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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 62, No. ISO

BY SENATE COMMITTEE

Fraternity Tax Bill
Amendment Passed

See editorial, page 8
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Managing Editor
A bill which threatens the
existence of UF fraternities and
sororities by removing ad
valorem tax exemption was
amended Wednesday by the
Senate Ways and Means
Committee to place the burden
of proof on tax assessors.
The bill, which has already
passed the House, provides for
the taxing of the property of
religious, charitable, educational
and fraternal organizations if
used for commercial purposes.
REPS. KENNETH MACKAY,
D-Ocala, and Granville Crabtree,
R-Sarasota, sponsored the bill in
the House last spring. At that
time, a UF delegation, led by
former IFC President Manny
James, went to Tallahassee to
fight the bill.
An amendment to the bill
allowing the County
Commission to rule on the
exemptions was added to the
measure Jnterfratemity Council
(IFC) Executive Vice President
Miles Wilkins said legislators who
were in favor of retaining
fraternity exemption from ad
valorem taxes felt that this
amendment would free
fraternities from the financial
burden.
But John Cosgrove of Phi
Kappa Tau fraternity said that
by passing the buck down to
HHImMII
WpMtfHMWW
SOUTH VIETNAM troops
will stay in Cambodia until
the Communists there
are defeated ....... page 3
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 16
Letters 9
Movies 12
Sports 18
Whats Happening 4

(EDITORS NOTE: In this last of a
three-part series on UF fraternal
organizations, Alligator staff writer Les
Gardieff reports on the special problein
of sororities.)
By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
Sororities and fraternities are both
fraternal organizations, but there much of
the similarity ends.
The two branches of the greek system
are each entities in themselves, often

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Sororities Are Changing-But Slowly

the County Commission, the
fraternities are placing their
futures in the hands of people
who have no voter ties to the
students.
THE AMENDMENT passed
Wednesday requires the tax
assessors to prove that the
previously exempt land should
be taxed as a commercial
enterprise, but Mac Kay said the
amendment would not destroy
his original bill.
The committee postponed a
vote on the House-passed bill.
We have been in contact

Spellman Withdraws
Because Os Illness
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Traffic Court Chief Justice Kathy Spellman has withdrawn from
school, but traffic court will be held next week.
Miss Spellman has been sick since the campaign, according to
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder. She is expected to return in

September and complete her
term.
An interim chief justice will
be appointed for the summer
quarter.
Miss Spellman said she would
be working closely with the
interim chief justice and would
be in Gainesville for part of the
summer.
She said the work would get
done and she hopes to be back
in school in September.
Associate Justice Jim
Lormann said he and three other
justices will hold court this week
at 8:30 p.m. Honor Court
Attorney General Gavin Lee will
be at the trial to help students
and justices should any problems
arise, Lormann said.

However, he said he does not anticipate anything going wrong.
Lormann was associate justice under former Chief Justice Bob
Wattles and was re-appointed by Miss Spellman. Miss Spellman also
appointed Jack Pankow.
Uhlfelder said he will select two more justices Friday.
The traffic court has built a good reputation and I dont want to
see it go down, Lormann said.
Traffic court justices have been trying to set up communication
with the city court. Lormann said they have established rapport but
have been having some problems in specific areas.

differing in their organization, purposes
and needs.
Still, there are some valid points of
camparison.
CHIEF AMONG these,
unquestionably, is the continuing success
of sororities and fraternities at UF where,
despite serious problems, these
institutions are thriving.
This is in sharp contrast with the
situation on most other campuses. At
Berkeley and the University of Illinois, for
example, greek membership has been
steadily and steeply declining. At

Thursday, May 28, 1970

with Clyde Taylor (former
student body president and now
registered lobbyist) all year to
keep tabs on where the bill is,
Wilkins said. And weve been
waiting to send someone up
there.
IF THE BILL passes Wilkins
said IFC is planning to meet
with UF President Stephen C.
OConnell and convince him to
explain to the Alachua County
Commission that this would
mean the death of fraternities.
We figured on a per man
(SEE 'BILL' PAGE 2)

KATHY SPELLMAN
... back in September

THEY MAY EVEN SURVIVE

Williams College fraternities have been
abolished altogether.
UF fraternity leaders believe
fraternities here are adopting new reforms
never tried on other campuses. And they
believe fraternities can be leaders and not
obstacles in pursuing exciting new
possibilities.
BUT WHAT ABOUT sororities?
Most fraternity leaders will smugly say
sororities are lagging behind. Most
sorority leaders will vehemently debate
the point.
This is where the difference in the two

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MIKE HENSON $
STRANGE ADS
.%
... do they work?
Guys Want Maid(
-Not Roommate?!
§
By TERRY PITMAN $
Alligator Staff Writer $
i
Contrary to the popular Playboy theory, some UF men §
regard a full stomach and a clean house above an overly active
sex life.
Occasionally advertisements such as these appear in the
Alligator: :j;
Coed wanted, room and board in exchange for domestic ?
duties. ;j
Girl needed for cooking and light housekeeping in :
exchange for room and board in luxurious apartment! :
ALONG WITH ads such as this comes, Oh, wow. What are :j
they trying to prove? Everyone knows what they want. :
Such statements insinuate that the employer wishes a cute ij
chick to sleep in, and keep house in her spare time. :
Well, I proceeded to apply for the jobs. j:
BELIEVE ME I was frightened. I, too, expected to be
propositioned for more than a housekeeper.
The first call I made was to three groovy-grad frat men who
I
(SEE 'COOK' PAGE 2)
w.v.v.v*v. .v.%%Y. .y.v.v*%%y.w.v.v.w.v.%v.v.wMwx>:*xi!

iltstlilit

systems makes itself obvious.
IN MANY AREAS, fraternities are
faced with immediate problems and find
drastic changes are needed now, while in
the same areas there is no similar pressure
on sororities.
These are such problems as alumni
control, formal rush and financial
solvency.
Fraternities, for example, are finding it
increasingly important to haw rush
(SEE 'GREEKS' PAGE 2)



Page 2

I,THe Florid* AMfator, Thursday, May 28.1970

Senate To Provide S2OO For SMC Speaker

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator atari writer
The UF Student Senate voted
S2OO to the Student
Mobilization Committee
Tuesday night to help pay
transportation for two speakers
at Fridays SMC rally.
The money will help the SMC
pay plane fare to bring William
Sloane Coffin and a Kent State
student to UF to speak on the
recent troubles in the nations
universities, especially Kent
State. Coffin is a chaplain at
Yale University and was arrested
along with Dr. Benjamin Spock
on charges of encouraging
students to dodge the draft.
THE KENT student, Judy
Redon, is supposed to be an
eyewitness to the shootings on
May 4, at Kent.
The senate killed a bill which
would have apportioned all
off-campus students into voting
districts for Student
Government elections. Presently
the students who live off-campus
are represented by 23 senators
elected at-large.
The bill which would
amend the voting laws would

Cook WantedNot Roommate
PAGE ONE^j
invited me to their luxurious apartment to look it over and to get
to know them.
The second number was answered by a gentleman living in a lush
new trailer, who also made plans for an interview.
THE INTERVIEWS were for 6 p.m. and 9 p.m.
Six oclock came. I donned my shortest dress and sexiest voice and
set out to obtain a proposition if there was one to be gotten.
I was shown the apartment and met the guys.
THE GIRL would be just another person living there, keeping the
place clean, cooking the meals, and probably spending a lot of time at
the pool.
We talked over some of the problems that might come Up and
generally discussed the whole thing.
They took me home and we parted, each to think about and discuss
the other.
MY ROOMMATE was anxiously waiting to hear what had
happened. So we talked until 9 p.m.
My second job opportunity arrived and we were off.
We went to the employers trailer, which turned out to be one of
the prettiest Id ever seen.
MY DUTIES would be keeping things in order, cooking one meal a
day and doing the grocery shopping.
This will be just as much your home as mine, he said. You can
come and go as you please, have friends over, or whatever you want.
Again I was taken home to thiqk things over.
AT THIS POINT in the game, I didnt want to play any more.
All of the men had convinced me that they were perfectly on the
level and only wanted a maid for the time being.
The deals offered were just great.
WHAT MORE could one ask than to live and eat free, with the only
stipulation being that you cook and clean? You would have to do it
for yourself anyway.
If I were in a situation to accept such a position, my only problem
would be deciding which job to apply for.
Rain Checks Insure
Frolics Performance
Spring Frolics, starring Janis Joplin and the Rotary Connection is
rain insured. Every ticket sold is a rain check.
In case of rain, Frolics will be held in the Florida Gym.
Starting Friday noon, tickets will only be sold at gate 3 of the
stadium. Tickets will be $5.50 per couple.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August wheri its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

have divided off-campus
students into geographic areas
for voting.
IT WAS defeated because
campus election officials said the
plan would be too difficult to
implement and would cause
undue confusion.
Also, the plan allegedly
disenfranchised students who
did not live in Gainesville and
was not clear about certain areas
of the city.
Resolutions passed by the
senate included a request for Dr.
Robert Cade to remain at UF.
Dr. Cade is the man who
developed Gatorade. He is
leaving because of controversy
over ownership rights to the
drink.
A RESOLUTION was also
passed urging the University
Senate to consider adoption of
the Track C plan for ROTC.
The plan would do away with all
military and drill programs,
leaving only academic courses in
the program.
Peter Klingman, a
commissioned second lieutenant
in the Army who went through
ROTC, assured the senate the
change would not effect the SSO

FOR COFFIN, KENT STUDENTS

a month pay to those in ROTC.
He said the Army favored the
plan as a compromise to those
who wanted to abolish ROTC.
Robert Wilkinson, a cadet in
ROTC, said Wednesday the drill
portion of ROTC should not be
relegated to the summer camp
alone as Track C would do
because of its value as a
training aid.
IT GIVES YOU a chance to

Greeks: Changing Fast Enough?

£frompa6EONeJ|
programs compatible with
todays social climate.
IN ALL likelihood, the
extremely formal rush of
sororities, with its endless
progression of ice-water teas,
informal parties, skit parties and
preferentials, could deal a death
blow to any fraternity in just
one year.
Sororities are changing in
these areas only more slowly
than fraternities.
Most sorority leaders agree
the changes are desirable but feel
they should not be recklessly
hastened.
RUSH AS IT now exists is
actually detrimental to
sororities, but it is still the best
way. New girls usually have so
much pressure on them from
parents and fraternities to join
one particular sorority, this is
the only way they can get to see
the others, Alpha Omicron Pi
President Vicki Krezdom said.
Panhellenic Rush Chairman
Lauren Genkinger agreed,
saying, Someday we may be
able to hold rush like
fraternities, but it cant be right
now.
Most sorority leaders feel no
pressure to drastically and
immediately alter what they
consider local problems of
individual houses.
IT IS NOT, after all, hurting
sororities recruitment of pledges
yet according to Miss
Genkinger 50 per cent of all girls
rushed still pledge.
And in some cases they
actually believe such things as
alumni control are beneficial.
A sororitys national, for
example, will force a member to
pay her dues in all cases while a
fraternity chapter may
sympathetically allow a
financially troubled brother to
postpone a few months dues,
thereby aggravating their
financial difficulties.
WHY DO WE need any
drastic changes? Sorority
Faculty Adviser Loyce Katz
asks. We are doing perfectly all
right as we are.
But as Dean Katz points out,
with respect to becoming
relevant sororities are changing
drastically so much so they
are keeping pace with, if not
exceeding, changes in
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work with other men, he said.
He also felt training in drill
and combat procedure should be
spread out over as much time as
possible instead of concentrated
in the summer camp.
It gives a man a longer
period of time to practice^ and
make corrections, he said. It s
hard to learn something all in
one lump.
Another resolution asked the

fraternities.
For example they are doing
more service projects than
before sorority officials say.
ACCORDING TO Dean Katz,
every national has a
philanthropy in which the local
chapters participate each year.
Panhellenic also has recently
raised SI,OOO for the Cancer
Fund, adopted a Philippine boy
and opened a cottage for
patients at Sunland Training
Center among other projects,
Panhellenic President Leslie Lott
said.
The one remaining area that
concerns many sorority leaders
is integration of the sorority
system.
A FEW FRATERNITIES have
already admitted blacks, but
there are no black sorority
members yet.

Bill Could Mean Frats Death

basis what the tax would mean,
and it came out to something
like $lO per month for each
member, Wilkins said.
All of the off-campus
fraternities and sororities would
be affected by the measure.
And, according to IFC Advisor
and Assistant Dean of Men Jay
R. Stormer, about half of the
houses on Fraternity Row would
also be affected. This
encompasses about 19
fraternities and two sororities.
THE TAX, would be on a basis
of $3,000 per SIOO,OOO of
assessed value, Stormer said.
Wilkins said Taylor had
notified them that the bill had

the summer s
Alligator
A chance to experiment, learn, create,
involve, write, edit, criticize, influence,
entertain, inform, question, answer...
We need you to do all these things as much as you need us.
Meeting Sunday night at 8 p.m.
Alligator office, third floor, Reitz Union
a.
IUFEI UFE GUARDS.. I
I GATE GUARDS. ..
Needed for Camp Wauburg, immediately I
I For information call Mr. Scott I

University Senate to consider
altering the fall schedule of
classes to allow a break before
the November national elections
and let students devote time to
campaigns.
The action would not shorten
the quarter in terms of class
time, but it would require classes
to begin several days to a week
earlier than planned.

Only one black girl has ever
started rush at UF, and she had
to drop out because of financial
reasons, Miss Lott said.
According to Miss Krezdom,
the racial question may be the
decisive issue for sororities in the
near future.
THERE MAY not be a black
pledge for a few years, though,
because it will take a really
courageous girl to do it, she
said. I am sure there are a few
houses that would pledge a black
girl, but the opportunity has not
come up yet.
Sororities have always had
the attitude we never go out and
try to bring in any girl.
In retrospect one thing is very
clear that fraternities and
sororities have changed and will
change a great deal more.
They may even survive.

passed the House by a small
margin and was going to check
on which committees the bill
was docketed for, and the
position of the bill on the Senate
calendar.
If the bill is far enough down
the line, its possible the session
will end before the bill is voted
on and we wont have anything
to worry about, he said.
Taylor was unavailable for
comment.
Another amendment passed
by the committee would exempt
property used by public fairs if
the Agriculture Department
certifies an educational
function for the fairs. It also
amended the bill to provide an
exemption for any function or
service deemed to be in the
community interest.



ygMCgsTOy.OTTOWgwccwwwx^x.:>>>x-:o::>s>a
| Uhlfelder, Jenness |
| On Antiwar Panel 1
v *5
i|j UF Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder and Linda §
Jenness, Socialist Workers Party candidate for governor of S
SS Georgia, will participate in a panel discusslion on Which Way
£ for the Antiwar Movement.
§ The program will begin at 7:30 p.m. today at the Catholic |
j: Student Center. It is being sponsored by the Young Socialist
i Alliance (YSA) according to Frank Lord, YSA member. ;S
Mrs. Jenness, a leading antiwar and womens liberation J;
activist who has spoken to UF audiences before on womens 3
!: liberation, will also speak at the SMC-called strike Friday. 3
A former candidate for mayor of Atlanta, Lord said, Mrs. *2
Jenness won some notable victories during her previous :
campaign. Chief among these was a fight carried to the U. S. j:
I; Supreme Court which overturned completely Atlantas
qualifications fees to run for office. ?:
:j When Mrs. Jenness announced her candidacy for the office of :j
;ji governor, the Atlanta Constitution ran an editorial which said, :
jij in part, that history is on her side, Lord stated. :
?.%Y.%y.\V%%%%%V.VAW.V.VAV.V.V.TOVKW*KW>:'K'>K*;v4 .%vi

Chaplain, Kent Witness
Speaking At Fridays Strike

By RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff Writer
A day of teach-ins and a rally in the Plaza of the
Americas are scheduled for Friday by the Student
Mobilization Committee.
William Sloane Coffin, Yale University chaplain
indicted last year for antidraft activities, will speak
at the 2:30 pjn. rally.
The UF Student Senate has appropriated funds
for Coffins UF appearance.
James A. Beckham Jr., assistant to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, said, Classes as usual, Friday
is like any other day. He said if students dont
want to go to class, it would be their decision to
make.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder said, I
encourage students to come and listen to Rev.
Coffin and other speakers on Friday.
Uhlfelder said he is in favor of student
participation in the teach-ins, but he wouldnt

South Viets Stay In Cambodia;
Resume Diplomatic Relations
m -w

SAIGON (UPI) South
Vietnam and Cambodia
announced Wednesday that
South Vietnamese troops would
remain in Cambodia until the
Communists there are defeated.
The two countries agreed to
restore full diplomatic relations
after a five-year break.
Cambodian Foreign Minister
Yem Sambaur also repeated that
his government may ask
Washington to keep U. S. troops
in Cambodia alongside South
Vietnamese forces beyond the
June 30 deadline.
SAMBAUR AND the South
Vietnamese foreign minister,
Tran Van Lam announced the
resumption of diplomatic
relations at a news conference
following three days of
negotiations. Much of the
emphasis, however, was placed
on the Cambodian government's
agreement that South
Vietnamese troops remain in
Cambodia until North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong
forces there are crushed.

NOW
BILLY'S "66"
SERVICE CENTER
TIRES BATTERIES 8* ACCESSORIES
"BILLY'S SER\ K I
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SOS (\l. W. 13th 3T

President Nixon has said
American troops will remain in
Cambodia only until June 30
and has set 21.7 miles as the
limit of American penetration
into the neutral country from its
border with South Vietnam.
President Nguyen Van Thieu of
South Vietnam said shortly after
the Cambodian campaign began
that his country's troops would
remain there indefinitely.
Sambaur said before leaving the
Cambodian capital of Phnom
Penh for Saigon Monday that his
government would ask Nixon to
keep American troops there
until the end of the war -a
statement that brought quick
response from the White House.
Ronald L. Ziegler, the White
House press secretary, said the
United States had received no
such request from Cambodia and
that, if it does, the White House
would reiterate Nixon's June 30
deadline for withdrawal.
Sambaur, who said he planned
to. visit Washington officially in
BURGER CHEFS
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sanction a strike.
This is a furthering of the educational process.
Youll get an education in addition to the education
you receive in the classrooms, SMC member Larry
Levin said.
Bob Llinas, SMC steering committee member,
said the discussions will be held between 11 a.m.
and 2 p.m.
The discussions are being worked out by SMC
members, who are arranging faculty and student
discussion leaders and discussion places.
Among those expected to lead discussions are Dr.
Kenneth Megill, philosophy instructor; Dr. David
Kurtzman, philosophy instructor, and Dr. Richard
Chang, history instructor.
A complete list of faculty and student discussion
leaders and places are to be posted in the plaza.
Other rally speakers include Judy Redon, Kent
State student, and representatives from Jackson
State University and Augusta, Ga. Llinas said Miss
Redon was an eyewitness to the Kent State
incident.

NIXON. IBJ PRAISE SPEAKER
mmmmmmemmmrn

Congress Tribute Opens
'McCormack Week

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
tall gaunt man had come to
Congress only a short time after
Lindbergh soloed the Atlantic
and the first talking movie was
released.
He had been a lawmaker
during the Great Depression,
World War 11, the Korean War,
the Vietnam War and now the
U. S. incursion into Cambodia.
HE SAT SLUMPED in a chair
in the front seat of the House
and listened to his colleague
eulogize him and recount the

the near future,'' and his South
Vietnamese counterpart issued a
17-point communique on the
resumption of diplomatic
relations that included a
provision that South Vietnamese
troops would remain in
Cambodia until Communist
forces are defeated there.
It has been agreed among the
members signing the
communique that the armed
forces of the Republic of
Vietnam with the agreement of
the Cambodian government have
come to help the Cambodian
troops in order to destroy Viet
Cong and forces of the North
Vietnamese, and they (the South
Vietnamese forces) will
withdraw from Cambodia as
soon as their mission is
achieved, the communique
said.
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FOR THIS SUMMER AND
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history he not only had lived
through but helped shape.
Then, with a President and a
former president and scores of
his colleagues listening, House
Speaker John W. McCormack
said:
No matter how dark things
may look from time to time, I
view the future with optimism
and confidence in the men and
women of my own country and
other countries who want to be
free under their own laws and
their own cultures.
TUESDAY, TRULY was
Speaker McCormack Day at the
Capitol, or perhaps more
accurately, the first day of
McCormack week, in recognition
of the South Boston
congressman who has served as
speaker of the House longer than
any man except Sam Rayburn.
For two hours members of
both parties praised him.
Later, in the Longworth
office building cafeteria,
President Nixon and former

SEIZE
THE
TIME
We can do something now. We can do some something
thing something about Peace, the Environment, Poverty, the
Economy, the Right to Dissent, the Freedom to be.
We can challenge the System and change it from
within ... NOW.
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Thursday

President Lyndon B. Johnson
joined in the tribute.
NO CITIZEN has given more
comfort or more strength to his
President, said Johnson, himself
a former colleague of
McCormack.
Nixon recalled in 1948, as a
freshman member in the
Republican 80th Congress he
was entrusted one day with
handling a bill in the floor of the
House.
Afterwards, John
McCormack came over to me
and said, that was a good job,
young man*, Nixon said. A
ybung member appreciates that
kind of remark from an older
member of his own party. He
never forgets it when it is said by
a senior man of the other
party.
Today President Nixon was to
host McCormack at a luncheon,
and tonight, with Johnson the
main speaker, the annual
Democratic congressional fund
dinner will fete him.

Page 3



Page 4

, TlieflqrMa Aflifeter, Thursday, May 28,1970

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"Hey, cut it out. That's my wife you're kissing
there," says Harry, played by Bill Stensgaard, as
Ellen, played by Cathy Huber, and Milt Manville,
played by Chick Lapointe, kiss passionately in a

Forty Top Businessmen

Meet Privately With Nixon

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon invited 40 top
businessmen to the White House
Wednesday night for a strictly
private discussion of the
economy and the war in
Southeast Asia.
In advance of the dinner
meeting, Nixons press secretary,
Ronald Ziegler, discounted the
possibility that the President
would announce any serious
decisions to the business leaders
and said too much drama was
being focused on the session.
HE CHARACTERIZED the
dinner as just one of a series that
Nixon has held with various
groups. The purpose is for the
President to express things he
has on his mind and to listen to
what they have to say, Ziegler
said. The President meets with
various groups frequently.
' Ziegler also told reporters that
the meeting would be off limits
for news coverage. This is a
private meeting the President has
chosen to have and it will remain
that way, he said.
With the stock market sharply
rebounding after weeks of
decline, Ziegler was reminded
that the White House had said
April 28 that the President
would make a televised speech
I florida I
I quarterly I
I We only did it for you. I

to the nation in a matter of days
on the state of the economy.
ZIEGLER SAID Nixon still
had set no date for it.
The administration reiterated,
meanwhile, that it had no
intention of trying to impose
wage price controls, despite a
suggestion by a 22 nation
economic organization that
some such sort of restraints
might help the United States
overcome its economic ills.
Appearing before a Senate
appropriations subcommittee,
James R. Schlesinger, acting
deputy director of the Budget
Bureau, said his agency had not
even been asked to make any
studies on how wage-price
controls might be implemented.
Schlesinger testified in place
of Budget Director Robert P.
Mayo, who went to the White
House to confer with Nixon in
advance of his dinner meeting
along with Treasury Secretary
David M. Kennedy, Paul W.
McCracken, chairman of Nixons
economic advisers, and Dr.
Arthur F. Bums, head of the
independent Federal Reserve
Board.
BURNS, WHO had served as
Nixons chief domestic adviser
before taking over the Fed job,
MODfItN SHOE
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376 0315
AND
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376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

scene from the Gainesville Little Theatre's
production of the comedy, Luv, now playing May
28,29 and 30 and June 4,5 and 6.

last week suggested wage-price
controls similar to those
proposed for the United States
Wednesday by the Organization
for Economic Cooperation and
Development, meeting in Paris.
Bums, McCracken, Mayo and
Kennedy were invited to Nixons
session with the businessmen.

I It moves with fast and bold I
private world that features (V I A ] (
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U.S. Planes Hit
North Vietnam
SAIGON (UPI) U. S. jets have bombed Communist gun positions
inside North Vietnam for the first time in three weeks, military
spokesmen said Wednesday.
In Saigon, bands of youths bombarded walls ringing the U.S.
Embassy with red paint, eggs and tomatoes in hit-and-run
demonstrations.
THE U. S. MILITARY spokesmen announced that two Air Force
F 4 Phantom jets struck Monday at North Vietnamese gun positions
60 miles north-northeast of the coastal town of Dong Hoi after
ground gunners opened up on an unarmed American reconnaissance
jet.
Neither the Phantoms nor the photo reconnaissance plane they
were escorting were hit and damage to the North Vietnamese gunsites
was unknown.
It was the first U.S. bombing strike in the North reported since May
3 and brought the number of such attacks to about 60 since Nov. 1,
1968, when the regular bombing raids against North Vietnam were
halted.
THE SAIGON demonstration against the U.S. Embassy was
conducted largely by bands of youths on motorbikes and a few on
foot in protest against remarks by Ambassador Ellsworth C. Bunker
that student protesters in the South Vietnamese capital were being
stimulated by Communists.
The egg and paint-smearing demonstration in midtown Saigon
lasted only a few minutes and no arrests were reported, but some
students scattered leaflets saying Bunker go Home and Down with
Bunker in the protest outside the heavily guarded embassy.
The demonstrations ended abruptly when South Vietnamese riot
police raced up to the embassy, which has been ringed by white walls
put up after the Communist Tet offensive of February, 1968.
ELSEWHERE IN Saigon, South Vietnam and Cambodia announced
after talks between their foreign ministers that South Vietnamese
troops would remain in Cambodia until the Communists there were
defeated.
The two countries also agreed to restore full diplomatic relations
after a five-year break. Cambodian Foreign Minister Yam Sambaur also
repeated that his government may ask Washington to keep U.S. troops
in Cambodia alongside South Vietnamese forces beyond the June 30
deadline set by President Nixon.
The U.S. Command reported Wednesday that 219 Americans had
been killed and 833 wounded since U.S. forces first crossed into
Cambodia May 1.
THE SOUTH VIETNAMESE have lost at least 505 dead and 2,200
wounded since they first entered Cambodia April 29, officials said,
while Communist losses were placed at about 9,300 dead.
Allied military sources reported, however, that American battlefield
deaths in Vietnam and Cambodia had fallen sharply last week while
South Vietnamese combat deaths increased.
The sources said the official weekly casualty toll to be issued
Thursday would show the U.S. death toll at less than 150 for the past
week, compared with 217 dead in the previous week ending May 16.



MIDEAST ; The Lebanese government
demanded Wednesday that Arab guerrilla* in
southern Lebanon abide strictly by agreed rules for
operations against Israel and warned that the army
would crack down on violators.
The warning was issued by the cabinet in Beirut
after a 2 Vi hour meeting on the deteriorating
situation along the border with Israel. Thousands of
refugees have fled from the frontier area for fear of
Israeli reprisals against Arab guerrilla raids.
VIENTIANE, LAOS Prime Minister Prince
Souvsnna Phouma Wednesday challenged the
National Assembly to vote him and his government
out of office if -it does not like the way they are
handling anti-Communist efforts.
Souvanna, 69, made the statement in an angry
exchange during a closed-door meeting with the
assemblys defense committee, a parliamentary
spokesman said.
VIENNA The House of Peoples, one of the
Czechoslovak Parliament's two chambers, purged
two of its deputies from membership Wednesday
because of their rightist opportunist orientation
and anthSocialist and anti-Soviet views, the
Czechoslovak news agency CTK said.
The ousted deputies were identified as Zdenek
Gudrich and Leopoold Hofman.
TOULON, FRANCE The U. S. Navy research
vessel Mizar sailed for the United States
Wednesday after locating the debris of the French
submarine Eurydice at the bottom of the
Mediterranean. The Eurydice sank March 4 with
56 men on board. The accident remains
unexplained.

WASHINGTON President Nixon will stop off
in Knoxville, Term., Thursday night while enroute
to California to speak briefly to a crusade Billy
Graham is holding there, the White House said
Wednesday.
Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler said Graham
invited the President to speak to youth night at
the crusade in the Tennessee University stadium
when he learned the President would be going to
San Clemente, Calif., for the Memorial Day
weekend.
WASHINGTON Defense Secretary Melvin R.
Laird has told Gen. Creighton W. Abrams in Saigon
he wants to exceed the administrations goal of
withdrawing an additional 150,000 U. S. troops
from South Vietnam by next May 1, the Pentagon
said Wednesday.
At die same time, the Pentagon indirecdy
confirmed reports that Abrams' request for a

CAPE KENNEDY A Minuteman 3 missile
carrying a test model of the new MIRV multiple
warhead assembly shot from an underground silo
toward a south Atlantic target area Wednesday on
its 22nd test flight.
The Minuteman 3 is scheduled to eventually
replace half of the 1,000 older model missiles now
operational in the western half of die United States.
ORLANDO The Florida League of Women

WHAT'S HAPPENING

- PEACE PANEL: UF Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder and Linda Jenness, Socialist Workers
Party candidate for governor of Georgia, will
participate in a panel, Which Way for the Antiwar
Movement Hear it at the Catholic Student Center
tonight at 7:30.
BIG FEST: Alpha Epsilon Delta, pre-medical
society will have their annual banquet Sunday in the
Arredondo Room of the Reitz Union. AH members
are invited. Dr. Robert Cade wiH speak.
PAPER BLAST: Sigma Delta Chi, professional
journalism society, will have its initiation banquet
freight at 8 in the Holiday Inn (West) near 1-75.

UPI Around

... The World

...The

... The State

JAKARTA Robert Aseng, alias Richard Tuwo,
has been sentenced to death for trying to rebuild
the outlawed Communist party in Sulawesi, Celebes,
it was announced Wednesday.
Aseng was convicted by a military tribunal in
Makassar, south Sulawesi. He said he would appeal
to President Suharto for clemency.
RABAT, MOROCCO King Hassan of Morocco
met President Hourari Bourne dienne of Algeria
Wednesday to coordinate the position of the two
countries on the Middle East crisis and to discuss
bilateral cooperation. Bourne dienne greeted Hassen
at the frontier near Oujda and the two then drove to
Tlemcen, a Moslem shrine in west Algeria, for the
one-day summit.
BANGKOK, THAILAND A force of Thai and
Malaysian border police have captured a Communist
guerrilla camp on the border of the two countries
after bombarding it for two days with mortar fire,
Thai police officials said Wednesday.
The camp, located about 500 miles south of
Bangkok, is the third Communist outpost seized in
the border area during the past three months. Each
of the camps was abandoned, however, by the time
police entered, and there were no indications the
Communists had suffered any casualties.
MADRID A group of youths hurled Molotov
cocktails and paint at the Madrid Stock Exchange
building Wednesday. The official Spanish news
agency Cifra said die youths broke two windows
and touched off a small fire in the building which
was quickly extinguished by firemen. Two of the
youths were arrested.

Nation

two-month suspension in force reductions in
Vietnam, until after June 30, had been granted
DALLAS The executive board of the Baptist
General Convention of Texas has voted to censure
President Nixon on one issue and support him with
their prayers on another.
The board passed a recommendation to express
concern and prayers for President Nixon in the times of
crisis he is facing in Vietnam and Cambodia. But
the 192-member board took issue with Nixon for
appointing four advocates of tax support to private
schools to an advisory committee.
NEW ORLEANS -% The Coast Guard said it
expected the swift flow of the Mississippi River to
carry most of a 1,600-barrel oil spill into the Gulf of
Mexico Wednesday. The crude oil polluted the river
when two barges tugboats pushing petroleum barges
collided south of New Orleans, splitting one open
and sinking it.

Voters went on record Wednesday strongly in favor
of establishing a unicameral legislature and staggered
terms for legislators.
Mrs. Richard Malchoa, president of the league,
said the main advantages of a one-chamber
legislature would be efficiency, pinpointing of
responsibility and simplification of procedures.
She also said that if the state keeps its two-house
legislative system, it should reduce membership and
streamline die often slow committee process.

ALMOST VET: The Pre-Veterinary Gub meets in
room 1031 McCarty Hall today at 7 pm. Elections
wfll be held.
TO THE RIGHT: Young Americans for Freedom
(YAF) will meet in Room 356 of the Union at 8
pm. today. Subject: A Conservative Alternative.
MORE TROUBLE: A Bridge Over Troubled
Waters will discuss today Babies and Budgets and
Alimony to Abortion. This evening at 7:30 in the
Union.
OUT OF DARKNESS: The Florida Players will
Light Up the Sky tonight at 8 in the Constans
Theatre.

Oregon Defeats
Lower Vote Age
PORTLAND, Ore. (UPI) Oregon voters, reacting to recent
campus unrest, soundly rejected Tuesday a proposal to lower
the voting age to 19.
The vote 19 proposal went down by a63 to 37 percent margin.
With returns in from 1,508 of the state's 2,484 precincts it was
behind 218,889 to 130,986.
GOV. TOM McCALL, who easily won nomination to a
second term in the Republican balloting, and nearly all other
candidates backed the lowered voting age proposition.
But McCall said earlier a backlash could defeat it.
McCall's opponent for the governorship in November will be
Democratic state Treasurer Robert Straub, who got more votes
than seven opponents combined.
McCALL BEAT Straub in 1966.
All four incumbent congressional members won
renomination. Only two had opposition. Rep. A1 UQman,
D-Ore., who was unopposed, will face Republican Everett Thoren
of Elgin in November. Rep. Wendell Wyatt, R-Ore., also
unopposed, will be challenged by state Sen. Vernon Cook of
Gresham.
Rep. Edith Green, D-Ore., defeated three challengers to win
renomination. Former state Rep. Robert Dugdale of Portland
won the GOP nomination to oppose her.
Rep. John Dellenback, R-Ore., easily won renomination while
William Grahnell of North Bend held a dim lead over James
Weaver of Eugene for the Democratic nomination.
Oregon has no U.S. Senate ccm test this year.
Ralph Ginzburgs Sentence
Reduced By District Court
PHILADELPHIA (UPI) New York publisher Ralph Ginzburg,
who has been free on bail while appealing a five-year prison sentence]
imposed seven years ago on a conviction of mailing obscene literature,
won a sentence reduction Tuesday.
U.S. District Judge E. Mac Troutman reduced the sentence to three
years, plus two years on probation.
Ginzburg was convicted by Judge Ralph C. Body in a non-jury trial
in June, 1963 on 28 counts of sending obscene material through the
mails, including mailing of a slick-paper magazine, Eros, devoted to sex.
iUHI
Assorted Fruit Topped, 12-oz.
Meltaway I
Coffee I
Cake I
h 59 I
Delicious 12-az. Plahr Leaf
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each 59 l
:h bakery I
Gainesville Mall
Special Orders Call

'r. *" si --- ; r-<, l ,T, r r^

Page 5



i,Ths Florida ANigstor,Thutsday/May2B^So

Page 6

PRICES EFFECTIVE WED- Get up to 600 extra]
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Thursday, May 28.1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida AMMor. Tlmryhy, May 28.1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

VFJO
Costa Rica Fetes Herrera

WASHINGTON Felipe Herrera, the cherubic
Chilean who heads the prestigious Inter-American
Development Bank, is up to his old tricks again, |j
scattering the U. S. taxpayers money around as if it
were green confetti.
In earlier columns, we told how Help-Yourself
Herrera spends the banks money to publicize and
exalt himself. We noted that he had dipped into the
banks vaults for a personal loan to help acquire a
$96,000 house befitting his high status and for
travel funds to subsidize his wanderings around the
world.
He has been equally cavalier with the banks
loans, tolerating slipshod lending practices. For
instance, the development bank has now promised
another $5.5 million to the Central Bank of Costa
Rica, whose financial base is as wobbly as a
three-legged table. More than one-third of its
outstanding loans are in default.
The new loan had been held up for more than a
year until Herrera appeared in Costa Rica to accept
the plaudits of the money seekers. He posed for
pictures and behaved like a visiting emperor.
A highly placed bank official said the sudden
action on the loan had nothing to do with Herreras
junket to Costa Rica but was more likely an effort
to pacify the Costa Rican government, which
invariably raises a ruckus at the banks annual
meetings.
#
All of this should be of considerable interest to
the U. S. taxpayers who put up most of the money.
The U. S. has veto power over all loans, but the
U. S. representative on the banks board, Henry
Costanzo, didnt use it. In return for the $5.5
million loan, he explained the Costa Rican bank
agreed to make a concerted effort to collect
its overdue debts.
Meanwhile the House, acting upon our
revelations, has passed an amendment prohibiting
further use of U. S. appropriations for the bank to
make loans to bank employes. Some 239 cut-rate
loans, totalling approximately $350,000, are
presently held by members of the bank staff.
The bank circulated a secret memo on Capitol
Hill, asserting the employe loans were necessary to
help persons from other countries who might have
difficulty establishing credit upon first arriving in
Washington.
The memo failed to mention, however, that such
loans are not only available to new employes but to
those who have been here for years. And they are
available not only for home purchases but also for
home improvements and even to bail employes out
of financial jams.
* *
At a recent House Foreign Affairs hearing,
Costanzo was asked by Rep. Edward Roybal,
D-Calif., for a detailed explanation of the charges
raised by this column against the bank.
What concerns me, said Roybal, are
allegations made s about the banks
management... particularly allegations with regard
to the management of the bank on the part of the
manager himself, Mr. Herrera. I think that this
committee should have the facts.
Earlier, the same committee had been told by
Controller General Elmer Staats that the Treasury
Department was impeding his efforts to obtain
information about what was being done with the

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors

Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Merry-Go-Round
lllilliiH
by Jack Anderson
money the U. S. had contributed to the bank.
We have all kinds of problems with the Treasury
Department in enlisting their cooperation and
getting the materials on the U. S. side of this,
Staats told the committee. They act almost as if it
were improper that we would even ask them a
question.
Assistant Secretary of the Treasury John Petty
assured the committee that his department was
working out an agreement with Staats General
Accounting Office. I can report a lot of progress
on this, said Petty.
However, we checked with the GAO and were
informed that no progress has been made.
* *
Roger L. Stevens, the distinguished chairman of
the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing
Arts, has written a long, labored letter to
newspapers, accusing us of snobbery for objecting
to the placement of the Hirshhom Museum in the
same exalted neighborhood with the Washington
Monument and Lincoln Memorial.
Pointing out that the Smithsonian Institution
named for scientist James Smithson had been
admitted to this area, Stevens questioned why A
self-made man like Joseph H. Hirshhom shouldnt
be entitled to the same distinction.
Stevens missed the whole point of our story. The
bantamweight Hirshhom, who is now to be
immortalized alongside of Washington and Lincoln,
was a stock manipulator and convicted money
smuggler.
He made his first fortune from shady stock
dealings on the curb market before the Securities
and Exchange Commission discouraged such
practices. Then he moved across the Canadian
border where the climate was more congenial for his
kind of stock operations.
Nevertheless, he got in trouble with Canadian
Securities Commissioner J. M. Godfrey who charged
in a written report that Hirshhom had pulled off a
million-dollar manipulation.
The Canadian authorities tried Unsuccessfully to
deport Hirshhom but later fined him $8,500 in an
illegal securities sale and for trying to smuggle
$ 15,000 out of Canada.
The amazing Hirshhom, clearly, is a self-made
man, as Stevens said. We merely questioned whether
a man with his record should be granted a memorial
to himself in the same neighborhood as those
honoring George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Alligator Staff

Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor

EDITORIAL
Fishermen
And Frats
The 1970 Florida Legislature has reached a new low in
meeting their funding responsibilities.
This legislative session recently displayed the munificence
that marks true statesmanship by passing the $3 per year
cane pole tax. Florida indigents now have the privilege of
paying to fish for their supper.
Meanwhile, a corporate stock tax, which represents a
mild overture toward forcing Florida business to pay its
share of state governments cost, cannot make its way out
of those august halls in Tallahassee.
So the legislature is faced with the onerous task of
funding roads, education, et al, after probably giving our
modern day robber barons another year of unhindered
profit-making.
On the local level, the legislatures record is, if possible,
less intelligent. It is considering a resolution doubling the
homestead exemption for senior citizens. Meanwhile, local
government cries for funds and since it must be funded, a
source must be found.
Where would be a better place to look than a college
campus? College students are not to be feared at the polls
primarily because they are not old enough to vote. So the
legislature feels safe in leaving with the County Commission
the power to lift the property tax exemptions now enjoyed
by 19 fraternities and two sororities at the UF.
Unfortunately, not all fraternities are well-heeled enough
to maintain a house during inflationary times, much less pay
taxes on it. Contrary to popular belief, not all fraternity
men have money to burn. In fact, few do.
We feel, then, that lifting the tax exemption is an unfair
imposition on those who can least afford to pay students.
In essence, this tax is no better than the one levied on cane
pole fishermen.
For these reasons we urge Sen. Robert Saunders,
D-Alachua, to exercise all his influence to stop the senate
from passing this bill. As a former UF student and member
of the Senate sub-committee on Higher Education, Saunders
should be aware of the financial problems such legislation
would raise.
Instead, we recommend the 10-mil limit on ad valorem
taxation, recently declared unconstitutional by a federal
court, be lifted. Local government could then fund itself
and cane pole legislation would not be necessary.
(TBCrtIRED OUT H3>l TO ENP THE Vlff IN &E. ftS|*T^>
~ If C 0 VEM,
/'ttfERYKP'y cash iM
SMfe BPMDS W J/

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor

Jeff Brein
Editorial Assistant

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, /\dve r tising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed ip the Florida Alligator are those of
, or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.



Days Os Decision

It has been suggested that
President Nixons decision to
send American troops into
Cambodia may have been
predicated on the assumption
that such a show of force would
convince the North Vietnamese
of the wisdom of seriously
negotiating a settlement at Paris.
The communists, however, are
not likely to enter into any
diplomatic agreement which
would require them to relinquish
any substantial part of what
they have paid for so dearly. To
be sure of this, one need only
turn back the clock to July 20,
1954. On that day, Brigadier
General Henri Deteil, acting for
the Commander in Chief of the
French Union Forces in
Indochina and La Quang Buu,
Vice Minister of National
Defense of the Democratic
Republic of Vietnam, in behalf
of the Commander in Chief of
The Peoples Army of Vietnam
signed the agreement on the
Cessation of Hostilities in
Vietnam, (i.e., the Geneva
Accords)
The central feature of the
armistice agreement was the
promise of free general
elections by secret ballot set
forth in paragraph seven of the
final declaration. Although the
U. S. refused to endorse the final
declaration, it did make a
unilateral declaration directly
relevant to the matter of
elections, wherein Under
Secretary of State Walter Bedell
Smith stated:
IN THE CASE of nations
now divided against their will,
we shall continue to seek to
achieve unity through free

MR. EDITOR:
Concerning IMPEACH, the May 25
letter by Peter Langly, ILW.
Mr. Langly offers himself as the Don
Quixote of the frustrated and seemingly
unrepresented faction of students.
Elevated by a sense of disappointment
and occasionally justifiable wrath,' he sits
astride his faithful swayback steed and
inquires, how does one impeach a
student body president? ... The rusty
visor of his helmet snaps shut, or perhaps
it has obstructed his vision for some time.
v
The contents of the letter itself
impeach Mr. Uhlfelder. Therefore Mr.
Langly has unknowingly realized his
desire. If to impeach is to challenge or
discredit a persons reputation, then the
letter clearly stands as a timeless
monument to Mr. Uhlfelders level of
incompetence. Now that El Dorado has
been discovered, the other generalizations
and fallacies in the letter can be
examined.
No president would commit political
suicide by alienating himself from
faculty, students, alumni, or
administration by organizing a rally
against the Gators. The rally was
obviously not a united effort emphasizing
acute displeasure with the performance of
the Gators. It was a form of respectful
dissent directed toward recent actions by
the Athletic Association (A.A.) which,
Uhlfelder believed, did not incorporate
the ideas or attitudes of the students. It
questioned the apparent administrative,
legislative, and judicial autonomy of the
Association. To call this dissent a rally
against the Gators is to commit the

Obstructed Vision

Hypocrisy And Lies

elections, supervised by the
United Nations to ensure that
they are conducted fairly.
It is worth pointing out that
the agreements explicitly
stipulated that the elections
were to be held under the
supervision of an international
commission composed of
representatives from the three
states comprising the U. N.s
International Control
Commission (ICC).
In order to appreciate the real
significance of this promise
one must recall that the Geneva
Conference was the diplomatic
modality whereby France was
allowed to retreat from
Indochina in an orderly,
face-saving fashion, having been
dealt a decisive military defeat at
Dien Bien Phu on May 7, 1954,
the day before the opening of
the Indochinese phase of the
Conference. In agreeing to
support the above mentioned
provisions of the Conference, Ho
Chi Minhs Vietminh sought
assurances that the elections
would in fact be held. The
provision that any
administration succeeding the
French prior to the 1956
elections would legally assume
Frances obligation and be
responsible for ensuring the
observance and enforcement of
the terms and provisons of the
agreements entered into between
the Vietminh and France seemed
to be adequate assurance.
IT IS ESSENTIAL to
recognize that the conference
did not establish a permanent
political boundary at the 17th
parallel (as has been alleged) but
merely a provisional line of

fallacy of extension. The problem is that
the A.A. is asking uninterested students
as well as interested students to pay the
dollar for each game.
The Fraternity-Sorority Bloc allegedly
supporting the Focus party is
nonexistent. A little research on Mr.
Langlys part would reveal that the
houses were divided between Focus and
First. Everyone knows a house divided
cannot stand, therefore the Bloc of
golden patronage is merely a tainted
disjunction of a gaudy hue. The reference
to such a Bloc in the last election is an
artful example of the anti-fact.
Continuing with his exercise of the
anti-fact, Mr. Langly contends that the
strike was Mr. Uhlfelders alone, as
opposed to the fact that it was a
nationwide student attempt. It was not
Uhlfelder who called off classes, but
President OConnell.
Also, the Rock Festival was not a
malignancy of the Uhlfelder
administration; the contracts were signed
before the election was decided.
Concluding his missive with
argumentum ad hominem and
prejudicing the issue, one question
arises not clarified within Mr. Langlys
text:
How did Mr. Uhlfelder, wallowing in
stupidity and folly, manage to get elected
by only a minority clique?????
DEBBIE LOWE
Impeach
MR. EDITOR:
In reference to Mr. Peter Langleys
letter which appeared in Mondays
Alligator (May 25) I would like to say

demarcation to facilitate the
withdrawal and regroupment of
opposing forces to either side of
the DMZ. Geneva did not, then,
leave two separate states, but
rather, it left two contesting
parties within a single national
state. Whereas the contest had
heretofore been military, it
would now be elevated to the
plane of electoral politics.
When in mid-1955 Ho Chi
Minhs government sought to
begin consultations on the
elections in accordance with the
conference provisions, Diem
refused to cooperate. Diem, you
will recall, had earlier deposed
the French-installed Chief of
State Bao Dai in a rigged
referendum while Bao Dai was
out of the country.
The U. S. clearly supported
Diem in this stand. However,
while making this clear to him,
the Department of State
indicated that it would have
preferred his paying at least
lip-service to the Geneva accords
by going through the motions
of trying to organize free
elections in cooperation with the
Communist North. But Diem
was unwilling to go even that
far, adamantly refusing to
participate in any pre-election
consultation under any
circumstances.
CONVERSELY, THE
VIETMINHS unwavering
commitment to elections was
initially expressed by Premier
Pham van Dong at the final
session of the Geneva
Conference on July 22, 1955.
He said:
The Conference has set up
the date for our unity. We shall

that President Uhlfelder had not the least
bit to do with the Super Show.
The Super Show which was enjoyed by
long hairs as well as short was conceived
under the Charles Shepherd
administration. With Shepherds complete
endorsement and approval.
If indeed anyone is to be impeached it
should be Mr. Langley for his confusion
of the facts.
MARC H. CLICK
LEONARD S. TANNER
SGP SUPER SHOW
Diversion
MR. EDITOR:
The statement by Student President
Steven Uhlfelder of May 22 in reference
to the petition by the Students for Equal
Protection Under Law (SEPUL) to enjoin
President OConnell from closing the
university on May 28 is in the nature of a
red herring.
While magnanimously acknowledging
the right of SEPUL to petition (thank
you Steve), Student President Uhlfelder
went on to say that he does not agree
with their actions trying to get money
back from the UF.
One may conclude from his comment
that Uhlfelder is myopic and cannot see
the real issue; which is, to prevent the few
loud-mouthed malcontents from
wrongfully causing the university to close
under threat of destructive overt actions
on their part. Anyone with a modicum of
grey matter knows that recovery of the
paltry tuppence ($3.75) is not the goal.
The goal is to insure, now and for the
future, the right of students at this

achieve it just as we have won
the war against the French. No
force in the world, internal or
external, can make us deviate
from our path of unity through
peace and democracy. This will be
the consummation of our
national independence.*
From the above, it should be
perfectly clear who did and
did not adhere to the provisions
of the Geneva Conference,

i-

FORUM:
( Ainu, ml 'DiiAftif J
hnpp fnr thr

/* , f v * * Al i v\,; 4 ', s t:a any -' 1
Thursday, May 28, to>o,Yha FloriHs ABfptar,

By Russ Taylor

which the U. S. has time and
again professed to uphold.
President Nixons Nov. 3
statement that the only thing we
will not negotiate is the right of
the Vietnamese people to
determine their own future
stands out for what it is.
HYPOCRISY AND LIES. The
same can be said for all those
who have based their arguments
on like grounds.

university to seek an education without
interference from misguided radicals who
take the law into their own hands.
While President OConnell is to be
applauded for his handling of the recent
flare-up, it remains, nonetheless, an
uncontrovertible fact that a small number
of students selfishly disregarded the rights
of others and forced the university to
bow to their illegal demands to close its
doers on May 8. This must not happen
again. The majority of students here at
UF dont want this to happen again. And
SEPUL is fighting (lawfully) to insure
that it doesnt happen again.
If the supposed sagacious Steve has
made a slip of rhetoric and truly didnt
mean what he said, then to err is to be
human. But, if his retort was deliberate,
then he has attempted to perpetrate a
gross diversion from the real quest of
SEPUL. This diversion is inconsistent
with the honor and dignity of his office.
HAL SILVER, ILW
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and
not exoeed 300 words.
t Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addressee and telephone numbers
of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer
shows Just cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for qsace.
Writers may submit longer eeanys,
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" columns. Any writ*
interested in submitting a regular oolumn b
asked to contact the editor and be rrtpnrad
to show samples of his work.
wmmmr

Page 9



Page 10

>, Tlm FlrMi AMmer. ThmnAm. M* M. 1970

eS^-_tf7 o PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON, JUNE 3
Offer!
AUGUST If Rj TWtU MJOlrtT IT KB PB 0000 MAT If IMU AUGUSI !Ni t
This coupon worth *I.OO ISXSXuSr KW.M This coupon worth *I.OO &£s£% Ml Ml This coupon worth *I.OO J3K K t *jj& (\ \
COVERED HU TWO 9" LUNCHEON H§ TWO SOUP §| Rfi|\ \ ****** )\
|§IP CASSEROLE I||3 y , ,? ' PLATES H^^|i PLATES M W\\ POUND I
r- *6.99 mmr 1 J 3.49 OBL-^ 52.99 s 2.99- g b ~7
k. Mdflsr rata 1* 1 moo..:';'- QQH 1 moo m \y^;^ BAG
*5.99 COUPON I ; L. >,V A *2.49 COI IPON M Bjjl BmI 5 1.99 coupon pjg
Limit 1 With $5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes
11111
o o o o o o o o o
ASTOfc Ait GRINDS
Tomato Jice4 *1 Fruit Cocktail 6 *1 fQCCCE Afic
THRIFTY MAID THRIFTY MAID CUT # AA D B
.. Cl AA ... S| OD Limit 1 Coffee of your choice with $5.00 ci more purchase excluding cigarettes
vdfsup ee e e 3^s ? l W66H 116110$ / cans *| chase 4 Sanborn ail grinds
THRIFTY MAK) WNE- THRIFTY MAIO LARGE or MEOIUM W_ AA ( ||LLL[ iC^jC
Apple Juice 3=, l 00 Green Peas WrrEE 3/
SONIQUE SALAO THRim MAID CREAM STYLE I.
Dressings .. 100l 00 W. K. Com. .71 Check These Low Prices
OOLELOCAL C * IN 'fI9P ASSORTEOMARSH -* IRONING BOARO
Bart. Penn 5^? $ I Mellow Puffs 4 *1 00 (OVERSETS Q 0
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Buttermilk 8r0ad.... 4 *l~ FLEA COLLARS... *l
DIXIE DARLING FRENCH DIXIE OARUNG RAISIN CINNAMON. FRUIT OR 30-Quort FOAM C Q<* E
Hard Rolls. 2 39*Pecan Buns 3 s l | |(| CHESTS s l
LIQUID DETERGENT ||B [|ll J STAMK j I [ill J \ I [ill T LVALUE SaSk \ E7V TWVAU^STAMPS j BTf TO WuSTKmW i
22-OZ. TWO PKOS WO TWO PKOS. KMOtN TWOPXGS TW JMMt JJ-K M-OZ. Ml
II IV ort ie #% V ; sr.-k.rt., ;Bfc&l H M k e-r. T 0 1 ".
II BOTTLE Ij-T 0000 THtu JUNC J 0000 THUU HiNt 1 Sandwich HunJ -Wmp ;Hm Keeker Dill,
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twm 7;rT.T. j. . a 1 a i IVT'- 1
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4 chuh Sweetner 69 e Pottea Meat 2/23 c Dog Food 2/59 c
brown OOUCG . AO 10-QT. SANALAC NONFAT NO.'/Y CANS RED SIRO IMITATION 1-U. PKO. SUNSHINE HI-HO
[mmH r .RM-ihnn mihmw Dry Milk $ 1 45 Vienna Sausage 2/27 c Cookies 47 c
Free mcVet IWB9BI i I Mustard. 21 c Dog Yummies 29 c Chop Suey 65 e
B Dinner Napkins ... 25 c Liv-A-Snaps 33 c Chow Mein 79 c
"RSweSr" n B 3421 west UNIVERSITY AVE. offn on Sunday 130 N.W. AIM ST.
HIWAY 441. HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.



BRAND CARVE OVEN READY
RIB ROAST.. 95 c
C I USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF BONELESS STEAK USDA CHOICE W-0 BRAND BEEF BONELESS BOTTOM
Delmonico ... $ 1 49 Round Roost. $ l O9
f *- 1 lAr'-'?.!! *T -X USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND Iff? BONELESS EYE OF ROUND OK
535-T Chuck Steak... 79* Rump Roast.. $ 1 39
SUNNYLAND PORK USDA CHOICE WO GROUND HBWAi -i s A|C USOA CHOICE W-0 BRAND BEEF BONELESS FULL CUT
SHOULDER Round Steak 99 e Round Steak. s l l9
PICNIC SMOKO Chuck Roast.. 99 c Sirloin Steak. $ 1 29
LB. USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF ROUND BONE USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF PORTERHOUSE OR
OSt L $ 1 39
M M ihlifissrifej _^j|
A A A A A A WBS Jpjb A A
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W-D BRAND ASTOR I
SC:::::.:I orange juke 6 99-
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Sliced n0m.......... ~ 1 t* ~ ... .-
Tar now Pizza Milk ... 3 39 c Cooking Oil 68 e
CARNATION HUNTS WEDGES
^=la. Skim Milk H 10* Tomato 2 29 c
SUNN VIAND HAM-CHEESE OR '*-< AA(
Cfllfim! A0 C VIIOOSC nG #7 shortening gem cut
EE::: ~ e gjjjj" 2 49 c Crisco .. 3 75 e Gr. Beans 10 c
HflU fkg. Jj snowdrift whirred camrabeua or cross road rride
se~T Cheese... . 89 e Shortening -7 Peaches . -*l*
* * CRACKIN' GOOD WAGON WHEEL DETERGENT SWEETHEART FABRIC
MSS 79* W Giant Tide 75* Softner . =7B*
SINGLETONS COCKTAIL * BUTTERMILK
Shrimp .3-89* Biscuits .. 23 e I l
- [mm-----" - ** "*Y r jj^ T i niliiTm j Wil jil n a i ii'f' f' f IlTb*'**[ MARGARINE !£ 33 e
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iKM ?u:x:r JiSsvs :wM Rid£ i n AA
: |Jy 6 0000tH.i..H,, iggaf 0000 tmwj .uni 3 : HgjW.. TM.U iuMi 3 p¥ggNo .g OOO thw ,uwt 1 iigggn 0000 ihoj juNt j JiTTy IVleat.... 2. 99*
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GOIOCN BANTAM YEUOW OR WHITE R* t ImtH . 5 - *l* RMoHI 29* FMSH FIU. HEADS FIV POtOtOeS 1G
CORN LETTUCE
g* * ~ SPP * WVII Morton Dinners 69*
WM A/> GoMoapM.... 2W Ratataw 5 £49* A y-* _.
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Tumlp Croons 3& *l**
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. oren on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. inhy Limas ... 4 *l*-
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 H. MAIN ST. 5w5w1*...... 3Z q*

lHanday, May 28,1970, TO* Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SA LE
sssmssismMMssss&f&
50 x 10 Schult trailer; AC; washer;
carpet; 20 x 10 screen porch; ail in
excellent cond. Lot 5 Plnehurst Pk.
378-5450. Best Offer. (A-10t-145-p)
MONKEY Tame Capochin, leash,
food, etc. S7O. Call 378-0181
mornings or after 10 p.m.
(A-147-st-p)
FANTASTIC COMPONENT
STEREO VALUE, Scott amplifier,
Garrard turntable, large cabinet,
Jensen speakers, Sony tape deck.
Original cost over SSOO. Financial
trouble must sell. $225 or $l5O
minus tape, Call 372-6845.
(A-147-st-p)
Pool table, cues, balls, racks, and
extras. 3 mo. old, exc. cond., Grad,
senior, must sell. All S6O. Call Bob or
Ed at 376-9410. Anytime.
(A-147-st-p)
Stereo system, 40 watt Tochebia
AM-FM multiplex system. Garrard
turntable two speakers Call after 6
PM. 373-2973. (A-st-147-p)
Microscope Zeiss Binocular Med
School approved. Variable light
$350. Call Steve Bloomfield
376-8442. (A-147-st-p)
60cc cycle xlent condi. plus helmet,
only SIOO Call Dennis 392-7509.
(A-3t-148-p)
1963 MGB mint year excellent
condition will last forever. Good
tires, 48,000 miles, new metallic
paint job 378-7930 ask for Pam.
(A-st-148-p)
Honda 160 1967. Leaving $75 or
offer. Call Bob 373-2216 or stop by
1824 3B N.W. 3rd PI. With all this
space I want to say Right On I
(A-3M48-P)
New Kustom 200 amp with fuzz,
trem, rev, and sel. boost. 3-15"
Jensen speakers. Vox Continental
organ. Shure microphone. Call
392-8225. (A-st-148-p)
STEREO turntable S4O, amplifier
$45, speakers S4O, Call 378-4200.
(A-st-148-p)
Camera nlkon sp rangefinder lenses:
50mm 1.4 85mm 2.0 case and lens
hoods. Excellent cond. call 378-9024
after 6pm. (A-2t-149-p)
8-track car units $38.95 lots of tapes
on sale everyday at $4.99. All others
$5.88 Muntz 14 NW 13th Street.
(A-Bt-149-p)
Economical living: cozy, remodeled
8x32 trailer, furnished, carpeted,
screened 12x22 cabana $995
378-3196, after spm. (A-2t-149-p)
White silk organza wedding gown.
Long chapel train and veil. Size 5 call
372-2740 after five. SSO.
(A-3t-149-p)
Standel Amp. $550, Fender prec.
Bass $l5O, call 372-8095 after 5:00.
(A-3t-149-p)
10x51 mobile home In good
condition 2 bedrooms, washer, and
air conditioned. Call 376-6372.
(A-3t-149-p)
-
8x34 aluminum trailer, has screened
porch and Bxlo added room. Student
park near campus; SIOSO
alrcondltloned, $950 without.
376-8082 anytime. (A-st-149-p)
MUST SELL 1964 Triumph Spitfire
Engine Recently Rebuilt Low Milage
$350 call 376-1018 anytime YOUD
BETTER HURRY. (A-2t-149-p)
Honda 50 Must sell Perfect condition
Best offer 378-2809. (A-5M49-P)
For sale: 1962 SAAB 33m1/ga(
Excellent mech cond S3OO 735 S.E.
sth Ave. From 5 to Bpm.
(A-4t-149-p)
Sell Hoble 96 surfboard Good
shape. Best offer. Call 378-3833
Week days ASK FOR TOM.
(A-5M49-P)
Its an experience! Authenic
ANTIQUE AUCTION Sunday
afternoon, 2 P.M. May 31st C & J
Auction House, Archer, Florida
(A-150-2t-p)
ll 11 I
winner acaoemy
best Picture
"MIDNIGHT COWBOY"

eVoV.%%%VeVe!*e%%%%%V*>V %>!!!?!!!!!!
FOR SALE
BE gentle, be kind, to that expensive
carpet, clean it with Blue Lustre.
Rent Electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-155-lt-c)
Honda 305 Superhawk runs well very
clean two helmets must sell today
S3OO firm Call 392-8190
(A-150-lt-p)
PUPPIES My mutt did her thing
with a traveling salesman. They are
cute + cheap. Look and make an
offer. Call 373-2750 (A-150-lt-p)
67 Honda 90 runs fine, great fun!
$125 Call Mike 392-7507
(A-150-3t-p)
Golf clubs! Spaulding's Jerry Barber
promodel. Bag, woods and Irons S7O.
Call 373-2815 after 2 PM
(A-150-2t-p)
Webcor portable stereo HI-FI and
smith-corona portable
TYPEWRITER and case. Must sell.
Call 392-7639. (A-st-150-p)
1969 Yamaha Enduro 125 cc 3500 mi
excellent cond. $375 4.00 x 18 knob.
7 mo old see at 304 NW 15 St. RmlO
(A-5M50-P)
8 x 35 Mobile Home, AC, SI2OO.
1968 125 cc Benelll cheap
transportation $125. Call after 5 PM
378-6389. (A-2t-150-p)
1967 Honda CB 160, 4700 miles,
perfect condition, bell helmet, used
very little, must sell, would like
$325. Call 373-1253 or 392-0128.
(A-Bt-150-p)
BULTACO METRALLAMKZ 250 cc
5 speed S4OO. Will trade for good
woods or trials bike 392-2155 days
3 76-2804 nights ask for Jim
(A-2t-150-p)
Harmon Kardon Gerrard componet
stereo, Goya Spanish guitar.
Grounding portable casset tape
recorder Call 378-4664 (A-150-2t-p)
Flight Servomatlon, buy my 3 cu. ft.
refrigerator. Perfect for dorm living.
Counter-top with walnut finish. Also
coronet. Call 392-8089 (A-150-st-p)
FOR RENT
Sublease or need 3 fern, roommates
available June 1. Tanglewood 2
bedroom townhouse. No deposits.
Call 372-0360. (B-146-st-p)
Married? Sublease for summer.
Furnished apt. slOl/month AC good
neighbors PH: 373-1935 evenings.
(B-146-st-p)
French Quarter Apts. 114 Sublease
summer qtr. $45 mo. End apt. very
quiet. Call Doug, PH: 373-2306.
(B-146-st-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
summer qtr. Share house 2 blocks
from campus with 2 coeds pvt. room,
A/C, Call 378-6548. (B-st-137-p)
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-C)

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Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 28,1970

FOR RENT
Large 3 bedroom duplex available by
mid June no damage deposit required
call after 6pm 378-5594.
(B-3t-149-p)
Modem bedroom apt., quiet behind
the mall, ww, central a.c. 100 per
month, regular sllO call after 5
373-2889 can move in June 1.
(B-st-149-p)
Sublease for summer 1 bedroom
furnished apt., unit ac, available June
14, 4 blocks from research library librarys9O
s9O librarys9O per month phone 372-3260.
(B-3t-149-p)
Sublease summer qtr Landmark apt 2
br 2-4 persons a/c dishwasher grills
poolside. Dishes, pots, pans, kitchen
utensils left for you. 378-3851.
(B-3M49-P)
Sublet for summer 1 bedroom house,
1 block from campus, ac. $125 for the
summer. 378-3757. (B-2t-149-p)
3-bedroom apt., offstreet parking,
full I>ath, kitchen, living rm, 16,500
B.T.U. A/C.' Min. of 1 qtr. lease.
$l3O mo. 408 NE Ist Ave. 376-0317.
(B-5M49-P)
30 yards behind Norman Hall. 2
bdrm. 1 bath no lease ac furnished
$35 for June $75 a month 1103 SW
7th Ave. 378-5410 after spm.
(B-st-149-p)
FREE one month rent, extra
bookcases, kitchen & bthroom equip,
and more. Sublet 2 bdr. apt for
summer. 141 Landmark or call
373-1968. (B-st-149-p)
For fall quarter only (Sept-Dec) 7BA
needs roommate for 1 bedroom
Landmark Townhouse $65 month +
utilities call 372-9317 Mike.
(B-3t-149-p)
Will sacrifice Two bedroom furn.
French Quarter apt. Beautiful,
spacious townhouse 2 pools Call
373-2643 make offer We promise
you the best price! Call and SEE!!!
(B-3t-149-p)
Several 1 br apt 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet $l2O mo. Colonial Manor
apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave. 372-7111
Grad students preferred. Special rates
for summer guarter now In effect.
(B-ts-109-c)
For rent for fall, alr-conditloned
apartments near campus. SBO to
$145 per month, pool. University
0 Apartments. Call 376-8990 evenings.
(B-Bt-149-p)
Furnished 1 bdr. super clean A nice.
Next to LaMancha. SBO/mo. summer.
SBS/mO. fall. 376-2738 or 376-3442.
(B-3t-149-p)
Sublet or rent 1 brm apt furnished air
conditioned rent slls/mo patio call
373-1080 or 376-4807 Village 34.
(B-st-144-p)
Across street from campus studio
apts. tor both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
Included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace Apts. 1225 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-109-ts-c)
Sublet 3-bedroom house to block
from campus $125/mo. 378-7726 or
392-9259 1224 SW 1 Ave. furnished
full kitchen. (B-st-149-p)

FOR RENT
Large house to sublet for summer: 3
bdrms, 2 baths, kitchen, etc. 1 blk.
from campus interested call
373-2268 or come by 1128 SW Ist
Ave. (B-10t-145-p)
Village Park 1 bdr. apt. no. 29, Call
378-0323 after 5 weekdays anytime
weekends. (B-147-st-p)
Village park 1 bedroom apt. sublease
for summer, pool, A/C. have a great
summer at Sin City apt. 24. Call
378-3554. (B-147-st-p)
TWO BLOCKS to campus men
women room TV carpet wood panel
kit. Priv. See Diane, Brenda or Rick
1204 NW 3 Ave. 378-0286 392-0700
(B-147-5 t-p)
BARGAIN SBO each for entire
summer. Two girls In Village Park top
floor, Poolside, Call 373-1501 after
3. (B-147-st-p)
2 Roommates wanted Summer
Quarter Air-conditioned, carpet,
dishwasher, other extras, located near
pool, Landmark no. 60 373-2207.
(B-147-st-p)
Sublet summer qt. 2 bedroom
Tanglewood Manor apts. A/C, pool,
landscaped, Quiet. June 15 Sept
15., pay only 2 months rent, Call
373-2706. (B-st-148-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deadlin -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
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for RENT
FOR RENT: Singles: Swing into
summer in a luxurious air-conditioned
poolside apartment. Private bedroom
Walk to campus. S7O include s
utilities. 378-7224. (B-15t-148-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus, A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Sublet or rent 1 brm. furnished
air-conditioned patio Village 34
slls/mo Call 373-1080 or 376-4807.
(B-st-148-p)
Frederick Gardens one-bedroom apt.
for summer. Available June 14. June
rent paid. Call 376-2909 or 392-0911
ask for Linda. (B-148-st-p)
Landmark Phase II apt. 164 1
bedroom sublet for summer June
rent paid dishwasher AC $ 145/mo,
Call 376-0453. (B-3t-148-p)
Sublease apt. 28 1716 N.W. 3rd
Ave. for the summer. Only $96/mo
June rent paid for close to campus
1 bdm.-air/heat only if married.
372-2257. (B-3t-148-p)
Sublet summer quarter Landmark
Apt. 104, Near Pool, Call 378-9041.
(B-147-st-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT'
Sublet Landmark summer
quarter pool suana dishwasher
slls per person plus refundable
deposits. Call now 376-2768.
(B-3t-148-p)
Must sublet Village Park apt. for
summer qtr. Great place good offer.
Call anytime 373-1962. (B-3t-148-p)
One bedroom apt. Gatortown $350
for whole summer thru Sept. 15 No
damage deposit. Call 376-5694 must
rent by June 6. (B-147-st-p)
Village Park need female roommate
open now thru summer apt. on pool.
Call 372-4918 anytime. (B-145-st-p)
Summer In a lovely apartment at
Point West will be one to remember
June 15 to Aug. 31 as little as
$300.00 for two apartments for 4
from $350.00 A quiet community
for people who want the best. You
will want to stay in September. Res.
Mgr. 372-3126 500 S. W. 34th Street.
(B-st-148-p)
Sublet or roommates for summer.
107 Landmark, 2 bdrm. poolside &
woodside extra features + gym, bar
BQ, sauna, good parking. Call
373-1208. (B-st-148-p)
Summer Bargain, $375 complete,
Village Pk. no. 86, 1001 S. W. 16th
Ave, 2 br. turn., upstairs, AC, pool,
rsvd. pkg, quiet, spacious, call
372- (B-st-148-p)
li only $87.50 per person for entire
summer quart. 2 br Tanglewood apt.
A/C dishwasher ww-carpet lease
ends Aug. 15 U-can stay THRU finals
or longer no Sept, lease worries call
378-7212 (B-150-2t-p)
2 BLOCKS from campus. 1 br. ac
furnished apartment. Sublet for
summer. $95/mo Includes utilities.
Call 376-1331. (B-150-st-p)
Landmark apt. no. 27 2 br. Summer
Qtr. A/C dishwasher pool health club
June rent free good full qtr. Call
376-1834 (B-st-150-p)
MARRIED? 2-Bedroom Apt., Furn.,
AC, Private Patio, Pool, BIG kitchen,,
quiet area of SW 16th Ave., Avail.
June 19th, $126/mo., 1405-28 SW
10th Tr., 376-9091 (B-3t-150-p)
Available In June 3 bdr. house, 1 and
2 bdr. apts. central A/C $l2O and
SIOO a mo., furnished. Call 376-9525
before 11 A.M. or after 9 P.M.
(B-st-150-p)
1 Bedroom Apt. Available June 14
Private Patio AC Dogs Welcome Call
373- After 5:00 P.M.
(B-st-150-p)
Single rooms for summer, winter
qtrs. 150/qtr maid linens utilities
close to campus, call or see 115 NW
10 St. Tom Ford 378-7222 378-5156
leave name (B-150-7t-p)
Sublet Summer 1 bedroom wood
panel apt. A/C, private patio, pet fee
paid, lots of extras slls a month
Village 34 apt 37 Call 378-5809
(B-st-142-p)
VW Squareback 1968 alr-condttloned
radio 23000 miles excellent
condition SIBOO call 378-6029
(B-3t-150-p)

The Selling Os The
President, 1968
Book Review
Reviewed by
Dr. Frank Munger
Professor of Political Science
and
Dr. James Terhune
Asst. Professor of Journalism
Today
8:00 PM
Lounges 122 & 123
Union
sponsored by the J.W.R. Union

WANTED
JUNE RENT FREE 4 to share 2 bdr
2 bath Point West apt $125 ea for all
summer pool ac dishwasher call
376-9924 or 372-5970 after 5 must
be 21. (C-10t-142-p)
Live all summer at La Mancha for
$l4O Inc. utilities, pvt. bedroom, pvt.
balcony, pvt. phone, walk-in closets,
pool, AC Call 373-1414. (C-146-st-p)
WANTED: Coed to share luxurious
air-conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious
air-conditioned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Roommate wanted Summit House 3
mo. only SBO. Air-cond., pool, Call
378-0043 or 392-0505 ask for Rich.
(C-3t-148-p)
1 male roommate for summer qtr. for
La Mancha $125 all summer Inc. util
A/C, carpet, furn, own bdr.
372-5833. (C-st-148-p)
Female roommate wanted to share a
two-bedroom air-conditioned house,
own room, only $65/mo. Close to
campus Call Carla 373-1992.
(C-st-148-p)
Need 1 co-ed roommate for 1 bdrm.
AC apt. 2 blks from campus. Price is
S9O for entire summer. Call
378-0551. (C-146-st-p)
2 roommates needed in
summer term for Gatortown apt. 2
weeks free rent, $36 66/mo +
utillt, A/C, pool, dishwasher, 3 bdr. 2
bath call 378-6423 (C-147-st-p)
GIRLS YOU name your own rent for
Pt. West Apt., deposits paid, available
June 1, Two bedrooms two full
baths Call 378-8771. (C-146-st-p)
3 Male Roommates Frederick Apts,
pool, wall to wall carpet, air. cond.,
summer quart. S3B/month 378-7104
(C-147-4t-p)
2-3 roomates for summer qtr. Village
Park apt., tv, stereo, bar, pool, air
cond. SIOO per qtr. each. Call
372- (C-4t-149-p)
Roommate needed for summer
quarter to share 3 bdrm. house. Have
your own room with double bed.
$45/mon. plus utilities. Call Nick
376-9450. (C-3t-149-p)
Leaving school for the summer? Let
me buy or rent your ten speed bike
while you are gone. Call Alan
373- (C-2M49-P)
Female roommate. S9O/summer +
1/3 utilities. Own room in large
comfortable house three blocks from
Med. Center. Call 376-7166 anytime.
(C-3t-149-p)
Want to share Landmark or La Bonne
Vie Apartment with three male
students for fall qtr. Call 392-7656
and leave name and address.
(C-3M49-P)
Desperate fmale rmmt needed imm
Lamancha only $l4O incl utit for
entire summer no deposit last mos
rent paid Call day 392-3601 night
378-0768. (C-4M49-P)

Thursday. May 28,1970, The Florida Alligator,

WANTED
Wanted male roommate for summer
Mt. Vernon apt. Call 376-5151
(C-4t-149-p)
MALE Roommate for summer June
rent paid. Pool A/C tv Frederick
Gardens apt. 57 call 373-1887 or
come by office. (C-3t-149-p)
2 Female roomates needed 72 Village
Park SIOO whole quarter Call
373-2771 after 5:00 Linda.
(C-2t-149-p)
Male roommate wanted for fall. 2br,
2 full bath, A/C, La Bonne Vie apts.
Call: 378-8319. (C-3t-149-p)
Female roommate Own bedroom In
Village Pk. Apt $79 per mo. plus
utilities 376-2875 after 5 PM
(C-150-3t-p)
Male roommates wanted for summer
quarter to share spacious 4-bedroom,
2-bath, central-air apt. I'-block from
Norman Hall $45/month. 372-1272
(C-150-7t-p)
Private bedroom and bath at Point
West apts. $l5O. for summer quarter.
Call Jim 378-9129. 500-7 SW 34 St.
(C-150-2t-p)
JU 1 Li,
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Page 13

WANTED
Needed 1 or 2 girls for 2 bdrm 2 bath
Point West Apt. $65 for all summer
372-3126 (C-150-3t-p)

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Selected for the Royal Command Performance, 1970, London

WANTED
Male roommate for fall quarter at
University Gardens; $55/mo Inc.
utilities, call 392-8928. (C-150-st-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
, /.V.V/A\V.V///.%V.V.V.V.V.VAV.VV. # .V
Female roommate to share 3
bedroom house summer qtr own
bedroom air conditioned S3O a
month call Karen 373-1396
(C-150-3t-p)
Two male roommates wanted for
summer. CAMELOT apt. 202,
$43/mo rent, pool, a/c, clubhouse,
TV, 376-0354 (C-150-st-p)
2 Female roommates needed for
French Quarter apt. no. 65. Air
cond., pool, etc. Only sllO for
summer. Call 372-3148 anytime.
(C-150-st-p)
TWIN SIZE BED anyone wanting to
sell one bed please call Claire at
392-9838 or Patti at 392-9240
(C-150-4t-p)
Wanted Male roommate to, sublet
apt for summer for SIOO. A/C,
carpeted, own bedroom. Move in
now. Call 373-2914 (C-150-st-p)
Men! Roommate needed for summer.
June rent free. Landmark no. 33 near
pool and quiet. Call 378-7543.
(C-150-st-p)
Female Roommate wanted for
summer. La Mancha apts. private
bedroom, air cond, pool, walking
distance from campus. June rent free
378-9611 (C-st-150-p)
Hip roomates wanted for summer
qtr. or will sub-lease air-con house
behind Norman. No deposits. Call
Sherry 376-&080 618 SW 10th St.
(C-7t-150-p)
Roommate needed for summer
quarter to share 3 bdrm. house. Have
your own room with double bed.
$45/mon. plus utilities. Call Nick
376-9450 or Pete 392-7112.
(C-3t-149-p)
HELP 'WA.NTED
Co-ed wanted room and board In
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
Male part-time, full-time
employment. Immediate openings for
summer or remainder of Spring terms
apply now at Arbys Restaurant 1405
S. W. 13th Street. (E-148-3t-p)
Legal Secretary with previous
experience. For interview call David
M. Anderson*, Fagan, Crouch,
Anderson & Folds, 376-5295.
(E-146-10t-p)
Female: Full and parttime waitresses.
Must be neat. Good wages. Apply
Kings Food Host 1802 W. Un. Ave
or 1430 SW 13th St. After 2:00 PM
(E-ts-c)
Counselor positions available at
Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville,
N. Male or Female Archery
Instructor, Male only overnight
camping trips operate truck big
and strong, Male only Go-Kart
Specialist mech. inclined, Male
only Cabin counselors (activity,
escorts and leaders), Male only ski
boat operator (exp. 160-220 h.p.),
Male or Female Riding instructor,
For application: T. R. Robertson,
1414 Fetch Ave., Jax., Fla. 32207.
(E-5M49-P)
MOVING TO WEST PALM
BEACH? SECRETARY II
POSITION OPEN WITH STATE
AGENCY IF INTERESTED CALL
378-1876 (E-3t-148-p)
Repairman for 8-track tape units
experienced man preferred good pay
MUNTZ 373-2333. (E-st-149-p)
Due to an unexpected cancellation,
an opening is available in a two-year
Ophthalmic Assistant's Training
Program at the Medical Center.
Ophthalmic assistants work with
ophthalmologists in the evaluation of
patients. Pre-requisite for the training
orogram is two years of college
and/or previous medical experience,
1.e., a military corpsman. Course
begins July 1, 1970. Details can be
obtained by contacting Miss Maija
Uotila, Department of
Ophthalmology, University of
Florida, telephone 3 92-3451.
(E-5M49-P)
Male: Summertime openings for
carhops and grill. Must be neat. Good
hourly wage. Apply Kings Food
Host 1802 W. Un. Ave. or 1430 S. W.
13th St. After 2:00 PM (E-ts-c)
SAMSON needs volunteers interested
in summer recreation Jun 15 Jul
24. Morning or afternoon. Contact
315 JWRU or Call 392-1608
(E-3MSO-C)
SAMSON needs a student to
coordinate summer rec program
work-study avail, water **£. ,n*t ,n*tprefer.
prefer. ,n*tprefer. Jun 15 Jul 24. JW2U 315
392-1608 I
Camp Mountain Lake for Boys and
girts In Hendersonville N.C. Rlflery
instructor needed. NRA required, call
ITB If T eftsrf pee (E-15Q-M-P)
SAMSON needs water safety
Instructor willing to help Irt summer
rec. program. Contact 315 JWRU or
call 392-1608. (E-150-3t-c)

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED MALE Men's
Clothing Salesman. Full or part time.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Apply Wilson
Department Stores, Inc., 22 E.
University Avenue. (E-st-149-c)
r-r-X-r-X-X-i-x-.^iv^XtXrXrirXrXtXrXxXxX:
AUTOS
1960 Chevrolet impala. Good
condition. Power steering plus two
new tires. 303 NW 17th St. Apt. 5
phone 373-2901. Only $l5O.
(G-st-149-p)
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy clean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission is a winner
too! TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)
'6l VW Sunroof, radio, '62 engine,
excellent tires, good condition.
Getting married cant afford
unkeep of 2 cars. $375. Call Mai
392-7571. (G-st-148-p)
1960 Falcon inexpensive reliable
transportation. Radio, heater, good
tires, engine in excellent shape. Call
376-2909 or 392-0911 ask for Linda.
(G-148-st-p)
64 Chevy Impala conv., white, power
steering, and brakes, vB, auto trans.
low milage, good mechanical shape.
376-4165 after 5-.00 392 0510 days.
(G-4t-148-p)
Save SIOO, beautiful compact, 64
falcoln, very good condition. S4OO.
Must sell, Need money for
Honeymoon. 378-4642, 376-2248.
(G-147-st-p)
63 TR4-wrecked needs body work
will sell whole car Cheap or parts.
Eng. 5 wire wheels, trans etc. Call
378-7082 and leave message.
(G-2t-149-p)
69 Vespa 125 cc Good Condition
$l6O Call 392-7549 after 5 P.M.
(G-5M50-P)
PE R SONA L
.wx.x<.x.x.x.x.x.x.x.x.x*x-:i*x*x<
Money and law what
do you know, is it enough? Come
and learn, frank, fun and friendly. A
Bridge Over Troubled Water May 28,
Thursday, 7:30 (J-3t-148-p)
Legally what does marriage
mean. Do you know? Come & learn.
Free, A Bridge Over Troubled Waters
Union Aud. 7:30 Thursday May 28,
Free Free (J-3t-148-p)
How to buy babies on the installment
plan**** A Bridge Over Troubled
Waters frank discussions about
marriage. Union aud. 7:30 May 28,
Thurs. (J-3t-148-p)
THE APOLLONIAN
ALTERNATIVE Handmade
sandals that you can wear to the
super show in foot deep mud and
rain and still wear them the next day
and the next and the next and for the
next year and we guarantee it. About
$15.00 108 N. W. 7th Street. Open:
12 to 6 daily. PAX (J-147-st-p)
Free kittens, male black, female
variegated, healthy, housebroken,
3720 S. W. 15th St. 372-3597.
(J-st-148-p)
ALL MARRIED COUPLES Become
more aware of each other. Discover
in the privacy of your own
relationship how to become more
real with your spouse. Intimacy
Encounter Tapes, Marriage & College
Life Project. Free. Call 392-1590.
(J-st-149-c)

MAY 28-29 30
Am ly
/kfili
y \ II MOSS HART'S
HIT COMEDY

Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 28, 1970

RSONA x
SOVIET UNION, Driving and
Camping 10 weeks, $1,350. Includes
air and all expenses. A. Lipson, 2
Garden Terr., Cambridge, Mass
02138 or call (collect) 617-547-1127
(J-6t-142-p)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
Would one of the two lonesome
coeds please call John at 392 7272; a
lonesome engineer. (J-2t-149-p)
Married couples lnterested in
improving communications and
understanding each other better?
Participate in a Marital Enrichment
Group experience. Increase your
awareness of the strengths in your
%marrlage. For information call
Marriage and College Life Project.
392-1590. Its free. (J-st-149-c)
Rent a luxury Tanglewood apt. 2 br,
2 bath, ac, etc. Sublet for Sum. Total
cost less than S9O. NO Damage
Deposit, Call 372-9705 anytime.
(J-147-st-p)
EUROPE Go this summer. Fly NASA
for student rates. Flights leaving till
August. For info call 373-2520 5 to 8
pm. (J-st-149-p)
Original caste Handmade jewelry,
gold or silver. Wedding rings, other
custom things. Call Hope White at
373-1947. (J-147-st-p)
DIVORCE
why, and on what grounds****** A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters, Frank
discussion about marriage May 28,
Union Aud. 7:30 FREE (J-3t-148-p)
Before you do it" Know the
consequences*****FEE****** A
Bridge Over Troubled waters Union
Aud. 7:30 Frank discussions about
marrlage*****COME******
(J-3t-148-p)
Babies and Budgets Alimony
to divorce
Frank answers to honest questions
about marriage *********** Union
Aud. 7:30 May 28, Thursday, free.
(J-3t-148-p)
Beautiful black kittens need home. 5
wks. old only 4 left. Call Jackie
378-6692. (J-4t-149-p)
Grad student hitchhiking to Calif,
leaving about June 10 anyone care to
come along? Call Graham 372-9317.
(J-3t-149-p)
To Billy (alias Clark Kent) I love you
MORE than I show you. HAPPY
BIRTHDAY! Wifey (J-150-lt-p)
Doug B. Thank you for making the
Pike wedding so much fun. Friends
forever. Funky Chicken. (J-150-lt-p)
EMPEROR FLASH I and friend will
grant an audience to two lonesome
coeds. Call this number on Uranus
378-9924 (J-150-lt-p)
Gertie Merrin Not legal yet! Eat
yogurt to save the cells.
Congratulations on tapping the
cabinet door open. Happy 20th. L.L.
(J-150-lt-p)
Human hair stretch wig never worn
short, paid S4O for it will take best
offer Call 3 72-6 997 after 6
(J-150-2t-p)
HALLOWEEN IN MAY! Three
midnight-black kittens desire good
home. Litter-trained. One male, two
females. Call 378-4554 after 6.
(J-2t-150-p)
NEEDED for summer: 1 or 2 coeds
for 1 bdrm apt in fred. gards. rent
41.25 per person per month. Call
372-7755 anytime. (J-150-4t-p)
Beautiful puppies for beautiful
people 372-3988 (J-150-st-p)
Dear Lambda Chis, Thanks for
making my weekend extra special I
love you bunches! Dee (J-150-2t-p)

PE R SONA L
..-..-..X.^.x-X-X-X-X-X-X'X'X-Xv
Strange bedfellows? Are they legal?
Before you act learn the
facts ... Union Aud. 7:30 A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE******
(J-3t-148-p)
Need to get your stuff up North? We
are renting a truck and will take
anything you want between here and
No. Hartford, Conn. Need to know
this week. Call 376-6107. Ask for
Brad or Rich. Will Take Bikes.
(J-st-145-p)
a*
aaaaaaaaatts a a at a a a a a a
* J*J* _*.*J*J* J* J* J*J* m +J* J* m *JJ*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*^>J*J*Jt^*^JtJ*,
LOST St FOUND
a a a a a a a a a a a a
(aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa a a a a a a at
a a a a J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*J*.
LOST: pair of sandals near N. W.
19th St. Call 378-1131 (L-3t-150-p)
LOST: A small black song notebook
Call Debbie at 392-9100. If you
have found it need badly for a
summer camp job. (L-3t-148-p)
Found: A brown shiney leather
jacket with silver snaps and snap
down pockets. Found by Gator pond
by McCartney Hall A Sebring sz. 42
392-9824. (L-3t-148-p)
FOUND: A set of keys near BRYAN
Hall old law building on 5-21-70. If
yours call Janice 372-2958 after
5:30. (L-3t-148-nc)
LOST In Med. Center area One
beeper $25 reward with no questions
asked. Call JOHN at 392-2867.
(L-st-145-p)

MOBRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Fish Almondine and
French-Fried Potatoes
S9
GAINESVILLE MALL
ILost Your Contact? i
#W* mm
Qatop AOs make Contacts!

: ; ;:;; ::::::::: ; ::: : ::: : :::::x:r>^:>:x : : : : : x : : : : :
LOST & FOUND
; .. ; ; ; : .;.:.:.;.:.: : :.: : :.::-:::-: : :xx:::::r::^::X:^
Medium-sized black female dog with
brown markings and white tip on tail.
Call 378-8967 (L-150-3t-nc)
SERVICES
Tutoring by certified teacher, english
through high school, german levels 1
and 2. Call 378-7641. (M-st-149-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pick-up delivery 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-143-p)
Horses boarded new barn tack room,
green pasture and riding ring & trails.
Complete care less than 15 minutes
from campus on 5R234 Phone:
373-1059. (M-147-st-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
AT THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 cent and 4 cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)
Free inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone*
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)



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Thursday, May 28,1870, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



The
Florida
Alligator

Rotary Connection
y
On Frolics Bill Too

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
In addition to the outstanding
headline act of Janis Joplin and
her band, the Interfratemity
Councils Spring Frolics this
Friday will feature Rotary
Connection.
The band is good. The
vocalists are more than exciting.
The sound they produce and
its good to say this cant be
defined very easily.
ROTARY CONNECTION has
recorded four or five albums
theyre signed with Chess and
Cadet and the records have
been good. Most of the material
the group has recorded has been
very special arrangements of
rock tunes of others. Their

I BOOKS|
The Roob Revolution:
Nixon And H.L Hunt?
The Great Roob Revolution, by Roger Price.
(Random House, $5.95)
r Hey, rube! was the old camie cry for help when the locals the
rubes (from Reuben) acted up. And according to Roger Price in his
own environment the rube was a man of many virtues.
Price, in a book that contains no droodles and more grim smiles
than giggles, claims when the rural rube moved from New England or
the Midwest or wherever to the big city, he became a Roob with a
capital R. Further, the Roobs are taking over American society
turning it into a classless system and Price speculates on what that
society would be like.
Price also breaks down the Roobs into stratifications basic, avant,
new and sub. This doesnt have anything to do with money; its more
a matter of cultural, behaviorial and thinking patterns.
Perhaps some of Prices examples of each type will help. His classic
basic types include the Nixons and Shirley Temple Black. Classic
avants range from Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. to William F. Buckley Jr.
Classics subs are H. L. Hunt and James Hoffa. The News havent yet
crane with anybody spectacular.
All rate can say about Prices picture of the Roob society is that
you wouldnt want to visit, no less liVe there.
Joan Hanauer (UPI)
* *
Joys and Sorrows, Reflections by Pablo Casals as told to Albert E.
Kahn.
(Simon & Schuster, $7.95)
Autobiographies usually are written. This one is told which gives
it a charming conversational flow. It has an aura of almost childlike
innocence. Thats remarkable, particularly for a man who is 93 years
old though still going strong.
But not remarkable for this man who is one of the few really
profound interpretive musicians of the century. In his lifetime he has
lifted his instrument, the cello., from an obscure orchestral position to
that of an eloquent solo voice for human emotions.
How? He doesn't know, because in his ultimate honesty he would
tell if he knew. For not knowing he cannot be faulted, \toio knows the
differences between the fine musician who is a compelling interpreter
and the fine musician is no more that that? Casals tells you it is
intuition. Maybe some day some genius will discover what intuition
is.
In his many long conversations with his friend, Albert Kahn, Casals
spoke many times of his love for his mother. She still lives vividly,
enshrined in rightness, in a mind crowded with less commanding
remembrances of kings, princes, statesmen and musicians. He sees his
mother in his dearly loved wife, Martita, who is 60 years younger than
he.

ppi*|

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version of the Creams
Sunshine of Your Love a
recording on one of their albums
is quite nice and imaginative.
The same goes for what they do
with Jaggers Lady Jane.
Vocals are handled by two of
the groups members Minnie
Ripperton and Sidney Barnes
and both are good. The sound
they come up with together has
learned much from soul but
doesnt stop there. Bames also is
a song writer and authored
several Supremes tunes and
some of those done by the
Shangri-Las.
To get in to see the show, you
have to pay $5.50 a couple and
crane to Florida Field at 8
Friday night. Tickets can be had
at the Union Box Office and at
record stores around town.

Delos Smith (UPI)
3 passport photos 3.50
SNEERINGER PHOTOGRAPHY
1013KW.UnHr.Av*. 378-1170

A. r*
mk mm.'*'-
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B' X X mt X: -*i Vi * Jjfl a S .3 *4
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THE MUSIC GOES AROUND AND AROUND
... Minnie Ripperton and the Rotary Connection hero for Frolics Friday
A
BRIDGE
OVER
TROUBLED WATERS
Frank discussions about marriage
miiiiii
* -t i . j.*
tonight
union auditorium
7:30
Mr, I(An Stewart, Assistant Professor of Finance at the
University of Florida will discuss the proper financing for a
young family. His presentation wiD include such topics as
Buying babies on the installment plan and Marriage is
not a good financial investment.
Mr. Robert Furlong, Professor of Law at the University of
Florida Law School will discuss some of die contemporary
topics of family law. His presentation wffl include
discusssion on Abortion Laws, Divorce Laws, and Joint
Ownership.
* v
Divorce to Budgets
*\-* * . -., ' ;~/ 4'. ~ O
sponsored by the university religious association

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

I, Tfw Florida Alligator, Thuraday, May 28.1870

Page 16



Moss Hart Comedy Opens
Tonight At Gonstans

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNER
Alligator Entertainment Writer
Constans Theatre will mirror
itself at 8 tonight and Friday
and Saturday nights of this week
by presenting a play about
theatre life.
Light Up The Sky, a Moss
Hart comedy, takes place in a
Boston hotel suite on the
opening night of a Broadway
play.
A TEMPERMENTAL
ACTRESS (Marilyn Wall), a

Di r e cto r-1 n str u cto r
Has Wide Background

The Theatre Department has
an artist in residence, Richard
Lake, who uses his practical
background to help young actors
get into the profession.
A member of the Actors
Equity Association, Lake
instructs courses in acting,
make-up and stage movement.
Stage movement basically a
dance course was designed by
Lake when he came to UF this
year.
HE EARNED his BFA degree
at the University of Arizona and
his MA at Purdue University in
Stage and Theatre Management.
He also attended the Pasadena
RICHARD LAKE
... director of show
GATORTOWN
and
La Bonne Vie
Apts.
EXTRA-LOW RATES
FOR SUMMER
Call 378-3467
or
372-1091
A
Or Come by office
309 S W 16th Ave
Apt 140

neurotic director (Gary
Cheatham), and a tycoon
producer (Peter Baloff) fray the
nerves of a young playwright
(Tom Shutee). They emote more
between themselves than on the
stage.
Irene Livingston the star of
the stage is so sure of the
plays success that she feels, Its
her last play!
The phrase, I could cry
comprises at least 50 per cent of
director Carleton Fitzgeralds
dialogue.

Playhouse College of Theatre
Arts, the Dance-Drama Center in
Long Beach California, and the
LeMone Ballet Center in
Pasadena.
He also sang with the
Northwestern University Choir
with the Chicago Symphony.
My purpose here is mainly to
train actors and make them
realize the work involved in the
profession, Lake said.
Acting is a study of mankind
- not just the reciting of lines,
he said. A recreation of life
itself.
SINCE HE came to UF, Lake
has brought in several theatre
people to talk to classes and
audition students.
i Craig Noel, producer-director
of the Globe Theater in San
Diego spoke and held auditions
for the 21st Shakespeare Festival
this summer. As a result
Richard Council, a UF student
was accepted.
Mr. Abel Porkas, a dance
choreographer connected with
Fiddler On The Roof, is here
this week giving a master class
and lecture to dance students on
campus.
STUDENTS RICK Cheatham
and Gary Cheatham are going to
North Carolina summer theatres
this summer. Becky Hoodwin
will go to the Sullivan Playhouse
in Illinois.
My goal is to send these kids
out into the field, Lake said. I
break their illusions in the
theatres by making them work
as hard as I can.
Lake is directing this weeks
Florida Players production of
light Up The Sky by Moss
Hart, tonight and Friday and
Saturday nights in Constans
' Theater.

Sidney Black a Mafia type
in a tuxedo falls into the
mood and trys to out-emote the
professional emoters.
THE PLAY REVOLVES
around these three actors each
trying to keep their head above
the others. Meanwhile, the
playwright gets lost in the
shuffle on opening night.
After the show is over, it
appears that things didnt go as
planned and the three go around
again each blaming the other.
Finally they pin the
responsibility on Peter Slone,
the young playwright.
Disillusioned with false values
of theatre life, Peter leaves town
- before they all find out that
the critics loved the show.
A mad scramble follows to
regain Peters graces and
everyones former spirits,
affected or not.
THE SHOW IS funny (with
some ribald lines) and gives a
sensitive look at the lives of
Theatre People.
Tickets are on sale now at the
Constans Theater box office, 35
cents for students, $1 for high
school students, and $1.50 for
general admission.

If You Want To Be In A C A 1
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I You're HALF PAST-16 /B\\ I
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l|
ft : v
GETTING LIT UP
... Marilyn Wall as Irene Livingston in production

WWf B# Bill, rMnOIAM|Mf f

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator

Southeast Drag Championships Here

Drag racing is felt in the gut.
When those huge 1,500
horsepower fuel dragsters come
to the line with their
earth-shaking brute power and
ear-splitting roar you know they
are there. Your insides vibrate
with the machines.

This kind of excitement is coming to the
Gainesville Dragway this weekend when the
National Hot Rod Association holds one of the five
drag meets for the Southeastern division of the
World Championship Series.
THE WORLD Championship Series is a group of
35 drag races held all over North America to
determine the World Champion Drag Racers. These
35 races are qualifying meets for the World Finals at
Dallas International Motor Speedway Oct. 24-25.
What this means is that this weekends drag meet
will be one of the few times you will see the top
men of drag racing all together to compete. If you
follow drag racing you know this is one of the big
meets in Florida. If you have never seen big time
drag racing this is a great chance.
In simplest terms, a drag race is a contest of
acceleration between two highly-tuned cars and two
skilled men. The main object for each man is to
out-accelerate the other down a quarter-mile road
called a fast path. This is measured in elapsed
time from a standstill until the car crosses the finish
line. A good double-A fuel dragster will travel the
quarter-mile with an elapsed time of about 6.5
seconds at a speed around 230 m.p Ji.
FROM THE GRANDSTANDS it doesnt look
much more difficult than driving your own car, but
it does require a high degree of skill. The place
where a race is won or lost is at the start.
A drag race is started by a Christmas tree. This
is an electronically controlled series of five yellow
lights at the start-line. Each yellow light comes on at
one-second intervals and after the fifth one a green
go light comes on and the race is on.
Skill is needed to pop the clutch between the
time the last yellow light comes on and the green
light follows. A good driver can time this fraction of
IN DISTRICT 111 PLAYOFF

FSU Faces East Carolina

GASTONIA, N. C. Florida
States Gene Ammann and East
Carolinas Ron Hastings are
expected to draw the top billing
when the Seminoles and Pirates
square off in the opening round
of the NCAA District 111
Baseball Tournament, Thursday.
The two junior righthanders
could be the best two pitchers in
the Southeast, judging from
their impressive season records,
and Thursday's opener shapes up
to be a pitching dual.
Hastings, a 6-1, 190 pounder,
from Connelly Springs, N. C.,
has led the Pirates to a 20-11
record and their fourth trip to
the playoffs in the last seven
years.
In 72 innings he has given up
eight runs, 45 hits, walked 18
and struck-out 41 while
compiling an 8-1 record. He has
an 0.38 eamed-run average,
which ranks him second in the
nation.
One area scout calls him, the
best pro prospect in the
country.
Ammann comes into the
tourney with a 12-0 record. In
110 innings he has given up 20

GATOR SPORTS

|tlU<>l(tUllliniHIIIIIIII*)!|llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll|||||UIHIIIIUHIIIIIUIIIIUIIIIIIIUniUIM|
I On Wheels I
iiiimiimiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i y Bo Berry mmml

runs and has an ERA of 0.65.
The Decatur, Ga., native has
fanned 125 and walked 54 while
registering six shutouts this
season.
If both the pitchers are
right, said Seminole Coach Jack
Stallings, I dont guess there
will be many runs scored. We
have a lot of confidence in
Ammann and from what we
have heard, Hastings must really
be a good one.
Florida State brings a 42-7-1
record into the tournament,
their 12th in the last 15 years
along with their nationally third
ranked status.
Among the hitters who will be
challenging Hastings will be

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a second just right and get a jump on his
competitor. This is called a hole shot. If a driver
moves too soon he will get a disqualifying red light.
If he moves too late the other will have the
advantage.
ANOTHER CRUCIAL part of drag racing is the
hours of mechanical work done on the machines.
This is only part of it, attention is also paid to tires,
gears and fuel. You miss a lot of drag racing if you
dont roam through the pits and see the behind the
scene action. You get a closer look at these
machines and their drivers. The machines are
fantastically clean with beautiful paint jobs. The
drivers range from 19- to 54-years-old. These guys
are highly skilled and intelligent. Find out for
yourself. Drivers and mechanics will often talk with
you if they arent working on their cars.
One of the spectacular parts of drag racing is the
burnouts each car does before coming to the
start-line. A burnout is the name of a technique
used to heat up the big rear tires of a dragster and
give it better traction. It is done in a Bleach Box
just before coming to the line. Bleach is poured on a
special area of the pavement and a driver moves his
car over it until his rear tires are sitting in the
puddles. For a brief second the driver pushes on the
power and spins the tires which heats them up. Its
very exciting with the burst of power smoking the
tires and moving the machine 10 to 20 yards.
Drag racing is big and exciting entertainment and
can be enjoyed if you keep in mind all these special
parts of it. Obviously there is more to it, but Ill
leave something for you to discover.
Saturdays eliminations start at 2 p.m. and finals
Sunday begin at 11 a.m. Admission Saturday is $3
and $4 Sunday.

All-America second baseman
candidate Dick Nichols (.371),
shortstop Greg Gromek (341),
third baseman Ron Cash (331)
and outfielder John Grubb
(.300).
The remainder of the
Seminoles starting lineup will
include outfielder Larry Cocks
(.297), catcher Harry Saferight
(.295), outfielder Greg Schnute
(.268), and first baseman Doug
Kasimier (.256).
Joining the Seminoles and
Pirates in the double-elimination
tourney are Maryland and
Mississippi State. They will meet
Thursday night at 8 oclock.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 18

1r :% /^i^Sll^Vi
* j^w|
V/ n "' >/ ;: *- 1 "VjA
80-WmvH
Driver Ray Godman of Memphis, Term., will pilot his 'Tennessee
80-Weevil" in this weekend's District II runoffs in preparation for the
NHRA World Finals at the Gainesville Dragway on a 225 m.p.h. run.
Joggers Do Re-Run

UFs jogging Larry Tuggle has
planned another one-mile run
for Friday at 7 p.m. at Florida
Track and everyone young and
old, male and female is invited
to run for the health of it.
Tuggle said because last
weeks run was so successful,
between 40 and 45 people ran,
he decided to schedule this

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, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 28,1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Fridays run. He said if enough
participants show up there will
be two heats, one for runners
who can run under a 6-minute.,
mile and another for those
running over a 6-minute mile.
He said once again the big
electric timing clock will be used
for all runners to keep their
individual times with over the :
mile.



Baseball Team: The Great Spoiler

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the third of a series that will
review Gator sports in the
1969*70 season with a look at
the prospects for the 1970-71
season.)
By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Writer
The 1970 UF baseball team
will be remembered by most
Gator fans as the spoilers.
The Gators ended the season
with a 27-17 record and a
reputation as the giant killers.
The diamond men started the
season in a mediocre fashion but
then exploded into action after
the Jacksonville University series
on April 7-8.
THE UF dropped the first
game of a two-game series with
Georgia but bombarded the
Bulldogs in a 11-7 slugfest. This
was a sign of things to come.
The UF next nipped Rollins
College 3-2, swept an important
three-game series from Kentucky
behind the tremendous shutout
pitching of Glen Pickren and
Wayne Rogers, and blasted
Rollins again before the crucial
Georgia series on April 24-25.
The Bulldogs invaded
Gainesville only to be soundly
beaten 10-0 and 3-0 by the
repeat shutout performances of
Pickren and Rogers. The two
wins put the Gators in a tie with
Tennessee in the Southeastern
Conference Eastern Division
race. The UF and Tennessee had
identical 9-2 SEC records.
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Then came Miami. The
Hurricanes came blowing into
Gainesville sporting a national
ranking and acting like they
invented the game. But fate had
something else in store as Ole
Albert reared up on his hind legs
and knocked the wind out of
Miamis sails. The Canes were
left breathless after dropping
two games to the UF and
dropping six places in the
national rankings.
WITH THE two wins over
Miami the UF had pushed its
winning streak to eleven in a
row. The UF traveled to Auburn
for an important two-game SEC
series with the Tigers. The UF
won the first game 4-0, but lost
the second in a 3-2 squeaker to
the Tigers. This win provided
little satisfaction for Auburn
after being humiliated earlier in
the season by a 174 loss at the
hands of the Gators.
The loss proved costly for the
UF and timely for Tennessee
who pulled a half game ahead of
Florida in the Eastern Division
race.
The UF knocked off Rollins
on May 6, in a warm-up for the
crucial three-game series with
Tennessee on May 8-9.
IN THE BIG Tennessee series
the UF lost the first game 7-3
but bounced back to win the
second, 7-0, behind the dandy
shutout pitching of Rogers. The
third game turned out to be a
nightmare for the Gators. The
UF was shutout 5-0 to kill any
SEC championship hopes.
After the disappointing loss to
Tennessee the UF proved their
mettle by coming back to beat
the nations number one team,
FSU, in three games of a
five-game series. These wins
toppled FSU from its number
one ranking and ended the
season in fine style for the UF.
The Gators had the satisfaction
in knowing that they were the
only team this year to win its
series against the Seminoles.
Coach Dave Fuller said if
any one thing could be said to
have been the cause of our losses
this year it would have to be
poor hitting in tight situations.
Fuller said that we could have
won the SEC if we had several
hits in the Tennessee series when
we had men on base, and we
could have won that FSU game
that we lost 1-0 if we could have
gotten a hit when we had the
bases loaded.
WE ARE JUST as good as
any team in the nation, and we
proved that, said Fuller.
The UF will lose Tommy
Blankenship, Leon Bloodworth,
Fred .Bretz, James Gruber, Rod
Macon, Ray McHale, Pickren,
Rogers, and Rod Wright to
graduation.
Rogers and Tommy Seybold
were the UFs top pitchers this
year as Rogers ended the season
with an 84 record an a 1.57
earned run average. Seybold
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ended the year with a 6-3 record
and a 2.57 earned run average.
Seybold led all UF pitchers in
strikeouts by fanning 66 men in
77 innings pitched.
The big bats for the Gators
were Tony Dobies and Will
Harman. Dobies had the sixth

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best batting average in the SEC
with a 345. He got 49 hits in
142 attempts and batted in 20
runs. Dobies was tied for second
in the most doubles hit with
teammate Harman. Harman had
the fourteenth best batting
average with a .315, and he

Thuraday, May 28.1970, Tha Florida AMfetor,

swatted 46 hits in an SEC high
of 146 attempts and batted in
19 runs.
Ace pitcher Seybold, Dobies
and Harman will be returning
next year so the Gators hopes
look bright for another good
season.

Page 19



Physicist Uses Math To Aid Duffers

WASHINGTON (UPI) More
than a decade ago a
distinguished physicist looked
over some research results and
came up with advice to baseball
pitchers on how to throw curves.
The important thing, he
said, is the amount of spin.
The greater the RPM
(revolutions per minute), the
wider the curve.
NOW ANOTHER physicist
has some advice for gulfs
duffers on how to improve their
drives.
Shorten your backswing (for
greater accuracy). Uncock, or
flex, your wrists at the last
possible moment (to impart
greater speed directly to the
ball).
The advice to pitchers was
given by the late Lyman J.

/ /7 snoia > shouts

Namath To Play

THE NEW YORK Jets
announced that contrary to
previous reports quarterback Joe
Namath does have an option
contained in his 1971 contract.
It had been announced last
week that there was no option
included, which would have
allowed Namath to become a
free agent if he so desired after
1971.
* *
HANNU MIKKOLA of
Finland and Gunnar Palm of
Sweden finished an hour and 18
minutes ahead of their nearest
rivals Wednesday in their British
Ford Escort to capture first
place in the gruelling
16,000 mile London to Mexico
City World Cup Auto Rally.
* *
PHIL JACKSON who missed
all of last season following spinal
fusion surgery, signed his
contract with the New York
Knickerbockers for the 1970-71
season.
Jackson, a 6-8, 220-pound
forward, injured his back late in
the 1968-69 season and was
operated on in April. Used
mostly as a substitute with the
Knicks, Jackson totaled 795
points for a 6.5 average in his
two NBA seasons.
* *
WILLY SCHAEFFLER; 54, a
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 31 13 .70S
New York 24 21.533 7ft
Detroit 20 20 .500 9
Washington 19 23 .452 11
Boston 18 23.438 11ft
Cleveland 14 25 .378 14ft
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 28 12 .700
California 28 14 .667 1
Oakland 22 21 .512 7ft
Kansas City 17 25 .405 12
Chicago 17 26 .395 12ft
Milwaukee 13 28 .317 15ft
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 22 18 .550
New York 21 21 .500 2
St. Louis 20 20 .500 2
Pittsburgh 21 24 .467 3ft
Philadelphia 17 25 .405 6
Montreal 16 25 .390 6ft
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 32 14 .696
Los Angeles 25
Atlanta 24 18 .571 6
San Francisco 21 24 .467 10ft
Houston 20 25.444 11ft
San Diego 21 28.429 12ft

Briggs, a one-time director of the
National Bureau of Standards,
who had guided much of the
early research on the atomic
bomb.
IN 1959 AT age 84, after a
lifetime of addiction to baseball,
Dr. Briggs embarked on a
research project to determine
what it takes to throw curves.
He used a large air gun to hurl
baseballs at a target 60 feet
away. His research assistant
included manager Cookie
Lavagetto of the old Washington
Senators, pitchers Pedro Ramos
and Camilo Pascual and catcher
Ed Fitzgerald.
Briggs concluded that the
biggest curve a pitcher can hope
to throw is about 17 inches. The
best speed for curve throwing is
100 feet per second, well

native of Kaufbueren, Bavaria,
and head ski coach at the
University of Denver since 1948,
has been named coach of the
U. S. National Ski Team.
Schaeffler will be responsible
for the entire U. S. Alpine Ski
program, including coaching of
the U. S. mens and womens
Alpine Ski Teams.

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within the capacity of a
professional. And the
optimum spin is 1,800 RPM,
which a professional can at
least approach.
THE RECENT advice to
golfers comes from Dr.
Theodore Jorgensen Jr. of the
University of Nebraska. He made
a study of the dynamics of the
golf club swing which he
reported in the American
Journal of Physics.
According to a release by the
American Institute of Physics:
You may not be able to tee off
with a long, straight drive. But
now, thanks to modem physics,
youll know why.
It may be that you are using
far too much backswing and
flexing your wrists all wrong.
INSTEAD OF using living
players, as Briggs did in his
baseball studies, Jorgensen
created a mathematical model of
a golfer. Then he fed it into a
computer.
His research is not yet
complete. But from what the
computer has told him to date,
Jorgensen has concluded that
most golfers would be better off
if they shortened their
backswing a bit and flexed their
wrists a bit later.
Jorgensen compared his
computers notions with a
picture of Bobby Jones swinging
a no. 2 iron. He found an

extremely dose cornelsti cornelstibetween
between cornelstibetween the malliMHilk d
model and real life.
THE PROFICIENT golfer
does a sort of hesitation with his
wrists (says the physical instate
story), uncocking them just as
the clubhead is about to contact
the ball, part of that elusive
quality called timing.
The less proficient golfers
strike the ball with arms and
club along a straight line. The

Cards 1 Coach Denies
Drop-Outs Set Trend
NEW YORK (UPI) Coach Charley Winner of the St. Louis
Cardinals says he wasnt surprised at the action of Dave Meggyesy, but
he doubts this kind of behavior is going to become a trend in
professional football*
The premature retirement of Meggyesy, a 27-year-old linebacker,
was the third such dropout by a pro football player since the end of
last season, and it has stirred up some thought that many other
sensitive-minded youngsters will choose to follow the same course.
DAVE IS a deep thinking boy on the political issues of this
country, and he was apparently very firm in his convictions. He was
determined to try and do something about them. He has quite a bit of
dedication. I would like to say that I respect any individual opinion,
even though I may not happen to agree with it, says Winner.
I doubt if hell get anybody to follow him. Most people have
developed their opinions and ideals by the time they get out of
college, and its not easy to change them, Winner added.
Meggyesys reason for giving up football was that he felt the sport
was wrong. It was too violent, he contended, and it mirrored the
violence of our society. He also felt the notion that football teaches
discipline was a false one.

I, The Florida AMpftor, Thuraday, May 28,1070

Page 20

pro also uses much less
backswing than does the duffer.
The shortened backswing
gives the pro much greater
accuracy at the expense of only
a small reduction in clubhead
speed.
This doesnt mean you have
to be a Ph.D. in physics to be a
great pitcher or golfer. But it
will help you understand why
youre not.