV close to pool too! Call after
5:00 372-6513 (B-3t-154-p)
Single rooms for summer, winter
qtrs. 150/qtr maid, linens utilities
close to campus, call or see 115 NW
10 St. Tom Ford 378-7222 378-5156
leave name (B-150-7t-p)
S9O per person, June rent free, 2 br
Fr Qtr no. 47, use of dishes, linens,
etc. Call 372-6768. Poolside, ac.
(B-st-152-p)
ENJOY THE SUMMER IN LUXURY
with AC and pool at Mt. Vernon apt.
83 2 bedroom Call 378-3779
(B-4t-153-p)
#
Sublease for Summer. Two bedroom
apt. French Quarter 114. June rent
paid ed. SIBO mo. Great way to
spend the summer call 373-2306.
(B-st-152-p)
Hawaalan village, sublet 1 bedroom,
furnished, ww carpet, A/C, pool,
$l5O per month, call 376-9014 after
5 PM available June 15 (B-st-153-p)
Sublet sum qtr Landmark 1 bdr
June free sl3O/mo on pool
TV and stereo Included no deposits
required apt 159. 372-0841
(B-151-st-p)
1 to 4 roommates need to sublet La
Mancha townhouse for summer qtr.
A/C, pool, pvt. bedrooms, $l5O for
summer Incl. utilities. 378-2294
(B-4t-153-p)
Sublet 1 bdr. furn Unlv. Garden apt.
pool, lake-view pvt. balcony, Morden,
June 14 Aug. 31, $270, Call
373-2290 after 6 PM (B-4t-153-p)
FOR RENT: Singles: Swing Into
summer in a luxurious air-conditioned
poolside apartment. Private bedroom
Walk to campus. S7O include s
Utilities. 378-7224. (B-15t-148-p)
Unlv Gardens 2 bdr apt by pool
you split July August $250 up to 4
persne pay remaining S9O plus June
Save $260 Summer Q apt
18-310 ph 372-7640 (B-4t-153-p)
Village Park 2 bdr. apt. for rent
summer quarter to best offer call
372-7439. (B-156-lt-p)
I PEAL FOR COUPLE 3 rm. furn
apt, a/c, privacy 3 blocks from
campus s6s plus util, no lease or
deposit, inquire at 902V2 SW 2nd ave.
apt B, mornings or 6-8 p.m.
(8r156-lt-p)
THREE BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS
Prvt. bdrm, furnished, AC, share
kitchen, bthrm. $47/mo, utilities
Included, come by 1604 NW 3rd PI,
no. 6 upper east, 5-7 p.m. ask for Jon
Hill. (B-156-lt-p)
Furnished 1 bdr. apt. next to
LaMancha very clean with lots of
room 75/mo. summer qtr. Call
376-2738 or 376-3442. (B-156-lt-p)
Camelot, 2 bedroom, central air,
dishwasher, can rent furnished or
unfurnished lease until November or
beyond $165 378-4572 after 6 p.m.
(B-156-lt-p)
SUMMER slOOlll Private room,
yard, next to campus Such a deal.
Summer quarter only carl or david
372-5091. (B-156-lt-p)
WANTED
$75 FOR THE ENTIRE SUMMER.
378-5784 ONE MALE ROOMMATE
FOR GREAT SAVINGS IN
LANDMARK. (C-5M52-P)
Female roommate. Own room In 2
bdrm Unlv. Gardens apt. $75/mo
Start immediately call Diana at
392-1291 before 5, 373-1853 after 5.
(C-st-152-p)
Male roomate apt. 1 Village Park
share Vk expenses no deposit call
378-8243. (C-5M52-P)
WANTED: Coed to snare luxurious
air-conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Male roommate to |hare luxurious
air-conditioned poolside- apartment.
STLOS^nunS
(C-15t-148-p)

WANTED
1 or 2 fmale rmmates needed immed.
priv. bdrm, poolside Village Park,
clean, spacious, kit & bthrm equip
and more. 378-3903 apt. no. 58
(C-3t-154-p)
Female roommate wanted for
summer. La Mancha Apts, private
bedroom, air cond., pool, walking
distance from campus. Jure rent free.
378-9611. (C-st-150-p)
Roommate wanted. 3 br. house sin
city, fall-spring. Qwn room, ac.
$42.50. 392-8971, 378-6583 after 5
Norm, Dave. (C-2t-155-p)
1 or 2 male roommates wanted.
Summit House close to campus.
S6O + utilities for entire summer
quarter. Call 376-5542. (C-2t-155-p)
2 male roommates for summer qtr.,
also 70-71 school yr. OWN
BEDROOM; prefer conservative,
straight type; 376-4912 late p.m.
(C-2t-155-p)
i
2 female roommates for Tanglewood
2 bdrm. apt. A/C, TV, quiet, June
free. Only $95 + util, for summer.
Call 373-2711 for Info. (C-155-2t-p)
1 male roommate summer qtr. La
Bonne Vie. $135 for qtr. + util. A/C,
pool, own bdr. & bath, dishwasher,
etc., etc. Apt. 420. Call 372-8800
after 5 p.m. (C-2t-155-p)
Live in Landmark this summer for
only $92.50. Two men desired to
help enjoy pools, gym, sauna,
diswasher, Bar BQ, a/c. Call
378-2098. (C-3t-154-p)
1 male roommate to share apartment
for summer quarter. Private room,
A/C, ww carpet. Walk to campus.
Call 378-9248. (C-2t-155-p)
Female roommate wanted for
summer Landmark apt's. Pool-side.
Cost reduced for summer. Call
Barbara at apt. 106. Tel. 373-2240
(C-3t-154-p)
1 male/female to share 3 bdr. house
fall qtr. $33/mon. + utilities. Will
have own room and complete
privacy. Call Gary 378-7506 after 11
PM (C-3t-154-p)
Male roommate wanted for summer
quarter. PRIVATE bedroom, 2-bath,
central air apt. 1-block from
Norman Hall $45/month. 372-1272
(C-150-7t-p)
Hip roomates wanted for summer
qtr. or will sub-lease air-con house
behind Norman. No deposits, Call
Sherry 376-8080 618 SW 10th St.
(C-7t-150-p)
1 or 2 female roommates needed for
Landmark apt. no. 17. Only SBS for
entire summer. Call 373-1055
anytime. (C-3t-155-p)

BbbF'X.
aco lo .m (W}sFVs|
9A ACADEMY JN
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1 w
---% Suggtfd for GENERAL oodionc. [CfciK
fcy[W?flWl PLUS CO-HIT
BKs
imJ ACROSS FROM THE MALL
SPECIAL EARLY BIRD |MO
2 PRICE 1.00 Ptr Car IF ARRIVE BEFORE 7:45
9fln PENTHOUSE 2 PENTHOUSE 2
CACTUS FLOWER CURIOUS YELLOW J
PLAYING C/S ll RATED X
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PVSMPW*at SUN Qm

Friday, June 5,1970. The Florida Alligator,

WANTED
Need two roommates for immediate
occupancy at Mt. Vernon towhhouse
apts. or will sublet entire apt. for
summer 373-1788 (C-4t-153-p)
HELP! I'll be working In W. Palm
Beach this summer and dont know
anyone there. Need a roommate $ an
apt. Know anyone? Please call Anne,
373-2703 (C-lt-154-p)
SBO FOR ENTIRE SUMMER
air-conditioned poolside Hawaalan
Village apt. Tel. 373-2511 after 7
p.m. 1 roommate. (C-2t-156-p)
CAMELOT wanted one male
roommate to share great apt.
poolside apt. no. 247. a/c dshwshr
priv gas bar bq 373-2396 after 6 p.m.
(C-156-lt-p)
HELP, wants to rent car or motorbic.
until the beginning of August, needs
economical local transportation Call
Jan after 6:00 p.m. 378-3005.
(C-156-lt-p)
One or two male roommates for
summer quarter in Village Park apt.
move In now. June rent paid. Phone
373-1275. (C-156-lt-p)
Male Roommate for fall. 2 baths a/c
La Bonnie Vie Apts. Call 378-8319.
(C-156-lt-p)
ATTENTION! Need male roommate
for summer at Summit House, private
bedroom, last half June rent free!
Jerry 378-8105. (C-156-lt-p)
2 male roomates, Summit House,
quiet, a/c, pool; $75 each + utilities
for summer quarter; graduate
students preferred; call 378-7889.
(C-151-st-p)
1 male for summer quarter in a/c
house have own room and bath low
rent July + Aug. only. Call
376-3067. (C-156-lt-p)
2 female roommates wanted to select
and share Apartment for fall. Contact
Carleen 392-9131. (C-156-lt-p)
Two males want to sublease summer
only, two bedrm sin-city apt, prefer
Landmark, call Pete 373-2703.
(C-156-lt-p)
Exceptional sales opportunity for
outstanding aggressive Individual.
Some prior sales experience
necessary. Salary plus incentive! If
youre sharp and can prove it... call
Bob White or Bill Marr for
appointment. Call 378-20601
(C-156-lt-p)
1 female roommate wanted to share
Star-1 Ite Apt. Contact Wendy
3 73-2724 or Kathl 392-9837.
(C-156-lt-p)

Page 11

WANTED
Poolside University Gardens Apt one
roomate needed for summer only
$75 call 373-2626 ask for George.
(C-156-lt-p)
HELP WANTED
.XvyX-X-X-X-XvX-X-X'XvXvX-X'XvX-X
I ndependent Florida Department
Store has opening for experienced
Children's Wear Buyer. Salary SSOO
to S6OO per month plus annual
bonus. Mall complete resume to
Wilson Department Stores, Inc., Box
1168, Gainesville, Florida.
(E-2t-155-p)
COOKWARE SALESMEN. Students
planning to sell cookware anywhere
In Florida are invited to phone
378-3615 for MUCH higher
commissions. Check us out. No
obligation. (E-2t-155-p)
Landmark no. 89 sublease summer
quarter cheap!! call 378-8563.
(C-156-lt-p)
Coed wanted to manage rooming
house must be liberal yet able to
handle men. Apply In person to Dave
1204 NW 3 Ave. between 5 PM and 6
PM (E-2t-155-p)
WAITRESS WANTED. Morning &
evening shift, neat In appearance.
Apply after 2 pm. Mr. Raddatz. Flag
Restaurant 1250 W. Unlv. Ave.
(E-st-153-p)

Start s TODAY!-
14,heGREAT stars
The epic journey of four generations
HOW
THE WEST
't a HW*N MAr-tR Hfnl CINERAMA presei-t HOW THE WEST WAS WON starring
CARROLL BAKER LEE J COBB HENRY FONDA CAROLYN JONES KARL MALDEN
GREGORY PECK GEORGE PEPRARD ROBERT PRESTON DEBBIE REYNOLDS
JAMES STEWART EU WALLACH JOHN WAYNE RICHARD WIDMARK
N v ,A(" n Ki,M, of Aife
/ "\
m
' fjK t
ifc flt V* o
< |GP|33
A Time Fofyf Giving
DAVID JANSSEN KIM DARBY CARL REINER
LAST WEEK-END!
Epic battle of the sexes! -Vincent Canby, N Y. Times
Richard Burton
Genevieve Bujoid jl3m.
as ANNE BOLEYN
IN THE Hal Wallis ODUCTION
(gs

H T y* iNT'I'jE!
Summer a good home for 3 yr. old
girl days Warm loving care Close to P.
K. Yonge. References please. Call
evenings 378-7950 Grad. Stud.
(E-2t-155-p
Co-ed wanted room and board in
exchange for domestic duties. Cad
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
TV Technician. Must be experienced.
Also, person over 25 to deliver TV
sets. Apply at Alliance TV Service
815 W. University Ave. (E-st-152-p)
X*X-XvX*X*X:X:X:Xt-:W::Wx-:->X*:x-:-:
AUTOS
;X;XvvX:X:X:XvXvX:X-X:X-X:X-XrX-X-:-
1966 Sunbeam Alpine. 1725 cc eng,
less than 12,000 m. Very good cond.
378-2024 (G-3t-154-p)
1963 VW Bus $250 or best offer call
373-1934 after 5 P.M. to 7 P.M.
student (G-2t-155-p)
BUICK RIVIERA 1964 low mileage,
new brakes and tires, all power, must
sell before June 15 $l,lOO or best
offer 378-6195 evengs. (G-2t-155-p)
Get It now or never 63 Rambler runs
perfectly great transportation $250
call Tom at 373-1573 or 373-2747
call now. It might be your last
chance. (G-st-152-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
1963 VW good shop* $400.00 call
378-3587 (G-3t-154-p)
VW Squareback 1968. Air
conditioned, 23,000 miles. Seat
extender for camping. Very
economical to drive. Excellent
condition, pood tires. 378-6029.
(G-2M55-P)
HELP! Bought new car. Must sell my
1966 Slmca. Excellent for beach or
shopping. MAOA Book $490. Make
offer. 372-1039 (G-2t-155-p)
1961 Chevy Blscayne good trans car
$125 Call Nick Masl 378-5154
(G-4t-153-p)
Triumph TR3 Beautiful Condition.
Overdrive, new brakes, transmission
just rebuilt, radio, many extras. Call
373-2798 after 5 oclock.
(G-st-152-p)
'69 Road runner, excellent condition
warranty, 4 spd. trans., power disc
brakes, 8,000 miles, headers. Call
376-3931. (G-5M52-P)
Seniors: Start your new life with a
sports car. 1967 MGB, 31,000 ml,
wire wheels, newly painted. Excellent
condition. 378-3903 (G-3t-154-p)
Grandparents 62 Ford Galaxie 500
superior condition power brakes and
steering. David 378-8684 or
392-1517 S4OO (G-2t-155-p)
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy dealt used caret Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7335.
(G-ts-c)
1961 Olds Starfire Conv. rebuilt
engine rebuilt trans excellent cond.
$350 or offer 372-0333. (G-156-lt-p)
63 VAN Ford S6OO tapes & deck
panel carpet new tires chrome wheels
on back call Earl 392-7482.
(G-156-lt-p)
Economy car for sale S2OO or best
offer 1961 Slmca 400 or sedan
engine In perfect cond uses very little
gas excellent offer call 373-1962.
(G-156-lt-p)
1955 Plymouth. Good mechanical
condition, like new tires & seat
covers, readable transportation $l5O
or best offer 376-0476 after 5 PM
(G-3t-153-p)
Winners of the recent Datsun contact
were JACK McConnell and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission is a winner
tool TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-130-rr-c)
1960 MG A New gold paint, spare 6
wire wheels, tonneau cover, radio
good condition, Must see, asking
S6OO call 392-9541 after 5 Rocky
(G-3t-154-p)
66 Corvair In good condition 4 new
tires, new shocks, new dutch, has 2
horns, asking $650 call 392-6931 ask
for Dave around 6-.30 or 11:00 p.m.
(G-st-152-p)
PERSONAL
WASHINGTON D. C. or surrounding
area Is destination of coed desiring
riders. Call Unda 378-6195 evenings.
(J-2t-155-p)
To the Runner of 437: Thank You. I
LOVE YOU. The Dancer (J-2t-155-p)
NEED YOUR TERM PAPER
TYPED? WILL TYPE ANYTHING.
BROWARD HALL. ONLY 50 cents
A PAGE. CALL 392-9760
(J-2t-154-p)
Help I to the virgo b. 9-8-48 who has
my chart. I need to check out my
month of June. Either call late
or come by. Cant live without It help
(J-3t-154-p)
BLOND COED In white shorts & top
who checked out smoking literature
in college lib. at 10 Sun. nite next to
longhair, please call 378-0228 ask for
Jay, Important (J-3t-154-p)
SEXY WIZARD Glad you could
come AMLA, Dum-Dum.
(Dum-Dum is better than S.C.)
(J-2t*155-p)
GATOR COURT
378-4887 43705 W
13th SL
spend.. wHeWthe
the night... price is right*'

PHI EPS (NOW ZBT) For the benefit
of us transfer students, let's start a
chapter here. (J-3t-254-p)
Have anything to take home for the
summer. I will haul your articles to
Miami, Ori, W PB, Laud. Hywd
Cheap. Experienced. Call Phil
372-6404. (J-st-152-p)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low coat gentle hair -removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologlst 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
My wonderfully sensitive scorplo
num-nums and everything beautiful Is
what youve brought me. I know
were gonna last ESP predicts I love
you more than I can say. Bark.
(J-156-lt-p)
TO BUTCH I know It's early, but
happy 20th on the 20thlll Love from
Sundance and the Hole-in-the Wall
Gang. (J-156-lt-p)
ARF SNARF ... Thank-you for the
rose, darling. I'm looking forward to
Friday night, your SILLY BUNNY
RABBIT. (J-156-lt-p)
Michael U., love and congratulations
on your graduation (finally)l August
15 Is getting closer! I Sweet pea.
(J-156-lt-p)
To my favorite fraternity. Delta Tau
Delta: Thank you for all the fun over
the last two years. Love, your little
sister, Mary. (J-156-lt-p)
Weaver 344 Good luck on finals
and thanks for one helluva of a year!
Love, BG. (J-156-lt-p)
Feme and Roslyn, congratulations on
making It thru 4 years at Fla. Best of
luck in future professions love, your
III sisters, L and J. (J-156-lt-p)
Tommy and Johnny thanks for
making our first a more enjoyable
year. See you at college Buch and
Scooter. (J-156-lt-p)
Thanks for such a magic &
instructive time. Love & share,
besltos Las Muchachitas. (J-156-lt-p)
RIDER WANTED to San Francisco,
leaving June 19, share costs and
driving, 66 Chevy Impala call Bob
376-1006. (J-156-lt-p)
Mastandovltz: my Italian lover! from
progs to finals. Mickey Mouse
forever! Were Uglles named for you?
Jeopardy wins. I lose. Matzoh balls
and Lasagne oy! your deal Glno.
(J-156-lt-p)
Ode to an Ugly: I am a Sampler
unsampled by you. You will never
know. One day you may think back.
Thanx for the weeks of friendship,
the night of marriage, a weekend of
frolics, hitchhiking trips, and a future
of more grief. Always, your beast.
P.S. I believe. (J-156-lt-p)
DELTA TAU DELTA Brothers and
Pledges, good luck on finals and have
a fun summer well miss you!
popcorn and beer forever sisters of
the Iris. (J-156-lt-p)
CONGRATULATIONS new Alpha
Chi Omega sisters! Your are our
Inspiration. AX love, The Spring
Pledge Class. (J-156-lt-p)

jEjTZUNjONAUDiTORiU^
' l/ ''r ib'uf'** 4 Ju>sLf<3& fsriJJj&i&'v %l* SS |l|fe:,
|JlukL& Ml mo, on P c *ure of its kind!
#W
cuMiasiwooof !fj| TECHMCrfIOR* """"* I I
SATURDAY JUNE I* (W
5:30, 8:00. 10:30 PM.
Admission 50 cants.'
tpontowd by JWRU
. .' (

Page 12

l. The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 5,1970

PERSONAL
Jew-boy, Thanks for the past 8
months and have a great summer.
Who knows, I may even miss you a
little! Love, Your (Shiksa) Kitten PS
What happened to my lobster?
(J-156-lt-p)
Sick of hearing five or six
commercials between every record?
Tired of the Incessant Bubblegum
sound? Move up to the best sound in
town ... Dial 1390 and join the Big
Switch" to WUWU Radiol
(J-156-lt-p)
KAPPA SIGMA Brothers, Have a
great summer! Congratulations Craig
Love the Little Sisters. (J-156-lt-p)
To all the k-s clubers, thank you for
three great years. 11l never forget
them the best to all of you. Always
love Shirley. (J-156-lt-p)
4th floor Yulee: color Is something
we see with our eyes, but love Is
something we see with our hearts.
Thanks so much 111 Love, Wanda.
(J-156-lt-p)
FACULTY NOTE! Student writing
thesis on history of academic
freedom at U.F. 1903-65. Anyone
with information please cal!
3 72-1036 or 392-0271 (History
Dept.) or write G. Currie, 1536 NW
2nd PI., C. (J-156-lt-p)
TEDDY BEAR (pwm), when looking
back and remembering what we have
shared I will see the full worth of
your love and the miracle that is you.
I love you! HONEY BEAR (sml).
(J-lt-156-p)
SEXY WIZARD Glad you could
come AMLA, Dum-Dum.
(Dum-Dum Is better than S.C.).
(J-2t-155-p)
To the two bruties have a good
summer but beware of the roaches
and big mouth frogs the two mentals.
(J-156-lt-p)
TO A CARTON OF CANDY! Such a
deal! Nope, you might have paid the
price, but thats no deal. The
Whitman Sampler was consumed too
fast! Theres more waiting at the
store. But dont buy them. Theyll be
gone. Lots of fun to all organ
grinder's monkeys. From an UGLY.
(J-lt-156-p)
Sweet Annette, straight, stoned or
drunk, you are the most affectionate
chick I know, and I think maybe I'll
miss you this summer. Jack.
(J-2t-155-p)
LOST <& FOUND
FOUND: Gold key on steps of
Anderson Hall. Engraved with IN4
Curtis, Ind. & Cleveland, Ohio. If
yours, call 392-0279 or come by
And. rm. 13. (L-lt-156-nc)
Found Brown Leather Suitcase with
Initials JRG call 378-8546
(L-2t-155-p)
Lost: Slide rule In brown case. Must
have for finals! Please call 378-0538
ask for Jay. 3EG (L-2t-155-p)
Lost Black female puppy 4 mos. old
lab-looking but floppy answers to
Karma $lO reward pis. call 372-6230
anytime. (L-2t-155-p)

LOST 4c FOUND
Found canary In vicinity of Law
Center May 31. 378-3609
(L-3t-154-p)
Found a weird silver ring with a
quartz stone. Found In University
Gardens. CaH 378-4127 and Identify.
(L-154-3t-nc)
LOST: black leather wallet lost three
weeks ago near Peabody need IDs
badly If found call Larry 373-2871.
(L-156-lt-p)
Lost or strayed from Drill Field June
2nd, Two First Flight Irons. Please
contace T. W. Steams, 392-0541, 211
Leigh Hall. (L-156-lt-p)

Reitz Union Auditorium
EXPERIMENTAL FILMS
TOUCHING Q 17:01
RAT LIFE X THE CRITIC
CASTRO STREET fl| SQUARE FEET
INVOCATION I CANT REMEMBER ..
This Sunday at 8:00 p.m. & 10:00 p.m., 50 cents
sponsored by JWRU Selected by Film Classics
fjOHNWAYNEI
I GLEN B l
I
(I I slornng k A. IL I
* color 11 7c\ MinneUi

ATTENTION
THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE HAVE SEMINOLE
PHOTO REFUND CHECKS READY IN THE
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUSINESS OFFICE,
Rm. 330 JWRUnion. THEY MAY BE PICKED UP
ANYTIME BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 8 and 4,
daily.
Peggy Eaton John Hughes
Fred Shore Tom Haney
Jan Berkey Michael Gaff
Alan Harris Doug Smith
John Schmidt Dick Santangelo
JoWebb Bill McClure
Judy Greenberg Jim Eriksen
Nancy WoHson Larry White
Donna Price Bill Lindner
B,ack Marie Rosenberg
Mike Crows Edward Wood
Tom Col menaces Mike Sullivan
Kathleen Dolan Bob Roepnack
George De Latorre Mike Hill
Marlene Schneider David Glantz
Barbara Ardin Mike Tobias
Bartlett Nunn Mart Gordon
Watterson Gary Rodney
J Fischer Bruce Swiren
i 6O Rocky Thornhill
Tom Todd John Folks
William Robinson P. Cleveland
Lou Caldwell Greg Stewart
Fred Joy Howard Wall
Di Anne Tasis Susan Arnold
H Steven Rokeaoh Lariie Robin Gardieff
Karen Surreney

Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S.W. 4th Ave., across from the
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480
(M-ts-107-c)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested add
repairs Auto Electrical Service.
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.w.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone*
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)



Comencement For UF Graduates Set June 13

By 808 WISE
ANlfllOr ovITT vvrvnr
Some 1,100 UF students will graduate in
commencement ceremonies beginning 9 am. June 13 on
Florida Field.
About SO per cent of the 2,200 graduating in June are
expected to attend, according to L. V. Voyles, director of
records and registration director.
DR. MASON W. GROSS, president of Rugters
University, will deliver the commencement address. Rev.
Leslie Tucker of the First Presbyterian Church of
Gainesville wffl give the invocation, and UF President
Stephen C. OConnell will act as master of ceremonies.
Henry S. Yoland of Tampa and Dennis K. Dutch
Stanley, former dean of the UF College of Physical
Education and Health, will be recognized as
distinguished graduates.
The late William Courtland Lantaff of Miami Springs
will be given the same recognition posthumously. Lantaff,
a graduate of the UF and the College of Law, served in the
Florida House of Representatives and the United States
House of Representatives.
TOLAND, PRESIDENT of the Exchange National
Bank in Tampa, received his bachelors and law degrees
from UF. Stanley came to UF in 1946 as the first dean of
the College of Physical Education and Health. He served

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111
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m "Exceptional. A brilliant anti-war movie \
M One of the screen's perfect moments I" %
I m -Gene Shalit, Ladies Home Journal 1
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1100 EXPECTED TO ATTEND

as dean until 1969.
Student Government will sell white armbands to go on
the black sleeves of graduates robes to protest the war in
Indochina. Proceeds will go to the National
Commencement Fund for Peace, New Haven.
This is a chance to show alumni, parents and the
general public that people on this campus can carry on
peaceful protest even at their graduation, said Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelder.
THE COLLEGE of Medicine will hold its
commencement ceremony 2 pm. Monday, June 7 in the
Reitz Union Ballroom.
Other ceremonies on June 13 will include the Colege of
Law commencement at 10 am. and commissioning
ceremonies for Army and Air Force ROTC graduates at 2
pm. in the Spessard Holland Law Center Auditorium.
President of Rutgers since 1959, Dr. Gross was
professor of philosophy and provost there for the previous
10 years. He came to Rutgers in 1946 as assistant
professor of philosophy and assistant to the dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences. He was made assistant dean
in 1947 and held that position until 1949.
GROSS RECEIVED the bachelors degree from the
University of Aberdeen in 1930, the master of arts degree
from Cambridge University in 1938.
He served as assistant professor of philosophy at

Harvard from 1936 to 1938, and was instructor of
philosophy at Columbia University from 1938 to 1942.
Serving three years with the Army Air Corps and two
with Combat Intelligence in Italy, he was separated from
the Army in 1945 with the rank of captain.
THE ACADEMIC processional for commencement will
begin at 8:40 ajn. If it rains, ceremonies will be held in
Florida Gym.
A reception for all graduates, their families and friends
will follow in UF President Stephen C. OConnells home
at 2 p jh.
Dr. Robert Q. Marston, director of the National
Institutes of Health, will deliver the main graduation
address for 59 graduates of the UF College of Medicine.
Degrees will be granted to 81 law graduates, eight of
whom will graduate with honors. Leonard S. Powers,
associate dean of the college, will present the diplomas.
A TOTAL OF 109 Army and 19 Air Force ROTC
graduates will be commissioned following UF
commencement ceremonies June 13.
Undersecretary of the Army Thaddeus Beal will deliver
the principal address. Dr. Scudder will give the invocation,
and Dean Harry H. Sisler will give a welcoming speech.
Forty Army and three Air Force officers will be
designated distinguished military graduates.

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WHY PATRONIZE
GATOR ADVERTISERS?
There are jots of good reasons. They are a special
group of people, who advertise in our Gator be because
cause because they like doing business with UF students,
they deal in the goods and services thaf we spec specifically
ifically specifically want, and they know this is the best way
to get their message across to us. Most of all,
their advertising contributes, to The Alligator's
success, so they are as much a part of The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator gang as the editor and the staff. If we, the
students, are the backbone of the uni verity news newspaper,
paper, newspaper, then the advertisers are the life's blood.
So do business with them. They're on our side.

Friday, June 5,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Juno 5,1070

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices Campus

CEASING PUBLICATION:
The Alligator will cease
publishing for the spring quarter
on Friday, June 5. The last
Orange and Blue Bulletin will be
published on that day.
Publication will resume Monday,
June 22, and the first Orange
and Blue Bulletin will be
Friday, June 26.
GRADUATING SENIORS:
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduation, granting
of credit, or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
on Thursday, June 11 at 1:30
p.m. in Room 235, Tigert Hall.

Library Schedule
Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
College Library* Bam llpm Bam llpm 2 pm llpm
Research Library Bam llpm Bam ll pm 2pm llpm
PKY Lib. of Florida History 8:30 am -5 pm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Special Collections 8:30 am -5 pm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Architecture & Fine Arts Library Bam spm
Arch. 8t Fine Arts Building 7pm -10 pm Bam -12 N 6pm -10 pm
Chemistry Library Bam- 5 pm 9am -12 N 2pm- 5 pm
216 Leigh Hall 7pm lO pm Ipm 4pm 7pm lO pm
Education Library
341 Norman Hall Bam 10:30 pm** 9am- spm 2pm -10:30 pm
Engineering & Physics Library 8 am-5 pm 9am-12N 2 pm-5 pm
410 Engineering Building 7 pm 10 pm Ipm -4 pm 7 pm 10 pm
Health & Phys. Ed. R. R. Bam spm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6pm- 10 pm*** Bam -12 N 7pm-10 pm
Health Center Library ~ ~
_L 102 Med. Science Bldg. Bi3oam-12M 8:30 am-5 pm 2pm-12M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall Bam ll pm Bam spm 7pm ll pm
Journalism 8t Communications R.R. Bam spm
337 Stadium 7pm -10 pm*** Bam -12 N Closed
Law Library
Mead Library (PKY Lab School) ~
Yonge Bldg. F. Bam 4pm Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Office Bam spm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam -12 N Closed 2 pm-5 pm
6pm lO pm 6pm lO pm
The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday nightsfrom 11 p.m. -12 M
** The Education Library closes at 6:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
*** The Reading Rooms dose at 5:00 pan. on Friday nights.

GREAT EXUMA, MON ?
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-~7~~~Y~^| ~f GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL

ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
APPLICATION DEADLINE
DATE is June 24. This is the last
day for receipt by the
Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, NJ. 08540, of
application and $lO fee for
reading knowledge examinations
in French, German, Russian, and
Spanish on July 18. Registration
fees increase $3 after this day
and up to the closing date of
July 1.
NOTICE OF DEPOSITORY
HOURS: Student Accounts in
the Hub, will be open from 9
a.m. until 3 p.m., June 19, 22,
and 23. If lines are as long as
they have been in the past, the
lines will be regulated on these
days so that there will be enough
time to wait on everyone inside
by 3 p.m. There is an envelope
drop on the east wall of the
Depository for your
convenience.

BLUE BULLETIN

NATIONAL DEFENSE
LOAN BORROWERS: If you
have been approved for a release
of funds from the National
Defense Loan program for the
summer quarter, and have
pre-registered for that quarter,
your fee payment can be
deducted from your loan. As
soon as you receive your fee
cards come to the Student
Accounts Office.
GRE APPLICATION deadline
date is June 16. This is the last
day for receipt by the
Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, NJ. 08540 of
Registration Form to take the
July 11 GRE without paying the
$3 penalty fee.
GRADUATING SENIORS: If
you have a National Defense
Student Loan, you must
complete the Exit Interview
procedure prior to graduation in
order to keep your account
current.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES*TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Friday
Union Movie, "Rebel Without a
Cause/' Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:30 p.m.
Modem Dance Group, Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Saturday
Union Movie, "A Few Dollars
More," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30
Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi
59th Annual Banquet,
Speaker: Chancellor Robert
B. Mautz, Union Ballroom,
6:30 p.m.
Florida Players: "Come
Together'' Dance
Interpretation of Abbey
Road, Constans Theatre, 8:00
p.m.
Dance, Tolbert Area, North &
East Halls, 9:00 p.m.
Sunday
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
362 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Florida Players: "Come
Together" Dance
Interpretation of Abbey
Road, Constans Theatre, 8:00
pjn.
Union Classic Film Series
"Experimental Films," Union
Aud., 8:00 8t 10:00 p.m.

free expression
. &
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read
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8 .
v : I ,V

Calendar

Monday
v
Exam Extravaganza Films: "Cat
Ballou/' Union Aud., 7:30 &
9:30 p.m. "Camp and
Cartoon Capers," Union
Aud., 9:00 p.m.
Dance, Union Terrace, 10:00
p.m.
Tuesday
Exam Extravaganza Films:
"Alice in Wonderland,"
Union Ballroom, 5:30, 8:00
& 10:00 p.m. "Caine
Mutiny," Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:30 p.m.
Dance, Band: 'The Back
Basement," Union Terrace,
10:00 pjn.
Attention I Camp Wauburg is
alive land will bd living in
Micanopy, Florida. Visiting
hours are as follows: 1:00
7:00 p/n. Tues. & Thurs.;
9:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m. .Sat. &
Sun.



AN OPEN LETTER FROM
COURSE AND TEACHER
EVALUATION
i*. *'
The objectives of Course and Teacher Evaluation have been and will
continue to be:
the improvement of teaching and course content where needed,
the recognition of superior teaching when achieved;

the publication of a thorough, accurate Course Guide that students may
rely upon in the selection of courses and teachers.
. *. r
The Teacher Evaluation Program has always attempted to be
conscientious and cooperative with all groups concerned with improving
classroom teaching. For three years we have administered the program on an
entirely voluntary, confidential basis despite pressure from many students to
conduct an underground evaluation. We adopted the Purdue University
questionnaire at great copyright expense to the student body solely to insure
reliable results. We have met with faculty and university committees
repeatedly to develop the best evaluation system possible for the entire
university.
The program has now reached the stage at which we are planning to
publish a Student Course Guide for next fall. Many faculty had responded
this quarter to participate in the evaluation, but others had not. Therefore
on June 1 we placed an ad to notify the students of the faculty who had not
responded so that the& faculty might be evaluated outside of class.
Unfortunately the tone and language of the ad was inappropriate and names
*- f
of some faculty members were erroneously included. We apologize for these
errors, both to the University Community and to the Alligator. The ad was
submitted in good faith. It should also be understood that Teacher
Evaluation is an independent body from Omicron Delta Kappa and so the
responsibility for the ad is ours.
Our hope is that the faculty will continue to work with the students as
they have in the past to improve teaching on this campus.
Douglas Shachtman
Co-Chairman
~ Course and Teacher Evaluation __l
2111 N.W.
Oy I f y' r ooiiosv b fLTftv qu uoy is*- f-FoW '.V.
'

Friday, Juna 5,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



I, The Florida AWgator, Friday, June 6,1970

Page 16

WASHINGTON (UPI) Ten senators pressing the administration
to sell jet warplanes to Israel reported they were encouraged Thursday
after a meeting with Secretary of State William P. Rogers.
Rogers, who met with President Nixon beforehand, declined to
comment following the Capitol Hill meeting, but Senate participants
emphasized that the administration was still considering the Israeli
request and that a decision was expected shortly.
WE HAVE EVERY reason to be encouraged, said Sen. Jacob K.
Javits, R-N. Y. I would be surprised and shocked if the answer was
no, said Sen. Abraham Ribicoff,D-Conn.
One thing were sure of, Javits added, the policy of the United
States is unchanged in dedication to preservation of the state of
Israel.
The 10 represented 76 senators who signed a letter urging appoval
Warplanes Strike
Egyptian Bases

By United Prate International
Waves of Israeli warplanes
swept into Egypt Thursday in an
almost nonstop blitz of bases in
a 20-mile-wide band along the
Suez Canal. President Nixon,
speaking on the eve of the third
anniversary of the 1967 war,
said the Middle East was ready
to explode again.
Egyptian communiques
announced one U. S.-built
Skyhawk jet fighter-bomber shot
down by antiaircraft fire
Gold water
Praises New
Chief Os Staff
WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Barry Goldwater, R-Ariz.,
Thursday advised Adm. Thomas
H. Moorer, the incoming
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, not to be frightened or
cowed by critics of military
spending.
Goldwater offered his advice
at a hearing of the Senate Armed
Services committee on Moorers
nomination to become the
nations chief military officer.
He is now chief of naval
operations.
WERE BUILDING fewer
aircraft this year than in 1935,
Goldwater told Moorer, and
proportionate to civilian
government spending the
military budget is at its lowest
point in history. He advised
Moorer to brush aside the
contention that spending on
Vietnam and arms is responsible
for the nations economic
troubles.

Northwest
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Senators Urge Jet Sates

Thursday near Qantara in the
northern sector of the canal as
Soviet-built MIGs rose to
challenge the Israeli raiders.
ISRAEL DENIED any aircraft
losses in the Suez attacks
Thursday which marked the
sixth consecutive day of raids in
the area. Israeli pilots have
racked up more than 60 hours
on missions in the six days in a
campaign to knock out Egyptian
artillery sites and prevent
installation of Russian
antiaircraft missiles.
Egypt reported heavy artillery
duels across the Suez Canal
during the Israeli air strikes, and
said one Israeli soldier on the
east bank was wounded.
Jordanian and Israeli forces
exchanged machine gun fire
Thursday in a 10-minute duel in
the southern Jordan Valley amid
fears of escalating combat on
that front.
THE MIDDLE EAST is
bubbling up and ready to
explode again, President Nixon
said in Washington in
extemporaneous remarks to a
group of high school students.
At another point in wide-ranging
remarks on the world situation,
Nixon said, The Middle East is
about to go up.
It was on June 5, 1967, that
the first shots were fired in a war
that saw Israeli forces sweep into
Jordan, Egypt and Syria and
occupy wide areas of all three
nations extending from the east
bank of the Suez Canal to the
Golan Heights of Syria.
Israel said it struck in 1967 to
remove the Arab threat to its
frontiers and lift an Egyptian
blockade of Israeli shipping at
Sharm El Shiekh on the Gulf of
Agaba.

TO ISRAELIS

of the sale of 125 planes to offset recent Soviet arms shipments to the
Arab nations.
THE SECRETARY was impressed that 76 senators of all
persuasions signed this letter, said Ribicoff. Many of these senators
come from states where there is virtually no Jewish constituency.
Senate Republican Leader Hugh Scott said Rogers promised it
would be not very long before a decision is made. And at another
point in the meeting, Scott added, Rogers said the decision would be
made shortly.
Others attending the hour-long meeting were Edward W. Brooke,
R-Mass., Robert J. Dole, R-Kan., Edward J. Gurney, R-Fla., Stuart
Symington, D-Mo., Herman E. Talmadge, D-Ga., Gale W. McGee,
D-Wyo., and Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass.

(Three Cubans Escape]
i From Homeland
: :
j£ KEY WEST (UPI) Three young Cubans survived a nine-day, jj
sun-scorched journey from their homeland on a rubber raft jj
jj without food and very little water but a fourth man died :jj
jj Thursday only five hours from freedom. :jj
ij The dead man was described as the father of one of the three :jj
;ij exiles, aged 16, 18 and 23. No names were released by U. S. ;jj
jij authorities. ij:
jjj THE RAFT, BUOYED up by two innertubes tied to the
sides, was sighted about 4.5 miles off Plantation Key in the
J i Florida Keys about 7:30 a.m. EDT by Ramon Hernandez, a
ij: fisherman from Key Largo. $
ij: The dead man had expired about 2 ajn., the survivors ji;
ij: reported. ji;
| Hernandez broutht the refugees to Tavernier, where they jj:
jji were taken to a nearby hospital. A hospital spokesman said they
| were dehydrated and denourished, but were expected to be jj:
j: released soon for transfer to Miami and processing through the ij:
j: Cuban Refugee Center. ij:
j; THE FBI IN Key West was taking charge of the dead mans ij:
ji body. It was not immediately known which of the survivors is ij:
ji his son. ij:
j; Death apparently was due to over-exposure. The survivors ji;
ji told Immigration and Coast Guard officials they used up the last :j:
j: bit of the five gallons of fresh water they had aboard the raft on ij:
ji; Wednesday. ij
j: They said they had no food since leaving Cuba nine days v
$ before. S
MONDAY NIGHT 7:00 £ 9:30
UNION AUDITORIUM

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Senate Attempts To Exercise Antiwar Power

WASHINGTON (UPI) Very, very
late, perhaps too late to matter, the
Senate has decided to retrieve its
vanishing role in the decision to make
war.
As it is want to do, the Senate has
grumbled and griped greatly but has never
come to grips with the erosion of its
powers.
BUT THE Vietnam War in general and
the Cambodian incursion specifically has
finally forced the Senate into at least
trying to reassert its authority.
The so-called Cooper-Church
amendment, which cuts off funds for the
retention of U. S. troops in Cambodia
after July 1, is a first step.
It will be followed by the so-called
antiwar amendment. This proposal would

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AUTHORITY BECOMING OBSOLETE

choke off money for military
operations in Southeast Asia by the end
of the year, leaving just enough to bring
U. S. troops home by July 1,1971.
THE PROPOSALS are negative and
symbolic.
Symbolic because, despite strong
support in the Senate, it has no chance in
the House. Negative because it is a retreat
to the only possible recourse left to the
Congress the power of the purse.
What poses an even greater dilemma is
the realization by a good many senators
that regardless of what the
Constitution says the power to make
war can no longer be vested in Congress.
THE FOUNDING fathers, in writing
the Constitution, could not visualize the
day when a President would just not have

the time to come to Congress.
As Sen. Robert J. Dole, R-Kan., put it,
... if there are circumstances, extreme
circumstances where American lives or
interests are threatened and its necessary
to make some move, it may just not be
possible to come to Congress.
In the nuclear age, Dole said, decisions
must be made in minutes, or hours, or a
few days.

Suspect Arrested In Rat Break-In

University police arrested John Edward
Young, 22, of 1723 N.E. Bth Ave. on
breaking and entering with intent to
commit petty larceny.
Young was arrested Friday by
under-cover UPD officer Wayne Katz,
who said he caught Young breaking into a

Friday, June 5,1970, Th* Florida Alligator.

... SOMETIMES we are very lengthy
in the discussions, Dole said. The war
could be over before we get around to a
declaration.
The Republican senator conceded that
Congress power to declare war before
action is taken may be fairly near the
age of obsolescence.

Rathskeller juke box.
BOND WAS set at SI,OOO.
Due to a recent rash of breaking and
enterings, we decided to stake out the
Rathskeller, Katz said.
Katz said the suspect had a tire iron in
his possession when he was apprehended.

Page 17



Page 18

I, Tfw Florida AlligMor, Friday, Juno 5,1970

PARIS Communist diplomats said Thursday
President Nixon was talking about imaginary
victories in claiming great success for allied
operations in Cambodia. The United States urged
Hanoi and the Viet Cong to begin serious peace
talks.
The statements came at the 69th session of the
Vietnam peace talks -a4H hour meeting which
produced no progress. The talks have been
deadlocked for 15 months.
LIMA Ton of relief supplies for earthquake
survivors flowed into Peru Thursday from the
United States and a half dozen other nations. A
witness told how one entire town simply
disappeared in a mass of mud.
A new tremor Wednesday night three days
after the killer quake struck sent thousands of

TALLAHASSEE The House gave 104-2
approval Thursday to a full disclosure bill aimed at
wiping out quasi-political funds such as Gov. Claude
Kirks once-secret governors club.
The bill by Sens. Reubin Askew, D-Pensacola,
and Richard Stone, D-Miami, would require
semi-annual reports of all gifts over $25 given to
public officials. The bill does not apply to campaign
contributions intended to pay entirely political
expenses, which are already covered by law, but
required disclosure of contributions for paying
personal expenses of a candidate or officeholder.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. George C. Wallace,
disavowing interest in a 1972 presidential bid in
much the same manner as he once denied interest in
this years Alabama gubernatorial race, is urging
President Nixon to woo Southern voters.
But he cannot woo Southern voters with nice
platitudes, we must see some action. If Nixon wants
to undercut me and get me out of the way, thats
what I want him to do, Wallace said.
ATLANTA Angie Brooks, president of the
United Nations General Assembly, said Thursday
she would have turned down an invitation to speak
at the 61st convention of Rotary International if
she had known the host Atlanta organization was
not integrated.
Miss Brooks told a news conference she
represented the world at large ... there should be
no discrimination.
WASHINGTON Texas multimillionaire H. Ross
Perot put on display in the U. S. Capitol Thursday
exhibits depicting a North Vietnamese prison camp.

Gob Martinez presents
Gettfaftcawfth
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Rare Earth
Sunday, June 7,8 PM
Curtis Hixon Hall
TICKETS $4.0055.0056.00
TICKETS. Available at CURTIS HIXON (BOX OFFICE)
t Sean (Tampa, St Pete, Clwptar. Lakeland Slak Shack in Tampa
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jittery residents streaming into the streets of Lima.
But there were no reports of casualties.
SAIGON Communist forces launched 71
shelling attacks throughout South Vietnam in a
24-hour period ending Thursday morning in the
biggest one-day bombardment in a month. In
Cambodia, Communist troops captured a village 10
miles from Phnom Penh in their closest thrust to the
capital.
In Saigon, the U. S. command said American
battle deaths in Indochina rose last week to 165,
from the previous weeks figure of 142, with 55 of
the fatalities suffered in the Cambodian campaign.
Military sources said the increase in American
deaths was due to stepped up Communist shelling
attacks in Vietnam.

TALLAHASSEE Gov. Claude Kirk asked the
legislature to speed up delivery of the $1,279 billion
general appropriations bill to his desk Thursday and
lawmakers cleared a major oil spill bill after the
House gave up on amendments to settle an agency
jurisdictional fight.
Kirks unusual request came in letters to the
leaders of both houses. Senate President John
Mathews, D-Jacksonville, replied that the bill
which Kirk might veto in whole or in part would
be on the governors desk by midaftemoon.

With the permission of the House and Senate and
the blessing of House Speaker John W. McCormack,
Perots United We Stand organization erected two
replicas of Communist prison cells.
They were placed on floor under the rotunda in
the Capitols crypt, a place visited by thousands of
tourists each week.
ALEXANDRIA, Va. . Racial unrest touched off
by the killing of a black youth by a white store
manager has plagued this historic suburb of
Washington, D.C., nightly since last weekend.
Crowds of blacks ranging up to 200 persons
blocked traffic Wednesday night and early Thursday'
at various intersections and set a minor fire inside a
parked car belonging to Rep. Frank Thompson Jr.,
D-NJ., before state and city police cleared the
streets.
Police said five persons were arrested.

FORESTS

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The
Florida
Alligator

Its A Lot More Than Club Pictures

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
I think most of us have the
idea that a college yearbook is,
for the most part, a waste of
paper and ink.
Unfortunately, most are. Most
are nothing but incredibly dull
group pictures of people who

Damn The Torpedoes;
Full Speed Ahead!
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Denise Alexander is unknown to
nighttime-only television viewers but she is one of the queens of soap
opera in her role of Susan Martin on the daily Days of Our Lives
strip.
The auburn haired beauty moved here from New York 12 years ago
and into a Beverly Hills apartment she has furnished with antiques
from a shop she opened and later closed.
HER POTPOURRI antique store was a modified success. Modified
because Denise tried to find good homes for her merchandise.
As a result many an ancient chair or table rests in her home, some
with price tags still on them.
A regular with Days of Our Lives for four years, Denise leaves
her four-room diggings bedroom, kitchen, dining room and living
room at 6:30 ajn. every day for morning rehearsals at NBC.
Denises boy friend is actor David Hartman who stars in The Bold
Ones for television. They are together almost every evening. Most
often David takes Denise to dinner, and then perhaps a movie.
Other evenings Denise broils steaks in her apartment for her fella,
as she calls him. At the moment they havent any marriage plans.
THE ACTRESS prefers gourmet dishes and few chefs prepare veal
cordon bleu better than she. Her swiss steak with wine sauce is also a
treat which Hartman relishes.
Denise opened her door one day and an enormous white cat walked
in, hopped onto a chair and staked a claim.
Better yet, she says, Id like to discover an ancient civilization
buried someplace in Greece or Italy. I cant think of anything more
exciting than that.

"FINALS WEEK"
-SALE -SALEat
at -SALEat e Unttoersrttp iMiop
savings from 50% to 60%
Mens Department Jt
Valued At Now! w\f\
Slacks $6 to $lO $3 Jo $5 l
Fraternity Ties $6 $1.99 Hr
Men's Sport Coats SSO-S6O $19.99 f
Suits $55-SBS $19.99-$39.99
Womens Department
Values Up To Nowl
m Skirt. sl6 $3.99
M Blows*. $26 54.99-512.99
Slacks S2B $5.99412.99
M&M 1 Bathing Suit. 522 53.99-58.99
Drossos up to 542 55.99-510.99
\ Short. P *o sl4 $5.99
k Midriff Pajama. Sl3 58.99
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Shoo. (Broken Size.) sl6 $8.99
Good Luck on your finals from:
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airriTiY-- --- -- 11 111 I i
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r n I r if I itiniYir if I

belong to incredibly dull clubs.
And then there are those endless
pictures of men in dark suits and
girls in dark sweaters.
WELL, THE SEMINOLE, the
yearbook put out recently here,
is an exception to all that
dullness. The book is exciting.
There are many fresh ideas and a
bright design makes it a pleasure

COMMENTARY: THE SEMINOLE

to look at even if you dont
belong to any club? or never
showed up in your dark suit the
day the photographer was on
campus.
The book costs $6 and there
are some available at the office
of Student Publications on the
third floor of the Reitz Union.
You ought to go up and look
through one and see if youd like
to have it. I think you will.
There is an organization of
the thing that is chronological
and uses the signs of the zodiac
to head the divisions of time of
the last school year. Each
section page has a good look
color design that is appealing
and fun. Theres a little blurb on
each of the section pages, too,
that talks about what the sign is
supposed to mean. Its really
kind of nice.
KEN DRIGGS is as
responsible as anyone for the
look and feel of the book and
hes to be congratulated for
working to make the book as
appealing as it is to many
different segments of the
student body, faculty and staff.
The general quality of the
picture reproduction is fine
particularly the color work. Its
hard as hell to get decent color
reproduction in a magazine or
book and the prints the
Seminole has chosen to use are
more than effective in color.

There are some nice nudes that
bear this out as much as any of
the photographs do.
Politics play an important
part in the feel of the book.
There are pictures of the various
political activity on campus this
past year and its been a good
year as well as shots of the
march on Washington and some
other off-campus activity. Its

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Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Friday, June 5,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

really such a heavy book in so
many ways.
THERES MORE that could
be said but I wont say it
because the book says what it is
better than I can say what it is..
All I am saying is this: give the
thing a chance to prove that it is
more than youd think it was
capable of being. I think youll
be surprised.

Page 19



Page 20

i. The Florid* AlUgrtor, Friday, June 5,1970

OH WHAT A LOVELY WAR! This is a funny look at war, a film
version of a Broadway musical. There is an impressive list of stars that
includes John Gielgud, John Mills, Susannah York, Michael and
Vanessa Redgrave and Laurence Olivier. Its the first try at directing
by a man named Richard Attenborough. One critic said it was the
only decent musical to appear in the whole of 1969. Its new at the
Plaza Two.
* #
HOW THE WEST WAS WON Heres another one with an
incredible cast. The story naturally is about the winning of the West.
Starring is John Wayne (whos as much West as anyone around),
Henry Fonda, Gregory Peck, James Stewart, Robert Preston, Lee J.
Cobb, Carrol Baker, George Peppard and Eh Wallach. It should be
something good. Its new at the Center One.
* *
A MAN CALLED HORSE Richard Harris, the singer, is the star
of this story about a white man who becomes an Indian, a Sioux to be
exact but only after going through a lot of bad okra to prove
himself. Okra is a euphemism. Harris is actually pretty good. There are a
few too many shots of his naked backside in it to suit me but Ive
never cared much for mens tails anyhow. I dont know much about
art but I know what I like. The thing is very authentic-seeming and
details make the Indian stuff fresher than most moviemakers have
been able to. Its playing at the Plaza One.

ANNE OF THE THOUSAND DAYS Richard Burton stars as
King Henry VII and Genevkye Bujold stars as his wife (after some
difficulty), Anne Boleyn. Henry wants a son to inherit the throne and
runs through several wives and a couple of mistresses trying to acquire
one. The story is a good one and\there are many tender times and
much power in the film. The supporting people are good and the sets
and costumes a thrill. Its a Hal Wallis production. Its showing at the
Florida.
*
THE WILD ONE Marlon Brando made a name for himself with
this picture from the 50s about motorcyclists and their activities in a
small town they terrorize. Brando is of course, brilliant and so are the
bikes. It concludes a week of Fifties Flicks brought by the Reitz
Union Program Office. Its on the same night as Rebel Without A
Cause which is just as good a movie, maybe even better. It stars
James Dean in his classic head down, stammering role. Its about a
young man who cant find his way back home. Its beautiful. Both are
at the Reitz Union. They cost 25 cents a person for each film. Wild
One will be shown at 7 pm. and Rebel will be shown at 9:30 pm.
* *
TRUE GRIT John Wayne stars in this fun Western written by
Charles Portis. He helps a little girl (Kim Darby) in her attempts to
avenge the deaths of her family at the hands of a bunch of desperados.
Wayne is spectacular and very much himself. Glen Campbell also is in
it as a country bumpkin who is dull and uninteresting. He also is very
much himself. Its with The Sterile Cuckoo with Liza Minelli at the
Gainesville Drivein.
* *
THE MEKAS COLLECTION This is a collection of short
experimental films put together by Jonas Mekas from the work of
filmmakers around the world. It was made especially for us here. See
that story over there for more about it. Its at the Reitz Union
Sunday.
# *
CAINE MUTINY Humphrey Bogart stars in this classic. No more
needs to be said. Its going to be shown next Tuesday night at 7 and
9:30 at the Reitz Union. Admission is 50 cents.
* *
OLIVER This one won the Academy Award for musicals the
year it came out. Its about a little boy and his desire for more stew. I
hate musicals. Its with Yours, Mine and Ours, a comedy about
busted up marriages at the Suburbia Drivein on the big screen.
* *
lAM CURIOUS (YELLOW) This is the story of a young Swedish
girl who is curious and not yellow in the least. She wants many things
and, strangely enough, there is always someone there to give. Love, on
the other hand, is kind. The passion is pretty passionless, the love is
pretty loveless, and believe it or not the sex is pretty sexless, too.
Whatever happened to good exciting filth? The picture is showing
(regardless of the local authorities) at the Suburbia Penthouse Three.
Cactus Flower with Walter Matthau and Goldie Hawn is in
Penthouse Two.

WEEKEND
SPECIAL
BOWLING
a p 3 games SI.OO
ODy Sat. 9am- 6pm
Per game Sun. all day
UNION GAMES AREA
You probably didnt know it,
but you can order your Florida
Quarterly by mail.
Just send $1.25 to Room 330,
J. Wayne Reitz Union.
And well mail you a Qgart#. i

WEEKEND
MOVIE FARE

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Short Films To Be Shown
At Reitz Union This Sunday

There will be a collection of
short films shown in the theater
in the Reitz Union this Sunday
night at 8 and 10.
The collection, sponsored by
the Union Programs Office, was
put together by Jonas Mekas, a
New York filmmaker and critic
who visited the campus early
this year.
MEKAS WAS ASKED by the
programs office to select a group
of films that he found
interesting and package the lot
together for showing here. He
said okay.
Mixed Media
Shaw At Union
The Constans Theatre will be
the scene this Saturday and
Sunday of a mixed media show
that will include modem dance,
rock music, and film.
Come Together is the name
of the show. Its being produced
by a group of students some
from here and others from
Florida Presbyterian College in
St. Petersburg and by some
members of the St. Petersburg
Ballet.
ADMISSION PRICE is $1 for
students. The show begins at 8
both nights.
The cast of 15 has been
working on the show for several
months. There were several
showings of the play at Florida
Presbyterian before the ones
here.
The Florida Players are
sponsoring the show. It uses The
Beatles Abbey Road in its
entirety for the background
music.
Gone Away
Yankee infielder Pete Ward
describes in the current issue of
Sport Magazine the best Ive
ever seen Hank Aaron handled
by a pitcher.
We were playing an
exhibition game against the
Braves, says Ward, and Ron
Klimkowski retired the first two
men. Then with Aaron coming
to bat, a sudden thunderstorm
washed out the game. Thats the
way to handle Hank, concludes
Ward. When he came to bat
everyone walked off the field.
USES*
...it moves

Its not known exactly how
many films Mekas will send
down for us, but it should be six
or so, making up a pretty
decent-sized program. Among
those already included on the
list is The Critic, a fairly well
known animated film that has
geometric shapes on the screen

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Starring Humphrey Bogart
Tuesday Night 7:00-9:30
Union Auditorium 50<
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and a skeptic in the audience
giving his comments.
Also on the program will be:
Rat Life in North America,
Castro Street, Invocation of
my Demon Brother, and Hold
Me While Im Naked.
It will cost a buck a person to
get in.



The Florida Alligator

GATOR SPOTRS

Owens Named Best Athlete

Andy Owens, the
scholar-basketball player who
labored with a team that won
only nine of its 26 games this
year, was named UF
Athlete-of-the-Year in a poll of
varsity coaches and university
sports writers conducted by the
Alligator.
Owens, whose lucky jersey
number 45 identified him in
action, just edged out another
number 45, All-American
flanker Carlos Alvarez, 4543 for
the honor. Both Owens and
Alvarez tallied four first-place
votes from the 13 ballots. The
ballot asked for the athlete who
best represented the university
in competition, academics, and
sportsmanship.
SLAG, AS HE is known by
his teammates because of his
r > mm-mm
VV *** W'
ANDY OWENS
... scholar-athlete

Hertz announces
yet another office.
Hertz announces a new office at:
1255 W. University Ave.
Its conveniently located and full of good
clean Fords and other good cars.
To reserve a car at our new office,
call our new number: 376"5600
Inquire about our special $7.47 rate.
HERTZ RENT-A-CAR

TOPS ALVAREZ IN POLL

strength and aggressiveness, led
the Gators this year in
practically every category, and
set school season records for
most points (676), highest
scoring average per game (27),
and most field goals (257). All
three records had been
previously held by Gator
All-American Neal Walk, now
playing for the Phoenix Suns.
Owens, a 6-5, 220-pounder,
graduated in March and is
already a law student at the UF
law school, rather than accept an
offer from the American
Basketball Associations New
Orleans team. He explained that
playing pro ball is a tough life,
and the financial rewards may
not be worth it.
Earlier in the year he was
awarded SI,OOO NCAA
scholarship for post-graduate
study, one of five athletes in the
country. During the basketball
season he posted the highest
grade-point average of any
player in the SEC.
ALVAREZ, WHO made more
i&B
JH
CARLOS ALVAREZ
... close second

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Friday, June 5,1970, The Florida Alligator,

All-American teams as a
sophomore than any player since
Doak Walker of SMU in 1947,
helped carry the football Gators
to a 8-1-1 season and a 14-13
victory over Tennessee in the
Gator Bowl. Another
student-athlete, he was named to
the Academic All-American
team.
The surprising third-place vote
getter with 25 points was
graduate student Jack Bachelor,
who runs for the Florida Track
Club, and is not a varsity
competitor. Bachelor, who
qualified for the 1968 Olympics
in Mexico City, holds virtually
every distance record on the
Florida Track.
John Reaves, the other half of
the passing combination that,
along with Alvarez, rewrote the
SEC record books collected 19
points to place fourth in the
rankings.
Swimmer Mark McKee, who
placed tenth in the nation in the
400-yd. individual medley, high
enough to be named an
All-American, rounded out the
top five.
Other vote-getters were Mac
Steen, football, 13 points; Ron
Jourdan, track, 8; Tommy
Durrance, football, 8; Jimmy
Perkins, swimming, 7; John
Parker, track, 6; Eammonn
OKeeffe, track, 6; Andy North,
golf, 5; Tom Derrough,
wrestling, 3; Tony Dobies,
baseball, 2; Wayne Rogers,
£gl IHHr
JACK BACHELOR
... surprise third

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

baseball, 1; Bob Favreau,
weightlifting, 1. Bachelor
collected two first place votes,
while Reaves, McKee and
Durrance got one each.
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Page 21

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1. Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, Juna 5,1970

Page 22

Msr
H II I I "Vi" I I
TOP SHOT

The Alligator Sports department has selected
this photograph as the outstanding action picture
of the quarter.
This shot was taken by Clay Phipps at a spring

GAMBLERS BEWARE

SBI-Sport Snoopers

NEW YORK (UPI) The
latest suggestion for the drive
against gambling in sports is an
SBI Sports Bureau of
Investigation.
This super agency would be
an umbrella under which all
sports executives would be
protected from the vultures of
the criminal world, says John
L. Brennan, former FBI agent
who heads Harness Tracks
Security, Inc., protecting 28
trotting race courses around the
country.
Since the Denny McLain case,
all major sports have stepped up
their private defensive measures
in the hope of heading off
another episode like the one that
led to the Detroit pitchers
suspension until July 1 for
associations and bookmaking
activities.

ipiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim
( Intramurals j
iiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii By Steve Rohan iiiiiwi
Cockrell section of Hume Hall scored a run in the first extra inning
of play to nose out Sledd H of Murphree Area, 16-15, in the dorm
all-campus softball tournament championship game.
The run came as a result of a triple by Flippy Faulkner which
scored Ziggy Xignes who had singled to lead off the inning.
After trailing 6-1 in the first, Cockrell took the lead in the fourth
14-8 on a six-run outburst which included four singles and a double.
Sledd tied the score with four runs in the sixth and three in the
seventh. Leading hitters in the game included Faulkner who
connected for three singles and a homer and, *Ara OHara for Sledd
who slammed three singles and, Hossey Dossey who hit two doubles
and a single for Sledd.
Other dorm softball winners for each area were: East-Towers 6,
Graham-Glunt, Murphree-Sledd H, Tolberi-Tolbert 11.
The overall dorm championship winners for each area were: Tolbert
Tolbert 11, Murphree Thomas H, Hume -Bristol, Graham Staff,
and East Jennings 111.
The girls independent champions for the year were: Orange-Yulee I
and for the Blue-Rawlings 11.
The SAHPER champion of the year was Aquarius.

f Student Special
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Bemnan suggests one master
sports intelligence service bureau
could cover all sports with
greater efficiency but not
necessarily replace professional
security men already on the job
in various sports.
A point in favor of such an
agency is the fact that McLain, a
baseball player, was grounded
temporarily by problems with
horse players. And pro football
investigators reportedly came
across the trail before the
baseball people did.
I am positive that men like
Bowie Kuhn in baseball, Pete
Rozelle in football, Walter
Kennedy and Jack Dolph in
basketball want to do everything
they can to preserve public
confidence, says Brennan.
They just dont have all the
facilities to police their sports

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practice game. The picture was taken when John
Reaves threw a flare pass to fullback Tommy
Durrance over the outstretched hands of the
defenders.

and athletes properly.
Brennan says security work is
a highly skilled occupation and
that warfare on the termites
gamblers must be done by
professionals.
Athletes are not the only
ones vulnerable, he notes.
These crooks approach sports
officials, timers, everyone
connected with an event, to get
their required edge.
The proposed agency, he says,
would work in closest
cooperation with security men
already employed in various
sports. It would, he adds,
provide instant service on
potential danger spots.
There is much talk today of
youthful crime and rebellion,
Brennan says. For decades
youngsters have idolized and put
on pedestals men like Babe
Ruth, Willie Mays, Mickey
Mantle, Eddie Arcaro, Stanley
Dancer, Gordie Howe you can
name them in any sport. Sports
promoters should not allow such
men or their games to be
tarnished by the slightest hint of
scandal.
Ive talked to many youth
groups. Believe me, if they lose
respect for their sportsheroes,
theyll lose respect for
everything else.
Pete Bets Dad
Press Maravich, you remember
him, Petes old man and coach at
LSU, said that Pete wasnt
particularly interested in
basketball until he bet him that
he couldnt beat his dad. Pete
learned and won the bet. Press
began to suspect his sons talent
when, at age 10, Pete challenged
two of his fathers best players
at Clemson and beat them at
games of 21 for $1 apiece.

NOW
BILLYS "66
SERVICE CENTER
TIRES BATTERIES & ACCESSORIES
BILLY'S SERVICE
IS BETTER SERVICE

Wrong Way Hannemans
Crazy Hurdle Style

SPRINGFIELD, Ohio (UPI)
The world of sports has
always had its share of teams or
individuals known for doing
things just a little differently,
such as the amazin Mets and
Dick Fosbury with his Fosbury
Flop.
Wittenberg University has
now come up with one in
Wrong Way Hannenman, who
happens to be the defending
Ohio Conference champion in
the 120-yard high hurdles.
WRONG WAYS real name
if Steve, and he is a senior at
Wittenberg out of Brecksville
High School, near Cleveland.
His hurdles style, which he
calls running to win, does not
include clearing the hurdle.
Instead he runs the hurdle down
by stepping on it while using the
sprinters bent leg technique
instead of the normal hurdlers
form of a locked leg, which is
extended while clearing the
hurdle.
Although Hannemans hurdle
lane usually looks like the
aftermath of a hurricane, it
hasnt stopped him from a best
ever clocking of 14.3,
three-tenths of a second off the
Wittenberg record of 14.0 set by
Bob Cherry when he won the
NCAA championship in 1963.
Summer Camp
In Ocala Forest
There is room for another 700
children at Floridas Youth
Conservation Camps located in
the Ocala National Forest in
central Florida and in the J. W.
Corbett Wildlife Management
Area in south Florida.
In the south Florida camp, an
additional 250 young people will
be accepted for camping sessions
which begin June 14 and
continue through July 25. The
south Florida camp is located
near West Palm Beach and camp
applications are available
through the Youth Conservation
Camp office at 551 North
Military Trail, West Palm Beach.
IN THE CENTRAL Florida
camp, summer sessions will
begin June 14 and continue
through August 22. There is
room for 450 campers and
openings will be filled on a
first-come-first-served basis.
Applications are available
through the Youth Conservation
Camp office at 1239 S.W. 10th
Street in Ocala.
Both camps are operated by
the Game and Fresh Water Fish
Commission and provides
children between the age of
eight and 14 with an
opportunity for outdoor
experiences which includes
swimming, fishing, boating,
wood and camp craft plus an
understanding of nature and
wildlife environment.
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HANNEMAN STARTED
perfecting his knock down
style during his sophomore year
and has never lost at the
120-yard distance in a dual or
triangular meet.
The conference track coaches
are trying to think up ways to
equalize the hurdle event at this
years OC Championships, set
for Ohio Wesley May 14-15.
One way would be to use
weighted hurdles, but Wesleyan
does not have any and would
have to ship them in. One of the
coaches proposed that idea last
year, but it was turned down
and the weighted hurdles spread
evenly in the first two rows.
IN FOUR YEARS of running
track at Wittenberg, Hanneman
has picked up 40 firsts and 260
points in dual meet competition.
He came to Wittenberg to
play football, but had to pass up
his freshman year on the
gridiron because of a summer
auto accident. After that he
decided to stick to track.
Hanneman, whose best time
in the highs this year is 14.5,
says his goal is to run a 14. Q flat,
and of course to repeat as
conference hurdles champ and
win his personal revolution
with the OC.
UJfofcl*
J^^Jt^moves
For information on the
Baha'i Faith
Write: 716-311 SW 16th Ave.
or call: 373-1814
or 378-3575
Ironwood
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2 bad room i
Upper or Lower
Furnished
Air Conditioned
3 Pools
Recreation Hall
Study Room
See today. Move right in
VILLAGE PARK
&
FRENCH QUARTER
i it df
1001 SWI 6th St.
i 3783771



Ball Four Causing A Furor

HOUSTON (UPI) Rusty Staub of the Montreal Expos said
Wednesday he hopes Jim Boutons book, Ball Four, scheduled for
release June 16, is damn good because it might be the last one he
writes.
Staub, the former Houston Astro bonus boy who was traded to
Montreal 18 months ago, said he did not know Bouton and was not
mad at him, but he didnt like the idea of Bouton revealing all the
behind -the-scene incidents of players.
I feel sorry for a guy who has to go that far to make money,
Staub said. I read the first magazine installment! I hope the book is
damn good because it might be the last one he writes.
TO ME JIM BOUTON is just another ball player, Staub said.
Ive never batted against him. I think writing a book should be his
prerogative. But its a shame he did it to make money that way.
Bouton said most of the players dont like his book.
They think Ive written some things I shouldnt have, the
Houston Astros pitcher said.
Bouton, whose book deals mainly with his former New York

i n shorts shorts

Stewart Will Talk

NASSAU COUNTY District
Attorney William Cahn said
Wednesday that New York
Ranger defenseman Ron Stewart
has agreed to sign a waiver of
immunity and testify before the
grand jury in connection with a
fight which led to the death of
teammate Terry Sawchuk.
Stewart was questioned
Wednesday about the April 29
fight in which Sawchuk, one of
the greatest goalies in National
Hockey League history, suffered
injuries that resulted in three
operations. Sawchuk, who held
the all-time NHL record of 103
regular-season shutouts, died
Sunday in New York Hospital.
The district attorney said
Stewart and six other witnesses

Major League Baseball

AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 34 16 .680
New York 28 23 .549 6ft
Washington 24 24 .500 9
Detroit 22 24 .478 10
Boston 21 25 .457 11
Cleveland 19 27 .413 13
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 31 14 .689
California 31 18 .633 2
Oakland 26 24 .520 7ft
Kansas City 19 29 .396 13ft
Chicago 18 31 .367 15
Milwaukee 15 33 .313 17ft

** SPECIAI mm RATES
VILLAGE PARK FRENCH QUARTER
$265 .00 $315.00
.... .> ,tr --
The Entire Summer The Entire Summer
ONLY A FEW APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE AT THIS RATE.
3 Swimming Pools Pool Tablo
Color T.V. Rocroation Center
e Free Cable Study Rooms
nso N,E, 16 th Ayenue 378 3771

will appear before the grand jury
and that the taking of testimony
probably can be completed in
one day. Legal experts said that
if the grand jury hears all the
witnesses on the same day it is
unlikely to return an indictment
in the case.
* *
TEAM McLaren has
withdrawn from the Formula
One Belgian Grand Prix at Spa
June 7 following Tuesdays
death of New Zealand racing
driver Bruce McLaren.
A spokesman said the team
intended to compete in all
events after that, despite the loss
of 32-year-old McLaren, founder
of the firm and its principal
designer and driver.

NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 26 20 .565
New York 25 24 .510 2ft
St. Louis 23 24 .489 3ft
Pittsburgh 24 27 .471 4ft
Philadelphia 21 28 .429 6ft
Montreal 16 32 .333 11
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 37 15 .712
Atlanta 28 19 .596 6ft
Los Angeles 29 21 .580 7
San Francisco 24 28 .462 13
Houston 23 29 .442 14
San Diego 23 32 .418 15ft

Yankee teammates, also has been attacked by sports writers in New
York. Columnist Dick Young of the New York Daily News criticized
Bouton again in Wednesdays column.
THATS THREE TIMES in a week, Bouton said of Young. Im
delighted because when people get that angry over a book theyre
very, very scared and, when there scared, they feel it is a very
important book.
They feel it is important sociologically and in terms of peoples
opinions hereafter in baseball, Bouton said. The more personal the
attack, the more frightened they are, the more desperate.
Young called Bouton a social leper in a column last week and
wrote Sunday: Jim Boutons writings could tear apart team morale
on the Astros. That is one consequence the free expression syndrome
fails to take into consideration.
BOUTON SAID HE doesnt think it has made his teammates feel
any differently toward him. Only one former Yankee teammate is on
the Astros and thats Joe Pepitone.
Joe said the only thing he didnt like was the Mantle stuff and he
wished I hadnt written it, Bouton said, a reference to stories in the
book about former Yankee star Mickey Mantle.
He had an image and I dont think Jim should have tom it down
like that. It wasnt necessary to say all those things. The kids will read
all that stuff about the guy they looked up to. What will they think? I
just dont think it was necessary, said Pepitone.
For Students Only!
Alotviontf Uth Street Store)
IFBIIP CHICKEN
18- Hour Delivery Service
Beginning Sunday June 7th At
11:30 A.M. Until Friday, June 12th
10:00 P.M. We Will Be Open
From 10:00 A.M. Until 4:00 A.M. Dally
Alto, There Will Be 18 Hour Delivery Service
Free Coffee For Students Who Come
In And Eat With Us.
New Chicken Sub Sandwich 75<
Maryland Fried Chicken
516 N.W. 13th StPh. 378-7412

Friday, June 5,1970, Tha Florida AHifrtor,

HAPPY WEEK
GOOD ANY DAY
DURING FINALS
4-7 PM
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
WITH THIS AD
Celebrate after Finals
BEER
sLo(jj
A PITCHER
TOM COUINS
Q
A PITCHER
VODKA COLLINS
H7s}
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SINGAPORE
SLING
0
A PITCHER
TONIGHT!
4-7 PM
THIRSTY
TIME
AT THE
THIBSTT
633 NW 13th Sr.

Page 23



Page 24

i, Tbs Florida AHlgotor, Friday* Juna 5,1070

BONANZA SIRLOIN PIT
0 * jfr jfr'THERE
'THERE jfr'THERE IS ONLY ONE'
2445 s.w. 13 st. J^ s:as sJk\ Mm
BON2NZS open da,iy from
"Congratulates the or/ 1
Player of the Week PLAYER of frho WEEK
b .. % ~
Your choice of juicy, tender Bonanza steaks,
chicken, fish, and our famous VHb.
Bonanzaburger 100% beef, French
Fries, salad, pickle and chicklets .79
Our steaks are served with a steaming-hot, buttery
baked potato, Texas toast, and a cool, crisp, green
K salad.
f unkhouse Special % lb. 100% chopped
\ Rib Eve 6 oz., tender cut steak
/ Top" Hand a 15 oz. T-bone for a huge,
W rugged appetite
CA ~ 1
Whatever your needs for
classroom use or campus
activities always check before
Y Canvas Shop
/( & Bookstore
Since there was no varsity competition this week
because of preparation for finals, the Alligator ; n + umm
instead pays tribute to all varsity performers in
football, cross country, swimming, basketball,
track, tennis, golf, wrestling and baseball for their branch stores mm*,, center,
outstanding efforts in bringing recognition to the Broward, Tri. Shop, Towers and
... , the Union
University of Florida.
at We salute all the athletes, coaches and Athletic I /
m Director Ray Graves and his staff for an ffhsttbrrx/ k "'w
outstanding year that saw the Gators compile an j7)
over-all all-sports record of 81 victories against 45
losses and one tie. J
\airto imports \ j
506 E. University Ave. YOUR on-campus store" /
372-4383 MONDAY FRIDAY
1969 VW BUGS $1695 ** £ IJ
your choice of five colors SATURDAY jgvjj tft u Bc ///
1968 VWy $1275 912 jwHtf
1967 SAAB WAGON $1395
it'll last a lifetime
1965 VWS $795 I W ~^= :::: === ==^
choose from three colors B ISs js va q]
1968 VOIVO $2195 'B/ ** H
1967 VOLVO $1895 HP! E9|
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