Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
. > ><*#. f. a~a V ~%
Janis Joplin Is
Janis Joplin and the Rotary Connection will perform, rain or shine,
at IFC Spring Frolics.
And if it looks like rain, you wont have to sit out in it. In case of
bad weather the show will be moved to Florida Gym.
EACH TICKET stub has a rain check which will admit the holder
to the gym for either the 8 or 10 pjn. show.
In the event of rain no glass or food will be allowed in the gym,
according to Miles Wilkin, IFC vice president and producer of the
concert.
There will be lots of receptacles around so that you can dispose of
glass and food you might have brought in expectation of the show in
the stadium, he said.
Tickets will be on sale all day today at Gate 3 of the stadium
starting at noon. Tickets are $5.50 per couple and $3 per person.
Radio station WGGG will announce this afternoon if the show has
been moved to the gym.

K&L
AW AwJVum

Vol. 62, No. 151

j /fs A Big Weekend j
ji Who says nothing ever happened at UF? ji
j: This weekend there will be events for everyone all you have j:
jj to do is participate. ji
ji KICKING OFF the weekend, the Student Mobilization ji
j: Committee will be sponsoring a day to open UF for anti-war j;
ji expression on the Plaza of the Americas. Eye-witnesses to the ji
S Kent State killings and the Augusta, Ga. riots, as well as Yale g
ji: Chaplain William Coffin, will speak at 2. See page 20. £
J Tonight, come hear the sounds of Joplin at Florida Field. IFC j*:
jj: Spring FrolicS is bringing Janis to Gainesville for two shows 8 jj:
iji and 10. And it wont be another Rascals show this time if it jj:
rains, the show will move to the Florida Gym. See this page. :j:
Saturday, the first happening since the ban on an amplified ij:
§ music will start at 2on the plaza. Togetherness is the theme, |
so come together. jj
;j; AND, SPEAKING of coming together, Pi Lambda Phi jj
ji fraternity is sponsoring a Come Together Day Sunday at lon j:
| the drill field. The purpose is to alleviate any communication ji
ij vacuum, sponsors say. See this page. ji
I* If youre a long hair, but not the kind that likes come ji
togethers, Johannes Brahms German Requiem will be ji
performed Sunday at 4 in University Auditorium. The jj
Requiem, which is being dedicated to the memory of those jj
who have given their life in the service of their country, is jj
sponsored by the Department of Music and conducted by jj
Troupin. :j

Communication Stressed
For 'Come Together Day

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
Come Together Day, called by
supporters an effort to alleviate
any communication vacuum,
will begin at 1 pjn. Sunday on
the UF drill field.
All students, faculty and
Gainesville residents are invited
to attend and come together
with all types of people,
according to sponsor Pi Lambda
Phi fraternity.
BARBECUE WILL be served
from 1 to 7 pun. while speakers
representing all segments of the
community will speak on
communication.
Power, The Celebration, The
Sensational Souls and the First
Baptist Church Youth Choir will
provide musice.
SPEAKERS WILL include:
Gainesville Mayor Perry McGriff,
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder, City Commissioner

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Neil Butler, Father Michael
Gannon.
Other speakers will include
Black Student Union President
Mitchell Dasher, Rabbi Michael
Monson, Rev. T. A. Wright and
Rev. Fred Laughon.
Dr. A. Didier Graeffe will
present a reading of African
poetry.
AS PART OF Come Together
Day students will present a
multi-media show in the Reitz
Union Ballroom Sunday at 8:30
p.m. The show is called I Shall
Be Released and will feature
the work of 40 musicians,
actors, dancers, photographers,
and technicians.
The performers are members
of RN 365, Theology and the
Arts Since 1940 and their
presentations include passages
from Ferlinghetti, Leonard
Cohen, T. S. Eliot, Brecht, and
E. E. Cummings.

_
W .MB M w
I
,a9
Hr *m
.-^^

University of Florida, Gainesville

WANTS STUDENTS VOTING

Kirk: 'Join System
Instead Os Protests'

By Alligator Services
Gov. Claude Kirk told UF
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder and other state
university students Thursday
they can be a major voice in
state politics if they get
organized and join the system
instead of protesting.
If youre going to change the
system, theres away to do it,
he said. Youve got to get
involved and run candidates for
office, not sit outside and talk
about it.
UHLFELDERS TRIP to
Tallahassee was in conjunction
with a meeting called by Kirk
for student government leaders
and university presidents to

Student directors are Angela
Whitney, Forrest Sawyer, Ron
Doyle, and Fran Ward.
According to Dr. Corbin Camell,
(SEE 'MULTI-MEDIA' PAGE 2)

OConnell To Get Gun Proposal

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
The Committee to Study the Removal and Control of Guns on
Campus will present its proposals and recommendations to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell and Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder on Sunday.
The committee recessed Tuesday to await completion of the final
draft of its report.
THE 16-MEMBER presidential committee has been meeting for the
past two weeks to hear testimony from witnesses and to discuss the
role of guns and the university police on the UF campus.
The committee was charged with the responsibility of examining
the duties and methods utilized by the campus police, the
effectiveness of those methods, and the general problem of guns on
campus.

discuss issues important to
campus.
Uhlfelder questioned the
governor on his request to the
U. S. Department of Justice
calling for an investigation of the
possibility of a nationally nationallyorganized
organized nationallyorganized conspiracy of
professional agitators.
Kirk replied that possibly his
request was hasty, and he would
give consideration to his
proposal.
KIRK SAID a recent survey
he had ordered indicated 51.9
per cent of Floridas college
students are over 21.
He said he ordered the survey
in request to student claims that
they are powerless to change the
system, and suggested that they
register and vote.
Uhlfelder expressed his
concern to Kirk regarding the
problems encountered by some
students trying to register to
vote in Alachua County. He said
the local voter registrar has made
if difficult for students to
register due to proof of
residence.
KIRK SAID he would work in
any area to see that students are
registered, and asked that he be

Friday, May 29, 1970

notified of any irregular
practices by vpting registration
offices in Gainesville.
Uhlfelder said he asked Kirk
to approve academic credit for
students taking part in
community involvement
projects. Projects such as
Samson and Come Together Day
are relevant parts of a
universitys educational value,
he said.
Kirk said the UF must first
establish a community
involvement curriculum program
before the Board of Regents can
take subsequent action.
Uhlfelder said he also urged
Kirk to recognize all student
organizations on campuses.
There sould be no question
of a groups right to organize
and meet, regardless of their
political affiliation or beliefs,
he said.
All the student officials at the
meeting agreed to the need for
marijuana laws with lowered
penalties. Kirk said he felt that
laws on the issue are necessary,
but agreed with the presidents
that their penalties should be
lowered to a misdemeanor,

WHATS YOUR future
for a UF grad. The
Alligator finds prospects
mixed page 3
Classifieds 14
Editorials... 8
Entertainment 19
Letters 9
Movies 14
Orange & Blue 12
Sports..;.... 22
Whats Happening 5



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 28.1970

OConnell
Good Guy
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell was presented with
the Real Good Guy Award
May 23 at an Evening with
the President sponsored by
the UF Faculty Club.
The award, presented by
Faculty Club Vice President
Alex Green, expressed their
appreciation for OConnells
efforts in UF administration.
In his remarks to the 250
faculty members attending,
OConnell emphasized the
need for mutual appreciation,
understanding and
communication.

KENT, AUGUSTA WITNESSES

SMC Calls Antiwar Rally

By Alligator Services
An eyewitness to the Kent
State University killings, an
eyewitness to the Augusta, Ga.,
events and Yale Chaplain
William Sloane Coffin will speak
at a rally in the Plaza of the
Americas at 2 pjn. today.
Judy Redon, the Kent
student, and Linda Jenness,
Socialist Workers candidate for
governor of Georgia who was in
Augusta, describe the incidents
that occured. Coffin, an antiwar
minister, was arrested with Dr.
Benjamin Spock for anti-draft
activity.
The purpose of the strike
called by the Student
Mobilization Committee is to
open up the university for
antiwar activity. It is called in
conjunction with nationwide
activity today and Saturday,
Memorial Day.

Multi-Media Show Scheduled

PAGE ON^J
instructor, the performances
range from a humorous scene
from an Albee play to a
sensuous explosion of camera
images, light, and sound which
features improvised
performances by live actors.
PURPOSE OF the event is
for you students to eliminate
any communication gap that
exists between YOU and anyone
whom you have had difficulty
communicating with, according
to the organizers.
Uhlfelder said the event had
SG's full support
We hope that all the students
will come out and participate.
It's an apolitical thing, and
everyone is welcome regardless
of his political views, he said.
THE IDEA GREW out of the
fraternity's experience working

3 passport photos 3.50
SNEERINGER PHOTOGRAPHY
1013WW.Univ.Ave. 378-1170

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is official student newspaper Os the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to fun
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

W j
Sam
m H l
m
YW-
I If Mtjh jfl
HWr / WmEKm
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... emphasized understanding

Our purpose is to show
support for the strike and
solidarity with campus and
community rallies across the
country, said Dennis Rockway,
SMC Steering Committee
member.
From 11 to 11:45 am., the
following teach-ins will be held:
f Campus Complicity in the
War; Dr. John Best, plaza.
- U. S. Involvement in
Viet-Nam; Roy Olesky 4AS, and
Russ Taylor 3 AS, plaza.
Racism and Repression; Dr.
Kenneth Megill, plaza.
Womens Liberation; Dr.
Marilyn Zweig, 416 Graduate
Library.
From 12 to 12:45 pm.:
Campus Complicity in the
War; Dr. David Kurtzman, plaza.
t History of Southeast Asia;
Dr. Richard Chang and Dr. John
Mugar, plaza.

with black children at the
Kennedy Homes housing project
in Gainesville, according to Pi
Lambda Phi spokesman Neal
Lubow.
Four months ago, the house
began sending members to the
project each week to help in a
childrens recreation program.
Weekly softball games and other
sports were organized.
At first they were, like,
hostile. But after a while we
really began to communicate,
said Lubow.
If it worked for one housing
project, why not for the whole
community?
To finance the project,
donations were asked from local
merchants, civic groups and
others. Underprivileged children
went door to door soliciting
donations. Barbecue tickets and
posters were sold, and a SIOO
Club was set up for donors.

_^~j£moves

UF Senate To Form
Biological Science Division

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
After more than a decade of
discussion and study, the
University Senate Thursday
adopted a proposed
reorganization of biological
units, personnel and resources.
Under the accepted program
the departments of zoology,
botany, microbiology,
biochemistry and comprehensive
biological sciences will be
merged into a division within the
College of Arts and Sciences.

f Racism and Repression
(continued); Dr. Kenneth Megill,
plaza.
f University Dissent; Dr. Max
Kele, plaza.
From 1 to 1:45 pan.:
Labor and the Antiwar
Movement; Jack Harris, plaza.
U. S. Involvement in
Viet-Nam; Tom Page 2UC, plaza.
Racism and Repression; Dr.
William Maples, plaza.
Gator Editor
Interviews
Set Today
In the meeting last week, the
BSP did not select an editor for
the Alligator because there were
not enough applicants. Miss
Karen Eng, 4JM, current
Alligator managing editor was
the only applicant for summer
editor-in-chief.
SINCE LAST week, three
more have applied for the job of
summer editor.
Those running for editor in
the summer are: Miss Eng; Fred
Vollrath, current Alligator wire
editor; Jimmey Bailey, former
Alligator staff writer, and Frans
Thyssen.
Running for summer
managing editor are Ken Driggs,
former Seminole editor ; and Les
Gardieff, Alligator staff writer.
Applying for Alligator editor
for the fall and winter quarters
are: Driggs; Vollrath; John Sugg,
current news editor; Neal
Sanders, Alligator assignments
editor; Sam Pepper, former
sports editor; and Ted Remley,
former entertainment editor.
Applying for managing editor
for the fall and winter quarters
are: Remley; Miss Phyllis Qallub,
Alligator staff writer; and Jack
Dicks.

I ~ I
I iWSm save 20 % I
Shopping for wedding gifts? 1
I home furnishings? NOW is the
X t me t 0 huy 8t 8 *Pcial savings.
! \ die design shop j
. 3448 w. university
tflat are a complete compliment' j

llllllllllllllllllllllllllll*llMlllHlll* M ~tt li*** ~,M,,M,, * M
The adopted program
mil allow instructors to
form part of a
department of molecular
and cellular biology in a
new basic science
program.
The departments of zoology,
botany and microbiology will
assume this status in September
1970, and the departments of
biochemistry and comprehensive
Biological Sciences (CBS) in
September 1971.
THE MEMBERS of the
present department of
microbiology in the College of
Medicine earlier elected to
remain in that college.
The adopted program will
allow these instructors to form
part of a department of
molecular and cellular biology in
the new basic science program in
that college.
The proposal also provides
that the merged biological units
shall become a College of
Biological Sciences if subsequent
developments and faculty
opinion justify such a change.
IN THE event such a college is
created the proposal further
provides that it be joined by
several other colleges of basic
fields of learning (e.g., Physical
Sciences and Mathematics,
Social and Behavioral Sciences,
and Humanities) in a Center of
Basic Sciences and Arts
administratively analogous to
the Health Center.

German Develops
Cure For Skin Cancer
HOUSTON (UPI) A German biologist said Thursday he has
developed a vitamin A preparation which has cured up to 90 per cent
of the known types of skin cancer during its two years of use in
Europe.
The preparation and a new Japanese drug to combat lung, throat
and mouth cancer were described to the 10th annual International
Cancer Congress Thursday but neither has received approval of the
U. S. Food and Drug Administration for use in this country.
BIOLOGIST KARL Ransberger of Grunwald, Germany, said at
least one American researcher has obtained the vitamin A preparation
in Europe, where it is available on the open market, and has tested it
without permission in the United States.
Tests of the Japanese drug are now under way with animals in
American laboratories, prior to clearance for human use expected this
fall. At least one U. S. researcher has made application for permission
to use the German treatment
Ransberger said his treatment has been used on cancer patients in
Europe for 22 months. Researchers say it takes five years of use to
determine whether any method of cancer removal really works.
Ransberger said preliminary results indicate a 100 per cent removal
of all but about one-tenth of the known types of skin cancer. He said
it also appears effective in healing another serious and very common
skin rash disease called psoriasis.
This brings tumors to complete remission without any other type
of treatment, he said. The results are regular. The rate of failure is
less than 10 per cent.

The purpose of this move
would be to avoid the isolation
of the biological sciences.
A MOTION to retain (CBS)
courses in University College
(UC) was heavily defeated.
UC Dean Franklin Doty, who
reviewed and approved the
proposal, defended the move to
transfer CBS courses to the new
division by saying the
complexity of the courses made
it a logical move.
I could not see the CBS
department as being isolated,
he said.
DOTY POINTED out the new
division will have a responsibility
to maintain a CBS department
which will remain under UC
supervision.
A motion put forth by Vice
President Harry Sisler that any
faculty member who has tenure
and is transferred shall retain
that tenure was passed
unanimously.
In other action, the senate
unanimously voted to establish
an ad hoc committee of seven
members.
The Senate Steering
Committee-proposed committee
will consider the suggestions and
proposals of the Black Students
Union as put forth in letters by
Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder and Professor Lyle N.
McAllister.
The names of the seven
persons elected to the
committee by the senate will be
released later today.



College Grads,
Fewer Jobs
Better Salaries

FOR FAMILY PLANNING

Alachua Refuses Grant

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writer
A grant from the Office of
Economic Opportunity (OEO)
to the State Board of Health to
extend family planning programs
in a 13-county area has been
turned down by the Alachua
County Health Service.
The grant is presently funding
a program for the. 13-county area
headed by Dr. Harry
Prystowsky, chairman of the UF
Department of Obstetrics. Dr.
Prystowsky is director of the
entire program.
THE PROGRAM is an
extension of the North Central
Florida Maternal and Infant Care
(MIC) project which provides
care for low-income women
through pregnancy, delivery, and
post-natal care. The OEO grant
provides health care and family
planning for low-income women
who have never been pregnant or
have not been pregnant for a
long time.
The two programs are
separate projects. The
OEO-funded family planning
program is merely an extension
of the MIC program. Alachua
County participates in the MIC
program.
Dr. A. F. Caraway, Director
of the Division of Maternal
Health Care of the State
Department of Health in

DATSUN
"THE NEW LEADER IN |MALL CART O PBJ 'TIL 7 PM
gNOAVEAND^NDST&^^^^jj^yyij^j

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Ther are fewer job offers for UF
students this year than in recent years,
but salaries are 5-7 per cent better
according to UF Placement Director
Maurice Mayberry.
This is mainly brought on by the
downturn in the national economy,
Mayberry said.
THE NUMBER OF job opportunities
can be measured by the demand per
employers visiting campus, he said.
Os the 1,000 or so who have visited the
UF in the past three quarters, their need

Jacksonville said the services of
the program had been offered to
Alachua County twice, but the
Alachua County Health Service
Director Dr. John Bianco had
refused the service both times.
Instead, he had applied for
additional funds on his own, but
was turned down.
DR. CARAWAY said he did
not know why Alachua County
had turned down the funds for
family planning. When 12
counties are part of a program,
and one turns the program
down, it must be for personal
reasons, he said.
Dr. Bianco refused to
comment on why Alachua
County was not included in the
OEO funded family planning
program.
He did say he knew two
doctors in northern Florida not
participating in the program
either.
ONE OF THE doctors Bianco
named, Dr. Covington, the
Health Director for Brandford,
Union and Clay Counties, is not
participating in the program
because the program has not
been extended to his counties
yet. He is, however, participating
in the MIC program.
However, the other doctor,
Dr. Barton Wells, Health
Director for Columbia,
Hamilton, Gilcrest and
Suwannee counties, is

were down by one-half as compared to
previous years.
Federal government and defense
industries were affected the most with a
total freeze. Consumer industries held
their demands as before, Mayberry said.
AT THE PRESENT the
vocationally-oriented student is in a much
better position than those in more
academic-minded fields such as liberal
arts, Mayberry said.
This past year was a time when it was
costly to major in non-direction,
Mayberry said.
The whole attitude of the system has
changed abruptly, Mayberry said.

participating in the program. In
fact, he is the only one
participating in it so far.
Dr. Wells nurse, Mrs. Evelyn
Townsend, said his counties have
participated in the program since
July. They also participate in the
MIC program.
THE REASON only four
counties are included in the
OEO funded program for family
planning is that the program is
still in its infancy, according to
Dr. Berel Held, assistant to Dr.
Prystowsky in the program.
Dr. Held said the program was
never anticipated to include all
13 counties the first year. Initial
plans were to begin with two or
three counties the first year and
work from that.
Dr. Held said Alachua County
has a family planning program
under MIC, but that MIC does
not provide planning for women
who have never been pregnant
or have not been pregnant for a
long time.

SEE THE "FLY
ON CAMPUS
Outside the Game Room,
in the Reitz Union A
|p
M/j
i PjdStr

Mfe. .:...
BtfeJUll J A VU I
Mmv
IRnf
i ip h^k
i jUfy
B v
m } fv, I! 7j*
7
# BB BHHBBp ~ Hlf I' >
' i ii§| jgi
POLLUTION BANNERS
With Pi Kappa Phi brothers collecting "pennies for pollution," this
intrepid brother balances on the roof of their house hanging Iha
banner of "man in balance with his environment," the
environmentalist's symbol. The campaign will continue through
today.

Friday, May 29,1970, The Florida Alligator,

FORMERLY, A STUDENT could
make the most exotic demands and his
expectations would be fulfilled.
' ~~f ~~ w *' V^ .**'" r . j* -- * *** 1
'The students are having to put out an
extraordinary effort to get th job he
wants, he said. This is advantageous
because a person will come closer to
getting the job he ought to have if he
must work for it.
Things are not so black as they seem,
according to Mayberry. We have an
all-time record demand for accountants
and an increase in the demand for
chemical engineers.

Page 3



I, Tha Florida ANftor, Friday, May 29.1970

Page 4

1
'% ||p 99 / Ik I 1
# Jjyfl
' : 'M^- Mi
AN OLD FISHERMAN
... he remembers Mrs. Rawlings
To get to Cross Creek, you go to Micanopy and turn left.
Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings would never have described it that way,
however. To her, it was a fishing village north by west of Lochloosa,
on the edge of Orange Lake.
Mrs. Rawlings, author of The Yearling, and Cross Creek, made
the fishing village famous before her death, but for nearly two decades
now, the town has lived in obscurity.
Today, however, the town may be on the verge again of becoming a
household word, at least in the state of Florida, and again, Mrs.
Rawlings will be the cause.
Her home, operated as a museum for the past two years by the UF,
has been approved to become Alachua Countys first state park.
Theyre going to put Cross Creek back on the map, was the
remark of one long-time village resident. Cross Creek has slowly lost
its status over the years, and disappeared off many maps after the late
sos.
For the student, Cross Creek offers the Rawlings home, a look at
rustic Florida, and to boot, theres even one restaurant, The
Yearling, specializing in fresh caught fish dinners.
For a lazy spring afternoon, take in a little history, and a little
Floridana. Take in Cross Creek.

m.,,yJM
'?' <: I s jM; : 'o
, & ..- WWSam.& g!)^lMW^ll
i>><( 6
' J ~ ,
<~ ~ ~~*3f^~ ; li T K|
, / -\rJ&?* %&/%*' Jkt > <-- : ;|fc-..
ii -, | ii
C,;V
,y | | |;'..- j
'
JUST AN OLD HOUSE
... but owned by aUF housemother

Photos By Sunny Barlow

i, |ti ..... £l2m i t
"fSB
''M
Mb- sr?! w. a raw w w? ggfe Sag'- gfla-.-, min isl ¥ <*Bk;
w iH Si &§> raa iffiaff -rii Ip
THE RAWLINGS HOME
... will be Alachua Countys first stats Dark

-. v IBPF fis> f
* l3| M' f w v% C f
:: IglMkS 1- FipiBPSMEpBK
\ -. S il 2 :. ...
n S tl s s. BK . ml .. :jS
w *' A fa \\ aK >< x x jjy x
M < ' | | \, \ \ &. v iW# ML
S r B %UHb > jP\. a
> ws?mx&m & < '^&''£'k", V %/
MAILBOXES
on, V 01,6 Paved rood, but residents live in the woods

sJir ?'y' -JGPpPS$£<; > sfeg. p *& |ji is-v 1? v isB < Wr*Bgx&s 'w?3Sp£t9''
wflSv j jjfe ' i§? I aPm|k>- 1 --~jf lllll IMBHlljasltfjf^Bfa Bhlv
v^ r '^^Br^^K%§ ? I ;.y|§fUM|BMa&^£>: : v^B| f^#/l i S?
Br "/K^tel 4* jLk-
WJWP?'i' m ff *j|*|^H;''"'"r' v '' Ts
Wl*-a. '^fcp^^jbwbt. f -, /
jMffit? .x x f t * V >4^x^
<". rjjfejt^J^ikv*3^ vviSf 'ejET^^_^T"ippllj^H^ r ><>fefc' 5 3fc^^Tr
y Jgi ** s '"* C**"* ''^'y^V' 3L,'
imrf : 4f mBiHIB. 14
earw tKimWPW '
-^ll2l ...
v|F*|g& \ :: : ***^^Bwks> x y
. ZT**flMmfMtSwY *w *&1 :W S w|f
*s, v> v ,^||^^B^BB^BBB|^^Hn^^^^^^^^^ir^^^^BSiM!2in r M "'""!* 1 m 1 %
v '' J t *js? '-* -* )Ev f ~t,
u r#i '***i>>fcZ ,^''^^yv --- ' mifakifi
, K v \ v ¥ 4 |T J^-
fishcamp and fishermen
... a restaurant is the chief industry



IK
it itw
w itw m &
M ...... ump
SPr Wr^
V .. jf? JL. #
ifc. J 'sp^
jjpp;
, J - 5 H, -' s'*.-j 's£* J K**r*"§' "& JrI*4-1, 1 4-1, S *r' *^\AV J'.i -- v
,>, 'jfi' jii' -,' ',' ,v r.v, l, 'w' V?/ ' '< 4 i'.f j*'
:f - : vy- '- mm**r
-v *. !f-^ -y, : v- ; y-- : j saF ''^ ; 'Wfv^
v * jsssSgl^
' cj* #>'' Hr \w%;
y ~
' * \ % '*l
f .vtel...* *Jjbm 'St.
-;
UMMM WAYNE KATEZ
Caught in the act of sunbathing, today's Gator Girt, Sherri Kooker,
3JM, from Clearwater is looking towards a career in broadcasting.
Sherri, an "aqua-nut" who digs all water sports, is also an avid dancer.
A past Miss Clearwater, this charmer is an attractive representative of
Jennings Hall.
WHAT'S HAPPENING
ART SHOW: There will be an art exhibit in the Constans Theatre
today and Saturday. Paintings by Steve Moore and Mike Krone,
graduate students in art.
FOOD: Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship is having a free buffet
supper at the house of Dr. Herb Wagemaker, 532 N.W. 55th St.
Sunday night at 6:30. All are invited.
MOVIES: At the University Auditorium.
Today and Saturday; Morgan time 5:30,8, and 10:30.
Sunday: Open City, 7 and 9:30.
DANCE: At the Reitz Union Dance, Saturday evening at 9. The
Riff will turn on.

I REBEL DISCOUNT I
I SAVES YOU UP TO 50% EVERYDAY I
I HEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS FILM & PROCESSING COSMETICS I
I RECORDS CARDS SCHOOL SUPPLIES SUNDRIES I
I sureR 1 skoals I EXCLUSIVE I saveso% save % so% I
I /*dcct onlyat on on
I mintTr rSular DISCOUNT KODACOLOR professional I
I 129 AO A ALL FILM PROCESSING HAIR CARE I
VALUE Or V REVLON-MAX FACTOR PRODUCTS FROM |
--CLAIROL-LOVE BONNIE BELL COLOR PRINTS REVLON*WELLA I
I IISTFPINF DISCOUNTED 30 cent ICA CLAIROL-REDKIN I
I UJIUUIH. EVERYDAY VALUE 1J > ea. pantene I
| 1.15 VALUE VC M OR E C X A P STm R DGE OLL AND MANY OTHERS |
I 2!2AL BIG VALUE! -y o DEVELOPED & PRINTED I
I IIITDA DDITC wonder LASH 1.79 £ rebel super discounts I
I ULIKA dklie $ft UE $2.80 a u I
I value 69c l0VI "' i "*l-29 SDH PDOOSSWe 3 67 1
I RIGHT GUARD max eye ... B 6 -* ,VAIUES 4.571
I wiiT 79c f CTOI> AKEU > DISCOUHTtD 6-98 VALUES 5.47 I
I specials good thru Sunday THE STORE WITH THE STUDENT IN MIND... I
I quantity RIGHTS RESERVED y STAFFED & OPERATED ENTIRELY BY STUDENTS |

FOR UNIVERSITY POLICE

Relations Director Named

By RON CRESPO
Alligator Correspondent
University Police Department
(UPD) Chief Audie Shuler has
named Sgt. Elbee Smith as
Campus Community Relations
director to bring UPD and
various student groups together.
Lt. Dudley Golden will assist
Smith in his duties.
WE NEED a better
understanding of the students
and the students need a better
understanding of us, Shuler
said.
Asked if the decision to create
this position came because of
recent complaints by students
about the campus police, Shuler
said they were aware of the
need for such a liaison with the
students.
A Campus Police-Student
Liaison Commission with similar
purposes was formed last
October under the auspices of
talfoW*
*_^jt^moves

r STK* SHfIKC 1
Student Special
| (With The Coupon) |
I ur e flwlar 93< Steakburger i
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90< plus tax |
Steak n Shake 1
l 1610 S.W. 13th St. m Gainesville |

Student Government President
Charles Shepherd, but was
dissolved.
LT. GOLDEN said there are
no definite plans yet as to how
to approach the problems, but
that they plan to go directly to
the students.
And we hope our actions
will be reciprocated, he added.
Some programs have already
been devised and tried,
according to Goulden. Among
them is a defensive
driving-training program to
which they expect to devote
more time in the future and a
first-aid program. They have also
talked to sororities on
self-defense.
CHIEF SHULER said they
expect as much help as possible
from the UF. The UPD plans to
hire a student as a liaison officer
between the Campus
Community Relations team and
the students.

FREDRICK
GARDENS
. . note Iciisiiw
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave

Friday, May 29,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

We hope to get the funds to
hire this student assistant,
Shuler said.
.
Assistant dean for Student
Affairs J. T. Hennessy said his
office had not been contacted
on this matter, but added, this
could be done on a work-study
basis if the student qualified
under this program.
IT SEEMS like a very
worthy idea. I would back it up
one hundred per cent, he said.
Student Body President Steve
Uhfelder said he had not learned
about the idea, but that he
would be willing to work with
the UPD on the program.
I think its a great idea, he
said.
> r- : v v .. |
T^ACEjM/§k
Up wBM
v ir 1 Wm
I episcopal
fJNIVEjgSy CHAPEK
HP
& -t ..a# m Tmi\. tmm
IhhL .MW tm yIL. % iSSSemt
mFflfmVl HAwl
V JbW Mr
1 V £: m
m mm?
a ?;: J
. WfW

Page 5



Page 6

'' '-*'* *. : J ' f % \ t f
I, Tlm Florida AWgator, Friday, May 29, Jf^Qv^

Wallaces Montgomery Mafia Fades

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPI)
Back in the days when the
Wallace for President movement
was sweeping into statehouses
with hundreds of ballot petitions
his corps of workers acquired
the nickname of the
Montgomery Mafia.
The sobriquet was taken
from John F. Kennedy's 'lrish
Mafia, the group of New
Frontier insiders which
engineered the Presidents
nomination and election and
formed his closest circle of
advisers.
THE MONTGOMERY
Mafia was a tightly knit group,
too, dedicated to George C.
Wallaces presidential campaign.
Strengthened by two straight
wins in the Alabama
gubernatorial primaries in 1962
and 1966, the hard core of the
Wallace camp was successful in
placing the former governors
name on the Presidential ballot
in each of the 50 states.
Men like Tom Tumipseed of
South Carolina, Jack House,
Cecil Jackson, Taylor Hardin, Ed
Ewing, Bill Jones and Seymore
Trammell were at the heart of
the Mafia.
THEY KEPT WALLACE on
schedule, spaced his appearances
and generally kept his campaigns
humming with efficiency.
With Jhe exception of
Tumipseed, all were directly
involved in the 1966
gubernatorial race made by
Lurleen B. Wallace and, in most
cases, the group had been with
Wallace since he lost to John M.
Patterson for governor in 1958.

... V *
Why does if fake two hands to
- handle a
j tut ittii m

Today the old Mafia is
gone. Only House, Hardin and
Tumipseed are active in the
present Wallace campaign.
JACKSON WENT into private
law practice when the
Presidential campaign ended and
has been too busy to rejoin the
former governors forces.
Trammell had an open
falling-out with Wallace and
some just drifted away as the
Presidential campaign went into
hibernation.
The result has been several
public gaffs and a number of
behind-the-scenes problems
which have contributed to some
extent to Wallaces problems in
this years campaign and runoff.
By contrast, the campaign
machinery of Gov. Albert P.
Brewer, Wallaces runoff
opponent, is a model of
efficiency.
ALTHOUGH MADE up
mostly of amateurs who have
never run a political race before,
Brewer get where he is supposed
to get on time, sees who he is
supposed to see and has his
statements distributed when
they are made.
Wallace has had problems
holding his schedule because
his appearances were packed too
tightly and there have been
instances when Wallaces
Country music singers went one
way while the candidate went
another.
THERE WAS the time a
Wallace aide informed newsmen
the former governor stopped at a
truck stop near Tuscaloosa and
promised a group of truckers he

CAMPAIGN HAS PROBLEMS

I Soviet Union Told First
lOf Cambodian Invasion?

*
$ WASHINGTON (UPI) A neutral diplomatic
source in Phnom Penh said Thursday President
; Nixon used the Washington-to-Moscow hotline to
: tell the Kremlin in advance he was sending U. S.
ij troops into Cambodia, but the White House
: denied it.
£ The President has not used the hotline since
£ he took office, Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler
:£ said.
:£ THE SOURCE in Phnom Penh said Moscow
£ relayed Nixons message to the Soviet
:£ ambassador in Cambodia. The ambassador, in
:£ turn, was reported to have told Gen. Lon Nol of
>: the U. S. plan to attack Communist sanctuaries
;j: just over the border from South Vietnam.
£ Ziegler declined to discuss any diplomatic
£ maneuvering that preceded the Cambodian
£ operation, but other White House sources said
£ the Lon Nol government was informed directly
; just before the operations began. The word came

would eliminate truck weighing
in stations if he was elected.
The campaign followed up
with a mailed news release with
the same statements but, last
week in Anniston, Wallace
denied ever making the
statement.
The mailed releases had been
printed widely in newspapers
and used by the broadcast
media.
HOUSE, ASKED about the
discrepancy, said he was to
blame for the mistake. He said
it arose from a misunderstand misunderstanding
ing misunderstanding on a campaign workers
report to Wallace headquarters.

On another occasion a Wallace
release said the former governor
had made no offers of Cabinet
jobs if he was elected.
But Wallace told the UPI
Broadcasters Association of
Alabama and Mississippi he had
offered Charles R. Woods, the
third place candidate in the May
5 primary, a job as state finance
director although it had been
turned down.
THE BIGGEST gaff in the
Wallace campaign turned out to
be a promise by Wallace
spokesmen he would hold
weekly news conferences.
Much was written about this,

from the U. S. representative in Phnom Penh, the
source said.
Ziegler did say that advance diplomatic notice
was consistent with the elements of security
and surprise.
THE WHITE HOUSE spokesman refused to
say Whether the United States contacted the
Soviet Union in advance of the operation in any
way other than through the hotline.
The Phnom Penh source said there were no
details available on when Nixon was supposed to
have sent the hotline message or what he said in it.
The hotline between Washington and Moscow
was set up in August, 1963, after both sides
found normal diplomatic channels too slow
during the Cuban missile crisis the year before.
Its last know use was during the 1967 Middle
East war when President Lyndon B. Johnson and
Soviet Premier Alexie N. Kosygin used the
teletype line.

speculating the reason for the
Wallace decision was that Brewer
was getting a great deal of
mileage out of weekly meetings
with newsmen he has held since
he became governor.
The first news conference
came off fine, but the next two
were cancelled and then an
announcement was made there
were no plans for weekly
meetings with the media.
In fact, Wallace who usually
thrives on the give-and-take of a
news conference has only had
one open meeting with the
media since his announcement
he would run.



UPI Around
... The World
MOSCOW Emperor Haile Selassi of Ethiopia arrived Thursday on
a friendly official visit to the Soviet Union and talks with Kremlin
leaders, the Soviet news agency Tass reported.
Selassie flew from Japan, where he visited Expo 70. It was his third
official visit to Moscow.
SAIGON American combat deaths in the Indochina conflict
totaled 142 last week, a decrease of 34 per cent from the 217
reported slain last week, the U.S. military command reported
Thursday.
Military sources said that of the 142 killed last week, 81 were in
South Vietnam and 61 in Cambodia.
The command said last weeks toll raised to 42,260 the number of
U.S. servicemen killed in combat since Jan. 1, 1961. Another 7,998
Americans have died from noncombat causes, the command said,
bringing the over-all American toll in the conflict to 50,258.
MIDEAST Israeli warplanes swept over the Suez Canal Thursday
in the seventh consecutive day of air raids against Egyptian targets, a
spokesman announced in Tel Aviv. Lebanon ordered its army to curb
Arab guerrilla activities against Israel from bases in southern Lebanon.
A Lebanese cabinet decree demanded that the guerrillas adhere to
an agreement made last Nov. 3 which bans forays into Israeli territory
without first checking with the government ,in Beirut. Lebanon is
trying to prevent Israeli retaliatory strikes.
.. The Nation
WASHINGTON U. S. officials expressed serious concern
Thursday over personal abuse by Swedes of the U. S. ambassador to
Stockholm. They said if it continued, they might have to consider
calling him home.
The officials said that for the moment, there is no plan to recall the
American envoy, Dr. Jerome H. Holland. The statements came only a
week before a visit to the United States of Swedish Prime Minister
Olof Palme.
WASHINGTON A Nixon administration crime fighter Thursday
proposed using more cameras in place of riot gear at protest
demonstrations, suggesting this could cut the use of force on both
sides in a confrontation.
The use of cameras would be sure to arouse, as it has, complaints
of big brotherism and invasion of privacy, said Clarence M. Coster,
an associate administrator of the Law Enforcement Assistance
Administration.
WASHINGTON lndonesian President Suharto held a final
70-minute conference with President Nixon and flew to New York.
Nixon said their two days of meetings went very well.
No official communique was released after the meeting, but while
in Washington, Suharto urged that all foreign troops American,
South Vietnamese and North Vietnamese be withdrawn from
Cambodia.
A 21-gun salute was sounded and the Marine drum and bugle corps
played as Suharto left the White House.
At an Indonesian Embassy reception Wednesday, Suharto told
newsmen, I believe that all foreign forces should be withdrawn from
Cambodia.
... The State
TALLAHASSEE The senate killed Thursday a bill that would
permit youths under 21 to shoot pool without parental consent.
The bill, which passed the house, was rejected 22-16 after Sen.
Jerry Thomas, D-Jupiter, said it would let minors frequent billiard
parlors where liquor is sold.
Sen. Truett Ott, D-Tampa, said the bill was drawn to keep the
Student Union at UF from getting into trouble for letting students
under 21 play at two pool tables in the hall.
Sen. Charles Weber, R-Fort Lauderdale, noted that all a student has
to do is get a letter from his parents allowing him to play.
QUINCY Three persons were being held without bond Thursday
on charges of attempting to murder Gadsden County Sheriff Robert
Martin following a chase late Wednesday.
Martin identified the three as David J. Lucas, 21, of Gainesville,
Herbert McKenzie, 19, of Jacksonville, and Shirley Williams, 21, of
Gainesville.
Frosted Glass
Union Dance
...... ; T
/% Sat.
May 30
u of f
K H HIV
W i 25c
I SPONSORED
/'* lli ;2- Jijk |§§| BYJWRU

Bfflkk GAINESVILLE MALL, 2546 N.W. 13th Street
I THE IN-FASHION STORE!
I 19HI
.Jr .\.v, v-.v V ''-
Aat-. HL
.<" BBBgf M. k r
'
I MINI MINI BIKINI I
Thats what Lemer Shops has for B
h you Many Mini Bikinis. B
I Hurry in and choose your favorite B;
and be ready to enjoy the swim & sun B
months ahead. B
Cottons or Jerseys in solids & prints B
to select from. B
Join the MINI-BIKINI CROWD B
jjp ;
From 9.99 Up U
IISHBBSSS9BBSS9^

Friday, May 29,1970, Tha Florida Ailifator,

Page 7



Page 8

Thf FlorfrU AWgW, Friday, Mfy 29,^70

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

l

The Dangerous Home

* WASHINGTON A three-inch-thick report,
assailing the manufacturers of dangerous household
products, will be issued next month by the National
Commission on Product Safety.
Declaring that household hazards kill three and
injure 3,000 Americans every hour, the report will
warn purchasers to beware of power lawn mowers,
color TV sets, glass bottles, motorcycle and football
helmets, floor furnaces, sliding glass doors, hot
water vaporizers, household chemicals, high-rise
bicycles and a host of childrens toys and other
products.
Yet even before this prodigious report was off the
presses, the Surgeon Generals Steering Committee
on Emergency Health and Injury Care pushed
through a more moderate study on the same subject
to soften the blow against the manufacturers.
Both reports are held under lock and key
awaiting a release date. Unauthorized copies,
however, have been smuggled to this column.
The Commission, proclaiming the consumers
right to safe products, will ask for authority to
develop and set mandatory consumer product safety
standards. The Commission will also seek the
power to recall hazardous items off the market.
In contrast, the Surgeon Generals report,
adopted by a secret 10-to-2 vote, puts the emphasis
on public education and joint industry-government
action.
*
Consumer demand for safe products and tools
must precede the economic investment required by
such changes, contends the Surgeon Generals
committee. This seems to say: what the purchasers
dont know wont hurt them or, perhaps more
precisely, the manufacturers neednt go to the
expense of eliminating a hazard until the public gets
outraged over it.
Disagrees the Commission: It is not necessary to
wait for an epidemic of injuries as proof of a
hazard ... When a manufacturer offers a product,
the offer implies a warranty that the item is not
unreasonably hazardous.
The Surgeon Generals committee also takes a
rosy view of the reforms that manufacturers already
have adopted, declaring: There have been many
recent evidences that manufacturers of consumer
products are willing to redesign or remove from
circulation products which are proven to be
hazardous.
Sharing epidemiological data with industry has
already resulted in the development of : Tempered
safety glass for doors and panels; flame retardant
fabrics for clothing and home furnishings; improved
heating pads; removal from the market of gas
heaters with defective design; refrigerators with
door assemblies to prevent accidental child
entrapment; safety closures for drug containers, and
many others.
Yet some of the same items, that cheer the
Surgeon Generals committee, have been singled out
for special condemnation by the National
Commission. Here are highlights from the
Commission's forthcoming report:
* *
Every year, about 150,000 victims of broken

: m m w V* * r * \ t %
Robert Fraser Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors

Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

A* OM6ML FNKONO BY WQttRD MLHOUS NIXON
BtnnJ>*TH ECONOMY WHIOL ACCORDING TO
TUB AKTWTC WHCJS THE S(JN JBSBte CWRAUKH.
GRfflN ttilEY AS SPRITES PLft FLUTES AND JUKE
mss dwkbsep ecumi Bnnwois.

Merry-Go-Round
iilllHlUittNlillHlllllllllllllllHlHlllllllliiltlHilllllllllliH
by Jack Anderson
windows, doors or glass walls discover that what
they cant see can hurt them ... The fragile, brittle
panels of ordinary glass shatter even under a light
blow from a child. The crystal knives and daggers
slice through the hand or wrist, cut vital organs and
cause permanent disfigurement, paralysis, or death.
Victims may bleed to death within 20
minutes ... Analysis of 352 glass door injury cases
reported to the Commission in 1969 and 1970
essentially confirmed the earlier survey results that
many of the injuries are serious and virtually all are
preventable.
The cause of (many deaths and brain-damage
cases) was something the victims couldnt see,hear,
or smell: carbon monoxide, CO. And the source of
CO in each instance was an innocent-looking
unvented gas heater ... There were 638,500
unvented heaters sold in 1969. A manufacturer
estimated 15 million such heaters are used in five
million households ... The decision to install
unvented gas heaters often is made by landlords
who pay for the heater but not for the injuries.
Household chemicals pose a major hazard to
young children because they are so curious. Every
liquid or chewable substance is something for them
to sample. The chemical bums children suffer from
strong detergents are particularly painful... The
Food and Drug Administration has the power to
ban a product which it deems so hazardous that
labeling will not protect the public, but this
procedure has not been used as to caustics or
petroleum distillates.
* *
On the opening day of the grass grooming
season, the rotary power mower begins its work of
trimming lawns, fingers and toes. About 70 per cent
of the injuries from power mowers are lacerations,
amputations, and fractures that result from the
cutting and crushing action of the fast-whirling
blade. In addition, there are high velocity ejections
of wire, glass, stones and debris that can puncture
vital body parts .. % One quarter of the 216 models
we examined did not comply with the industrys
own concensus safety standards.

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Craig Goldwyn
Assignment Editor Sports Editor
Fred Voflrath
Wire Editor
Dan Vining Jeff Brein
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant

f \ > - . Cr yr *

EDITORIAL
March On
Memorial Day is more than just a convenient day to hold
the Indianapolis 500.
It is a time to remember those who have died in the
service of their country. An American tradition, Memorial
Day is a fitting way to honor those who have lost their lives.
But we must not forget the thousands of men who have
not lost their lives but have lost an arm, a leg or their health
in the armed forces.
We should remember them also, and with more than
words.
These men lie in Veterans Hospitals across the country
if they can get in. But overcrowding is just one of the
problems.
In Gainesville, we have a new Veterans Administration
Hospital one which although only three-years-old, faces
two of the main problems of the great majority of these
other facilities underfunding and understaffing.
As UF students we should know something about
underfunding. A frustrating, seemingly unsolvable problem
one which we can do little about.
But understaffing is something we can effect.
The V.A. Hospital needs volunteers.
Arthur Muth, chief of the voluntary services, says the
hospital could use approximately 350. Right now they have
less than 100.
What are you doing?
You march, you strike, you sit in the Plaza of the
Americas and talk about how evil the war is.
The war is wrong, people shouldnt kill other people just
because their eyes are slanted a different way, their skin is
tinged a different color, and national pride demands it.
But when one is lying in a hospital wounded arent
these points rather academic?
These men need our help. One day a week doesnt seem
too much to ask. The work isnt hard and doesnt take any
extensive training.
All it takes is time and the willingness to work, Muth
said.
Volunteers are interviewed and an attempt is made to
place them according to preference, he said. The work is
patient-oriented but not always directly involved with
patient contact.
Muth said anyone who is interested should contact him at
the V.A. Hospital, 376-161 1.
Why dont you march down there this afternoon?
PSYGBIATRI
un pc n HC-Lr OH' rcms P&E OJT TOSTEAL^
ALL THOSE' VOUM& GrfELSf
HOvI CAM I $£ fcINCr W
lf>- 0U T > mmj
THE
J 6 1
1 l 1 AJOLOWfo I'O
V i I I mjl &c.mnTL
1 I] \ TTHOJPS
5

Published by students of the University of
Pioriiia under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union
Editorial, phone 392 1686, 37, 88. or 39
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82. 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392 1619. I
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
r of the writer of thc "tic l and not those
of the University of Florida.



Keep Right

In 1865 the Congress freed
the black man, at least on paper,
with the passage of the 13th
admendment.
Section 1 of that amendment
states: Neither slavery nor
involuntary servitude, except as
a punishment for crime, whereof
the party shall have been duly
convicted, shall exist within the
United States, or any place
subject to their jurisdiction.
The military draft is clearly a
violation of this provision.
I fail to see how anyone can
contend to the contrary. If you
are serving in the military, and
you did not volunteer, it doesnt
take an expert in constitutional
law to tell it is involuntary
servitude.
When the black man was
forced to labor in the fields and
homes of the white southern
planter, it was called slavery.
When a young man is drafted
into service today and forced to
labor in the fields or masters
house, it is called fulfilling
ones obligations to the public,
doing ones patriotic duty, or
some other euphemism for
slavery.
Perhaps I have more
confidence in the people or
ideals of this country than those
who support the draft. I dont
think if this country were truly
threatened from the outside it

Cog Wheel Functionings

MR. EDITOR:
Mel Pearlman and the other members
of SEPUL create an amusing picture of
the legal process even at a very precarious
period in out nation's history. As
thousands of students banded together in
an emotional protest against a vague but
very real sickness in our judicial, political
and economic systems, Mr. Pearlman was
no doubt busily at work trying to figure
out something to do about the
outrageous fact that a day of classes had
been missed.
. *
His petition for a refund is perfect. Mr.
Pearlman is undaunted by the fact that it
would cost the university a tremendous
amount of money in paperwork, time and
bureaucratic confusion thereby increasing
the changes of a tuition hike in the near
future. If the members of SEPUL did not
receive three dollars worth of education
on strike day they probably wont get
their moneys worth yesterday either.
Mr. Pearlman will no doubt make a
very successful lawyer. He exhibits that
all important and peculiar trait of being
able to understand the intimate cog-wheel
the small society

SAY WfJAT YoO WANT A&>UT
inflation ear Yoo Neva?

Defended By Volunteers

would lack volunteers to defend
it.
True, the military services
might have a difficult time
maintaining their cur rent
manpower, but the military,like
all bureaucracies, is overstaffed
anyway. Its efficiency would
probably increase if it had less
fat and more muscle.
President Nixon is moving in
the right direction by trying to
eliminate the draft, but it leaves
a dangerous precedent standing.
His approach leaves legal the
principle that it is at the
descretion of Congress to enslave
large portions of our population
or not.
The proper approach is for
the courts to declare the draft a
violation of the constitution.
Then, if Congress and the
states feel the overwhelming
need for a draft, they could go
through the process of amending
the constitution.
The draft is not part of the
system. It is repugnant to it. In
the controversy over the draft, it
is the government which stands
outside our system of
constitutional law, not the
protestors.
How then, and by whom, is
the country to be protected?
It will be defended by those
who think it is worth defending.
If our government leaders do not
think a sufficient number of

functionings of a clock without knowing
what time it is. HENRY A. BAKER
ALUMNUS
Choose
MR. EDITOR:
I have recently come to believe that
the radicals among us are the most
closed-minded group ever to be
assembled.
They believe that they and only they
have been chosen to know the truth, and
to see that it is enforced on the rest of us
whether we like it or not. They make
demands and if they do not obtain
everything they want, they scream that
their demands have not been considered.
If they would stop screaming and listen,
they would come to know that their
demands have been received and
considered and that the answer to some
of those demands was no.
Os course the radical believes he knows
what is best for all. He knows more than
the administrators, he knows more than
the experts, he even knows more than his
fellow students who disagree with him.
They want to be allowed to do their
own thing and at the same time the
radical is telling other students that they
by Brickman

citizenry would offer their
services to defend this country,
they have less faith in the
institutions and government

Out 5

Another Compromise

As a member of the Silent Majority, I wish to
commend the group of hunger strikers for their
steadfast determination in seeing that all the
demands proposed by Larry Woldenberg in the May
11 issue of the Alligator be met to the fullest before
discontinuing the hunger strike. I would like to
examine the proposals which the strikers have
successfully accomplished for which they can
proudly take full credit. The demands, as listed in
the Alligator are:
An immediate meeting of the University
Senate to vote the disaccreditation of ROTC.
This demand, I assume, was a success because the
Senate placed the position of ROTC on campus on
the agenda for their next meeting which will be held
this Thursday. I must admit, it isnt exactly
immediate. I would like to note that President
OConnell asked Steve Uhlfelder to establish a
committee to study the ROTC question before the
hunger strike started, therefore, it would have been
brought up before the next meeting of the Senate
anyway.
Disarm the Campus Police.
If I recall, Jose Perez stated at the Friday, May 9
rally on the Plaza of the Americas that if the police
were not disarmed by Monday night he would start
a hunger strike until they were .. As the hunger
strike progressed, I noticed a slow change in color
from all black or white to shades of gray. In the
May 19 issue, it stated, this strike was called
because we dont think the campus police should
carry guns in situations where guns arent
specifically needed. Now I must admit, this
statement sounds more realistic, but it is not the
original demand. The May 20 issue quoted a striker

may not do their own thing. I am
referring of course to a student choosing
to study military science.
ROTC is voluntary, no one has to take
it and I see no reason for denying it to
interested students. This country will
always need a military, even when it no
longer has an interest in Southeast Asia.
If we wish to see the draft limited or
ended altogether we must allow men and
women to freely choose the military for a
career.
The radical student is free to express
his ideas and feelings, but it is time to put
an end to the radical infringing on the
rights of others.
NAME WITHHELD
Appeal
MR. EDITOR:
Every age of man has had its
charismatic leaders who, with the
guidance of God, have endeavored to lead
man from the wilderness into the
sunshine. The Jews had Moses, the
English had King Arthur, the French had
Joan of Arc and America now has the
Silent Majority.
In times of crisis and corruption,
darkness and depression, these leaders
have vicariously and variously emerged
from the quagmire of despair to kindle a
spark of hope where the blackness used to
be. And so it is with the Silent Majority.
We find our country blighted by
poverty, divided by a war, tom by
prejudices, choked by pollution and
bloated by inflation.
Ah, but do not despair. For over the
spreading crisis and turmoil, an angelic
voice can be heard and a shimmering ray
of hope can be seen. The Silent Majority
has spoken. They have enunciated the
awe-inspiring and silver lined words that
will guide us through the forest and come

they have created than the most
militant factions of the New
Left.,
A country and institutions

FORUM:-
C A&liu mi VilAMt /)
hope f the

Friday, May 29,1970, The Florida Alfigatnr,
no <* # a > .* .

By Fred Vollrath

By Geza de Czege

as saying, we dont want all guns taken from the
police. (Another compromise so soon? Stomachs
are getting tight.) 1 guess a backfield has been
made for play area. Somewhere in this backfield
there must be room for (as the last compromise
suggested) a favorable report by the gun
committee. This gun committee was also agreed
upon by President OConnell before the hunger
strike was started.
Comply with the demands of the Black
Student Union.
The Websters dictionary defines comply as to
act in accordance with a request, demand, etc., So
far the Senate has stated they would consider the
demands. Consider, according to Webster, means
to look at carefully, regard attentively. In
political circles, this is a word used by politicians to
keep the public happy.
9 Total amnesty for all strikers:
I think this was just added because it is the in
thing to say. One striker answered this when he said
it was not mandatory to attend classes anyway. That
was stated in the May 20 issue of the Alligator.
So now, looking at all these great things
accomplished, for the life of me, I cant think where
the hunger strike fits into the picture. If they
wanted to play the martyrs roll, they shouldnt
have compromised or modified their demands. The
way it stands now, no one feels sorry for them, and
the real clincher is, if they were on a real hunger
strike, drinking only water, they would have lasted
only three days. But as it was, they drank juices and
other liquids which, according to a local physician,
had enough nutritional and caloric value in them to
maintain the strikers indefinitely.

to be known as the soul and inspiration
of our generation:
WE WANT A TUITION REBATE!
ERIC KAPLAN, 1 LW
Coffin
MR. EDITOR:
Your Wednesday editorial, So What?
puzzles me. Yale Chaplain William S.
Coffin and other visitors scheduled to be
here Friday have not yet spoken, but you
have already decided that their
appearance will squander another day in
the Plaza, that they will only bring
rhetoric and shouting.
I have seen and heard Mr. Coffin
before on many occasions. He is
informed, intelligent, and an eloquent
and powerful speaker. He has evidenced
both understanding and courage in his
participation in civil rights and
anti-Vietnam war activities.
Unlike your know-it-all-already
editorial writer, I cannot predict what Mr.
Coffin will have to say. But I do predict
that he will be worth hearing.
RICHARD H. HIERS
ASSOC. PROFESSOR OF RELIGION
LETTERS POLICY
Lettars must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and
not axoaad 300 words.
Not ba signad with a paaudonym.
Have addremes and tafeohone
numbers of writers.
ernes wm oe wimneia omy it writer
shows just oouse. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for space.
vvnwfi may suchthi lonyat tnnys,
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" ookimna. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular oolumn
mkoq to contact me aaitor ana m
nieond to diaw samnles of his work
|rsogieows ms asswev nsa vwsita

that cannot be defended by
volunteers from amongst its
citizenry by definition is not
worth defending.

Page 9



Page 10

I, TIM Florida Alligator, Friday, May 29, 1970
* * ? T' r. c r

Cambodian Fund Cutoff Vote Set

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Senate,
after two weeks of talk, finally agreed
Thursday to a test vote on legislation to
cut off hinds for U. S. military operations
in Cambodia. But final action on the
measure still was not in sight.
Members unanimously agreed to vote
at 11:30 ajn. EDT Wednesday on an
amendment that would void the antiwar
measure if any U. S. citizens were being
held as prisoners of war in Cambodia.
THE TEST likely will come moments
before that on a motion by Sen. Robert
Dole, R-Kans., to table the amendment.
The tabling vote will provide the first

1970 Will Prove Good Year
Agnew Assures Audience

HUNTINGTON N. Y. (UPI)
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew
predicted Thursday that 1970
will prove to be a good year for
business, a turnaround year in
Vietnam and a time when
everybody learned that it never
pays to sell America short.
In an economy-slanted speech
prepared for Suffolk County
Republicans, Agnew took a few
swipes at Democratic critics of
the administration and even
chided Wall Street for predicting
eleven out of the last four
recessions.
HIS REMARKS apparently
were part of a continuing
administration effort to reassure
the business community.
Before ticking off gains he
said the administration had
made in cooling economy,
Agnew told his Long Island
audience that fears of
businessmen about the
Cambodian situation are totally
unfounded.
The war has not been
widened, he said. We are not
about to get into any war in
Cambodia, nor are we about to
assume the responsibility for
training the Cambodian
army ...
THE COURAGEOUS
decision by the President to
clean out the Cambodian
sanctuaries will be seen by
historians and even by some
instant historians as the action
that turned the comer toward
peace in southeast Asia.
The vice president termed the
Cambodian forays as the most
successful military move since
the Inchon landing in the
Korean War.
Agnew also said the budget is
not going to be increased as a
result of the Cambodian move.
HE BLAMED the recent stock
market skid and inflationary
pressures on Great Society
spending in the 1960 s and said
many of those now offering
IN THE MALL-IN THE MALL
f j£jj
a- rn i
; \s
A*'
j MEN AND BOYS I
iMbHHIf
MTHE MAU.-WTHIMAU.

indication of whether Sens. John
Sherman Cooper, R-Ky., and Frank
Church, D-Idaho, have enough support to
pass their controversial proposal to bar
U. S. combat units from re-entering
Cambodia after they are withdrawn next
month.
Most head counts indicate they may
have a solid majority behind them,
perhaps 60 votes. Opponents, however,
said they may not have suffident strength
to block the Dole amendment, since the
prisoners of war issue is such an
emotional one.

snap solutions to an inflation
caused then are the same people
who caused the present
problems.
The vice president pointed
out that total employment
readied an all-time high in April,

WT :: : *:Â¥
.. .' :: :
W WJT*-"
mmmSy m - rji itl WWmk .
AT S3MWH
I ON SALE AT THE DOOR. SATE 1

that the amount individuals have
left to spend after allowing for
taxes and inflation hit a peak in
the first quarter of 1970, and
that total production is only
down slightly from last falls
record.

COOPER SAID he considered the vote
a real test. If the Dole amendment is
passed, he said, the antiwar measure will
be too emasculated to mean anything.
The Senate was still far away from
final action on the Cooper-Church
proposal. Eleven Republican senators,
with the tacit backing of the
administration, were blocking a
showdown by parliamentary tactics, in
the hope that a final vote could be
delayed until U. S. troops were
withdrawn.
Sen. Ted Stevens, R-Alaska, held the

toytime
Toys Hobbies
Juvenile Furniture
A complete line of swim
goods and playground
equipment.
1315 N.W. 16th Ave.
376-4576 Phono 376-4577

floor most of the morning with a speech
opposing any restrictions on Nixons
Cambodian operation.
DOLE DISCLOSED the existence of
an informal group of 11 Republicans
who are responsible for the voting delay.
Members of the group are Assistant
Senate Republican Leader Robert P.
Griffin, Mich., and Sens. Milton R.
Young, N. D.; Hiram L. Fong, Hawaii;
John J. Williams, Del.; Paul Fannin, Ariz.;
George Murphy, Calif.; Clifford p!
Hansen, Wyo.; Edward J. Gumey, Fla.,
Dole and Stevens.

Student Special "1
Any car or color!
j4gs. |
I Joy's Paint & Body Shop j
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
j__ Ph. 373-1665 J



gjj|M UNTZ STEREO,
COLUMBIA TCB TAPES
WELCOM* £
J4NIS JOPLIN T 9

' r
TREASURE JANIS CONCERT ALL
YEAR LONG. MUNTZ AND COLUMBIA
PRESENT ON 8-TRACK TAPE JANIS
GREATEST RECORDINGS. JSf&f
KOZMIC BLUES *oain**. each only
WSA CHEAP THRILLS Z = A c N 0 $ j aa
SlSlheavy sounds 4-ay
r_ HEAVY HITS
ENJOY MUSIC WHILE
TRAVELING THIS SUMMER
IMUNTZ 8-TRACK I fWCTHftBpW9-y9SIW?M
| TAPE PLAYER | g^J-HJIHIiI-Uil'LlUl'M
I £ MUNTZ STEREO CENTER
Â¥ 1 FULL ONLY C
< £ Gainesvilles Headquarters For Columbia Tapes And Accessories
{ 38.951 14 NW 13th Street

Friday, May 29,1970, Tha Florida Alligator, I

Page 11



Page 12

t. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 29,1970

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

CEASING PUBLICATION:
The Alligator will cease
publishing for the spring quarter
on Friday, June 5. The last
Orange and Blue Bulletin will b*
published on that day.
Publication will resume Monday,
June 22, and the first Orangq
and Blue Bulletin will be
Tuesday, June 23.
Q
GRE APPLICATION deadline
date is June 16. This is the last
day for receipt by the
Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, N.J. 08540 of
Registration Form to take the
July 11 GRE without paying the
$3 penalty fee.

Library Schedule
*
Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
College Library* 8 am llpm \ 8 am llpm 2 pm llpm
Research Library Bam ll pm | Bam ll pm 2pm ll pm
PKY Lib. of Florida History 8:30 am spm I 8:30 am l2 N
Special Collections 8:30 am spm 8:30 am l2 N
Architecture & Fine Arts Library Bam spm
Arch. & Fine Arts Building 7pm lO pm Bam l2 Npm lO pm
Chemistry Library Bam spm 9am l2 Npm spm
216 Leigh Hall 7pm lO pm Ipm 4pm 7pm lO pm
Education Library
_ 341 Norman Hall Bam 10:30 pm** 9am spm 2pm 10:30 pm
Engineering 8i Physics Library 8 ams pm 9am l2 N 5 pm
410 Engineering Building 7 pm 10 pm Ipm-4 pm 7 pm 10 pm
Health & Phys. Ed. R. R. Bam spm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6pm lO pm*** Bam -12 N 7pm lO pm
Health Center Library ~ ~
L 102 Med. Science Bldg. 8:30 am l2 Mam spm 2pm l2 M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall Bam llpm Bam spm 7pm ll pm
Journalism 8t Communications R.R. Bam spm
337 Stadium 7pm lO pm*** Bam l2 N
Law Library
Holland Law Center 8 am-11 pm 8 am-11 pm 8:30 am-11 pm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School)
Yonge Bldg. F. Bam 4pm Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Office Bam spm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam-12N Closed 2 pm 5 pm
4 6pm lO pm 6pm lO pm
lpm spm
* The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday nightsfrom 11 p.m. 12 M.
** The Education Library closes at 6:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
*** The Reading Rooms dose at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.

GREAT EXUMA, MOIM ? : w
II Jyf A Or any of the Bahamian "Out Islands"
\f /v \ jTh for an adventure Sn paradise...constant
II / \ Trade Winds...crystal waters...and the V i
f iT tl§|* peace of being "away from it all." V /
Tr Check with your travel agency and see \S. l\ /L/fO S
V how inexpensive this vacation can bei \//53x
11 pjfefr_ We' ll set you up with a vacation loan. V
__ GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS

ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
APPLICATION DEADLINE
DATE is June 24. This is the last
day for receipt by the
Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, N.J. 08540, of
application and $lO fee for
reading knowledge examinations
in French, German, Russian, and
Spanish on July 18. Registration
fees increase $3 after this day
and up to the closing date of
July 1.
CUBAN STUDENTS who
have received the Cuban Student
Loan and who are leaving the
University in June are requested
to have an Exit Interview with
G. A. Farris at International
Center.

BLUE BULLETIN

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE
EXAMS will be given Saturday,
May 30, at 10:00 a.m. 12:00
noon in Room 18 Anderson Hall
for graduate students.
UNIVERSITY HOLIDAY
SCHEDULE: The Personnel
Division has announced the
following schedule of holidays
for University employees for the
coming academic year:
Independence Day (July 3),
Labor Day, Homecoming (Oct.
30) half day. Thanksgiving,
day after Thanksgiving,
Christmas Eve half day,
Christmas Day, Dec. 28 to
substitute for day after
Christmas, New Year's Eve
half day. New Year's Day, and a
half day to be scheduled at the
discretion of each department
chairman. It should be noted
that the University will not
observe May 29 as a substitute
for Memorial Day.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Friday
Pop Art Exhibition, 2nd Floor
Gallery Union, 1:00 pm
Union Movie, "Morgan," Union
Aud., 5:30, 8:00, & 10:30
pm
Florida Players, Experimental
Theatre, "Light Up The
Sky," Constans Theatre, 8:00
pm
IFC Spring Frolics, Janice Joplin
& Rotary Connection, Fla.
Stadium, 8:00 pm
Saturday
India Club, Indian Movie,
"Anupama," Union Aud.,
2:00 pm
Union Movie, "Morgan," Union
Aud., 5:30, 8:00 8t 10:30 pm
Florida Players, Experimental
Theatre, "Light Up The
Sky," Constans Theatre, 8:00
pm
Union Dance, "The Riff," Union
Ballroom, 9:00 pm
UNION BOX OFFICE: Florida
Players, "Light Up The Sky,"
$.75 U. of F. Students; SI.OO
18 years and under; $1.50
Faculty & General Public

WHY PATRONIZE
GATOR ADVERTISERS?
There are lots of good reasons. They are a special
group of people, who advertise in our Gator be because
cause because they like doing business with UF students,
they deal in the goods and services that we spec specifically
ifically specifically want, and they know this is the best way
to get their message across to us. Most of all,
their advertising contributes to The Alligator's
success, so they are as much a part of The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator gang as the editor and the staff. If we r the
students, are the backbone of the university news newspaper,
paper, newspaper, then the advertisers are the life's blood.
So do business with them. They're on our side.

Campus

Calendar

Sunday
Music Dept: Oratorio, Univ.
Choral Groups & Symphony
Orchestra, Univ. Aud., 4:00
pm
Classic Series Film, "Open
City," Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:30 pm
Come Together Day, "I Shall Be
Released," Multi-Media
Show, Union Ballroom, 8:30
pm
Monday
Science Fiction Book Exchange
& Fan Club Meeting, 357
Union, 8:00 pm
Tuesday
Union Movie, "Bus Stop,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30 pm
Chess Club Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 pm
Univ. Stamp Club Meeting,
Doyle Conner Bldg., 7:30 pm
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:30 pm



Up' /
Mr/*' j||
~ > ,%^ 1 i y/ v y \^ f ,vKv v ? J^lyySjt^il^y s
Sfe SfewHIH
wHIH SfewHIH
pfeiMi
3SSKnSR v 'Mli!';.:v *' iiMiiTflimmff hMhmMBmm+ w. ?<
x 1 '* WWI-? JHi^res~
,X,! ! '**& i?I** 1 ** t 7 *-*.* T- 1 *% ~~- i"
CLAY PHIPPS
HARD WORK

Sitting atop the "Charlie Shepherd Bridge," an
unidentified UF student lazily tosses stones into the
stream in Ravine Park. Our photographer remarked

Fewer Work Offers,
Vocational Jobs Rise
By Alligator Services
College placement directors in the Southeast agree there are fewer
job offers for college graduates this year than in recent years,
according to Brunswick A. Bagdon, Southeast Regional Director of
the U. S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics.
An informal survey of placement directors showed that recruitment
for positions in federal agencies, aerospace and research, automobile
and related industries is less than last year.
THE VOCATIONALLY-PREPARED student is in greater demand
than his more academically-oriented fellow student.
There is a general consensus that recruiters are making fewer job
offers per student. They are more selective than in recent years, and
some campus visits have been made solely for the purpose of
maintaining contact.
Recruitment has risen with accounting firms, retail trade, insurance,
public utilities, data processing and services and the textile industry in
the private sector.
THERE ARE some reports, of a rising demand for civil and textile
engineers but an overall decrease in demand for engineers.
Personal appearance was more a factor in determining job offers to
graduate men than in the past. Many had to part with beards and long
hair.
Personality is particularly important for all public contact work.
Participation in campus activities also ranks high as an element in job
offer and selection.
.< j jg|ME|g|
AA^WmAs^y' i lllll' ; ;-'-
'-NBH mm
s Tij?|rW y v -'' p lil
ALL FISH AND AQUATIC PLANTS
(UNDER $10)
1/2 Price
WITH THIS AD
If you've been planning to re-stock your aquarium,
now is the time. Whatever your loving pleasure is
from Redtail sharks, GOLD TILLIES and Clown
Loaches to Elephant nose and monos there is none
to compare with Love for Sale.
And for the first time in this area Love for Sale brings
you GOLD DUST MOLLIES.
COME IN TODAY. SALE IS GOOD TODAY
AND SATURDAY.
GOOD LUCK GRADUATES AND STUDENTS ON FINAL EXAIttiS.

[o!( Qak
IN THE GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

that at this time of the quarter, such activity is
certainly a luxury.

i
t
ALL NEW 1970
- n .-Err 'jrefiiTM .low only
'mim SIA9S
SHIRT-POCKET l
TRANSISTOR PORTABLE
RADIO READY FOR FUN
Complete with
5-pc. gift ensemble:
Radio
Battery pack WE WILL GIFT f
Earphone \ !}
| YOU |
royal 26 lOPEN TO 9 P:M FRIDAY!
FOR THE GRADUATE GOING OVERSEAS
*ST£NiTH
SOLID-STATE TRANSISTOR PORTABLE
FM/AM 'PLUS 3 SHORTWAVE BANDS
A new world of listening pleasure is yours with this outstanding Zenith II
Multi Band radio Powered by 11 transistors, it's designed and engineered \ f*** |II
to bring you the best in reception and performance-operates on 8 in- I
expensive D cell batteries FM/AFC Compare the Inter-Oceanic with I
other portables of its type and size! You wont find a better performer
at such a value price! I
TRULY THE
ONLY* 7 99

OF COURSE PERFORMANCE IS ASSURED BY
COUCHS OWN ZENITH MASTER TECHNICIANS
GAINESVILLES ONLY C.E.T. NATIONALLY CERTIFIED
ELECTRONIC TECHNICIAN BY N.E.A |
/*/N|
vUUvil J PH-378-1562
GAINESVILLES LARGEST SELECTION OF ZENITH
STEREOS RADIOS T.V.TAPE RECORDERS

SMC Has Kuntsler
At UF June 8

The UF administration
apparently will not oppose a
campus appearance by the
defense attorney in the Chicago
conspiracy trial of seven antiwar
activists.
William Kuntsler has
reportedly accepted a request by
the Student Mobilization
Committee (SMC) to speak here
June 8.
JOHN SUGG, SMC press
officer, made the announcement
last week.
Rae O. Weimer, special
assistant to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell said, The
university has a policy enabling
student organizations to have
any speaker they desire.
Sugg said if any problem did
arise with administration

Friday, May 29.1970, The Florida Alligator, I

officials over Kuntslers
appearance, arrangements would
be made to have the speech
off-campus.
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
/BARBER S STYLE SHOP
3 Roffler Stylists
5 Barbers
Roffler Sculpture
Kut for longer hair
Hair straightening
and relaxing
6 to 8 week guarantee
Capiloscope Free
Analysis of hair and
scalp problems
1620 W. University Ave.
373-1195

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SA LE
50 x 10 Schult trailer; AC; washer;
carpet; 20 x 10 screen porch; all in
excellent cond. Lot 5 Pinehurst Pk.
378-5450. Best Offer. (A-10t-145-p)
MONKEY Tame Capochin, leash,
food, etc. S7O. Call 378-0181
mornings or after 10 p.m.
(A-147-st-p)
FANTASTIC COMPONENT
STEREO VALUE, Scott amplifier,
Garrard turntable, large cabinet,
Jensen speakers, Sony tape deck.
Original cost over SSOO. Financial
trouble must sell. $225 or $l5O
minus tape, Call 372-6845.
(A-147-st-p)
For sale: 1962 SAAB 33mi/gal
Excellent mech cond S3OO 735 S.E.
sth Ave. From 5 to Bpm.
(A-4t-149-p)
[ Guns Guns Guns
-1 Inventory over 500. Buy
] | Sell Trade Repair.
, ( Reloading supplies. Layaway
4 I plan. Harry Beckwith, gun
'[dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
HkC 11
j 11 executive Producer* j

FOR SALE
a
a*#

STEREO turntable S4O, amplifier
$45, speakers S4O, Call 378-4200.
(A-5M48-P)
Pool table, cues, balls, racks, and
extras. 3 mo. old, exc. cond., Grad,
senior, must sell. All S6O. Call Bob or
Ed at 376-9410. Anytime.
(A-147-st-p)
Stereo system, 40 watt Tochebia
AM-FM multiplex system. Garrard
turntable two speakers Call after 6
PM. 373-2973. (A-st-147-p)
Microscope Zeiss Binocular Med
School approved. Variable light
$350. Call Steve Bloomfield
376-8442. (A-147-st-p)
1963 MGB mint year excellent
condition will last forever. Good
tires, 48,000 miles, new metallic
paint job 378-7930 ask for Pam.
(A-st-148-p)
New Kustom 200 amp with fuzz,
trem, rev, and sel. boost. 3-15
Jensen speakers. Vox Continental
organ. Shura microphone. Call
392-8225. (A-st-148-p)
8-track car units $38.95 lots of tapes
on sale everyday at $4.99. All others
$5.88 Muntz 14 NW 13th Street.
(A-Bt-149-p)
White silk organza wedding gown.
Long chapel train and veil. Size 5 call
372-2740 after five. SSO.
(A-3t-149-p)
Standel Amp. $550, Fender prec.
Bass $l5O, call 372-8095 after 5:00.
(A-3t-149-p)
10x51 mobile home in good
condition 2 bedrooms, washer, and
air conditioned. Call 376-6372.
(A-3t-149-p)
8x34 aluminum trailer, has screened
porch and Bxlo added room. Student
park near campus. SIOSO
airconditioned, $950 without.
376-8082 anytime. (A-st-149-p)
Honda 50 Must sell Perfect condition
Best offer 378-2809. (A-st-149-p)
Sell Hobie 96 surfboard Good
shape. Best offer. Call 378-3833
Week days ASK FOR TOM.
(A-st-149-p)
It's an experience! Authenic
ANTIQUE AUCTION Sunday
afternoon, 2 P.M. May 31st C & J
Auction House, Archer, Florida
(A-150-2t-p)
67 Honda 90 runs fine, great fun!
$125 Call Mike 392-7507
(A-150-3t-p)
Golf clubs! Spauldings Jerry Barber
promodel. Bag, woods and irons S7O.
Call 373-2815 after 2 PM
(A-150-2t-p)
Webcor portable stereo HI-FI and
smith-corona portable
TYPEWRITER and case. Must sell.
Call 392-7639. (A-st-150-p)
1969 Yamaha Enduro 125 cc 3500 mi
excellent cond. $375 4.00 x 18 knob.
7 mo old see at 304 NW 15 St. RmlO
(A-st-150-p)
8 x 35 Mobile Home, AC, SI2OO.
196 8 125 cc Benelli cheap
transportation $125. Call after 5 PM
378-6389. (A-2t-150-p)
1967 Honda CB 160, 4700 miles,
perfect condition, bell helmet, used
very little, must sell, would like
$325. Call 373-1253 or 392-0128.
(A-Bt-150-p)

B B
I The J. Wayne Reitz Union, with the I
I cooperation of Ce/ebration '7O is proud to I
I present an Exhibition of Pop Art including
I three works by Andy Warhol. This week 2nd j
floor gallery Union. I

Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 29,1970

FOR SALE
Harmon Kardon Gerrard componet
stereo, Goya Spanish guitar,
Grounding portable casset tape
recorder Call 378-4664 (A-150-2t-p)
BULTACO METRALLA MKZ 250 CC
5 speed S4OO. WHI trade for good
woods or trials bike 392-2155 days
376-2804 nights ask for Jim
(A-2t-151-p)
Fight Servomation, buy my 3 cu. ft.
refrigerator. Perfect for dorm living.
Counter-top with walnut finish. Also
coronet. Call 392-8089 (A-150-st-p)
CLEAN rugs, like new, so easy to do
with Blue Lustre. Rent Electric
shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-155-c)
Acetone compact organ $175 Haynes
Bass Amp $l5O Drum set SSO Fender
Palomino acustical guitar with hard
case $l5O Call 372-1297 or
378-0928. (A-151-st-p)
Hotpoint Refrigerator, 2 door no
frost automatic ice maker 18 mos.
old available June 6 S2OO Call
anytime 376-0401 (A-151-3t-p)
68 Dodge 3 /4ton camper 10 V2Gas
stove, stereo, beautiful condition.
$2995 Call 378-5150 (A-151-st-p)
Women and speed are two
transtitional things we carry them
both in our bodies. Myers type dune
buggy available in all colors and
metalflakes for only $195 Mike
Sullivan ATO house 372-9427
(A-151-6t-p)
DYNAMITE STEREO, only 4 mos.
old. Must sell for cash. 2 AR-2ax
speakers, $l6O. Sony 355 stereo deck
+ 15 tapes, $175. Sansui 2000, lOOw
am-fm receiver, $225. CALL anytime
373-2296, ask for Rick (A-151-3t-p)
GE stereo girls bike Schwln
1-speed medium-sized fan records
textbooks paperbacks transistor
radio with 9-volt converter + MORE
call 3 92-9406 (A-151-st-p)
STEREO harmon kardon, garrard
40 mk. II built-in, am/fm, 60 watt
spks, dust cover, tape rec, 400 new,
sacrifice 290 Call Steve at 392-7128
(A-151-st-p)
For JJ and Pat Sold out! I wont
be hair when you do you thing,
but wishing you peace and love! from
afar. I dig Itl ONE the wook
(A-151-2t-p)
Labrador pups AKC registered top
breeding 8 weeks old females SSO
each Day 372-2547 Nlte 376-2827
(A-st-151-p)
Stereo components! See and hear
Fisher and Sansuis best values. Try
the Astrocom/Marlux 3-motor
auto-reverse tape deck, priced below
all competition. Student owned and
operated ALTMAN STEREO
SYSTEMS offers the best buys in
audio. Call 376-9583 or visit us at
1638 West University, Saturday,
10:00 am to 5:00 pm No trades will
be turned down! 3 to 5 Mon and
Tues (A-151-lt-p)
FOR RENT
.....................................
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
Village Park 1 bdr. apt. no. 29, Call
378-0323 after 5 weekdays anytime
weekends. (B-147-st-p)

FOR RENT
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-966 8 (B-ts-C)
Large 3 bedroom duplex available by
mid June no damage deposit required
call after 6pm 378-5594.
(B-3t-149-p)
Modern bedroom apt., quiet behind
the mall, ww, central a.c. 100 per
month, regular sllO call after 5
373-2889 can move in June 1.
(B-st-149-p) _____
Sublease for summer 1 bedroom
furnished apt., unit ac, available June
14, 4 blocks from research library librarys9O
s9O librarys9O per month phone 372-3260.
(B-3t-149-p)
Sublease summer qtr Landmark apt 2
br 2-4 persons a/c dishwasher grills
poolside. Dishes, pots, pans, kitchen
utensils left for you. 378-3851.
(B-3t-149-P)
3-bedroom apt., offstreet parking,
full bath, kitchen, living rm, 16,500
B.T.U. A/C. Min. of 1 qtr. lease.
$l3O mo. 408 NE Ist Ave. 376-0317.
(B-st-149-p)
30 yards behind Norman Hall. 2
bdrm. 1 bath no lease ac furnished
$35 for June $75 a month 1103 SW
7th Ave. 378-5410 after spm.
(B-st-149-p)
FREE one month rent, extra
bookcases, kitchen & bthroom equip,
and more. Sublet 2 bdr. apt for
summer. 141 Landmark or call
373-1968. (B-st-149-p)
For fall quarter only (Sept-Dec) 7BA
needs roommate for 1 bedroom
Landmark Townhouse $65 month +
utilities call 372-9317 Mike.
(B-3t-149-p)
Will sacrifice Two bedroom furn.
French Quarter apt. Beautiful,
spacious townhouse 2 pools Call
373-2643 make offer We promise
you the best price! Call and SEE!!!
(B-3t-149-p)
Sublet summer quarter Landmark
Apt. 104, Near Pool, Call 378-9041.
(B-147-st-p)

MAY 28 29 30
CONSTANS THEATRE //V J\ 1\
VC
d V /
'JP\ HIT COMEDY
r||npanKa F EVlL starts Sunday I
WINNER ACADEMY AWARD I
BEST Picture
fTw!i3urfCTg?S?f??!r!!r MIDNIGHT COWBOY"
*^*jlusc^t*^ucerktaurantJ

FOR RENT
Several 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet $l2O mo. Colonial Manor
apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave. 372-7111
Grad students preferred. Special rates
for summer guarter now In effect.
(B-ts-109-c)
For rent for fall, air-conditioned
apartments near campus. SBO to
$145 per month, pool. University
Apartments. Call 376-8990 evenings.
(B-Bt-149-p)
Furnished 1 bdr. super clean & nice.
Next to LaMancha. SBO/mo. summer.
SBS/mO. fall. 376-2738 or 376-3442.
(B-3t-149-p)
Across street from campus studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace Apts. 1225 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-109-ts-c)
Sublet 3-bedroom house V 2 block
from campus $125/mo. 378-7726 or
392-9259 1224 SW 1 Ave. furnished
full kitchen. (B-st-149-p)
Large house to sublet for summer: 3
bdrms, 2 baths, kitchen, etc. 1 blk.
from campus, interested call
373-2268 or come by 1128 SW Ist
Ave. (B-10t-145-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus, A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
TWO BLOCKS to campus men
women room TV carpet wood panel
kit. Priv. See Diane, Brenda or Rick
1204 NW 3 Ave. 378-0286 392-0700
(B-147-st-p)
GATOR COURT
376-4667 4170 SW
/
spend where the
the night. . price is right



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
Village park 1 bedroom apt. sublease
for summer, pool, A/C, have a great
summer at Sin City apt. 24. Call
378-3554.
REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM
OPEN CITY
The first of the Italian neo-realism films, a story
of the activities of two Resistance leaders one a
communist, the other a Catholic priest. A portrayal
of people at war in their own streets. Directed by
Roberto Rossellini. Written by Fredrico Fellini and
Sergio Amidei.
SUNDAY AT 7:00 & 9:30p.m.
Sponsored by JWRU & selected by Flim Classics Committee
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Dead Bn* -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
Q for sale (con*c ut i,.) STUDENT # PHONE
Q for rent
Q wanted 2 days ADDRESS.
n help wanted Q 3 days (*lO% discount)
autos 4 days (*lO% discount) fITY STATE ZIR
personal q 5 days and over
lost-found <* 2o% discount)
Q services
WORDING
ill I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II II I I I'l"
ai 11 ii it
an I I I I l I I I I I I I l I I I I T T I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
4l I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I II IT I I'TTf ITTT

FOR RENT
BARGAIN SBO each for entire
summer. Two girls in Village Park top
floor, Poolside, Call 373-1501 after
3. (B-147-st-p)

Friday, May 29,1970, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT
Sublet summer qt. 2 bedroom
Tanglewood Manor apts. A/C, pool,
landscaped, Quiet. June 15 Sept
15., pay only 2 months rent. Call
373-2706. (B-st-148-p)
FOR RENT: Singles: Swing into
summer In a luxurious air-conditioned
poolside apartment. Private bedroom
Walk to campus. S7O Include s
utilities. 378-7224. (B-15t-148-p)
2 Roommates wanted Summer
Quarter Air-conditioned, carpet,
dishwasher, other extras, located near
pool, Landmark no. 60 373-2207.
(B-147-st-p)
Frederick Gardens one-bedroom apt.
for summer. Available June 14. June
rent paid. Call 376-2909 or 392-0911
ask for Linda. (B-148-st-p)
Sublet or rent 1 brm. furnished
alr-conditloned patio Village 34
slls/mo Call 373-1080 or 376-4807.
(B-st-148-p)
One bedroom apt. Gatortown $350
for whole summer thru Sept. 15 No
damage deposit. Call 376-5694 must
rent by June 6. (B-147-st-p)
Summer In a lovely apartment at
Point West will be one to remember
June 15 to Aug. 31 as little as
$300.00 for two apartments for 4
from $350.00 A quiet community
for people who want the best. You
will want to stay in September. Res.
Mgr. 372-3126 500 S. W. 34th Street.
(B-st-148-p)
Sublet or roommates for summer.
107 Landmark, 2 bdrm. poolside &
woodside extra features + gym, bar
BQ, sauna, good parking. Call
373-1208. (B-st-148-p)
Summer Bargain, $375 complete,
Village Pk. no. 86, 1001 S. W. 16th
Ave, 2 br. turn., upstairs, AC, pool,
rsvd. pkg, quiet, spacious, call
372-1114. (B-st-148-p)
!! only $87.50 per person for entire
summer quart. 2 br Tanglewood apt.
A/C dishwasher ww-carpet lease
ends Aug. 15 U-can stay THRU finals
or longer no Sept, lease worries call
378-7212 (B-150-2t-p)
2 BLOCKS from campus. 1 br. ac
furnished apartment. Sublet for
summer. $95/mo includes utilities.
Call 376-1331. (B-150-st-p)
Landmark apt. no. 27 2 br. Summer
Qtr. A/C dishwasher pool health club
June rent free good full qtr. Call
376-1834 (B-st-150-p)
5 bedrooms 4 entrances 3 fireplaces 2
bathrooms and a partridge in a pear
tree. AC house $2lO/month summer
W/ fall option. 1406 NW 5 Ave.
378-1080. Call or come by now.
Peace (B-151-2t-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom univ. gardens apt.
available for summer school and next
year. Call or see at 702 SW 16 Ave
no. 111, 376-8958. Perfect for 2
people. (B-151 -st-p)

llt moves with fast and bold t^
1 private world that features ] \ six I
I INDIVIDUAL, PRIVATE / \ \r X/ V- 1
I BEDROOMS. Just two blocks I
I multi-level apartments with I / 'I
I summer at our special rate of Cj j / I I

Page 15

FOR RENT
Sublet Summer 1 bedroom wood
panel apt. A/C, private patio, pet fee
paid, lots of extras slls a month
Village 34 apt 37 Call 378-5809
(B-st-142-p)
Single rooms for summer, winter
qtrs. 150/qtr maid linens utilities
close to campus, call or see 115 NW
10 st. Tom Ford 378-7222 378-5156
leave name (B-150-7t-p)
MARRIED? 2-Bedroom Apt., Furn.,
AC, Private Patio, Pool, BIG kitchen,
quiet area of SW 16th Ave., Avail.
June 19th, $126/mo., 1405-28 SW
10th Tr., 376-9091 (B-3t-150-p)
Available in June 3 bdr. house, 1 and
2 bdr. apts. central A/C $l2O and
SIOO a mo., furnished. Call 376-9525
before 11 A.M. or after 9 P.M.
(B-st-150-p)
Sublet 2 br. townhouse ww carpet
AC $l2O mo. June Free NW 39th
Ave Call 372-6813 (B-151-st-p)
Men 3 Blocks from campus central
air conditioning single $155.00
double $l2O each for summer
quarter 378-8122 (B-10t-145-p)
Sublet sum qtr Landmark 1 bdr
June free $ 130/mo on pool
TV and stereo Included no deposits
required apt 159. 372-0841
(B-151-st-p)
LANDMARK PHASE II sublet
SUMMER JUNE rent paid 1 br apt
162 call 372-7760 (B-151-st-p)
Camelot Large two-bedroom
furnished apt. all extras TV
dishwasher Central air summer qtr
only prefer careful tenants. Special
rates 378-5133 (B-151-st-p)
Have fun this summer. Sublet 1 br.
French Qtr. apt. Great location, right
on pool, furn., ww carpet, 120/mo
Call 378-8980 after 5 (B-151-3t-p)
1 br. apt. AC furn. Close to campus,
avail June Ist. No lease for summer.
SIOO Tel 373-2168 after 5 P.M.
(B-151-3t-p)
WANTED
XvX*XX*X*XvX*X*XvX*X*X*X*XvX*X*:*
JUNE RENT FREE 4 to share 2 bdr
2 bath Point West apt $125 ea for ail
summer pool ac dishwasher call
376-9924 or 372-5970 after 5 must
be 21. (C-10t-142-p)
WANTED: Coed to share luxurious
air-conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious
air-conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
1 male roommate for summer qtr. for
La Mancha $125 alt summer inc. util
A/C, carpet, furn, own bdr.
372-5833.
:x : x:x:>: : ::ra^
WANTED
Female roommate wanted to share a
two-bedroom air-conditioned house,
own room, only $6 5/mo. Close to
campus Call Carla 373-1992.
(C-st-148-p)
Need 1 co-ed roommate for 1 bdrm.
AC apt. 2 blks from campus. Price Is
S9O for entire summer. Call
378-0551. (C-146-st-p)
2 roommates needed In
summer term for Gatortown apt. 2
weeks free rent, $36 66/mo +
utlllt, A/C, pool, dishwasher, 3 bdr. 2
bath call 378-6423 (C-147-st-p)
2-3 roomates for summer qtr. Village
Park apt., tv, stereo, bar, pool, air
cond. SIOO per qtr. each. Call
372-1117. (C-4t-149-p)
Roommate needed for summer
quarter to share 3 bdrm. house. Have
your own room with double bed.
$45/mon. plus utilities. Call Nick
376-9450. (C-3t-149-p)
Female roommate. S9O/summer +
1/3 utilities. Own room in large
comfortable house three blocks from
Med. Center. Call 376-7166 anytime.
(C-3t-149-p)
Want to share Landmark or La Bonne
Vie Apartment with three male
students for fall and leave name and address.
(C-3t-149-p)
Desperate fmale rmmt needed Imm
Lamancha only $l4O Incl utit for
entire summer no deposit last mos
rent paid Call day 392-3601 night
378-0768. (C-4t-149-p)
Wanted male roommate for summer
Mt. Vernon apt. Call 376-5151
(C-4t-149-p)
MALE Roommate for summer June
rent paid. Pool A/C tv Frederick
Gardens apt. 57 call 373-1887 or
come by office. (C-3t-149-p)
Female roommate Own bedroom In
Village Pk. Apt $79 per mo. plus
utilities 376-2875 after 5 PM
(C-150-3t-p)
Male roommates wanted for summer
quarter to share spacious 4-bedroom,
2-bath, central-air apt. 1-block from
Norman Hall $45/month. 372-1272
(C-150-7t-p)
Private bedroom and bath at Point
West apts. $l5O. for summer quarter.
Call Jim 378-9129. 500-7 SW 34 St.
(C-150-2t-p)
Male roommate wanted for fall. 2br,
2 full bath, A/C, La Bonne Vie apts.
Call: 378-8319. (C-3t-149-p)
Needed 1 or 2 girls for 2 bdrm 2 bath
Point West Apt. $65 for all summer
372-3126 (C-150-3t-p)
Male roommate for fall quarter at
University Gardens; $55/mo inc.
utilities, call 392-8928 (C-150-st-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
Female roommate to share 3
bedroom house summer qtr own
bedroom air conditioned S3O a
month call Karen 373-1396
(C-150-3t-p)
Two male roommates wanted for
summer. CAMELOT apt. 202,
$43/mo rent, pool, a/c, clubhouse,
TV, 376-0354 (C-150-st-p)
2 Female roommates needed for
French Quarter apt. no. 65. Air
cond., pool, etc. Only sllO for
summer. Call 372-3148 anytime.
(C-150-st-p)
TWIN SIZE BED anyone wanting to
sell one bed please call Claire at
392-9838 or Patti at 392-9240
(C-150-4t-p)
Wanted Male roommate to sublet
apt for summer for SIOO. A/C,
carpeted, own bedroom. Move in
now. Call 373-2914 (C-150-st-p)
Men! Roommate needed for summer.
June rent free. Landmark no. 33 near
pool and quiet. Call 378-7543.
(C-150-st-p)
Female Roommate wanted for
summer. La Mancha apts. private
bedroom, air cond, pool, walking
distance from campus. June rent free
378-9611 (C-st-150-p)
Hip roomates wanted for summer
qtr. or will sub-lease air-con house
behind Norman. No deposits, Call
Sherry 376-8080 618 SW 10th St.
(C-7t-150-p)
Roommate needed for summer
quarter to share 3 bdrm. house. Have
your own room with double bed.
$45/mon. plus utilities. Call Nick
376-9450 or Pete 392-7112.
(C-3t-149-p)
Listeners wanted: Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and 4 PM for appointment
392-2049 (C-5M43-C)
2 male roomates, Summit House,
quiet a/c, pool; $75 each + utilities
for summer quarter; graduate
students are preferred; call 378-7889
(C-151-st-p)
Landmark no. 25 3 female
roommates needed to sublet for
summer quarter call 378-6263
anytime (C-151-2t-p)
1 fern, roommate for Frederick
Gardens fall qtr. AC, pool, carpet,
etc. Call Melissa or Barbara 373-2480
HURRY I (C-151-3t-p)
2 coeds needed to share 2 bedroom
apt Summer quar ss4/mo
security dpt. free UnN. Gardens
call Diane after 4:30 at 376-0716
(C-151-st-p)
1 or 2 coeds for super Landmark apt
summer quarter also 1 male for
large A/C house have own room
great deals! LoW rent Call 378-3667
(C-3t-151-p
I need an apartment for fall quarter
ONLY Sin City preferred if you need
a roommate for fall only, call Lois
372-6513 (C-151-3t-p)
HELP WANTED
Co-ed wanted room and board In
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
Legal Secretary with previous
experience. For Interview call David
M. Anderson; Fagan, Crouch,
Anderson 8> Folds, 376-5295.
(E-146-10t-p)

*L W Bj I Wz. I Jr jH| ySSm IgR
I'!: The family that |l
I ( lay together II
§ stays together! II
| | -MA BARKER jg|
I COLOR I
I SHELLEY WINTERS |
Ip I
|u tVgfelWiMiEUX |

Female: Full and parttime waitresses.
Must be neat. Good wages. Apply
Kings Food Host 1802 W. Un. Ave
or 1430 SW 13th St. After 2:00 PM
(E-ts-c)
Counselor positions available at
Camp Plnewood, Hendersonville,
N.C. Male or Female Archery
Instructor, Male only overnight
camping trips operate truck big
and strong, Male only Go-Kart
Specialist mech. inclined, Male
only Cabin counselors (activity,
escorts and leaders), Male only ski
boat operator (exp. 160-220 h.p.),
Male or Female Riding Instructor,
For application: T. R. Robertson,
1414 Fetch Ave., Jax., Fla. 32207.
(E-st-149-p)
Repairman for 8-track tape units
experienced man preferred good pay
MUNTZ 373-2333. (E-st-149-p)
Male: Summertime openings for
carhops and grill. Must be neat. Good
hourly wage. Apply Kings Food
Host 1802 W. Un. Ave. or 1430 S. W.
13th St. After 2:00 PM (E-ts-c)
SAMSON needs volunteers interested
in summer recreation Jun 15 Jul
24. Morning or afternoon. Contact
315 JWRU or Call 392-1608
(E-3t-150-c)
SAMSON needs a student to
coordinate summer rec program
work-study avail, water safety Inst,
prefer. Jun 15 Jul 24. JWRU 315
392-1608 (E-150-3t-c)
Camp Mountain Lake for Boys and
girls In Hendersonville N.C. Rlflery
Instructor needed, NRA required, call
378-0285 after 6 pm (E-150-st-p)
SAMSON needs water safety
Instructor willing to help in summer
rec. program. Contact 315 JWRU or
call 392-1608. (E-150-3t-c)
HELP WANTED MALE Mens
Clothing Salesman. Full or part time.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Apply Wilson
Department Stores, Inc., 22 E.
University Avenue. (E-st-149-c)
Due to an unexpected cancellation,
an opening is available as a student in
a two-year Opthalmlc Assistants
Training Program at the Medical
Center. Ophthalmic assistants work
with ophthalmologists In the
evaluation of patients. Pre-requisite
for the training program Is two years
of college and/or previous medical
experience, 1.e., a military corpsman.
Course begins July 1, 1970. Details
can be obtained by contacting Miss
MalJa Uotlla, Department of
Ophthalmology, University of
Florida, telephone 392-3451
(E-st-149-c)
AUTOS
1960 Chevrolet Impala. Good
condition. Power steering plus two
new tires. 303 NW 17th St. Apt. 5
phone 373-2901. Only $l5O.
(G-5M49-P)
Everyday transportation specials: W*
Also buy dean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL artd
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission Is a winner
tool TRY m Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.£. (G-135-ts-c)
69 Vespa 125 cc Good Condition
$l6O Call 392-7549 after 5 P.M.
(G-st-150-p)

Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 29,1970

AUTOS
'6l vw Sunroof, radio. 62 engine,
excellent tires, good condition.
Getting married cant afford
unkeep of 2 cars. $375. Call Mai
392-7571. (G-st-148-p)
1960 Falcon Inexpensive reliable
transportation. Radio, heater, good
tires, engine In excellent shape. Call
376-2909 or 392-0911 ask for Linda.
(G-148-st-p)
64 Chevy Impala conv., white, power
steering, and brakes, vB, auto trans.
low milage, good mechanical shape.
376-4165 after 5:00 392-0510 days.
(G-4t-148-p)
Save SIOO, beautiful compact, '64
falcoln, very good condition. S4OO.
Must sell. Need money for
Honeymoon. 378-4642, 376-2248.
(G-147-st-p)
For sale. Need home for loveable 67
Valiant 4-door >s whlte, black top
61,000 miles. SBOO. Call 373-1589.
Prof, returning Japan, must sell.
(G-151-st-p)
69 SPRITE, 4 speed, fully equlped,
canary yellow, warranty, like new,
exc. tires, black interior, 373-2475
(G-151-st-p)
VW squareback 1968 air-conditioned
radio 23,000 miles excellent
condition SIBOO call 378-6029
(G-3t-150-p)
For Sale 1965 Triumph Spitfire.
Brand new engine. Desperate Must
sell Immediately. S6OO or best offer.
Call 378-7655 after 5:00
(G-151-st-p)
64 VW bug 55,000 miles original
owner maintenance records available
radio and undercoating no rust S7OO
call 378-2079 (G-151-st-p)
xwx:^
PERSONAL
THE APOLLONIAN
ALTERNATIVE Handmade
sandals that you can wear to the
super show In foot deep mud and
rain and still wear them the next day
and the next and the next and for the
next year and we guarantee it. About
$15.00 108 N. W. 7th Street. Open:
12 to 6 daily. PAX (J-147-st-p)
Free kittens, male black, female
variegated, healthy, housebroken,
3720 S. W. 15th St. 372-3597.
(J-st-148-p)
ALL MARRIED COUPLES Become
more aware of each other. Discover
In the privacy of your own
relationship how to become more
real with your spouse. Intimacy
Encounter Tapes, Marriage & College
Life Project. Free. Call 392-1590.
(J-st-149-c)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair -removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologlst 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
Married couples lnterested in
improving communications and
understanding each other better?
Participate In a Marital Enrichment
Group experience. Increase your
awareness of the strengths in your
marriage. For information call
Marriage and College Life Project.
392-1590. Its free. (J-5M49-C)
EUROPE Go this summer. Fly NASA
for student rates. Flights leaving till
August. For Info call 373-2520 5 to 8
pm. (J-st-149-p)

REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM
Morgan!
IS
hilarious.
Two gifted young
British actors,
David Warner and
Redgrav^^^^^^
FRIDAY A SATURDAY
5:30, 8.-00, 10-30 PM. Admission 50< |

Rent a luxury Tanglewood apt. 2 br,
2 bath, ac, etc. Sublet for S,um. Total
cost less than S9O. NO' Damage
Deposit, Call 372-9705 anytime.
(J-147-st-p)
Original caste Handmade Jewelry,
gold or silver. Wedding rings, other
custom things. Call Hope White at
373-1947. (J-147-st-p)
Babies and Budgets Alimony
to divorce
Frank answers to honest questions
about marriage *********** Union
Aud. 7:30 May 28, Thursday, free.
(J-3t-148-p)
1
Beautiful black kittens need home. 5
wks. old only 4 left. Call Jackie
378-6692. (J-4t-149-p)
Grad student hitchhiking to Calif,
leaving about June 10 anyone care to
come along? Call Graham 372-9317.
(J-3t-149-p)
Human hair stretch wig never worn
short, paid S4O for It will take best
offer Call 372-6997 after 6
(J-150-2t-p)
HALLOWEEN IN MAY! Three
mldnlght-black kittens desire good
home. Litter-trained. One male, two
females. Call 378-4554 after 6.
(J-2t-150-p)
NEEDED for summer: 1 or 2 coeds
for 1 bdrm apt In fred. gards. rent
41.25 per person per month. Call
372- anytime. (J-150-4t-p)
Beautiful puppies for beautiful
people 372-3988 (J-150-st-p)
Dear Lambda Chis, Thanks for
making my weekend extra special I
love you bunches! Dee (J-150-2t-p)
Need to get your stuff up North? We
are renting a truck and will take
anything you want between here and
No. Hartford, Conn. Need to know
this week. Call 378-6107. Ask for
Brad or Rich. Will Take Bikes.
(J-st-145-p)
We give away something every day on
WUWU Radio. Like a new Zenith
Radio! Dial 1390 and Be a Winner)
Hear complete Indianapolis 500
Race Saturday on WUWU
Radio .... Gainesvilles Top Station
at 1390 on your dial. Broadcast time
11:30 am. Dont miss it! (J-151-lt-c)
98 MORE DAYS AND 97 MORE
NIGHTS until LARRY AND
CAROLYN GET MARRIED!!!
(J-lt-151-p)
Julie, 743 days of love and happiness
past, a lifetime left to go. Happiness
is a smile. Yours, forever, Tom
(J-151-lt-p)
Papa, This our May 25th. I love you.
Happy, Happy Birthday. Love, Your
Punkin. (J-151-lt-p)
KITTY IS COMING! KITTY IS
COMING! (J-lt-151-p)
HAPPY BIRTHDAY CHARLIE!
love, george (J-151-lt-p)
Two girls need a third person to
travel through europe from the
beginning of august to end of
november Call Diana 392-7668
(J-151-st-p)
HELP! I must find homes for my 4
adorable Aries kittens. Call Lucinda
at 392-1771 or see at 103 S.W. 4th
Avenue after 5:30 (-151-3 t-p)
KITTENS NEED HOME. 4 healthy,
playful, 7 wks., black and white
373- after 6 p (J-151-2t-p)

s*:*:*y-

LOST Beagle dog lost in Yulee Area
Tuesday night. Brown, white, black
with red collar and lease. Answers to
name of Pooky. If found please call
Yulee office, 475,1239, or 392-2081.
Reward If necessary. (L-151-2t-p)
STUDENTS
All "for rent" and
"sub-lease" ads should be
listed with the OFF CAMPUS
HOUSING OFFICE.
This is necessary in order to
maintain the high standards
now maintained with OFF
CAMPUS HOUSING.
By completing the necessary
forms OFF CAMPUS
HOUSING insures students
Reasonable rates and
conditions with landlords.
Help yourself and OFF
CAMPUS HOUSING by
listing all ads for renting and
sub-leasing with the OFF
CAMPUS HOUSING
OFFICE.
; STARTS TODAY
i GLEN CAMPBELL i
KIM DARBY
! SUPER \ |
! JOCNAMATN M
m his first i
I movie role gi I
J
I j
today
! a simple story |
| about a man J
and a
!
COLOR
"j
! Richard
; Burton
; Genevieve ;
; Bujoid i
| (sf J
! tfje Tkousatih T)av§ J
* UNIVERSAL PICTURE j



a t
MORRISONS CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES I
FRIDAY I
> A ii
LUNCH AND DINNER 1
fish Almondine I
and French-Fried Potatoes I
C&>ys) I
I
GAINESVILLE MALL I
mSr **
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
V
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Dead Bn* -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

K-' t -I s Mj ''
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAWE DATE
n for sale STUDENT # RHONE
for rent 1 daV
g wanted 2 days ADDRESS
|~[ help wanted O 3 days (*lO% discount)
Q autos 4 days (*lO% discount) Qjy STATE ZIR
Q personal q 5 days and over $ f it \
a lost-found (*20% discount) "'t ] i
Q services WORDING
il I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I l I I I I I I I I I I I I ITTTT
2 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I n~r
an 11 11 11 11 11 1 11 1 11 mi l 1 11 1 11 1 11 11 1
4i 11 11 11 11 1 11 11 1 1 ii iti i 11 11 1 11 1 1 1 nr
.in i. 11 1 -- "i . I |-I 1 t

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

LOST dc POUND
LOST: pair of sandals near N. W.
19th St. Call 378-1131 (L-3t-150-p)
Medium-sized black female dog with
brown markings and white tip on tail.
Call 378-8967 (L-150-3t-nc)
* ******"*************%**
SERVICES
Horses boarded new barn tack room,
grren pasture and riding ring & trails.
Complete care less than 15 minutes
from campus on 5R234 Phone:
373-1059. (M-147-st-p)

r IIISJ YOU HAVE NEVER SEEN I
AN yTH ING LIKE IT ...
FEATURE
at BAW.PM ae
3;3j A MU CALLED HORSE
Also Starring DAME JUDITH ANDERSON Co-Starring JEAN GASCON
9:45 MANUTUPOU Introducing CORINNA TSOPEI
1 h:iaimk'u; J 2nd big week i I
Ak k FEATURE AT ... 2:05 3:55 5:45 7:33 9:33
v^iUl^^ G Pst^Scllcrs& aC ingo Starr
in u< 73Se G Mamc Christian
'THf The Magic Qiristian is:
aHfeantiestablishmentarian. antibcllum,
antitrust,antisepUc,antibiotic,
m antisocial, & antipasto. I
" V
free expression read
FLORIDA
for $1 #25? QUARTERLY

Friday, May 29,1970, The Florida Alligator,

SERVICES
>X:X%XvXrXvX*x*x*x-x-X'X-x ; :v: ; X ; : ; x
AT THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 cent and 4 cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
Del-Ray Typing Service: manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pick-up delivery 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-143-p) (

Page 17

XxXxx-x-xxv-x-X'X-X'XX'X'XvX'X*:
SERVICES
txsx-ixrswr*^
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S.W. 4th Ave., across from the
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480
(M-ts-107-c)
Tutoring by certified teacher, english
through high school, german levels 1
and 2. Call 378-7641. (M-st-149-p)
Free inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone'
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 29,1970

Landlords May Hunt Down Lease 'Skippers

By GLENN PRZYBORSKI
- Theres danger in the popular
habit of skipping out on a lease,
according to manager James
Mason of the University Gardens
Terrace.
A person can be hunted
forever for defaulting on a
lease,*' said Mason, who is also a
lawyer.
MANY EMPLOYERS and
colleges, Mason said, check with
the previous landlords of an
applicant before granting
employment or admission.
As an example, he said the
Florida Bar Association has a
representative- personally check
with the applicant's previous
landlords before he is admitted
to thd bar. The landlords are also
asked about the character of the
applicant.
Mason stressed the fact that a

Sorority Moving Out Os House,
Join Apartment Living Crowd

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
If you can't beat em, join 'em.
Its an old cliche to many people but it's a new
way of life to the Phi Sigma Sigma sorority.
TIRED WITH losing members to the new
apartments around Gainesville, the chapter
decided to sell its house and move into University
Gardens Apartments, Phi Sigma Sigma adviser Mrs.
Beverly Parker said Tuesday.
- We talked it over with our national officers and
they were favorable to the idea. Then the Parents'
Gub held a meeting and they agreed to it. We were
very surprised but happy," Mrs. Parker said.
Mrs. Parker described her girls as being ecstatic."
WE ARE definitely not going to lose our group
effectiveness," she added.

ACE Elects New Officers

The Association of Childhood
Education (ACE) elected new
officers at their May 7 meeting.
ACE is the student branch of
Association of Childhood
Education International (ACEI),
an organization concerned with
projects for children from ages
of 2 to 12.
ACE UNDERTAKES such
community projects as taking
children on picnics, and visiting
Prairie View Elementary School
to observe a new type of grading
system. There are 60 members at
the UF chapter.
New officers are: president,
Dave Holloway, 4ED; vice
yiN V
' 4

th>wn4c§...
WBN. U9MV. AVE.
1430 SJV. 13th ST.

lease is a legally binding
contract.
IN THE EYES of the law,
when you skip out on a lease,
it's the same as breaking any
other contract, and you can be
prosecuted in court.
However, most students who
default on their lease are never
formally prosecuted in court.
Their parents are simply billed
for the balance of the debt.
This is because every
prospective tenant under 21 is
required to have his parents sign
a parental liability statement
which says the parents assume
financial responsibility for the
actions of their sons or
daughters.
JOHN D. SMITH Jr., manager
of French Quarter and Village
Park, said several coeds left their
apartment with a large cigarette
bum on the rug. The cost to
repair the rug was greater than
their SIOO damage deposit.

president for publicity, Connie
Head, 4ED; vice president for
membership, Judy Cohen, 4ED.
Also elected were
corresponding secretary, Jane
Maurer, 2UC; recording

JOB APPLICATION
AND
PASSPORT PHOTOGRAPHS
TAKEN ONE DAY
READY THE NEXT
CM! 376-7457 FOR APfOMTMBd
TOTAL
PHOTOGRAPHY
W. Univ.

CAN BE HUNTED FOREVER

According to Mrs. Parker, the group plans to
remain unified through such things as pot-luck
dinners and roommate swapping.
Our sorority was number one scholastically
during the winter quarter, and I dont think
apartment living will hurt our standing any. I believe
the girls are mature enough to handle it," she said.
PHI SIGMA SIGMAS reasons for moving were
partly financial, according to Mrs. Parker.
We had a small pledge class last year. This
seemed like a good way to keep a lot of girls from
moving out," she said.
We definitely are going to stick with apartment
living," Mrs. Parker stressed.
No buyer for the Phi Sigma Sigma house has been
found yet, she said.

Smith simply called the girls'
parents, and they split the repair
costs.
Most apartments in the
Gainesville area are rented on a
fixed amount each month for
each apartment, whether there is
one occupant or four.
Joseph Lance, manager of
Landmark, explained that if a
student skips out on his lease,
his roommates are responsible
for the unpaid rent. This is why
students should know future
roommates before signing with
them.
LANCE SAID ONE of the
most common misconceptions
of newcomers to apartment life
concerns their damage deposit.
Students think that their
damage deposit will cover any
and all damage that they do to
the apartment. This just isnt
true," he said.
Most of the major apartment
complexes in the area are

secretary, Cynthia Humes, 2UC,
and treasurer, Linda Nicks, 3AS.
Miss Esther Morgan, ACE
faculty advisor, was elected
president of ACEI at its April
conference in Atlanta.

members of the Gainesville
Apartment Owners Association
(GAOA). Any member of this
association can blacklist" a
tenant for failure to pay his rent
or for excessive damage to an
apartment.
Someone who is blacklisted
may not be allowed to rent again
from any GAOA member
complex.
MOST STUDENTS who wish
to rent an apartment are faced
with a high initial cost first
and last months rent and a
security or damage deposit in
advance.
The UF Off-Campus Housing
Office and various apartment
owners met recently to discuss
WEEKEND
SPECIAL
BOWLING
ap. 3 games SI.OO
ODy Sat. 9am- 6pm
Per game Sun. all day
UNION GAMES AREA

Sderosa
JML l STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
FREE
9:00-12 Noon artwork displays sat
1:30 chalk drawings on sidewalk. \
/ 2:00 original poatry readings and songs. J
/ 2:30 folk dancing^outside. /
13:00 mural finger painting and homamada movies
\ 4:00 Contemporary dance demonstrations. \
9:00-1:00 Dance Styrofoam Soul; | l
\ fofc singers will sing at breaks, f /#
Towers Area
i% : / -'
Spring 'Unrefined
Arts Festival
/
Saturday May 30
For More Information
Call: 392 -6111

this and other student rental
problems.
Mason attended that meeting
and said that if UF would adopt
a system similar to the one used
on students who pass worthless
checks, many of the apartment
problems would be solved.
WITH THE PROPOSED
system, any UF student could
rent an apartment by paying his
first months rent and a damage
deposity. No last months rent
or parental liability statement
would be required.
If a student breaks his lease or
damaged the apartment, the
landlord reports it to the
university.
IronvMi
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMKRSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 4.TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For informal ion call
376-0080
& IZOFMOOP
cur tiw
Ni ]9


The
Florida
Alligator

i WEEKEND
i MOVIE FARE
ANNE OF THE THOUSAND DAYS This is the story of Queen
Anne of England and her husband King Henry VII. He needs a son to
hold the throne when he dies and sees the possibility of that in her.
The story is a good one and the acting and design make it a huge
picture. There are many fine moments. Its at the Florida.
* *
A MAN CALLED HORSE Richard Harris stars in this picture
about a white man among the Sioux. Judith Anderson also stars.
From all thats been said about it, it should be okay. Its at the Plaza
One.
* *
THE MAGIC CHRISTIAN Ringo Starr stars in this one with
Peter Sellers. Sellers is a businessman very rich and wants a son.
Ringo is feeding ducks in a park and the man takes him under his wing
- particularly financially. Ringo gets a new fur coat and the man gets
happy. Theres a lot of funny stuff in this one. It maybe goes a little
too far but the trip there is fun anyway. Its at the Plaza Two.
* *
NORWOOD Glen Campbell and Kim Darby star in this one about
a guy who comes home from the service and finds some changes.
Charles Portis, who wrote True Grit, wrote it and its pretty good.
It was Portis first novel and got good reception. Campbell could be a
little too much for my taste but well see. Its at the Center Two.
* *
PUSSYCAT, PUSSYCAT, I LOVE YOU I dont know anything
about this one but would guess that its pretty light. Its at the Center
One.
* *
BLOODY MOMMA Shelley Winters is the star of this one thats
about Ma Barker more or less and her family of killers and robbers.
Im sure the blood will flow freely and the corpses be scattered about.
It could be okay though if you care for that sort of thing. Its a little
known fact that Ma Barker and her boys were killed in a shootout
with the police in a town not too far from here. Huh. Just imagine
that. Now theres something to think about. The picture is with
Three in the Attic at the Gainesville Dnvein.
* *
THE FIFTIES FLICKS These arent this weekend, but I wanted
to remind you about them. They could be the nicest thing to happen
here in some time. There are going to be seven films made in the
Fifties shown beginning Tuesday of next week, running through the
weekend. From Rock Around the Clock to Rebel Without a
Cause. All at the Union for 25 cents a head. You others should come
too.
* *
MORGAN! A young Briton has troubles with his wife and
Communism. Vanessa Redgrave is the wife. I forget the guys name
but hes good. Its really a nice picture witii many laughs and real
tenderness and warmth. Hes sort of like 3en in The Graduate only
British. Thats, of course, an oversimplification. The picture is at the
Union this weekend. *
* *
ANUPAMA This is the story of an ill-fated girl whose tragic and
happy moments are bound to bring nostalgic memories of the times
you have experienced at some stage of your life. Sharmila Tagore
plays (he girl. India Club will be showing it this Saturday at 2 p.m. in
the Union Auditorium. It is subtitled in English.

Don't miss An Arby's & A Shake
SPRIN
Arby's
I Constantly growing Coast to Coast *** Just South of the Underpass I

. s f 4 '/ c.S il #ll t
1 I i XIIII _. ....'.._.__ll~Vl_LLL__L
t ftl Ivil K IsflsFslT
|| II I L mM I
tt B-imR BE ? :W B Bl- iHw;IBM-Bi iHKMI iH
B-: B B 'BIB B BBt.B
liil B 1, B m B
WIMB^IHI' Bl B WHmm B B BF IB B nV V 8 B

Joplin Rotary Here Tonite;
Its Been AGood Term

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
A really full quarter of
entertainment pretty much ends
tonight with Janis Joplin and
Rotary Connection on stage at
Florida Field.
The show is the
Interfratemity Councils Spring
Frolics and begins at 8 p.m. It
costs $5.50 a couple to get in.
MISS JOPLINS TALENT is
hard to question. Shes been
right at the top of the rock
music biz for some time and
should stay there. She improves
her style continually and the
changes keep her music very
alive and exciting.
She brings with her a top
band -a new band put together
in the last month or so and
the music they produce should
be as good as her vocals.
Rotary Connection is
impressive too. Theyve done a
Mini Art Fest
At Towers
The Towers living area is
planning a day of artsy activity
Saturday beginning at 2 p.m.
Lots of things will be included.
According to Towers Area
President Charles Dorman, there
will be competition and activity
in chalk drawing, fingerpainting,
folk dancing, general painting,
wood sculpting, collage
construction and folk singing.
THERE WILL BE a dance
with the Styrofoam Soul
Saturday night in the Towers
activity center from 9 pun. to 1
a.m.
Everything is free. There will
be ribbon awards awarded to
winners in the various activities.
Those interested in displaying
paintings or other objects should
bring their things to the Towers
plaza at 9 Saturday morning.

Friday, May 29,1970, The Florida Alligator,

bunch of albums all pretty
good and offer a unique sound
that is what it is because of two
good vocalists.
l&O, ALL IN all, it should be a
good night. The seating will be
in the stands and not on the
grass. Lets hope the sound is as
Hft
J*'" Your Generator \
I OVERHAULED Soecial!
ISA 50
MKUtOj/'
alachW^Wsity
GENERATOR SERVICE
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARD.
Mon.Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm
378-4011

ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
V3skL" "CORVAIR SPECIALIST"
GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 376-7771

rVolkwoM
EXPERT SERVICE [
inirrnmii him MIMiBBI
PORSCHE CARE AND PREPARATION
Speed Equipment Y Service on All
and Accessories / Foreign Makes
535 SW 4th Ave. tt 376-9381

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

good as it was most of the time
at the Super Show.
Tickets are probably up to
noon today at the Union Box
Office and at various record stores
in the Greater Hogtown area.
After that, go to Gate 3 at the
stadium.

NOW
BILLY'S "66
SERVICE CENTER
TIRES BATTERIES 8, ACCESSORIES
BILLY'S SERVIC E
IS BETTER SER\ IC E"
505 INI. W. 13th ST.

Page 19



Page 20

l. Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, May 29,1970

DRAMA COMMENTARY

'LightUpThe Sky
A Lively Show
By CHARLOTTE O'CONNER
Alligator Entertainment Writer
SRO, Darling. No seats till January Standing Room Only, is
the first line given in the play, Light Up The Sky. Its delivered by a
parrot.
Far from being sold out yet, the Moss Hart show is being put on by
the Florida Players tonight and Saturday night at 8. Admission is 35
cents for UF students, $1 for high schoolers, and $1.50 general
admission.
THE PLAY CENTERS around the 1940 s when Broadway shows
were the big thing. A comedy, most of the humor reflects the
characters of theater people. The actress, director, and producer
throw lines and strike poses about the stage in an effort to upstage
each other for emotions.
Marilyn Walls stage presence and poses exemplify the typical 40s
starlet. Not once during the entire performance does she let her head
fall. A picture of pride and insincerity.
Peter Barloff, the cigar-smoking producer, delivers more" cliches
than a W. C. Fields movie.
AN AFFECTED director, Carleton Fitzgerald (Gary Cheatham)
cries more than he talks in the show.
Two comical actresses Yvonne Dell and Eleanor Broome
provide down-to-earth distractions for the three with their heads in
the clouds.
Charles Billings who plays the stars husband does a hilarious job
as the bom loser. The star married him for comfort and whenever
his mother-in-law wants to see things his way she thinks like a
horse.
The playwright, whose first show is the object for everyones
attention, is portrayed by Tom Shuttee. His character is that of an
awkward, gawking small town boy. It kind of makes you
uncomfortable to watch him, as if any moment he were about to
knock over a lamp or break a glass.
CURTAIN WAS a little late for the Wednesday nights trial
performance. It seems the tape of the parrots voice was off cue.
Despite some sound difficulty, by the second act the bugs were gone
and even the phones were ringing on schedule.
The only real problem with the play is that it runs a little long
2 Vi hours. But the jokes especially those in the last act are worth
waiting for.
This is director, Richard Lakes first performance in the Constans
Theater. He has worked on such stages as the Pasadena Playhouse and
the Old Globe Theater in California and at the Purdue University
Theater. His use of the Players stage here is more than adequate.
The stage comes alive with the movements of the actors. Each
character was carefully studied so that not for one moment would any
make an inappropriate gesture.
THE ENTIRE SET and design was created by student Michael
Ward. The lavish Boston hotel suite complete with a window
overlooking the Boston Gardens was Wards production.
The play is good. Itll play through Saturday and should be seen.
N.W. 13ttrSt. C\ V. S.W. 13th St.
Gainesville Gainesville
BREAKFAST SPECIAL
TWO FARM FRESH EGGS
HOT BUTTERED GRITS
GOLDEN TOAST
AND
FRESHLY BREWED COFFEE
FROM OPENING TO 11:00AM DAILY

Pm, XI
HEj{|j§g§
WSw 9
ftlaJk W **\J| | I |
tBSl J bM I
pfu em mStm 4 w$
MX; S SR S f
. Wt. |a
*%, m
pL, %. w%
A fl
MARILYN WALL
... one of the stars in latest Florida Players production

RENT NOW!
FOR THIS SUMMER AND
SEPTEMBER, 1970
FALL LEASES 9 & 12 MONTH
Featuring
e 2 bedrooms
# Upper or Lower
# Furnished
# Air Conditioned
t SPools
t Recreation Hall
# Study Room
See today. Move right in
VILLAGE PARK
&
FRENCH QUARTER
APTS.
1001 S.W. 16th St.
| 378-3771

J?AHOY!
free%
A SET OF THREE MINIATURE
SIGNAL FLAG
INITIALS
With Any Purchase of A
I Dozen Donuts
Stick them on your car, boat, bike,
or anything personal. Theyre
colorful, distinctive, and theyre
weather resistant too.
CX/ OPEN 24 HOURS
NOW, ONLY AT
WUStCr 2111 N.W.
Donut 8 ,3,h ST

Rristip?K
1\ I 1712 W. University
\ I e TEXTBOOKS
1 I e SCHOOL SUPPLIES K
l| e ART SUPPLIES
e ENGINEERING
K SUPPLIES
vM 11 Customer Parking In
i The Rear
Wm 11 we Welcome: B
ll^sj

Celebrate
the end of the term
with us
TONIGHT
4-7 PM
FREE
FROZEN
DAIQUIRI
with this ad
limit 1
TOM COLLINS
Tits)
A PITCHER
VODKA COLLINS
H7s}
A PITCHER
SMGAFOK
SUNG
Ejj
A PITCHER
TONIGHT!
4-7 PM
THIRSTY
TIME
AT THE
THIKTT
633 WW 13H> St.



The
Florida
Alligator

I On Wheels I
iMaMNHnwwniiiiniiniHiiiiii Bo Berrym JH
Gasoline Alley Ready
At Indianapolis everyone is relatively quiet after the past three
weeks of practice and qualifying for the 500.
The attention has settled on Gasoline Alley where 33 racing cars
are being checked and rechecked to make sure every little bolt is tight,
and ready for the grueling race Saturday. The tension is building every
minute for the drivers and crew. They are getting psyched up for the
race and wondering how theyll do^
Everyone in the first four rows is a threat, says pole-sitter A1
Unser, and then there are other guys like Joe Leonard and Lloyd
Ruby who are possibles regardless of where they start. It just takes
them a while longer to work their way through the field.
PARNELLI JONES, co-owner of Unsers racer, thinks the ideal
strategy would be to build up a sizable lead going into the first of
three required pit stops. This way he wouldnt loose the lead. It is
interesting to know that no one has ever led from start of finish.
Im convinced A1 can run away from the field, says Jones.
Unser has said, If I can grab the lead and hold it comfortably, I
will. Otherwise, I just plan to stay with the leaders and see what
happens. I think I can run comfortably all day at speeds of around
168 m.pJi. set by last years winner Mario Andretti.
JOHNNY RUTHERFORD, the man who will be in the middle of
the front row, is being more cautious.
Its hard to have any race-day strategy anymore, Rutherford said,
because so much depends on the leaders pace. You go as hard as you
think your equipment can stand and think about 500 miles rather
than lap for lap.
The winner of the Indy 500 is still anybodys guess, and my
guess is Dan Gumey, who will be in the middle of the fourth row. He
has finished second the last two years at Indy in cars of his own
design. Bobby Unser won in 1968 with one of Gurneys Eagles.
The only way to find out who the winner will be is to wait like
everyone in Gasoline Alley and see Saturday. WU WU radio will
broadcast the race starting at 11:30 ajn. Saturday.

WITH PURCHASE OF
_ fjSB 1 Rj Mi
minimum H aJ
15 GALLONS ; / ,",* *. 7 ** / X -*V .;/
r A 3 : STUDENT free spray glow wax ,*
ONLY SrCCIAL WITH FILL-UP MINIMUM IS GALLONS
PRESENT THIS COUPON i
WITH student ID WEEK DAY HOURS-MON thru SAT BAM-6PM
(JjSSSan) NE W SUNDAY HOURS 12 NOON-SPM
'mm can') Well give you a raincheck
Automatic Carwaahua RAIN OR SHINE FILL-UP to use at a later date
Gainesville's Finest Car Wash
gS COURTESY coupon
FIGHT THIS COUPON ENTITLES bearer to I
WITH
AIR POLLUTION! || CREDIT CARDS
I ICC 1C AH CDCC GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
gas ASK FOR OUR NEW FREE WASH PUNCH CARD!
-^

GATOR SPORTS

FSU Wins First Round

GASTONIA, N.C. (UPI)
Florida State University, seeking
its fifth District IH NCAA
baseball championship here,
took a 2-0 first-round victory
over East Carolina Thursday
with Gene Ammann firing a
two-hitter. Florida State, ranked
third in the country, ran its
record to 43-7-1.
The Seminoles advanced to a
Friday night winners bracket
game against the winner of
Thursday nights game between
Maryland and Mississippi State.
Ammann, who scored his
13th straight win, bested Ron
Hastings of East Carolina in a
pitching duel.
Hastings had a one-hitter
tiJkfcha
*^~jMmoves
CENTRAL AUTO SHOP
MAJOR TUNE UPS
MINOR TUNE UPS
ENGINE OVERHAULS
RING AND VALVE JOBS o
CLUTCH JOBS BRAKE WORK
CARBURETOR REBUILDING
1027 S. MAIN 378-4943

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Friday, May 29.1970, The Florida Alligator, I

going until the sixth inning when
Dick Nichols led off with a
double over the right fielders
head, advanced to third on a
ground out, and scored on a
single up the middle by John
Grubb.
In the ninth inning Grubb
singled with one out, stole

AAU Gymnasts Meet
Joyce Tanac, winner of all four womens individual events last year,
heads the list of defending champions who have entered the National
Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) Gymnastics Championships May
29-31 at the Miami Beach Convention Hall.
" Some 200 men and women, the best in the nation in the sport, will
compete for honors as well as the right to participate in the trials for a
spot on the U. S. team for the world championships in Yugoslavia in
October.
-TSSHnnoSuTEoSSESm
SAVE!
I STARKE? FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEA LER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Page 21

second, and rode home on a
single by Ron Sach.
ECU had runners in all but
two innings but advanced them
to second only twice, and never
got them to third.
Ammann struck out seven and
walked three.



Page 22

The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 29,1970

Track Team: Over Bridesmaid Complex?

(EDITORS. NOTE: This is
the fourth of a series that will
review Gator sports in the
1969-70 season with a look at
tiie prospects for the 1970-71
season).
By BO BERRY
Alligator Staff Writer
Coach Jimmy (Hawk) Cames
said before the 1970-71 season
started the Gator cindermen
would be in contention for the
Southeastern Conference
Championship.
At the SEC Championships
the Gators won five events, more
than any other team, but
couldnt match the great depth
of the University of Tennessee
squad. Tennessee won 74 to
UFs 54 and the Gators were
bridesmaids again this year.
THE GATORS also continued
their feud with FSU and won
one of the three meets. The
Gators lost at Tampa in the
Jesuit Invitational when rain
cancelled the pole vault event
HHH mmmm
H / -&.V' <'&
HI
ISr
w
JOHN PARKER
... top distance runner

OMM
MON-SAT
MB Jfift
Every Tuaoday Nit* ft Evsryctay I
1 A Frw Kagof Bmt jl ** ftJ
aft Toth# Guy Who |\ llyy
flj Brings Bit Most Girts II I
Famous ALANS
CUSANA

that Coach Cames said would
have pulled off a slim victory
margin for the UF.
The Gators got revenge at the
Gulf Coast meet here in
Gainesville when they outscored
FSU 79-69. That made the score
one a piece with the Seminoles
coming to Gainesville for a dual
meet show-down.
The Gators hadnt lost a home
dual meet since 1965 when the
Seminoles were also the culprits.
The Seminoles were favored
for the final meet this year but
Coach Cames planned to shuffle
some of his runners around to
come up with the victory.
THE MEET should go right
down to the wire, and probably
the last event, the mile relay,
will determine the outcome,
said Cames before the meet.
The third place finishers in
several events, may very well
determine the winner.
The Gator mile relay team of
Eamonn OKeefe, Jim Dyson,
Benny Vaughn and Ron Kingry
won the race but it wasnt good
enough for the overall win. FSU
won the meet 85-60. The feud
will continue next year with
Coach Carnes predicting
another close year with the
Seminoles.
COACH CARNES built this
years track team around some
of the SECs best competitors

g Jj? / ~
. -V ~V J ,V I
Jk flj
M |KW
RON JOURDAN
slumped to SEC championship

and will have some of the best
back again next season.
Ron Coleman, the SEC indoor
and outdoor long jump and
outdoor triple jump champion,
will return next year to try to
repeat his performance. This
year the former state prep
record holder jumped feet
in the long jump and 49-11
feet in the triple jump to set new
SEC records. Coleman, a
sophomore, overcame injuries
and academic hassels to be
named the outstanding athlete
of the meet at the SEC indoor
meet.
Sophomore Scott Hurley, the
Gators top pole vaulter, will be
back to try to repeat his SEC
victory next year. Going into
this season Hurley was
predicting a vault of 16-feet, but
couldnt reach that height during
the season. With the chips down
at the SEC Championships he
finally pulled it off going 16-feet
for the win.
IRISHMAN EAMONN
OKeefe gave the cindermen a
big boost in the 880-yard run
throughout the season, and won
the SEC 880 championship this
spring. OKeefe will be one of
the veteran Gators returning to
help in the medium distance
events.
The mile relay team of Dyson,
Rober Carson, Vaughn and
OKeefe will be back too. This
team set a new school record for

GREAT NEWS!
10% DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(except Body Shop repairs)
TO INTRODUCE YOU TO GAINESVILLE'S NEWEST CHEVROLET DEALER,
HARBER CHEVROLET IS OFFERING STUDENTS A 10% DISCOUNT ON YOUR
ENTIRE REPAIR BILL.
COME IN TODAY, AND PRESENT YOUR STUDENT ID. MEET THE NEW
DEALER IN TOWN, WHO CARES MORE ABOUT SERVICE THAN SALES.
ISIS N. MAIN ST. 376-7SBI

the event at 3:12.6 and will be
trying for a better time next
year.
High jumper Ron Jourdan
won seven out of nine high jump
events, but took most of the
season to come out of a slump
caused from over-work and an
injured foot. He came out of his
slump with a 7-2 jump and with
everything going well again
jumped well enough to take the
SEC high jump championship.
JOURDAN WILL be lost to
the Gators next season because
of graduation and will be missed.
Coach Carnes has recruited Chris
Adams, a 6-7 high jumper from
Pennsylvania in that event.
John Parker, the Gator
captain and reigning SEC indoor
mile champion, had an
outstanding senior year. He
broke school records for the
mile and two mile runs with
times of 4:06.7 in the mile and
8:51.4 in the two mile. Parker

HEAR
THE WORLD-FAMED
INDIANAPOLIS
500
TOMORROWII:3OAM
BROADCAST UVE ON
WUWU
Presented by
SPRITE,DAYTONA INTERNATIONAL SPEEDWAY.G .C. MURPHY

capped his last year as a Gator
by winning the SEC outdoor
mile championship.
Coach Carnes thinks the SEC
race will be close again next
year, but once again will have to
defeat Tennessee for the
championship. The reason for
Carnes optimism is he has good
men returning, and he had a
good year recruiting. Among the
35 new recruits are: Henry
Cummings the best high hurdler
in the nation with a time of
13.8. He also runs the 100-yard
dash in 9.7; Bill Hicks the
Indiana state champion in the
880-yard run with a time of
1:54.; Jim MxQuinn, the Florida
State mile champion from West
Palm Beach, who does the mile
in 4:19; Jim Stites from New
Jersey who throws the javlin
215-feet, the shot 58-feet and
the discus 165-feet and Hank
Franklin from Winter Park who
placed fourth in the state in high
hurdles with a time of 14.3.



Saints Fullback Investigated By NFL

pete rozelle,
commissioner of the National
Football League, said
Wednesday his security staff was
investigating Ernie Wheelwrights
association with known
underworld figures in New
Orleans and that he would likely
decide within a couple of weeks
what course of action to take.
Wheelwright, a fullback for
the New Orleans Saints, is
reported in this weeks edition
of Sports Illustrated to have
invested in a bar in New Orleans
which is reputedly owned by the
underworld. The situation is
similar to that of the Joe
Namath case in New York last
summer.
* *
BASEBALL commissioner
Bowie Kuhn said today he was
opposed to an option clause in
player contracts because he

Major League Baseball

AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 32 13 .711
New York 25 21 .543 7ft
Detroit 20 21 .488 10
Washington 20 23 .465 11
Boston 18 24 .429 12ft
Cleveland 14 26 .350 15ft
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 28 12 .700
California 28 15 .651 Ift
Oakland 23 21 .523 7
Kansas City 18 25 .419 lift
Chicago 17 27 .386 13
Milwaukee 13 28 .317 15ft

-/y \
9 1 |j A y v 4 % m m *g n
A .... _/ wKggggmgkr
' ... S : ." 4 Pii
"' X.-/ ; :V -..-XX' />£:. ; | Sj^F"l?#
:... fl
TWO BIG DAYS
MAY 30 A MAY 31 |^|^^|B
These champion drivers along with IfIHMHHHHMHi
300 top racers will be challenging 183 national
records and trying for a share of the $20,000 purse.
Special Saturday Night Feature
Pro Stock Eliminations
Drivers will be trying to set new national
records Saturday afternoon and evening and again
Sunday morning. Be there for the Super action
as new national records are set.
[SATURDAY I SU " AY
s> g. Gates Open 1:30 P.M. Gate* Open 10:30 A.M. A Gen
[ $3 Ad.** Pro Stock Eliminations 8:30 P.M.| Final Eliminations 1:30 Ad.|
_:jrpi r l.
3% miles north municipal airport state road 225

wanted the sport to be free of
any danger of losing its integrity.
Kuhn made the comment
under cross examination during
the Curt Flood trial in Federal
District Court. Floods anti-trust
suit is seeking to overturn
baseballs reserve clause which
binds a player to one team until
he is traded.
The veteran player was traded
by the St. Louis Cardinals to the
Philadelphia Phillies but refused
to report to the Phils and
subsequently filed the suit
contesting the reserve system.
Kuhn also said he was against
arbitration to settle trade
disputes because it would be
harmful to player-club
relations.
I think players would be
better off under the reserve
clause system as the rank and
file would be injured under any

NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 22 18 .550
New York 22 21.512 Ift
St. Louis 20 21 .488 2ft
Pittsburgh 21 24 .467 3ft
Philadelphia 18 25 .419 sft
Montreal 15 26 .381 7
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 33 14 .702
Atlanta 25 18 .581 6
Los Angeles 25 19 .568 7ft
San Francisco 22 24 .478 10ft
Houston 20 26 .435 12ft
San Diego 21 29.420 13ft

I Il SI'ORTS SHORTS
u* ***. ......

other system or modification,
the commissioner said.
* *
SHAPELY Tiffany Eddinger
figures a woman should look like
a woman at all times and in
every place. Apparently some
men dont agree.
The five-foot-two brunette
hopes to become a harness horse
driver and she wants to
revolutionize the industry by
becoming the first woman to
wear short shorts and a
form-fitting blouse on the track.
Men permit us to drive in
harness racing and recently we
have even been granted the right
to ride in thoroughbred races,*
Miss Eddinger says, but under
current rules we must not look
like women while competing
with men.
Miss Eddinger, who admits
she doesnt want to make
racing my profession, I just want
to make my point also figures
the short shorts might give her
an advantage over the men in a
race.
* *
YOU DONT have to take
Rico Cartys temperature to find
out if hes healthy. All you have
to do is look at his batting
average.
Its obvious right now that
hes feeling just fine.
Carty, who has the highest
lifetime average of any active
player in the majors (.320), had
a 31-game streak and is batting
.432.
Carty, who has hit in 40 of

the Braves 43 games, collected
three singles and drove in a run
to pace the Atlanta Braves to an
8-1 rout of the Houston Astros
Wednesday night.
* *
MICK TINGELHOFF,
Minnesota Viking all-pro center
who relishes bone-crushing
blocks for a main dish, will be
served a well-earned dessert next
week.
Tingelhoff has been named
winner of the 1969 National

Shop
32 W. UNIVERSITY B
376-7657 |
Brings you the Q
sea glove
Vv' 1 1
u
for your 35mm SLR and... |
Sea Comber [
~ -j. riiijf-r -uttrf itfitiTtaMMfitMlMiMnMMfM .... -- n- j rviiifr^Vflfr iV' ,: I'
Instamatic Movie
Camera Housmi| |
L I

r*rtdy,rtty2Mtfttf lYd¥
Football Leagues Outstanding
Blocker Award.
I imagine a real good
crunching block is as satisfying
to me as it is for an end to catch
a touchdown pass, the 6-foot-2,
237-pound veteran said.
Tingelhoff signed with the
Vikings as a free agent in 1962
after being completely ignored
in the college player draft by the
pros. He has been a solid fixture
in the Viking offensive line since
1963 and has been an all-pro the
past six years.

Page 23



Page 24

I, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, May 29,1970

BONANZA SIRLOIN PIT
'THERE IS ONLY ONE A
2445 S.W. 13 ST. %ms
BONANZA " n AitY f,oM
"Congratulates the or/ l v
Player of the Week PLAYER of th WEEK
Corns Q6t your FREE jjjjjjjjflj
STEAK DINNER Bonanzabur9er lOO% beef, French
Fries, salad, pickle and chicklets .79
Our steaks are served with a steaminq-hot, buttery
baked potato, Texas toast, and a cool, crisp, green
£ Rib Eve 6 02., tender cut steak
Sirloin Strip ll oz., savory, hearty meat,
* *f Top Hand a 15 oz. T-bone for a huge,
w % :g§| m n ill
k'. jlf INI
i m ff Isl
ilr Whatever your needs for
J J jBHB classroom use or campus
I B f , I activities always check before
3nd BMW 2002 ->/
The BMW 1600 and B (Luk
BMW 2002 have independent sus- OIgVI PickrGfl vGHipUS wilO^
pension with front spring struts, semi semitrailing
trailing semitrailing arm suspension at the rear _.. ~ _, , _, ft D*Lal*t*
and anti-roll stabilizers. to senior righthander Glen Pickren for his Irlr w lr B
clutch pitching performance against the
|, .. Seminoles from Tallahassee.
// \\ Pickren's 4-3 squeaker over FSU enabled located in the HUB
the Gators to be the only team in the nation
iln to have beaten the Seminoles in a season
^
record to 4-3 for the season, was the third the Union
straight for the Gators against the 'Notes. aQ
Pickren started the year by dropping two
decisions before finally getting in the groove
The outstanding ideas realized in the JSU'SSSi fSSg^^j
BMW 1600 and the BMW 2002 chas- a 1.92 earn-run-average for the season. I J
sis represent nothing less than life in-I
surance. "your on-campus store" 111
Such a life insurance gives you a reas reassuring
suring reassuring feeling, safety and control; so Monday Friday
it is not surprising that a BMW is the Saturday iff/
only sedan in the world to have com- 9 12 j/jjf $[
corners, in under 10 minutes. 9 minu minutes
tes minutes 58.5 seconds to be precise.
Our automatic transmission is the best. Just ~' ====::: ;~ = J'' oLyS \ho7
another safety item. 1 J
Why take chances?
. .and this month
bh m
506 E. University Ave Pro/by. 372-4373 iji 8181 Cfl Wlftll S SllOft St BOOkStOrC