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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
STUDENTS UNAWARE OF COURT PRINCIPLES
Honor Court Fails To Educate Students

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the final article in a two
part series by staff writer Steve Strang evaluating an
extensive report on the honor system by the University
Squires.)
By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writar
Whats wrong with the honor system and what can be
done to solve the problem?
Thats not a simple question, but its one the University
Squires attempted to answer in the second part of its
report on the honor system.
THE REPORT LISTS what the Squires think are some

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CAROL CARSWELL
MOOG MUSIC
The Moog Synthesizer, played by Edward Troupin, conductor of
UF's Symphony Orchestra, is another example of computers invading
another facet. See story page 3.
Measure Opposing
SE Asia War Backed
WASHINGTON (UPI) Opponents of UJS policies in Southeast
Asia forged a voting majority in the Senate Wednesday for the first
time since the war began. u
By a 54-36 roll call vote, they blocked an amendment which would
have hobbled a controversial proposal to cut off funds for UJS.
military operations in Cambodia after June 30.
BACKERS OF the antiwar measure, sponsored by Sens. Frank

Church LMdaho, and John
Sherman Cooper, R-Ky., hailed
the vote as a solid expression of
support for their cause. White
House allies vowed anew to stall
with more amendments and
prolonged debate until the
Cambodia issue bums down.
SEE 'SENATE'PAGE 2
ffIKKKKMKtM
GEORGE WALLACE is
nominated for governor of
Alabama over incumbent
Albert Brewer .page 7
Classifieds 14
Editorials 8
Entertainment 24
Letters . 9
Movies ..14
Small Society 9
Sports..), 25
Whats Happening 4

Sex Bias Charged In State Colleges

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Sex discrimination complaints were filed against the Florida
University System last week in Washington, D.C. by Womans Equity
Action League (WEAL), a womens rights group.
Os the more than 100 universities across the nation that have been
named in WEALs suit, this is the first time an entire university system
has been filed against, according to Dr. Bernice Sandler, chairman of
the organizations action committee.
IN ITS PETITIONS, WEAL has asked that all Florida state
universities and junior colleges be reviewed and that all federal
contract negotiations be suspended until investigations are completed
and plans for affirmative action adopted and implemented.
Sexual imbalance is due to society trends and tradition, according
to Florida University Systems Chancellor Robert B. Mautz.
Were obviously in transition,** Mautz said. I think more women
will move into careers and the balance will change.**
AT THE PRESENT the university structure reflects the past, and
as women leave their previous concern of just being a housewife, we
will see a gradual increase in the number of women administrators,
faculty and students,** Mautz said.

of the causes of the problems the student body has in
effectively identifying with its honor system.
The first cause listed in the report is a failure on the
part of the Honor Court to provide for the maintenance
of the ideals expressed by the honor code through the
continuing education of the entire student body and
faculty on the purposes, principles and advantages of the
honor system and the responsibilities which accompany
it.
The report praised the professionalism maintained by
the Honor Court staff in the best tradition of the
American Legal System. But it criticized the Honor

The
Florida Alligator

NO CLASS DISMISSAL

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has written a letter to
Sen. Charles Percy (R-ffl.) in
opposition to any dismissal of
classes on campus in the fall to
involve students in campaign
work.
OConnells letter was
prompted by a plea made by
Percy to many university
presidents to allow students to
work in the fall elections by
rearranging their calendars or
dismissing classes.
O'CONNELL ADAMANTLY
opposed such a plan, stating in
the letter,
Few if any other segments of
society have the privilege of
being completely relieved of
their responsibilities to allow for
such participation.
The letter explained that
students, like other public
spirited citizens should
campaign in addition to other
activities. There is no logical, or
to my mind, defensible basis for
making students an exception
this principle.
PERCY'S PROPOSAL was
made following the killings at

Vol. 62, No. 155

O'Connell's Letter
Criticizes Request

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

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STEPHEN O'CONNELL
... no logical basis
Kent State University May 4.
Several colleges, including
Princeton, have already
organized efforts to rearrange
academic calendars to allow
students to campaign in the fall.
OConnell was in agreement
students should be allowed to
participate in government, but
added, on the same basis as
other citizens.
Student leaders were in
disagreement with the president.

In a recent telephone poll, two-thirds of the members of the Board
of Regents declared there is no sex bias on the campus.
I dont think women are being discriminated against, I just dont,
Regents Chairman D. Burke Kibler 111 said.
THE FIGURES on which the complaints were based were compiled
for a report for the Florida Commission on the Status of Women.
UF Womens Commission on the Status of Women has been busy
examining the conditions existing here.
As far as the students are concerned, things are pretty good,
Kathy Waldman, of women's commission, said. When you get to the
level of faculty, staff and administrators, I feel that women are
shafted.
IN THE COLLEGES of Education and Arts and Sciences, where a
majority of the students are women, there are very few women
faculty members, Miss Waldman said.
At the present time, husband and wife cannot be hired in the same
college and men are favored for tenure. Miss Waldman said.
We do have very intense (dans to do research on the status of
SEE 'REGENTS'PAGE 2

Courts failure to educate the university community
concerning the honor system.
THE SQUIRES also cited a failure on the part of
student leadership, faculty, student publications and
administration to exert continuing evidenced support for
the honor system. They said that while student leaders
support the honor system, their support is too often in
the form of rubber-stamp approval which lacks real
impact and is given merely because it is expected.
The report states that student body leaders are often
the most silent about the honor system, rarely
commenting publicly about Floridas most cherished
SEE 'HONOR' PAGE 2

Thursday, June 4, 1970

m m
lEfr
STEVE UHLFELDER
... O'Connell difficult
STUDENT BODY President
Steve Uhlfelder said OConnell
was making it difficult to, take
part in the system in which we
are so often advised we must
participate.
I think we need to make it
possible for students to channel
their energies into constructive
efforts'. Rearranging the calendar
would serve to accomplish this,
Uhlfelder said.
SEE 'LETTER' PAGE 2



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 4,'1970

Senate Majority Backs Antiwar Measure

f FtOH PA6£ ONE
The vote came on an
amendment by Sen. Robert
Dole, R-Kan., to permit
President Nixon to continue
full-scale combat operations in
Cambodia indefinitely as long as
a single American is imprisoned
or missing in action there.
It was the first time since the
war in Vietnam began that
opponents of U.S. policy in
Southeast Asia have been able to
muster a majority to beat White
House supporters.
THE SENATE HAS not had a
real test of strength on the war
since it voted 88 to 2 on Aug. 7,
1964, to approve the Gulf of
Tonkin resolution to give the
executive branch unlimited
authority to repel Communist
aggression in Southeast Asia.

UFS Honor Courts Professionalism Praised

tradition. It also states that the lack of leadership concerning the
system can be seen in all areas of Student Government from the
Student Senate, which only infrequently ratifies legislation dealing
with administrative aspects of the system, to the lowly dorm rep.
The Florida Alligator is also responsible, in part, for the problems
of the honor system by remaining aloof from open support befitting
of Floridas most cherished tradition. The report cites the
Alligators well-read pages which have consistently remained
barren of constructive articles concerning the honor system.
FACULTY SUPPORT for the honor system is similarly poor,
according to the report, despite the dusty pledges of support which
appear in honor system literature.
Administrative support, however, has been better than the others,
the report said, but.even it has been little more than rubber stamp
approval. More distrubing has been the administrations relative lack
of concern over the honor systems present plight.
Another primary reason the honor system is currently experiencing
problems, according to the report, is what it calls incongruous ideals
of the student body and its honor system.
THE SUCCESS of the system is dependent upon the honor of each
individual member of the student body in that he is duty-bound to
abide by the principles of the honor code, and also he is further
pledged to report to the Honor Court such violations of the code as he
may observe.
A report on the Honor Court by Jeffrey Klink, which the Squires
report used extensively, said that many men and women coming to
UF for the first time feel hesitant about assuming this responsibility
(to report violations of the honor code) inasmuch as early school
training has created feelings of antipathy toward one who tattletales
on a fellow student.
Klink found that three-fourths of the students saw little likelihood
that this important duty would be carried out.
THUS, THE SQUIRES report concludes, there exists clear
evidence of a pervasive discontent within the student body toward
this obligation imposed by the honor system and such a
discontent... spells a breakdown of the system.
Inadequate academic testing procedures which, when combined
with the intense pressures of academic environment, place an
unreasonable load upon the honor of the individual student, is the
final cause to the current honor system situation, the Squires said.
Specifically bad, are conditions in which test rooms are badly
overcrowded, and a sloppy, often disrespectful attitude toward the
honor system by testing administrators.
WHAT CAN BE DONE to alleviate this problem?
The Squires have made several proposals.
The Squires first suggestion is to hold a referendum next spring
after an intensive effort has been made to educate the student body
concerning the honor system. The referendum would be held to
determine whether the honor system should be abolished, and a new
system implemented. In this way, if the old system was voted down,
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

Despite the strong antiwar
showing on Wednesdays test
vote, the Cooper-Church
amendment was still nowhere
near a showdown vote.
Minutes after the Dole
proposal was blocked, Sen.
Robert C. Byrd, D-W. Va., called
up his amendment to assert
President Nixons authority as
commander-in-chief to take
steps in Cambodia which he
deems necessary to protest the
lives of American troops. Cooper
and Church contend that change
would be even more crippling
even than the Dole amendment.
THE BYRD AMENDMENT
probably will provide a more
accurate gauge of support for
the Cooper-Church proposal.
Some Republicans who voted
against the Dole amendment
may support Byrd to
demonstrate White House
loyalties.

Byrd and Sen. John Stennis,
D-Miss., held the floor for the
remainder of the day, pleading
with their colleagues to preserve
Nixons options in Southeast
Asia.
Stennis, chairman of the
Senate Armed Services
Committee, said the Cambodian
incursion was successful and had

Letter Refuses Percy Request

Florida Blue Key Vice
President Jim Kersey expressed
concern that the presidents
letter was perhaps a little
hasty in its decision for the fall.
ON ONE HAND students are
urged to stop protesting and
demonstrating and try to change
things from within the system,
Kersey explained.
Now that many students see

there would be a confidence that it had been given a fair chance, and
that it had been abolished by a concerned and knowledgeable student
body.
THE REPORT by the Squires also proposes the beginning of an
extensive program to educate the student body about the honor
system.
The purpose of this education would be three-fold:
To thoroughly inform the entire student body as to the
principles, purposes, and advantages of the honor system.
To clearly define the responsibility. of the student under the
system.
To vigorously attempt to increase the affectation of student
body in the system.
The education would take place by several methods.
FIRST, MORE specific information about the honor system would
be included in the package containing the catalog and admission forms
to entering students. There would also be an explanation on the
admissions form which tells the student that his signature binds him
to comply with the principles of the honor code.
Second, a more extensive orientation would be given to incoming
freshmen and transfer students concerning the fundamentals of the
honor system.
Third, lectures on the honor system would be given during the first
few weeks of school to freshmen in their CSS 111 (Institutions)
classes and also in freshman lecture.
ALSO INCLUDED are articles in the Alligator, and other methods.
The report recommends orienting faculty to the fundamental
purposes of the honor code, too.
The Squires also proposed revising the honor code which they feel
would be more realistic for a contemporary university, possibly
striking the part about reporting cheaters.
They also recommend the creation of a special publicity
information and relations staff to be responsible for the primary and
continued education of the student body concerning the honor
system.
HONOR COURT Chancellor, Dan Stephens, agrees with the spirit
of the University Squires report.
The report is a fairly accurate statement of the conditions as thev
are on this campus, Stephens said.
He also said he wasnt surprised with the results of the report and
he agrees that something needs to be done with the honor svstem
STEPHENS said that several of the things the Squires suited had
been proposed during the campaign. He plans to begin an extensive
nexfM t 0 CdUCate StUdCnt b dy COnceming the honor system
effective 6118 ** h nor system must be workable to be
."SSfi agieed * h the *** concluding statement in the
report Thehonor system must exist, not merely as a tradition
though traditions are important, but as a viable solution for the
problems that confront the UF today. r me

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REMIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
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brought the war nearer to an
end. Before the operation began,
he said, U. S. troop withdrawals
from South Vietnam were in
jeopardy and down to a narrow
margin. K
Joining as a cosponsor of the
Byrd amendment, Stennis
contended the Cooper-Church
measure, in its present form, was

the opportumty to do just that,
they must be relegated to taking
an inactive role in the election.
Gov. Claude Kirk told student
body leaders from all over the
state that getting involved in the
system was necessary and the
most effective means of voicing
concern. Kirk also commended
the idea of students taking time
to work in campaigns.
FSUS STUDENT BODY

AN INFORMATIVE NOTICE FROM
Tur TRADER TOM'S
nnx GAINESVILLE POLICE DEPT. HAS RULED
wJi 22SJXJ2 ANY FORM BY AMATEUR DANCERS IN
piu7k dl* NTESTS ETC Regardless OF THE
Tno Z |l S c PR GFESSIONAL DANCERS CAN LEGALLY BE
pn^ O A^!? ELL w BARMAIDS. OUR MINI-SKIRT
T S F "OM NOW ON WILL BE LIMITED TO PRIZES
TOW P c JL AB,UTY ONLY TRADER TOM. NOW
"EMFn?i:rJ T rs A WEEK BAMD THURS., FRI., SAT.
BATTI FSc tu! X IT WNNER OF OUR SAT. NIGHT
L BATTLE OF THE BANDS CONTEST.

probably unconstitutional
because it usurps executive
branch powers to direct military
forces.
I cannot conceive of
anything more chaotic than
having 535 persons iqq
senators and 435 representatives
- acting as a Joint Chiefs of
Staff, he said.

President Chuck Sherman told
the Alligator Wednesday, We
are aware of your presidents
decision.
Sherman explained that the
FSU Faculty Senate has passed
a resolution in favor of students
working in the fall campaign and
making provision for rearranging
our calendar.
A referendum will be put
before the FSU students in the
fall to determine the degree of
interest which the students have
in the plan.
IF THE STUDENTS favor
the referendum, I feel our
president, Dr. Stanley Marshall,
will follow suit by rearranging
the calendar, Sherman said.
OConnell was unavailable for
comment on the matter. Rae
Weimer, special assistant to the
president, called OConnells
decision sincere and sound in
its intent.
Weimer saw little possibility
of changing the calendar for the
fall.
Our calendar has already
been printed and distributed,
Weimer said, I see the
presidents position as very
strong and not likely to change.
Regents Deny
Bias. Charge
women at UF and we feel that
the results will bear out the
accusations leveled against us,
Miss Waldman said.
SOME OF THE
discriminatory factors at UF are
that the placement center
exercises recruitment policies
that are not equal for women,
according to Caron Balkany,
womens commission.
There are disproportionately
low numbers of women
professors and salaries are
discriminatory against women,
Miss Balkany said.
This thing is like liberalized
abortion laws, she said.
We feel that all the students
here are involved in some way
and we would like to find some
way that things can be
changed.



UFS 'Moog Makes
Computer Music
Computers, those exasperating machines everywhere on the
UF campus, have invaded yet another facet of the students life
his music.
With the electronic age, tubes and transitors can be made to
set up an electronic wave and then modify it, thus creating a
strange new sound.
THE INSTRUMENT used to make this music is the Moog
synthesizer.
The musician who plays UFs synthesizer is Edward Troupin,
conductor of the University Symphony Orchestra.
The Moog synthesizer, developed by Robert Moog in his
Trumansburg, N.Y. studio, can be mathematically set up to
create sounds never heard before.
THE LISTENER tends to interpret the sounds as resembling
more familiar sounds. One sound, for example, is similar to a
cross between a rock falling in water and an engine roaring.
One of the curiosities and, at the same time, one of the
problems of the synthesizer is that it cannot play more than one
note at a time.
TO PLAY A sequence in harmony, an operator must first
play one line of the harmony, tape it and then overlay
additional lines.
The UF model was purchased by the graduate school for
$3,000. A more complex Moog can cost up to $15,000.
This summer Troupin will teach a course in electronic music
using the Moog synthesizer. Anyone with a musical background
is eligible to take the new course.
Confusion Delays Senate Talk
On Super Show $24,000 Loss
Confusion over who should explain Super Show losses to the
Student Senate has postponed the hearing until at least July 7, the
senates next scheduled meeting.
The show, sponsored by Student Government Productions (SGP),
lost a possible $24,000 May 16.
SENATE MAJORITY Floor Leader Bill Gilmore said executive
producer Marc Glick was asked to give his report at the senate meeting
last Tuesday night.
But Glick told him Tuesday SGP Chairman Leonard Tanner should
make the report.
I didnt think it was my responsibility. It was the responsibility of
the SGP chairman, Glick said.
TANNER DID not attend the Tuesday night senate meeting. I
assumed arrangements had been made, Gilmore said.
I accept the responsibility for the mixup in communications, he
said.
Glick said he came to the senate two weeks ago prepared to give a
report on the Super Show, but was not invited to speak at the time.
He didnt talk to the president of the senate or anyone connected
with setting up the meeting, Gilmore said.
The senator said Tanner will be asked to attend the July 7 meeting
if he is able then to give an accurate financial statement.
No Warrant; Charge Dropped

By RICK ROSKOWE
m IM_ ** mm
Own vfiVTir
Possession of marijuana
charges were dropped against
two men and a UF coed by
County Judge John L. Connell
Wednesday.
Connells action came after
defense attorney Mike Bryant
motioned that the trio was
arrested after an unlawful police
entry.
The three defendants were
arrested on May 28 in room 614
of the J. Wayne Reitz Union and
chaiged with possession of
marijuana by the University
Police Department.
The defendants Evelyn
Brown, 1 UC; Arthur Engel, 227
Garden Road; and Alan Don
Lindsay, both of Palm Beach
had charges dropped at a
preliminary hearing in the
Alachua County Courthouse.
University police officer Gene
Watson testified that he didnt
have a warrant and notification
had not been given to the
suspects before entering the
room.
IU&H

Bryant cited Florida statute
961.19, which states an officer
must either have a warrant or
notify suspects before entering a
domicile.
Bryant said even though an
officer had probably cause to
investigate or effect an arrest, he
should indicate his intentions
before entering a room, either
by knocking or obtaining a
search warrant.

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UF LEADERS SPEAK

Kirk Keynotes Key Banquet

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
The Florida Blue Key (FBK)
Installation Banquet Tuesday
night marked the first time a
black has been accepted for
membership in the leadership
group.
Black Student Union
Chairman Mitch Dasher was
among the 37 new initiates who
were charged by Gov. Claude
Kirk to, serve this university in
your actions.
OUTGOING FBK President
Don Middlebrooks recognized
the need for cooperation
between the generations. We
must do better in facing the
problems that confront us, he
said.
Middlebrooks told his
audience of Blue Keys from past
years that discussion must not
lead to violence. He then called
on Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder to address the
audience which included the
governor.
This nation is headed in one
of two directions, Uhlfelder
began. One end leads to a
repressive society, the other to
an open and free society.
THOSE PEOPLE who feel
their voices have not been heard
or considered are frustrated.
They have been prompted to
take their dissent to the
streets, according to Uhlfelder.
Dasher spoke next.
THE DIFFICULTY in
America today arises from the
fact that our institutions are not
dealing with the problems of
the people, he said. Os course
its difficult for you to deal with
the concepts of the Black
Panthers you havent dealt
with the concepts of black
people.
Dasher spoke out against the
acclaimed Silent Majority.
The only silent majority in
the wodd today is the people of
India and Africa. Its in Ghana,
Cambodia and Brazil, he
-* j
cMwnca.
DASHER STATED his
reasons for seeking membership
in FBK and said, I really
wanted to be in Blue Key
because I think that some of its
members Steve (Uhlfelder),
Don (Middlebrooks), and Greg
Jones are concerned and want to
change things.
Alumni and present members
listened intently as Dasher
pointed out, Dont do
something as a favor to me or

because you love black people.
Do it because you have children
who must live in this society.
Its a question of priorities,
Dasher said. Love me or hate
me, Im indifferent. Either way
Im going to tell you the truth.
I CAN ONLY say to future
leaders here that I hope you deal
with the problems, Dasher
concluded.
Father Michael Gannon,
honorary FBK member, spoke
of the questions that youth is
asking.
Our democratic principles
are being examined by young
people not for their speculative
value, but for their practical
worth.
KEYNOTE SPEAKER for the
affair was Kirk, who began his
remarks by saying, Im not
going to be friendly tonight in
the sense of my charges to you.
Kirk talked about the budget

Paid Advertisement
Congress and the War
C Since the day American troops entered
Cambodia, people in the United States
have turned to Congress to end the war in
Z Southeast Asia.
In the weeks ahead we must insure that the
> coming elections will create a Congress
that will be committed to peace, the with withdrawal
drawal withdrawal of American military presence from
Indo China and the prevention of other
* 1 Viet Nams.
The Universities' National Anti-War Fund
is committed to these goats.
We ask every faculty and staff member of
every college and university in the United
States to pledge a minimum of one day's
salary to the Fund.
The millions of dollars raised will:
A Provide support on a non-partisan basis to
candidates for the House and Senate whose
election is critical to the cause of peace.
(Your support may be earmarked for a
candidate of your choice or given to a
common fund administered by a Motional
Booed*}
space and other publicity for dm dMctioo
of peace candidates.
3 Send representatives of the university
community to Washington to lobby the
Congress or to any part of the country to
assist in critical local campaigns.
UNAF is a member of the National Coalition for a Responsible Congress.
Partial list of sponsors:
H. D. Aiken J.K. Galbraith Hollis F. Price
Roger Albritton Bentley Glass David Riesman
Father Coleman Barry Nathan Glaser Allan Robinson
Edward J. Blaustein A.D. Hershey Henry Rosovsky
Felix Bloch Hudson Hoaglund Bruno Rossi
Konrad Bloch H. Stuart Hughes Albert Sacks
Howard R. Bowen Roman Jakobson Franz Schumann
Harvey Brooks Vernon Jordon Jose Luis Serf
Jerome S. Bruner Gyorgy Kepes Raymond Siever
Bernard Budiansky Leon Kirchner Ascher Shapiro
Mary Bunting John Knowles Walter H. Stockmayer
Owen Chamberlain Joshua Lederberg Albert Szent-Gyorgi
Jule Charney DanielS. Lehrman Lionel Trilling
Abram Chayes Harry T. Levin Albert D. Ullman
Robert Cole Cyrus Levinthal Harold C. Urey
Henry Steele Commager Hans Linde George Wald
Edward Condon Franklin Long James D. Watson
Carl Djerassi Edward Lowinsky Victor F. Weisskopf
John T. Edsall Salvador E. Luria Jacqueline Grennan Wexler
Howard W. Emmons Lewis Mum ford Jerome Wiesner
Erik Erikson Martin Peretz Herbert York
Bernard Feld Frank Press
I enclose $ to the Universities' National Anti-War Fund
I also pledge a future donation of $
I am willing to help work for the Fund on my campus at
e>
(Name)
(Address)
The Uidverddes' National Anti-War Fund, Bon MO, CasWdp, Maw. 08134

Thursday, June 4,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

and the relevancy of the
university.
The governor cited figures
showing that only 16 per cent of
students in first grade will ever
graduate from college. Os that
percentage, Kirk noted, half
will be in the field of
education.
KIRK CALLED the
educational system in Florida
poor. The educational system is
not relevant if one third of its
children are primed for
continued life in the ghetto.
Kirk commented on
educational funds saying, Why
put more money in a bad
system?
The governor would not take
a public stand on the issues of
the 18-year-old vote and
liberalized abortion laws.
Newly elected FBK President
Steve Zack and Vice President
Jim Kersey were installed just
before the banquet adjourned.

Page 3



l The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 4,1970

Page 4

LUV ANYONE?

Nuts to Luv, I've had it Harry, had it up to
here/' Chick Lapointe as Milt expounds his miseries
to Bill Stensgaard as Harry, in Gainesville Little

Black Panther Hearings Near
End Os Four Month Proceedings

NEW YORK (UPI) Pretrial
hearings for 13 Black Panthers
facing trial on bombing
conspiracy charges finally neared
an end Wednesday after 38 days
of sometimes stormy
proceedings spread over a four
and a half month period.
State Supreme Court Justice
John M. Murtagh, who has
presided with a firm hand since

Santa Fe Exhibiting
Pollution Photographs
An exhibition of dirty pictures (student photographs on pollution)
will be held on the various Santa Fe Junior College campuses June
12-19.
The exhibit will be displayed at the S. E. campus (old Lincoln High
School) June 12; at the East campus (old Hotel Thomas) June 15-16,
and at the West campus (University Avenue) June 17-19.

FREE DANCE
in
8 Tolbert Area
.
By: Cottonwood
from Miami
JUNE 6th, 9:00 P.M.
FREE COKES
BY
I UNION BARBERSHOP
SPONSORED BY:
RAWLINGS & TOLBERT
AREAS COUNCILS.
=

the hearings began last Feb. 2,
recessed the proceedings until
Monday for final action on a
handful of minor matters.
The hearings, frequently
interrupted by the defendants
during the first three weeks,
were stretched out by a six week
recess, by four-day weeks, by
procedural delays and by the

Theatre's production of Luv, now playing today
through Saturday. For reservations, call 376-4949.

birthdays of Huey Newton and
Malcolm X.
During the hearings Murtagh
sentenced two spectators to
30-day jail sentences for
contempt of court and regularly
warned the defendants and their
six defense attorneys they were
risking contempt sentences at
the end of the trial by their
behavior.
The 13 Panthers facing trial
were among a total of 22
indicted for allegedly taking part
in a conspiracy to bomb police
stations, department stores,
railroad facilities and the Bronx
Botanical Gardens.
The other alleged
co-conspirators are still at large,
are in jail in other states or have
had their trials severed.-

i
c /
* SOMETHING NEW
AT
Mister Donut,*
SPECIAL OCCASION CAKES
C j £* N made to order for
HOURS BIRTHDAYS PARTIES
372-1049 WEDDINGS ANNIVERSARIES
"7* £
2s££3sS£S£i=g~

SG Plans Change
For Insurance
By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
There are some changes being made for student insurance for next
yC jhe changes, including a new company, will be made effective in
September.
SECRETARY OF HEALTH and Insurance Neil Smith said the
Student Government insurance program will have Blue Cross and Blue
Shield cover UF students for the next academic year.
Jeffrey H. Mandell, assistant professor of business administration,
said the changes include consulting benefits, which he said are better
under the new policy.
Mandell, a member of the committee for health and insurance, Dr.
Wilmer J. Coggins, director of student health services and Jeff Warren,
former secretary of health and insurance, prepared the changes in the
program.
MANDELL SAID THE benefits will be according to the Blue Cross
and Blue Shield scale.
Another part in the insurance which will be better, according to
Mandell, is the maternity benefits. Also married students will be able
to cover their families by paying extra.
Mandell said changing insurance companies was for what we
thought was better insurance.
THE COMPANY which previously handled insurance, McGriff
Scarborough and Associates, wanted to raise the rates for the same
coverage, he said.
In addition, Smith said they did not want to agree to the changes
made in the policy.
One of the troubles facing the program is that few students have
taken it Mandell said.
ONLY ABOUT 5,000 students took insurance this year, Mandell
said.
Information concerning insurance should be mailed to fall students
during the summer. Also, at registration SG will set up a table to give
students information on the insurance program.
According to Mandell, the insurance covers students for one full
year, but it can only be taken during September, or if the applicant is
a new student at the UF.
The insurance covers the applicant even if he drops out of school.
WHAT'S HAPPENING
THE MAYOR: Citizens for Lindsay meet tonight at 8 at the
Presbyterian Student Center (W. University Avenue, near Krystal).
FLYING: AIESEC charter flight to Europe tickets can be picked
up today in room 301 of the Reitz Union between 3:30 and 5 p.m.
AWAY THEY GO: The Modem Dance Group will be performing
tonight at the Constans Theatre at 8.



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HOMECOMING HEADS

For the first time in history, UF's Homecoming
Celebration in 1970 will have a strong feminine
flavor in its planning, coordination and
administration. Three coeds were named by Florida
Blue Key President Steve Zack to Homecoming
chairman positions. No woman ever served as a

Smut Statute
Unlawful?
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
Pensacola attorney told a
three-judge state district court
panel Wednesday Floridas
statute against sale of
pornography is an
unconstitutional invasion of
privacy and religious freedom.
The sale of obscenity is a sin,
not a crime, said Paul Shimek,
representing the owner of a
closed Panama City book store.
I think were getting to moral
interference with religion, or
freedom from religion.
SHIMEK ASKED the court to
overturn Circuit Judge W.L.
Fitzpatricks order closing the
store as a public nuisance. The
store, owned by Robert
Mitchum of Atlanta, was opened
in February and shut down by
Fitzpatrick April 8.
Fitzpatrick ruled six
magazines to be obscene,
Shimek said, but did not ban the
sale of 13 others seized at the
store. He said the U. S. Supreme
Court has upheld the right of
private possession of
pornography, and that there are
three legal criteria which must
be met in prosecuting such
cases: Sale to minors, invasion of
the privacy of unwilling adults
and sale through pandering
advertisements.
THE ISSUE is the right to
obtain it and read it, Shimek
said. You dont have to go to
Denmark to buy it, you have a
right to buy it.
Shimek also said the
magazines in question were
presumptively protected by
the first amendment of the
constitution until proven
obscene, and that the bookstore
should not be closed while the
case is pending.
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Homecoming committee chairman before. Shown
from left: Jeff Warren, Homecoming general
chairman; Barbara Kesterson Griffin, assistant
general chairman; Jacquie Bolling, slogan chairman;
Zack; and Sherri Jo Cox, publicity director.

POW Petitions Net
3,000 UF Names
f
Between 2,000 and 3,000 signatures were collected on petitions in
conjunction with POW (prisoners of war) Week, May 9-16.
The petitions, which are addressed to the leader of the North
Vietnamese Delegation to the Paris Peace Talks, to Hanoi, and to the
Swedish Embassy in Washington, are asking for fair treatment for
Americans being held captive in North Vietnam. They also ask the
North Vietnamese to release a list of all those being held so their
families will know they are alive.
AT PRESENT THERE are almost 1,500 U. S. servicemen chiefly
airmen being held or listed as missing in action.
Dennis Tyra and Frederick Brandt, Air Force ROTC cadets who ran
the program, were happy with the size of the turnout.
Some of the reports I got from over at the Plaza of the Americas
were that quite a few of those protesting the war came over and
signed, Brandt said.
We contacted about half of the churches in town and five said
they would try and push it to the congregations, said Brandt, and a
church in Jacksonville supported it.
Tyra, who was chairman of the effort, said the war protests and the
incidents at Kent State did make the campaign difficult, but he still
considered it a success.

Thursday, June 4,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Juna 4,1970

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A TYPICAL SCENE AT GROVE HALL
... architecture student Mike Bier works through the night
Unlike most students who make the big push during final exams
week, architecture students begin the presentation of their project
during the seventh and eighth week of classes. As the project deadline
nears, it is not unusual for them to spend several all-nighters
working on their models and supplementary drawings.
Once the projects have been turned in, many students succumb to
the rack monster for the next 24 hours in order to recuperate enough
to make up the assignments in their other courses.
During the 10th week of classes this week, their design proposals
are juried by their instructors and often includes special guests
interested in the problem.
And, like the other students at the UP, final exam week is the
same.

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A GROUP OF STUDENTS DISCUSS
... details on one of the AE 433 team projects



Wallace Wins The Alabama Primary

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Democrat championing
proposed popular election of the
president predicted Wednesday
that George Wallaces victory in
Alabama would stir President
Nixons renewed interest in the
proposal.
Sen. Birch Bayh, D-Ind.,
sponsor of the constitutional
amendment that would abolish
the electoral college in favor of
direct election, also said
Wallaces successful bid to return
to the governors chair in
Montgomery meant the
Republican southern strategy is
still in business.
BAYHS REASONING that
the Alabama results would stir
some interest in the White
House for direct presidential
election was based on the
possibility that Wallace, the
1968 American Independent
party candidate, might be able
to deny both major party
candidates of an electoral vote
majority in 1972, even if he
could not win.
No such deadlock, which
would require election of the
president by the House under
present law, could occur under
the presidential election system
advocated by Bayh and already
approved by the House.
But the amendment has not
moved quickly in the Senate
despite Nixons endorsement
after the House vote, and Bayh
conceded the vote, expected in
July, would be close.

'Societys Criminal Misfits
Deplored By V.P. Agnew

WEST POINT, N.Y. (UPI)
Deploring a time when the
criminal misfits of society are
glamorized while our best men
die in Asian rice paddies, Vice
President Spiro T. Agnew told
graduating West Point cadets
Wednesday that they will deal
with the survival of the nation.
In a low keyed U. S. Military
Academy commencement
address warmly applauded at its
conclusion by 15,000 in
attendance, the vice president
painted a gloomy picture of the
present day when application,
achievement and success are
Askew Resigns
Senate Seat
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
State Sen. Reubin Askew of
Pensacola, a candidate for
governor, Wednesday became
the first official to tender his
resignation under a
newly-enacted law.
Since it is my intention to
qualify 'as a Democratic
candidate for governor in this
years election, I hereby
submit... my resignation from
the office of state senator,
Second District, effective
midnight Nov. 3,1970, Askew
said in a letter to Gov. Claude
Kirk.
THE NEW LAW requires that
public office holders resign in
order to run for another office
with an overlapping term.
There are 10 other state
senators affected provided
they carry out presently
announced plans to run for state
or congressional offices.

IF THE WALLACE comeback
in Alabama was bad news for the
President, he could take some
solace from results in other
primary states where a number
of candidates for federal and
state office pitched the
campaigns on opposition to the
Nixon Southeast Asia policy.
Li the eight states that held
party primaries Tuesday,
California provided the biggest
test of antiwar candidacies, but
even there the hawk-dove
contrast was not completely
clear.
Although Assemblyman Jess
Unruh, opposed to the war,
defeated Los Angeles Mayor
Sam Yorty, a supporter of the
President, for the Democratic
nomination to oppose
Republican Gov. Ronald
Reagan, more was at issue than
Vietnam.
YORTY IS A conservative
who frequently has refused to
back the Democratic ticket, and
Unruh had solid backing from
party loyalists.
Rep. George Brown, one of
the earliest congressional critics
of the war, was defeated by Rep.
John V. Tunney for the
Democratic nomination to
challenge Sen. George Murphy,
R-Calif.
In New Jersey, Sen. Harrison
Williams, who was favored to
win the Democratic nomination
anyway, did so with the backing
of the antiwar Referendum 70
group.

derided as callous, corrupt and
irrevelant.
HE CHALLENGED the
cadets to aspire to leadership.
Pointing out that difficult
times are not unfamiliar to the
Army and are often the
customary circumstances of
American soldiers, Agnew said
the cadets must recognize that
this is a time when the
charlatans of peace and freedom
eulogize foreign dictators while
desecrating the flag that keeps
them free.
This is a time, he said,
when the criminal misfits of
society are glamorized while our
best men die in Asian rice
paddies to preserve the freedoms
those misfits abuse.
A LEADER in todays world
needs a strong resistance to
adversity. He needs also to
realize that leadership in a free
society, unable to call on
authoritarianism, must rely on
the authority of superior
Heat, Not Humidity
ITHACA, N.Y. (UPI) A
Cornell University professor has
discovered that it isnt the
sweltering sun that keeps
farmers in tropical lands from
growing vegetables commonly
found in northern countries.
Its the oven-like temperatures
below ground that destroy the
roots, says Prof. Peter L.
Steponkus, who made his theory
known at an international
horticultural congress in Tel
Aviv. He contends that proper
irrigation would allow tropical
countries to grow such northern
vegetables as peas, broccoli,
lettuce and cabbage.

BUT LEWIS B. Kaden, who
had the same group plus college
students on his side, was beaten
by incumbent Rep. Edward J.
Patten, D-NJ., and David Wolf,
another antiwar candidate, fell
before Rep. Cornelius Gallagher,
D-NJ.
Wallace, returning to the
Alabama governors mansion for
another four year term, said
Wednesday he was not
advocating defiance of
anything, but promised there
would be freedom of choice
in public schools.
The dapper little politician,
dressed in a blue pinstriped suit
and wearing a lapel pin
fashioned after a Confederate
flag, met with newsmen to
comment on his victory.
HE SAID HE had no
national political plans at
present, but left the door wide
open for a change of heart and
another run at the presidency in
1972.
Wallace defeated incumbent
Gov. Albert P. Brewer Tuesday
in a runoff primary for the
Democratic gubernatorial
nomination. Since the
Republicans are not offering a
candidate for governor, Wallaces
election in the fall balloting is
assured.
Nearly complete returns
showed Wallace led Brewer by
32,000 votes, picking up 51.5
per cent of the 1,074,000 votes
which were cast.

competence and the impact of
demonstrated and effective
dedication and concern.
You are embarking upon
careers that offer challenge and
opportunity in abundance. You
will deal in what may practically
be viewed as the primary
indispensable survival of the
soverign nation.
Agnew was one of the few top
Nixon administration officials
who ventured onto campuses
during the current
commencement season,
apparently due to the chance of
demonstrations.
WVMMC
confidence
in being
sure of no feminine
offense with
MY
OWN.
Hygienic Deodorant
Spray
for women only.
Available also in
cleansing towelettes.

BITTER OVER the loss,
Brewer called the campaign the
dirtiest Ive ever seen in my
political life. It was nigger,
nigger, nigger all over again, he
said.
Wallace, who made a widely
publicized stand in the
schoolhouse door during his

TRANS-WORLD'S
~ CLEARANCE
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BEAUTICIANS DEALERS
PUBLIC WELCOME 1
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& JACKSONVILLE

Thursday, Juna 4, 1970, THa Florida Alligator,

last term in a vain attempt to
prevent integration of Alabama
schools, said, however, Race
was not an issue in the
campaign.
Bloc voting was an issue and
thats something entirely
different from race, he
declared.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 4,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Dont Talk Peace

WASHINGTON The White House has been
trying to muzzle anti-war talk, of all places, in the
Peace Corps. President Nixons efficient aides,
apparently, see nothing illogical about shutting up
Peace Corps volunteers who speak out for peace.
The suppression began after Vice President Spiro
Agnew came back from his recent Asian tour with
reports that young Peace Corps workers were
joining the dissent against the Vietnam War. In
Afghanistan, for example, 10 Peace Corps people
signed an anti-war petition.
After Agnew tattled to the President, Peace Corps
director Joe Blatchford was summoned to the White
House and asked to muzzle the dissenters. He agreed
that Peace Corpsmen, as representatives of the U. S.,
shouldnt make public statements abroad critical of
U. S. policies. But at home, he felt they had the
right to oppose the war.
He investigated the Afghanistan incident and
found that the 10 volunteers had submitted their
petition to the American Ambassador. This seemed
to Blatchford to be proper.
* *
When he resisted the attempt to stifle the
anti-war sentiment in the Peace Corps, the White
House began dropping ominous hints about budget
slashes. At one staff meeting, Deputy Director Tom
Houser complained that we are getting intense
pressure from the executive branch to shut off
dissent.
Blatchford, a clean-cut, 35-year-old executive
raised on Wheaties, has been less valiant about
resisting what insiders call the Nixonization of the
Peace Corps. One associate describes him as a Pat
Boone figure with newly lowered sideburns.
In a private memo to the Republican members of
the House Foreign Affairs Committee, Blatchford
wrote: We inherited a very difficult situation
resulting from volunteers just out of college with
strong, liberal views. We have also had to weed out
many members of a hostile staff hired during the
past eight years of Democratic administration and
unwilling to accept the new administration ...
In a little more than a year from now, all
volunteers overseas will have been selected during
this administration. They will have better screening,
training and guidance.
* *
Blatchford later reconsidered what he had
written, decided it had been indiscreet and sent
aides up to Capitol Hill to retrieve the memo. But
he has gone ahead with efforts to recruit more
volunteers from President Nixons silent majority
- farmers, technicians, and skilled laborers.
Insisted a Peace Corps spokesman: Youth is still
the backbone of the Peace Corps and always will
be. He explained that several countries had
requested volunteers with skills that young people
dont possess. These older volunteers, he said,
are every bit as idealistic as the kids.
Meanwhile, Peace Corps applications are down 30
per cent for the first eight months of the program
year ending August 31. Last year, applications
dropped 22 per cent.
As part of the Nixonization process, Blatchford
has put emphasis on getting business executives to

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors
. K
Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Merry-Go-Round
iii[iiiiiiiiinniiiimiiiiiniiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiuiiiniunnnnimiiiiiimnnnininimiai
' ' US
by Jack Anderson
fill staff positions. His staff now includes William
Inglis, 38, an Irving Trust Co. vice president; John
Mills, 47, a manager from Monsanto Co.; Robert
Jorgensen, 55, a wholesaler from Livingston, Mont.;
John Guyer, 39, an executive from the American
Investment Counseling Co.; and Thomas Roeser, 41,
a former public relations man for Quaker Oats.
One staff member, projecting the Nixonization
process into the future, remarked wryly: I wonder
what Latin Americans are going to say when the
president of the United Fruit shows up as their
Peace Corps director.
* *
Several readers have inquired about the
policy-making machinery that produced President
Nixons Cambodian decision.
Normally such decisions are ground out by the
National Security Council, which has exhaustive
intelligence at its disposal. The NSC is guided by
overall policy guidelines, which have been prepared
with elaborate care.
From the Johnson administration, the NSC had
inherited a policy document known as the Foreign
Internal Defense Policy, which opposed unilateral,
U. S. action in a situation like Cambodia.
The Nixon Security Council reviewed, refined
and reshaped this policy into the Nixon doctrine,
which calls for an offshore presence but no more
onshore involvement in places like Cambodia. The
Presidents decision to send troops into Cambodia,
therefore, would appear to be a violation of his own
policy.
As we reported immediately after the Cambodian
move, the decision was based upon the paperwork
of a secret task force known as the Washington
Special Action Group, headed by the Presidents
national security adviser, Henry Kissinger.
The other members are Joint Chiefs Chairman
Earle Wheeler, CIA director Richard Helms,
Undersecretary of State Alexis Johnson and
Undersecretary of Defense David Packard.
In other words, the NSC was largely bypassed in
the Cambodian planning, although the President
took up the question with the NSC at two meetings
on April 22 and 26.

Phyllis Gallub
Assignment Editor

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

fsafsdf

Alligator Staff

Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor

EDITORIAL
Need A Ride?
If you have taken a train ride recently, its not because
the railroad industry encouraged it.
Since 1929, the number of passenger trains has decreased
from 20,000 to 450 and each year railroads schedule half a
hundred for discontinuance. The Association of American
Railroads blames this on economic necessity.
But the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee disagrees. An
increasing number of them (railroads) decided that there
was no future in passenger service and deliberately
downgraded service standards and discouraged patronage,
viewing discontmuance as the only answer, the committee
reported.
This February, Seaboard Coastline Railroad attempted to
discontinue its two passenger trains to Gainesville. Only
1.19 passengers disembarked and 8.88 embarked each day,
it claimed. The train in question constituted the last
passenger rail service between Jacksonville and St.
Petersburg, with the exception of Ocala.
A questionnaire sent to UF students, staff and faculty
indicated they would use the railroad more if services were
improved, according to Ralph Glatfelter, then Student
Government Secretary of Consumer Affairs.
According to the railroads own figures, Glatfelter said,
trains are late an average of two hours going south and a
half hour going north.
The commerce committee, on the other hand, says an
adequate rail system could solve many of the countrys
transportation difficulties:
i America seems hell-bent on paving its entirety we
have one mile of highway for every square mile of land;
one railroad track can accommodate as many travelers
as 20 lanes of highway;
trains have the best safety record of any mode of
transportation -a worthy consideration since more than
56,500 Americans died on our highways last year;
trains can bring passengers directly into the middle of
cities, are comparatively unaffected by weather and dont
pollute the air.
This month the Senate passed and sent to the House a bill
designed to aid rail passenger service with $175 million in
loans and capital grants. We urge Rep. Don Fuqua to give
this bill his full support.
We also urge Seaboard President W. Thomas Rice to look
into the possibilities of obtaining funds for Gainesville if the
bill should pass.
And perhaps passenger service to Gainesville would
become an economic necessity.
N '**

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor

Jeff Brein
Editorial Assistant

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
in the Flor d Alligator are those of
of i* jjvesj f *" * >



Does ROTC belong on the
university campus? I will
attempt to answer the arguments
of people who oppose ROTC
and give the reasons I feel ROTC
should remain on campus.
At the demonstrations on
May 6 around the ROTC
building, a former student
explained as his reason for
opposing ROTC, This country
is so rotten It does not deserve
an army to defend it. This
person and those who agree with
him certainly are not friends of
the U. S.
Then there are those who use
the slogan there is nothing
academic about the art of
killing. Or that ROTC gives cript
courses. I think a look at the
curriculum and grade
distribution will clarify matters.
Army ROTC MAR 101 is a
course in individual weapons and
marksmanship but only one
hour is spent shooting. The
courses become progressively
harder.
MAR 103 The army and
national security.
MAR 201 Military history.
MAR 301 Military leadership,
i.e., decision making process of
officers in realistic situations.
MAR 303 Military teaching,
principles of communication and
counter insurgency. Most of the

Monday's Back Page

MR. EDITOR:
Why is it were never asked to
evaluate the teachers we think need it
most? Thus begins the back page of
Mondays Alligator, followed by a list of
313 instructors who refused
in-classroom evaluation. Thereby does
ODK seek to bring shame and public
condemnation to bear upon these
recalcitrant teachers.
But let us consider the question posed
by ODK. I propose that the
incompetency of ODK is responsible for
students having been denied an
opportunity to evaluate these teachers,
for, although my name appears on the list
of accused, I was never at any time
contacted by ODK with regard to course
evaluation, and, having talked to several
others of the accused, I found that only
one had been contacted by ODK. It
seems then that the large number of
instructors listed is indicative not of a lack
of cooperation in the evaluation, but
rather is indicative of the slip shod
fashion in which ODK has conducted the
evaluation. As an instructor, I resent the
misrepresentations of ODK; as a student,
I resent the disservice being done the
student body. Also, as a student, I ask

the small society

Life ys what
You AAAte IT- te(9i/LAT/oHS,
/ OFcaiMi&e-
Vita 8i S>Mhc( 6-4 VfZtcKtfA**

% Speaking Out

class is spent on teaching in
which each cadet must give a ten
minute class.
MAR 401 Logistics and
administration.
MAR 402 Military law, taught
by law school professors.
MAR 403 Army readiness
programs, career benefits, and
independent team research and
oral presentation of foreign
policy for a devoloping area of
the world.
If one declares ROTC as
non-academic then one must
also declare that the study of
education, law, history and
political science are
non-academic.
Admission to the Advanced
Program is selective. Students
must have a 2.0 average and pass
an aptitude test. These students
should receive higher average
grades than the university
students as a whole.
In 1969, fall quarter, 24.41
per cent of the students taking
ROTC received As. This may
seem high but six out of sixteen
colleges of the UF gave a higher
percentage of As than ROTC.
They ranged from a low of
27.79 per cent in agriculture to

that Student Government take over
administration of the evaluation so that it
may be handled in a more responsible and
competent manner.
PAULE. MOLER, 7AS
GRADUATE INSTRUCTOR, CBS
Bad Light
MR. EDITOR:
In Mondays Alligator, ODK ran an
advertisement implying that myself and
others had refused to submit ourselves to
student evaluation.
My class and I discussed this subject
several weeks ago at which time I not
only told them that I thought that the
student evaluation was very helpful for
the instructor and the administration, but
also told them that I would give them the
appropriate forms the last week of
school. I intended to do it then and I still
intend to do it now.
I regret your uninformed criticism.
There are many others like myself who
have been cast in a bad light, contrary to
our intentions and actions.
HENRY E. MCLAUGHLIN, 7BA

ROTC Should Stay

by Brickman

35.21 per cent in engineering to
a high of 51.85 per cent in
biological science.
Also 99 per cent of all combat
training is conducted off
campus. Bayonet training is
conducted without bayonets,
and the hand grenade throw is
only performed to acquaint
students with the physical
fitness tests that they will have
to do at summer camp.
There are those who say there
is no freedom of expression in
ROTC classes. On the contrary, I
we found that class discussion
and the expression of ones
opinion is encouraged. In fact,
some military science professors
have been more liberal than
some social sciences professors
under whom I have studied.
Then there are the pseudo and
the real pacifists who oppose
ROTC. The pseudo pacifist
abhors violence by the
establishment but does not
condemn violence when used by
radicals. This is nothing but
moral hypocrisy.
The real pacifist believes in
the use of peaceful means to
obtain all objectives. This theory
is fine on an abstract level and in
certain instances of real life can
be successful. But if Martin
JLuther King or Ghandi had lain
in front of Russian trucks they

Apologies
MR. EDITOR:
In your story on the ODK ad on
teacher evaluation you quoted Doug
Shachtman as apologizing to those
teachers who were listed erroneously as
not permitting the evaluation to be
conducted in their classes.
Mr. Shachtman is obviously
apologizing to the wrong people and for
the wrong reasons. Since the ad's
sponsors were the only ones made to look
foolish or whose reputations were harmed
by it, no apologies are necessary even to
teachers whose names were placed there
in error, as a good many of them
evidently were.
Apologies are in order, however, to
those persons who have been working for
acceptance of a teacher evaluation
program at UF teachers and students
alike for the immature and stupid
tactics of placing such an ad in the first
place. Its insinuations and use of a public
blacklist can only create ill-will among
those who oppose such a program.
One of the arguments against a
student-run teacher evaluation program is
the possibility that it will be carried out
in an irresponsible manner. As the ODK
ad has now removed any doubt that
might exist on this point, it has actually
harmed the cause it was supposedly
trying to help.
The reason that I permitted the
evaluation to be conducted in all three of
my classes though my name has also
gone down in infamy in file ad was that
I thought the results would probably help
me do a more effective job of teaching. If
the mentality of those who are now going
to evaluate the results is on a level with
that of. the people who placed, the ad, I

By Joseph M. Web by

would have been smashed.
It is unfortunate that at
present only money and power
are respected in world politics.
What then are the benefits of
having ROTC on campus? I feel
that the purpose of the
university is to expose students
to varied currents of thought,
and to educate them for their
professions. Military
interpretation of problems will
be absent from the campus if
ROTC is abolished. Ideas such as
the role of the military concept
of force, and the principles of
leadership, are as applicable to
non-military as well as military
professions.
ROTC also provides 42
full-time scholarships for
students who otherwise might
not be able to attend college.
There is the question of
academic freedom. The
voluntary nature of ROTC on
this campus allows the student a
freedom of choice within the
liberal traditions of the
university. ROTC provides the
qualified student the
opportunity to earn a
commission while earning an
academic degree.
Also the UF is a land grant
college. The land was provided
under the Morrill Act, if the
university has an ROTC
program.
But more important; if one
believes that armed forces are

FORUM:^^
C Aina ml Vitimt )
Pln frr the

Thursday, June 4,1970, The Florida Alligator,

necessary for national security
and that these armed forces
should be civilian oriented and
civilian controlled, ROTC is the
best way to accomplish these
goals. If ROTC is abolished or
made unproductive through
disaccredatation, the Congress
will not deprive the military of
its officer requirements.
Monies will be appropriated
to expand the military
academics and OCS programs.
The military will drift out of the
civilian mainstream of ideas
which is presently brought in by
liberally educated ROTC
officers.
In addition, the cost will be
greater. The cost of training an
officer in a military academy is
five times that of an ROTC
officer.
If the 108-year-old tradition
of civilian military training dies,
a military caste will form. Father
to son succession with no
civilian ideas will become
prevalent. An American Foreign
Legion will develop loyal only to
their officers and a military coup
will become a possibility for the
first time in American history.
All of this frightens me.
Finally, freedom is more
necessary to the functioning of
the university than any other
area of life. Therefore the
university has a responsibility to
contribute to the defense of the
free society of which it is a part.

seriously doubt that there will be any
value in the program after all.
C. R. LUCHT
ASST. PROF., DEPT. OF ENGLISH
Eaten
MR. EDITOR:
In regard to the high-handed way in
which we were accused of refusing
in-classroom evaluation by ODK, we
would now like to state that, amazing as
this must sound to ODK, we were never
notified of their evaluation program.
Realizing the magnitude of a crime
which warrants a full-page ad in the
Alligator, we submit the following for
consideration: From the fact that a letter
sent out receives no response, it is equally
possible to conclude that the mailman
was eaten by a rhinoceros as that the
addressee refused in-classroom evaluation.
We challenge ODK to justify their
conclusion.
JANSUGALSKI
PPY GRADUATE ASST.
CHARLES BRADLEY
PPY GRADUATE ASST.
LETTERS POLICY
Lttlm must:
Be typed, signed, double pieced end
not exceed 300 words.
Not be signed with e pseudonym.
numbers ol writers.
im whi n wintMiu onvy it witnr
shows Just reuse. The editor reserves the
right to edit ell letters lor spree.
Writers mey submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be eonoidsrsd for use
es "Speaking Out" oafcsmns. Any writer
iiiisiviivo in mom fixing g rapmf column
Is edced to oontset the edtor end be
prepared to diow samples o# his work.

Page 9



Page 10

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Juno 4,1970

UPI Around
... The World
LIMA, Peru Typhoid has broken out in partly flooded and
avalanche buried Callejon de Huaylas Valley posing the threat of
epidemics in the wake of Perus worst earthquake, a government
spokesman said Wednesday.
The presidential press office, meanwhile, reiterated a previous
unofficial estimate the death toll could go to 30,000. The estimate
appeared highly speculative but it was noteworthy there were only
2,500 known survivors of 21,000 residents of the buried town of
Yungay.
MANILA Three Philippines airlines announced Wednesday that
hereafter all baggage taken aboard their domestic flights will be
searched.
The announcement followed the second in-flight explosion in six
weeks Tuesday aboard a Philippines Airlines.
BERN, Switzerland The Swiss parliament Wednesday rejected by
a vote of more than three to one a motion calling for increased
sanctions against South Africa. The government opposed the motion
that would have banned the sale of South African bonds in
Switzerland and reduced government risk insurance on Swiss exports
to South Africa.
VIENNA Three Italians asked for political asylum in Austria
after running an Italian check-point on the frontier at Thoer-Maglem,
authorities said Wednesday. The trio, identified as Pisa University arts
professor Giuseppe Masi, 28, Fabio Fismondi, 20, and Lorenzo Lulli,
24, both students, claimed to be Maoists and said they feared
persecution for organizing strikes in Italya.
LONDON A printers walkout temporarily suspended publication
of two evening newspapers and the loss of 650,000 copies of a
morning paper, publishers said Wednesday.
Papers affected were the Daily Mirror, the Evening Standard and
the Evening News. The Standard and News failed to appear for one
edition and the Mirrors press run was reduced by 650,000,
spokesmen said. Later editions appeared normally. The printers are
seeking higher wages.
... The Nation
CADILLAC, Mich. Army Sgt. Gary Lee Spitler, 20, who arrived
home 24 hours earlier after a years duty in Vietnam, was killed
Tuesday night when his new car crashed through a row of guard rails
and mail boxes and overturned.
State Police said there were only 57 miles recorded on the cars
speedometer.
ATLANTA A wild gunbattle in the waiting room of the
Greyhound bus station Wednesday took the lives of two persons,
including a young policeman, and left two others wounded.
Bullets richocheted off walls and crashed through windows and
plate glass, sending about 50 startled and frightened passengers diving
for cover.
WASHINGTON Thirty-nine youngsters from across the nation
survived the first five rounds in the 43rd National Spelling Bee
Wednesday, successfully coping with such words as recalcitrant and
rhododendron.
BIRMINGHAM, Ala? r- Virtually complete returns indicated
Wednesday that civil rights attorney Fred Gray of Tuskegee has
broken the color line in Alabamas all-white legislature.
If Gray survives an anticipated challenge in the general election this
fall, he will be the first black to sit in Alabamas legislative halls since
Reconstruction.
... The State
, TALLAHASSEE o- Opponents of collective bargaining rights for
public employes stalled a vote Wednesday on a bill that would set up
procedures for city and county policemen and firemen to negotiate
for improved pay, hours and working conditions.
Even after the bill was amended to make the results of arbitration
advisory, rather than binding on city or county officials, opponents
refused to give the two-thirds vote necessary to move it into position
for immediate action.
The motion to put it to a full Senate vote got a majority, 20-18, but
fell far short of the required two-thirds.
TALLAHASSEE A bill setting into law the succession to the
governorship cleared the Legislature Wednesday.
Implementing the constitution, the bill provides for the lieutenant
governor to succeed a governor unable to finish his term. Next in line
would come the elected Cabinet officials.
TALLAHASSEE A bill permitting youths between the ages of 18
and 21 to give blood without parental consent cleared the Legislature
with Senate approval Wednesday.
TALLAHASSEE A bill which Sen. Wilbur J. Boyd, D-Palmetto,
said meant sl4 million to county school districts cleared the
Legislature Wednesday.
The bill required county commissioners to pay the commissions to
county tax assessors and collectors on all non-voted school millage.
Otherwise, Boyd said, the commissions would have to come out of
school revenues.

Communists Move Supplies

SAIGON (UPI) Military sources said
Wednesday Communist supplies stockpiled inside
Laos for the past five months have apparently
begun moving into South Vietnam in an area that
has been the scene of two days of heavy fighting.
The sources cited the supply movements as the
reason for massive 852 strikes early Wednesday
near the Laotian border base of Tun Tavern
where South Vietnamese defenders came under
such heavy attack from North Vietnamese troops
they had to call in air strikes on their own
positions.
THE STRATEGIC need to protect the supply
movements could also be one reason the
Communists reacted so strongly to South
Vietnamese forces in the area, the sources
indicated.
The upsurge of fighting along the border with
Laos came as Laotian Premier Souvanna Phouma
announced in Vientaine his country would set up
a guerrilla force to help combat Noith
Vietnamese invaders but would reject any offer
of troops from other nations.
U. S. 852 bombers dumped more than a
million pounds of bombs on the Communist
supply lines from their strike altitude of around
30,000 feet above the south-central Laotian
border Wednesday.
TAIL GUNNERS monitoring the bomb
patterns reported sighting 50 secondary
explosions, apparently from ammunition
stockpiles touched off by the bombing.

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Military sources said the 852 s had been flying
heavy strikes along the Ho Chi Minh Trail
complex inside Laos opposite the same area
during the past week. The sources said the 852 s
were now moving inside South Vietnam as the
Communist supplies moved into the country.
Military spokesmen said at least 50 South
Vietnamese soldiers were killed and 119
wounded and 17 others missing after North
Vietnamese troops attacked and partially overran
the Tun Tavern fire support base 3 Vi miles from
the Laotian border 390 miles north of Saigon.
A PORTION OF the heavy casualties the
most severe South Vietnamese losses in a single
action in six months came as a result of U. S.
air strikes called by the defenders on their own
positions in order to beat off the Communist
attack, military sources said.
The South Vietnamese reported 105
Communist soldiers were killed in the attack on
the Tun Tavern base before dawn Tuesday.
In the Mekong Delta region south of Saigon,
the Communists launched ground attacks on two
posts in Chau Doc province near the Cambodian
border early Wednesday, killing one American
and one South Vietnamese and wounding 51
South Vietnamese.
In a delayed report the U. S. Command
disclosed that nine Americans were killed last
Sunday when a UHI Huey helicopter crashed
for unknown causes near the Cambodian border
in Binh Long province.



Arab Rockets Blast Israeli Village

By United Prate International
Arab rocketeers fired two barrages of Katyusha missiles
into the Israeli village of Beisan Wednesday killing two
schoolgirls. Israeli jets retaliated with five hours of attacks
against Arab positions in Jordan.
Israeli jets also pressed their attacks against Egyptian
positions along the Suez Canal in six hours of intermittent
bombing. Syria reported that its artillery killed or
wounded 35 Israeli soldiers in the Golan Heights which
Israel occupied during the 1967 war whose anniversary
Israel began observing Wednesday.
ISRAEL REPORTED that its fighters downed three
Egyptian Soviet-built MIG2Is in a dogfight over the
northern sector of the canal and that Israeli planes all
returned safely.
The attack on Beisan was the second this week on the
frontier town only five miles from Jordan south of the
Sea of Galilee. A 9-year-old girl was killed there on
Monday, and schoolchildren again were the main victims
of Wednesdays attacks.
Eight Katyusha rockets, the same kind used by the Viet
Cong in Vietnam, slammed into Beisan today in two

Maddoxegins
Picketing Today
LAGRANGE, Ga. (UPI) Gov. Lester Maddox, who is scheduled
to begin picketing the Atlanta Journal and Constitution offices in
Atlanta today scored the newspapers Wednesday and charged they
had printed hundreds of untruths in news columns.
Maddox cited editorials in the Sunday Journal and Constitution
and again in Mondays Journal which said there had already been two
special legislative sessions during the Maddox administration.
MADDOX SAID THERE had been only one session, an abbreviated
two-day affair in 1969.
Maddox is currently considering calling a special legislative session,
which the newspapers have maintained is politically motivated and
not needed at this time.
The governor last weekend ordered all Journal and Constitution
vending machines removed from State Capitol property, and
personally helped remove some of the newspaper racks.
HE SAID HE would picket the newspaper offices beginning at 2
p.m. Thursday.
In his speech Wednesday, Maddox said the hard hat philosophy
characterizes the feelings of most Americans.
Maddox paid tribute to the hard hat philosophy Wednesday and
characterized it as representative of the feelings of most Americans.
IN A SPEECH to a civic club, the governor said many Americans
had read about the marches of the construction workers in New
York. Theyve come to be known as hard hats and they have taken
to the streets to parade and show their support of America and her
fighting men in Southeast Asia.
Maddox said the hard hats speak for the overwhelming majority
of Americans.
Those construction workers arent ashamed to stand up and be
counted for America, and they dont like it when they see others
spitting upon their flag and calling for victory by the North
Vietnamese enemy.
THE GOVERNOR SAID, This hard hat movement was born when
one lone construction worker, disgusted by anarchists and
revolutionists who were waving a Viet Cong flag, raised high the flag
of America and stepped out boldly into the street.
Behind him came hundreds of his fellow workers voicing their
belief in America. All this, because one man was willing to stand up
for his country.
Talmadge Denounces
Campus Revolutionists
WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen. Herman Talmadge said Wednesday
the tactics of campus revolutionists, aside from being lawless, are
self-defeating if they wish to win the ear of their government.
Talmadge, in his weekly newsletter, said many of the recent
demonstrations on the nations college campuses have been blatantly
lawless and wantonly destructive.
HE SAID THAT during the past school year, 1968-69, there were
more than 850 demonstrations on some 225 campuses and 61
instances of arson or bombings.
Approximately 200 buildings were seized or occupied, some of
them at gunpoint, he added.
Some 4,000 persons were arrested, there was one death and 125
injuries and damage to campus facilities amounted to about $3
million.
TALMADGE NOTED that such demonstrations continued into the
present school year with more destruction and loss of life.
The Georgia lawmaker praised several hundred students who visited
his office recently to express strong discontent over the war in
Vietnam. I was glad they came, he said. Here was the give and take
of discussion in voices calm enough to be heard and

TWO SCHOOLGIRLS KILLED

barrages spaced two hours apart. Two girls, aged seven and
nine, were killed in the attacks and 16 others, including at
least 10 children, were wounded.
THE SECOND barrage of rockets, which landed as the
inhabitants were coming out of shelters, scored a direct
hit on a school, setting two classrooms afire.
The Israeli response was quick. The raids on Jordan
began at 11 a.m., an hour and a half after the second
rocket attack, and continued until around 4 pjn. An
Israeli spokesman said that the targets were both
Jordanian and Arab guerrilla positions opposite Beisan.
A Jordanian military spokesman said three civilians
were killed and nine wounded in the air attacks. He said
one of the dead and two of the wounded were children.
He said the attacking planes used machineguns and
rockets.
THE ROCKET ATTACK on Beisan also triggered
artillery duels across the frontier which the Jordanian
spokesman said lasted one hour and 25 minutes.
Celebrations went on in Jerusalem commemorating the
capture of that Holy City in the Six-Day 1967 War.
An Israeli spokesman reported that Israeli jets were
attacking across the Suez waterway again after the six

Hawks Urge Conservatives
Vote For Debt Increase

WASHINGTON (UPI) Republican leaders
Wednesday urged their partys fiscal
conservatives to abandon their traditional
opposition to raising the national debt ceiling.
They made clear it was a matter of supporting
the President on Vietnam.
The leaders issued their appeal at a last-minute
caucus of Republican lawmakers.
THE MEETING TOOK place shortly before
the House convened to debate and vote on a bill
that would boost the legal debt limit by $lB
billion to $395 billion.
Antiwar Democrats, claiming government
expenses are up principally because of the

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Thursday, June 4,1970, The Florida Alligator,

hours of attacks this morning. He said that the Israeli
planes tangled with intercepting Egyptian aircraft over the
northern sector of the canal at 4:50 pjn. and downed
three Egyptian planes.
THE ISRAELIS appeared to be stepping up their
attacks on Egyptian military objectives along the canal in
an effort to block any effort by the Egyptians or Soviets
to bring their SAM 3 ground to air missile sites closer to
the waterway.
An Egyptian military spokesman in Cairo said earlier
that Egyptian fighters had scrambled also to intercept the
Israeli raiders which attacked positions along the central
and northern sectors of the Suez Canal this morning. He
reported no Egyptian losses.
In Damascus, a Syrian military spokesman reported
that the artillery attack against the Israelis in the Golan
Heights came after an Israeli unit attempted to surround a
Syrian patrol inside the territory which Israel occupied
during the 1967 war.
In a one-hour exchange, an estimated 35 Israeli
soldiers were killed or wounded, the Syrian spokesman
said.

Indochina war, have launched a drive to block
the bill until Nixon agrees to speed U. S.
disengagement from Southeast Asia.
REP. JOHN W. BYRNES, R-Wis., speaking for
the GOP leadership at the closed caucus, tried to
convince the economy bloc that this time it was
different.
The ceiling is the absolute minimum required,
explained Byrnes, and is more the result of
decreased revenues than additional spending.
Although Byrnes dismissed the dove effort as
pure demagoguery, he conceded that the vote
would be close.

Page 11



:, Th. Florid. AIHgMor, Thunder. Aim 4.1*70

Page 12

PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON, JUNE 10
Won't miss this Offer! deep south
mayonnaise
/ f ...... FEATURED PIECE-A-WEEK
VOID AFTER JUNE 10
SmL. y- oNLY^^p^
WITH A 5 3.00 PURCHASE Bfl I
fiS GOOO JUNE 4 THU AUGUST I* EaGOOD JUNt 4 TMU AUGUST BM I
H This coupon worth *I.OO JSKXI'S, El|3 This coupon worth *I.OO M-ZAZ |H||9 This coupon worth *I.OO Y'iZlt El \^ r / 1
B TWO DESSERT TWO DEMI-CUPS HB TWO SALAD M X
dishes By P r SHi &SAUCERS ii PLATES m
r' 1 *2.49 price 5 2.99 PR,C6 nr ; S 2.99 PR,cE §j QUART
A *I.OO VALue N BH BF HB L J *IOO tSP" || 1 with $5.00 or more
B pu : din9
LAND O' SUNSHINE
BUTTER AOcNgfetatea, Don Food 12 ; 1 00
W 0 I II ### m CRACKIN'GOOD DIXIE
SAVE 20c... BRIQUETTES liimaUa DlAfi O I5o! SIOO
CHARCOAL 20
COOKING 01L... 68 c |W| i: Z
ELECTRIC FANS *l2" HU I Prestige Bread 2£ 59 c
rTPBfl HAMBURGER OR
P.H.....Z. GRADi B_ Wiener Buns .. 2 £ 39 e
MED.EGGS Hffl o
ASTOR GRINDS
j|B|Bl
ALL GRINDS
c= COFFEE 59 c
mgtgmam O O
Iflnf If i ... STOKELY FANCY CUT GREEN STOKELY 3 SV. ALASKA PEAS OR
WmWmm 41 Asparagus 3 s l .&& Spinach .. 5 S I OO
Blii g|i Pork & Beans 4*1 #0 JJf Weenies.. 5 S I OO HHHiilf
KB] H BH Chili 4 - s l Catsup ... 6 i S I OO j B
Jr Liams.... 4 "ss s l W Carrots... 6 *1 00 HHI B
MBi Sausage.. 5 -:i *l famj Gr. Beans. 7 s l
Q 018 Gr. Beans. sts s l 808 Beets.... 8 ?s s l 0 0
Patna Rice 33 c Italian Dressing ... 39 Tomato Juice .'".'!.. 35 e
NEW! Syrup~T 69 Catsup 49* 2?c
- ....
iHITFv
?o* srssr iwiT^ds??
_ a v war aA a a l a M OAL UtAC i ONI CARTON i ONC PRO. i ooqana POST uao flat hi mas
NOW AT YOUR LOCAL fiMcMrm ifeiiSff ci|ntii "f" ; Aruas. tnc umm*Ls oNo.tAOo
IMIUM MVII si back ooooTMWWHf 1# OOOOtmcuiuni 10 **** or Stow VoMtabU. IBXGr ShrimpCkvnkoo*
WINN-DIXIf. PLIASI 'n No. If No. 20 KM N o, Btljlf 0000 thru juhiio
DISTROY YOUR 010 n M r' ! .. r T.T = ~.
Vic.mNo wu'.* 342! WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
niw caw. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.



PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON, JUNE 10
SWIFT'S PREMIUM CANNED jgflk I QQ
MEHARIS I
" A DELICIOUS, SUCCULENT
HANDIPAK y HAM FOR SUMMER MEAL
COPELAND TEND!* SLICED FRENCH FRIED PERCH PALMETTO FARMS
All Meal Franks . 49 c Beef Liver 69 c Fisk Fillets ... 69 c Pimento Cheese... 'ts 69 c
TARNOW WHOIE HOG BREAKFAST LINK OR MEATY PORK FRENCH FRIED FLOUNDER KRAFTS SLICED NATURAL
Pattie Sausage ... 69 c Neck Bones 29 c Fish Fillets 89 Swiss Cheese .... . 59
SUNNYLAND SUNNYLAND THIN FRENCH FRIED SUPERBRAND
Smoked Sausage $ 1 Sliced Bacon S 69* Shrimp Patties ...... 79* Cottage Cheese.. 2X. 69*
LAND O' FROST CHIPPED STACK PACK OSCAR MAYERS BRAUNSCHWEIGER OR WD BRAND MILD DAISY STYLE CHEDDAR BORDEN'S 810 10
Ham or Turkey... 3= *l Sandwich Spread .. 5s 49* Cheese 89* Canned Biscuits.. 49*
W-DBRANDPURE I QUICK FROZEN WDBRAND 16PATTIES
Gr. Beef 3 1 1 79 Hamburger.... 2 $ 1 69
Chuck Steak 79* BTfiMViB Rump Roast $ 1 29
BOSTON BUTT USDA CHOICE BRAND BEEF BONELESS EYE OF
Pork Roast S9 C Round Roast $ 1 39
Baking Hens 49* mL L j Strip Steaks $ 1 59
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND ROUND BONE SHOULDER ROAST LB. 99 OR FUU CUT BONELESS
8010gna...." 58* Round Steak rrrr. *1 19
Quantity Right! Ruturvud dfi£t h- jfrA /MBjh
wimn own itomi inc corioHt-i7 BB & CS/gm BORDEN
W W w Heath Bars. > 59*
ICE CREAM = 59* BBHjjHB $ Ravioli ...... 69*
THRIFTY MAID All FLAVORS mk ROMAN CHEESE
ICE MILK ss 49 c T pizza 79*
mw m m 0 BtmSm ROMAN fepperomi or sausage
FROZEN SHOESTRING WfliP DItVM OQ C
POTATOES 2 69* Mjilfflm 9sSsn~
OYSTERS 59* tits a- *9<
PIE SHELLS 29* MBB 0m0n....... a*-
lUly TOP V ALUf STAMPS TOP VALUE ST'AMPS
*> '.-ait H !UT 3 MIX O# MATCH GRttN Vl.??'
Kyaf c Hou Rich giant whiti coin. baby umas B
BjijjF N'. :|- oooom"Till ,0
S?tTn liiiuu .TAr*??. A Ms Ml I 1 I
| B | Y vine ripe size ikELJ
bbb Loupes.. 2 < 89 £ Carrots . 10 c Potatoes 5 49 c^AMi|i^l
FRESH BLUE FLA. SUNKIST 28-LB. AVG. RED RIPE
Cv|fa Berries . 39 c Lemons 12 49 c Watermelons 99 c^vWVl
| Lettuce .2 39 c Onions ..3 ' 49 c Margarine . 31 c ||J | J|
P 1- Lmm'" : TiT L
VALUE STAMPS j I [iTIT Toj MM B [lllj nl> VALUE STAMPS j IllllT TOP VALUE STAMPS | *9 M
GOOO " U jUNf 10 GOOD THRU JUNE 10 GOOO TMtU JUNt 10 N THiU JUNE 10
'liiweiii irrTr-iL.f^g r--Ti,.. r r.Tnir r.r; iioi.brock
E!f p^ L M& J[ijlJ romimuMM JsuSwm |B[ill Starlight Mint. 39*
: .yy o, Viwriiwwapirco?ss Ae pwkmam 0 w.tH covnh. *u.c-.i cuf I 111 .KG. WD HAND III! fUUOUAITt! IIOT.CG 01. Ml QT. GULF
Cottaaa'chaaia Ground * ParkChagi Dry Milk
VSXXEXr: RPJIL iliffJi.. .?th.utn, m No 0000, ,ujun " 8 000 ,u,UNe 0 iribetT opray . Oo
i a 1 nRJuB No. 13 i Hfnra no. io 4! tm ikal hwcmih 1 Br-it w ' lkh wi um w a ton* local .inh buh 1 4
4t you* toe* wtoiH i iii ../ ~,jji Ju mil v ggsT's "1.., -1. iii 111 a. a** imiiui'j ar A
-rrmTTTTTra wWmTTmwTr ..
Irai VALUE STAMK 'I [ 111 J TOP VALIS StJmW j I [IIIT VALUE STAMM i [ill 7TW | BflllT TW VALUE STAMM j SQndwich ..... 49
TVpP VALUC 3m ML/9%r9 ( Vtn *"** * J i*v** coio~ o* # cv*o *.p tuBCNAM * J - '** *** pmc-am o * J
JH.IAO VIA' f SAIISIUIT
FitNCMrrr ^_/ T n. A Blm strawbnrrini 'HIKa cnh.iC.li. HKcUT Friad Ckltkan IGoi. SUNSHINE
JJSSL. Ban jSSfAtSa SrrSf. -iaf ; Hi-Hn Cmrlrorc *-7c
j; :;r.-r:.-r.T. No 1 -ASESm 11 m..HbUMmu 4 ...r.ri.T "..,. A ,m...r.::rr~,,,JS ll riu v-racKers O/
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. no can CH g kino plain
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST. Fned Rice 43 c

Thuraday, June 4,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

.


FOR SALE
Honda 50 Sport, Must Sail. Excellent
condition with helmet and tools. Best
offer. Call Jeff 392-8320.
(A-st-152-p)
2 12 speakers handbullt custom
upholstered seats on top unbelievable
bass minimum distortion yours at a
steal S7O call for Mark 392-9506.
(A-4t-153-p)
1969 Yamaha Enduro 125 cc 3,500
mi. Excellent cond. $375 4.00x18
knob. 7 mo old see at 304 NW 15 St.
Rm 10.
FROM wall to wall, no soil at all, on
carpets cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-159-c)
WIG WIG WIG For Sale. Must Sell.
Name your price. Hardly worn.
Looks like new. Call 392-8607
Anytime. (A-lt-155-p)
15% OR MORE OFF LIST PRICE
TO STUDENTS ON SCM
PORTABLE ELECTRIC
TYPEWRITERS J.R. OFFICE
FURNITURE CO. 620 S. MAIN ST.
PHONE 376-1146. (A-lt-155-p)
HONDA 250 SCRAMBLER.
Showroom condition. Call 378-1895.
(A-2t-155-p)
Sllngerland Drums. Full Set. Stiver
Sparkle. S3OO. Call Chuck 373-1443.
(A-2t-155-p)
Honda 300 Dream, windshield and
racks. Best offer. Golf clubs and
stereo, albums, headset, camera, &
aquarium also. Call Gary 373-1835.
(A-2t-155-p)
1968 Honda 90 Sport, only 2,000
miles. Excellent condition, must sell.
Best offer. Call Ken 392-8328.
(A-2t-155-p)
Sofa-bed, sls; recliner, $10; chair,
$5; lamp, $2.50; Bxlo rug, $8; 9x12
rug, $6; other great buys. Come see
919 S.W. sth Ave. or call 373-2570.
(A-2t-155-p)
Bargains VW sedan trailer hitch S2O.
Color TV antenna $25. 1968 125 cc
Benelli $125. 28 Issues of Playboy
$5. Call after 5 pm 378-6389.
(A-2t-155-p)
Triumph chopper new engine new
paint new tires, going to Europe,
must sell, call 378-7727 ask for Neal.
(A-2M55-P)
Motorola color TV 12 inch screen 3
mo. old for S2OO. Call 378-8010
btwn 12-1 pm or after 6 evenings.
(A-2t-155-p)
1967 Detroiter mobile home 12x45 2
bedroom air cond. utility shed good
cond. on nice lot. 378-3827. $2995.
(A-2t-155-p)
Refrigerator, big, good shape. SSO.
Graduate In June. Available June 6.
Call 372-8823 after 5 pm.
(A-3t-155-p)
REFRIGERATOR, large, $25 or best
offer. Call 392-7002. (A-3t-155-p)
TACHOMETER FOR SALE. 6-8
cylinder, 0-10,000 rpm solid state,
excellent condition for information
call 392-7991. (A-3t-155-p)
GUITAR, Yamaha FG-150 Folk.
Excellent condition. Beautiful sound.
Call 392-9829 ask for Lynn.
(A-2t-155-p)
SCUBA GEAR White Stag tank with
J valve, boot and U. S. Divers back
pack. Sportsways Malibu single hose
regulator. Small Parkway wet suit
Jacket. Espadon mask. Super
Rondlne fins, size 5-6. All for $125.
Call Ed 376-5400. (A-2t-155-p)
Motor Scooter $65 spare parts 8i
helment Included 19 fall md brown
S3O bedroom suit S3O desk 3 drawer
$lO aqua 9x12 rug $6, 378-3324.
(A-2t-155-p)
1966 Honda 90, good condition,
$65. Call 378-7537 or 392-7953.
(A-2M55-P)
65 VW, new tires top shape. Call
378-6912 Bill or Pat. S7OO or the
best offer. Must sell immediately
It's a fantastic deal. (A-2t-155-p)
Stereo system: Scott 342 C receiver, 2
12 speaker systems, never used.
Garrard tt with base, cover, & M9IE
cart. Cost $563, now $439.
378-9192. (A-2t-155-p)
NEW, USED, ANTIQUE AUCTION,
something for everyone. Saturday
night, 7:30, June 6th, C&J Auction
House, Archer. (A-2t-155-p)
GE stereo girl's bike Schwln
1-speed medium-sized fan records
textbooks paperbacks transistor
radio with 9-volt converter + MORE
call 392-9406 (A-151-st-p)
STEREO harmon kardon, garrard
40 mk. II built-in, am/fm, 60 watt
spks, dust cover, tape rec, 400 new,
sacrifice 290 Call Steve at 392-7128
(A-l 51-st-p)
68 Dodge %ton camper 10 toGas
stove, stereo, beautiful condition.
$2995 Call 378-5150 (A-* el -st-p)

X*X*X*X-X<-X*X*X*X*X*X*XyXvvx*'*x***: :
FOR SALE
Xirxrx-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-i-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x
-
1968 CL 90 HONDA includes helmet
and bumper carrier call 373-0374
Ask for Ed (A-2t-154-p)
DON'T PASS UP THIS DEAL, Stero
Phonic 4-Track Solid State Tape
Recorder by Panasonic plus two
Lafayette 860 Microphones plus 9
reels of tape. All for only $l5O. Call
392-8734 (A-3t-154-p)
1967 Honda 160 Scrambler
excellent condition $350 or best
offer; also Admiral stereo and
portable small tape recorder must
sell; 392-7006 (A-2t-154-p)
Refrigerator 4 cu. ft. Ideal for dorm
room. S6O Call 392-9301
(A-3t-154-p)
MOTORCYCLE TRAILER custom
made can carry 1600 lbs. alum, rail,
good tires, like new $125 see at
Gatprtown apt. 100 (A-3t-154-p)
5.5 cu. ft. table top refrigerator 1 yr.
old designed for dorm living excellent
condition asking SSO call 392-0686
between 3 and 6 PM. (A-2t-154-p)
SICK of EATING OUT? Refrigerator
perfect condition I sVt x 3* big
freezer must sell $35 372-9177 ask
for Ryan or Steve (A-3t-154-p)
SPARTAN Imperial Mansion, 8 x 45
two BR mobile home, SIO,OOO
originally, now only $2200 A/C and
furnishings. CALL 373-1775
(A-3t-154-p)
Honda C 8350 700 ml. 1970 still on
warranty with helmet only $650 call
378-7943 after 11 PM (A-3t-154-p)
Trailer with large cabana A.C. in a
nice park with pool for sale or rent
SI2OO or 75 a mo. H. B. Williams
392-0939 or 376-3322 (A-3t-154-p)
1966 Honda 50cc 5700 ml
Automatic clutch Recently
overhauled New rear tire Saddle bags
Helmet All For SIOO Call 392-7363
(A-3t-154-p)
REFRIGERATOR CHEAP must sell
by June 10. Perfect for apt. or dorm
room. SSO or best offer Call
392-7700 soon please! (A-3t-154-p)
Available September 10x47 New
Moon; 2 bdrm; central heat; AC; new
shag carpeting. Excellent condition;
near Univ., shaded lot. S3OOO.
378-766 7. (A-st-152-p)
Cozy, economical living, 8 x 28
mustang trailer, furnished, full bath,
will consider renting, cabinets,
house type appliances, hitch available
373-2714 (A-3M54-P)
1970 Bridgestone, 200cc, low
mileage, Just tuned, SSOO, call
378-8480 after 11 AM or 378-9084
after 7 PM. (A-st-152-p)
Labrador pups AKC registered top
breeding 8 weeks old females SSO
each Day 372-2547 Nite 376-2827
(A-5M51-P)
Acetone compact organ $175 Haynes
Bass Amp $l5O Drum set SSO Fender
Palomino acustlcal guitar with hard
case $l5O Call 372-1297 or
378-0928. (A-151-st-p)

at
MORRISON'S CUTTERU'
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
THURSDAY
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<
FRIDAY
Fish Almondine and
French-Fried Potatoes
'=#> *
GAINESVILLE MALL

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 4,1970

Page 14

FOR SALE SALE
SALE e
1967 Honda CB 160, 4700 miles,
perfect condition, bell helmet, used
very little, must sell, would like
$325. Call 373-1253 or 392-0128.
(A-BMSO-P)
Webcor portable stereo HI-FI and
smith-corona porta bl
TYPEWRITER and case. Must sell.
Call 392-7639. (A-st-150-p)
Headquarters for Cypress Garden
skis. Dunlop tennis balls 1.50 can.
Handball gloves 3.00. Barbell set 110
lb. 29.50. B & B SPORTS CENTER
1406 N.W. 13th St. (A-st-152-p)
8-track car units $38.95 lots of tapes
on sale everyday at $4.99. All others
$5.88 Muntz 14 NW 13th Street.
(A-Bt-149-p)
Women and speed are two
transtitional things we carry them
both In our bodies. Myers type dune
buggy available In all colors and
metalflakes for only $195 Mike
Sullivan ATO house 372-9427
(A-151-6t-p)
FOR RE BIT
.:-X-x*x-X-:-:-X ; X ; : ; :v>x-:-: ; :-: ; : ; x ; : ; : ; : ; :-: ; : ; : ; : ; >:-
Large 3 bdrm. house to sublet for
summer 1 blk. from law school.
Furnished, a/c, color TV. Quiet
street, large yard, pets ok. Call
378-4154. (B-2t-155-p)
Hawaiian Village Luxurious 2
bedroom, 2 bath, carpet, dishwasher,
air cond., $lB5 per mo. or best offer.
Available furnished. Call 376-8366.
(B-2t-155-p)
SBO FOR ENTIRE SUMMER.
Alr-condltloned poolside Hawaiian
Village apt. Tel. 373-2511 after 7
p.m. (B-2t-155-p)
Univ. Gardens 2 bdr apt. by pool
You split July-August $250 up to 4
pers. We pay remaining S9O plus June
Save $260 Summer Q Ap.
718-310. Ph 372-7640. (B-4t-153-p)
1 br apt. for summer term 3 blocks
from campus AC. See at 328 NW 14
SL after 4. (B-st-152-p)
$55 mo., summer qtr. rate, NO
LEASE, Cone. blk. cottages, private
& rustic surroundings, 6 min. drive
from campus, furnished, oak-shaded
& cool, window fans, 5700 SW 13th
St., Call Steve 372-4407 after 8:00
p.m. (B-3t-153-p)
SAVE $2lO 4-man Village Pk. apt. to
sublet for summer. Fum., balcony
over pool, end apt. for spacious
parking. S3OO for entire summer. Call
373-1347 anytime. Apt. 94.
(B-2t-155-p)
YOU can live at CLO ail summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
Several 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet $l2O mo. Colonial Manor
apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave. 372-7111
Grad students preferred. Special rates
for summer guarter now in effect.
(B-ts-109-c)

for RENT
Experience CO-OP LIVING at J*!
very best. Call Georgia Seagle Hall for
the summer qtr. nly $22 ? P n
quarter. Call 376-8941. (B-4t-153-p)
Village Park Apt. only SSO per
person for entire summer. One, two,
three or four person occupancy. Call
376-6587 after 8 p.m. (B-2t-155-p)
2 bdrm duplex 5 blks from campus.
Sublet summer or longer A/C carpet
furnished. Call 376-8119.
(B-2t-155-p)
Two blocks to campus room men or
women liberal carpets kit. priv. air
prlv. 60 semi 45 new T.V. wood
paneling. See Dave 1204 NW 3 Ave.
378-0286. (B-2t-155-p)
FRENCH QUARTERS apt. poolside.
Sublease for summer, only S3OO. Call
376-5412. (B-2t-155-p)
BARGAIN! Landmark Apt. no. 26
Sublease 4 people SBO per person
for entire summer. Call 378-1074
anytime or stop by. (B-2t-155-p)
FRENCH QUARTER. Sub-lease 2
bdrm. apt. on POOL, many extras.
Asking $300.00 for summer. Call
373-2381. (B-2t-155-p)
Men Live in Landmark all summer
for only S9O. June 15 thru Aug. 31.
Air, pool, girls. Call now 376-2768. If
not taken by weekend best offer.
(B-2t-155-p)
1 bedroom apt. within walking
distance to campus SIBO for summer.
378-3341. (B-2t-155-p)
Here it Is. Just what youve been
looking for. Luxurious two bedroom
apartment fully carpeted air-heat
$145 per mo. Call Jeff or Tom,
373-1573 or 373-2747. (B-2t-155-p)
Live In La Mancha $ 120/summer
Includes utilities private room, a/c,
pool, gas grills, free newspaper.
Campus 2 blocks, apt. no. 5 or
373-1815. (B-2t-155-p) l
FREE JUNE RENT, Landmark Apts.
1111 SW 16 Ave., Apt. 56. Excellent
condition! Call anytime. 378-4849.
(B-2t-155-p)
S7O for entire summer In Village Park
Apt. A/C, pool, 2 bedroom, only 2
other roommates besides you. Call
378-8243 (male). (B-3t-154-p)
For rent for fall, air-conditioned
apartments near campus. SBO to
$145 per month, pool. University
Apartments. Call 376-8990 evenings.
(B-Bt-149-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-c)
WILL DISCUSS PRICE on our 2
bdrm., AC Sin City apt. can rent
from one to four persons. Good
location and great neighbors. Call
372-1272. (B-3t-152-p)

DON'T BE CURIOUS CCC
DONT BE YELLOW
THE MOST 'CURIOUS' OF THEM ALU
"TIE ULTIMATE EXPERIMENT IN HUMAN SEXUAL RESPONSE!
NMW YORK DAILY NMW 1
PLUS IN COLOR
__]THE_WONDERFUL world OF GIRLS

.
for rent
POOLSIDE F.Q. APT. Sublet
summer June rent FREE Call
372-5246 Ask for Susan or KJ
(B-3t-154-p)
Trailer, 10 by 50. 2 bedroom,
furnished, air-conditioned, summer
quarter, $55/mo. 378-7131
mornings. (B-3t-154-p)
Coed roomate for summer qtr. Have
your own room In a house 10 blocks
behind Norman. S7O + utilities for
the entire summer. Call 373-1748
( B-2t-154-p)
3-bedroom apt., offstreet parking,
full bath, kitchen, living rm, 16,500
B.T.U. A/C. Min. of 1 qtr lease. $l3O
mo. 408 NE Ist Ave 376-0317
(B-st-149-p)
Sublet or rent 1 brm furnished air
conditioned patio Village 34
slls/mo call 373-1080 or 376-4807
(B-st-148-p)
Three apartments; Private bath, living
room, kitchen. Available at beginning
of summer quarter. Call 372-9855 or
inquire at 102 NW 15th St. or 1508
NW Ist Lane (B-3t-154-p)
JUNE RENT FREE. Hawalaan
Village apt. 2 bdrm. townhouse pool,
patio, free maid service, central A/C,
dishwasher. Call 373-2520 no. 140
(B-3t-154-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus, A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
One to three guys can rent our
Landmark apt and have a pool,
sauna, a/c, dishwshr, and neat
neighbors for only $46.25/per.l apt.
126 378-6277. (B-st-152-p)
Sublease summer qtr Landmark apt 2
br 2-4 persons A/C dishwasher grills
poolside. Dishes, pots, pans, kitchen
utensils left for you. 378-3851.
(B-st-152-p)
Across street from campus studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace Apts. 1225 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-109-ts-c)
LANDMARK PHASE II sublet
SUMMER JUNE rent paid Ibr apt
162 call 372-7760 (B-151-st-p)
Sub-let apt. Village Park no. '6O 2
bedroom phone anytime available
June 15. (B-st-152-p)
VILLAGE PARK summer sublease 2
bdrm. poolside apt. no. 108. Come
by late afternoons, evenings.
(B-st-152-p)
1 male rm. to share lux air cond
mobile hm your own rm SSO mo. call
373-1690. (B-st-152-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for rent
sllO. Mo for luxury at Mt. Vernon
apt single br. carpeted A.C.
finest furnishings pool all
electric apll. close to campus
evenings 378-4877 (B-3t-154-p)
WILLIAMSBURG apt. 41 can be
yours for the summer. Spacious 2
bed. 2 bth, full equipped kit. for 4 or
5 call 378-7670 after 5 (B-3t-154-p)
Apt. 167 Landmark to sublet for
Summer quarter. Two bedrooms.
Need to sublet entire apartment so
male or female group accepted.
(B-3t-IS4-p)
Sublet for summer: 5 room furn.
house, 1 brm, den, large storage rm, 2
baths, AC, TV, pets OK. June 15
Sept. 15 S3OO. 373-2398
(B-3t-154-p)
Sublease Duplex Modern Quiet
Airconditioned A Good "Place"
Call Nights 376-9513 1009 NW 31st
Ave (B-3t-154-p)
$75 for entire summer 2 bdr. AC on
pool Village Park unusually furnished
available June 15 .378-3747
(B-3t-154-p)
LIVE ALL SUMMER FOR $55 AT
HAWAIIAN VILLAGE APTS!!
HURRY!! CALL 373-1103
(B-3t-154-p)
One to four roommates needed for
Landmark apt. 138. $92.50 for the
summer. June rent paid. Call Joanne
376-0687 (B-3t-154-p)
1 Bedroom Apt. available June 23
Paneled AC Private Patio Pets
Allowed 8105/mo* Some Utilities
Call 373-2165 (B-3t-154-p)
Sex sun surf and suds can be yours
this summer at luxurious Landmark
Phase II poolside apt. 112 sauna gym
health club central air wall to wall
dishwasher pannellng two bedroom
townhouse 378-1775 such a deal!!
(B-2t-154-p)
Village Park sublease 1 bedroom apt.
for summer A/C pool enjoy the
summer In the sun apt. 24 call
378-3554 live In sin city over the
summer (B-3t-154-p)
Live 3 mos. La Mancha $l3O Inc.
util. pvt. bedroom pool ac. Save S2O
move in now. Please call 373-2973
(B-3t-154-p)
Free June Rent sub-let Landmark apt
summer quarter Female only 2 steros
1 TV close to pool too! Call after
5:00 372-6513 (B-3t-154-p)
Single rooms for summer, winter
qtrs. 150/qtr maid linens utilities
close to campus, call or see 115 NW
10 st. Tom Ford 378-7222 378-5156
leave name (B-150-7t-p)
Your own private bedroom for the
summer. Fully furnished 3 bedroom
house to sublet. S4O a month. Call
373-1162 or 373-1968 after 7 PM
(B-5M53-P)
Luxurlus Williamsburg Poolside
townhouse apt. Sublease for summer
for appointment call 378-3323
(B-3t-153-p)
ENJOY THE SUMMER IN LUXURY
with AC and pool at Mt. Vernon apt.
83 2 bedroom Call 378-3779
(B-4t-153-p)
S9O per person, June rent free, 2 br
Fr Qtr no. 47, use of dishes, linens,
etc. Call 372-6768. Poolside, ac.
(B-5M52-P)
SupercaLlfraglllstlcexplaladoclous
deal 2 female roomies for Landmark
apt for summer you pay only July &
August hurry call 373-1883.
(B-4t-152-p)
Sublease for Summer. Two bedroom
apt. French Quarter 114. June rent
paid ed. SIBO mo. Great way to
spend the summer call 373-2306.
(B-st-152-p)
FOR RENT: Singles: Swing Into
summer In a luxurious air-conditioned
poolside apartment. Private bedroom
Walk to campus. S7O In c I u d e s
Utilities. 378-7224. (B-15t-148-p)
Unlv Gardens 2 bdr apt by pool
you split July August $250 up to 4
persne pay remaining S9O plus June
Save $260 Summer Q apt
18-310 ph 372-7640 (B-4t-153-p)
Hawaaian village, sublet 1 bedroom,
furnished, ww carpet, A/C, pool,
$l5O per month, call 376-9014 after
5 PM available June 15 (B-st-153-p)
Camelot Large two-bearoom
furnished apt. all extras TV
dishwasher Centra! air summer qtr
only prefer careful tenants. Special
rates 378-5133 (B-151-st-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom unlv. gardens apt.
available for summer school and next
year. Call or see at 702 SW 16 Ave
no. ill, 376-8958. Perfect for 2
people. (B-151-st-p)
Men 3 Blocks from campus central
elr conditioning single $155.00
double $l2O each for summer
quarter 378-8122 (B-10t-145-p)

FOR RENT
1 to 4 roommates need to sublet La
Mancha townhouse for summer qtr.
A/C, pool, pvt. bedrooms, $l5O for
summer Incl. utilities. 378-2294
(B-4t-153-p)
3 br, 2 baths, cen air, very nice. 315
NW 19th lane also 1103 SW 2nd ave.
Each $l5O per month, available June
15; phone 376-2892 or call Jay after
5, 376-6769 (B-4t-153-p)
Sublet 1 bdr. furn Unlv. Garden apt.
pool, lake-view pvt. balcony, Morden,
June 14 Aug. 31, $270, Call
373-2290 after 6 PM (B-4t-153-p)
Sublet sum qtr Landmark 1 bdr
June free sl3O/mo on pool
TV and stereo included no deposits
required apt 159. 372-0841
(B-151-st-p)
WANTED
Female roommate wanted for
summer. La Mancha Apts, private
bedroom, air cond., pool, walking
distance from campus. June rent free.
378-9611. (C-st-150-p)
Roommate wanted. 3 br. house sin
city, fall-spring. Own room, ac.
$42.50. 392-8971, 378-6583 after 5
Norm, Dave. (C-2t-155-p)
1 or 2 male roommates wanted.
Summit House close to campus.
S6O + utilities for entire summer
quarter. Call 376-5542. (C-2t-155-p)
2 male roommates for summer qtr.,
also 70-71 school yr. OWN
BEDROOM; prefer conservative,
straight type; 376-4912 late p.m.
(C-2t-155-p)
2 female roommates for Tanglewood
2 bdrm. apt. A/C, TV, quiet, June
free. Only $95 + util, for summer.
Call 373-2711 for Info. (C-155-2t-p)
1 male roommate summer qtr. La
Bonne Vie. $135 for qtr. + util. A/C,
pool, own bdr. & bath, dishwasher,
etc., etc. Apt. 420. Call 372-8800
after 5 p.m. (C-2t-155-p)
Live in Landmark this summer for
only $92.50. Two men desired to
help enjoy pools, gym, sauna,
diswasher, Bar BQ, a/c. Call
378-2098. (C-3t-154-p)
1 male roommate to share apartment
for summer quarter. Private room,
A/C, ww carpet. Walk to campus.
Call 378-9248. (C-2t-155-p)
CASH FOR YOUR USED DESKS,
CHAIRS; FILES & TYPEWRITERS.
CALL 376-1146 DAYS OR
378-6403 EVENINGS. (C-lt-155-c)
Bicycle. Bicycle. Bicycle. Bicycle.
Bicycle. Bicycle. Bicycle. Bicycle.
Bicycle. Bicycle. For Sale. 378-6544.
(C-lt-155-p)
Male roommate for fall quarter at
University Gardens; $55/mo Inc.
utilities. Call 392-8928 (C-150-st-p)

II ATTENTION I
I THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE HAVE SEMINOLE I
PHOTO REFUND CHECKS READY IN THE
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUSINESS OFFICE,
Rm. 330 JWRUnion. THEY MAY BE PICKED UP
ANYTIME BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 8 and 4,
daily.
Peggy Eaton John Hughes
Fred Shore Tom Haney
Jan Berkey Michael Gaff
Alan Harris Doug Smith
John Schmidt Dick Santangelo
Jo Webb Bi| l McClure
Judy Greenberg Jim Eriksen
Nancy Wolfson Larry White
Donna Price Bill Lindner
James Black Mark Rosenberg
Mike Crews Edward Wood
Tom Colmenares Mike Sullivan
Kathleen Dolan Bob Roepnack
George De Latorre Mike H 'l*
Marlene Schneider David Glantz
Barbara Ardin Mike Tobias
Bartlett Nunn Marc Gordon
Terry Watterson G ar V Rodney
Randy Fischer Bruce Swiren
Lee Force ; Rocky Thornhill
Tom Todd J o lo
William Robinson P- Cleveland
Lou Caldwell Greg Stewart I
Fled Joy Howard W.II
Di Anne Tads Sum" Arnold
Steven Rokeach Ladle Robin Gardieff
Karen Surrency

Thursday, June 4,1970, The Florida Alligator,

WANTED
$75 FOR THE ENTIRE SUMMER.
378-5784 ONE MALE ROOMMATE
FOR GREAT SAVINGS IN
LANDMARK. (C-st-152-p)
Female roommate. Own room In 2
bdrm Unlv. Gardens apt. $75/mo
Start Immediately call Diana at
392-1291 before 5, 373-1853 after 5.
(C-st-152-p)
Male roomate apt. 1 Village Park
share V expenses no deposit call
378-8243. (C-st-152-p)
WANTED: Coed to share luxurious
alr-conditloned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15M48-P)
Male roommate to share luxurious
air-conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
1 male/female to share 3 bdr. house
fall qtr. $33/mon. + utilities. Will
have own room and complete
privacy. Call Gary 378-7506 after 11
PM (C-3t-154-p)
1 or 2 fmale rmmates needed Immed.
priv. bdrm, poolside Village Park,
clean, spacious, kit & bthrm equip
and more. 378-3903 apt. no. 58
{C-3t-154-p)
Female roommate wanted for
summer Landmark apt's. Pool-side.
Cost reduced for summer. Call
Barbara at apt. 106. Tel. 373-2240
(C-3t-154-p)
1 or 2 female roommates needed for
Landmark apt. no. 17 only $95 for
entire summer. Call 373-1055
anytime. (C-3t-154-p)
Listeners wanted: Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and 4 PM for appointment
392-2049 (C-st-143-c)
Female roommate Williamsburg. SBO
+ ¥4 util, for entire summer quarter.
Pool, A/C, etc. Walk to campus Call
372-4814 (C-3t-153-p)
Need two roommates for immediate
occupancy at Mt. Vernon townhouse
apts. or will sublet entire apt. for
summer 373-1788 (C-4t-153-p)
Hip roomates wanted for summer
qtr. or will sub-lease air-con house
behind Norman. No deposits. Call
Sherry 376-8080 618 SW 10th St.
(C-7t-150-p)
Female Roommate wanted for
summer. La Mancha apts. private
bedroom, air cond, pool, walking
distance from campus. June rent free
378-9611 (C-st-150-p)
1 or 2 female roommates needed for
Landmark apt. no. 17. Only SBS for
entire summer. Call 373-1055
anytime. (C-3t-155-p)

Page 15

WANTED
S7O for entire summer In Village Park
Apt. A/C, pool, 2 bedroom, only 2
other roommates besides you. Call
378-8243 (male). (B-3t-154-p)
ROOMMATE WANTED own
bedroom 32.50 month + util. 1813
NW 2nd Ave. No. 2 373-1662
(C-2t-154-p)

**********************
last day 2
1 Tomorrow f Norwood 1
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5 GREGORY PECK- GEORGE PEPRtRD ROBERT PRESTON
************************>*
LJsttiSiSLW^iSPfl**********************
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. last day 2
} StartS "PUSSYCAT PUSSYCAT 2
2 TOMORROW! L-LLoveyou" J J
SAA A
* Different Different Different 2
J Kind of Kind of Kind of £
| Love ... Film ... Life Style .. 2
J DAVIDJANSSEN CARLRBNER }
bj|jfji.y m 11 1
MODW&*' 2
* J
5 Fourstars**Highestrating. > 2
J A production of quality and a
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j Richard Burton 2
as HENRY VIII )t
2 Genevieve Bujold 2
as ANNE BOLEYN
J IN THE Hal Wallis PRODUCTION
J (/AW (oftfae Tfiousatib DayS 2

WANTED
Two male roommates wanted for
summer. CAMELOT apt. 202,
$43/mo rent, pool, a/c, clubhouse,
TV, 376-0354 (C-150-st-p)
Hip female looking for others of
same gender and similar Interests for
fall housing arrangement call
376-0928. (C-4M52-P)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

XvX-X-X-XvIW
WANTED
Male roommate wanted for summer
quarter. PRIVATE bedroom, 2-bath,
central air apt. 1-block from
Norman Hall $45/month. 372-1272
(C-150-7t-p)
2 coeds needed to share 2 bedroom
apt Summer quar ss4/mo
security dpt. free Unlv. Gardens
call Diane after 4:30 at 376-0716
(C-151-st-p)
June and August rent Free! 2
roommates wanted summer quarter.
Air conditioned, near pool.
Landmark no. 60, call 373-2207
(C-3t-154-p)
HELP! Ill Do working In w. Palm
Beach this summer and dont know
anyone there. Need a roommate & an
apt. Know anyone? Please call Anne,
373-2703 (C-lt-154-p)
#%# #
HELP WANTED
COOKWARE SALESMEN. Students
planning to sell cookware anywhere
In Florida are Invited to phone
378-3615 for MUCH higher
commissions. Check us out. No
obligation. (E-2M55-P)
Independent Florida Department
Store has opening for experienced
Childrens Wear Buyer. Salary SSOO
to S6OO per month plus annual
bonus. Mall complete resume to
Wilson Department Stores, Inc., Box
1168, Gainesville, Florida.
(E-2t-155-p)
Summer a good home for 3 yr. old
girl days Warm loving care Close to P.
K. Vonge. References please. Call
evenings 378-7950 Grad. Stud.
(E-2t-155-p
Coed wanted to manage rooming
house must be liberal yet able to
handle men. Apply In person to Dave
1204 NW 3 Ave. between 5 PM and 6
PM (E-2t-155-p)
Co-ed wanted room and board in
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
TV Technician. Must be experienced.
Also, person over 25 to deliver TV
sets. Apply at Alliance TV Service
815 W. University Ave. (E-5M52-P)
WAITRESS WANTED. Morning &
evening shift, neat in appearance.
Apply after 2 pm. Mr. Raddatz. Flag
Restaurant 1250 W. Unlv. Ave.
(E-st-153-p)
Legal Secretary with previous
experience. For Interview call David
M. Anderson; Fagan, Crouch,
Anderson & Folds, 376-5295.
(E-146-10t-p)
AUTOS
VW Squareback 1968. Air
conditioned, 23,000 miles. Seat
extender for camping. Very
economical to drive. Excellent
condition, good tires. 378-6029.
(G-2t-155-p)

O ULI
^'SiwX-:^s^:;:;>Xjy-;-xovX:X>::;:y3^!;:;:;:;.;.;.;.v
Try Us
GATOR
CLAS6SFIBDS

X.XvX-X-X-XvXvXvXxXrXvXxXtXxX;
AUTOS
Avav.vav.v.v.v/.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.
HELP! Bought new car. Must sell my
1966 Simca. Excellent for beach or
shopping. MADA Book $490. Make
offer. 372-1039 (G-2t-155-p)
BUICK RIVIERA 1964 low mileage,
new brakes and tires, all power, must
sell before June 15 $l,lOO or best
offer 378-6195 evengs. (G-2t-155-p)
1966 Sunbeam Alpine. 1725 cc eng,
less than 12,000 m. Very good cond.
378-2024 (G-3t-154-p)
1963 VW Bus $250 or best offer call
373-1934 after 5 P.M. to 7 P.M.
student (G-2t-155-p)
1968 Sprite excellent condition.
Great summer fun and good
transportation Stebro exhaust
swaybar very quick 228 C Flavet
378-2235 Hurry! (G-3t-153-p)
1961 Chevy Blscayne good trans car
$125 Call Nick Mas! 378-5154
(G-4t-153-p)
1960 MG A New gold paint, spare 6
wire wheels, tonneau cover, radio
good condition. Must see, asking
S6OO call 392-9541 after 5 Rocky
(G-3t-154-p)
1963 VW good shape $400.00 call
378-3587 (G-3t-154-p)
1964 Mercedes Benz 190 gas sedan
becker AM FM Air Conditioning
radlals superb 1390 378-5068
(G-2t-154-p)
Seniors: Start your new life with a
sports car. 1967 MGB, 31,000 mi,
wire wheels, newly painted. Excellent
condition. 378-3903 (G-3t-154-p)
Get it now or never 63 Rambler runs
perfectly great transportation $250
call Tom at 373-1573 or 373-2747
call now. It might be your last
chance. (G-st-152-p)
66 Corvalr in good condition 4 new
tires, new shocks, new clutch, has 2
horns, asking $650 call 392-6931 ask
for Dave around 6:30 or 11:00 p.m.
(G-st-152-p)
For sale. Need home for loveable 67
Valiant 4-door white, black top
61,000 miles. SBOO. Call 373-1589.
Prof, returning Japan, must sell.
(G-151-st-p)
69 SPRITE, 4 speed, fully equlped,
canary yellow, warranty, like new,
exc. tires, black Interior, 373-2475
(G-151-st*p)
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL artd
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission Is a winner
too! TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)
1955 Plymouth. Good mechanical
condition, like neW tires & seat
covers, readable transportation $l5O
or best offer 376-0476 after 5 PM
(G-3t-153-p)
Triumph TR3 Beautiful Condition.
Overdrive, new brakes, transmission
just rebuilt, radio, many extras. Call
373-2798 after 5 oclock.
(G-st-152-p)

Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 4,1970

:-:-:-:-:-x-:-x-x*X*XrX:::::::::::X;:;:;X;:;:;:;X;::::X :
AUTOS
:X:XvXtX:X:X:X:X:X:XvX::rXv:-::X:XvXv
69 Roadrunner, excellent condition
warranty, 4 spd. trans., power disc
brakes, 8,000 miles, headers. Call
376-3931. (G-st-152-p)
For Sale 1965 Triumph Spitfire.
Brand new engine. Desperate Must
sell Immediately. S6OO or best offer.
Call 378-7655 after 5:00
(G-151-st-p)
64 VW bug 55,000 miles original
owner maintenance records available
radio and undercoating no rust S7OO
call 378-2079 (G-151-st-p)
Grandparents 62 Ford Galaxle 500
superior condition power brakes and
steering. David 378-8684 or
392-1517 S4OO Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy clean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
FLY to MIAMI leave Sat morn. Jun
13 return Sun nite. $45 round trip.
Call 378-9130 or 376-1611 x 359.
(J-st-152-p)
Two girls need a third person to
travel through europe from the
beginning of august to end of
november Call Diana 392-7668
(J-151-st-p)
Have anything to take home for the
summer. I will haul your articles to
Miami, Orl, W PB, Laud, Hywd
Cheap. Experienced. Call Phil
372-6404. (J-st-152-p)
Rick, I love you. Happy 23rd
Birthday. Cats are nice, but elephants
are better. Joan. (J-lt-155-p)
TEDDY BEAR (PWM), When looking
back and remembering what we have
shared I will see the full worth of
your love and the miracle that is you.
I love you! HONEY BEAR (SML)
(J-lt-155-p)
SEXY WIZARD Glad you could
come AMLA, Dum-Dum.
(Dum-Dum is better than S.C.)
(J-2t-155-p)
TO A CARTON OF CANDY! SUch a
dealt Nope, you might have paid the
price, but thats no deal. The
Whitman Sampler was consumed too
fasti Theres more waiting at the
store. But dont buy them. Theyll be
gone. Lots of fun to all organ
grinder's monkeys. From an UGLY.
(J-lt-155-p)
Sweet Annette, Straight, stoned or
drunk, you are the most affectionate
chick I know, and I think maybe Ill
miss you this summer. Jack
(J-2t-155-p)
WASHINGTON D. C. or surrounding
area Is destination of coed desiring
riders. Call Linda 378-6195 evenings.
(J-2t-155-p)
To the Runner of 437: Thank You. 1
LOVE YOU. The Dancer (J-2t-155-p)

PERSONAL
I need a hip warm female companion
to share what could be a glorious
summer even In Gainesville Write
Tom Box 12273 Gainesville.
(J-4t-152-p)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologlst 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
BLOND COED In white shorts & top
who checked out smoking literature
In college lib. at 10 Sun. nlte next to
longhair, please call 378-0228 ask for
Jay, Important (J-3t-154-p)
Seniors I will be driving to Miami
on June 14 (after graduation). Can
take 1 or 2 riders with light luggage.
Call 378-5443 evenings (J-2t-154-p)
NEED RIDE TO SAN FRANCISCO
for myself and one other, split
expenses. Leave end of this quarter.
Call Colleen 392-8676 (J-2t-154-p)
NEED YOUR TERM PAPER
TYPED? WILL TYPE ANYTHING.
BROWARD HALL. ONLY 50 cents
A PAGE. CALL 392-9760
(J-2t-154-p)
Help! to the Virgo b. 9-8-48 who has
my chart. I need to check out my
month of June. Either call late
or come by. Cant live without It help
(J-3t-154-p)
Free kittens. 2 long haired all white
males and one calico female. Call
378-7116. Five weeks old.
(J-2t-154-p)
PHI EPS (NOW ZBT) For the benefit
of us transfer students, lets start a
chapter here. (J-3t-254-p)
Somewhere in Atlanta Is a
marshmallow a perfect one for an
almond macaroon. MMM delicious
because there Is love there.
(J-2t-154-p)
LOST St FOUNTD
Found a weird silver ring with a
quartz stone. Found In University
Gardens. Call 378-4127 and Identify.
(L-154-3t-nc)
Found Brown Leather Suitcase with
Initials JRG call 378-8546
(L-2t-155-p)
Lost: Slide rule in brown case. Must
have for finals! Please call 378-0538
ask for Jay. 3EG (L-2t-155-p)
Lost Black female puppy 4 mos. old
lab-looking but floppy answers to
Karma $lO reward pis. call 372-6230
anytime. (L-2t-155-p)

Reitz Union Auditorium
TWO BIG ONES TONIGHT!!
.
BECAUSE THEY'RE YOUNG
With Dick Clark, Michael CaUaa,
Tuesday Weld, Victoria Shaw,
Roberta Shore aad also
Btarri&g James Darren,
Dmaae Rddy aad (he
Rebels
Dick Clark, the idol of teenagers,
plays a high school teacher who
knows his students, likes them all,
and helps with* their many prob problems.
lems. problems. Because Theyre Young goes
beyond football and cheer-leading
into the minds and hearts of young youngsters
sters youngsters growing up. A film about
todays youth and the challenge
they face.
50 s FLICKS
W|W
Miss Bardot plays a French coun-
try girl in London who is para parachuted
chuted parachuted into German-occupied France
to help kidnap an important Ger German
man German general. She drops into France . *. -MSE 'Em'
all rightbut right into the arms "MflUh* Mmk Mmkof
of Mmkof the Gestapo whose chief mistakes r H -d vl WBr'
her for a black marketeer. Re- V **
cruited to work for the Gestapo, L-. E
Brigitte is caught up in a merry- tiE Em
go-round of plot and counter plot ~ E
and the laughs mount top. loud and
funny.

lost <& FOUND
LOST: GOLD BRACELET
mesh-type dangle. Probably lost at
Landmark pool. REWARD. Call
Carol at 372-9764 (L-2t-154-p)
Found canary In vicinity of Law
Center May 31. 378-3609
(L-3t-154-p)
SERVICES
&5583
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone*
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested add
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
aMiliT now i
iNhaaflaarcJl I G p
as A MAI
CALLED HORSE
THE MAGIC
CHRISTIAN gp

STARTS FRIDAY
'OH WHAT
A LOVELY
WAR'
SUMMER MOVIE CLUB
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
12 SHOWS $1.50



WHCN YOU CUP AND
M\ MARKET
Jm/h 4 11IIIUWG re e n Sta mps Pj 11111 ree n Sta mps p K J on this page
lAidhel *'h HSwfiiiSllJLhm with ihii coupon and fupchasi op BliaiSiii
I Crest Tooth Paste <|| Broiler Pans 3 i
| 6.75-oz. size 79 c <| P | 10. (Kxpir.l W.U., Jwn. 1970) || 0 (xp.r M. i... *7O, J LgQ3AUUAj£J£L&i|I
EXTRA EXTRA EXTRA JSSSSIB
! Gillette Super S.S. J| Dr. West Tooth Brushes || Ty-D-80l 2 :
Razor Blades || Med. or Hd. Adult 48 c I Bowl Cleaner <
pkg. of 5,75 or || Plus Three Med. or Hd. each, reg. price 5
pkg. of 10, $ 1.45 II Adult 58 c || 21. I
& 11. (Expires Wed June 1 0 1970)
Sta m G reenSta m ps reenSta m ps E9
BAadadl WITH THU COUPON ANO PUPCHAJi OF WITH TN IS COUPON ANO PU PC NAS OP WITH THIS COUPON ANO PUPCNASI OP
8 Saccharin Tablets || ... i
|Vi gr. 1000,98; V* gr. 1000, 78 If Polident I/s gr. 500's 59*; Mgr. 500's 55* I pkjof So 93" 1 h 1 KZffiQgZCgmlfl
| || P g* ot *KJ, VsJ || each, reg. price jj;
g EXTRA
WITH THIS COUPON AND PUPCNASI OF UttaeMM WITH TH IS COU PO N ANO PU PC HAS lOF WIT HTH IS COUPO NANOPUPCH ASI OF BKwiiM
I Pristeen Feminine || Regular, Menthol or < | M 0 TbJ
Deodorant || Lemon-Lime Gillette Foamy ||| Mildew Disk
2!/2-oz. size $ 1.29 i| 11-oz. can 99 c <[| each, reg. price J
3- (Expires Wed June 10, 1970) 2$ 13. (Expires Wed., June 10, 1970) o jjl 23. (Expires Wed., June
EXTRA EXTRA F'Hlf T. Y.Y o EXTRA *"
WITH THIS COUPON ANO PUPCNASI OF HfelMpdH EhMbLm WITH TH IS COU PON ANO PU PC HAS IOP WITH THIS COUPON ANO PU PC H ASP OF
12$ .2$ 2 BfTrtyjyjfgf^^iiirw'T '-lit-
Arlnrn Acct UnSr Cnrnu 11 AnOCin Carbona
Adorn Asst. Hair Spray || Tab|ets 3; Shampoozer HBltQu£Hfl
n.7 rnnM7o <1 bot. of 100, $ 1.29 3| bottle, reg. price 3 I f 5
reenSta mps W G reenSta mps 1111 G reenSta mps bWhS
I DippHy-Do Setting Lotion ij| 6-12 Brand II L f^ r |
Oippity-Do Setting OeTs-oz. 99*! j '%!£' V JM
I ~*'i~, *' i ~ lip ; nnnnnn nj?r ifi(inn n nnnnnf]n^n-r^nrihnr 1 *****
EXTRA o EXTRA EXTRA Bs |
|> Breck Asst. Liquid Shampoo ;jj> Any Size Package Any Pair
| 3/2-oz. size 59 c or 31 BAND-AID Bandages Rubber Gloves
| 7-oz. 93* || reg. price each pair, reg. price 1 T
l *' (i.pir*. W.d., Jun. 1970) <{|3 16. (fxpir. W.A., J... 1*70) 26 (Ixpir.i W.d., (
EXTRA EXTRA PP^^BF^TTl 1 EXTRA TP^ !R!^Si
Stamps
Mavis or D'jer Kiss Johnson's Baby Powder ;| ; A T^|
Talcum Powder 9-oz. 75* or : I *1 or more ;
I 10-oz. can 59* 14-0Z.99* ;| of any Candies ; A
> T < b IT w aS 27 (Kxpire* Wed., Jwee V#, 1970) < :
' (Expires Wmd., June I#, 1170) (fxpsre* Wed., ieee 10, 1970) 9 |P
ilillUwGreen"aamiis[iriTn*iWGree T naamps^iriTiUv ISolarcaine Medication |l Johnson's Baby Oil If I
3-oz. liquid *1.29 or 1; 4-oz. 69* or If M ormoreof (dTlTm
4-oz. spray $ 1.79 1; 10-oz. $1.19 || any Glassware I B^nUaMi

SeotSkflrand il Q-Tips Cotton Swabs || 1
v V i!? 1 II 54's 33 c 88's 49 c 11 $ 1 or more of 1 A
Sun Tan Lotion If 5^ s Tz 'f 21 flnw E mnir(l | § T § M
r ftr ; f A li 125 s, 69*; 170 s, 79 e If any Empire Brushes I m 1 m J
*. . If j. n uxoi^w^^j..^ nnnnnnn 1!. rn r 1

Thursday, June 4,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

:, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 4,1970

MSbMu-
ODOR CfIUKHONWN!
lie UfFFlft FFATIIRF
lU WW La I* w I Lfl I Ullfc
[ ( JA MR p,ECt
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I I Mj| (With purchases of $3, you may buy 1 piece;
£1 II | w ith purchases $6, 2 pieces, etc.)
jssic txreen
JNKRWARE
1 Al AAA A J* AA AA AAA
-| j|j§ &pf tjf/ Tasty Fresh or Smoked Deliciously Different Mershmellew
I Liverwurst 99* Delight . 49*
Delicious Sliced Fresh Zesty Flavored
jr BAISmL I jkjaf AOC Cldnaff 9Ac
P ieotood Tree*, Testy Fresh rVllDll WY lb. eD %VIV 9IHW lb. 99
rJm Grouper Fillets 89 C To#t y Lm Sliced Delicious Sandwich Special,
§)£ smaiTshTimp " 89' Cooked Ham ib!' 89* Roast Beef 59*
F We reserve |
Ithe1 the to | I
markets a
" £, J|
Armour's Star MiraCura
,.h >. 0 Sliced Bacon ..... T9*
Pl*H ImOCI*" *b- 9Tr Ternew's Testy Sliced 5 os. 1001.
Fresh Lean Meaty g c Bologna 29* 49* 69 Jmt
>-' "£*-
Smoked Daisies .... 99* Im .^
Link Sausage P k 65* Swift's Premium Frozen Boneless
Swift's Premium Wafer-Thin Assorted Light & Dark Meat Mixed 2 _, b Jfekl
Sliced Meats .... X 35* Turkey Roast.... .* *2 Mj|<,.... vttwHLA*d.-.4V'-
(Plus 100 Extra S&H Green Stamps with coupon) i.
i f L y) SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
J Iroleri inspected heavy western beef sale
ml rVA LrJH London Broil .- $ 1 39
J Chuck Steak 89
F)||ff Regular All Dishwasher All Cold Water Wisk Liquid Lux liquid Lux Toilet Liquid Dove
All Deteraent Detergent Detergent Liquid All Detergent Detergent Soap For dishes
gt. pkg. 89c 51 et. pkg. 83c 20 oi. pkg. 45c qt.bt. 83c Quart hat. 85c Giant bat. 63c 3reg. bars 35c Quart bat 63c
i^JLmmam" '" " A" i



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racial Tissue P k 9. 19* r~M..,ciab 1 30 c |^J
Tomato Juke \.r 29 Jr~ ,t 15 ~, A IgM oi.mTiaol
uvi... .. w .-. M. Margarine \Z 45= Cottage Cheese 69' EBBoR I
Hunt's Spinach ... 3 49*
SAVE *C, Stokoly T..ty Deiri-rre.b Wlscansle Cheese Bar Mild I without coupon, 89#
Fordhook Limas /i 29* Sour Cream ,;; 23 c Longhorn Cheese * 98 c 9 .#, ,07., |
mu *" (71a. SO Extra SAH Orean Stamp, with caapae) hiMjuo-iLiLwwwwiw. ...... na... ui.lwwiJl
SAVE Ac. Stokely Cut 11 '' I puyu g^ TRA pp_
Green Beans 5 $ l ....cm.. u [llllM^GreenStanips
SAVE 4c, Stokoly Vnu| JO JJ AmA aiont KOC limJ wnimicNnsMirsMs.iiw Sug|
Shellie Beans 5 *1 Tide Detergent. ..... 59
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Green Beans Apple SdUCe .3 $ l !? 1
A Root Tasty Treat, Stokoly H XAAAAAAAAAnnnaaAAn'WAAAaAAASbASMUMMMUbJc
££= K ~** '; caSde. Dm@9pH
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SAVI 10c, Hunts With Onions, Mushrooms, or Cheese June lU, IV/U. j _ JH £ Breuded Shrimp I
Tomato Sauce ..e. 3 " 39* 9ICIICIGr i 3l v4 l b.pk i .si.6 9 1
W U RU cans UT .31. (Expires Wed.. Jane 10, 1070) I
SAVE 10, Hunt's Rick Thick SAVE 10c, Richer, Thicker, Hunt's XMMAAMMMMMdMMMMAMMMMM
!rr2? * Tomato Ketchup :39' ffilil^sreVnsi.mpsF!
Vienna Sausage ... 4::: $ l luJ/S ~ *_ jT T"7"V "5
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Low Cost 1 .2 j
Cookery ttujg WeSSOH Oil XT 49* nnri " cxtra s^|
SAVE 10c, LykosJ'lavorful Corned ||^lJ^lJ I^ WGf66ll St3 fTIPS
Beef Hash 3 v.:: $ l i j
Borden's Cre mom |
jar 79c |
J (Expires Jane 1970) S
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IWft IWua Lone plastic as| > u |.
GALLON TT STMT t"iHA w"m
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Potatoes 2Q~.99< s 29' |r. :r, 1
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PUBLIXrt
1 GAINESVILLE MALL GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER pSiEll
liff.b..y C.ral Wblt. 2*30 N.W. 13* SltMt 10)4 N. Mein Sne S 7
smA. 3 WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER M u fc .F*-sat
W. University Avenue at 34rti Street

Thursday, Juna 4.1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



I, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, Juna 4,1970

Page 20

Law Students Business Boosts Grocers Profits

By PATSY TRUBOW
Alligator Cormpondant
One of the happiest men
around when the new Spessard
Holland Law Center opened up
about a year ago was the owner
of the small grocery store across
the street.
Wilbert Langston, owner of
Fanelli and Edwards Market,
said, The law students made
me. The first year I was here my
family and I were putting in 24
hours a day and we only cleared
$3,100.
I ATE BEANS for a long
time.
Langston hung on to the
grocery store because he knew
the new law complex would
open soon and figured they
would receive a lot of business
from the students.
His hunch paid off. Before the
school opened he had between
300 and 400 customers a day.
He now gets about a thousand.
STUDENTS COME over when
they have a few hours off to get
soda, candy, cigarettes, etc. At
noon the grocer sells around 200
sandwiches. Langston has picnic
tables outside his store so
customers may eat lunch under
the trees.
The boys have been
exceptionally nice to me and I
think I know an awful lot c r

State Supreme Court
Widens Gideon Rule
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The state supreme court broadened its
application of the famed Gideon decision Wednesday to require that
indigent defendants charged with serious misdemeanors be entitled to
court-appointed lawyers.
The ruling was made in a 4-3 decision in which the minority
contended the right to an attorney should be applied to any penniless
defendant who is charged with a misdemeanor or violation of ah
ordinance which could result in the imposition of any jail sentence.
But the majority opinion, written by Justice B. K. Roberts,
adopted a 1967 ruling by federal District Judge William O. Mehrons of
Miami that the right to a public defender should be accorded only to
defendants who face charges which could involve jail sentences of
more than six months.
Roberts* majority opinion adopted the language of the Mehrons
ruling that the absolute right to counsel in all criminal prosecutions
must be qualified by practical exigencies, and unless this is done, the
necessities of sound judicial administration would be disregarded and
the administration of justice thrown into senseless chaos.
The court agreed with Mehrons that to carry the absolute right
doctrine of the landmark Gideon vs. Wainwright decision of the U. S.
Supreme Court over from felony cases to misdemeanor cases could
lead to the appointment of counsel for misdemeanors not normally
considered criminal, such as overparking and other petty traffic
offenses, jaywalking, dropping trash upon the sidewalk and like
offenses.
iStudy Rooms Open 1
* If crammings your thing -or if you have to do it and your
:j:j roommate is one of those types who goes to bed by 10, starting g
Friday study rooms will be open all night.
Student Government has arranged to have rooms 109, 12S 8
$ and 127 in little Hall and rooms 227, 229 and 230 in the
Mechanical Engineering Building to be kept open through June
I 12, Secretary of Academic Affairs Gail Merem said. Jjj

Too Many
56,500 lives were lost on
Americas highways in 1969. In
addition, more than 4,700,000
men, women and children were
injured.
More than 40 per cent of
perdestrian deaths in 1969
ocmrrtiA while the pedestrian
crosseu ueiween intersections.
More than 4,040 died and
67300 were injured between
intersections.

them. may not know
everyones name but I know the
face of each one that comes in
here, Langston said.
Customer Gene Eddy, 7AS,
said, Wilbert is very friendly
and open. Half of his friendliness
is business, but the other half is
the sincere down-home type of
friendliness.
IF I LIVED nearby Id buy a
lot of things from him because I
like the idea of patronizing a
small businessman, Eddy said.
In addition to snacks and
lunches, Langston also does a
good business in milk and bread.
His prices are somewhat cheaper
than large grocery stores, and
people often stop by on their
way home in the afternoon to
pick up a loaf of break and a
half-gallon of milk.
Langston got started in the
grocery business because I cant
stand having a boss. I come from
a family where everyone likes to
work for himself.
WHEN HE WAS 17 years old,
Langston received a SI,OOO
wedding present from his father.
Then living in North Carolina,
Langston invested the money in
a grocery store which he sold
when he moved.
After moving to Miami,
Langston worked for Streitman
Biscuit Company for three years.
Shortly after they transferred

Toys Hobbies
Juvenile Furniture
A complete line of swim
goods and playground
equipment.
1319 N.W. 16th Ave.
376-4576 Phone 376-4577

AVERAGES 1,000 CUSTOMERS DAILY

Freshmen and sophomores at the UF should
become aware of the need for developing a parallel
program of academic studies, interests and job
opportunities, Maurice Mayberry, director of the
University Career Planning and Placement Center,
said.
During an interview Wednesday Mayberry said
students begin early in their college careers and
develop long range plans for the future.
WE ATTEMPT to assist students as they develop
themselves and their careers. We counsel them
concerning occupations which are compatible with
their interests and education, he said.
The placement center serves approximately 70
per cent of the graduating class each term and has
increased its operation as the UF has grown from
10,500 in 1953 to the present enrollment of
20,000.

The Council on International
Educational Exchange (CIEE)
announced today it will offer
the International Student
Identity Card and a broad range
of other services to young-
Americans who will study or
travel in Europe during 1970.
The ID card has been issued in
the past by the National Student
Travel Association (NSTA) of
the U. S. National Student
Association (NSA), but NSTA
terminated its operations in
November of 1969. At the 29th
International Student Travel
Conference (ISTC) held in
November in Brussels, the CIEE
was named as the only U. S.
organization to issue these
official student identification
cards.
The ID card entitles the
holder to discounts and student
reductions at some theaters,
concert halls, shops and most
museums in Europe; it also
makes him eligible for the
money-saving services provided
by the national student travel
bureaus in various European
countries intra-European
charter flights, student trains
and buses, low-cost tours and
holiday centers, accommoda accommodations
tions accommodations in student hostels and
meals in student restaurants.
Students will also be able to
book passage through CIEE on
intra-European charter flights,
saving as much as two-thirds of
RENT NOWI
FOR THIS SUMMER AND
SEPTEMBER, 1970
FALL LEASES 9 & 12 MONTH
Faaterlua
1 badrawwt
UppworLMar
FtimMiad
Air Coutfltlonad
9 3 Pools
Raaraation Half
Study Roam
Saa today. Mova right in
VILLAGE PARK
A
FRENCH QUARTER
APTS.
1001 S.W. 16th St.
3MK1771 1

him to Gainesville, he decided to
go back into business for
himself.
The first few years he rented
the property, but once business
improved he was able to buy the
store and land and is now paying
off the mortgage.
IT WILL BE 80 per cent
mine in two years, he said.
Running the store means long

Early Career Planning Essential

European Travel ID Available

hours for him and his family. His
wife, Betty, opens up the store
at 7 ajn. each day. After he
takes their 11-year-old son to
school, Langston comes to the
store, and the two of them work
together until 11 p.m. The son
and 18-year-old daughter help
one hour each afternoon and
eight hours on Saturday.
Once I get the mortgage paid

the regular fare on some routes.
BOTH THE International
Student Identity Card (for
college and undergraduate
students) and the International
Scholar Identity Card (for high
school and other non-university
students) will be sold by CIEE
for SI.OO.
Applicants will be required to
submit proof of full-time

't&tUSes/
t\fT?l~~ Delicious Chocolate-Fudge
\J YL j Brownies
f A Or 3Q
l'^> £ w **
*fa> J _, Assortad Danish Paean
Frui
Strips
"* 69<
IJAMSH BAKERY
Gainesville Mall
Special Orders Call 372-3885
FORESTS CANT

In addition to career planning and placement, the
center publishes job listings for education, business,
and industry.
WEEKLY AND MONTHLY bulletins concerning
job openings are published and sent to registrants on
the active file in the placement office.
Medicine, law, pharmacy and nursing are some
of the areas in which we do not participate to an
indepth degree, said Mayberry.
Literature on 1,500 companies which represent
20,000 careers is available in the centers library.
Students wishing to utilize the services of the
career planning and placement center should make
their wishes known by contacting Mayberry, room
22, ground floor of Reitz Union.
We want to enable students to realize the full
benefits of what they are in terms of career
development and satisfaction, Mayberry said.

off I want to let my wife off and
Ill hire a man to help me. Then
I can work only about eight
hours a day or so, Langstcn
said.
It has been hard but we are
making it. Besides I like the
people that come in here.
And I like working for
myself.

student status and two passport
or automat photos. The ID cards
are valid for one year, beginning
on the first day of the calendar
year, and are renewable.
University of Florida students
may pick up application blanks
for the International Student
I. D. cards at the first and third
floor information desks in Reitz
Union.



"Super-Right" Western Beef Shoulder
TOWELS r
6 PAKI2 oz No Return Bottles BEER Special! T w g
National Bohemian 99H-lIMVJI
Ann Page Brand (Limit 1 w/ $5. or more food order)
Salad Dressing*?39<
Special! Jane Parker
Size 02 49< Tn nwr I' SAVE 20* i
* Coupon you Buy pE/
ClifT DAI 1C |fj| M With this Coupon QQ. Without P\
&ww I ItwLLd JlfM 100 Ct Box j 6-OZ. JAR Coupon $1.19 SK
J Coupon Good Thru June JvK
Jelly, Date or
79 t
jlj With this Coupon when you Buy Im
Bl GLAMALON PANTV HOSE I
111 I VPKIIPI Alir (S With This *)ICiAQ Without W
WATERMELONS 1
Limit I Coupon w/$5 Os more order
ISj With this Coupon when you Buy jf
DAM A MAC I SLAB FOOD STORAGE BAGS |
dANANaj I <£r 27c c rx 1
a (81 Coupon Good Thru June 7, 1970 |B|r I
GOLDEN I|J V I I
I RIPE l\# LB
hmbbhh||P|MMH|lJUX 1 through With this Coupon when you Buy
bhd>x-iaii;l.i***
STAMPS i | STAMPS STAMPS I lf un W * 3 With this Coupon Without H
CYSOL TOILET BOWL fUPgj spray foam pus cleaner flp REG. OR LEMON Hpjppl purchaw any jj PKG. OF 80 Coupon 35c
Cleaner *s? 49c JA> Glory *ss 51.89 JAX Pledge :s 93c JAX jTU-J, J
GOOD THROUGH JUNE 7 e-e-70 GOOD THROUGH JUNE 7 wo GOOD THROUGH JUNE 7 ,^. 70

Thursday, Jum 4,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Juno 4,1970

Abortion: Two Methods Commonly Used

(Reprinted by permission
from The Gainesville Sun)
ByTOMPAWLICK
Detroit News Staff Writer
DETROIT Its supporters
call it abortion the termination
of an unwanted pregnancy.
Its opponents call it killing
children.
STRIP AWAY the words, the
euphemisims on both sides and
what is the reality?
Ive performed two
abortions,* said Dr. Richard V.
Jaynes, an obstetrician obstetriciangynecologist
gynecologist obstetriciangynecologist in private practice
here for 10 years.
Both were accidents
resulting from errors in
diagnosis.
EVERY DOCTOR is bound
to make an error sometime. I
admit mine, he continued.
In one of them, I had no
idea there was a fetus inside the
patients Uterus until I drew out
a detached arm, still moving at
the elbow. Personally, it was one
of the most sickening
experiences Ive had in
practicing medicine, he said.
In standard abortion
procedure however, its normal.
There are two methods
commonly used to destroy an
unborn child -a suction
apparatus procedure used up to
about four weeks after
conception and curretage.
THE SUCTION apparatus
involves the creation of a
powerful vacuum in a tube. The
tube is inserted in the womans
uterus and whats inside is drawn
through it into a bottle.
The vacuum is so powerful

t
Frosh Drive Planned
The Freshman Council, an outlet for freshman problems, is
planning a fall drive for membership.
The organization is open to any freshman who wants to come to
meetings. Officers are selected from those who attend.
This year the group had problems because of little publicity and
funding. They hope if they build up their membership more funds will
be available.
At present, they discuss the problems which face freshmen and
students in general.
'DON7 SWEAT IT!
COME TO THE UNIONS
EXAM
EXTRAVAGANZA
MONDAY:
Camp & Cartoon Capers
on the colonnade
10-12 midnight, bank
The Emergency Exit
on the Terrace
7:00 & 9:30 Cat Ballou 504
in the Auditorium
TUESDAY: 5:30,8:00, 10:30 Alice in
Wonderland, The Back Basement band
7:00 & 9:30 The Caine Mutiny 504
WEDNESDAY 9-10 p.m. Camp & Cartoon Capers
7:00 & 9:30, The Birds 504

sometimes advertising is the only way to get published

1 itick
A roughly spoon-shaped instrument called the curette, about 10 inches long and
with sharp edges is inserted into the uterus. The child inside is cut into pieces and pulled
or scooped out limb by limb, Dr. Jaynes said.
In order for the members to be removed, of course, the doctor must stretch the
uterine opening. It isnt dilating of its own accord as it would in a normal birth.
It can't be stretched too far, however, and in order to pass larger parts like the head,
they must be crushed. Some doctors use a ring forceps.
After a legal abortion, in a hospital, the pieces are sent to the pathology lab for
study. In illegal abortions, the most common practice is to throw the parts in a sinks
garbage disposal.

that the process is almost
instantaneous. You hardle see
the fetus as it zips through the
tube.
After about 10 to 12 weeks,
however, the developing child
has grown too large and solid to
pass through the suction
apparatus. After that point
curretage is generally used, he
continued.
A ROUGHLY spoon-shaped
instrument called the curette,
about 10 inches long and with
sharp edges is inserted into the
uterus. The child inside is cut
into pieces and pulled or
scooped out limb by limb, Dr.
Jaynes said.
In order for the members to
be removed, of course, the
doctor must stretch the uterine
opening. It isnt dilating of its
own accord as it would in a
normal birth.
It cant be stretched too far,
however, and in order to pass
larger parts like the head, they
must be crushed. Some doctors
use a ring forceps.
AFTER A legal abortion, in
a hospital, the pieces are sent to
the pathology lab for study. In

MORE DANGEROUS THAN CHILDBIRTH?

illegal abortions, the most
common practice is to throw the
parts in a sinks garbage disposal.
Curretage is rarely used after
14 weeks of pregnancy. At that
stage of development a
hysterotomy is used as a kind of
abdominal surgery similar to
Caesarean section.
Technically, however, by 24
weeks you have to call it a
premature birth, not an
abortion. There have been
instances where babies bom that
early have survived. I think two
per cent do.
I KNOW personally, in my
own practice, of three babies
bom that early who survived to
live normal lives. In abortion, of
course, the premature child is
not permitted to survive.
As far as the childs
development is concerned it, of
course, varies. No two are alike.
From about two weeks after
conception onwards, the fetus is
in almost constant motion. It
can respond to movements of
stress, a decrease in its oxygen for

V

Hk I I IB 1 II II II

It's fast, but it's casual. Living
with a Spanish accent designed
for you. Nobody else. That's
why every single and
multi-level apartment features:
i Your own private bedroom
Rugged Barcelona furniture
i All electric Kitchen
Central Air
TGIF parties at the pool
and patio
And it all happens the entire
Summer for only $l5O including
utilities. Or rent for September
they're moving fast Only a limited
number of Fall vacancies left

914 SW Bth AYE 378-7224

example, by moving faster. If
you stick a needle into the bag
of water and remove a little
sample fluid and touch the baby
it jumps.
BY EIGHT weeks it has all
its organs, legs, arms, feet,
hands, ears and looks like a
human being. It often sucks its
thumb at this stage.
There is a definite heart
beat. It waves its arms and legs
and, if removed from the uterus,
often struggles to take a breath
into its lungs. It answers all
ordinary criteria for life.
Frequently a
three-month-old fetus removed
from the uterus will struggle for
life as long as two or three
hours.
AT ABOUT five months, or
shortly after, the child is capable
of making feeble cries. They
make them when theyre being
destroyed sometimes.
These obviously, are the
only defense mechanisms an
infant has, visibility and
audibility.
What about the mother in an
abortion operation?

I' I 'i v >' 'v' I v 1 11 H V, I f
I HR
- v ~* I v ; 1 II H t '-'i* *~>? ?
... where things happen fast

AN ABORTION is major
surgery, said Dr. Jaynes. It
requires anesthesia, which is
always somewhat dangerous. But
the most serious danger is that
of hemorrhage. Especially with
curretage you run the risk of
puncturing the uterus.
This is a common accident in
illegal abortions, performed by
men who arent even doctors.
There is also danger of infection,
although thats lessened in legal
abortions performed in a
reputable hospital.
But legal or illegal, statistics
show it is definitely more
dangerous than childbirth to the
mother. To the child of course,
it is the ultimate danger death.
YOU LOSE, irretrievably, a
particular combination *of
genetic possibilities that will
never be repeated. That
combination, the individual, will
never be duplicated. Its a little
like witnessing the extinction of
a unique species.
Dr. Jaynes, a Presbyterian,
was not asked to comment on
the religious implications of
abortion.
He was asked only to relate
facts, corroborated later by
other physicians facts that
may help clarify an emotionally
clouded issue.
Dr. Jaynes, former chief of a
hospital obstetrics department,
is a diplomate of the American
Board of Obstetrics and
Gynecology, a fellow of the
American College of
Gynecologists, and a member of
the Michigan Maternal Mortality
Review Committee.



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STUDYING OUTDOORS

Finals time is here again, and with it, the end of
quarter rush to cram everything into a few days
or maybe hours -of study. This UF coed is

CBS Newsmans
Body Discovered
PHNOM PENH (UPI) A body tentatively identified as that of
correspondent George Syvertsen of CBS was found Wednesday in a
shallow grave near the burnt out jeep in which he and his news team
were riding when they disappeared Sunday.
Five other newsmen traveling in two cars behind Syvertsens jeep
wer? reported to have been taken prisoner by the Communists. But
the bodies of three other men were found with that presumed to be
Syvertsens.
THREE OTHER MEN, including Gerald Miller of CBS, were
believed to have been in the jeep with him when they disappeared.
CBS in New York said that Saigon bureau chief David Miller, who
currently is in Cambodia, made tentative identification of Syvertsens
body from clothes, boots and personal effects.
In New York, the president of CBS news, Richard S. Salant, issued
a statement saying George Syvertsen, it would appear from all
reports, has been killed in Cambodia.
SYVERTSEN, 38, an American, would be the first correspondent
known to have been killed covering the Cambodian campaign. A
number of other correspondents are missing, however, and presumed
by military officials to be prisoners of the Viet Cong.
The five other newsmen reported captured were traveling in two
cars behind Syvertsens jeep Sunday.
The Cambodian driver of a car carrying a National Broadcasting Co.
(NBC) team, including correspondent Welles Hangen, was captured
with the newsmen but escaped Tuesday and rode into Phnom Penh on
a motorbike to report to officials.
THE DRIVER, Chang Yu Leng, 33, said his car was last in a line of
three vehicles carrying correspondents stopped Sunday on Highway 3
near the village of Prey Neuk, 33 miles southwest of Phnom Penh.
The second car behind the jeep with Syvertsen and Miller carried
two other members of the CBS team, Tomoharu Ishii, a cameraman,
and Kajiro Sakai, a sound man.
The others in the NBC car with Leng and Hangen, an American
based in Hong Kong, were Roger Colne, a French cameraman who
lives in Phnom Penh, and Yoshihiko Waku.
AS HE DROVE around a bend Sunday, Leng said, Sakai and Ishii
flagged him down and said they had stopped because of an explosion
and fire in front of them, which appeared to be the jeep. Moments
later, they were surrounded by Viet Cong who took them prisoner, he
said.
The five newsmen were led away and later were fed by the Viet
Cong, Leng said, but he did not see the newsmen after Sunday night.
On Tuesday, he said, Cambodian troops attacked the camp in
which he was being held and the Viet Cong scattered. He fled to a
nearby village where he hitched a ride to Phnom Penh on the
motorbike.

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Soyuz 9 Crew
Ignore Exercise
MOSCOW (UPI) Soviet ground control Wednesday caught the
Soyuz 9 cosmonauts neglecting their exercises in space and ordered
top priority for assigned physical workouts.
Sensitive ground instruments detected the cosmonauts neglect as
visiting U. S. astronaut Neil A. Armstrong raised hopes for
Soviet-American space cooperation.
GESTURING TOWARD cosmonauts Maj. Gen. Georgi Beregovoi
and Konstantin Feoktistov, Armstrong told an audience of Soviet
scientists, I am looking forward to be enabled to meet them again in
space and shake their hands.
The exercise order for the Soyuz 9 crew was reported by the
newspaper Izvestia which said ground control technicians at the
Baikonur cosmodrome noted the level of carbon dioxide a
byproduct of human activity was too low in the spacecraft.
They asked Col. Andiran Nikolayev and engineer Vitaly Sevastianov
why.
THEY SAID they were too busy with other experiments and did
not have time for it, Izvestia said. That brought a terse command
from Baikonur:
Do all your exercises, even at the expense of the experiments.
Since losing the race to the moon the Soviets have pinned their
hopes on being the first to construct a practical and permanent
orbiting laboratory.

Thursday, Jwm4, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 23



Page 24

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 4,1970

j BOOKS
Newsman Tells Story
Os Anchormans Life
The Anchorman, by Ned Calmer
(Doubleday, $6.95)
Veteran newsman and telecaster Ned Calmer has turned out a
probing and fast moving novel of the television news medium.
Televiewers of the nightly news reports will enjoy the look behind the
scenes of the news, at the people who make the news and those who
present it over the air.
Calmers central character is the fictitious networks new news
anchorman a young newscaster raised from a relatively minor job to
become the pivotal point of a news program.
Calmer probes the intrigues in the background of the news program
from advertiser to the White House.
He has set his novel in the year 1968 and dramatically presents
the action of such events as the assassinations of Robert Kennedy and
Martin Luther King and the Miami Beach and Chicago conventions.
The Anchorman is an impressive novel by an impressive newsman.
Patricia E. Davis (UPI)
* #
Exiles, by Michael J. Arlen.
(Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $6.95)
Michael Arlen wrote 14 books, among them The Green Hat, the
epitome of the 1920 s glamour and charm. Soon after his large success
it was the 1930 s and he, like his friend F. Scott Fitzgerald, had been ~
decreed irrelevant.
But he went on living and, for a time, writing, until the mid 19505.
A sad story, it is redeemed by the strength and dignity with which
Arlen met the circumstances of his life and by the love and skill with
which it is told by his son, Michael J. Arlen, a New Yorker writer and
author of The Living Room War, a collection of television criticism.
Exiles is part biography of the Armenian-English Arlen, who
changed his name from Dikran Kouyoumdjian on his publishers
advice, and his wife, Atalanta, daughter of a distinctly Jamesian
American heiress and the Lord Chamberlain of the Greek court. It
also is in part the autobiography of their son who went to school at
St. Pauls and Harvard and envied people who had houses in places
like Greenwich and Old Westbury.
Both as biography and autobiography it is a book of taste and
sensibility.
Peggy Polk (UPI)
* *
Vector, by Henry Sutton
(Bernard Geis, $5.95)
This novel is the latest entry in what might be called the what if
school of fiction. Probably the most famous of the genre was
Fail-Safe, in which the authors posed the question, What if
something happened to the device used to prevent a nuclear-armed
bomber from attacking Russia?
Other examples: What if the president of the United States went
mad? and What if the U. S. military decided to take over the
country?
The basic requirements seem to be that the subject be topical, the
events within the realm of possibility and the likely effect on the
United States disastrous. Unfortunately, characterization and
credibility are necessary only to a minor degree.
Here, Henry Sutton, author of the famed scatological tome, The
Exhibitionist, asks, What if an airplane from an Army chemical
warfare testing center accidentally sprayed nerve gas near a small
Western town?
The answers are for the most part predictable. Sickness. Panic. An
attempted cover-up. But for those who like this sort of thing, the
story moves along nicely and Suttons prose is spare and direct. At
least, hes outgrown his sex obsession.
Joan Hammer (UPI)
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The
Florida
Alligator

Dancer Says Govt Subsidy
Os Art Is A Poor Idea

SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
At a time when artists in all
fields are seeking larger
government subsidies, one of the
worlds best dancers warns the
result may be a perpetual
amateur night.
Erik Bruhn, a director of the
Royal Swedish Ballet and
leading dancer with the
American Ballet Theatre, says
subsidies for the arts can turn
them into an amateurs
paradise.
THE SLIM, 40-year-old
dancer cites Scandinavia both
his native Denmark and Sweden
as examples.
As people have more and

Mixed Media Show
Coming To Constans

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
A show of modem dance with
rock music and film added will
be offered Saturday and Sunday
nights at 8 in the Constans
Theater in the Reitz Union. The
show is called Come Together
and was written and produced
by Steve Reuther, 2UC, and
Tom Stovall, a young man from
St. Petersburg.
IT IS A PLAY without words
and uses many different dance
forms. The Beatles Abbey
Road is used in its entirety as
the background music for the
dances.
In the story one man is
danced by two people Darryl
Schaaf and Stovall to show
the mans indecision between

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more free time because of
automation, the governments in
the social democracies have tried
to make culture into a hobby to
fill it, Bruhn said in an
interview.
In Sweden, if you get
together a group of 12 people in
any field, you can get the
support. The result is an
amateurs paradise.
But the professionals have
got to go. Were a threat to the
system. The governments dont
want the population to have any
problems or worries, so they
discourage any professional
standards in the arts.
BRUHN PREDICTED other

the materialistic world and the
spiritual world.
One of the dancers Cathy
Dandoise is on stage to
symbolize love. Love becomes
the thing that bring both halves
of the undecisive man back
together. Hence, the name. The
final scene the scene in which
the man and the girl get together
has as its background music
the portion of Abbey Road
which says, The love you take
is equal to the love you make.
The production is sponsored
by the Florida Players. The cast
of 15 has been working for
about two months on the show.
The cast includes students from
Florida Presbyterian College and
members of the St. Petersburg
Ballet as well as UF students.

governments in Europe and the
United States will adopt similar
programs in coming decades.
The sandy-haired ballet star
said he had rejected offers to
direct the Royal Ballet in
Denmark because of excessive
governmental supervision and a
corresponding curtailment of
artistic freedom.
But Bruhn, who has retained
his post with the Royal Swedish
Ballet despite his views, said
hopefully that the effect of
subsidies may eventually change.
There should be something
like government-supported
academies where talent can be
discovered and standards set,
he said. But it will be some
years before we reach them.
THE THING thats still
needed in the arts is a driving
force -a single person who can
survive and allow his actors or
dancers to survive. This driving
force doesnt come out of
subsidies.
He said John Cranko, who has
made Germanys Stuttgart Ballet
into one of the worlds top
companies in the past decade, is
an example of what one man
can do if left to himself.
Bruhn, who has danced with
American Ballet Theatre on and
off since 1955, said the United
States is in the midst of a great
period in the arts.
IN HIS OWN field, Bruhn saw
a ballet boom in the United
States at a time when interest in
the dance has reached an
impasse in Europe.
There is still an active ballet
public in London, but elsewhere
in Europe, people seemed
surprised that dancers can still
make a living. But interest in all
forms of dance is booming in
America



The
Florida
Alligator

Harlan And Graves Named
Top Coaches-Of-The-Year

The 1969-70 editions of the
Gator football and swimming
teams strongly reflect the efforts
of their coaches, Ray Graves and
Bill Harlan, and for their efforts
the Alligator sports department
named both coaches to share the
Alligators Coach-of-the-Year
award.
Graves disproved pre-season
COACH GRAVES
... top man

South Stars Picked
Twelve of the top high school basketball players in Florida headline
the South All-Star team named Wednesday for the annual cage battle
with the North, August 1 in Gainesville.
The squad: Bill Butler, Key West; Steve Close, Lake Worth
Leonard; Jerry Dodd, New Port Richey Gulf; Ron Haskell, St.
Petersburg Northeast; Percy Howard, Ft. Lauderdale Dillard; Otis
Johnson, FSU Stuart Martin Co.; Ron Mitchell, Tampa Hillsborough;
Hugh Prentiss, Lake Wales; Tim Thornton, St. Petersburg Lakewood;
Dawn Tonkovich, Hollywood Chaminade; Bob Valibus, Miami Carol
City; Henry White, Fort Pierce Dan McCarty.

Gator Ski Club Opens Doors

The Gator Ski Club is looking
for students interested in
participating in competitive
skiing events.
The club new holds the
Florida Inter-Collegiate Water
Skiing Championship title. But
as Sonny Craddock, competition
skiier in the club points out,
many of those on the team are
graduating, and we have too few
prospects to replace them.
THE SKI CLUB is open to all
students and knowledge of
skiing is not required to join.
Craddock said students can ski
for fun, improve their ability, or
simply learn if they have never
skiied.
Requirements for membership
include a $5 fee and passing a
basic swimming test, which is
Porsche Club's
Gymkhana Set
For June 13 Ih
The central florida region of
the Porsche Club of America is
having a fun gymkhana at noon
on Saturday, June 13. All
Porsche owners and drivers are
invited.
The gymkhana will be held at
tbe UF physical plant packing
lot. There wffl be an entry fee of
* 2 and atae trophies will be
awarded.
A meeting wffl he held
Rowing the event hosted by
Performance.

GATOR SPORTS

football critics and writers by
coaching his 1969-70 Gators to a
remarkable 9-1-1 record and a
14-13 Gator Bowl victory over
Southeastern Conference
champion Tennessee
GRAVES, WHO RETIRED
this year after 10 years as the
Bull Gator to devote full time to
his duties as athletic director,
produced 12 All-Americans and
a Heisman Trophy winner, Steve
Spurrier, in the past decade.
Graves is also the winningest
head football coach in Florida
history with a 10-year chart of
70-314 to his credit.
Harlan also overcame a regular
season defeat by nemesis
Tennessee, to guide the Gator
tankers to this years SEC
Swimming Championship. Since
coming to the UF in 1963,
Harlan has coached the
swimming team to seven out of

given at Florida Pool by the
lifeguard on duty.
All interested persons can
contact the Intramural office in
the Florida Gym, room 134, or
contact any Ski Club member.

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ONLY A FEW APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE AT THIS RATE.
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a
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*
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COACH HARLAN
... shares honors
eight SEC championships.
Harlan, who is a UF graduate,
has coached 24 All-American
swimmers and divers, including
this years Bruce Williams and
Mark McKee, in addition to
numerous All-SEC champions.

Twenty-Five New Getters Chosen

A hectic two months of
applications, tea parties and
interviews ended this week with
the naming of 25 Gator Getters
for the UF athletic department.
Gator Getters are UF coeds
who help promote the athletic
department to the alumni and
other groups, and help recruit
prep athletic talent by escorting
prospects to games, dinners, and
answering any questions about
the university.
THERE IS NO question that
these girls have helped our
recruiting, said Norm Carlson,
assistant athletic director.
Carlson started the program
last year, and was surprised that
80 girls applied. There were 18
girls who were Gator Getters last
year, and this year after having
as many applications, 25 girls
were named.
Thirteen of the girls returned

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Thursday, June 4,1970, The Florida Alligator,

~ yvr!, X OIOIOXvXOI, X vX*Xv
| Intramurals |
Bj StSVS RollClfl
The Intramural Department wrapped things up for this intramural
season by announcing the Orange and Blue League all-campus softball
teams.
The Orange League all-campus team consists of pitcher Bill
Mandeville, PKA; catcher Steve McCain FIJI; first baseman Richard
Rohlwing, SPE; second baseman Bill Meade, SPE; third baseman
Bruce Huff, SN; shortstop A1 Carson, PKA; leftfielder Mike Gordon,
TEP; center fielder Hank Salzler, BTP; shortfielder Rocky Doddridge,
PDT; and rightfielder Jerry Handley, PKT.
THE BLUE LEAGUE all-campus team consists of pitcher Jim
Drake, KA; catcher Buffy Bellanger, DSP; first baseman Miller
Couse, AGR; second baseman Steve Kaufman, XP; third baseman
Robert Reed, XP; shortstop Tim Colbert, AGR; leftfielder Jerry
Stang, DU; centerfielder Lefty Lynn, PKPsi, rightfielder Dan
Lovell, TX; and shortfielder James Wilkerson, TX.
The final Orange League standings in order of finish are Phi Kappa
Alpha 947, Beta Theta Pi 922, Sigma Chi 844, Tau Epsilon Phi
- 843, Sigma Alpha Epsilon B4O, Phi Kappa Tau 744, Sigma Phi
Epsilon 736, Alpha Epsilon Phi 686, Phi Delta Theta 682,
Sigma Nu 677, Delta Tau Delta 665, Alpha Tau Omega 644,
Delta Chi 6Ol, Pi Lambda Phi 593, Lambda Chi Alpha 583,
and Phi Gamma Delta 555.
The final Blue League standings in order of finish are Chi Phi
1133, Delta Upsilon 98 5, Kappa Alpha 951, Theta Chi 863, Pi
Kappa Phi B5O, Tau Kappa Epsilon 670, Alpha Gamma Rho
628, Delta Sigma Phi 551, Phi Kappa Psi 520, Kappa Sigma
484, Sigma Alpha Mu 204, and Sigma Pi 4O.

from last year. They were: Gwen
Jones, independent, Gainesville;
Tammy Bowman, Kappa Delta,
Jacksonville; Linda Burr, Delta
Gamma, Clearwater; Linda
Comparato, Tri-Delt, Titusville;
Beth Graves, Kappa Alpha
Theta, Gainesville; Robin
Keeley, Delta Gamma, Miami;
Sharyn Keller, Tri-Delt,
Titusville; Pamme Miller, Delta
Gamma, Augusta, Ga.; Joan
Pasteris, Delta Gamma, Miami;
Diann Smith, Tri-Delt,
Jacksonville; Pam Turner,
independent, Miami; Ronna
Stahl, Alpha Epsilon Phi, Miami;
Cathy Sudduth, Phi Mu, Miami.
danish pastry 6 t EACH??
WHERE ?
KEN S BAKERY
15 SW 2ND ST.
(Down the street from Penny's)

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Page 25

New Gator Getters are: Sue
Scranton, Tri-Delt, Centralia,
HI.; Mary Ellen Sorenson, Delta
Gamma, Melbourne; Susan
Terry, independent, Gainesville;
Jennifer Craggs, Chi Omega,
Ocala; Brenda Crews, Zeta Tau
Alpha, Live Oak; Donna Dembs,
independent, Sarasota; Debbie
McCallum, Delta Gamma,
Miami; Nancy McLeod, Kappa
Delta, Gainesville; Sharlin
McCabe, Delta Gamma, Miami;
Christy Oetter, Alpha Delta Pi,
Gainesville; Janet Wemple,
Kappa Alpha Theta, Miami; and
Cheryl Connelly, Kappa Delta,
Hollywood.

FREDRTCK
GARDENS
. . now leasing
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave



*

Page 26

i, Th* Florida Alligator. Thuraday, Juna 4,1970

Football Team: Record-Breaking Sophs

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
die eighth of a series that will,
review Gator sports in the
1969-70 season with a look at
the prospects for the 1970-71
season.)
By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Writer
Ah yes, the 1969 football
season, it was a very good year.
Indeed it was. The UF
football team was rated in the
bottom 20 teams in the nation
before the season. The opening
game against Houston was
predicted by most sports polls to
be disasterous for Florida.
THE PUBLICITY man for the
University of Houston had
dubbed the Cougar team as the
greatest football show on
earth. If that was the case the
big top fell in when the
Cougars came to town.
On the third play from
scrimmage John Reaves
unloaded a bomb to Carlos
Alvarez and all hell broke loose.
Complete mayhem broke out in
the stands and on the sidelines.
The lowly Gators had scored
against the preseason pick of the
sports writers fraternity. From
that point on the UF bombarded
the Cougars with one
touchdown after another.
Reaves ended the afternoon with
five TD passes and 341 yards in
total offense. The sophomore
go-go kids of the UF turned in a
performance that would have
made Knute Rockne warm in his
grave. When the gun finally
sounded the tally sheet read, UF
59, Houston 34.
We had the game you dream
of as a coach, said Ray Graves.
THE UF FOOTBALL team,
still floating on cloud nine after
the Houston game, came within
a bulldogs tooth of getting their
plow cleaned by a fired-up
Mississippi State squad. The
State receivers riddled the Gator
secondary for 35 points before
Mike Rich and Alvarez pulled it
out if the file. The game was an
aerial battle between Reaves and
Tcaamr Phan of Miseaesippi
Sta 4% wifii the feckless running
of Rich keeping the State
defenders honest. The UF ran up
582 yards in total offense and
scored 45 points.
UF 21, FSU 6. The third
game of the season was
completely lopsided as the Gator
defense stood like the rock of
Gibralter. FSU quarterback Bill
Cappleman had more Gator
defenders in his backfield than

-% s > JppiMPf^
Bj ;S
PHIL COFC
~TD~ TOMMY DURRANCE
M .SEC'tmottpralM*aMir
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he had running backs. The Gator
defense smothered Cappleman
and the Seminole backs causing
four fumbles and three
interceptions. Defensive captain
Tom Abdelnour said after the
game, It wasnt lack of effort,
but mistakes that hurt us before.
We played today like we should
have played all year.
The counter offense of Tulane
almost overturned the apple
cart. The Gators pulled the game
out of the hat with less than
four minutes left in the contest
when Reaves connected on a
two-point conversion to Alvarez.
Tulane led the game going into
the fourth quarter 17-12, but
the UF bounced back to win it
18-17.
WHEN NORTH CAROLINA
came to Gainesville they would
have been better off to have
remained in their hotel rooms.
Mac Steen, co-captain of the
team said on the night before
the game at Gator Growl that
were going to beat their ass.
How right he was. The Gators
administered a terrible 52-2
shellacking to the hapless
Tarheels.
The Commodores of
Vanderbilt had upset on their
minds when they met the UF
and for the first two quarters it
looked like they might just
accomplish the feat. But Steve
Tannen came to the rescue and
swiped two Vandy passes that
put the UF back into the game
and the super-sophs took over
from there and put the game out
of reach in the fourth quarter.
The Cuban Comet caught two
TD passes and the score board
read at the end of the game UF
41, Vanderbilt 20.
THE NIGHTMARE of Cliff
Hare Stadium became a reality
when the UF played its seventh
game against Auburn. The War
Eagles sunk their talons into the
Gators and never let go. Reaves
threw nine interceptions and the
game ended 38-12, Auburns
favor. Enough said.
Its like kissing your sister,
said Mm Steen after the 13-13
tie with Georgia. Skip Albury
made Hie (day of the game when
he intercepted a Georgia pass on
the UF 2-yd. line and returned it
33 yards. The Gators had an
opportunity to win the contest
but place kicking specialist
Richard Francos boot was wide
of the mark and the Gators
never got another opportunity
to score. The tie was not much
of a consolation for the
humiliating defeat that the

t it
| SK Cheaps? |
: With a little bit of luck and
j: a minimum of injuries, the :j:
Alligator figures the Gators to :j:
j: top the SEC in football next
season. This is how the SEC :j:
standings should look when
its all over, with last seasons !
record in parenthesis. $
£ ¥
j:; 1. Florida (9-1-1) :j:
2. Mississippi (8-3-0) $
§ 3. LSU (9-1-0) 5;
:j: 4. Auburn (8-3-0)
§ 5. Alabama (6-5-0)
6. Tennessee (9-2-0)
* 7. Vanderbilt (4-6-0) J
J 8. Georgia (5-5-1) :j;
: :j 9. Kentucky (2-8-0) §
% 10. Miss. St. (3-7-0) B
* ?
Bulldogs handed Florida in 1968
and it left a bitter taste in
everyones mouth. The only
good thing that came out of the
game was that Reaves broke the
generation-old SEC total offense
mark with 2,240 yds.
The Gators steam-rolled
Kentucky 31-6 in a cockeyed
victory that produced some of
the dirtiest playing witnessed in
the Hot Box of the South in a
long time. The desparate
Wildcats did everything but
throw the cheerleaders at Reaves
in an attempt to stop the Florida
styled blitzkrieg.
IN THE FINAL contest of
the season Miami succumbed to
UFs onslaught 35-16. It was the
same old song as Alvarez snagged
15 of Reaves passes for 235
yards. Miamis quarterback wore
wall-to-wall Ghesquire
throughout most of the battle.
Seeing it only fitting that they
attend the bowl game named
after them the Gators took on
the highly touted Volunteers of
Tennessee Defensive back Mike
Kelleys heroics spelled the
difference in the game as he
scarfed-up a Vol fumble and
rolled into the end zone to put
the UF ahead. Then to add icing
3 pmpwt pllM 3.51
SNEERHVGER PHOTOGRAPHY
101316 W. Univ. Ave. 378-1170

Hertz announces
k
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Hertz announces a new office at:
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Its conveniently located and full of good
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To reserve a car at our new office,
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HERTZ RENT-A-CAR

to the cake Mr. Kelley came up
with a key interception that
smothered the flames of the
Tennessee offense. How sweet it
was. UF 14, Tennessee 13.
With lettermen returning at
every position except four, at
least eight potential
all-conference players, a
sprinkling of promising new
players at just the right
positions, a new head coach with
a championship record, and an
impressive schedule, there ought
to be some midnight oil burned
in a few opponents athletic
departments and some candles
lit in churches in eleven cities..
NEW HEAD COACH Doug
Dickey says that the team has
the half-dozen super players
necessary to form a nucleus, and
about 25 players who should be
able to hold their own. After
that, however, we can get
out-personelled in a hurry. I
think that you need about 35
boys who are capable of starting
for you. My championship teams
have had this. This team is a
little thin in this respect.
With the return of the
All-American combination of
Reaves-to-Alvarez, with the
intimidating presence of Tommy
Durrance and Mike Rich, the
spring discovery of Jim Yanceys
hands and legs at tight-end, with
the wild free-wheeling
linebacking of Mike Kelley, Fred
Abbott and Richard Buchanan,
probably the best trio in the
SEC, the pincer power of
defensive ends Jack Youngblood
and Robert Harrell, the promise
of Willie Jackson with his speed
and sideline to sideline style of
running ...
The Gators will have a few
headaches too. Dickey faces
what is probably the toughest
schedule in a decade with road
games in Alabama, Tennessee
and FSU, an eleventh game with
Duke in Jacksonville, Kentucky
in Tampa, and arch rival Georgia
in Jacksonville, Tangerine
Bowler Richmond, improving
Kentucky, always tough Miami,

the jinx teams from Mississippi
State and North Carolina State,
and last years spoiler Auburn
come to Florida Field. If they
can make it through those
eleven, perhaps a tougher
twelfth opponent will await
them on New Years Day.
k
. aHjl
JF '"npir'
' W* .5 i
§|
|||ffl.
JIM YANCEY
... spring standout
For information on the
Baha'i Faith
Write: 716-311 SW 16th Ave.
or call: 373-1814
or 378-3575
FLORIDA
QUARTERLY
We only did it for you.



Ohio State Rated Best Os The Sixties

THE 1968 Ohio State team,
which swept to a 10-0 record
with 12 sophomores in the
starting lineup on offense and
defense, was named the college
football Team Os The Decade
Wednesday in a pool conducted
by ABC Sports
Writers and broadcasters from
all over the nation, voting on a
64-3-2-1 point basis, picked the
Buckeyes with 870 points over
the 1969 Texas team, which had
658 points. The 1961 Alabama
team (619 points) was third with
the 1962 Southern California
club (576 points) fourth and the
1963 Texas team (432 points)
fifth.
Those five teams were the
only national champions in the
6os to compile perfect records
during the regular season and the
bowl games. The 1966 Notre
Dame national champion team
was unbeaten but was tied by
Michigan State in the famous
10-10 game and the other
champion, Minnesota in 1960,
Alabama in 1964, Michigan
State in 1965 and Southern
California in 1967, were all
beaten.
* *
BILLIE JEAN King of
Berkeley, Calif., and Rosemary
Casals of San Francisco both
were beaten Wednesday in
womens singles quarter-finals of
the SIOO,OOO French Open
Tennis Championships.
Mrs. King was upset after a
fine start, losing to West German
champion Helga Niessen, 2-6,
8-6, 6-1, and Miss Casals went
down as expected to Australias
Margaret Court, the defending
champion, 7-5,6-2.
* *
BIG BILL Hyndman of
Huntingdon Valley, Pa.,
squeezed through to the third
round of the British Amateur
Golf Championships Wednesday
but only after a torrid match
against Scotsman Martin Lygate.
Hyndman dropped a three
hold lead with three to play and
just scraped in to Wednesday
afternoons third round by
winning at the 21st hole."
The 54-year-old American,
last years runnerup and the only
overseas player seeded for the
tournament, came very near to
elimination.

Major League Baseball

AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT. GB
Baltimore 34 IS .694
New York 27 23 ;540 7 -Vi
Washington 23 24 .489 10
Detroit 21 24.467 11
Boston 21 25 .457 11-Vi
Cleveland 18 27 .400 14
W L PCT. GB
Minnesota 31 14 .689
California 31 17 .646 I %
Oakland 25 24 .510 8
City 19 28.404 13
Chicago 18 30 .375 14-V4
_Mflwaukee 15 32 .319 17
I jtttWMf
I Golf Club
STUDfNT MEMKRSHP
three MONTHS FOR $25 + TAX
SKOAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 AIL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 All DAY
For information caff
fl 376-0080
IK iSONWOOU
I Nr MM
UMtWM

Also through to the third
round and playing again
Wednesday was Dale Morey of
High Point, N.C., who had
another easy passage. The
51 -year-old former Walker
Cupper drubbed lan Lambie of
Scotland, 4 and 3.
* *
NIJINSKY, ridden by
champion jockey Lester Piggott,
showed his classic style
Wednesday to win the $223,920
English Derby.
The 11-8 favorite, trained in
Ireland, bred in Canada and
owned by New Jersey
industrialist Charles Englehardt,
made his move three furlongs
out to sweep to a majestic two
and a half lengths victory over
French challenger Gyr.
* *
FRANCIS DALE, president
of the Cincinnati Reds,
Wednesday joined the list of
court witnesses who contended
that the reserve system is an
integral part of organized
baseball.
Dale, also part owner of the
Cincinnati Bengals of the
National Football League and
publisher of the Cincinnati
Inquirer, testified during the
Curt Flood trial that the reserve
system enabled him and his
associates to purchase the
Cincinnati baseball franchise in
1967 because the reserve
system assured us that our
players would stay with the
team.
Dale said that impartial
arbitration, in the case of a
player who couldnt reach a
salary agreement with a team
owner, would be unfair to the
player as well as the owner,
because arbitration would take
into consideration only statistics
without consideration of a
players actual value to the
team.
Four witnesses, including St.
Louis Cardinal General Manager
Bing Devine, who attempted to
trade Flood to Philadelphia
during the off-season, testified
Tuesday that the clause is
necessary for the well-being of
the sport and said that he
exercised the option renewal
clause to force Richie Allen and
Steve Carlton to end their

NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT. GB
Chicago 25 20 .556
New York 25 24.510 2
St. Louis 22 24 .478 3-Yi
Pittsburgh 24 27 .471 4
Philadelphia 20 28 .417 6-V1
Montreal 16 31 .340 10
WEST W L PCT. GB
Cincinnati 37 14 .725
Atlanta 28 19.596 7
Los Angeles 29 20 .592 7
San Francisco 24 27.471 13
Houston 22 29 .431 15
San Diego 23 32 .418 16
jr Have %.
/ Your Generator %
# OVERHAULED Special %
s£sol
IMCUIOIt.
alaciWWlWnty
GENERATOR SERVICE
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARD.
Mon.Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm
378-4011

/ // >/V>K7's S//OK / S

holdouts with the Cardinals this
spring.
* *
THE MANAGER of light
heavyweight challenger Mark
Tessman Tuesday offered Floyd
Patterson SIOO a round to come
to Houston and spar with
Tessman.
Perry Payne, Tessmans
manager, said chances looked
dim of ever getting to fight
Patterson any other way.
Patterson and Tessman were
scheduled to fight twice in April,
but both were postponed
because of injuries to Patterson.
They have argued over money
since and no date has been set.

. -W mi lum I ill i i IIP W Hill
FLORIDA ATHLETIC
BUYS OUT ENTIRE
STOCK OF FAMOUS
DEPARTMENT STORE
IN GEORGIA

MENS M 4 87 PLAIDS
CDHDT I STRIPES,
orUKI SOLIDS
COATS VALUES TO 29.95
MENS A HOW
CAN YOU
SUITS IO GO WRONG
REG 39.95
NATIONALLY 07
ADVERTISED Mm
.. MM HOUNDSTOOTH
H.D. LEE Wm pIAIDS
SLACKS reg 10.50
FLORIDA 302 NW 6 th ST
ATUI FTir "JUST 1 HOCK FROM
" mltllv WVHSITV AVI
& CLOTHING CO I bankamehicarp or mastehcharoel

He wont fight him with the
little gloves on, Payne said of
Patterson. Maybe hell fight
him with the big gloves and the
headgear.
Tessman, 23, is training for a
June 27 title fight with
champion Bob Foster in
Baltimore.
* *
IN THE WORLD Soccer
Championship matches Tuesday
defending champion England
dominated Romania for most of
the play at Guadalajara. But it
took a single goal by Geoff
Hurst in the 65th minute to give
England a 1-0 victory.

Thursday, June 4,1970, Thu Florida AHiftor,

Peru produced a magnificent
comeback from a two-goal
deficit to edge Bulgaria 3-2 at
Leon. The Peruvian heroes were
Alberto Gallardo, Hector
Chumpitaz, and Teofilo Cubillas
after Dinko Dermendjiev and
Khristo Bonev had given
Bulgaria what looked like an
insurmountable lead.
Uruguay beat Israel 2-0 on
goals by lido Maneiro and Juan
All games were virtually free
of incident as coaches and
players were apparently fearful
of warnings that offenders
would be severely dealt with.

Page 27



Page 28

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, Juno 4,1970

FOOTBALL INFORMATION 1970
r V
HOW DO I OBTAIN A FOOTBALL TICKET?
1.
Student football season cards will be sold to five (5) home games played in Gainesville for $5.00. All students will be given the
opportunity to purchase the season card fjrior to the time they pay their student fees for the fall quarter with a deadline of
1970,* thereafter, all remaining seats on the east side of the stadium will be sold at the regular reserved ticket price of $7.00.
* Note that it is not necessary to have a validated Academic Fee Card in order to purchase a student season football card, but a
validated fee card will be required at the time of ticket pick-up.
A mail-out will be made to all students making application to the 1970 fall quarter. Upon return of the season card and remittance, the
card will be validated by the Athletic Department and returned to the student. Students will be responsible for correct mailing address.
* Also note that it will be necessary for all women students who anticipate dates for the 1970 Football Season to personally
purchase a student season football card in order to be able to sit with her date.
2.
Married Students 2,000 season spouse ticket books @ $3.00 per seat for five (5) home games played in Gainesville for a total of $15.00
will be sold in accordance with the dates and schedules above on a first-come first-served basis with a deadline of Aug. 30,1970.
Special season spouse tickets may be purchased by mail by sending the validated (paid) fee card and validated (paid) student season ticket
and a check, money-order, BankAmericard or Master Charge card for $15.50 to the Athletic Ticket Office, P. O. Box 14485, Gainesville,
Florida 32601, before August 30, 1970. No orders will be accepted after August 30, 1970.
3
Priority for student guest tickets at $7 each on an individual game basis depending on number of student season cards sold.
Mississippi State Sept. 19, 1970 2:00 P.M. Florida Field
Ten ticket windows will be opened at Gate 13, East side of the stadium, beginning September 16 through September 18, 1970, during the
hours of 10 A.M. to 8 P.M., for the purpose of picking up tickets for bloc seating and independent student seating.
The following schedule will govern the dispensing of tickets for the remainder of the home games A limited number of tickets will be
available for each home game @ $7.00 each for guests and students who did not purchase season ticket cards. These tickets can be
purchased at Gate 13 at the same time as the tickets are picked up by independent students.

NhorthjCarolirgjState^Octotw
INDEPENDENTS:
September 28 10:00 A.M. 8:00 P.M. Gate 13
September 29 10:00 A.M. 8:00 P.M. Gate 13
BLOC SEATING:
September 28 9:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. Turn in requests
September 30 9:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. Pick up seating
assignments
Richmond October 17. 1970 2:00 P.M. Florida Field
INDEPENDENTS: 2 JS
October 12 10:00 A.M. 8:00 P.M. Gate 13
October 13 10:00 A.M. 8:00 P.M. Gate 13
BLOC SEATING:
October 12 9:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. Turn in requests
Octoberl4 9:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. Pick up seating
assignments

4.
'l*' 1 ..
Student Tickets for home games played on Neutral sites will be at 1/2 the negotiated contract price in effect at the time of the game
(1970 Duke and Georgia @ $3.50)
DEADLINE FOR STUDENT SEASON TICKET CARDS: AUGUST 30, 1970

U? A e. M~-
SFtCIfN. IrtVTAUCTioas

Auburn October 31. 1970 2:00 P.M. Florida Field
INDEPENDENTS:
October 26 10:00 A.M. 8:00 P.M. Gate 13
October 27 10:00 A.M. 8:00 P.M. Gate 13
BLOC SEATING:
October 26 9:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. Turn in requests
October 28 9:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. Pick up seating
assignments
Miami November 28. 1970 2:00 P.M. Florida Field
INDEPENDENTS- h """ fV ' ri r .
November 23 10:00 A.M. 8:00 P.M. Gate 13
November 24 10:00 A.M. 8:00 P.M. Gate 13
BLOC SEATING:
November 23 9:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. Turn in requests
November 25 9:00 A.M. 5:00 P.M. Pick up seating
assignments

y*
IWivEsi+y of FLoftidAv'TO
S+odwaf fbotUll Season Cm?d
M**r
soo*l Sttrd fJo.
*5
VlitOAViMi
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