Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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PHIL BANNISTER
FANTASTIC JANIS
It was one helluva show Friday night at IFC Frolics. Janis Joplin
and the Rotary Connection kept them on their feet and the unity of
audience and performers was something you had to experience to
understand. See story page 2.
UF Investigated On
Athletic Charges ?

By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Writer
The UF is definitely under
investigation for violation of the
National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA)
constitution, Buddy Martin,
sports editor of the Cocoa
Today newspaper, still contends.
Martin said in a telephone
conversation Friday that UF is
certainly being investigated and
the case will be presented to the
infractions committee of the
NCAA sometime this summer.
UF PRESIDENT Stephen C.
OConnell denied the newspaper
report and said the NCAA
normally notifies the president
If |l; : ;ip|i|d,i; ;/...'
llMiMli
THE ALLIGATOR needs
new staff members for the
summer and fall quarters;
all positions page 3
Campus Crier 12
Classifieds .. 10
Editorials . .8
Letters 9
Movies .: 10
Sports .- 13

Come Together A Noble Gesture

By 808 WISE
AIVipROr otiiT WfltSf
Nearly 1,000 came
together on the UF Drill
Field Sunday afternoon for
what many termed a
quality rather than
quantity Come Together Day.
Come Together Day was
sponsored by Pi Lambda Phi
fraternity in an effort to fill
the communications
vacuum between races and
age groups. Neal Lubow,
2UC, coordinated

of an involved institution before
any investigation is begun.
Martin said OConnells
remark is correct. The NCAA
normally follows this procedure,
but maybe he has not had time
to be notified of the preliminary
investigation. The matter is in
the hands of the NCAA
enforcement staff. My source is
unimpeachable, irrevocable or
any other adjective you wish to
use.
According to the account in
Cocoa Today, the NCAA is
investigating the coaching
changes at the UF last winter in
which Tennessee head football
coach Doug Dickey replaced
Ray Graves after both teams had
met in the Gator Bowl. The
section of the NCAA
constitution that was supposedly
violated says coaches shall
deport themselves with honesty
and sportsmanship at all times.
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR Ray
Graves said I personally know
of no NCAA investigation nor
do I know of any reason for
such an investigation.
The NCAA would neither
confirm nor deny the
investigation, as is its normal
policy. Faculty Chairman of
Athletics Mandell Glicksberg
(also a law professor) could not
be reached for comment.

arrangements for the event.
NEAL AND the Pi Lams
have really put it together,
said Gainesville Mayor Perry
C. McGriff.
This is one tune when we
have quality rather than
quantity, commented Rev.
Bade Page of the Holy
Trinity Episcopal Church in
Gainesville.
Although small, the crowd
was not monochromatic,
he said.
YOUNG WHITES made up
most of the crowd, but a

The
Florida Alligator

Vol 62, No. 152

PRESIDENT CAN SUSPEND

Conduct Proposals,-
Await Senate Action

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Managing Editor
A proposed revision of the
Student Code of Conduct has
been presented to the University
Senate after more than a year of
work by the Student Affairs
Committee.
The code, approved by the
committee at their May 12
meeting and presented at the
senates Thursday meeting, will
be placed on the senates action
agenda for next month.
THE PRESENT code,
adopted in 1967, has been
criticized by Student
Government officials for its
vagueness, double jeopardy and
in loco parentis.
A preliminary revision of the
code in the summer of 1969
caused a furor among students.
Then Student Body President
Charles Shepherd called the
proposal unacceptable and
complained of its ambiguous
nature.
Former Student Body
President Clyde Taylor ordered a
commission to study certain
words and phrases in the
present code which Taylor said
made a student liable under the
code for an offense that he has
already been charged with by
civil authorities.
STUDENT BODY
PRESIDENT Steve Uhlfelder
If |
m W
'ii#d
m I Wm SPP
KAREN ENG
... Alligator summer editor

large number of blacks of all
ages and a substantial number
of middle-aged whites were
present.
Rain threatened to drown
out the event in the early
hours of the afternoon, but
about 100 Spectators huddled
under umbrellas and raincoats
during a brief downpour.
Skies finally began to dear
after a few verses of Here
Comes the Sun, and the
number of spectators grew. A
buffet dinner was served as

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

says the current revision is a
definite improvement over the
present code, but there still
needs to be a clear definition of
what a person can be held liable
for in terms of city and county
ordinances.
He said the revision contains
double jeopardy to a degree,
but it is not as bad as the present
one.
The revision states that
action by municipal, state or
federal authority shall operate as

Guns Approved
Changes Asked
By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writar
The Committee to Study the Removal and Control of Guns on
Campus released its report today with recommendations ranging in
force from mild proposal to strict enforcement of its findings.
The 16 page document represents the work of two weeks of open
and closed meetings during which the committee heard testimony
from 20 witnesses and received 481 petitioned signatures.
THE FIRST underlined finding of the committee regarded the role
of policemen, their right and necessity to carry firearms. The report
added, however, that the University Police Department (UPD) should
be encouraged, to continually examine its functions, looking for
opportunities to handle functions without guns, particularly in its
daytime activities.
The duty of the committee has been misunderstood by several
factions of the UF campus in past weeks. Police and students have
(SEE 'GUNS' PAGE 2)
BSP Selects Editors

By CAR LOS J. LICE A
Alligator Writer
The Board of Student
Publications (BSP) selected Miss
Karen Eng, 4JM, for summer
Alligator editor-in-chief. Sam
Pepper, 3JM, was selected
editor-in-chief for the fall and
winter quarters.
Also selected Friday were
Leslie Gardieff, 3JM, Alligator
staff writer, as managing editor
for the summer quarter, and

the First Baptist Church choir
sang.
FOUR LOCAL clergymen,
McGriff and City
Commissioner Ned Butler
spoke on the topic of
communication between
races and age groups. Power,
the Cdebration and the
Sensational Souls provided
music.
Dean of Student Affairs
Lester Hale termed the
(SEE 'QUALITY' PAGE 2)

Monday, June 1, 1970

a bar to an action against the
student by the UF under this
code of conduct unless the
offense:
interferes with the
educational and orderly
operation of the UF ;
endangers the health,
safety or property of members
of the academic community if
the student were allowed to
remain enrolled;
requires, under Florida law,
(SEE 'STUDENT' PAGE 2)

Miss Phyllis Gallub, 4JM, also a
staff writer, managing editor for
the fall and winter quarters.
MISS ENG is the first woman
to be selected editor-in-chief
since the Alligator became a
daily newspaper in 1962. She is
currently managing editor.
Miss Eng had been offered the
position of managing editor for
the spring quarter. She turned
down the position because she
disagreed with the BSP and their
policy for selection of
editor-in-chief.
Pepper was also offered this
position but turned it down.
Many members of the staff,
including Pepper, resigned
because of the BSP decision.
MISS ENG LATER
reconsidered and was selected
managing editor for this quarter.
The BSP also approved an
increase of the Alligator's
weekly payroll to $450. This is
SSO more than the present
payroll.
Outgoing editor-in-chief
Robert Fraser asked for this
increase to raise the salaries of
the staff and to attract more
candidates for staff positions.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, June 1,1970

AUDIENCE SPELLBOUND

Joplin, Connection Explode

By Alligator Services
Florida Gym has seen many an explosion of
talent, but very few to compare to the one which
occurred Friday night in the form of Janis Joplin
and the Rotary Connection.
Together they blew the place sky high.
METAPHORS cant describe the diminutive
Joplin who took over the stage with her first song
and held the standing audience spellbound until she
strode off in triumph amid cheers and applause.
The heavy blues were fantastic. The sheer amount
of energy coming from the little singer was enough
to stagger the imagination.
Among the songs performed were such classics as
Piece of My Heart from her days with Big Brother
and the Holding Company, belted out in typical
Joplin style, and Maybe and Try from her
Kozmic Blues album, as well as Gershwins
Summertime, and Cry Baby by Garnet Mimms
and the Enchanters.
BEFORE THE first show, which didnt begin
until about 8:45 pm., Janis roamed the stage
saying, Lets go, lets go! and walked around the

Guns At Checkpoints Out, Report Says

pFROM PAGE OmQ|
misinterpreted the committees
function as being primarily to
determine whether the police
should wear guns.
The committee found that a
viable security force is not only
desirable but necessary if the
university community is to
retain the capability to handle
its own problems.
SUGGESTED modifications
were offered by the committee
for the UPD to consider. The
recommendation was made that
campus checkpoints at entrances
to the university be manned
with unarmed personnel. This
duty is presently performed by
the campus police, but is not of
a nature requiring guns,
according to the committee.
During its study the
committee found training
received by campus police is
identical to that received by any
Florida policeman. The type of
police work on a university
campus is different than this
training provides for.
The committee recognized
this and recommended that
The Alligator
Apologizes
James Mason, manager of
University Gardens Trace, was
incorrectly quoted in Fridays
Alligator as saying that A
person can be hunted forever for
defaulting on a lease.
Mason said, in fact, that a
person can be haunted.
The article also identified
Mason as a lawyer. He is a senior
law student. The Alligator
regrets the error.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida aik? is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement .appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

campus policemen receive
additional training. The
emphasis of the added training
was suggested to involve the
areas of social problems, human
relations, and crowd psychology
and control.
THE RECOMMENDATION
carrying the most significance
calls for an absolute
prohibition of firearms and
similar weapons by any
non-police person while on'the
UF campus. To implement this
prohibition the committee
recommended that any student
possessing a firearm on the UF
campus be immediately
suspended for at least one
quarter.
This would include students
in dormitories, married student
housing, fraternity and sorority
houses.
A SIMILAR recommendation
covered staff personnel.
The committee said
possession of firearms may be
desirable in certain of its
academic programs, such as the
Florida State Museum, military
history courses and other areas.
The committee suggested UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
adopt a method for granting
possession and use of weapons
in academic programs, when
necessary or desirable.
GUNS UTILIZED by ROTC
would enter into this category.
A committee is presently
meeting to study ROTC.
The UF rifle team is a group
possessing firearms approved by
the committee. The
recommendation was made,

FREDRICK
GARDENS
. . now leasing
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave

gym floor signing autographs, which she was doing
even as swarms of people there to see Joplin
passed her by unnoticed. She signed some guys cast
and drew a heart on it, then disappeared backstage.
After the second show it was a different Janis
interviewed behind the stage. This one was hoarse
and smiling, a warm bottle of Ripple in her hand.
She seemed very relaxed as she talked about a
handful of her engagements for the coming week.
This Janis was unwound.
The Rotary Connection, which also entertains at
the UF Rathskeller, was dynamite. The group was
augmented during the first show by a pint-sized
drummer-singer who came on strong late in the act,
but even so the act was fantastic all by itself.
NOT MANY groups do better or more versatile
blues and rock. The audience was really moved.
During the second show the Connection really
connected (sorry!) with solid songs like Soul Man
and Ruby Tuesday which brought the house to
its feet and kept it there.
There were no stars in the Connection, the entire
group was strong. They had a sound all their own.

however, that the weapons used
be at all times in the custody of
proper professional personnel in
the ROTC department.
The recommendation would
allow the rifle team to carry
firearms only on the rifle range
or in the armory.
The committee studied the
division in communication and
mutual understanding
experienced by police and UF
students. With positive results as
its aim, the committee called
for, more openness of action
and intent on the part of all
elements of the UF involved in
crowd actions.
The committees report is
being studied by OConnell and
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder. Their comment and
subsequent actions are expected
later this week.
Young Drivers
Drivers under 25 were
involved in much more than
their share of auto accidents in
1969. One-fifth of all drivers are
under 25, but the under-25
group was involved in one-third
of last years fatal accidents.

Hertz announces
yet another office.
Hertz announces a new office at:
1255 W. University Ave.
Its conveniently located and full of good
clean Fords and other good cars.
To reserve a car at our new office,
call our new number: 376-5600
Inquire about our special $7.47 rate.
HERTZ RENT-A-CAR

Quality Stressed

[Tbom paoe^l
gathering a noble gesture.
Rev. T. A. Wright told the
group that the turmoil of the
60s had brought with it
invaluable progress in race
relations.
A LOT OF people would
like to go back to 1953,
before the Supreme Courts
civil rights ruling. Everything
was so quiet then, they
said Wright.
But the early 50s were not
peaceful or pleasant times for
black Americans, he said.
Progress, with the
accompanying
demonstrations and
controversy, would have to
go on, he said.
Rev. Tom Laughon warned
the crowd that citizens would
have to get together, or
we may all go down the
drain.
AS RAINDROPS began to
fall, Rabbi Michael Monson
cut his speech short with the
remark that Somebody up
there sure doesnt like me.
Monson admonished the
group to address each other
with the Hebrew greeting,
Shalom peace.

Student Code Revised

PAGE ONeJP
the UF to assume jurisdiction
over the offense.
SECRETARY OF Academic
Affairs and Student Affairs
Committee member Gail Merein
said the revised code is the
most fair code we could come
up with for a university of
20,000 students.
Obviously were never going
to come up with something
20,000 people would agree
with, she said.
Former Student Affairs
committee member Marc H.
Click slammed the revision,
claiming that the code puts
more power in the hands of the
university and leaves less
discretion to the students.
THE REVISION didnt
come from the students needs,

Later in the afternoon,
Butler told the group that
coming together was no
longer just desirable, but a
necessity for our survival.
THERE WERE dangers in
relying blindly on the
democratic process to redress
the grievances of minority
groups, Butler said.
The majority rules is a
good old American tradition.
But when you are in the
minority and voting takes
place along racial lines, this is
like saying all your ideals are
doomed, said Butler.
Complacency and violence
are both enemies of progress,
Butler said
AS WE LEAVE this
meeting, let us pray that no
man will drag us down low
enough to make us hate
him, he said.
UF Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder said
the only regrettable thing
about the event was that we
have to have a gathering like
this to have communication.
Laws were not enough to
bring American society
together, Uhlfelder said.
It will take future laws,
but it will also take
communication and
understanding, he said.

he said. It came from the
universitys needs.
One of the proposed changes
in the code provides the
committee with subpoena
powers. If a student fails to
appear before the committee
when notified, he is
immediately suspended until
such time as the hearing body or
official is presented information
which in its opinion justified the
failure to appear and testify.
The UF presidents power of
summarial suspension, criticized
by Shepherd last fall, is still in
the revised code. The code gives
the president power to suspend,
pending a hearing, a student who
fails to abide by the presidents
cease and desist order.
BUT THE revision entitles the
student to a hearing at the
earliest practical time.



Few Attend SMC Rally; Blamed On Move, Rain

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
|_l. Alligator Staff Writer
Multiple circumstances accounted for the dismal
turnout at Fridays Student Mobilization
Committee (SMC) rally in the Plaza of the
Americas.
Rain caused the biggest problem. The rally had to
be moved into the University Auditorium.
ACCORDING TO SMC spokesman Arlene
Rosenfeld, many people didnt realize that the rally
had been moved and could not attend because they
could not find the speakers.
Rev. William Sloane Coffins speech had to be
scrapped because his flight from Hartford, Conn,
was cancelled.
Another speaker, Jack Harris from the Gainesville
area, could not speak because of illness. Had he
known that the rally was to be moved out of the
rain, he might have been able to attend, Miss
Rosenfeld said.
AND THINGS are best when, theres spontaneity
- this should have been held earlier, she said.
The rally kind of fell down. But the people that
came learned a lot, and the teach-ins were good.
Only two speakers out of five actually spoke.
They were Mrs. Linda Jenness from Augusta, and
Miss Judy Redon, from Kent State.
MRS. JENNESS said the Augusta, Ga. riots began
with a card game that ended in a death by beating.
Mrs. Jenness, Socialist Workers candidate for
Georgia governor, said a 16-year-old mentally
retarded black boy in the county jail played a card
game in which the loser was beaten and tortured by
the winners.
Since he was mentally retarded, she said, he
always lost. She said the boys body was found
covered with cuts, scratches and cigarette bums at

Faculty Club Says
Building Plans Off
Faculty Club House building plans have been abandoned as of May
27, according to Dr. W. J. Wiltbank, newly elected president.
Discussion of the progress being made on member recruitment led
to this decision at Thursdays meeting.
ORIGINALLY, the Faculty Club had planned to accept some 750
members who would be willing to pay $l5O each to build a club
house, Wiltbank said.
The members decided that their present efforts were not successful
enough for continuation of the plans.
We are going to continue social activities of the club as in the past
with no actual club house, Wiltbank said.
OFFICERS FOR 1970-71 were also elected. Wiltbank, assistant
professor of fruit crops, was elected president.
Other officers are Vice-president, Dr. F. B. Wood, professor of
physics and secretary, Charles S. Haupt, assistant director of the
Bureau of Professional Relations in Pharmacy
Clifton Oliver Jr., associate professor in business administration,
was re-elected treasurer.
GATORTOWN APTS.
Featuring :
ft 3 MONTH leases
for summer
LARGE CLOSETS
% t 9 ALL ELECTR,C kitchen
\ (C 9 MASTER TV antenna
\l 0 I § ABUNDANT parking
v I 9 TWO LARGE POOLS
j vj/ftjt BARBECUE GRILLS
) ]\ 9 12 MONTH leases
309 SW 16th
EASY NOW FOR

2 SPEAKERS CANCELLED TALKS

least two weeks old.
A POLICE detective told me the layout of the
jail was such that every officer and every deputy
would have to have had full knowledge of what was
going on, she said.
Mrs. Jenness said Augusta police had no ordinary
riot-control equipment only guns. She added that
almost all of the six blacks killed in the riots had
multiple bullet holes in the back.
Her reason for the riots was the alleged squalor of
Augustas black section.
ACCORDING TO Miss Rosenfeld, there were also
some good question-and-answer periods.
Miss Rosenfeld said that about five of the
scheduled 11 teach-ins were held.
Topics discussed were U. S. Involvement in
Vietnam, Campus Complicity on War, and
History of Southeast Asia, also, Womens
Liberation and Racism and Repression.
THE TEACH-INS were designed for small
groups, she said. There were at least twenty
attending each.
According to Miss Rosenfeld, when Miss Redon
spoke at the rally she called the UF students
complacent and apathetic. Miss Redon said that it
would take another Kent incident to get people
moving again.
Naturally, the people who showed up in the rain
didnt need to be called complacent, Miss
Rosenfeld said.
WE WERENT offering brainwashing we
offered knowledge, she said.
We asked several people in the plaza to come
and join us, but they werent interested.
If they complain that UF never has good
speakers and is always complacent, she said, let
them look inside themselves.

VHHhHHHHsHBBP
We're with you on water and air pollution

We're against pollutionas much as
you are. After all, we live here, too.
So, what are we doing about it?
On Air Pollution the U.S. Public
Health Service estimated that 60% was
caused by automobiles; 26% by indus industry,
try, industry, space heating and refuse burning;
and about 14% by electric utilities.
We felt 14% was too much and we're
spending mLons of dollars to find
ways of lessening it.
In the nuclear plants we're now build building,
ing, building, there will be no combustion what whatever.
ever. whatever.

JhFloridafr
$ Electric
Conqiaiiies
Taxpaying ImestorOwned
Florida Power & Light Company / Tampa Electric Company
Florida Power Corporation / Gulf Power Company

A
Story Os Shooting Told
By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Wrltar
How four students were shot to death is the story Judy Redon
carries across the nation.
A junior in physical education at Kent State University, Miss Redon
is now a speaker for the National Student Mobilization Committees
Committee for Kent Speakers.
I want to really tell what happened at Kent, she said. We (the
committee) want people to get up and start doing things.
Its sad that Kent has to be the reason for motivation.
FIRST OFF, I want to dear the rumor that there were snipers,
she said. There were no snipers there.
The only shots we heard were fired at us in a long volley by the
National Guard.
According to Miss Redon, the students at Kent were having a
peaceful demonstration to protest the Cambodian War, ROTC
programs and the presence of the National Guard on campus.
THE NATIONAL Guard was there because of the students burning
the ROTC building earlier.
Miss Redon said the National Guard had chased the students up and
down the hill and had cornered them at a fence before running out of
tear gas and started to shoot.
THEY SHOT at us while we were running, she said. We couldn't
even stop to help the wounded.
I was standing beside a boy as he was shot I couldnt believe it,
she said.
Alligator Needs Staff
Applications are now being accepted for positions on the summer
and fall Alligator.
Photographers and students interested in writing and editing for the
summer should see Karen Eng or Les Gardieff at the Alligator offices,
third floor of the Reitz Union, this week.
Students interested in working this fall should attend a meeting
Tuesday, 7:30 pm. in the Alligator office.

Monday, June 1,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

We are equally concerned about
water pollution and we're doing some something
thing something about that, too.
Each of Florida's four electric com companies
panies companies is supporting continuing inde independent
pendent independent research to try to find out if
there are any undiscovered effects
on marine life caused by our warm
water return.
It's simply good common sense for
us to help in any way we can to improve
the communities we serve.
We're not only with youwere
doing what we can to help win the
battle against pollution.

Page 3



Page 4

V The Florida Alligator, Monday, June 1,1070

UF Foreign Students Find Home

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Wrhar
A little frame Building behind
the new Graduate Studies
Building represents more than
just an office for UF foreign
students.
It is a (dace to socialize, hold
meetings, and a home away from
home.
THE UF has more than 900
foreign students and faculty.
They come from places as near
as Canada, and from as far away
as Nepal. In all, 78 countries are
represented by this group.
They have come to the United
States for different reasons, but
they have chosen the UF as the
place to study.
According to figures released
by the International Student
JKRfIPg $
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MRS. ROSSANA LAURIE
CBfitf secretary

* 14 ijE
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TAKISHI SALTO
INTERNATIONAL CENTER
What the UF needs is a center in the full meaning of the word.

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DEPTH REPORT _J

Center, about one half of the
students, 373, are graduate
students.
THE UF CENTER is one of
about 2,000 centers in
universities and colleges
throughout the United States,
said Glenn Farris, foreign
student adviser and director of
the center.
The center is not an office in
the ordinary sense of the word.
It is a lounge, a place for foreign
students to relax, use the
telephone, watch TV and read
periodicals, according to Farris.
He said larger cities have
larger centers, like a small Reitz
Union, but the UF center is
quite small.
FOR A FOREIGN student in
Gainesville, adjustment can be
frustrating if he does not find
in the campus an agent
specifically assigned to assist and
orient him, giving guidance
concerning the laws and
procedures of a strange country
and campus, Farris said.
Most foreign students are
tested in their countries prior to
admission. **ln spite of this,
Farris stated, the foreign
student is at a great disadvantage
in assimilating classroom
instruction and in carrying out
assignments.
Farris believes this causes
them to make an extra effort,
because they (the students) have
made a big investment in

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78 COUNTRIES REPRESENTED

achieving an education in this
country.
Consequently, Farris said,
they are considered to be
serious and hard-working
students with much at stake in
shaping their future, whether it
be in the United States or in
their countries.
The Cuban students represent
the largest group of foreign
students on the UF campus.
According to Farris, 337 are
enrolled this quarter.
But the Cuban students are
almost like Florida students,
Center Secretary Mrs. Rossana
Laurie said. The Cubans are not
really foreign students.
THEY have no cultural
problems, since most of the
Cuban students attending the
UF have attended either high
school or junior college in the
United States.
The center is informal. There
are no impressive rooms or
massive pieces of furniture. The
secretaries sit in pinhole-sized
offices and offer advice and help
to students who wander in
needing assistance.
Our job is not an 8 to 5
job, tors. Laurie said. It is
more than just filing cabinets
we work with people.
THE CENTER does more
than just advise students,
according to Marty Kirkpatrick,
4AS, a student assistant. We do
everything.
Sometimes the center is used
as a meeting place for foreign
student clubs, or even small
parties, Mrs. Laurie said.
Some of the student assistants
have become more involved with
the foreign students, than just
filing their papers.
CAROL CARSWELL, 7AS, is
the graduate assistant at the
center. She does more than sit in
the tiny office pouring over visa
documents.
The interest comes from the
people themselves. To use the
popular term *you get
involved,* Miss Carswell said.
The greatest pleasure I get is
associating with the students
outside of class, and helping
them to learn more about
Americans.
As a result, I have developed
many lasting friendships, and
have received an education you
do not receive in the classroom.**
SHE HAS DONE everything,
from giving cooking lessons and
dance lessons, to getting violins
fixed. She shares an apartment
in an old, rundown duplex
two blocks from the campus
with a Hungarian roommate.
The house has been called by
some foreign students the
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off-campus international
center.
According to Miss Carswell,
Mrs. Laurie has been at the UF
for 12 years; she is the most
informed authority concerning
immigration matters. If anyone
has a problem capable of being
solved, Mrs. Laurie is the one
who can handle it.
The office staff has organized
camping trips, beach parties and
tubing parties for the foreign
students and interested
American students.
ANOTHER ASPECT of the
life of the international student
is sports.
Soccer is the most popular
game in the world, excepj in the
United States. It is also one of
the favorite sports of the foreign
students. The UF Soccer Gub,
which has compiled quite a
number of victories, has a great
number of foreign students in it.
Students from the
Commonwealth nations are most
interested in cricket. They have
started the UF International
Cricket Team.
ARTHUR ANDERSON, 3EG,
a student from Jamaica, is one
of those interested in the team.
The cricket team has helped to
unite the students from the West
Indies.
Samir Khalil Itani, 6PH,
president of the Arab Gub, is
from Lebanon. He said he came
to the UF because he had many
friends who had graduated from
the university.
His opinion of the center is
that it is doing an excellent job,
considering all of the
circumstances.
SINGLING OUT Mrs.
Itani said, Without her the
center will crumble.
He said he thinks the UF
needs a center in the full
meaning of the word, a house
for the international students.
Juanita Shearer is from
Jamaica, and she is a freshman at
the UF. Miss Shearer thinks the
education in the United States is
more flexible than in her native
country.
EDUCATION (in the United
States) is more broad, and a lot
less formal.
The life of the foreign
students is not always tied to the
center. Foreign students have
started organizations to keep in
touch with each other.
The dubs are the India Club,
the Luzo-Brazilian Club, Latin
American Gub, and many others
from different nationalities. The
clubs are grouped under the
Council of International
Organizations (CIO) which has a
representative in the student
government.
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ACCORDING TO Farris, the
foreign students are aware of
campus politics, but since most
are graduate students, they
concentrate on their academic
programs.
Illea Hammwi, 3EG, is from
Syria. He considers the French
system of education which is
the one used in Syria better.
Foreign students know a lot
more about the world, about
fgi
m
iRL 1,4 M- in
K
GLENN A. FARRIS
... foreign student adviser
history, geography, everything.
He said American students
have too much freedom
without responsibility.
THE AWARENESS of the,
foreign students to the campus is
shown in their activities. The
CIO has sponsored International
Week, which shows a part of the
life of the country of those
students participating in it.
Gainesville stores, for
example, helped the CIO prepare
the International Week set up of
last year.
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Israeli Jets
Hit Egyptian
Naval Base

IN ALABAMA PRIMARY

'Black Block Vote Issue

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPI)
George C. Wallace and Gov.
Albert P. Brewer took a day off
in their heated runoff campaign
for governor Sunday and let the
electorate mull their latest
charges over the black bloc
vote.
Wallace, fighting for his

'Vietnam Deaths Rendered
Meaningless States Maddox
BREMEN, Ga. (UPI) Gov. Lester Maddox said Sunday the lives
of Americans who have died in Vietnam have been rendered
meaningless by bargaining them away at the conference table, and
through politics.
Maddox was in the northwest Georgia town for dedication
ceremonies for a monument to Haralson County men who have died
in Vietnam.
AMERICA HAS lost the war where these men died, because we
have not had a goal of victory. And the withdrawal of our troops is a
step toward another war at a later time, Maddox continued.
Maddox added it is time for the nation to honor American fighting
men, the men who have fought and sometimes died for freedom
across the nation and the world.
The state's chief executive lauded Haralson Countys monument to
the war dead and continued, Americans everywhere should do what
you in Haralson County have done.
MONUMENTS SUCH as this should be raised throughout the land,
and the voices of our people should be raised so loud and so strong
that we would drown out the cries of the anarchists, the
revolutionaries, and the traitors who call for victory by our
enemy ... the enemy which took the lives of these young men.

La Mancha

It's fast, but it's casual. Living
with a Spanish accent designed
for you. Nobody else. That's
why every single and
multi-level apartment features:
Your own private bedroom
Rugged Barcelona furniture
All electric Kitchen
§ Central Air
TGIF parties at the pool
and patio
And it all happens the entire
Summer for only $l5O including
utilities. Or rent for September
they're moving fast Only a limited
number of Fell vacancies left

914 SW Bth AVE

political life in Tuesday's
election after trailing Brewer by
some 11,000 votes in the
seven-man May 5 Democratic
primary, has centered his
campaign on a charge that
Brewer received a 250,000 bloc
vote from blacks.
BREWER, A one-time Wallace

'//*,&&&s '/ ,' '-'S'/
MKRF" .. %v>.;.vs^hjjfc& v
... where things happen fast

Israel's jet raiders attacked the Egyptian naval
base at Bur Safaga Sunday for the second time in
a week, and Israeli ground forces caught and
killed 10 Arab guerrillas on the Jordan frontier.
President Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt said
that Soviet advisers were with his troops
everywhere.
AN ISRAELI military spokesman in Tel Aviv
said the jets flew 240 miles south of Suez City at
the southern end of the canal to hit the Bur
Safaga base on the Red Sea in a lightning raid
that lasted only 10 minutes. The jets swooped in
at about 10 am.
The spokesman said other jets hit Egyptian
targets across the canal, but gave no other details.
Bur Safaga was the target of an Israeli commando
raid, carried out under air cover, a week ago
Thursday night.

protege who succeeded to the
governors chair upon the death
of Gov. Lurleen B. Wallace two
years ago, countered that a
runoff would not have been
necessary if such had been the
case.
Wallace said on a statewide
television program Saturday
night his defeat would signal an
era of black control over
Alabama politics.
No candidate for governor
has ever been so
opposed, Wallace said. I did
not inject race into this
campaign and I am not injecting
race into the campaign now, but
if the black bloc vote wins this
election it will have control of
this state for the next 50 years.
BREWER SAID in another
weekend telecast the bloc vote
charge was an effort to scare
you into voting for or against a
candidate.
Its an insult to your
intelligence, he said. If we had
gotten a bloc vote in the first
primary we wouldn't be here
tonight in the runoff.
The black vote issue is the
same old issue thats been
knocking around for years in
Alabama.

378-7224

Police 'Marauders
Bust Quiet Festival
DENHAM SPRINGS, La. (UPI) Undercover agents and mounted
policemen with shotguns waited until the music died before dawn
Sunday, then sneaked into the Festival of Man and Earth to arrest
about 50 long-haired youths.
Mrs. Dale Fucundus, whose husband operates Thunderbird Beach
where the three-day rock festival is being held, called the policemen
marauders and accused them of turning an otherwise peaceful
gathering of more than 10,000 into bedlam.
AS SOON AS the music stopped and the press left, she said,
they slipped in here. They didnt have to slip in. Everyone can come
in here. Theyve done everything they could to harass us.
Mrs. Fucundus said the young people gathered for a weekend of
music from several rock bands, had been quiet and nice.
The Livingston Parish County sherriffs department said it had
made 70 arrests over the weekend, about 50 early Sunday, mostly for
camping on private property and disturbing the peace. They said
there were few drug arrests.
Jim Brown of Baton Rouge, who organized the festival, said
undercover agents from Jefferson Parish, a New Orleans suburb 80
miles away, had stationed themselves outside Thunderbird Beach and
would zoom in through the fence and grab several youths, then zoom
them back out and into a bus headed for jail.
They were running around with guns, calling them hippies and
pot heads, Brown said.
If one of my men gets hurt, youre dead, Brown quoted one of
the deputies as telling him while brandishing a pistol.
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Monday, Juna 1,1970, The Florida Alfioetor,

On the frontier with Jordan, Israeli military
spokesmen reported that troops caught the
guerrilla patrol in the Besian Valley one mile
inside Israel and 15 miles south of the Sea of
Galilee near Maoz Hyyim.
THE SPOKESMAN said 10 guerrillas were
killed and one captured.
Jordan said its forces fought a 65-minute duel
with the Israelis across the border with tank,
artillery and machine guns Thursday night in the
South Jordan valley, the scene of almost nightly
exchanges. Jordan said the Israeli barrages caused
no damage or casualties.
At the same time, Tel Aviv reported that Arab
guerrillas in Lebanon fired several bazooka shells
across the northern frontier to hit the Israeli
settlement of Idmit but that no casualties were
reported.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, June 1,1970

TOKYO Thousands of radical students staged
peaceful demonstrations against U. S. military bases
throughout Japan Sunday demanding that the
Americans leave this country.
A homemade bomb exploded harmlessly inside
one American air base.
The rallies marked the beginning of three weeks
of expected leftist protests against the U. S. military
security treaty which comes up for renewal June 23.
PARIS France expects an official exchange of
views with the Soviet Union on the Indochinese and
Middle East conflicts this week during the five-day
visit of Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko, official
French sources said Sunday.
BOGOTA, Columbia A Columbian Avianca
airliner with 41 passengers and four crewmen
aboard was hijacked Sunday by two unidentified
armed men who ordered the pilot to fly to Cuba.
An Avianca spokesman said the Avro-748
turbo-prop landed at Barrancabermeja, an Oil
refining center on the Magdalena River, for refueling

COLUMBUS, Ohio Nine Ohio State University
students and the parents of one student filed a suit
in Common Pleas Court against 12 student strike
leaders, asking those who participate in
demonstrations be put off the campus.
A hearing was set for Tuesday morning.
The suit sought $1 million in damages and a
permanent injunction. It also asked for a
declaratory judgment on whether students, parents
and taxpayers have a right to insist on enforcement
of rules to maintain order on the campus.
The suit claimed it was a misapplication of
taxpayer money to pay professor who delivered
disruptive speeches.
WASHINGTON The Justice Department has
told U. S. attorneys to drop charges against about
600 young men who refused to be drafted for
antiwar reasons and were ordered for immediate
induction by their draft boards as punishment.
The order, issued last Jan. 30, is an outgrowth of
two Supreme Court decisions which said draft
boards may not reclassify or speed-up the induction
of antiwar protestors they declare delinquent.
The policy, disclosed Thursday* was spelled out
by assistant Attorney General Will R. Wilson, chief
of the criminal division.
HOUSTON Cancer should be considered a
disease that can be prevented rather than a dread
malady that can only be treated after it strikes, a
pair of leading specialists urged Sunday.
Dr. Phillip Shubik of Omaha, Neb., and Dr.
Benedetto Terracini of Milan, Italy leaders of a
closing panel session at the 10th International
Cancer Congress said much more work should be

TALLAHASSEE Two representatives of
Floridians Against Bullfighting* began lobbying in
an effort to repeal the bloodless bullfighting bill
passed last week.
_ Mrs. Barbara Karp of Dunedin and Mrs. Conon
Swann of Largo said they hoped to get 32 senators
to co-sign the repeal measure introduced by Sen.
Bill Young, R-Seminole.
They had already gotten signatures of Sens.
Henry Sayler, R-St. Petersburg, John Bell, R-Fort
Lauderdale, and J. H. Williams, D-Oclala.
LAKELAND Motorists using the Florida
Turnpike over the Memorial Day weekend can have
a free automobile safety check and orange juice at
the Fort Lauderdale Exchange, the Florida
Department of citrus said Sunday.
Hal Gardner, director of the Sell Florida First

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and repair of its engine. He did not say what
was wrong with the engine.
The plane was commandeered shortly after taking
off from Bogotas Eldorado Airport en route to
Bucaramanga, 190 miles northeast of here.
MADRID U. S. Secretary of State William P.
Rogers met with Spanish head of state
Generalissimo Francisco Franco Sunday about
renewal of American base rights but declined to see
opposition leaders because the Franco regime
opposed the meeting.
The secretary was aware of the Spanish
governments attitude against it, U. S. officials
said. As a guest of the government it would have
been difficult for the secretary to accept it.
They said Rogers delivered a letter to Franco
from President Nixon expressing hope that a new
agreement providing for the continued presence of
American military bases in Spain will be concluded
soon.

done to study cancer as a public health menace.
NEW YORK A woman plunged from the fifth
floor window of a hospital with her newborn son in
her arms early Sunday killing both herself and the
the 4-day-old infant.
Police said Toni Katz, 32, apparently jumped
from the hall window at Beth Israel Hospital at 6:30
am. a hospital physician pronounced mother and
child dead at the scene.
A hospital spokesman said Mrs. Katz, admitted to
Beth Israel May 27, appeared perfectly normal,
had a good relationship with her physicians and
had been looking forward to her discharge from the
hospital.
Police identified her husband as Moishe Katz.
WASHINGTON The Nixon administration will
not propose additional taxes this election year even
if the deficit in the federal budget soars to $5
billion, a high-ranking administration official said.
SAN CLEMENTE -President Nixon assembled
his top military commanders from Washington and
Saigon Sunday for a high-level planning session on
the Southeast Asian war.
The afternoon conference brought together for
the first time in six months the top U. S. military
commander in Vietnam, Gen. Creighton W. Abrams,
and Washingtons strategic planners.
The President wanted a first-hand report from the
South Vietnamese and Cambodian battlefields
before making his address to the nation sometime in
June on what has been accomplished by his
controversial decision to send U. S. troops into
Cambodia.

program, said every motorist taking advantage of
the safety check will receive tickets for two servings
of orange juice.
TALLAHASSEE House and Senate conferees
stretched estimates of available funds almost to the
breaking point Sunday in approving a no new tax
$1,285 billion general revenue budget apparently
acceptable to nearly all factions in the legislature.
The vote to tentatively approve the bill was 12-1,
with Republican Sen. Henry Sayler of St. Petersburg
the only dissenter. Sayler said he wanted to cut a
few million more dollars to more nearly match the
$1,273 billion estimate of total available funds
including a standard 2.5 per cent lapse factor of
funds appropriated but not spent for one reason or
another.^

1 Sagging Ratings
I I
Sting Labor Party)
LONDON (UPI) Prime Minister Harold Wilson, stung by i|
jS egging opinion poU ratings, took the offensive Sunday in the $
| first of a series of American-style, meet-the-people whistles-top §
tours. : :
.v This is more whistle than stop, Wilson said as he and his :
j: wife Mary swung into a half-day of rapid fire handshaking, ;j
ji street corner chatting and meeting local labor party candidates
: in his native Yorkshire. :j:
j: THE TWO LATEST opinion polls indicated a marked swing :
ji in favor of the opposition Conservative party. j!
: The Sunday Telegraphs call up poll showed Labors lead cut ji
: from 7to 5.5 per cent in the past 10 days. The Sunday Times
: opinion Research Center poll gave the Conservatives a 2 per
j: cent edge for the first time since April. The Sunday Observer, >;
: averaging out the results of five national polls, gave Labor an :
: overall 2.6 per cent lead.
: Wilson showed no sign of discouragement. ;
: WONDERFUL TIME of year to have an election, he ; j|
: remarked to supporters on Yorkshire, where the weather was i;
:j balmy and springlike. Open air meetings, factory gate meetings :
you can do everything. :
5 Wilson had a virtual monopoly on Sunday vote-catching. :j
J Conservative leader Edward Heath worked at his fathers :
:j: seaside home at Broadstairs, polishing speeches for a two-week :
j barnstorming tour by plane, helicopter and automobile he :
j: planned to launch Monday. :
i; The Liberal party leader, Jeremy Thorpe, and his wife ij:
i Caroline celebrated their second wedding anniversary at home §
j: with their son Rupert.
% *

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RVN Launch
Cambodia Drive
SAIGON (UPI) Thousands of South Vietnamese
infantrymen opened a new campaign in Cambodia Sunday -a
sweep through jungles along the Mekong River in search of a
North Vietnamese forces battered in fighting around the
province capital of Prey Veng.
The Phnom Penh government announced the imposition of
martial law effective at midnight in a move that decreed the
death penalty for troublemakers.
IN SOUTH VIETNAM, North Vietnamese troops who had
occupied part of the resort city of Dalat slipped away under the
cover of darkness and abandoned three places they had held for
more than 24 hours.
Military sources said local commanders in Dalat had allowed
the Communists to withdraw to avoid a major battle that could
have destroyed parts of the scenic city on the cool highlands
245 miles north of Saigon. It has been a tourist magnet for
years.
There was some criticism by high-ranking American and
South Vietnamese generals for the failure of Dalat commanders
and U. S. advisers to order pursuit of the North Vietnamese
invaders.
BUT THIS WAS tempered with praise and relief that the city
of 70,000 persons had been saved.
UPI correspondent Robert E. Sullivan, reporting from Dalat,
said the invasion was carried out by 200 North Vietnamese
regulars wearing khaki uniforms. At least 47 were reported
killed in fighting that cost 16 South Vietnamese dead and 32
wounded.
The new campaign in Cambodia sent a column of 120 South
Vietnamese army vehicles from Neak Luong, a ferry crossing on
the Mekong River, on the first leg of a mission that will
eventually reach Kompong Cham, Cambodias second largest
city.
THE OBJECTIVE was a force of North Vietnamese who fled
west from Prey Veng late last week after two days of fighting
with Cambodian and South Vietnamese troops in the streets of
the city.
Field reports identified the retreating North Vietnamese as
men of the 272nd Regiment, 9th Division.
Phnom Penh communiques said at least 125 were slain in the
Prey Veng fight.
NEAK LUONG is about 30 miles southeast of Phnom Penh
and about 25 miles upstream from the point where the Mekong
River crosses the Vietnamese border. Kompong Cham is about
70 miles upstream from Phnom Penh.
A report from U. S. headquarters said 236 Americans had
been killed and 896 wounded in Cambodian operations since
May 1.
Russian Generals Gain
Increasing Influence
ROME (UPI) The Red Armys generals have gained substantial
influence in the Kremlin to become a pressure group of notable
consequences, according to qualified Allied and neutral diplomatic
sources.
Diplomatic observers have reported to the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization (NATO) that the hand of the generals can be felt
stronger than ever before in peacetime Soviet Russia, sources said.
THE RED ARMY chiefs expanded influence has weighed in
Russias recent foreign policy decisions. It plays a key role in the
Kremlins military entrenchment in the Middle East, the defense
buildup against Red China and Soviet pressure for integration of
Warsaw Pact forces, the reports said.
The reports are corroborated by Communist sources opposed to the
growing influence of the military on Soviet political leadership.
In its push into policy making the Red army has been careful not to
challenge the Communist partys role in the Moscow power setup,
headed by Leonid I. Brezhnev.
IT HAS, IN fact, openly acknowledged the partys supremacy, the
sources said.
But Brezhnev was reported working closely with Red army chiefs,
including Gen. Andrei A. Grechko, Soviet defense minister and an ally
of Brezhnev since World War 11.
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Nixons Senate Supporters
Prepare Curb Filibuster

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Thirty to 40 senators are
prepared to filibuster a curb on
President Nixons military
intervention in Cambodia until
U. S. troops are pulled out, Sen.
Robert J. Dole, R-Kan., said
Sunday.
In a UPI Washington Window
interview, Dole said he hoped
some compromise could be
reached and added, Hopefully
this week, next week, we can
work out some kind of
accommodation.
OTHERWISE, DOLE said,
There are probably 30 or 40 of
us who are willing to talk at
length, at least until the troops
are removed from Cambodia.
The Cooper-Church
amendment, which cuts off
funds for retaining U. S. troops
in Cambodia after July 1, gets its
first major test Wednesday when
the Senate votes on additional
language proposed by Dole.
Doles proposal would allow
re-entry of U. S. forces into
Cambodia if American prisoners
are held there. After the vote,
the Senate will resume debate
with another vote during the
week unlikely.
SENATE REPUBLICAN
ORDERS WITH
PHYSICAL PLANT
SHOULD BE PLACED
7 DAYS IN
ADVANCE.
ABSOLUTELY NO
STAGES WILL BE
SET WITH LESS THAN
48 HRS. NOTICE

It does 0 to 150
in 21 seconds. M
Sowedorithandccffr
the keys to just any km
that comes along.
SEE THE TEAM
Outside the Game Room,
in the Reitz Union Jjr I rMSUKKKKMS^^
Itfc an education.

Leader Hugh Scott said Sunday
that after the Dole amendment
vote he expects Sen. Robert C.
Byrd, D-W.Va., to introduce a
resolution which may contain
language protective of the power
of the commander-in-chief to
protect the armed forces
abroad.
The proposal declared nothing
in the Cooper-Church
amendment would prevent
Nixon from taking action to
protect American troops.
Scott made his remarks in a
broadcast interview,
Profile-Metromedia.
HE INDICATED an attempt
was being made to get White
House backing for the Byrd
legislation. The administration
was opposed any Senate action
even favorable compromises
involving its Indochina activity.
Dole, a staunch
administration backer, said the
Byrd proposal would be a key
test vote. It will be a test vote
and I would guess it could pass,
Dole said. I would guess even
some of the sponsors might even
vote for the amendment to
protect American armed forces.
Asked to evaluate the chances
that the Cooper-Church

Student franchise Plan
The Sea-Swinger MW has been one of A
Americas best selling sailboats. A full \ A
12 sloop rigged boat at only $179.95.
If you wish to know more about a
franchise, contact:
MR. SAUL B. GREEN, director of marketing
SILTRONICS INC. PACIR PRODUCTS DIVISION
140 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE / OAKMONT, PENNSYLVANIA 13139

Monday, Junt 1070, Th*. 'orida Alligator

amendment would be approved,
Dole said, If we were to vote
on the so-called Cooper-Church
amendment n0w,... it would
pass the Senate.
I doubt that it would ever
become law.
Peronislas
Threatened
BUENOS AIRES (UPI) The
kidnaping of former President
Pedro Eugenio Aramburu
threatened Sunday to touch off
a violent feud between the
Peronistas and an organization
of retired military officers.
Supporters of exiled former
dictator Juan Domingo Peron
have claimed credit for the
kidnaping and a prominent
group of former officers who
helped depose Peron has
threatened revenge if Aramburu
is harmed.

Page 7



Page 8

t. The Florida Alligator. Monday, Jura 1, 1970

Tlie
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Sorry Father From the Back You Looked Like A Protestant
Mitchells Dilemma

WASHINGTON Attorney General John
Mitchell, who has had a fine time indicting big-name
Democrats, must now decide whether to prosecute
two prominent Republicans. They are:
West Virginias Gov. Arch Moore, a Phi Delta
Phi mountaineer with a clean-cut, all-American
look, who has been accused by Internal Revenue of
pocketing over SBO,OOO in campaign contributions.
The case has been forwarded to the Justice
Departments Tax Division for action.
Rep. James Collins, the aristocratic
multi-millionaire from Dallas, who has been accused
by this column of taking kickbacks from his office
help. His 78-year-old father, Can Collins, received a
personal birthday greeting last month from
President Nixon, and the Collins fortune has helped
to bankroll the Republican cause in Texas. Among
those who have received financial support from
Collins is Will Wilson, now the Assistant Attorney
General in charge of the Criminal Division. The
kickback case, therefore, has been turned over to his
deputy, Henry Petersen, who has ordered a full FBI
investigation.
Gov. Moores tax troubles came to the attention
of the White House recently when he was
recommended for an appointment to a presidential
advisory committee. White House troubleshooter
Clark Mollenhoff heard rumors of the tax
investigation and asked Internal Revenue to send
him the file- After reviewing the evidence, he
strongly recommended against Moores
appointment.
Result: Instead of receiving presidential honors,
the governor had his tax case referred to the Justice
Department.
* *
He allegedly transferred campaign contributions
to his personal accounts and invested the money on
the stock market. Under the law, funds that are
diverted from political to personal use must be
reported as income. The governor explained to tax
agents that he had invested the campaign money in
the hope of increasing the amount, but that he had
intended eventually to use it for political purposes.
He refused to return repeated calls from this column
seeking his comment.
The huskily handsome Moore had been caught in
financial irregularities before he was elected
governor. As a congressman, he arranged for the
taxpayers to pay part of his printing bill and provide
him with a private pilot. His pilot, Floyd Graham,
was carried on Moores congressional payroll for 20
months. Yet at the same time Graham was
employed, supposedly full time, by Ohio Valley
Aviation, Inc., in Wheeling, W. Va., assigned to fly
Moore around the state.
Moore also sent his private printing business to
the Art Press in Washington and worked out a neat
scheme for paying the bills without cost to himself.
He simply put the print shops Carl Baron on the
public payroll. The printer did no work for the
taxpayers and credited government paychecks
against Moores personal printing bill.
Gentleman Jim Collins, as the impeccable
congressman from Dallas, is known, collected
irjrirtmrW from his staff to help finance office
projects. Most of the money was turned over to his
administrative assistant, George Haag, who signed a

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors
Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Merry-Go-Round
flllllilllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH
by Jack Anderson
statement on March 7, 1970 -two days after our
expose appeared that he had never received any
kickback money.
This is now being contradicted by Haag himself in
a statement to FBI agents Forrest F. John and
Alfred C. Ellington. Haag admitted to the agents
that he accepted money from employes to help pay
needed additional office expenses. He insisted,
however, that the payments were voluntary, not
compulsory.
It is a federal violation for a congressional office
to take kickbacks of government payroll money for
any purpose.
* *
Noel Reed, who also signed a statement on March
7 that he had never received or given any money of
any type to anyone that works in Congressman
Collins office, has now admitted in a sworn
statement: I would give George A. Haag some of
my own money to use for these (office) projects.
Carolyn Conner, the former manager of Collins
Dallas office, has sworn to FBI agents that she
collected kickbacks from Reed and delivered the
money in sealed envelopes to Haag. She backed up
her statement with detailed notations from a
shorthand notebook.
Her former secretary, Carole Joyce Ancelein, also
confirmed Miss Conners story to the FBI in
Ankara, Turkey, where she is now working for the
Air Force. She gave FBI agents, who called upon her
in Turkey, an eye-witness account of some of the
transactions.
This column also has affidavits from Sue
Gutterman and Lea Baker, two part-time workers,
who kicked back part of their government salaries
to Collins Washington office manager, Bernard
Wunder.
The FBI is still trying to nail down the role of
Ray Fortner, who was paid $25,616 annually as
director of field work. As an example of
Fortners work, Collins told this column that he
paid his aide $2,174.74 a month to count all the
homes in the congressional district displaying die
flag last Fourth of July.
Painful as it may be for Attorney General
Mitchell to investigate top Republicans he has made
it clear that the law must be enforced equally
against Democrats and Republicans.

Phyllis Gallub
Assignment Editor

Dan Vintng
Entertainment Editor

Alligator Staff

Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor

EDITORIAL
'Come Together
Spirit Shown
Appropriately, the Committee to Study the Removal and
Control of Guns on Campus released its report to us on
Come Together Day.
The report indicated to us that students, faculty and
administrators can work together on the most controversial
issues and produce findings of benefit to all factions.
Although bom in an intense emotional climate, the
committee managed, to produce a report conspicuously
absent of extremist, irrational views. Instead, its low-keyed
recommendations offer viable means of making the UF
campus safe. Among the best were,
recognizing the need for police to carry firearms;
eliminating guns from all students, including those
living in fraternity and sorority areas contiguous to the
campus;
eliminating guns from all visitors to the campus by
legislation enacted by the Florida Legislature,
§ eliminating armed guards at entrances to the
university;
the suggesting by seven committee members that
students man checkpoints at the entrances to the university.
The last two suggestions are particularly attractive, on a
number of grounds. First, unarmed students would
eliminate a rather persistent resemblance the UF has for the
Guantanemo Naval Base in Cuba. We doubt if the confines
of our campus are so sancrosanct, the football field
notwithstanding, that armed police are needed to check
traffic.
9 Secondly, removing police and replacing them with
students would free those officers of more than 150 hours
of standing boredom and allow them to patrol the campus
more effectively. At least ten jobs for needy students could
also be created in the process.
Perhaps the spirit of cooperation was expressed best in
one paragraph when the report said, Courtesy, interest,
dialogue, appreciation and encouragement are expressions
which we all can use to promote the best values of the
academic community and life in general. As individuals we
must all search for such opportunities, particularly with
those persons we might seem furthest from.
We hope the committees effort is acceptable to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell and Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder both for its merits as well as the spirit it
represents.
I 1
this is getting serious

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor

Jeff Brain
Editorial Assistant

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, ousiness, Adve r tising in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union'.
Editorial, phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone ,392-1681, 82, 83.
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
exprw ed the Florida Alligator are those of
or of *£ of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.



Speaking Out

A letter appeared in the
Alligator the other day, in which.
it was suggested that eliminating
ROTC because one is opposed to
war is akin to eliminating a fire
department because one is
opposed to fire. Id like to share
an experience which I think
throws some light on the
subject.
In the town I came from, we
had a marvelous fire department.
The neighboring town also had a
fine fire department. The only
problem was that there were no
fires. This upset the fire chiefs of
the two towns, because they had
graduated from fire-fighting
academies where they had been
taught that fire-fighting was a
great and glorious adventure,
and they were afraid that fame
and honor would pass them by if
there were no fires in which they
could prove their valor.
Moreover, each town had a
factory which made fire engines
for their respective fire
departments. The factories were
idle because there hadnt been
any fires to create a demand for

Keep Right-

Campus moderates and
conservatives have finally come
together to assure their voice is
heard and their interests
protected from a militant
minority.
The catalyst was the closing
of UF May 8.
This action convinced many
students it could and would
happen here if they did not
organize and do something
about it.
It convinced them certain
leftist elements on this campus
have no respect for the rights of
anyone else.
They also discovered
university administrations are
quick to give in to militant
demands when there is no
effective student opposition to
the militants.
Two new organizations are a
direct outgrowth of the events
that took place that week.
Students fdr Equal Protection
Under the Law (SEPUL) will
bring a law suit against the state
for damages and has drawn up
an injuction to require the
school to stay open in the
future.
It is interresting to note that
the militant Left changed its
slogan from on strike dose it
down to a far more moderate
goal on May 29th of an open
university for antiwar
discussion.

LETTERS POLICY
Lctlifi mutt*
Bo typed, signed, double geced and not exceed
SOOwonb.
Not bo rignod wHh a pseudonym.
Have addresses and talaphone numbers of writers.
Names wriN be withheld only if writer dtows Just
cause. The edtor reserves the riott to edit aH letters for
Writers may submit longer essays, oolumns or letters
to be eonsldemd for use ae "Speaking Out" columns.
Any writer interested in submitting a regular column is
asked to contact the editor and be prepared to show
aonplas of Ida work.

There Wasnt A Fire

new fire engines.
The problem was solved when
each fire chief decided to send
his men out to set fires in the
fields between the two towns.
The townsfolk, not knowing
what had happened, sounded the
alarms, and the firemen rushed
to the scene. The fire
departments of both towns
fought the blaze valiantly, and
when it was finally extinguished,
it was discovered that a great
amount of fire-fighting
equipment had worn out in the
process. Each town had to levy a
special tax to pay for new
equipment, and for the medals
awarded to the courageous fire
crews.
From that time on, the day
never passed that there wasnt a
new fire. The fire engine
manufacturing companies
declared new dividends daily due
to their increased business in
replacing equipment, and the
fire crews collected a great
number of ribbons and medals
for their valor. But the
townspeople suffered under an
increasing burden of taxes which

An Even Broader Front

On an even broader front is
the Coalition.
It represents a spectrum of
political thought from liberal
Democrats to the Young
Americans for Freedom.
Headed by Bill DeArteaga, a
graduate student in history, it
will provide an alternative to the
Radical-Revolutionary Left.
It acts as a communication,
information, and coordinating
center between the organizations
and individuals who comprise its
membership.*
It wont make policy or take
direct action as a group. But it
will assure each organization in
it is informed as to what the
others are doing.
If Young Americans for
Freedom plans a rally in the
Plaza of the Americas and needs
help, the Coalition will not
require support from all its
membership. What it will do is
let the other groups know what
it is planning to do so they can
help if they wish.
The most encouraging sign of
this movement is these groups
are searching for areas of
agreement for coordinating
action rather than areas of
disagreement.
The biggest stumbling block
between moderates and
conservatives has been constant
internal bickering. They
emphazied ideological purity

were necessary to pay for all
this.
At the time I left, the young
people of the two towns were in
the streets agitating for the
elimination of the fire
departments. Their elders,

/ \\ ft /mm

and doctrinaire positions at the
expense of coming together for
constructive action.
The result was a constant
splitting and factionalizing of
moderate-conservative strength.
So much time and energy was
spent fighting each other there

Confused Students

MR. EDITOR:
It seems that no matter what organization tries to
reform this university, the Alligator reports what it
wants to have happened instead of giving the truth
to the campus.
The report of the Student Senate is the latest
case. One of the resolutions passed by the senate
was that the Faculty Senate consider ten proposals
of the Black Student Union. The Student Senate
also sent them to committee to be studied.
This resolution is extremely important, especially
considering the racial situation and the lack of white
support of black students. WHY WAS THIS NOT
REPORTED?
The second misrepresentation was your report of
the dissent over the ROTC resolution. Most
discussion of that bill was merely informational, but
your reporter blew up the opposition to such a
point that it seemed he was editorializing in favor of
the present system.
Anyone involved in any activity at UF has a
feeling of deja vu reading the Alligator same
selective reporting, same editorializing in supposed
news items. The only news available on campus is
inaccurate and incomplete. No wonder students
here are confused and/or apathetic.
JUDITH ROSS, 7AS
Contact
MR. EDITOR:
Ten black students at Highlands Junior High
School in Jacksonville, Florida were put out of
school almost three months ago and they cannot
return.
An urgent appeal is made to faculty, students and
concerned individuals to find housing for these

however, wanted to keep the fire
departments because most of the
jobs in the two towns were
connected with the fire-engine
manufacturing companies; they
condemned the young peoples
dissent.
Tempers grew hot until at last

was none left for the common
foe.
Hopefully, times they are
a-changing.
I regret to report that the
exception to the generally
optimist picture of a comming
together of the moderate-right

Monday, Juna 1,1970, The Florida Alligator,

By F. Richard Nolle

OPEN FORUM:-^^
( Aim mi Viaut J
hope forth rnmplacwL**^
students when they come to Gainesville to
participate in a summer enrichment program.
Interested persons may contact me in the
Department of Romance Languages.
BOOKER C. PEEK, 7AS
Correction
MR. EDITOR:
Please note the retraction which is supposed to be
printed on the front page of this issue. I am quite
concerned that a journalism student is able to have
access to the printed page without being more
closely supervised. I am referring specifically to the
story *Can be hunted forever on page 18 of the
Alligator, Friday, May 29.
First, I specifically informed the reporter that I
am a law student, not yet a lawyer. A simple error
of this nature has already caused me considerable
embarrassment and may require clarification to the
Florida Bar.
Second, regarding lease skippers, I stated that
one may be haunted, not hunted. In addition I
explained that what was meant by this was simply
that very frequently a person applies for a job with
a company, or governmental agency that checks out
credit and residence references. As a result, an
applicant might well have problems getting the job
he wanted, if he has a history of breaking contracts
and leaving bad debts.
JAMES C. MASON, 4LW
MGR. UNIVERSITY GARDENS TRACE

several of the young protestors
were killed by firemen's axes at
the comer of Kent St. and
Jackson. What the outcome will
be is hard to predict, but this
much seems clear: He who
knows how to put out a fire,
best knows how to start one.

By Fred Vollrath

coalition is the UF Young
Republicans.
Their contribution to a united
front against the Radical-
Revolutionary Left was to spend
their last meeting having
one-half their membership
censure the other half because of
internal personality conflicts.

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
50 x 10 Schult trailer; AC; washer;
carpet; 20 x 10 screen porch; all in
excellent cond. Lot 5 Plnehurst Pk.
378-5450. Best Offer. (A-10t-145-p)
STEREO turntable S4O, amplifier
$45, speakers S4O, Call 378-4200.
(A-5M48-P)
1963 MGB mint year excellent
condition will last forever. Good
tires, 48,000 miles, new metallic
paint Job 378-7930 ask for Pam.
(A-st-148-p)
New Kustom 200 amp with fuzz,
trem, rev, and set. boost. 3-15
Jensen speakers. Vox Continental
organ. Shura microphone. Call
392-8225. (A-st-148-p)
8-track car units $38.95 lots of tapes
on sale everyday at $4.99. All others
$5.88 Muntz 14 NW 13th Street
(A-Bt-149-p)
Honda 50 Must sell Perfect condition
Best offer 378-2809. (A-st-149-p)
8x34 altrinlnum trailer, has screened
porch and Bxlo added room. Student
park near campus. SIOSO
alrconditloned, $950 without
376-8082 anytime. (A-5M49-P)
Sell Hobte 96 surfboard Good
shape. Best offer. Call 378-3833
Week days ASK FOR TOM.
(A-5M49-P)
lpitl&M[ I NOW!
I-. aMi 84. M 21 a * 4* V|
I I er hr l I Pp
;>X;Xv
|P:'v y.\
BICIUBn BIPSK
nllU
GALLED HORSE
CoHwnonwsllh United Prwnts a Grind Film Starring
c Peter§dkrs
& G Ringpstarr
in c Qie c Magic
Qiristiaif
SUMMER MOVIE CLUB
TICKETS NOW ON
SALE 12 SHOWS $1.50

DEADLINE!
WEDNESDAY JUNE 3
ALL CLASSIFIEDS FOR THE LAST
2 ISSUES OF THE ALLIGATOR
MUST BE IN BY 4:00 PM
ROOM 330 J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
CLASSIFIEDS OFFICE
1

FOR SALE
67 Honda 90 runs fine, great fun!
$125 Call Mike 392-7507
(A-150-3t-p)
Webcor portable stereo HI-FI and
smith-corona portable
TYPEWRITER and case. Must sell.
Call 392-7639. (A-st-150-p)
1969 Yamaha Enduro 125 cc 3500 ml
excellent cond. $375 4.00 x 18 knob.
7 mo old see at 304 NW 15 St. RmlO
(A-st-150-p)
1967 Honda CB 160, 4700 miles,
perfect condition, bell helmet, used
very little, must sell, would like
$325. Call 373-1253 or 392-0128.
(A-Bt-150-p)
Fight Servomation, buy my 3 cu. ft.
refrigerator. Perfect for dorm living.
Counter-top with walnut finish. Also
coronet. Call 392-8089 (A-150-st-p)
CLEAN rugs, like new, so easy to do
with Blue Lustra. Rent Electric
shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-155-c)
Acetone compact organ $175 Haynes
Bass Amp $l5O Drum set SSO Fender
Palomino acustlcal guitar with hard
case $l5O Call 372-1297 or
378-0928. (A-151-st-p)
Hotpolnt Refrigerator, 2 door no
frost automatic Ice maker 18 mos.
old available June 6 S2OO Call
anytime 376-0401 (A-151-3t-p)
SUBURBIA DRIVE IN
Across From Mall Phone 372-8523
Winner Best Picture of the Year
v MIDNIGHT COWBOY
V PLUS CO-HIT
x ALICE'S RESTAURANT
ailiraiwKX^kiEfiMMfliakf
LAST
Mjylidjl 11 4 days
what they
J do best!
&BICAMHHU-HMPABr
LAST
yl4 DAYS
pa%ivrg
*
a Nimplc wry ahum $
M. a nun and awi man. m
iCS andawcmun.
sitjOpSik^ a wtmwnr
***J!U***
LAST
lMIU4 DAYS
I rn W. WefrecWtr Aw.

Page 10

1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, June 1,1970

FOR SALE
x*x*x%*x*x # x # x # x*x # x*x x*x%*x£xXtX
68 Dodge *ton camper 10 Vz.Gas
stove, stereo, beautiful condition.
$2995 Call 378-5150 (A-151-st-p)
Women and speed are two
transtitlonal things we carry them
both in our bodies. Myers type dune
buggy available In all colors and
metalflakes for only $195 Mike
Sullivan ATO house 372-9427
(A-151-6t-p)
DYNAMITE STEREO, only 4 mos.
old. Must sell for cash. 2 AR-2ax
speakers, $l6O. Sony 355 stereo deck
+ 15 tapes, $175. Sansul 2000, lOOw
am-fm receiver, $225. CALL anytime
373-2296, ask for Rick (A-151-3t-p)
GE stereo girl's bike Schwln
1-speed medium-sized fan records
textbooks paperbacks transistor
radio with 9-volt converter + MORE
call 392-9406 (A-151-st-PV ~"
STEREO harmon kardon, garrard
40 mk. II built-in, am/fm, 60 watt
spks, dust cover, tape rec, 400 new,
sacrifice 290 Call Steve at 392-7128
(A-151-st-p)
Labrador pups AKC registered top
breeding 8 weeks old females SSO
each Day 372-2547 Nite 376-2827
(A-st-151-p)
69 Vespa 125 cc Good- Condition
$l4O Call 392-7549 after 5 P.M.
(A-st-150-p)
MOTOROLA black & white TV. Big
23 screen, stand. In perfect
condition. $65. Call 372-7882
anytime. (A-2t-152-p)
Headquarters for Cypress Garden
skis. Dunlop tennis balls 1.50 can.
Handball gloves 3.00. Barbell set 110
lb. 29.50. B & B SPORTS CENTER
1406 N.W. 13th St. (A-5M52-P)
1970 Bridgestone, 200cc, low
mileage, just tuned, SSOO, call
378-8480 after 11 AM or 378-9084
after 7 PM. (A-st-152-p)
Must sell (grad) 650 Triumph
S7OO, typewriter $25, stereo phono
sls, weights $lO, call Scott
378-2873, Landmark Apts. no. 8.
(A-3t-152-p)
1968 55396 Chevelle full power a
real performer cragar mags factory
tape speakers must sell at sacrifice
S2IOO call Mark Nelson 392-9506.
(A-3t-152-p)
Honda 50 Sport, Must Sell. Excellent
condition with helmet and tools. Best
offer. Call Jeff 392-8320.
(A-st-152-p)
Remington typewriter and case for
sale. Good condition Call Doug
378-1998. (A-3t-152-p)
ARGUS CAMERA 35mm with flash
$25 372-7950. (A-3t-152-p)
SURFBOARD hansen hustler 7'4"
good stick $90.00 call Jack at
392-8161 after 7:00 p.m.
(A-2M52-P)
Available September 10x47 New
Moon; 2 bdrm; central heat; AC; new
shag carpeting. Excellent condition;
near Unlv., shaded lot. S3OOO.
378-7667. (A-st-152-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
MONDAY
Baked Meat Sauce and
Macaroni 79 C
All you can eat m
TUESDAY
Golden Fried Chicken

FOR RENT
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-c)
30 yards behind Norman Hall. 2
bdrm. 1 bath no lease ac furnished
$35 for June $75 a month 1103 SW
7th Ave. 378-5410 after 5 pm.
(B-st-149-p)
FREE one month rant, extra
bookcases, kitchen & bthroom equip,
and more. Sublet 2 bdr. apt for
summer. 141 Landmark or call
373-1968. (B-5M49-P)
Several 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet $l2O mo. Colonial Manor
apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave. 372-7111
Grad students preferred. Special rates
for summer guarter now in effect.
(B-ts-109-c)
Modem bedroom apL, quiet behind
the mall, ww, central a.c. 100 per
month, regular sllO call after 5
373-2889 can move In June 1.
(B-st-14$-p)
3-bedroom apt., offstreet parking,
full bath, kitchen, living rm, 16,500
B.T.U. A/C. Min. of 1 qtr. lease.
$l3O mo. 408 NE Ist Ave. 376-0317.
(B-5M49-P)
Across street from campus studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
Included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace Apts. 1225 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-109-ts-c)
Sublet 3-bedroom house Vz block
from campus $125/mo. 378-7726 or
392-9259 1224 SW 1 Ave. furnished
full kitchen. (B-st-149-p)
For rant for fall, alr-conditloned
apartments near campus. SBO to
$145 per month, pool. University
Apartments. Call 376-8990 evenings.
(B-Bt-149-p)
Large house to sublet for summer: 3
bdrms, 2 baths, kitchen, etc. 1 blk.
from campus Interested call
373-2268 or come by 1128 SW Ist
Ave. (B-10t-145-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus, A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
WILL DISCUSS PRICE on our 2
bdrm., AC Sin City apt. can rent
from one to four persons. Good
location and great neighbors. Call
372-1272. (B-3t-152-p)
1,2, or 3 girls spend entire summer
In Williamsburg for $125. Great
Townhouse apt. on pool 2 bedroom.
Call Mussy 372-7882 apt.-4.
(B-3t-152-p)

FOR RENT
One to three guys can rent our
Landmark apt and have a pool,
sauna, a/c, dishwshr, and neat
neighbors for only $46.25/per.i apt.
126 378-6277. (B-st-152-p)
Sublease summer qtr Landmark apt 2
br 2-4 persons A/C dishwasher grills
poolside. Dishes, pots, pans, kitchen
utensils left for you. 378-3851.
(B-st-152-p)
1 Bedroom Apt Available June 14
Private Patio AC Dogs Welcome Call
373-2982 After 5:00 p.m.
(B-st-149-p)
Two roommates needed. Private
room in 4 bedroom house $42.50/mo
no lease call 376-0703 after 6 pm.
(B-lt-152-p)
S9O per person, June rent free, 2 br
Fr Qtr no. 47, use of dishes, linens,
etc. Call 372-6768. Poolside, ac.
(B-st-152-p)
Sublet sum quarter Landmark atp.
46, A/C, carpet, dishwasher, pool
side. Call 373-1509 for Bargain.
(B-3M52-P)
1 br apt for summer term 3 blocks
from campus AC See at 328 NW 14
St after 4. (B-st-152-p)
VILLAGE PARK summer sublease 2
bdrm. poolside apt. no. 108. Come
by late afternoons, evenings.
(B-st-152-p)
1 male rm. to share lux air cond
mobile hm your own rm SSO mo. call
373-1690. (B-st-152-p)
2 bedroom aircondltloned furnished
completely very near campus. ONLY
SIOO a month TV cable nice peaceful
nelghtborhood call 372-7624.
(B-st-152-p)
2 roomates needed summer quarter
ML 2 br. townhouse In Landmark
apts. 90.00 for summer quarter call
after 4 378-2298 at 144 1111 S.W.
16 ave. (B-2M52-P)
Sub-let apt. Village Park no. 60 2
bedroom phone anytime available
June 15. (B-st-152-p)
Supercallfragllistlcexplaladoclous
deal 2 female roomies for Landmark
apt for summer you pay only July &
August hurry call 373-1883.
(B-4t-152-p)
Sublease for Summer. Two bedroom
apt. French Quarter 114. June rent
paid ed. SIBO mo. Great way to
spend the summer call 373-230 G.
(B-st-152-p)
Sublet summer qt. 2 bedroom
Tanglewood Manor apts. A/C, pool,
landscaped, Quiet. June 15 Sept
15., pay only 2 months rent. Call
373-2706. (B-st-148-p)
FOR RENT: Singles: Swing Into
summer In a luxurious air-conditioned
poolside apartment. Private bedroom
Walk to campus. S7O Include s
Utilities. 378-7224, (B-15t-148-p)
Frederick Gardens one-bedroom apt.
for summer. Available June 14. June
rent paid. Call 376-2909 or 392-0911
ask for Linda. (B-148-st-p)
Summer In a lovely apartment at
Point West will be one to remember
June is to Aug. 31 as little as
$300.00 for two apartments for 4
from $350.00 A quiet community
for people who want the best. You
will want to stay In September. Res.
Mgr. 372-3126 500 S. W. 34th Street.
(B-st-148-p)
Sublet or roommates for summer.
107 Landmark, 2 bdrm. poolside &
woodslde extra features + gym, bar
BQ, sauna, good parking. Call
373-1208. (B-st-148-p)
Summer Bargain, $375 complete.
Village Pk. no. 86, 1001 S. W. 16th
Ave, 2 br. furn., upstairs, AC, pool,
rsvd. pkg, quiet, spacious, call
372-1114. (B-st-148-p)
2 BLOCKS from campus. 1 br. ac
furnished apartment. Sublet for
summer. $95/mo Includes utilities.
Call 376-1331. (B-150-st-p)
Landmark apt. no. 27 2 br. Summer
Qtr. A/C dishwasher pool health club
June rent free good full qtr. Call
376-1834 (B-st-150-p)
"""" 1 -
MARRIED? 2-Bedroom Apt., Furn.,
AC, Private Patio, Pool, BIG kitchen,
quiet area of SW 16th Ave., Avail.
June 19th, $126/mo., 1405-28 SW
10th Tr 376-9091 (B-3t-150-p)
Available in June 3 bdr. house, 1 and
2 bdr. apts. central A/C $l2O and
SIOO a mo., furnished. Call 376-9525
before 11 A.M. or after 9 P.M.
(B-st-150-p)
LANDMARK PHASE II
SUMMER JUNE rent paid Ibr apt
162 call 372-7760 (B-151-st-p)
GATOR COURT
376-4667 JR 4170 SW
\ 13th St.
spend where the
the night.. price is right



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
::x*x ; x*x ; xwx ; x : x ; x ; xwx ; x ; x : x ; x*x*
5 bedrooms 4 entrances 3 fireplaces 2
bathrooms and a partridge in a pear
tree. AC house $2lO/month summer
W/ fall option. 1406 NW 5 Ave.
378-1080. Call or come by now.
Peace (B-151-2t-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom univ. gardens apt.
available for summer school and next
year. Call or see at 702 SW 16 Ave
no. 111. 376-8958. Perfect for 2
people. (B-151-st-p)
Sublet or rent 1 brm. furnished
alr-conditloned patio Village 34
$ 115/mo Call 373-1080 or 376-4807.
(B-st-148-p)
Sublet Summer 1 bedroom wood
panel apt. A/C, private patio, pet fee
paid, lots of extras slls a month
Village 34 apt 37 Call 378-5809
(B-5M42-P)
Single rooms for summer, winter
qtrs. 150/qtr maid linens utilities
close to campus, call or see 115 NW
10 St. Tom Ford 378-7222 378-5156
leave name (B-150-7t-p),
Men 3 Blocks from campus central
air conditioning single $155.00
double $l2O each for summer
quarter 378-8122 (B-10t-145-p)
Sublet sum qtr Landmark 1 bdr
June free sl3O/mo on pool
TV and stereo included no deposits
required apt 159. 372-0841
(B-151-st-p)
Camelot Large two-bedroom
furnished apt. all extras TV
dishwasher Central air summer qtr
only prefer careful tenants. Special
rates 378-5133 (B-151-st-p)
Have fun this summer. Sublet 1 br.
French Qtr. apt. Great location, right
on pool, furn., ww carpet, 120/mo
Call 378-8980 after 5 (B-151-3t-p)
1 br. apt. AC furn. Close to campus,
avail June Ist. No lease for summer.
SIOO Tel 373-2168 after 5 P.M.
(B-151-3t-p)
:-X'X*X*X*XX*X*XX*XX*X*X*XX*X*X*X-X
WANTED
X-X ; X ; X ; X*X-X=X-X ; X-X ; X : X-X-:>:XWX : X
WANTED: Coed to share luxurious
alr-conditloned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious
air-conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
1 male roommate for summer qtr. for
La Mancha $125 all summer Inc. util
A/C, carpet, furn, own bdr.
372-5833. (C-st-148-p)
-'M i I
Female roommate wanted to share a
two-bedroom air-conditioned house,
own room, only $65/mo. Close to
campus Call Carla 373-1992.
(C-st-148-p)
2-3 roomates for summer qtr. Village
Park apt., tv, stereo, bar, pool, air
cond. SIOO per qtr. each. Call
372-1117. (C-4t-149-p)
Desperate fmale rmmt needed Imm
Lamancha only $l4O incl utit for
entire summer no deposit last mos
rent paid Call day 392-3601 night
378-0768. (C-4M49-P)
Wanted male roommate for summer
Mt. Vernon apt. Call 376-5151
(C-4t-149-p)
Female roommate Own bedroom In
Village Pk. Apt $79 per mo. plus
utilities 376-2875 after 5 PM
(C-150-3t-p)
Male roommates wanted for summer
quarter to share spacious 4-bedroom,
2-bath, central-air apt. 1-block from
Norman Hall $45/month. 372-1272
(C-150-7t-p)
Male roommate wanted for fall. 2br,
2 full bath, A/C, La Bonne Vie apts.
Call; 378-8319. (C-3t-149-p)
Needed 1 or 2 girls for 2 bdrm 2 bath
Point West Apt. $65 for all summer
372-3126 (C-150-3t-p)
Listeners wanted: Will pay $2.00 for
one nour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and 4 PM for appointment
392-2049 (C-5M43-C)
Wanted Male roommate to sublet
ept for summer for SIOO. A/C,
carpeted, own bedroom. Move In
now. Call 373-2914 (C-150-st-p)
Men I Roommate needed for summer.
June rent free. Landmark no. 33 near
pool and quiet. Call 378-7543.
(C-150-st-p)
Female Roommate wanted for
summer. La Mancha apts. private
bedroom, air cond, pool, walking
distance from campus. June rent free
378-9611 (C-St-150-p)
Hip roomates wanted for summer
qtr. or will sub-lease air-con house
behind Norman. No deposits. Call
Sherry 376-8080 618 SW 10th St.
(C-7t-150-p)

'*'**'*"*""'-"-'-*-**-'*-*****XX*X-X*X*x*XvX*X*X
... ... Ol RE NT
v**x*x*X*X*;*X*X-X*X*
Female roommate to share 3
bedroom house summer qtr own
bedroom air conditioned S3O a
month call Karen 373-1396
(C-150-3t-p)
Two male roommates wanted for
summer. CAMELOT apt. 202,
$43/mo rent, pool, a/c, clubhouse,
TV, 376-0354 (C-150-st-p)
2 Female roommates needed for
French Quarter apt. no. 65. Air
cond., pool, etc. Only sllO for
summer. Call 372-3148 anytime.
(C-150-st-p)
TWIN SIZE BED anyone wanting to
sell one bed please call Claire at
392-9838 or Patti at 392-9240
(C-150-4t-p)
Landmark no. 25 3 female
roommates needed to sublet for
summer quarter call 378-6263
anytime (C-151-2t-p)
1 fern, roommate for Frederick
Gardens fall qtr. AC, pool, carpet,
etc. Call Melissa or Barbara 373-2480
HURRY! (C-151-3t-p)
TWO ROOMATES fall quarter Live
In Luxury at Pt. West apts
two-bedroom, two bath, a/c, pool,
carpeted. Be Ready for Fall!
373-2760. (C-3t-152-p)
$75 FOR THE ENTIRE SUMMER.
378-5784 ONE MALE ROOMMATE
FOR GREAT SAVINGS IN
LANDMARK. (C-st-152-p)
Female roommate. Own room In 2
bdrm Unlv. Gardens apt. $75/mo
Start Immediately call Diana at
392-1291 before 5, 373-1853 after 5.
(C-st-152-p)
Male roomate apt. 1 Village Park
share V* expenses no deposit call
378-8243. (C-st-152-p)
Hip female looking for others of
same gender and similar interests for
fall housing arrangement call
376-0928. (C-4t-152-p)
ROYERS RAUNCHY
ROADHOUSE has vacancies!
Students needed to share house next
to campus. Clothes dryer & washer,
baby grand piano, color TV, enclosd
vegetated yard fertilized by watch
dog. Private alr-cond bedroom,
$65/mo. Includes all utilities. Carl or
David, 372-5091. (C-3t-152-p)
2 male roomates wanted for summer
alr-acond., swimming pool,
dishwasher, June rent free $92 all
summer long Landmark apts. Call
378-2990. (C-3t-152-p)
2 male roomates, Summit House,
quiet a/c, pool; $75 each + utilities
for summer quarter; graduate
students are preferred; call 378-7889
(C-151-st-p)
2 coeds needed to share 2 bedroom
apt Summer quar ss4/mo
security dpt. free Unlv. Gardens
call Diane after 4:30 at 376-0716
(C-151-st-p)
1 or 2 coeds for super Landmark apt
summer quarter also 1 male for
large A/C house have own room
great deals! Low rent Call 378-3667
(C-3t-151-p
I need an apartment for fall quarter
ONLY Sin City preferred if you need
a roommate for fall only, call Lois
372-6513 (C-151-3t-p)
X ; X-X ; X ; X ; X\ ; X ; X ; X-X ; X ; X'X*X-XvX-:-X-:
help wanted
Co-ed wanted room and board in
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
Legal Secretary with previous
experience. For Interview call David
M. Anderson; Fagan, Crouch,
Anderson & Folds, 376-5295.
(E-146-10t-p)
Male: Summertime openings for
carhops and grill. Must be neat. Good
hourly wage. Apply Kings Food
Host 1802 W. Un. Ave. or 1430 S. W.
13th St. After 2:00 PM (E-ts-C)
Repairman for 8-track tape units
experienced man preferred good pay
MUNTZ 373-2333. TV Technician. Must be experienced.
Also, person over 25 to deliver TV
sets. Apply at Alliance
815 W. University Ave. (E-st-152-p)
HELP WANTED MALE Mens
Clothing Salesman. Full or part time.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Apply Wilson
Department Stores, Inc., 22 E.
University Avenue. (E-st-149-c)
Counselor positions available at
Camp Plnewood, Hendersonville,
N.C. Male or Female Archery
instructor. Male only vmight
camping trips operate truck- bg
and strong, Male only Go-Kart
Specialist l mech. Inclined. Male
only Cabin counselors (activity,
escorts and leaders), Male only ski
boat operator (exp. 160-220 tup.).
Male or Female Riding Instructor,
For application: T. R.
1414 Fetch Ave., Jax., Fla. 32207.
(E-SM49-P)

Monday, June 1,1970, The Florida Alligator.

X-X ; : ; X ; X-: ; X ; : ; : ; : ; : ; : ; X->X ; : ; X : : ; :-X ; : ; : ; : ; x ; :*:: ; : ;
,p IN TP FID
Female: Full and parttime waitresses.
Must be neat. Good wages. Apply
Kings Food Host 1802 W. Un. Ave
or 1430 SW 13th St. After 2:00 PM
(E-ts-c)
SAMSON needs volunteers interested
in summer recreation Jun 15 Jul
24. Morning or afternoon. Contact
315 JWRU or Call 392-1608
(E-3t-150-c)
SAMSON needs a student to
coordinate summer rec program
work-study avail, water safety Inst,
prefer. Jun 15 Jul 24. JWRU 315
392-1608 (E-150-3t-c)
Camp Mountain Lake for Boys and
girls In Hendersonville N.C. Rlflery
Instructor needed, NRA required, call
378-0285 after 6 pm (E-150-st-p)
SAMSON needs water safety
Instructor willing to help In summer
rec. program. Contact 315 JWRU or
call 392-1608. (E-150-3t-c)
Due to an unexpected cancellation,
an opening Is available as a student in
a two-year Opthalmic Assistants
Training Program at the Medical
Center. Ophthalmic assistants work
with ophthalmologists In the
evaluation of patients. Pre-requisite
for the training program is two years
of college and/or previous medical
experience, 1.e., a military corpsman.
Course begins July 1, 1970. Details
can be obtained by contacting Miss
Malja Uotlla, Department of
Ophthalmology, University of
Florida, telephone 392-3451
(E-5M49-C)
:-:-X-Xi>>XXWXW:XvX;X;X;X;:::vXxS:
AUTOS
.XlXXvXtXwXtXrXrXr.vXvXvXvXxXv
196 0 Chevrolet impala. Good
condition. Power steering plus two
new tires. 303 NW 17th St. Apt. 5
phone 373-2901. Only $l5O.
(G-st-149-p)
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy clean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission Is a winner
too! TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2i)d
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)
6l VW Sunroof, radio, 62 engine,
excellent tires, good condition.
Getting married cant afford
unkeep of 2 cars. $375. Call Mai
392-7571. (G-st-148-p)
1960 Falcon inexpensive reliable
transportation. Radio, heater, good
tires, engine in excellent shape. Call
376-2909 or 392-0911 ask for Linda.
(G-148-st-p)
VW squareback 1968 air-conditioned
radio 23,000 miles excellent
condition SIBOO call 378-6029
(G-3t-150-p)
For Sale 1965 Triumph Spitfire.
Brand new engine. Desperate Must
sell immediately. S6OO or best offer.
Call 3 78-7655 after 5:00
(G-151-st-p)
64 VW bug 55,000 miles original
owner maintenance records available
radio and undercoating no rust S7OO
call 378-2079 (G-151-st-p)
For sale. Need home for loveable 67
Valiant 4-door white, black top
61,000 miles. SBOO. Call 373-1589.
Prof, returning Japan, must sell.
(G-151-st-p)
69 SPRITE, 4 speed, fully equlped,
canary yellow, warranty, like new,
exc. tires, black Interior, 373-2475
(G-151-st-p)
69 Roadrunner, excellent condition
warranty, 4 spd. trans., power disc
brakes, 8,000 miles, headers. Call
376-3931. (G-st-152-p)
Get It now or neyer 63 Rambler runs
perfectly great transportation $250
call Tom at 373-2747 call now It
might be your last chance.
(G-st-152-p)
1937 Plymouth. Good condition.
$450 or best offer. Contact Bill
behind Spanish Main. Must be
Intrepid, genuinely old-tlmey person.
(G-3t-152-p)
1962 Ford convertable good
condition. Mino repairs hood
scoupcal! 373-2233: (G-3t-152-p)
Triumph TR3 Beautiful Condition.
Overdrive, new brakes, transmission
just rebuilt, radio, many extras. Call
373-2798 4fter 5 o'clock.
(G-st-152-p)
6 Corvalr in good condition 4 new
tires, new shocks, new clutch, has 2
horns, asking $650 call 392-6931 ask
for Dave around 6:30 or 11:00 p.m.
(G-st-152-p)
1962 Saab, excellent mechanical
condition S3OO. Must sell. Come Jay
735 SE sth Ave. between 5 and 8
p.m. (Q-2t-152-p)
GOODBYE GVILLE Must sell
1963 Ford Galaxle cheap
transportation $75 or best offer call
Sam 378-7212. (G-3t-152-p)

Page 11

Free kittens, male black, female
variegated, healthy, housebroken,
3720 S. W. 15th St. 372-3597.
(J-st-148-p)
ALL MARRIED COUPLES Become
more aware of each other. Discover
in the privacy of your own
relationship how to become more
real" with your spouse. Intimacy
Encounter Tapes, Marriage & College
Life Project. Free. Call 392-1590.
(J-st-149-c)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologlst 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
EUROPE Go this summer. Fly NASA
for student rates. Flights leaving till
August. For info call 373-2520 5 to 8
pm. (J-st-149-p)
Married couples lnterested in
improving communications and
understanding each other better?
Participate In a Marital Enrichment
Group experience. Increase your
awareness of the strengths In your
marriage. For information call
Marriage and College Life Project.
392-1590. Its free. (J-st-149-c)
Beautiful black kittens need home. 5
wks. old only 4 left. Call Jackie
378-6692. (J-4t-149-p)
NEEDED for summer: 1 or 2 coeds
for 1 bdrm apt In fred. gards. rent
41.25 per person per month. Call
372- anytime. (J-150-4t-p)
Two girls need a third person to
travel through europe from the
beginning of august to end of
november Call Diana 392-7668
(J-151-st-p)
HELP! I must find homes for my 4
adorable Arles kittens. Call Lucinda
at 392-1771 or see at 103 S.W. 4th
Avenue after 5:30 (-151-3 t-p)
KITTENS NEED HOME. 4 healthy,
playful, 7 wks., black and white
373- after 6 p (J-151-2t-p)
Need to get your stuff up North? We
are renting a truck and will take
anything you want between here and
No. Hartford, Conn. Need to know
this week. Call 378-6107. Ask for
Brad or Rich. Will Take Bikes.
(J-st-145-p)
A message from a banana to a crazy
ducky leo. 4 mos. Is a lucky number,
but the best remains ahead. Love
Youre chocolate coated leprechaun.
(J-lt-152-p)
Congratulations sweet Lynne Hanna
my new Delta Gamma signed the
rellsher. (J-lt-152-p)
Snapper bougie and yogi have a nice
summer Its been nice rooming with
yall aekdb the cub scout. (J-lt-152-p)
FLY to MIAMI leave Sat morn. Jun
13 return Sun nlte. $45 round trip.
Call 378-9130 or 376-1611 x 359.
(J-st-152-p)

Were
concerned
; ~o t
about
the
atmosphere.

You knew that on a
campus this size, there
had to be some writing
talent.
So did we.
If you wanted to read
it, you had to dig it
out of somebody elses
magazine.
Now you've got your
own.

pic;
For JJ and P at Sold Out! I wont
be "hair when you "do your thing",
but wishing you peace and love! from
afar. I dig It! ONE! the wook.
(J-151-2t-p)
Lonesome co-eds Im Interested but
need more facts Bill 378-0256.
(J-lt-152-p)
I need a hip warm female companion
to share what could be a glorious
summer even In Gainesville Write
Tom Box 12273 Gainesville.
(J-4t-152-p)
URGENT!!! Girls moving Into
Towers Rm. 701 this summer please
call Naomi or Sandy 392-9764. Very
Important! (J-lt-152-p)
Have anything to take home for the
summer. I will haul your articles to
Miami, Orl, W PB, Laud, Hywd
Cheap. Experienced. Call Phil
372-6404. (J-st-152-p)
LOST & POUND
LOST: pair of sandals near N. W.
19th St. Call 378-1131 (L-3t-150-p)
Lost prescription sunglasses Friday
May 15 reward Call Gall 378-1965.
(L-2t-152-p)
J*VfVViVVV*VJ%|Ve\\\*e\'eVe%|e'*eV/e*f*e*i
SERVICES
Alternators Generators * Starters
Electrical Systems tested ahd
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
Del-Ray Typing Service: manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pick-up delivery 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-143-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S.W. 4th Ave., across from the
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480
(M-ts-107-c)
Tutoring by certified teacher, engllsh
through high school, german levels 1
and 2. Call 378-7641. (M-st-149-p)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
TUTOR Experienced, certified
teacher wants to make reading and
other subjects Interesting and fun for
elem. children. Begin June 15 $5 a
lesson (supplies incl.) 372-3991.
(M-3t-152-p)
Tennis rackets restrung, guaranteed
call Mike, 392-6004. (M-lt-152-p)

We're the ones that put
it together. We do it
Fall, Winter, and Spring.
Another one is coming
up.
florida
quarterly
We only did it for you.



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, June 1,1970

Campus; Crier
T SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
ATTENTION: FOOTBALL BLOC SEATING
All campus groups and organizations are reminded that the drawing for the 1970 Bloc Seating will be held Wednesday,
June 3, at 7:30 in room 346, J. Wayne Reitz Union. All representatives from groups or organizations must be present. An
explanation of the present state of student seating will be given. Extra applications for Bloc Seating can be picked up in the
student government offices, 3rd floor Reitz Union.
WANTED KEY- PUNCH OPERATOR
The Finance department of student government needs a key-punch operator
to help compile an inventory list of S.G. equipment. Anyone who is
experienced in this area please contact the Secretary of Finance, 3rd floor
Reitz Union.
INTERESTED GIRLS ...
Any girls interested in doing secretarial work for Accent'7l during the r
summer quarter should contact the Accent office Mon. Fri. 3:30 4:30, i
3rd floor of the Reitz Union.
UNIVERSITY COMMITTEE OPH4INGS STILL AVAILABLE
Any student interested in serving on a University Committee please fill out an application in the Student government office
room 305. Interested students are needed for die summer and fall quarters. These are some of the committees which are
still open.
Student Affairs Campus Housing Curriculum
Student Board of Publications Public Functions Policy & Lectures Intercollegiate Athletics
Union Board of Managers Admissions Petitions
Parking & Transportation Student Conduct Disadvantaged Students
HOMECOMNG POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Anyone interested in holding a major position for the 1970 Homecoming Program can pick up an application in the
Florida Blue Key Office, 3rd floor, Reitz Union.
SAMSON NEEDS VOLUNTERS
SAMSON IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR SUMMER RECREATION VOLUNTEERS: Call 392-1608 or
Come by room 315, JWRU.
BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE
Bulletin Board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it. Bring your material, 20 copies of each
sheet, to the Student Government office and you will get free publicity for your organization. No personal material will be
posted.
GOODLUCK ONFINALS
SEE YOU NEXT QUARTER (?)
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER, MUST HAVE
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 5:00 OF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. THANKS
808 BERRIN
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT



The
Florida
Alligator

WINS DOUBLE-A FUEL

Moulder Drags To Title

By BO BERRY
A CmAvA* lAlviAjkM
AHiQstor oports writer
Charlie Moulder of Atlanta,
Ga. drove his 1,500 horsepower
392 cubic inch Chrysler
Double-A fuel dragster to an
anti-climatic final run at the
Gainesville Dragway Sunday to
win top honors at the second
race in the Southeastern division
of the World Championship
series drag races.
The final race for Double-A
fuelers was between Moulder
and Prestem Davis in the
Tennessee Bo Weevil. Both
machines were pushed up the
staging lane, but both men knew
the race was Moulders. Moulder
fired-up his big engine and let
it roar. Davis drove up the
staging lane in silence without
trying to light-up his engine.
It didnt even have oil in it.
Davis had thrown two rods in
in m
\ myjH A Sr jg|H
m R
JACK BACHELER
... wins again
Bachelor Ist,
Shorter Short
The Florida Track Clubs Jack
Bacheler and fellow running
mate Frank Shorter finished
one-two in the three-mile event
of the Kennedy Games at
Berkeley, Calif., Saturday.
Bacheler set a stadium record
with a time of 13:13.0 while
Shorter was only eight-tenths of
a second behind him. Shorter
has finished second to Bacheler
in every major race this year.
Shorter was last years NCAA
six-mile champ and runner-up in
the indoor two-mile and outdoor
three-mile races.
Olympic champion Randy
Matson won the shot put with
an unbelievable 71
heave and Chuck Laenz ran the
fastest mile in the world this
year with a time of 3:56.9.
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GATOR SPORTS

80-WEEVIL BEATEN
... loses to Charlie Moulder

the semi-finals leaving a stream
of oil on the track and a large
puddle in the pits. It was the
second blown engine of the
weekend for the team. Moulder
didnt bother to go to the
bum-out box to warm up his
tires, and instead went straight
to the line. His engine screamed
and he flew down the
quarter-mile track to win. The
victory was extra sweet for
Moulder, he hasnt won all year.
Moulder has been drag racing
since 1955 when he ran an
altered. A few years later he
moved to the king of drag racing
FSU Wins
District Three
Florida State won the NCAA
District 111 Championship
Saturday night by defeating
Mississippi State 54 at Gastonia,
N.C.
FSU defeated East Carolina in
the first round of the playoffs
Thursday behind the two-hit
pitching of Gene Ammann. The
victory over Mississippi State
pushed the Seminoles record to
44-7-1.
The Noles travel to Omaha,
Neb., for the College World
Series on June 12.

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machines, the Double-A fuel
dragsters. He had two accidents
last year racing, once when a tire
blew and again when an engine
blew splattering oil on his tires.
He flipped both times, but was
unhurt. It didnt dim his desire
to travel over 200 m.ph. in a
light-weight racing machine.
He said, I cant tell the
difference between 190 m.ph.
and 200 m.ph., but I can tell
the difference in a run of seven
and six seconds.
He said he can also tell the
difference in his confidence as
he travels to the next track with
the rest of the drivers in search
of qualifying points for the
World Finals in Dallas Texas
next October.
In the three other pro classes
Herb McCandless won the
Pro-Stock in the Sox and Martin
Hemi-Baracuda. McCandles took
over the car while Ronnie Sox
was in Detroit on business.
In the funny car competition
Schul Greer won in his Charger
bodied racer at a speed of 193
m.ph. in 7:58 seconds for the
quarter. The Top Gas title went
to Bogie Kell in his dragster.
In the amateur classes John
Mistic won the competition class
in a dragster, Wayne Dokken
took the Stock class title with a
Plymouth, and Super Stock was
taken by Robert Mance.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Monday, June 1,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

j Intramurals J
BLUE LEAGUE: Chi Phi and Delta Upsilon, year long contenders
for the Blue League Presidents Cup will battle it out for the softball
championship in the Blue League.
The Chi Phis easily stopped the Theta Chis in their bracket playoff
match, 8-3. Harvey Prior led the Chi Phi attack by hitting three singles
and knocking in several runs.
The DUs on the other hand scored two runs in the bottom of the
fourth to edge the Delta Sigma Phis 64. Charlie Gresser led the way
for the DUs with two doubles.
ORANGE LEAGUE: Sigma Phi Epislon scored six runs in the
bottom of the sixth inning to finally put the brakes on Pi Kappa
Alpha 12-10 in the Orange semis.
The Pikes Presidents Cup margin was solidified at 25 points
indicating how tight the championship race was.
The Pikes took a 10-6 lead into the bottom of the sixth but singles
by Mike Smith, Mike Hawley, Mike Hembree, and Nick Cammarano,
along with a triple by by Don Tindall and a homer by Richard
Rohwling did the Pikes in.
In the other semifinal game, TEP grabbed a 94 lead but had to
score two in the top of the seventh to outlast Sigma Nu, 11-9, in
another hitting battle.
Tony Center and Jim Stark led the TEP hitters by going three for
four each but the clutch hit was a two-run double by Bruce Schwack
in the final frame.
The TEPs and the SPEs now meet in the last Orange game of the
year. The TEPs can become a double sport winner and move into
third place with the championship, the Sig Eps could dose out a
rather undistinguished season on a brighter note with the softball
crown.
BULLETIN: Fraternities are required to bring in softball all campus
selections to the Intramural Department by Friday May 29.
Sderosa
JUL l STEAK HOUSE £
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OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
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'THE NEW LEADER IN SMALL CARS" OPEN 'TIL 7 PM
2ND AVE AND 2ND ST. S.E. MON TMPII

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Page 13



Page 14

The Florid* Alligator, Monday, Juna 1,1970

Wrestling Team: A First Year Success

EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the
fifth of a series that will review
Gator sports in the 1969-70
season with a look at the
prospects for the 1970-71
season.)
By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
UFs newest varsity sport
wrestling, despite many
pre-season handicaps, refused to
roll over for anyone and went
out and compiled a creditable
7-1 duel match record and won
themselves a strong following of
wrestling Gator supporters all in
their first season. r
Last years favorable vote of
athletic directors and coaches at
the Southeastern Conferences
annual meeting made wrestling
the 10th SEC intercollegiate
varsity sport.
THE UFS ATHLETIC
Association said it just couldnt
afford to support wrestling fully
because of budgeting problems.
So coach Keith Tennant had
to face building a team with
limited funds, without a
permanent home for his
grapplers, with second-hand
equipment and finally with no
money for scholarships.
But despite this the wrestling
decendants of Albert lost only
to Georgia in duel matches while
knocking off state rival FSU and
sinking the U. S. Navy from
Pensacola once at home to
mention a few victims.
AND DESPITE BEING a
motley crew of inexperienced
TOM DERROUGH
... top grappler

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grapplers, considering their
opposition, Coach Tennants
squad captured sixth in the SEC
Wrestling Championships to
finish their year.
Four middleweights led by
junior Jeff Shaffner, freshman
Tom Derrough, freshman John
Banes and sophomore Bill Reid
were the bulwark of the Gator
team racking up most of the
points the UF scored in the SEC
and during the duel matches.
Derrough, wrestling in the
150-lb. class, proved to be the
strongest grappler winning 14
against two defeats. He also won
his weight class in the Florida
State Intercollegiate and placed
third at the Georgia Tech,
matches.
BARRES WAS FIRST at the
Fla. State Intercollegiate in the
142-lb. class and Reid was
second in the same tourney in
the 1344 b. division.
Coach Tennant said, I was
real proud of the boys for what
they accomplished. It was their
efforts. They were a good group
and I have high expectations for
next year.
Before talking about next
season Tennant pointed out also
how pleased he was with
spectator support, despite having
only three home matches and
one tournament at Florida Gym.
WE HAD 800 to 900 people
show up for our FSU match,
Tennant said, that really fired
the boys up.
Next season Tennant said he
will have everyone back except
- .. .
mm *1:
mm \
: JBgjg
JEFF SHAFFNER
... one of best

mhe,
|§gg||f v % ......... <
A Hk
... H
JOHN BARRES
... runner-up in Florida championships

190-pounder Gary Du van, who
graduates this year. Plus he said
he has been given a substantial
budget for 1970-71 and has
recuited four boys for the team.
John Reid (UFs Bill Reids
younger brother), a 126-pounder
from Grand Rapids, Mich., leds
the lineup that includes Jack
Marshall, 142-pounder from
New York, Chet Sanders,
150-pounder from Virginia
Beach, Va., and 167-lb. John
Zimmerman from Pittsburg, Pa.
Tennant said all four are high
school regional champions in
their respective weight classes.
Coach Tennant said the team
had to come along way after a
season of shuttling mats before
and after home matches from
under Yon Hall to Florida Gym
and back to establish themselves
as a winning team. But that the
experience was well worth it and
provides the team with a
foundation for next season.
Next year will see the
wrestlers going against the 5 SEC
schools that will field teams
twice on a home basis. Not to
mention participation in four
tournaments and numerous duel
and three-way matches.
Burned-Out Bulb?
The average household light
bulb has a life expectancy of
750 hours.

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shop
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12



Unser Receives Biggest Purse Ever

AL UNSER missed the record
in winning the 54th annual
500-mile chase, but Sunday
night he accepted the biggest
paycheck ever handed an auto
race driver.
The handsome Albuquerque,
NM., veteraat received an
estimated $250,000 from the
speedway at the traditional
victory dinner at Indianapolis,
Ind.. It is also the silver
anniversary of Tony Hulman as
owner of the famed
two-and-a-mile race track.
Official results posted Sunday
morning by the United State
Auto Dub showed that Unser
led 190 of the 200 laps, one less
than he was announced at the
conclusion of Saturdays race,
including the last 95. His average
speed remained the same as
posted previously 155.749
miles per hour compared with
last years record 156.867 m.pJi.
by winner Mario Andretti.
***
' RICO CARTY drove in six
runs with three homers and a
single Sunday to raise his major
league-leading batting average to
.436 and pace the Atlanta Braves
to a 9-1 victory over the
Philadelphia Phillies.
Carty, who was left off the
all-star ballot, got the Braves
their first two runs in the third
inning when he hit his 12th
homer of the season after Felix
Millan led off with a double.
His single drove in one of four
runs the .Braves scored in the
fifth, he hit a two-run homer in
the sixth with Millan aboard
again, and then drove in one run
in the eighth with his solo blast.
*#*
RANDY MATSON says, and
who should know better, there is
no mystery about the 70 foot
barrier in shot putting.
It really isnt that
psychological, said the Texas
strongman, who on Saturday in
the Kennedy Invitational Track
and Field Games at Berkeley,
Calif, hurled the 16-pound ball
over that magic mark for the
eighth time in his career, and the
first outside of his home state.
The only magic about the
barrier, added Matson, is
adjusting to the constant travel
and the varying shot put rings,
plus fan enthusiasm.
Its hard to get adjusted to
the facilities and the time
changes, he said. Outside of
that there is nothing to stop a
man from breaking the so-called
barrier. Its no different, now
that its been broken, than the
old four minute mile barrier.*
Its easy for Matson, now a
stockbroker in Houston, to

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make such an evaluation, but no
one even comes close to the 70
foot barrier. Matson, in fact, is
the only man to pierce it.
BIG, GENIAL Pennsylvanian
Bill Hyndman 111 three times a
runner-up but never a champion
leads a massive American
assault on the 75th British
Amateur Golf Championship
which starts Monday at the
picturesque Royal County
Downs Links in Jewoastle,
Northern Ireland.
Its only the second time in
the history of the event, which
began back in 1885, that Ireland
has hosted the championships.
Portmamock, Dublin, had the
honor in 1949 and produced an
American winner in Sam
Mceady.
Hydman, from Huntingdon
Valley, Pa., is the only
non-Briton among the eight
players seeded for the week-long
match-play tournament. The
other berths are occupied by
members of last years British
Walker Cup squad led by team
captain and reigning champion
Mike Bonallack.
But the U. S. will be out in
force with 56 entries bidding in
a field of 256 which also
includes 10 South Africans, six
Frenchmen, two Canadians, a
Belgian and one Kenyan.

LARRY MIKAN of
Minnestoa, the Los Angeles
Lakers fourth round draft
choice and the son of former
Laker great George Mikan,
Thursday agreed to terms for a
two-year contract with the
National Basketball Association
club.
Mikan, a forward, scored
1,007 points in three seasons for
Minnestoa for a 13.9 average. He
also picked off 735 rebounds for
a 10.2 varsity college
average.
Last season he set a school
record with 349 rebounds. Los
Angeles General Manager Fred
Schaus said he felt that young
Mikan like his father may reach
filll physical maturity later than
most young men and in two
years may develop into one of
the real fine cornermen in the
NBA.
Mikan will report to the
Lakers rookie camp June 13.
The terms of his contract were
not released.
kick
WILLIAM F. SULLIVAN,
president of the Board of
Directors of the Boston Patriots,
Thursday outlined for the league
owners in New York the

(// s/vw/s suoias

procedure for moving the team
to Foxboro, Mass, by 1971.
Sullivan emphasized to the
press that the are not
in trouble in fact, weve never
had it so good as the National
Football League owners
concluded their spring meetings.
Sullivan pointed out that the
teams season ticket sales have
more than doubled since last
year, when it sold 10,000 season
tickets, even though the Patriots
arent sure where theyll play
their games in 1970.
THE TOWN of Foxboro,
located 20 miles from Boston
and with a population of 5,000,
voted in April to adopt the
homeless Patriots, who were
forced to leave Boston because
they did not have a stadium.
Sullivan said that the state
realty trust has applied with the
Securities Exchange Commission
for the right to sell stock to the
public in order to build a
53,000-seat stadium in Foxboro,
and a decision by the SEC is
expected within six to eight
weeks. '
AAA.
WWW
BASKETBALL COACH A1
McGuire said Thursday Lary
McNeill, a 6-foot-9
forward-center from Brooklyn,
N. Y., has accepted an athletic
scholarship to Marquette
University, Milwaukee*, Wis.
McNeill is the fifth player
recruited this year by McGuire,
whose Warriors won the
National Invitational
Tournament last winter.
McNeill played two years at
George Washington High School
in Brooklyn before transferring
to Rockwood Academy in
Lenox, Mass., where he averaged
21.5 points and 20 rebounds a
game last season.
ROCKWOOD POSTED a 16-1
record and beat the St. Johns
University freshmen this past
year.
Other players recruited by
McGuire include Randy Wade,
Omro, Wis., a 6-foot-5 guard and
UPI Wisconsin Player of the Year
in 1970; Paul Vollmer of
Wauwatosa, Wis., Andy
Friedrich, an AAU All-Star from
Chicago, and Marcus
Washington, star of the La
Grange, 111., state championship
team this year.
kick
NELSON BURTON Jr. of St.
Louis and Mary Baker of Central

Slip, N. Y., pulled away from
the fields Wednesday halfway
through the finals of the
$65,000 29th All-Star Bowling
Tournament in Northbrook, 111.
Burton rolled a record
four-game series of 1,073 in his
first match and finished the
afternoon bowling with a
24-game total of 6,673, giving
him a 156-pin edge over Bobby
Cooper of Houston, Tex., who
had 6,517. In third place was the
defending champion, Billy
Hardwick of Louisville, Ky.,
with 6,204.
In the finals a bowler gets a
50-point bonus for winning a
game. Burton rolled games of

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steering and brakes. Locally owned and serviced by Braslngton. 2 to choose
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1967 PONTIAC $1695
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Monday, June 1,1970, The Floride Alligator,

279, 279, 257, and 258 in his
all-star record series.
Mrs. Baker, a pretty
southpaw, piled up a '*uge lead
of 328 pins over Pat McNeill of
Durham, N. C., in the womens
division while averaging almost
211. In third was Betty
Kuczynski of Chicago with
4,080 pins. Mrs. Baker had
4,446 while Miss McNeill totaled
4,118.
Big Lungs?
Oxygen requirements are high
for trout, compared with other
fresh water species.

Page 15



Page 16

. Th> Florida Alligator, Monday, Juna 1,1970

Why is it were
never asked to
evaluate the
teachers we think
i p n V --. v ' .-, 4
need it most?

Because they won't let us... in the classroom. But now,
every 100 and 200 level instructor who refused in-classroom
teacher evaluation will be evaluated, out of the classroom.
Starting June Ist, volunteers will be going through all the
dorms, sorority houses, and fraternity houses, giving out
evaluation forms to freshmen and sophomores so they can
evaluate their instructors who refused in-classroom
evaluation. In case we miss you at your dorm or Greek-house

The following teachers still have not acquiesced to participate in Teacher Evaluation:

(CEH)
Sadler
Kennedy
Predmore
Boger
Kendall
Gilliland, M.
Chisholm
Ford
Bowers
Gehan
Rubrecht
Nelson
Long
Landry
Teahan
Douglass
Mead
Baum
Stokes
Dunlop
McFadyen
Block
Vogel
Neale
Curry
Sherman
Siegel
Morehead
Hetrick
Knauft
Graeffe
Ashdown
Dixon
Haseil
Mettaer
Jensen
MHler
Zelinka
Latah
Travis
Sherry

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Sprague
Raymond
Klinedinst
Edwards
Terhune
Richard
Watson, R.
George
Hermance
Watson, V. S.
Blood worth
Frye
Gorrell
Hodges
Warn
Burke
Thompson
Metcalfe
Culver
Hester, F.
Faraci
Ormond
Popson
Smiljanich
Marinetti
Todd
Ibarra
Moore
Perez
MacDonald
Morefield
Ochester
Crews
Nadeau
Haggerty
Cutler
Dell
TnMblood
(SY)
Zkmer
VeHinga
Marcus

McLachan
Albrecht
(SH)
Griffen
Brodman
Stackhouse
Alverez
Fletcher
Miller
Davey
Hayes
(CLC)
Morefield
Hester
Branch
Haines
Frazer
Cates
Baum
Marotta
Parsons
Mott
Mabte
Com
Moore
Kelly, D.
(CPS)
nKNUng
Mundy
Stagat
Peterson
Bunting
Lynch
Yoho
SBk
Eoff
Olsson
Omar

Roberts
Lindquist
Sellin
Cross
Bieber
Cohen
Dunkle
D'Alli
Davis
Tunison
(CBS)
Griffith
Moler
Brown
Goin
Confer
Carr
Leavitt
Kilby
Roye
Maslin
Lloyd
Harper
Westfall
(APY)
Moore, A.
Purdy
Selfradge
Shuta
Boone
de Jongh
(ATY)
Olson
Lebo
Glin
(UCC)
Lambert

there will also be a table in front of the college library with
evaluation forms.
Below is a list of instructors who will be evaluated out of
the classroom. Please look it over and see if any of your
instructors' names are there. If so, please fill out an
evaluation form when you receive it. After we have compiled
all the results they will be published in the Course Guide.
However, the only way we can get results is with your help.

Cox
Saddler
(CY)
Bennet
Muschlitz
Allgatter
Ryschkewitsch
(CHN)
Lambert
McCullen
MacDonald
Carson
Kniseley
Funk
Wei bom
Sunwall
Lewis
Beistle
Waldo
Murray
Haines
Taylor
Rising
Storer
Graeffe
Keherson
Stokes
Curry
Bryan
Teahan
Langford
(CMS)
Connor, Mrs*
Horn
Eldar
-
renncK
Rose
Roch
ii ?
moMMnng

(CSS)
Hoffman
Williams
Manson, Mrs.
Shenkman, M.
Doyle
Peek
Robinton
Baringer
Maclachlan
Cripe
Hammad
Griffis
Cox
Doria
Price
Beri
Slaughton
Partridge
White
Buys
(CE)
Grantham
(EDV)
Hunter, Mrs.
(EH)
Murphree
Geoghegan
Thompson
RoaeaHi
Haggerty
Lucht
Frazer
Nadaau
wlOflW

(FH)
Howerton
Goodman
Schnare
Abraham
Golsan
Peek
Hendricks
Hershberger
Rosen
Lamarchand
Marinetti
(GPY)
Butler
Lewis
McCune
(GY)
Pierce
Nichel
(PHA)
Hester
Lea
Shields
Hicks
NuetzeT
Lae
(GN)
Jones
Hagan
Volk
aa aa
WBIKHni
Brown
Ebert
Crape
Robineon

Johnson
Rapp
(HY)
Winius
Daves
Sterrgill
Turner
Chaners
Peek
Bums
(JM)
Thomas
Allen
Winkler
(MS)
Hanes
Wu
Deeborg
Smith
Jones
Finley
Sadler
Whitiy
Miers
Willard
Morse
Kovacevic
(PPY)
Sugabki
Bradley
Kurtzman
Sanders
Sorer
(ES)

Koefod
Mahar
Velez
Jones
Zepp
Waldman
Disalvo
Manteiga
McLaughin
Hurff
Fristoe
Bradbury
(ATG)
Immelman
Viljoen
McCabe
Hallbauer
Most
Corbett
Jenkins
Lacouture
(SCH)
Wittig
Neil
Snyder
Tew
(ZY)
Johnson
Confer
Lanciani
(MSC)
rovnes
Small
Fouse
KoMor
WltH*
(WY)
Graham