Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
All A*wum

Vol. 62, No. 153

ODK Advertisement In Gator Draws Attacks

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Assignments Editor
Attacks and hasty explanations were the result of
a paid advertisement for course and teacher
evaluation which appeared in Mondays Alligator.
The ad asked Why is it were never asked to
evaluate the teachers we think need it most?
BECAUSE THEY wont let us, the ad
answered.
It went on to explain that Omicron Delta Kappa

O 'CONNELL REQUESTS ANSWER
NCAA Head Asked
About UF Probation

By CRAIG GOLDWYN
Alligator Sports Editor
*
National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) President
Walter Byers has been asked in a
letter by UF President Stephen
C. OConnell to inform the
public whether the UF is under
investigation for irregular
practices surrounding the hiring
of new football coach Doug
Dickey.
OConnell explained that he
had first heard about the
JKirk Facing
pssues Tonight|
fOn Dialogue!
j:| Gov. Claude Kirk will be :j
Â¥ featured on WRUFs Dialogue
§ show tonight at 11:05. j:
Â¥ The governor will, if it can j:
jj: be arranged, take questions :
over the telephone from :
? students. :
: Kirk will speak on campus :
5 disorders and a wide variety :
j of issues, according to :
| Dialogue Director Bob |i
jt Moore. j:
| Kirk will be in Gainesville j:
: tomorrow to speak at a j:
j: Florida Blue Key Banquet. If j:
conditions do not permit, the :j
program will be carried on :j.
£ tape. |
'WVVMW+fMVVVVWMW.W.WAV.vSi
AN IFC delegation plans to
oppose the removing of the
ad valorem tax exemption for
fraternities .page 2
ciifM 8
Editorials... 6
L.... 7
Small Society 7
Sports..-. 11

The
Florida Alligator

investigation from a sports
writer, and as yet no official
word has come from Byers
office.
ALL OF THIS is
unfortunate, OConnell said,
for it leaves this university in
the position of having a sports
writer stating unequivocably
that an investigation is in
progress and other news media
stating that your office will
neither confirm nor deny it.
OConnell claims
Southeastern Conference
Commissioner Tonto Coleman
knows nothing of an

Change Seen For Homecoming

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writar
Changes are being made in the
traditional plans for
Homecoming 7O, Oct. 30-31.
Jeff Warren, newly-appointed
chairman, said he is using new
avenues to improve homecoming
and make it more relevant to the
student and alumni.
SO FAR, Warren has used a
committee of presidents of
major campus organizations to
make recommendations, as well
as the Dialogue program last
Tuesday night when many
students phoned in suggestions.
Changes that have been
accepted are:
The elimination of house
and dorm decorations. In the
past, students have been
overworked during the
festivities. Warren is suggesting
that the houses and dorms put
their efforts into parade floats
and use them as decorations
afterward.
Expand a Saturday night
dance for married, foreign, and
independent students who
otherwise would have nowhere
to go.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

IRATE TEACHERS COMPLAIN

(ODK) will evaluate the included list of 313
professors who still have not acquiesced to
participate out of class.
ODK is the group which is conducting the
evaluation program and which sponsored the ad.
The problem centers around three things,
according to Co-Chairman Doug Shachtman.
A few members of the faculty, who had
volunteered for the in-class evaluation, were listed in
the ad through a clerical error. These people were
Father John McCullen, Clementine White, Ellen

investigation. He said Byers aide
Arthur Bergstrom said that while
a complaint had been filed, no
inquest was in progress.
OConnell said the UF would
welcome an investigation by the
NCAA.
BUDDY MARTIN, sports
editor of the Cocoa Today
newspaper, originated the rumor
of an investigation last week in a
copyrighted article. He said his
source was unimpeachable.
OConnell said in his letter
that there was a need to place
the matter on a factual basis,
something only Byers could do.

Use females in major
positions. This year three
women have been appointed to
the staff: Barbara Griffin,
assistant general chairman;
Sherri Cox, publicity director;
and Jacquelyn Bolling, chairman

UF Senates Consider Black
Student Union Proposals

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
University and Student senators moved in unison
last week to consider a list of proposals from the
Black Student Union j(BSU).
The proposals called for admissions and financial
aid for blacks to be handled solely by the office of
Minority Affairs, for hiring of blacks in several
academic and administrative posts, and for a raise in
salary for the director of minority affairs.
THE UNIVERSITY SENATE elected a seven
member ad hoc committee Thursday to consider the
BSU proposals along with another list of suggestions
presented by Dr. Lyle McAlister.
Members included Dr. John Baxter, Dr. Benjamin
Barger, Dr. John Dunkle, Dr. Luther Hammond, Dr.
John Mahon, Dr. Robert Marcus and John J.

Zinner, Frank Taylor and A. M. Bums.
We apologize for those persons erroneously
included, Shachtman said.
The lead-in paragraph to the list of names,
which said The following teachers still have not
acquiesced to participate in Teacher Evaluation,
was slipped in through error in submitting the ad
to the Alligator, Shachtman said.
Alligator Advertising Manager Kerry Dupree said
the material given to him was placed in the ad.
(SEE 'ERROR' PAGE 2)

w mWKr
J iff
w ; < E>?
jUI yin
EB miji.
#?!it p#. nf* /^-
r **.-.. ,< mm vsshk^;.
i mm## '*
Hr A jlr Hf. 9E
aSSS^-x^:
K
flpP r iPp §§
f : ;,!: : ; : : '& f 's* vyv&sM
mfammm 1 Br
fl
w
BUBBLES TOGETHER T KENNE Y
All ages came together Sunday on the UF drill field celebrating
"Come Together Day." Despite threatening rain, 1,000 blacks and
whites of the community joined in the activities. While parents
mingled and talked the issues, children mingled with UF students and
blew bubbles.

of the slogan contest.
Traditionally, there has been a
women executive secretary. This
year Debbie Amos was selected.
Several major and minor
positions on the staff have been

Nattress, according to Senate Secretary Ann Jones.
The committee was charged with investigating the
recommendations, using public hearings if
necessary, and reporting back to the senate as soon
as possible.
THE STUDENT SENATE approved a resolution
to consider the proposals Tuesday night, sending the
list to the Student Rights Committee.
Senators Mike Hittleman, Gary Woldenberg and
Geoffery Burdick introduced the measure as a
resolution to support the proposals.
After lengthy discussion, the resolution was
passed 354 in amended form, saying the Student
Senate would consider them.
THE STUDENT RIGHTS Committee will
probably report back to the senate early in the
(SEE 'BSU'PAGE 2)

Tuesday, June 2, 1970

given to non-politically affiliated
persons.
Other recommendations are
still being considered.
THERE IS also a need for
(SEE 'INTERACTION' PAGE 2)



!, The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Juna 2,1970

Page 2

Infirmary Can Copej
| With Minor Injuries |
Too many students are going to the Shands Teaching Hospital jj
j I emergency room after hours with injuries as minor as a splinter jj
i | in the finger, according to Valorie Ayer, administrative assistant jj
; | at the UF infirmary. j
jjj Students are strongly urged to check with the nurse on duty j:
jj! at the infirmary before going to the emergency room between j
j| the hours of 11:30 p jn. and 7:30 a.m. Mrs. Ayer said. i
ij
5j ONLY MAJOR injuries, such as broken bones, should be jj
j j taken directly to the emergency room, she said. ij
A / jj
x When a patient goes directly to the emergency room without :j
ij: checking through the infirmary, he is given a series of laboratory ij
§ tests which he will be billed for later.
f _____ \
X The on-duty nurse can get these tests waived, eliminate :j
ij: time-consuming paperwork at the emergency room, and often jj
jij: deal with the problem without sending the patient to the jj
j:j hospital, according to Mrs. Ayer. ;
:$ j:j
Students Alumni
Interaction Needed

PAGE ONE^j
interested people to work on
homecoming over the summer
quarter.
According to Warren,
Homecoming 7O will be a good
time to approach alumni with
the problems of the UF.
Football games are a good
rallying point for the students to
get at the alumni, he said.
Students should make the
effort to show the alumni UFs
problems in funding, building,
and academics.
STUDENT BODY President
Steve Uhlfelder wanted to see
homecoming changed either to
be geared more to the student or
eliminated.
He cited the proposal to
change a general admission to
Gator Growl. I would be
against anything but a nominal
charge for the students,
Uhlfelder said.
We could raise money from
the alumni and general public
for an Endowment Fund, he
said.
ONLY $5,000 of the $30,000
Swimmers Welcome
TORONTO (UPI) Pollution
control and new sewers have
cleaned the water off Torontos
West End beaches to such a
degree that for the first time in
10 years, signs warning
swimmers away will not have to
be put up this summer.
In the last five years the city
has spent 154 million on sewer
reconstruction. Pollution
controls also have been in force
on the Humber River.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.
THE QUARTERLY IS HERE

budget comes from Student
Government all of which goes
into Gator Growl. The rest of
the funding is provided by the
Alumni Association and
contributions.
I think a relevant theme for
homecoming is necessary,
Uhlfelder said. Something like
Financial Crisis at UF.
He cited the state elections in
November, only a few days after
homecoming here.
I THINK the students will
make an attempt to change the
attitudes of the people that
come, he said.
This will benefit the
students power in getting the
vote.
To cut out everything now
just to show up the Athletic
Association, he said, wouldnt
be right.

Error In Ad Submittance Claimed

PAGe"qNe||
The sentence in question was on the copy and
not marked to be deleted, so we included it,
Dupree said.
One list was used in sending out invitations to
participate in the evaluation program and another
was used in making out the ad.
This led to some instructors being listed in the ad
who had not received notification of the program.
In a letter to the Alligator, the English Graduate
Student Association Executive Committee said
approximately 50 of the 80 CEH teachers listed are
graduate students who have never at any time been
asked to request their evaluation.
Yet these graduate students have been publicly
and prominently named as being among those
faculty members who need evaluation most, as
those who wont let us ... in the classroom, and as
those who refused and still have not acquiesced to

TAX BREAK IN DANGER
IFC To Oppos Stot Bill

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
An Interfratemity Council
(IFC) delegation probably will
go to Tallahassee this week to
oppose a state bill removing the
ad valorem tax exemption from
fraternal organizations, IFC
President Charles Brackins said
Monday
I imagine some of us will be
going up there later this week.
Well try to get as large a
delegation as we can, Brackins
said.
THE BILL, which has already
passed the house, provides for
the taxing of property belonging
to religious, charitable,
educational and fraternal
organizations, if used for
commercial purposes.
An amendment was added to
the bill in the Senate Ways and
Means Committee allowing the
county commission to rule of
the exemptions. According to
IFC Executive Vice President
Miles Wilkins, legislators
sympathetic to the fraternities
plight feel this would almost
certainly guarantee a continuing
exemption for fraternities.
Rep. Kenneth Mac Kay,
D-Ocala and a co-sponsor of the

BSU Demands Considered

PAGE OWE^j
summer quarter, according to Senator Doug Jewett.
The BSU proposals included the following:
Office of.Minority Affairs shall recruit, admit
and obtain financial aid for all students gaining
entrance solely at the discretion of its director, Mr.
Roy Mitchell.
Raise Mitchells salary to $20,000,
recognizing his importance as a black
administrator.
§ Hire a black administrator in the Office of
Academic Affairs to coordinate recruiting of black
faculty.

I GOOD TUESDAY ONLY
( Kntuckif FHd Cki token I
214 N.W. 13th st. m
m 376-6472 114 S.W. 34th St.
g JKSSB3BSF~I 372-3649
DINNER (j(jM
3 Pc. Chicken w
I Mashed Potatoes L 25 'M
Sla^ and BRING COUPON I

bill, said the bill is heavily biased
in favor of fraternities and
sororities and there is no reason
for these organizations to fear it.
THERE IS a special clause in
the bill exempting all fraternities
which a university president
deems essential to the f
educational process, Mac Kay
said.
Mac Kay explained this meant
that as long as a fraternity is in
good standing with a university,,
there should be no problems.
Other organizations affected
by the bill have strongly
expressed dissatisfaction with
the special treatment afforded
; fraternities, he said.
, I THINK the IFC would be
well advised to call Sen. Robert
Saunders and other senate
members and urge them to keep
i this provision in the senate
[ version, Mac Kay said.
i Brackins later said he doubted
that the IFC delegation could
kill the bill and that the group
probably would concentrate on
keeping the clause in the senate
version.
We are still unhappy with
I the bill, even with the clause in
it, because it puts fraternities
, completely at the mercy of the
university, Brackins

participate in Teacher Evaluation.
The majority of complaints have centered around
the fact that many of the people listed were not
contacted about the evaluation, Shachtman said.
Journalism Instructor Robert Thomas said he was
not aware of the program.
Now that I am aware of it, Ill go ahead and take
part, he said.
Biology Instructor Charles Harper, a graduate
assistant, said he had not at any time this year
(been) invited to be evaluated.
Last year when I asked to be evaluated, no one
from ODK ever showed up. I have made my own
evaluation forms, since ODK forms are apparently
unavailable to me and my class, Harper said.
Shachtman said if the teachers calling in are as
favorable to evaluation as they claim to be, then
they should be calling in to participate. Those
teachers who are not being evaluated may not be
the ones who need it the most, but then, we wont
know unless theyre evaluated, will we?

Develop a relevant black studies program
leading to a degree, staffed with black scholars.
Hold more black events on campus, including
an annual Black Week.
Eliminate racist hiring and promotion
procedures cited in HEWs March 19 report on UF.
Hire a black assistant manager in personnel.
9 Name buildings and campus structures after
black men and women, beginning with new
structures.
9 Withdraw campus recognition immediately
from all sororities and fraternities having racist
policies.
9 Recruit more black athletes and hire blacks as
coaches in the athletic department.

commented. We would prefer
to avoid that situation.
MACKAY DENIED there was
any antagonism toward
fraternities in the bill, saying
instead it recognizes the reasons
to treat sororities and
fraternities differently.
If nothing else, these
organizations serve a housing
function that the state would
rather not assume, Mac Kay
said.
He added he also recognized
the distinction between the
ability of fraternities to pay the
tax and the ability of such
organizations as the American
Legion and the Elks.
STUDENT BODY President
Steve Uhlfelder said he voiced
his objections to the bill during
his visit to Tallahassee last week.
I will continue to do every
thing I can to avoid it. If it is
passed I will go before the
Alachua County Commission to
further seek the exemption, he
added.
Panhellenic President Leslie
Lott said only one sorority,
Kappa Alpha Theta, would be
affected by the bill. She did not
know if that sorority planned to
include a representative in the
IFC delegation.

RENT NOW!
FOR THIS SUMMER AND
SEPTEMBER, 1970
FALL LEASES 9 & 12 MONTH
Featuring
§ 2 bedrooms
Upper or Lower
Furnished
Air Conditioned
3 Pools
Recreation Hall
Study Room
See today. Move right in
VILLAGE PARK
A
FRENCH QUARTER
APTS.
1001 S.W. 16th St.
i 378-3771



Glick To Answer On Super Show Loss

By JIM DAVIS
Alligator Writer
The Student Senate tonight
will ask Marc Glick, Super Show
executive producer, to explain
why the production lost a
possible $24,000.
The meeting is scheduled for
7:30 pjn. in Reitz Union, room
349.
GLICK WILL be asked how
much money the show lost,
according to Majqrity Floor
Leader Bill Gilmore.

ft AAA
v ;
I* ~ %
> Froks Security Inadequate ? I

f
:| By RICK ROSKOWE
I; Alligator Staff Writer
I
j I think there were a lot more people there
:j: (Janis Joplin concert) than bought tickets,*'
Charlie Brackins, Interfratemity Council
:! president, said.
$ Brackins said, At best we broke even. He
>: said it would be a couple of months before a
:j: financial statement could be released.
:j| We went way, way over our technical
>: budget because equipment was set up on
$ Florida Field and then again inside Florida Gym,
Brackins said.
j
:j: The show was transferred because of rain.
: We had a big problem with security,
: Brackins said. It wasnt ROTCs fault.

Lemonade Lucy
CHICAGO (UPI) The wife
of President Rutherford B.
Hayes was known as Lemonade
Lucy because she refused to
permit drinking or serving
alcoholic beverages in the White
House while she was First Lady,
says the World Book
Encyclopedia.

I
It's fast, but it's casual. Living
with a Spanish accent designed
for you. Nobody else. That's
why every single and s^srf
multi level apartment features: \: 7':-o.jC*; O^y*-
Your own private bedroom
Rugged Barcelona furniture ..S' f #*
All electric Kitchen
Central Air
TGIF parties at the pool
and patio
And it all happens the entire
Summer for only $l5O including
utilities. Or rent for September iV*T V V Jr ,4>5 v y£;; f; ,;
they're moving fast. Only a limited '; O ';V, :'
number of Fall vacancies left
... where things happen fast
, / *rT "'" ;. -V, -."' *. £ ;/.
914 SW Bth AVE 378-7224

Estimates of Super Show
losses run from $20,000 to
$24,000, Gilmore said.
In other activity, Director
Mike Brown of the Rathskeller is
slated to tell senators the clubs
organizational setup, financial
status and possible directions for
the future.
PHYSICAL PLANNING
Director Walter Matherly will
give suggestions on campus
improvement projects for the
senate, which spent $31,800 this
year for that purpose.

I RED PIN oft I
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

ESTIMATED AT $24,000

, ft
There was no way we could have our security
adequately set changing from the stadium to the >i
gym in a matter of hours. |
Mrs. Eleanor F. Roberts, UF public functions >
manager, said because of upcoming exams only :
30 ROTC guards could be provided, when about :
60 were needed, to check entrance points in the ;
gym. She estimated a couple of hundred :
people slipped into the gym without paying. :
I thought there were more than 5,100 :j
persons in there, Brackins said. The fire :
regulations allow up to 5,100 persons in the gym :j
at any one time. j:
Mrs. Roberts said about 3,000 persons j:
attended the show at any given time. :
Mrs. Roberts and Brackins agreed that those :
who did slip into the gym came in through the j:
mens training room and the northeast fire stairs, j:

The Community Revision Act
will be read a third time and
probably will pass, according to
Gilmore.
The bill would divide the
senate into five committees,
Gilmore said: Internal Affairs,
Information and Investigation,
Academic Affairs, Student
Rights and Judiciary.
AN APPROPRIATION for
Samson will go through a second
reading. The S2OO appropriation

TOYTIME
Toys Hobbies
Juvenile Furniture
A complete line of swim
goods and playground
equipment.
1316 N.W. 16th Ave.
376-4576 Phone 376-4577
% \

is for a planned camp for
underprivileged children at Lake
Wauburg.
First readings will include:
a proposal to spread Accent

SAVE! i
baldwi^^^A
I u.s. 301 NORTH^^^SI^H^^
I STARKE, FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM -6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
I THKU-BUS I
I MOBILE I
I NEW ORLEANS I
IFT .MYERS I
H Tamiami Trail ways
B 527 W. University Ave. PHONE 372-6327 B
I Trallmys I
t. easiest travel on earth jjg: ; ;
From Gainesville 1-way
B TAMPA $4.80 S|
Only 2V* hours Non-Stop
B SARASOTA $6.65 B
B The only Thru service WM
B PENSACOLA $12.45 H
B Thru Express service H
B NEW ORLEANS $21.00 B
B The only Thru service M

Tuesday, June 2.1970, The Florida Alligator,

7l activities over more than one
week.
9 money to send a delegation
to a womens leadership
conference in Washington, D.C.

Page 3



, Thu Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 2,1070

Page 4

By Alligator Sarvicas
American journalists must
fend off threats of governmental
control of the press but also
should take a good critical look
at themselves, the president of
the nations largest professional
journalism society said Thursday
night.
We must focus discussion on
what we do and how we do our
job, not on whether we should
be allowed to do it, Frank
Angelo, national president of
Sigma Delta Chi and managing
editor of the Detroit Free Press,
said in a speech at the UFs
College of Journalism awards
banquet.
ANGELO SAID recent
developments across the
country, such as the
subpoenaing of newmens notes
and films directly threaten the
foundations upon which
freedom of the press rest.
He emphasized that a free,
though imperfect, press is to be
preferred to a perfect but
controlled media.
Angelo said Vice President
Spiro Agnews attacks of the
news media have created a vast
sensitivity among the public to
what we do and how we do our
job.
THE VICE Presidents
speeches have succeeded in
awakening the negative instincts
of the public, he said, adding
there is more than a little
political acumen in Mr. Agnews
approach.
The Vice President, he said, is
taking the fullest advantage of
the questioning, challenging and
un t rusting mood permeating
America today.
Criticism of the press is
nothing new, Angelo said, but
the persistence and intensity
of todays public attacks on the
news media are indeed new.
BUT, HE added, some of "the
criticism of the press is probably

.W*%V.V.V.%V.V.%*V Vi*'%VV VV.ViV/AVXvXvI # XvI # I X X X%VVV%%VViVV
IStudy Rooms Opened)
: If crammings your thing -or if you have to do it and your ij
: roommate is one of those types who goes to bed by 10, starting :
: Friday study rooms will be open all night. jr
: Student Government has arranged to have rooms 109, 125
: and 127 in Little Hall and rooms 227, 229 and 230 in the &
: Mechanical Engineering Building to be kept open through June :j;
: 12, Secretary of Academic Affairs Gail Merein said. £
open
AT 11AM A
MON-SAT
J!/
Every Tuesday Nite I I
I A Free Keg of Bear 1 8-7 for A
To the Guy Who \ th * irt ||y^|
yU Brings the Moat Girls l 1
Famous ALANS
CUBANA
A

Angelo Warns Against Press Control

well founded and well intended.
People have a feeling that we
may be involved in verbal
overkill, Angelo said. He added
the news media may well be
emphasizing the negative while
overlooking the moments of
good and beauty.
Angelo stated that a lack of
precision in our words is
viewed by many as deliberate
bias.
WE MUST be more
demanding of ourselves as
journalists, he said. Lets be
uncompromising in our demands
to live up to the highest
professional standards.
We may do well to drop the
word objectivity from our
journalistic lexicon and
substitute it with fair, he
said, pointing out that the same
events are seen differently by
different observers.
And, above all, Angelo said,
we must be more expert in our
presentation of the news.
ONE THING is certain, he
added, the need for good
journalists in the days ahead has
never been any greater. The
potentials for someone entering
the field are unlimited.
Several students received
awards at the banquet. Among
those honored was Raul
Ramirez, 4JM, who was awarded
the Deans Cup for outstanding
service to the College of
Journalism and Communica Communications.
tions. Communications.
The Sigma Delta Chi
Certificate of Achievement for
the outstanding graduate of the
College of Journalism went to
Kenneth Anderson, 7JM.
SIGMA DELTA Chi
Presidents Committee Award
for outstanding service to the
chapter was awarded to Dennis
L. Watson.
Elliot Skidmore received the
award for the outstanding
advertising student. The Public

CRITICAL SELF-VIEW URGED

Relations Association Award for
the Outstanding Public Relations
student in the College of
Journalism was given to Eric W.
Williams.
The Theta Sigma Phi award
for the outstanding female
graduate was given to Vicki Van
Eepoel. The Theta Sigma Phi
PICA award was given to Patricia
Howell.
THE EMIG award, which is
given to the graduate of the
College of Journalism with the
most future potential service to

Hertz announces
yet another office
Hertz announces a new office at:
1255 W. University Ave.
Its conveniently located and full of good
clean Fords and other good cars.
To reserve a car at our new office,
call our new number: 376-5600
Inquire about our special $7.47 rate.
HERTZ RENT-A-CAR
It does 0 to 150 9
in2lseconds. f
So we dorit hand cmt
the keys to just any kit
that cones along. W^d/k
SEE THE "FLY NAVY" TEAM
ON CAMPUS June I
Outside the Game Room,
in the Reitz Union ;f
Itfe an education. Y /

Florida journalism was given to
Henry Stokes.
The Public Relations Student
Society of America recognized
Terry Biehl and Eric Williams as
outstanding members.
The Minneapolis scholarship
was given to Mary Barrineau.
The Gannett scholarship went to
Grafton Wilson.
irara
M^UUr^jmovesJ

Mark Kamen was given the
WJXT-TV Production Award.
The Broadcasting Faculty Award
was given to Mike Moskowitz.
Your Generator \
# OVERHAULED Soeiialt
*aso ;
wtuio^r wtuio^ralachO^BWty
alachO^BWty wtuio^ralachO^BWty
GENERATOR SERVICE
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARD.
Mon. Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm



gSALE PRICES EFFECTIVE THROUGH JUNE I3lh
IIN LINE FRAMES! FASHION TINT LENSES lj||
eg. $1.27 SUNGLASSES 9 U
en's or women's aviator, octagon, UUae J
- ' "'
n c.tljcd.c n*v -- STURDY, WEATHERIZED JMT HR
la SPORT SHIRTS ~IM HAMOC g 5 / £
cave Cl 19 IDC Gold canvas bed,
IOO fringe trimmed pillow. llllf
efree fabrics. Regular or I s e f s up easily, stores iflr §|||§
son down. Sizes S, M, L. compactly. SAVE $1
HAIRDO PROTECTION! FOR FATHER'S DAY. . BOXES OF 18
REG. $1 SLEEP OUR OWN BRANB #*-* I REG. 69c BOX
BONNET fiQdi/h SOCKS' L# "* M CARDS
57' J§[*w 54* 47 c L_\s
Satin steep bonnet *~--SCaA-C Ban-Lon soch of 100% ment cards. Box.t ffifc JR
eliminates clip*, n y ,on Complete color of all occasion, HK zyr
curlers and pins. renge. 10*13, 12-15. birthday, convales- I
om-lbhteg. tm. in. bukreft cent greetings.
CCTS REG *s2 49 SAVE 16c
' T f l REG. 53c PKG. OF 50 REG. 3 PKGS. SISAVE 12c
SAVE I I \ INSULATED CUPS Delicious COOKIES
50c / I \
rIQ /I \ Keep cold things QfC 2te"chip. 'shoit 3 Hn, 88*
/ I \ cold, hot things J# bro ad, butter, W W
/ 1 \ hot. ox s ze many others. 33c Pkf.
6th St. & UNIVERSITY AVE. J
T-^l I B

Tuwdcy, Jum 2,1979, Fkxkfr AlUftor,,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 2, 1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

f - 11
Hi, guy ...
Bo mbs To Israel

WASHINGTON President Nixon has taken
pains to hush up the fact that the United States, in
the strictest of secrecy, has made bombs available to
the Israeli Air Force.
The first hint that the U. S. might be giving secret
aid to Israel leaked out of the Presidents
closed-door conference last week with the nations
governors. During his report on the Middle East, he
confided guardedly that the U. S. was helping Israel
in ways he couldnt talk about.
He didnt mention the bomb shipments or
otherwise indicate what secret help the U. S. might
be furnishing. However, this column has learned
from the most reliable sources that Israel urgently
needed bombs and the U. S. agreed to supply some.
In the past, the U. S. has been careful to furnish
Israel only weapons that could be justified as
defensive. But the Arabs arent likely to regard
bombs as defensive in view of Israeli air raids deep
inside Egypt.
The bomb deal received the personal approval of
President Nixon, who has been criticized by Jewish
leaders in this country for not doing enough for
Israel. But top State Department officials,
apparently, have been kept in the dark about the
bomb shipments.
* *
The State Department has opposed military aid
to Israel and has counseled against engaging in an
arms race with Russia in the Middle East. Indeed,
the Department has suggested that l&ie Soviet
military transfusion might even improve the
prospects for peace by giving Egypt the strength to
negotiate a settlement.
As long as the Arab countries are too weak to
withstand the pressure from the Palestinian
underground, the reasoning goes, negotiations will
get nowhere. The Egyptian, Jordanian and Lebanese
governments have all been considered too weak to
make peace without risking overthrow by the
Palestinian nationalists.
The State Department doesnt want the U. S. to
upset the delicate new power balance by
over-reacting to the introduction of Soviet-manned
planes and missiles into Egypt. For close to a year,
U.S. intelligence has monitored Soviet pilots at
the controls of planes with Egyptian markings. But
the Soviet involvement has been steadily increasing.
President Nixon, meanwhile, has tended to look
upon Israel increasingly as the best bulwark against
communist encroachment in the Middle East.
Footnote: The State Department has advised the
White House that Egypts President Nasser, despite
his hostile speeches, has remained privately friendly
to the U. S. When ex-President Johnson sent Robert
Anderson to Cairo to warn Nasser against military
involvement with Russia, according to a confidential
account of the meeting, Nasser replied:
Tell President Johnson that the Soviets have not
asked for a base. We give bases to no one. They only
asked for fresh-water supplies ... I told them they
may have all the water they want, that they can

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors

Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Merry-Go-Round
BimiMMlllllllllllM
by Jack Anderson
make needed repairs and stay for awhile.
*
President Nixon, after his initial shock over the
anti-war frenzy, has returned to his former
confident mood. Intimates say he was buoyed by
the rousing reception he received from the nations
governors and labor leaders. He is also convinced
that the silent majority supports his bold move
into Cambodia.
As evidence of his renewed assurance, say those
around him, he has been seen leaning back in his
presidential chair, relaxed, with his feet propped up
on a pulled-out drawer. Once, he even lit up a cigar,
which is a sure sign of good spirits.
Some intimates are concerned, however, over his
failure to fathom the public mood. He is a
thorough, calculating student of politics, who tends
to measure public reaction by polls, charts and cold
analysis. He lacks a feel, they say, for the human
undercurrents.
Although he is aware of the need to unite the
nation, they fear he doesnt realize how deep the
division has become over his war policies. He would
like to make a dramatic peace gesture after the
Cambodian operation is concluded, for example, to
appease the protesters. But some aides feel that
nothing short of an immediate pullout from
Vietnam would now calm the dissent.
The President is thinking more of a token gesture,
like appointing a top-level ambassador to take over
the Paris peace talks. The more imaginative aides
have agreed this might help only if the President can
persuade a leading dove, such as Senate Democratic
leader Mike Mansfield, to take a short leave of
absence from the Senate to seek peace in Paris.
These aides also urged the President to accept the
Senate amendment, which would restrict his
war-making powers. But the President listened
instead to his national security adviser, Henry
Kissinger, who balked over any limitation on the
President that might be interpreted abroad as an
expression of lack of confidence.
Some aides saw this decision as typical of the
Presidents concern with foreign above domestic
consideration.

Phyllis Gallub
Assignment Editor

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Alligator Staff

r
Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor

EDITORIAL
Lester 'White
Wine Maddox
The late Ralph McGill, long time Atlanta editor once
described journalism as a blend of wines. Red wine
represented the gore, the hate, the conflict in the days l
news. White wine conversely, symbolized the warmth, the
humor, the love found in the news.
We wonder how McGill would have judged the actions of
Gov. Lester Maddox of Georgia last weekend. We would
think he perceived of them as examples of white wine
even though his newspaper, the Atlanta Constitution, was
involved.
Maddox, the Associated Press reported, gathered 29
newspaper vending machines last Sunday, put them in
storage and vowed not to release them until the Atlanta
newspapers decide to support this country.
The Atlanta Constitution and Journal encouraged violent
people, Maddox charged and, They hurt the state because
of their hatred and bitterness toward Lester Maddox.
This is not an infringement of freedom of the press.
When the newspapers lead protesters to bum and to shoot
policemen, they shouldnt have that freedom.
At first the article caused us some concern. We put
ourselves in the Atlanta newspapers position and thought
of some campus interest group stealing our stands because it
did not agree with what we print.
But then we saw Maddox, actions as great stuff. He is
contributing to the white wine, the humor, we could use
more of today. Imagine in the minds eye, if you will, the
governor of the Sovereign State of Georgia rushing about
stealing news stands. We havent laughed so hard since Hitler
burned books or Gov. Claude Kirk played tug-of-war with
the Manatee County busing issue or the Florida Legislature
stopped funding higher education.
In fact, we can find but a few dregs of red wine in the
entire incident. But for an accident of geography Maddox
started his political career passing out ax handles in Georgia
he could have been governor of Florida.
These incidents may serve to explain what Claude Kirk
observed six months ago: Lets face it, Kirk said,
nobody believes in state government.
w
They Loved Me!

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor

Jeff Brain
Editorial Assistant

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor; Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83.
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.



Speaking Out

The country is not being told
the truth about oqr involvement
in Cambodia. On April 30,
President Nixon told the
American people that our attack
was pre-emptive in nature and
was designed to forestall an
enemy who was building up to
launch massive attacks on our
forces and those of South
Vietnam. Mr. Nixon told the
country that there would be a
swift withdrawal of our troops
after the mission was
accomplished and also that this
attack was not a sign of a
deepening involvement in the
affairs of the people of
Cambodia.
In private, however, the
administration is taking a
different line. On May 13 Rep.
Hamilton Fish sent a letter to his
constituents in which he
summarized a private briefing by
Under Secretary of State
Richardson which he and other
selected members of Congress
attended. Rep. Fish reported, it
was clear that the present
military thrust into Cambodia
hinged largely on the reportedly
surprise speech that for five
years neither the U. S. nor
South Vietnam moved against
those (Cambodian) enemy
sanctuaries because we did not
wish to violate the territory of a
neutral nation. Richardson,
however, said that, while it was
true that we have known of the
sanctuaries for some time, we
never attacked them before
because it was feared that
Sihanouk would counter any
invasion by allowing NVA
(North Vietnamese Army) forces
to enlarge their occupied areas.
The President made several
pious statements about our
respect for Cambodian
neutrality our lack of a
diplomatic mission in Cambodia,
the fact that we have recently
given them no military or

In The Wee Hours

MR. EDITOR:
In the light of recent critical events,
the topic we wish to broach may seem
insignificant. However, we feel that any
matter which so offends our great
adolescent sensitivity needs to be
remedied immediately and brought to the
attention of those in authority.
That to which we are referring is the
obnoxious reek of the revolting sprinklers
which overwhelm us on most mornings
and make our struggle to attend classes
even more hazardous. Our families and
visiting friends, not to mention
permanent are very much
impressed with the remarkable efficiency
of our sprinkler system as it waters
foliage and pedestrians. We are of the
opinion that the sidewalk is flourishing
nicely without the aid of our biquitous
sewer water.
he small society

reteALLY IT NeVeiz KNOW WHAT
ACtoPe TW& HOVJ T y T

economic assistance, etc. The
truth is that our diplomatic
mission was thrown out of
Cambodia by Sihanouk after
several plots against the Princes
regime were discovered, plots
with significant American
participation. The truth is also
that Sihanouk refused our aid in
the belief that it would be only a
coverup for increased CIA
activities inside his country, a
belief for which he had
significant supporting evidence.
Following Sihanouks ouster,
the Lon Nol government
anti-Communist in nature, cut
all supply lines to the
Communists inside their
country. Richardson, to
re-secure their severed supply
routes, VA and NVA began
moving out of the enclaves,
thereby threatening the
overthrow of the Cambodian
government. Rep. Fish, it is
against this background that the
American-South Vietnamese
strikes into Cambodia were
ordered.
This is very different from the
Presidents rationale for the
move. Instead of preparing to
attack our forces the enemy was
attempting to protect his lines of
supply.
The long range consequences
of our intemperate action are
very serious. Suppose Prince
Sihanouk, who still enjoys
power, with NVA and Chinese
support. He would have to
return as their ally instead of the
more neutral figure he once was.
Does anyone believe that the
Nixon Administration will stand
by and let this happen?
The U. S. was instrumental in
the overthrow of Sihanouks
regime. As far back as 1958
Eisenhower was pledging
support to Cambodian army
officers if they would overthrow
the Prince. Recently our Green
Berets and CIA operatives have

Rather than turning the sprinker
system on during every change of class we
suggest that they be run in the wee hours
of the morning when those who are out
and about dont give a damn anyway. In
conclusion, we feel that any change must,
necessarily, be an improvement.
BETSY LUCREY, lUC
DEBBIE IRWIN, lUC
Proctor
MR. EDITOR:
After three quarters of progs I have
finally come to a conclusion regarding the
Honor System at the UF, OBVIOUSLY,
IT DOES NOT WORK.
However, it was not until recently that
I came upon the perfect solution with
which to replace the current Honor
system; that is, the Proctor System.
Immediately, visions of instructors
circling the room and breathing down
by Brickman

A Different Line

trained Khmer tribesmen, living
in Cambodia, as anti-Sihanouk
mercenary guerrilas. The Thieu
regime, which supports the new
Cambodian government, is now
in an even more shaky position,
for it is the Cambodian regime
which has massacred Vietnamese
living in Cambodia and it was
the Khmers from whom the
Vietnamese took the Mekong
Delta slightly less than two
hundred years ago. In Asia old

Speaking Out

One of the most astounding manifestations of the
recent wave of repression in America is President
Nixons anti-crime package, more commonly
referred to as the Omnibus Crime Bill.
The Nixon administration introduced its
anti-crime package (actually a collection of four
separate bills) to the house in the fall of 1969. The
bills would effect only the District of Columbia and,
in effect, transform the nations capital into a test
tube for the study of the methods provided for in
the bill concerning their future implementation for
the rest of the nation. As John Mitchells Associate
Deputy Attorney-General put it, we would be
pleased to see it adopted in the District of Columbia
immediately, and we then will have an opportunity
to examine it on an experimental basis.
PREVENTATIVE DETENTION: This provision
provides for holding an arrested person in jail
without right to bail for up to sixty (60) days. This
is for a period before a trial.
NO-KNOCK: In short, no-knock allows police
to enter and search, with no restriction on what is
being sought, a home or apartment without a
warrant and without prior notice in cases where
evidence may be destroyed or concealed if notice
were given. There is no limitation on what type of
crime to which this provision will be applicable; it
applies to all offenses from shoplifting to sodomy.
It was this provision which prompted Reverend
David Eaton, senior minister of All Souls Church in
Washington, D.C. to say last week that shooting
all intruders may be the only way for citizens to
defend their rights.
UNLIMITED WIRE TAP: The Omnibus Crime
Bill greatly extends the right of government to
wiretap and use electronic surveillance. It would

Vote No

ones neck comes to mind. However, this
is not what I have in mind. Instead, three
or four proctors could be situated at
various locations in the room whose sole
purpose is to watch the students in order
to prevent cheating from occurring during
the exam.
Since we are already used to taking our
exams with one person 'Situated at the
front of the room, four stationary
proctors would not make any difference
to the person who doesnt plan on
cheating anyway. This person is absorbed
in his work it is only the cheater who
becomes uncomfortable and nervous
because of the presence of the proctors.
In short, the proctors do not inhibit or
interfere with anyones work but that of
the potential cheater.
The Honor System here at Florida
works for the cheater, whereas, in reality,
what is needed is a system which works
for the non-cheater. As I see it, the
Proctor System, or some version of it,
would do just this.
PAULA GROSS, lUC
Super Show
MR. EDITOR:
I would just like to take this
opportunity to commend Student
Government Productions on their fine
Super Show Production which was held
on Florida Field on Saturday, May 16.1

rivalries die hard.
Once again we have made the
mistake of attempting to achieve
a military victory in what is
essentially a political problem.
Perhaps just as important,
however, is the fact that the
President of the United States
now feels that it is acceptable
for him to lie to the American
people. One more piece of
proof, the New York Times,

OPEN FORUM:
C Alula ml DiaAwT j
hope ''^rt

Tuday, June 2,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

By Mark Waldman

By Wayne Hieber

allow their use in connection with such offenses as
robbery, arson, and destruction of property.
Although it is commonly known that wiretapping is
already being utilized, making it legal has
important judicial implications, all detrimental to
individual liberties.
TREATMENT OF JUVENILES: Any youth
sixteen years old or older, accused of a felony,
would be placed in an adult court and tried as an
adult, as would a fifteen year old in some cases.
Once a youth is so treated, even if the case is
dropped or the youth is found innocent, he or she
must face adult courts in any future arrests, even
when the charges are petty.
MANDATORY MULTIPLE OFFENDER
SENTENCES: This provision would require that
persons committing a crime of violence be given, in
addition to the punishment for the crime itself, an
additional sentence of not less than five years. Any
person previously convicted Os two violent crimes
would have to be given a mandatory life sentence.
Similar penalties are established for narcotic
offenders.
The Omnibus Crime Bill, as incredible as its
provisions are, has the full support of the President
of the United States, many congressmen and private
citizens. It is a blatant example of the movement of
American society into a new era of repression of
dissent by totalitarian methods. The mentality that
produced this anti-crime package is symptomatic
of the paranoid intractability affecting the Nixon
administration. Outspoken criticism of this
abomination to Congress and the President can halt
its passage. Write to your representatives in
Washington urging them to vote NO on the
Omnibus Crime Bill.

was in charge of field security and I was
amazed how the show was able to
continue after the tremendous downpour
we had. I, for one, thought that there was
no chance that the show would be able to
continue and that we would have a repeat
of last years fiasco with the Rascals.
I think we owe our thanks to three
groups of people. The first of these is the
production crew under the leadership of
Leonard Tanner, chairman, and Marc
Glick, executive producer. It was through
their negotiating with the performers that
the show was able to continue. Next I
think we owe a vote of praise to the
University Police Department for keeping
their cool under a tremendous amount of
pressure.
I think most important we owe thanks
to the people who showed up and
watched the show. They were well
behaved and 1 can say with authority,
since I was on security, that there were
no serious incidents or trouble.
Its true that Student Government
Productions lost $20,000 on the show
but it is also true that almost one half of
the student body was at the show at one
time or the other during the day. There
were several mistakes committed by the
productions crew but the important thing
is that they proved that a Super Show
could work. Next time there will be fewer
mistakes and hopefully no money lost. I
only hope that there will be a next tune.
ED ALBANESI, 2UC

April 4, (2 weeks after
Sihanouks ouster), said that in
an intelligence briefing it was
reported that COSVN, the
enemy HQ, had been moved
from Cambodian to South
Vietnamese territory. The article
even included a map. Most of
the information in this piece
came from I. F. Stones
Bi-Weekly, an independent
Washington publication, and the
Progressive, a monthly magazine.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS



00000 m _
FOR SALE
xX-X-X-X-X-;-;-;.;.;.v.v.v.v.v.5v.v;,
50 x 10 Schult trailer; AC; washer;
carpet; 20 x 10 screen porch; all In
excellent cond. Lot 5 Pinehurst Pk.
378-5450. Best Offer. (A-10t-145-p)
8-track car units $38.95 lots of tapes
on sale everyday at $4.99. All others
$5.88 Muntz 14 NW 13th Street.
(A-Bt-149-p)
Honda 50 Must sell Perfect condition
Best offer 378-2809. (A-st-149-p)
8x34 alUmlnum trailer, has screened
porch and Bxlo added room. Student
park near campus. SIOSO
alrconditloned, $950 without.
376-8082 anytime. (A-st-149-p)
Sell Hobie 96 surfboard Good
shape. Best offer. Call 378-3833
Week days ASK FOR TOM.
(A-st-149-p)
Webcor portable stereo HI-FI and
smith-corona portable
TYPEWRITER and case. Must sell.
Call 392-7639. (A-st-150-p)
1969 Yamaha Enduro 125 cc 3500 ml
excellent cond. $375 4.00 x 18 knob.
7 mo old see at 304 NW 15 St. RmlO
(A-st-150-p)
1967 Honda CB 160, 4700 miles,
perfect condition, bell helmet, used
very little, must sell, would like
$325. Call 373-1253 or 392-0128.
(A-Bt-150-p)
Fight Servomation, buy my 3 cu. ft.
refrigerator. Perfect for dorm living.
Counter-top with walnut finish. Also
coronet. Call 392-8089 (A-150-st-p)
Acetone compact organ $175 Haynes
Bass Amp $l5O Drum set SSO Fender
Palomino acustical guitar with hard
case $l5O Call 372-1297 or
378-0928. (A-151-st-p)
Hotpoint Refrigerator, 2 door no
frost automatic ice maker 18 mos.
old available June 6 S2OO Call
anytime 376-0401 (A-151-3t-p)
68 Dodge %ton camper 10 Vz.Gas
stove, stereo, beautiful condition.
$2995 Call 378-5150 (A-151-st-p)
Women and speed are two
transtltlonal things we carry them
both In our bodies. Myers type dune
buggy available In all colors and
metalflakes for only $195 Mike
Sullivan ATO house 372-9427
(A-151-6t-p)
DYNAMITE STEREO, only 4 mos.
old. Must sell for cash. 2 AR-2ax
speakers, $l6O. Sony 355 stereo deck
+ 15 tapes, $175. Sansul 2000, lOOw
am-fm receiver, $225. CALL anytime
373-2296, ask for Rick (A-151-3t-p)
GE stereo girls bike Schwln
1-speed medium-sized fan records
textbooks paperbacks transistor
radio with 9-volt converter + MORE
call 392-9406 (A-151-st-p)
STEREO harmon kardon, garrard
40 mk. II built-in, am/fm, 60 watt
spks, dust cover, tape rec, 400 new,
sacrifice 290 Call Steve at 392-7128
(A-151-st-p)
Labrador pups AKC registered top
breeding 8 weeks old females SSO
each Day 372-2547 Nite 376-2827
(A-5M51-P)
69 Vespa 125 cc Good Condition
$l4O Call 392-7549 after 5 P.M.
(A-st-150-p)
ARGUS CAMERA 35mm with flash
$25 372-7950. (A-3t-152-p)
SURFBOARD hansen hustler 74
good stick $90.00 call Jack at
392-8161 after 7:00 p.m.
(A-2t-152-p)
Available September 10x47 New
Moon; 2 bdrm; central heat; AC; new
shag carpeting. Excellent condition;
near Unlv., shaded lot. S3OOO.
378-7667. (A-st-152-p)

REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM
BUS STOP
-n MARILYN MONROE
* Ist of the "50's Flicks" Series. 7:00 and 9:30
showing*. Admission 25 cents. SponMWd by jwru

a
*

FOR SALE
Headquarters for Cypress Garden
skis. Dunlop tennis balls 1.50 can.
Handball gloves 3.00. Barbell set 110
lb. 29.50. B & B SPORTS CENTER
1406 N.W. 13th St. (A-st-152-p)
197 0 Bridgestone, 200cc, low
mileage, Just tuned, SSOO, call
378-8480 after 11 AM or 378-9084
after 7 PM. (A-st-152-p)
Must sell (grad) 650 Triumph
S7OO, typewriter $25, stereo phono
sls, weights $lO, call Scott
378-2873, Landmark Apts. no. 8.
(A-3t-152-p)
1968 55396 Chevelle full power a
real performer cragar mags factory
tape speakers must sell at sacrifice
S2IOO call Mark Nelson 392-9506.
(A-3t-152-p)
Honda 50 Sport, Must Sell. Excellent
condition with helmet and tools. Best
offer. Call Jeff 392-8320.
(A-st-152-p)
Remington typewriter and case for
sale. Good condition Call Doug
378-1998. (A-3t-152-p)
CLEAN INGEST carpet cleaner you
ever used, so easy too. Get Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-156-c)
UN stamp collection complete singles
Ml blocks & stationary in Scotts
album. All mint, vs, nb. An, ce
collection for SSOO. Call 373-2158
(A-lt-153-p)
.45 AUTO, extra clip holster and 740
rounds of ammunition. A nice pistol
with plenty of ammunition. $125
Call 373-2158 (A-lt-153-p)
Harley cycle 50cc, Inspected, $55.
call Joe, 392-8704 want to purchase
Yamaha 100 or Honda 90.
(A-2t-153-p)
2 12" speakers handbuilt custom
upholstered seats on top unbelievable
hass minimum distortion yours at a
steal S7O call for Mark 392-9506
(A-4t-153-p)
v-xrrX::::::::::::::;:::::;:;:;:;:;:::::::;:::::::;:;:::::::::;:;:::::::
FOR FIE BIT
:*xx*x*x-x*x
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-c)
30 yards behind Norman Hall. 2
bdrm. 1 bath no lease ac furnished
$35 for June $75 a month 1103 SW
th Ave. 378-5410 after spm.
(B-st-149-p)
FREE one month rent, extra
bookcases, kitchen & bthroom equip,
and more. Sublet 2 bdr. apt for
summer. 141 Landmark or call
373-1968. (B-st-149-p)
Several 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet $l2O mo. Colonial Manor
apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave. 372-7111
Grad students preferred. Special rates
for summer guarter now in effect.
(B-ts-109-c)
Modem bedroom apt., quiet behind
the mall, ww, central a.c. 100 per
month, regular sllO call after 5
373-2889 can move in June 1.
(B-st-149-p)
3-bedroom apt., offstreet parking,
full bath, kitchen, living rm, 16,500
B.T.U. A/C. Min. of 1 qtr. lease.
$l3O mo. 408 NE Ist Ave. 376-0317.
(B-st-149-p)
LANDMARK PHASE II sublet
SUMMER JUNE rent paid Ibr apt
162 call 372-7760 (B-151-st-p)

Page 8

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 2,1970


**
FOR RENT
vX*X*" X*X X'X X*X*X%*X*X*X*X*XvX*X
Across street from campus studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
Included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace Apts. 1225 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-109-ts-c)
Sublet 3-bedroom house >/2 block
from campus $125/mo. 378-7726 or
392-9259 1224 SW 1 Ave. furnished
f Jll kitchen. (B-st-149-p)
1
Large house to sublet for summer: 3
blrms, 2 baths, kitchen, etc. 1 blk.
ftom campus interested call
373-2268 or come by 1128 SW Ist
Ave. (B-10t-145-p)
For rent for fall, air-conditioned
apartments near campus. SBO to
$145 per month, pool. University
Apartments. Call 376-8990 evenings.
(B-Bt-149-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus, A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
WILL DISCUSS PRICE on our 2
bdrm., AC Sin City apt. can rent
from one to four persons. Good
location and great neighbors. Call
372- (B-3t-152-p)
1,2, or 3 girls spend entire summer
in Williamsburg for $125. Great
Townhouse apt. on pool 2 bedroom.
Call Mussy 372-7882 apt.-4.
(B-3t-152-p)
One to three guys can rent our
Landmark apt and have a pool,
sauna, a/c, dishwshr, and neat
neighbors for only $46.25/per.l apt.
126 378-6277. (B-st-152-p)
Sublease summer qtr Landmark apt 2
br 2-4 persons A/C dishwasher grills
poolside. Dishes, pots, pans, kitchen
utensils left for you. 378-3851.
(B-st-152-p)
1 Bedroom Apt Available June 14
Private Patio AC Dogs Welcome Call
373- After 5:00 p.m.
(B-st-149-p)
S9O per person, June rent free, 2 br
Fr Qtr no. 47, use of dishes, linens,
etc. Call 372-6768. Poolside, ac.
(B-st-152-p)
Sublet sum quarter Landmark atp.
46, A/C, carpet, dishwasher, pool
side. Call 373-1509 for Bargain.
(B-3t-152-p)
1 br apt for summer term 3 blocks
from campus AC See at 328 NW 14
St after 4. (B-st-152-p)
VILLAGE PARK summer sublease 2
bdrm. poolside apt. no. 108. Come
by late afternoons, evenings.
(B-st-152-p)
1 male rm. to share lux air cond
mobile hm your own rm SSO mo. call
373-1690. (B-st-152-p)
2 bedroom alrconditloned furnished
completely very near campus. ONLY
SIOO a month TV cable nice peaceful
nelghtborhood call 372-7624.
(B-st-152-p)
2 roomates needed summer quarter
ML 2 br. townhouse in Landmark
apts. 90.00 for summer quarter call
after 4 378-2298 at 144 1111 S.W.
16 ave. (B-2t-152-p)
Sub-let apt. Village Park no. 60 2
bedroom phone anytime available
June 15. (B-st-152-p)
Hj|| NQ~
I'usxMi&rLj] GP
RICHARD HARRIS
as A MAH
CALLED HORSE
jiWMLrl GP
LAST 3 DAYS
%
M'
cptterSdkrs&WingoStiUT
inj&c G Mafpc Qinsdaii

FOR RENT
Su percalif ragilist icexpialadocious
deal 2 female roomies for Landmark
apt for summer you pay only July &
August hurry call 373-1883.
(B-4t-152-p)
Sublease for Summer. Two bedroom
apt. French Quarter 114. June rent
paid ed. SIBO mo. Great way to
spend the summer call 373-2306.
(B-st-152-p)
FOR RENT: Singles: Swing Into
summer in a luxurious air-conditioned
poolside apartment. Private bedroom
Walk to campus. S7O include s
Utilities. 378-7224. (B-15t-148-p)
Available in June 3 bdr. house, 1 and
2 bdr. apts. central A/C $l2O and
SIOO a mo., furnished. Call 376-9525
before 11 A.M. or after 9 P.M.
(B-st-150-p) Ll
2 BLOCKS from campus. 1 br. ac
furnished apartment. Sublet for
summer. $95/mo includes utilities.
Call 376-1331. (B-150-st-p)
Landmark apt. no. 27 2 br. Summer
Qtr. A/C dishwasher pool health club
June rent free good full qtr. Call
376-1834 (B-st-150-p)
Unlv Gardens 2 bdr apt by pool
you split July August $250 up to 4
persne pay remaining S9O plus June
Save $260 Summer Q apt
18-310 ph 372-7640 (B-4t-153-p)
Sublet two bedroom alrconditloned
poolside furnished VP apt $l5O for
summer June 15 August 31 call
372- anytime. (B-2t-153-p)
Experience CO-OP LIVING at its
very best, call Georgia Seagle Hall for
the summer qtr. 376-8941
(B-4t-153-p)
ENJOY THE SUMMER IN LUXURY
with AC and pool at Mt. Vernon apt.
83 2 bedroom Call 378-3779
(B-4t-153-p)
One bedroom apt. near campus, 1624
4 NW 4 ave, air conditioned patio
furnished cost 225 for summer
quater from June 15 Sept Ist for
info call A. W. Row 372-1714
(B-2t-153-p)
Hawaaian village, sublet 1 bedroom,
furnished, ww carpet, A/C, pool,
$l5O per month, call 376-9014 after
5 PM available June 15 (B-st-153-p)
June and August rent free! 2
roommates wanted summer quarter.
Air conditioned, near pool,
Landmark no. 60, call 373-2207
(B-4t-153-p)
Your own private bedroom for the
summer. Fully furnished 3 bedroom
house to sublet. S4O a month. Call
373- or 373-1968 after 7 PM
(B-st-153-p)
Luxurius Williamsburg Poolside
townhouse apt. Sublease for summer
for appointment call 378-3323
(B-3t-153-p)
Single rooms for summer, winter 0
qtrs. 150/qtr maid linens utilities
close to campus, call or see 115 NW
10 St. Tom Ford 378-7222 378-5156
leave name (B-150-7t-p)

Were
concerned
about
the
atmosphere.
You knew that on a We're the ones that put
campus this size, there it together. We do it
had to be some writing Fall, Winter, and Spring,
talent.
Another one is coming
So did we. up.
If you wanted to read ft j
it, you had to dig it HOtIUCI
out of somebody elses >.
magazine quarterly
Now you've got your
own We only did it for you.

FOR RENT
2 bedrooms open In 4 bedroom
house, 4 blocks from campus. SIOO
per room pays all thru August. Call
Joe Godfrey, 378-9617 (B-2t-153-p)
1 to 4 roommates need to sublet La
Mancha townhouse for summer qtr.
A/C, pool, pvt. bedrooms, $l5O for
summer incl. utilities. 378-2294
(B-4t-153-p)
3 br, 2 baths, cen air, very nice. 315
NW 19th lane also 1103 SW 2nd ave.
Each $l5O per month, available June
15; phone 376-2892 or call Jay after
5, 376-6769 (B-4t-153-p)
Sublet 1 bdr. furn Univ. Garden apt.
pool, lake-view pvt. balcony, Morden,
June 14 Aug. 31, $270, Call
373-2290 after 6 PM (B-4t-153-p)
$55 mo, summer qtr, rate NO
LEASE, lone., blk cottages, private &
rustic surroundings, 6 min. drive
from campus, furnished, oak-shaded
& cool window fans, 5700 SW 13th
St., Call Steve 372-4407 after 8:00
PM. (B-3t-153-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom univ. gardens apt.
available for summer school and next
year. Call or see at 702 SW 16 Ave
no. 111, 376-8958. Perfect for 2
people. (B-151-st-p)
Men 3 Blocks from campus central
air conditioning single $155.00
double $l2O each for summer
quarter 378-8122 (B-10t-145-p)
Camelot Large two-bedroom
furnished apt. all extras TV
dishwasher Central air summer qtr
only prefer careful tenants. Special
rates 378-5133 (B-151-st-p)
Have fun this summer. Sublet 1 br.
French Qtr. apt. Great location, right
on pool, furn., ww carpet, 120/mo
Call 378-8980 after 5 (B-151-3t-p)
1 br. apt. AC furn. Close to campus,
avail June Ist. No lease for summer.
SIOO Tel 373-2168 after 5 P.M.
(B-151-3t-p)
Sublet sum qtr Landmark 1 bdr
June free sl3O/mo on pool
TV and stereo included no deposits
required apt 159. 372-0841
(B-151-st-p)
WANTED
X*X*X*X X X X*X X ,, X*X*X ,, X*X*X*X ,, X*r*J%
WANTED: Coed to share luxurious
air-conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious
air-conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
SUBURBIA DRIVE IN
Across From Mall Phone 372-9523
Winner Best Picture of the Year
COWBOY
w ED PLUS CO-HIT
x ALICE'S RESTAURANT



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
Hip roomates wanted for summer
qtr. or will tub lease air-con house
behind Norman. No deposits. Call
Sherry 376-8080 618 SW 10th St.
(C-7M50-P)
Two male roommates wanted for
summer. CAMELOT apt. 202,
$43/mo rent, pool, a/c, clubhouse,
TV, 376-0354 (C-150-st-p)
2 Female roommates needed for
French Quarter apt. no. 65. Air
cond., pool, etc. Only sllO for
summer. Call 372-3148 anytime.
(C-150-st-p)
TWIN SIZE BED anyone wanting to
sell one bed please call Claire at
392-9838 or Patti at 392-9240
(C-150-4t-p)
TWO ROOMATES fall quarter Live
in Luxury at Pt. West apts
two-bedroom, two bath, a/c, pool,
carpeted. Be Ready for Fall!
373-2760. (C-3M52-P)
$75 FOR THE ENTIRE SUMMER.
378-5784 ONE MALE ROOMMATE
FOR GREAT SAVINGS IN
LANDMARK. (C-st-152-p)
Female roommate. Own room In 2
bdrm Unlv. Gardens apt. $75/mo
Start Immediately call Diana at
392-1291 before 5, 373-1853 after 5.
(C-st-152-p)
Male roomate apt. 1 Village Park
share V* expenses no deposit call
378-8243. (C-st-152-p)
Wanted Male roommate to sublet
apt for summer for SIOO. A/C,
carpeted, own bedroom. Move in
now. Call 373-2914 (C-150-St-p)
Men! Roommate needed for summer.
June rent free. Landmark no. 33 near
pool and quiet. Call 378-7543.
(C-150-st-p)
Female Roommate wanted for
summer. La Mancha apts. private
bedroom, air cond, pool, walking
distance from campus. June rent free
378-9611 (C-st-150-p)
Hip female looking for others of
same gender and similar Interests for
..fall housing arrangement call
376-0928. (C-4t-152-p)
ROYERS RAUNCHY
ROADHOUSE has vacancies!
Students needed to share house next
to campus. Clothes dryer & washer,
baby grand piano, color TV, enclosd
vegetated yard fertilized by watch
dog. Private alr-cond bedroom,
$65/mo. Includes all utilities. Carl or
David, 372-5091. (C-3t-152-p)
2 male roomates wanted for summer
alr-acond., swimming pool,
dishwasher, June rent free $92 all
summer long Landmark apts. Call
378-2990. (C-3t-152-p)
Listeners wanted: Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and 4 PM for appointment
392-2049 (C-st-143-c)
2 male roomates. Summit House,
quiet a/c, pool; $75 each + utilities
for summer quarter; graduate
students are preferred; call 378-7889
(C-151-st-p)
2 coeds needed to share 2 bedroom
apt Summer quar ss4/mo
security dpt. free Unlv. Gardens
call Diane after 4:30 at 376-0716
(C-151-st-p)
1 or 2 coeds for SUPr Landmark apt,
summer quarter also 1 male for
large A/C house have own room
great deals! Low rent Call 378-3667
(C-3t-151-p
I need an apartment for fall quarter
ONLY Sin City preferred if you need
a roommate for fall only, call Lois
372-6513 (C-151-3t-p)
Female roommate Williamsburg. SBO
+ Vi util, for entire summer quarter.
Pool, A/C, etc. Walk to campus Call
372-4814 (C-3t-153-p)
Need two roommates for Immediate
occupancy at Mt. Vernon townhouse
apts. or will sublet entire apt. for
summer 373-1788 (C-4t-153-p)
1 fern, roommate for Frederick
Gardens fall qtr. AC, pool, carpet,
etc. Call Melissa or Barbara 373-2480
HURRY! (C-151-3t-p)

DEADLINE!
WEDNESDAY JUNE 3
ALL CLASSIFIEDS FOR THE LAST
2 ISSUES OF THE ALLIGATOR
MUST BE IN BY 4:00 PM
ROOM 330 J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
CLASSIFIEDS OFFICE

Male roommate wanted for summer
***£? PR, Y ATE bedroom, 2-bath,
central air apt. 1-block from
Nrm* n Hall $45/month. 372-1272
(C-150-7t-p)
Male roommate for fall quarter at
Ji?.',sss/mo Inc.
utilities. Call 392-8928 (C-150-st-p)
help wanted
Co-ed wanted room and board Iff
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
Repairman for 8-track tape units
experienced man preferred good pay
MUNTZ 373-2333. (E-st-149-p)
TV Technician. Must be experienced.
Also, person over 25 to deliver TV
sets. Apply at Alliance TV Service
815 W. University Ave. (E-st-152-p)
HELP WANTED MALE Mens
Clothing Salesman. Full or part time.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Apply Wilson
Department Stores, Inc., 22 E.
University Avenue. (E-5M49-C)
Camp Mountain Lake for Boys and
girls In Hendersonville N.C. Rlfiery
Instructor needed, NRA required, call
378-0285 after 6 pm (E-150-st-p)
Counselor positions available at
Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville,
N.C. Male or Female Archery
Instructor, Male only overnight
camping trips operate truck big
and strong, Male only Go-Kart
Specialist mech. inclined, Male
only Cabin counselors (activity,
escorts and leaders), Male only ski
boat operator (exp. 160-220 h.p.),
Male or Female Riding instructor,
For application: T. R. Robertson,"
1414 Fetch Ave., Jax., Fla. 32207.
(E-st-149-p)
Female: Full and parttime waitresses.
Must be neat. Good wages. Apply
Kings Food Host 1802 W. Un. Ave
or 1430 SW 13th St. After 2:00 PM
(E-ts-c)
WAITRESS WANTED. Morning &
evening shift, neat In appearance.
Apply after 2 pm. Mr. Raddatz. Flag
Restaurant 1250 W. Unlv. Ave.
(E-st-153-p)
Legal Secretary with previous
experience. For Interview call David
M. Anderson; Fagan, Crouch,
Anderson & Folds, 376-5295.
(E-146-10t-p)
Male: Summertime openings for
carhops and grill. Must be neat. Good
hourly wage. Apply Kings Food
Host 1802 W. Un. Ave. or 1430 S. W.
13th St. After 2:00 PM (E-ts-c)
Due to an unexpected cancellation,
an opening Is available as a student in
a two-year Opthalmic Assistant's
Training Program at the Medical
Center. Ophthalmic assistants work
with ophthalmologists In the
evaluation of patients. Pre-requisite
for the training program Is two years
of college and/or previous medical
experience, 1.e., a military corpsman.
Course begins July 1, 1970. Details
can be obtained by contacting Miss
Malja Uotlla, Department of
Ophthalmology, University of
Florida, telephone 392-3451
(E-st-149-c)
AUTOS
a
1960 Chevrolet impala. Good
condition. Power steering plus two
new tires. 303 NW 17th St. Apt. 5
phone 373-2901. Only $l5O.
(G-st-149-p)
Winners of the recent Datsun contact
were JACK McCONNELL add
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission Is a winner
tool TRY ITI Godding and Clarfe.2>ld
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-i35-tf-c)
For sale. Need home for loveable 67
Valiant 4-door white, black top
61,000 miles. SBOO. Call 373-1589.
Prof, returning Japan, must sell.
(G-151-st-p)
69 SPRITE, 4 speed, fully equlped,
canary yellow, warranty, like new,
exc. tires, black Interior, 373-2475
(G-151-st-p)

Tuesday, June 2,1970, The Florida AlH*tor,

AUTOS
VW square back 1968 air-conditioned
radio 23,000 miles excellent
condition SIBOO call 378-6029
(G-3t-150-p)
For Sale 1965 Triumph Spitfire.
Brand new engine. Desperate Must
sell Immediately. S6OO or best offer.
Call 378-7655 after 5:00
(G-151-st-p)
64 VW bug 55,000 miles original
owner maintenance records available
radio and undercoatlng no rust S7OO
call 378-2079 (G-151-st-p)
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy clean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
69 Roadrunner, excellent condition
warranty, 4 spd. trans., power disc
brakes, 8,000 miles, headers. Call
376-3931. (G-st-152-p)
1937 Plymouth. Good condition.
$450 or best offer. Contact Bill
behind Spanish Main. Must be
Intrepid, genuinely old-tlmey person.
(G-3t-152-p)
1962 Ford convertable good
condition. Mlno repairs hood
scoupcall 373-2233. (G-3t-152-p)
Triumph TR3 Beautiful Condition.
Overdrive, new brakes, transmission
just rebuilt, radio, many extras. Call
373-2798 after 5 oclock.
(G-st-152-p)
1962 Saab, excellent mechanical
condition S3OO. Must sell. Come by
735 SE sth Ave. between 5 and 8
p.m. (G-2t-152-p)
GOODBYE GVILLE Must sell
1963 Ford Galaxie cheap
transportation $75 or best offer call
Sam 378-7212. (G-3M52-P)
Get It now or never 63 Rambler runs
perfectly great transportation $250
call Tom at 373-1573 or 373-2747
call now. It might be your last
chance. (G-st-152-p)
66 Corvair in good condition 4 new
tires, new shocks, new clutch, has 2
horns, asking $650 call 392-6931 ask
for Dave around 6:30 or 11:00 p.m.
(G-st-152-p)
1955 Plymouth. Good mechanical
condition, like new tires & seat
covers, readable transportation $l5O
or best offer 376-0476 after 5 PM
(G-3t-153-p)
1968 Sprite excellent condition.
Great summer fun and good
transportation Stebro exhaust
swaybar very quick 228 C Flavet
378-2235 Hurry! (G-3t-153-p)
1961 Chevy Blscayne good trans car
$125 Call Nick Mas! 378-5154
(G-4M53-P)
PERSONAL
For JJ and P at Sold Out! I wont
be hair when you do your thing,
but wishing you peace and love! from
afar. I dig It! ONEI the wook.
(J-151-2t-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
TUESDAY
Golden Fried Chicken
All you can eat 99<
WEDNESDAY
Jumbo Baked Chopped
Steak nd Ye-kiw Rkk 79< j

Page 9

ALL MARRIED COUPLES Become
more aware of each other. Discover
In the privacy of your own
relationship how to become more
real with your spouse. Intimacy
Encounter Tapes, Marriage & College
Ufa Project. Free. Call 392-1590.
(J-5M49-C)
EUROPE Go this summer. Fly NASA
for student rates. Flights leaving till
August. For Info call 373-2520 5 to 8
pm. (J-5t*149-p)
Married couples lnterested In
improving communications and
understanding each other better?
Participate In a Marital Enrichment
Group experience. Increase your
awareness of the strengths In your
marriage. For Information call
Marriage and College Life Project.
392-1590. It's free. (J-st-149-c)
Two girls need a third person to
travel through europe from the
beginning of august to end of
november Call Diana 392-7668
(J-151-st-p)
HELP! I must find homes for my 4
adorable Arles kittens. Call Lucinda
at 392-1771 or see at 103 S.W. 4th
Avenue after 5:30 (-151-3 t-p)
NEEDED for summer: 1 or 2 coeds
for 1 bdrm apt In fred. gards. rent
41.25 per person per month. Call
372-7755 anytime. (J-150-4t-p)
Dear Dumpy: I am so glad that you
said YES. Always remember
Memorial Day 1970. Thanks for
staying too. Love forever Dempy.
(J-lt-153-p)
Driving North? Need ride either to
Cleveland, Ohio or Ontario, Canada
after finals. Split expenses, excellent
driver. Call Doug 372-6598
(J-2t-153-p)
In reply to two lonesome coeds: Ive
got the courage to ask you. Make
Jaime Happy. Good time guaranteed.
Call 392-9499 (J-lt-153-p)
BIG D. We were a bit worried, but
the SBOGGE Is graduating, painful
tho It was. Now the skys the limit
congratulations Huon D. (J-lt-153-p)
Kevin Michael Before everyone
leaves wont you please do your
vulture Imitation and sing -Ducky
Duddle? Much love, Watsy
(J-lt-153-p)
BABY CARE 3 blks north of BSU
sls/wk. 8 AM to 5 PM Mon Frl.
Exper., reliable, loves children. 311
NW 15 Terr. 376-2072 (J-2t-153-p)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair -removal.
Edmund DWyer Electrotogist 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
Need to get your stuff up North? We
are renting a truck and will take
anything you want between here and
No. Hartford, Conn. Need to know
this week. Call 378-6107. Ask for
Brad or Rich. Will Take Bikes.
(J-st-145-p)
FLY to MIAMI leave Sat morn. Jun
13 return Sun nlte. $45 round trip.
Call 378-9130 or 376-1611 x 359.
(J-st-152-p)

PERTOWAiL^
I need a hip warm female companion
to share what could be a glorious
summer even In Gainesville Write
Tom Box 12273 Gainesville.
(J-4t-152-p)
Have anything to take home for the
summer. I will haul your articles to
Miami, Orl, W PB, Laud, Hywd
Cheap. Experienced. Call Phil
372-6404. (J-5M52-P)
LOST dc FOUND
Lost prescription sunglasses Friday
May 15 reward Call Gall 3>B-1965.
(L-2M52-P)
SERVICES
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested* artd
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S.W. 4th Ave., across from the
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480
(M-ts-107-c)
Tutoring by certified teacher, engllsh
through high school, german levels 1
and 2. Call 378-7641. (M-st-149-p)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed,
standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone*
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
TUTOR Experienced, certified
teacher wants to make reading and
other subjects Interesting and fun for
elem. children. Begin June 15 $5 a
lesson (supplies Incl.) 372-3991.
(M-3t-152-p)
Tennis rackets restrung, guaranteed
call Mike, 392-6004. (M-lt-152-p)

NOW
BILLYS "66
SERVICE CENTER
TIRES BATTERIES & ACCESSORIES
BILLY'S SHU l( I
IS Bi l l I R SI R\ 1(1
505 N. W. 13th ST.

I JTH jji j/ffij LAST
|j3 DAYS
* what they
+ do best! J
iigN CAMPBELL* KIM DARlfr
v iMmsy
NAMATH
*>**# i*
I ~H CM&ir 7Qn LAST
iwga:i 013 days
*"
4c Htv .i simple t H /ju .i nun jihJ j uimun.
JCfIX jndawnnua.
# jik! jwimun-
I last
awaniSl 3 days
| Pi W. tMvnttr Awm. |



Page 10

I, The Florida ANigrtor, TiiMdey, Jimm 2,1970

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

GRE APPLICATION deadline
date is June 16. This is the last
day for receipt by the
Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, NJ. 08540 of
Registration Form to take the
July 11 GRE without paying the
$3 penalty fee.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
APPLICATION DEADLINE
DATE is June 24. This is the last
day for receipt by the
Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, NJ. 08540, of
application and $lO fee for
reading knowledge examinations
in French, German, Russian, and
Spanish on July 18. Registration
fees increase $3 after this day
and up to the closing date of
July 1.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
on Thursday, June 11 at 1:30
p.m. in Room 235, Tigert Hall.

Library Schedule
Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
College Library* Bam 11 pm Bam 11 pm 2pm 11 pm
Research Library Bam 11 pm Bam 11 pm 2pm 11 pm
PKY Lib. of Florida History 8:30 am -5 pm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Special Collections > 8:30 am -5 pm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Architecture & Fine Arts Library 8 am 5 pm
Arch. 8i Fine Arts Building 7pm -10 pm Bam -12 N 6pm -10 pm
Chemistry Library Bam- 5 pm 9am -12 N 2pm spm
216 Lsigh Hall 7pm lO pm Ipm 4pm 7pmlo pm
Education Library
-JUNymw Hail 8 am -10:30 pm** 9 am 5 pm 2pm -10:30 pm
Engineering & Physics Library Bam-5 pm 9am -12 N 2pm-spm
410 Engineering Building 7pm -10 pm Ipm-4 pm 7pm -10 pm
Health 8i Phys. Ed. R. R. 8 am 5 pm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6pm -10 pm*** Bam -12 N 7 pm-10 pm
Health Center Library "7 ] r
L 102 Science Bldg. 8:30 am -12 M 8:30 am -5 pm 2pm-12M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall tern-11pm Bam-spm 7pm -11 pm
Journalism & Communications R.R. Bam-5 pm
337 Stadium 7pm -10 pm*** Bam -12 N Closed
Law Library
Holland Law Center 8 am-11 pm Bam -11 pm 8:30 am -11 pm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School)
Yonge Bldg. F. Bam 4pm Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Office Bam-5 pm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam l2 N 2pmspm
6pm lO pm 6pm lO pm
Ipm spm
The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday 12 M.
** The Education Library closes at 6:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
*** The Reading Rooms dose at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.

BECaME A CHEF... ~
s. in your own back yard. Let us help
-Jr"" {w j\ IXTyI I you build that new patio you've been
II I \ wishing for. We'll even let you include
r,C,#S anciest 9 r * and outdoor
* GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

CEASING PUBLICATION:
The Alligator will
publishing for the spring quarter
on Friday, June 5. The last
Orange and Blue Bulletin will b#
published on that day.
Publication will resume Monday,
June 22, and the first Orangq
and Blue Bulletin will be
Tuesday, June 23.
GRADUATING SENIORS:
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduation, granting
of credit, or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
GRADUATING SENIORS: If
you have a National Defense
Student Loan, you must
complete the Exit Interview
procedure prior to graduation in
order to keep your account
current.

BLUB BULLETIN

NATIONAL DEFENSE
LOAN BORROWERS: If you
have been approved for a release
of funds from the National
Defense Loan program for the
summer quarter, and have
pre-registered for that quarter,
your fee payment can be
deducted from your loan. As
sooa as you receive your fee
cards come to the Student
Accounts Office.
NOTICE OF DEPOSITORY
HOURS: Student Accounts in
the Hub, will be open from 9
a.m. until 3 p.m., June 19, 22,
and 23. If lines are as long as
they have been in the past, the
lines will be regulated on these
days so that there will be enough
time to wait on everyone inside
by 3 p.m. There is an envelope
drop on the east wall of the
Depository for your
convenience.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Tuesday
Union Movie, Bus Stop,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30
p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:30 p.m.
University Crisis Committee
Meeting, Hillel Center, Will
Discuss U. S. Involvement in
Indochina, 8:00 p.m.
Law Dames Work and Planning
Meeting, Law School
Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday
Union Movie, "Girl's Town" and
"Rock Around the Clock,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30
pjn.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 362 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Music Dept: Twilight Concert,
Variety Band, Union Terrace,
6:45 p.m.
Mensa Meeting, Winnjamer, 8:30
p.m.

$1.25? I
1 We 11... yes. The magazine is $1.25. 1
1 But it's not for us. That's not so much to 1
llt goes for paper and ink pay for free expression. §
I and production work and 1
I other things you need if tl/lfid/l 1
1 you're going to make a fIUIUiU jf
I So the expression is free. quarterly I

Campus
Calendar

Thursday
Union Movie, "Jail House Rock"
and "Love Me Tender,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30
pjn.
Black Student Union Meeting,
150 C & D Union, 7:00 pan.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Association Meeting, 362
Union, 7:30 pjn.
Modern Dance Group, Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Friday
Med Center Senior Skits,
Norman Hall Aud., 6:30 p.m.
Union Movie, "Wild One" and
"Rebel Without a Cause,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30
p.m.
Modem Dance Group, Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: Modem
Dance Group, $.25.



The
Florida
Alligator

Basketball Team: Young & Experienced

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the sixth of a series that will
review Gator sports in the
1969-70 season with a look at
the prospects for the 1970-71
season.)
By BO BERRY
Alligator Sports Writer
Coach Tommy Bartlett sits in
his office surrounded by
trophies, game balls and other
momentos of four years of
coaching basketball at UF. He is
planning for next season, and
trying to forget last season when
the Gators went 9-17 overall and
6-12 in the Southeastern
Conference.

| Intramurals (
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii By Steve Rohan iiiimii
BLUE LEAGUE: Chi Phi added to the prestige of its Presidents
Cup with a 20-7 softball championship win over DU. The win
provided the Chi Phis with its third championship of the year.
The Chis banged out 23 hits. Bill Hinson led the parade with a
homer and two doubles.
The championship brought the Chi total to 1133 points. They were
followed distantly by Delta Upsilon with 985 and Kappa Alpha with
951.
The secret for the Chi Phis was consistency this year. Along with
championships in swimming, volleyball, and softball, came second
place finishes in football, and basketball. They also finished strong in
golf and track and never finished with less than 80 points in the
reamining 120 point sports.
Kappa Alpha was able to nail down three championships also, with
firsts in golf, tennis and basketball. All these wins came in the last two
quarters, however, when they were nearly out of the race.
Pi Kappa Phi won the track and football championships while DU
won bowling and handball.
The KAs, DUs, and Pi Kappa Phis, unlike the Chi Phis, sprinkled
poor performances between their championship efforts in the race for
the Blue Presidents Cup.
ORANGE LEAGUE: Sigma Phi Epsilon scored three runs in the
top of the eighth and then stalled a TEP rally to take the Orange
League softball championship 9-8.
The TEPs had taken the lead 5-4 in the bottom of the fifth on a
double by Eli Wolf and singles by Tony Center and Mike Gordon with
none out.
The SPEs retired the side, however, and went on to take a 6-5 lead
in the top of the seventh inning. Singles by Mike Hawley and Rich
Rohlwing sandwiched a double by John Geiger to provide the runs.
The TEPs managed to get a double, single, walk and an error in the
last half of the inning but scored only once to tie.
The first extra inning was wild. The SPEs scored three times in the
top of the inning on singles by Mike Smith and Bert Simpson and a
homer by Hawley.
The TEPs scored two in the bottom of the inning and left two on
base when the last man popped out.

CONTINENTAL CAPERS TRAVEL CENTER
Domestic and International Travel
Independent or Group Travel
PERSONAL
OUR SERVICES
COST YOU TO ALL YOUR
NOTH.NOI TUVQNEEDS
Hotels
Auto Rentals
CALL
CONTINENTAL V
1 CAPERS WAVIICENTER M 1202 NW 23rd Blvd
c. aeajflife. 5 pm dai| y
v"§?*

GATOR SPORTS

Im not pleased with the
winning and loosing record. I
hoped for a better team than the
record showed, he said. He
explained that 1969-70 was a
building year and he had
expected the veterans to lead the
team.
Andy Owens did a fine job
offensively scoring and
rebounding, says Coach
Bartlett. But overall the Gators
had poor shooting and went
from number one rebounders in
the conference'last year with
Neal Walk to last this year.
THE GATOR team also
suffered from injuries. Tony
Duva, Tom Purvis, Hal Kelley,
and Gary Waddell were all out

by mid-season. And then Coach
Bartlett caught cold and a virus.
He said he tried to stay up and
help the team, but couldnt all
the time.
The biggest reason the Gators
had a poor season, Coach
Bartlett believes, was because
each man was playing as an
individual and the team never
jelled.
The SEC is one of the
stronger conferences in the
nation and the Gators were
playing high caliber teams.
Kentucky, the conference
champions, won both games
from the Gators, as did Georgia
and Louisiana State. They split
games with Tennessee,
Vanderbilt and Auburn.
WE WERENT A road team,
said Coach Bartlett. We just
didnt play well away.
Some of the great moments of
the season were wins over
Tennessee in overtime and a
come from behind victory over
Vanderbilt within three days.
Beating Auburn with the final
buzzer going off was also a high
point.
The Gators seemed to be
getting together a number of
times, but something always
happened, like loosing a
heartbreaker to West Virginia
in overtime. Its pretty hard for
a young team to overcome, said
Coach Bartlett.
THE 1969-70 season
basketball is over and the team
and Coach Bartlett are looking
forward to next year. The
schedule will be even tougher
with the same SEC teams as this
First Convoy
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI)
The first motor convoy to cross
the continent took place in 1919
to test 20 Army trucks to see if
they could withstand the rigors
such a journey presented.
The convoy started out from
Washington, D.C. traveled over
all types of terrain, and arrived
at its destination in San
Francisco 56 days later.
Among the men participating
was Dwight D. Eisenhower, then
a Tank Corps Captain.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

r
Tuesday, June 2,1970, The Florida Alligator,

year and Houston and Fordham
added.
Coach Bartlett thinks all the
teams in the SEC will be as good
or better than last year. He is
hoping the Gators will be better
too, but it will be another
building year for the young
team.
Some 17 or 18 basketball
players will report for practice
next October to form the Gator
team. Coach Bartlett considers
all the positions open to all the
players whether sophomore or
senior.
-S There is no attitude problem
with the players, said Coach
Bartlett. They have been
practicing on their own in
pick-up games getting in
shape.
Coach Bartlett isnt making
any predictions for next season.
He knows it will be a tough year,
but he is waiting, hoping and
planning for a better season. It
rnmmmmmmm mm mm whw mm mm mm
I Student Special
Any car or color!
1*49.95, j
I Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373-1665

K puts you in
the pilots
9 For Your
JTj First Flight
Lesson
WANT A PIECE OF
THE ACTION?
Glide into the wonderful world of flying. Just $5 lets you fly a
Cessna 150 with a government licensed instructor. You also get a
head start toward your own pilot's license.
$ INTRODUCTORY FLIGHT
£ ''"'V INSTRUCTION COURSE.
Four flying lessons, preliminary
ground instruction, your own flight
log book.
Cessna 150 You'll learn the wonderful world of flight in a
Cessna 150 one of the world's most popular airplanes. Before you
know it, you'll feel at home behind the controls. Take advantage
of these money saving plans today.
N
\/ffottA
y\ AvtVriio* toe.
S GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPQ9VT
376-5326

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

will all come together Dec. 1,
when the Gators meet Samford
in Florida Gym.
Iroowood
Golf Clab
SIVKNT MEMHKHO
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 + TAX
SPECIAL RATI
WEEKDAYS $2 AIL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 AU DAY
For information toll
a 376 0080
& IZONWOOP
COlf CIOO
N I 19thAViNUf
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
BARBER § STYLE SHOP
3 Roffler Stylists
5 Barbers
t Roffler Sculpture
Kut for longer hair
Hair straightening
and relaxing
6 to 8 week guarantee
Capiloscope Free
Analysis of hair and
scalp problems
1620 W. University Ave.
373-1195

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 2,1970

Miss Budweiser Wins Tampas Regatta

THE REIGNING national
champion hydroplane, Miss
Budweiser, started off defense of
that title by winning the
wind-delayed Suncoast Regatta
Monday at Tampa.
The Miss Budweiser, driven by
Dean Chenoweth, was tied at
800 points with Myrs Sheet
Metal Special, going into the
championship race.
Chenoweth was clocked at an
average speed of 86.830 over the
choppy course, for his third heat
victory and a total of 1,200
points. The Myr Special was
second overall with 969 points,
and two heat victories, while the
Notre Dame was third with 769
points.
The regatta had been
scheduled for Sunday with six
races on tap. But winds
exceeded safety factors much of
the day and only three heat
races were run.
* *
BILLIE JEAN King, recently
reinstated by the United States
Lawn Tennis Association, was
named Monday with five other
players to the U. S. Wightman
Cup Team that will meet
England on June 12-13 at
Wimbledon, England in a
best-of-seven series.
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 33 IS .688
New York 26 23 .531 7Vi
Washington 22 24 .478 10
Detroit 21 23 .477 10
Boston 20 25 .444 1 V/i
Cleveland 16 27 .372 14A
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 31 13 .705
California 30 17 .638 2Vi
Oakland 25 23 .521 8
Kansas City 19 27 .413 13
Chicago 18 29 .383 14*/2
Milwaukee 15 30 .333 16/2
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 25 19 .568
New York 25 23.521 2
Pittsburgh 23 26 .469 4'A
St. Louis 21 24 .467 4 Vi
Philadelphia 20 27 .426 6Yi
Montreal 16 30 .348 10
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 36 14 .720
Atlanta 27 19 .587 7
Los Angeles 28 20.583 7
San Francisco 24 26 .480 12
Houston 21 29 .420 15
San Diego 2131.415 15^
a term of
independent
study in
CUERNAVACA
MEXICO
correct
and fluent
SPOKEN
SPANISH
$135 per monthbegin any month
Varieos courses offered on social change
hi Latin America, radical alternatives to
the school system and ether institutions.
Writs for catalog, Pept.
CIDOC
APD0.479
Cuernavaca, lexica

Mrs. King was reinstated by
the USLTA after she did not
renew her pro contract with
Tennis Champions, Inc. She
previously played on victorious
U. S. teams from 1961-67 before
becoming a contract pro.
Five members of the
American team that beat Britain
5-2 last year at Cleveland, Ohio
are included on the team with
Mrs. King. They are Nancy
Richey, Julie Heldman, Jan
Marie Peaches Bartkowicz and
Mary Ann Eisel Curtis.
* *
DEFENDING champion Dave
Hill, a b qsp e ctacled
chain-smoker from Jackson,
Mich., fired a two under par 68
Sunday to win the $150,000
Danny Thomas Memphis Classic
by one stroke for a record third
time.
The victory was worth
$30,000 to the slender,
140-pound Hill and sent his
career earnings past the
$400,000 mark.

FREDRICK
GARDENS
. . now leasing
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave

The only beer that
always tastes light
H lljr
HF 18 |IIJ *f v fH
jV I |
Ills; §
ills I i:l
m : H m
I'M :-,:

| iri snows shorts

* *
THE BIG surprise in National
League hitting is Billy
Grabarkewitz (pronounce his
name Bill-y), one of several pee
wee infielders to play for the
Dodgers since Reese retired.
Grabarkewitz is listed at
5-foot-10 and 170 pounds, but
dont believe it. He also started
the season, technically his rookie
year since he had only 65 at bats
in 1969, with an .092 lifetime
average, but dont believe that
either.

GOOD TUESDAY ONLY
I Kentuckii Fried tfkicken {
| 214 N.W. 13th st. m
M 114 S.w. 34th St. M
m 376 6472 372-3649 M
U / jmxfSMGMT A M
Lbmihi \ I DINNER QQA I
{ UBjiffigt BOX |
3 Pc. Chicken Reg. 1.25 B
H Mashed Potatoes
1 cl G s r:,a BRING COUPON I
M Role

Sunday he delivered a two-run
bases-loaded single in the
seventh inning when Los Angeles
sent 10 batters to the plate,
scored five runs and tied the
score 6-6. Then he blasted a
two-run homer in the 11th
inning to give the Dodgers an 8-6
victory over the St. Louis
Cardinals and lifted his batting
average to .374, right behind
Rico Carty and Tony Perez.
* *
MIKE STOREN, a rising
young executive in the American

Basketball Association, Monday
became the new president and
general manager of the
Kentucky Colonels.
Storen, 34, a native of
Michigan City, Ind., and a
graduate of Notre Dame,
resigned as vice president and
general manager of the Indiana
Pacers to accept his new
position.
This past season, the Colonels
wound up second in the Eastern
Division, but lost to the Pacers
in the playoffs.