Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Ad AmViMIL

Vol 62, No. 149

Kirk Signs
Bill Banning
Disrupters
By RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff Writar
The Florida Board of Regents
may refuse college entrance to
any person who has been found
guilty of disrupting any
university, college or junior
college.
The senate bill, which was
introduced early last year by
State Senator C. W. Young, was
signed into law by Gov. Claude
Kirk Tuesday morning.
BILL DAVID, Youngs aide,
said the bill was designed to give
the regents the right to refuse'
c o nvicted, traveling agitators
entrance into a Florida
university.
Senator Young is proud of
the way Florida universities have
acted in the past, David said.
He (Young) believes the
majority of Floridas college
students are interested in an
education, David added.
The bill is just trying to
protect the right to an
education, he said.
THE BELL states that the
regents shall take into account
past actions of any person
applying for admission, either as
a new or transfer student, where
such actions have been found to
disrupt or interfere with the
orderly conduct, processes,
functions, or programs of any
university, college or junior
college.
Senate President Jack
Mathews said the bill, which is
labeled The First Campus
Disorder Bill, gave the regents
the power they already had. He
said the regents may set up any
regukftkns or entrance standards
'* V ' ; /' * -.* Vi

The
Florida Alligator

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HERES ALBERT M,KE HENSON
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When Albert the Alligator smiles (?), it's big an expressive mood. Alert Mike Henson snapped the
news. The popular mascot is seldom caught in such resplendent reptile.
RELAX POT LAWS
SDS Recognition Asked

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Student government
leaders from several Florida campuses told
lawmakers Tuesday the state should allow formal
recognition of Students for a Democratic Society
(SDS) and relax anti-marijuana laws.
(Student Body Vice President Henry Solates was
on his way back from Tallahassee and could not be
reached to discuss UF students suggestions on these
matters.)
CHUCK SHERMAN, president of the Florida
State University student body, said the Board of
Regents policy against recognition of SDS and
other radical groups will not stop campus disorders.
He also said the universities have no right to
suspend students accused of drug possession before
their trials.
Sherman, speaking at a joint meeting of the
House and Senate Higher Education Committees in
the Senate Chamber, said, M I don't think there is
aayneed for any more campus unrest legislation

APARTMENTS, INFLATION CITED

(EDITOR S NOTE: This is the second part in a
three part series by Alligator staff writer Les
Gardieff, investigating problems facing the fraternal
organizations. The third part of this series will cover
die sororities on campus.)
By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
Involvement and independence are the two key
words fraternity leaders use in discussing the
survival of the UF greek system.
They are acutely aware fraternal organizations
have withered in areas where they failed to accept a
leadership role when student attitudes altered in
favor of more active participation in social problems
and condemnation of conformity and pretentions to
status.
AS A RESULT when fraternity leaders talk about
the survival of the UF greek system they usually
emphasize the steps they are making to keep pace
with the rapid social changes occuring in their
environment.
But there are, they freely admit, other more
immediate and more pressing problems confronting

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

Frats Face Money Problems

all state-supported colleges and universities.
ITS JUST not practical because a group of
students can get together anytime and call
themselves anything they want, he said. If they
cant get a campus meeting room, they can sit out
on the grass.
Sherman also said denying recognition to radical
groups arouses sympathy for them among moderate
students and you give them a forum that the
Florida Legislature apparently doesnt want them to
have.
In a show of hands requested by Rep. Leonard V.
Wood, R-Oriando, the student government leaders
agreed 194 that marijuana laws are too harsh.
BUT THEY ALSO voted overwhelmingly against
legalizing LSD or addictive drugs such as heroin.
It appears that the overwhelming feeling is that
marijuana, at least, should be legalized, said Sen.
Robert Htverfield, D-Migim, chairman of the
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individual houses and, sometimes, the entire UF
system.
Most of these problems are financial and stem,
according to Interfratemity Council (IFC) President
Charles Brackins, from inflation and the new
apartment complexes springing up near campus.
THE SINGLE most serious problem facing
fraternities as a system at the present moment is not
ideological, that is that freshmen think its childish,
but simply that most kids would rather live in the
nice, new apartments, Brackins said.
According to Brackins, a large percentage of
brothers desert their houses for the apartments
upon achieving upperclassman status. This denies a
house income not only from rent but often meals
and in may cases dues as well.
Most fraternities will allow seniors to become
inactive. As a rough guess I would say about 60 per
cent of all seniors become inactive or semi-active
and about 40 per cent of these just forget their
house completely, Brackins said.
HAVING A large sleeping capacity is getting to
be a drag, he added.
Most of the houses on campus doing well
(SEE 'CHANGE' PAGE 2)

\ J
\ t y

Wednesday, May 27, 1970

Frosh Coed
Curfew Will
Be Dropped
By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Curfew for freshmen women
will be discontinued as of the
beginning of next quarter,
Clifton Oliver Jr., chairman of
the Committee on Student
Housing, said Tuesday.
The Interhall Council and
Committee on Student Housing
recommended this action after
detailed study. The
recommendation has been
approved by Dr. Lester L. Hale,
vice president for Student
Affairs.
THE PARENTS of entering
freshmen will be notified of the
change in policy.
To provide for the security of
residents, entrance doors to
residence halls will continue to
be locked at midnight on
weeknights and 2 am. on Friday
and Saturday nights.
After these hours residents
may enter their buildings at the
main doorway with the
assistance of the night clerk on
duty.
Recommendations to
(SEE 'COED'PAGE 2)
OMICRON DELTA Kappa,
national leadership society,
may let women in by spring
of 1971 page 2
CMM 12
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. * 4 . . ' i * v



:, The Florida AHigitbr, Wednesday, May 27,1970

Page 2

v u m
v||
GENE FARMER
WET AND WILD
What's better than a cool ride on a salty surf? Try a cool ride on a surf board on a river current.
Change Seen In Frats

jfIFROM PA6E ONeJ
financially are those which have had good rushes the
past few years and now have a large sophomore class
which can be made to live in the house.
Allen Levi, president of Pi Lambda Phi, said his
house was financially well off because it has a very
large pledge class waiting to get into the house, so
much so that a priority system favoring lower
classmen had to be established.
THE TROUBLE is when you dont have enough
pledges. Once a person moves off campus its hard
to draw him back, Levi said.
A Pi Lam brother added, You have to offer
something really extra to draw people back. You
don't have to be in a fraternity to have an active
social life anymore.
Sigma Chi President Ken Driggs said his house
was fortunate to get a large number of junior college
transfers who for some reason prefer to live on
campus.
I THINK WE attract junior college people
because we have a more serious pledge^program.
Hazing doesnt appeal to them, Driggs said.
He added having the house full has helped to pull
it out of the red.
An additional point Levi noted is the big houses
keep growing while the smaller ones keep shrinking.
JIM WALLACE, former president of Beta Theta
Pi, one of the smaller houses, said his chapter has
been losing 5-7 members every year.
In the last four years our pledge class has
steadily shrunk from 52 to 32, he said.
According to Wallace the drop in new pledges has
hurt the chapter sufficiently to raise the question of
closing the house in the near future.
I THINK YOU have to admit fraternities are on
the way out here just like anywhere else. Kids today
just dont want the financial problems that go with
fraternities. They have found too many other good
things to spend their money on, he ventured.
Fraternities are also being hurt financially by
inflation.
Houses are going to have to improve their
management billing and like that, Brackins said.
ACCORDING TO Dr. Irving Goffman, an
economics professor and former adviser to
fraternities, the monetary difficulties of fraternities

3 passport photos 3.50
SNEERINGER PHOTOGRAPHY
1013% W. Univ. Ave. 378-1170
ViiO'

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June. July and August wherf it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601,, The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601. J
Subscription rate is SIQ.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Fjprlda Alligator will not be, responsible for
more tha#. Jq*Brt*on *pf an advertisement scheduled* to fun
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insartltin * < > . i. >maeeienmnww

FREDRICK
GARDENS
. . HOU l( u> 1110
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave

can be seen more clearly by examining the four
main determinants of a houses financial stability:
size of the pledge class;
number of members remaining active;
efficiency of bill collections; and
prices charged for food and other services;
THE IMPORTANCE of a large pledge class has
already been pointed out above.
According to Brackins, fraternities have been able
to recruit as great a percentage of freshmen as
always but are being hurt by the increasing number
of junior college transfers coming here as UF
becomes more and more an upper division
university.
UF fraternities will have to change to appeal to
this group or be prepared to face the consequences,
Brackins said.
A SIMILAR appeal will be needed to keep juniors
and seniors active.
According to Goffman,'A great number of juniors
and seniors leave to live in apartments. Usually they
never come back, and if they don't come back there
is no reason for them to pay dues.
Fraternities are becoming two-year propositions
and I think they ought to conceive of themselves in
that way, he added.
ON HIS LAST two points Goffman felt
fraternities were in trouble in most cases because of
poor management.
MANY FRATERNITY presidents agree in large
part with Goffmans conclusions.
Recently Steve Kobetz, who was then president
of Tau Epsilon Phi, closed his houses kitchen for
two days to remind members to pay their bills.
THE MOST DRAMATIC change Goffman forsees
is real social involvement and I mean more than
just painting a church.
Other changes he predicts include fraternities
going coeducational in the near future to compete
with apartments, less emphasis on the concept of
life-long bonds of brotherhood and within three
or four years some of the major houses ending
their participation in intramurals to become
involved in other things.
Most fraternity men believe their system has
already made long strides in changing its nature.
Almost as many, however, believe sororities are
lagging behind.

GOOD WEDNESDAY ONLY
( Kentucky pried Chicken I
-214 N.W. 13th St. m
m 376-6472 114 S.W. 34th St.
A 372-3649 V
I dinner QQA j
I BOX Wy I
I 3 Pc. Chicken
I Mashed Potatoes 1.25 S

Nixon Congress
Allies Blasted

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Senate Democratic leader Mike
Mansfield, upset by the
time-consuming tactics of
administration allies, told his
colleagues Tuesday they would
each carry a share of the blame
for the war in Southeast Asia to
their graves.
Decrying dilly-dallying
after the first vote in the
weeks-long debate over use of
U. S. troops in Cambodia,
Mansfield waved a list of U. S.
war casualties at members for a
second day in a row and urged
them to take steps to limit the
conflict and bring it to an end.
THE VOTE -an2to 11 roll
call was to soften language of
a pending amendment to show
that the Senate does not
mistrust President Nixon to keep
his June 30 cutoff date for U. S.
U.S. Going
To Sex, Pot
- Graham
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (UPI)
Evangelist Billy Graham told a
youthful audience of 52,000
Monday night that overemphasis
on sex is destroying the United
States.
No nation ever lived in the
sexual gutter like we have and
gotten away with it, said
Graham. The moral problem
can threaten the security of the
nation.
Take the twin problems of
pornography and drugs and
another five years, and weve
had it, in my opinion, he told
his audience.

Coed Curfew Ends

Erom page j|
eliminate curfew hours were
made because students were
increasingly mature, the
committee said.
MANY HAVE been given
much discretion by parents in
ordering their personal and
social behavior.

THE QUARTERLY IS HERE!

Cambodian operations.
Both sides agreed that the
amendment was inconsequential.
It declared that the pending
antiwar measure sponsored by
Sens. Frank Church, D-Idaho,
and John Sherman Cooper,
R-Ky., was in concern with
declared objectives of the
President to avoid the
involvement of the United States
in Cambodia after July 1,
1970.
ADMINISTRATION allies
stepped up immediately with
another amendment this one
sponsored by Sen. Robert Dole,
R-Kan. and served notice they
would debate it extensively.
After that, a half-dozen more
amendments will be ready to be
considered. And more may be
introduced when these run out.
Senate Republican leader
Hugh Scott said he would be
pleased if the final vote is
delayed until after U. S. troops
are withdrawn from Cambodia.
Since the primary purpose of
the measure is to hold Nixon to
his promise of a quick end to the
Cambodian affair, the
amendment then would be
largely moot.
Admissions
Screened
jjFROM PASE^I
they want. He said the bill was
just letting off steam.
Matthews said the bill was
softened and amended before
it passed the legislature.
David said the bill sets up a
guideline for the regents to
follow.

Responsibility for personal
conduct is an important
educational objective, the
report stated.
The UFs expectation is that
both men and women freshmen
students will establish and
maintain, on a voluntary basis,
reasonable hours for rest and
study which are important
elements of academic success,
the committee said.



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JANIS JOPLIN
... appears Friday
Tiny Janis Joplin
Is Blues Queen
Janis Joplin exploded on the national scene in the summer of 1967
at the Monterey Pop Festival when, feet slightly apart and hair
streaming in the wind, she tensed her slight body as for a high jump,
seized the microphone and split the air into shockwaves with the first
notes that bolted from her astounding throat.
The following February, Janis hit New York and the Eastern
seaboard for the first time,bursting through the usual complacency of
East Coast audiences and critics with the charged force of a starburst.
A year later, Janis performed in New York with her new band, a
seven piece back-up group which she formed after leaving Big Brother
in December.
Port Authur, Texas, where Janis was bom, is an oil-refinery town
populated by some 60,000 middle-income-bracket people who like
their drive-in movies, corner drug stores and
get-married-to-the-guy-next-door way of life left undisturbed. Janis
began bucking like a wild colt when she was about fourteen.
I WAS A sensitive child, she recalls. 1 had a lot of hurts and
confusions. You know, its hard when youre a kid to be different.
Youre all full of things, and you dont know what its about.
When she was 17, Janis ran away: Houston, Venice Beach, San
Francisco, Austin, anyplace. She dropped in and out of four colleges,
worked a little and drew unemployment a lot. Somewhere along the
line, she began to sing.
Janis Joplin will be appearing at Spring Frolics Friday on Florida
Field at 8 pm. The tickets are $5.50 a couple and $3 single. Aso
appearing are the Rotary Connection.

ftSlk Don't miss An Arby'S & A Shake
Just. South of the Underpass

ODK May Tap Women
By Spring Quarter 1971

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Women may be tapped for Omicron Delta Kappa
(ODK) national leadership fraternity by spring
quarter, 1971, according to President Ralph
Glatfleter.
UFs ODK circle voted overwhelmingly to
present a resolution to the national convention
which would allow women to be accepted into the
organization, Glatfelter said. The national
organization is now limited to men.
BUT REACTION at the convention was
extremely favorable to the ides, he said.
The resolution contained three main points:
women have attained equal status and rights
under the law and in reality,
women on campus deserve recognition for
what they have done and achieved at UF,
sex should be no criteria for membership in
ODK.
The resolution contained a clause which asked
that a national commission be set up to look into

I tt moves with fast and bold I
I private world that features IV fl Qv \ 1
I INDIVIDUAL, PRIVATE S/ V 1
I BEDROOMS. Just two blocks \ | V '\P I
I September. Or stay the entire j) I\\ 111 I
summer at our special rate of vj // I \\i l \ l\\V
I 914 SW Bth Ave. Ave 378-7224 C \ J |

Wednesday, May 27,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

the question. They are to make their
recommendation in January 1971, Glatfleter said.
MY FEELING IS that the national convention
will, and should, change the constitution to allow
women to be honored by membership in ODK.
There is no question that women deserve this honor
- that women on this campus should be admitted
to ODK. There is absolutely no reason an honorary
should be discriminatory.
Glatfelter said the purpose of an honorary is to
honor people who have shown outstanding
leadership.
Leadership should be exclusive of sex, he said.
GLATFELTER SAID he intends to work during
his term of office to make sure women will be
admitted to ODK.
ODK taps in five areas. They are: publications;
scholarship; athletics; student government; social
and religious, and fine arts, drama and speech.
To be eligible for tapping, a person must be in the
top 35 per cent of his college and be an
upperclassman.

Page 3



Page 4

L Thf Florida AUigator, Wadnaaday. May 27,1*70

.
jMHrf 1' *'... W x grj
H I*
TOM KENNEDY
PENNIES FOR POLLUTION

And down they go. Pi Kappa Phi brothers collect
"Pennies for Pollution." During the week-long
campaign, the brothers plan to collect as many

SEPUL Spokesman Reports
OConnell f eceptive Os Plan

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
Mel Pearlman, spokesman for
Students for Equal Protection
Under the Law, said Monday
night UF President Stephen C.
OConnell had been receptive
of the idea of keeping the UF
open.
Ken Hart, ILW, head of the
Refund Committee of SEPUL
said that if the administration
does not respond to the petition,
the organization would have to
seek legal action.
HART SAID if the UF is
closed because of a strike, the
group will seek an injunction to
keep it open.
Wayne Carrol (chairman of
SEPULs Legal Action
Committee) has been in contact
with the University of Miami
students who got the injunction
to keep the university open,
Hart said. At the same time he
said the circumstances are
different with the UF the UM
is a private institution.
Pearlman said the issues and
programs committee of SEPUL
is sponsoring a debate Thursday
night at 8 pm. in room 349 of
MmwMitwm
tht wrote*
IM2W.UMV.AVE. v*
jgwMwytfriflvinu,

the Reitz Union.
THE PROGRAM, according
to Pearlman, will have speakers
with different points of view,
and the title of the debate will
be Indochina, Where Do We Go
from Here. He said the speakers
will answer questions from the
audience.
Bill de Arteaga, coordinator

No Exams Next Week
No exams will be scheduled for next week, according to the
Department of Academic Affairs.
Class instructors may not assign exams, quizzes, projects, papers,
take-home exams not due prior to the regular examination period,
said Laura Stewart, a secretary in the office of academic affairs.
This doesnt mean that work previously assigned cant be due next
week, she added.
No Ten-Wheel Drive
The Ten-Wheel Drive will not be performing at the Pi Lambda Phi
Come Together Day May 31 as was previously reported in the
Alligator.

j WANT TO BE A 8.M.0.C.? I
WHO IS A BIGGER MAN ON CAMPUS THAN
THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR?
The UF Board of Student Publications
is accepting applications from
interested students for Term IV (SUMMER)
Editor and Managing Editor and for
Term I (FALL, 1970) and Term II
(WINTER, 1971) Editor and Managing
Editor positions.
I Application forms are available in Room 330, J. Wayne Reitz Union
Applicant mutt return an original plus two clean copies of his
application to Room 330, J. Wayne Reitz Union by 5 PV ttnrZJ
Board will meat at 2:30 PM, Friday, Vay 29 to interview all applicants. fj
Bom j ' 1 .J3VA Vlt2l97t*lU o . t M

pennies as possible from UF students. These pennies
will be donated to the Balance Fund Foundation.

for a group he called
Coalition, also spoke at the
meeting. He said he represents
students concerned with the
violent Left in the UF campus
and in the United States.
k
Our image is created for
what we do, de Arteaga said,
not what we call ourselves.

Uhlfelder Says
Letter Not Facts
By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder said Tuesday the person
had his facts wrong in a letter calling for his impeachment in
Mondays Alligator.
I dont mind people criticizing me or my actions but this person
had his facts wrong, Uhlfelder said.
THE LETTER claimed Uhlfelder represents only a small portion of
the student body in endorsement of most of his actions.
I feel I have an obligation to represent the students as best as
possible. I cant take a poll on every issue before I make my decision,
he said.
Uhlfelder pointed out that in past years, one of the major problems
for students has been that Student Government (SG) has been merely
a subsidiary of Tigert Hall policies.
I PLAN TO continue to take strong stands on issues. I am not
going to be a neutral president, Uhlfelder explained. Students have
a right to criticize and suggest, and I will listen to anyone with this
desire.
In considering endorsement to his policies, Uhlfelder said it is not
necessary to receive word from 10,001 students before he makes a
move.
I think its more important to take a stand to get people involved.
And if people disagree with something I do, at least they will be*
motivated to come out and state their view.
UHLFELDER CONSIDERS it his responsibility to represent the
student interest, be it in agreement or disagreement with the
faculty and administration.
Uhlfelder again spoke out against the method in which
entertainment has been brought to the UF campus.
I personally had nothing to do with the Super Show, he said. If
I had been president at the time those contracts and agreements were
made, there would never have been so many groups booked.
Uhlfelder plans to limit future shows from making
overexpenditures in funding for entertainment.
I LIFE GUARDS .. I
GATE GUARDS. .
I Needed for Camp Wauburg, immediately!
I For information call Mr. Scott I
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r STCfIK SHfIKC "!
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Our Regular 93< Steak burger
Luncheon And Any 15C Drink
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[J6IO S3N. 13th St. Gainesville^



Angelo To Speak
At JM Banquet

Managing editor of the
Detroit Free Press Frank Angelo
will be the guest speaker at the
UF College of Journalism and
Communications awards
banquet Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
at the Holiday Inn at 1-75.
Angelo is national president
of Sigma Delta Chi, journalism
honorary, a member of the
Detroit Press Club Board of
Directors and vice president of
the Detroit Press Club
Foundation.
THE STUDENT chapter of
Sigma Delta Chi will present its
award to the most outstanding
male graduate. The womens
counterpart, Theta Sigma Pi, will
give the Pica Award to the

.w;v.vw.

Programs Help Marriages
Beyond Molds And Images

Two programs, designed to move married
couples beyond the molds and images they are
locked in, will be offered during the Summer
and Fall quarters by the Marriage and College
Life Project, says Dr. Carl Clarke, projects
director.
Staff, faculty as well as the 3,600 married
student couples at the UF are welcome to
participate in the program without charge.
ACCORDING TO a statement issued by the
project, Even those who have basically happy,
sound marriages may not be really aware of one
another and your potentialities as a couple.
Sometimes you need to replace what is being
taken for granted with genuine feelings.
The programs, marital enrichment groups and
intimacy encounters, will be conducted in
conjunction with a series of tests. Before and
after the programs are administered, confidential
surveys will be employed to gauge the
effectiveness of the exercises and will be
incorporated into a body of research done by
Clarke on married couples.
THE INTIMACY encounters will be
conducted in the privacy of the couples home,
Clarke said, using tapes and other materials for

Student Gets Grant
A UF graduate student is one of three in the nation to receive the
first annual $5,000 Proctor and Gamble Fellowship, awarded by the
Division of the Analytical Chemistry, American Chemical Society.
Robert L. Wade, a doctoral student in analytical chemistry here, is
the recipient of the award for stipend, travel and equipment.
WADE, A NATIVE of Athens, Ga., took his bachelor's and masters
degrees in chemistry at the University of Georgia. At UF he is doing
research in chromatography, a separation technique for gases or other
mixtures with many components.
Wade, 30, hopes to finish his degree in June 1971. He is a veteran
of the U. S. Air Force and taught chemistry from 1964 t 01967 at the
Air Force Academy.
He eventually plans to go into analytical chemistry, research and
development in industry.

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outstanding female graduate.
The Emig Award, named for
the late Elmer Emig, long-time
director of journalism studies,
will go to the journalism student
with the highest academic
average.
Other professional
organizations, including the
Public Relations Student Society
of America and Alpha Delta
Sigma advertising society, will
award students in their
respective fields.
Also scheduled for
recognition are winners in the
Hearst writing competition who

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guidance. They contain a series of private
exercises to get better acquainted through
meditation and sharing, massaging and relating
parts of the body painted on mosaics to the
emotions they inspire.
The five tapes are two hours long and are
accompanied by written directions.
The marital enrichment groups are directed by
graduate students trained by Clarke to lead five
couples through seven sessions. They are
designed to generate emotions by discussing
topics that couples very often neglect to talk to
each other about and to give each other
feedback says Clarke.
A SERIES OF exercises serve initially to bring
out what each member likes about his partner
and his marriage. The sessions are not group
therapy Eutic or counseling in nature, Clarke
said.
Instead, they put emphasis on marriage as a
growth experience in which couples gain from
the experiences of others.
The summer groups will form during the last
week of June. Additional information is available
by calling 392-1590.

FRANK ANGELO
... banquet speaker
gained the UF first place in the
national contest this year.
Some 20 Florida
newspapermen participating in a
campus seminar are expected to
attend the event as guests of the
college.

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UF Students Form
Lindsay Group
By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
With the major polls showing New York Mayor John Lindsay as a
possible presidential candidate, a group of UF students have started
Citizens for Lindsay.
The Harris poll shows the New York mayor splitting the number
one spot with Maine Senator Edmund Muskie in Democratic party
popularity 26 per cent of democrats under 30 polled.
LINDSAY, according to the same poll, is shown as the third choice
overall of democrats.
Sidney Bertish, a recent UF graduate, is the chairman for the group.
He has already written to Lindsay inviting him to speak at the UF
next fall.
We are working on the assumption Lindsay wants to be
president, said Jim Salhany, member of the pro-Lindsay group.
BERTISH SAID the group hopes to help form support in the
southern campuses for Lindsay.
I feel he has been courageous; he is a viable candidate, Bertish
said. The fact is he has survive!! two tough elections in New York He
had to fight his own party.
Salhaney said Lindsay has proven his ability to unite minorities
with different ideas, and that he is what this country needs.
BERTISH SAID another reason he supports Lindsay if he decides
to run is that he can work within the system.
The group is now small, 10 or IS members, according to Bertish,
but they have already started to work. The group has opened a bank
account in the name of Citizen Lindsay, to set up a fund to support
a Lindsay for President campaign.
Bertish said there is room for men with progressive social
economic ideas, and against the war. Lindsay, he said, has been
consistent in his ideas. The issues on which Lindsay won in New
York were national issues, issues that are facing the country now.
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Wednesday, May 77. 1970, The FforMe AMgetor,

Page 5



Page 6

i, the Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 27,1970

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Census Gets Greeks
Representatives from the U. S. Census Bureau are on campus this
week to re-check the information needed from students living m
sorority and fraternity houses.
Elmer Horne and Bob Cunningham of the Bureaus
office will visit each greek house during the week, Mkiag for a
complete roster of members.
THEY WILL then check the roster against forms turned in at the
beginning of the head count last month.
Home said the bureau will need birth date, race and marital status
of those members not previously enumerated.
Messages regarding the census will be handled through the Office
for Student Development, phone 392-1261.
GSA Post For Student
UF law student, John Ingle, has been selected as a summer intern
with General Services Administration (GSA) in Washington.
Ingle received his appointment under President Richard Nixons
summer intern program to involve young people in the process of
government.
CURRENTLY COMPLETING his second year of post-graduate
study in law, Ingle will spend his summer working in the Office of
General Counsel in GSA. It is the arm of the government headed by
Administrator Robert L. Kunzig.
Ingle majored in political science at the University of the South in
Sewanee, Tenn. After one year attending UF law school, he spent
three years in the Navy, and then returned to his post-graduate
studies.
The summer intern program was outlined by Nixon in his
memorandum oii March 30,1970.

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Southeast Auditorium
(Formerly Lincoln AudJ
Tickets on 8ele: Record Bar,
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UFs Lake Alice 'Coming Back To Life

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OXYGEN PLENTIFUL FOR GATORS, FISH

Lake Alice cleanup crew
makes their point, as the
hyacHrihs slowly disappear.
Alligators are looking the lake
over, according to reports.
PHOTOS BY PHIL BANNISTER

Uhlfelder Debuts In Concert

Student Body President Steve
Uhlfelder will star as the guest
artist with'UF Concert Band
tonight in the twilight concert
on the University Auditorium
lawn at 6:45.
Uhlfelder will play the
glockenspiel, or bells, in a
number entitled Guest Artist
by UF Director of Bands
Richard Bowles. The piece was

WHATS HAPPENING

THEOLOGUE THING:
Dialogue with a Theologue
tonight in room 122 of the Reitz
Union. Protestant, Catholic and
Jewish Views of Abortion.
PENNIES EVERYWHERE:
Phi Kappa Pi brothers will be
collecting pennies Thursday
again. Save your spare pennies.
VESPERS CONCERT: The
Music Department presents a
Twilight Concert. At the
University Auditorium lawn
tonnight at 8:15.
MAYOR ISSUE: Citizens for
Lindsay meet at 8 pjn.
Thursday at 1523 NW 1 Place.
FROM UNDER: The Florida
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Jacksonville
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By JANE BEVERIDGE
Alligator Correspondent
Lake Alice is coming back to life after last weekends clean-up ad
Don Goodman, 7AS, describes the sight as a very satisfying feeling.
Goodman said the job of clearing out the hyacinths is more than
half-finished after the help of the 150 students who came last
weekend.
NOW THAT the hyacinths arent absorbing all of the oxygen, fish
and alligators can once again inhabit the lake.
Goodman said he saw four alligators while just looking around
by the west end of the lake Sunday
This is the way it (the lake) once was, said Goodman.
STUDENTS ARE concerned about the lake because it is the only
natural recreation area within walking distance, he said.
Buck Johnson, a local contractor, is providing the cranes to remove
the hyacinths. He has been working at the lake during the week, as
well as on weekends.
The greatest concentration of plants is on the deep end of Lake
Alice, the western area. Goodman said he hopes that this area will be
cleared by the end of next weekend.
THE EASTERN end is quite shallow and they are not going to
work on it until the pollution problem is overcome, he said.
Until that time, a fence will be erected between the eastern and
western end so that the hyacinths do not spread to the cleared area.
In addition, the UF Plants and Grounds Department has offered to
provide two men to work full-time to control hyacinth growth.
Next weekend will be another major clean-up, and student help is
greatly needed, Goodman said.

last performed by UF President
J. Wayne Reitz.
The guest clarinetist, Ron
Sarjeant, will play Webers
Concertino for Clarinet with
the band. Saijeant is a senior
from Florida A&M interning in
instrumental music at Bucholz
Junior High School.
The majority of the concert
will consist of music by UF
conductors. Music by UF faculty

Speleological society meets
today at 7 pjn. in room 362 of
the Union. Officers will be
elected.

M ; SB
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members, Richard Bowles, Reid
Poole, and Russell Danburg,will
be performed.
Associate Director Robert
Foster will conduct.
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Conservation '7os Package Passes

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A package of conservation
70s legislation, including a key measure banning coastal
construction closer than 50 feet to the shoreline, passed
the senate Tuesday in what Sen. Warren Henderson called
a most meaningful session.
Although several of the bills were watered down after
passing the house, the Senates Mr. Conservation said
they are still worthwhile and preserve the key provisions
for protection of the public interest.
HE ALSO DISCLOSED in an interview that a
compromise has been worked out for passage later this
week of a major bill that would write into the
constitution a requirement that the cabinet make no
further sales of submerged lands unless it is proven to be
in the public interest.
Henderson said Rep. John R. Middlemas, D-Panama
City, who passed the amendment through the house to
apply both to sale and use of these lands, had agreed to
the compromise applying it only to sales.
It would still permit dredging, filling and use of lands,
already privately owned or leased from the state, when
shown to be not contrary to the public interest but
subject to requirements of the existing Randall Act

Political Climate In U. 5.
Precludes Laotion Invasion

SAIGON (UPI) Official
U. S. sources said Tuesday Allied
forces would not cross the
Laotian border as they did into
Cambodia because of the
political climate in the United
States and the advant of the
monsoon rainy season in
Indochina.
The report came as military
communiques showed that
Communist forces, stiffening
their resistance against U. S.
operations in Cambodia, had
killed at least 27 U. S. soldiers
and wounded 66 others in six
ground battles since last Friday.
IN THE LATEST assault,
Communist infantrymen firing
rocket grenades and automatic
weapons attacked a U. S. 25th
Division encampment seven
miles inside Cambodia Tuesday,
killing six Americans and
wounding 25.
Diplomatic sources in Saigon
said American commanders in
Vietnam were convinced that
any ground thrust into Laos
would cause public criticism in
the United States nullifying the
effects of any ground attacks on
Communist sanctuaries in that
country.
In addition, official sources
said, heavy rains in the monsoon
season would make action along
the Communists Ho Chi Minh
supply trail through Laos almost
impossible for six months,
stalling ground operations
making close air support nearly
impossible.
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IN SAIGON, the South
Vietnamese army announced it
had ended two of its strikes into
Cambodia and withdrawn more
than 16,000 troops in moves
that cut government forces
operating in Cambodia to about
30,000 men.
In Washington the Senate
Tuesday overwhelmingly
declared itself to be in concert
with President Nixons decision
to withdraw from Cambodia by
June 30.
Members approved an
amendment declaring that
pending legislation to cut off
funds for the war was in
concert with the declared
objectives of the President to
avoid the involvement of the
United States in Cambodia after
July 1,1970.
BOTH SUPPORTERS and
opponents of the antiwar
measure agreed that the new
language was legally
inconsequential and was only a
cosmetic to demonstrate that
the Senate was not distrustful of
the President.
Sen. John Sherman Cooper,
R-Ky., one of the sponsors of
the measure, took sharp issue
with a colleague who made that
claim.
The amendment was adopted
82-11.
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FOR PROTECTION OF PUBLIC INTEREST

providing for studies and other restrictions to conserve
public lands for public use.
THERE IS A BIG difference, he said, between proving
sale of public land is in the public interest as required
by the proposed law and proving that it is not contrary
to public interest as provided in present law.
One of the three measures passed Tuesday was not
changed, so goes straight to the governors office.
It requires construction permits to dredge inside or
outside the bulkhead line, clarifying existing law which
Henderson said permits numerous exceptions. Before
passage, a proposed amendment by Sen. Lee Weissenbom,
D-Miami, to set the statewide bulkhead line at the mean

high tide, was withdrawn as too controversial.
HENDERSON, A Venice Republican and member of
the C-70s citizens organization for conservation, said it
will be offered in a separate bill.
The most meaningful bill passed Tuesday, even with the
amendments, is the one requiring a 50-foot setback on
coastal structures, he said.
The senate took off a house provision that also
prohibited buildings on lands of an elevation lower than
three feet, but Henderson said that was aimed at

GEORGE W. BALL, former
No. 2 man in the State
Department, testified at House
hearing that increased U. S.
entanglement in the gluepot of
Southeast Asia had encouraged
Russia to build up its strength in
the Mideast.
Cooper told Senate GOP Whip
Robert P. Griffin of Michigan
that it was a disservice to the
country for foes to say the plan
to cut off funds would aid the
enemy.
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protecting people against themselves, rather than
preventing erosion or protecting the public resources.
SO IT WILL still let people do things wrong and build
too low on lands that can be easily inundated by high
tides/ 1 he said, but the setback requirements will keep
buildings off the sand dunes and remove one of the major
causes of beach erosion, he added.
The senate also passed and returned to the house a bill
requiring the affirmative vote of five of the seven
members of the Cabinet to waive ecological or biological
surveys prior to sale or lease of sovereignty lands.
The house version flatly prohibited waiver, which now
can be done by three of the seven members.
THE AMENDMENT WAS a compromise with senators
who wanted to leave the present law intact.
Henderson said he considers that the senate has
produced a far better work product than the house on
conservation legislation despite amendments, and he said
people who claim otherwise are not reading the results
right.
Over the weekend, C-70s director Loring Lovell was
quoted as criticizing the senate leadership for inaction on
the massive conservation program.

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Wdiwdiy, May 27.1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, Ttw Florida Alligator, Wadrmday, May 27,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

'Sjw v . y
~~ I#i glad "those students are on ovrsidc.
Plagiarism Charged

WASHINGTON The man President Nixon has
appointed to head the embattled Bureau of Mines
was rejected for the same job five years ago because
of an FBI report that there may have been
plagiarism in his doctoral thesis.
The nominee, Professor J. Richard Lucas of
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, was among several
candidates considered for the Bureau of Mines hot
seat by the Johnson administration in 1965.
This column has learned that Lucas was at the
point of being selected when the FBI report came
in, containing charges based on interviews with
professors that Lucas had copied part of the work
on his doctoral thesis. His name then was quietly
dropped from consideration.
Lucas obtained his doctorate from Columbia
University in 1965 with a thesis astutely challenging
the notion that atomic energy was about to become
the nations main source of electric power, thus
eliminating coal as a major fuel.
White House aide Harry Fleming confirmed that
the charge of plagiarism appeared in the earlier FBI
report, but he said a more thorough FBI
investigation had persuaded the Nixon
administration the charge was unfounded.
A gentle, sensitive man, Lucas is understood to
have received strong support from segments of the
coal industry, including the massive Island Creek
Coal Company.
Coal officials have been saying privately that they
hoped the rugged, pressure-packed job would go to
a soft-touch, not to a man who might enforce the
tough new federal mine health and safety laws too
vigorously.
#
rtn a telephone interview with my associate, Brit
Hume, Lucas broke down and wept when informed
about the plagiarism allegation. I think you can
destroy this appointment, he said, his voice
choking. There is a career at stake here ... Youve
put me through an emotional crisis.
The professor said he had no idea where the
plagiarism charge, which he vigorously denied, could
have come from.
The soft-spoken Lucas expressed strong
identification with the coal industry with which he
has been associated all his life.
The industry has many problems, he said in a
voice filled with emotion, and many people dont
understand them... We know the problems and
can intuitively sense them. We have devoted a career
to it.
Lucass appointment was pushed by Virginias
new Republican governor, Unwood Holton, and
Congressman Richard Poss, also a Republican, from
the southwestern Virginia district where Lucas lives.
The selection was made over the opposition of
Hollis Dole, the Interior Departments Assistant
Secretary for Mineral Resources, who will be Lucas
immediate superior. Dole was supporting another
better Ui
. the height offtipgilfcj
of the nevgd&jyge

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors

Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Merry-Go-Round
miiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiHiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiHiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiyyiiuiiiiiiiuttH
nniiiiimmmiimmmimmmmmmmmmmmmmimmmivniimmiiiuHivinnii
by Jack Anderson
health and safety law. Coal company officials have
complained bitterly that the law is unreasonable and
will have a disastrous effect on the industry.
But several coal-state Congressmen, notably West
Virginias Ken Hechler, have charged repeatedly that
the Interior Department is deliberately dragging its
feet on implementing the new law.
Lucass appointment follows the ouster of former
mines bureau chief John F. OLeary, an
exceptionally able career government man, who had
earned the reputation as the first tough enforcer of
mine health and safety regulations in the bureaus
history.
* *
President Nixon has tipped off intimates that
sometime between June 10 and 15 he will announce
to the nation that the Cambodian operation has
been successfully completed and that all Americans
have been withdrawn from Cambodia ahead of
schedule ... Arizonas Mo Udall and Michigans Jim
OHara, the two leading liberal candidates for House
Democratic leader, have agreed privately to unite
behind the one who can rally the most support from
the liberal Democratic Study Group. Most Southern
Democrats favor Illinois Dan Rostenkowski, who is
Chicago Mayor Richard Daleys spokesman in
Washington ... The winner will succeed Oklahomas
amiable little Carl Albert who will take over Speaker
John McCormacks chair. Albert has indicated to
friends that hell retire after a couple of terms. This
means the Udall-OHara-Rostenkowski battle will
probably determine whom the next long-term
Speaker will be.
Secretary of State Bill Rogers has told
congressional leaders privately of signs that the
Kremlin is disturbed over Red Chinas influence
with Prince Sihanouk, who leads the communist
liberation movement to take over Cambodia. Rogers
cited criticism of Chinas relationship with Sihanouk
in Pravda ... Anti-war agitators have indicated that
they will raise a clamor next for withdrawal of U. S.
troops from Thailand and South Korea. The Nixon
administration has no intention of pulling troops
out of either country.

Alligator Staff

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor

- Dan Vining
lafiiH Yottesb bns eqoiu3

Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor

EDITORIAL
So What?
Explaining the rules of evidence to a Supreme Court
justice or the intricacies of an appendectomy to a physician
is shoptalk, not education.
In that same vein, teaching does not consist of telling
something to someone who already knows it.
So we were somewhat disappointed to see the Student
Mobilization Committee squander another day in the Plaza
of the Americas listening to antiwar rhetoric from William
Sloan Coffin, Linda Jenness and eyewitness
representatives from the recent Kent State University,
Jackson State College and Augusta killings.
What will we learn at the rally? We will learn that war is
evil. We will learn that four white students, two black
innocent bystanders and six blacks shot in the back
constitute an outrage. In short, we will learn nothing we do
not already know.
The scene, no doubt, will be comparable to bankers
extolling the virtues of capitalism or an education professor
praising public schools well-intended but predictable.
On the other hand, our local environs are full of people
who think war is the American way and anyone who
protests should be shot and buried in a shallow grave.
If the war is to be ended, then, it seems only logical to
carry that idea to those who do not have it. Convincing the
American voting population to exert all possible pressure on
our elected representatives to end the war is the only viable
function of dissent.
We do not disagree with the spirit of the SMCs
objectives, only their methods. They can shout, Stop the
War, Now, for the next 10 years and if the war does end, it
will be only by coincidence. In fact, the mere act of
shouting will serve only to drive more support to Nixon.
Nixon never shouts, he simply invades another country.
For these reasons we urge the SMC leadership to consider
seriously the idea of taking the issues to the people.
Stopping the war will be done only after enought people are
convinced it cannot be allowed to continue. They will only
be convinced after being confronted with reasoned
discourse. They will only be confronted on their ground,
not ours.
Their ground, unfortunately, is not the Plaza of the
Americas.

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor

Jeff Brain >*,
&di toi wrt' Assisfam^

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business. Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
the I Ipritfe *VHigator arc those of
- r c *ii ttLhrr amnfiTn h <>s*
i



Fluted Columns

The trouble with the Vietnam
war is that there is not enough
humor in it.
Oh, it has its moments of
hilarity as when the Vietnamese
General smiles into CBS
cameras and says how happy he
is that we invaded Cambodia
because Vietnamization was
getting to be pretty dull, but the
whole thing is altogether lacking
in real belly laughs. And thats
why the American public is
getting fed up with it.
THROUGH THE EFFORTS
of television comedy writers,
such great American tragedies as
the emasculation of the
American male, the killing and
maiming of fellow human
beings, and the perpetration of
Donna Reed as the ideal of every
housewife in the country have
been carried out with a
minimum of protest and a
maximum of good soul
rendering guffaws.
My contention is that if we
had the staff writers from
Petticoat Junction and I Love
Lucy working on the Vietnam
war, the American public would

Staff Writings

Gainesvilles Population Up
38,000 Overnight
This was the caption I
intended to use for a photo I
was going to take at a Gainesville
hatchery. Each Tuesday and
Thursday, the hatchery
produced that many chicks for
shipment to egg farms around
the state.
The photo would be packing
crates full of chicks, awaiting
shipment, with a cutline about
how Gainesvilles population
fluctuated by the day.
The photo I intended never
came about. I was too late to

MR. EDITOR:
The analogy that abolishing ROTC is
like abolishing the Fire Department
because one doesnt approve of fires is
invalid unless one assumes that wars are
inevitable.
One may take extensive precautions
against fire but there is a possibility that
someday a fire will occur, thus the
existence of fire departments. Mr. Darnels
assumes that precautions against war are
not totally effective and war, like a fire,
will someday inevitably erupt.
I do not accept this analogy because I
believe war is not inevitable. War

the small society

TUb PPbSiPhhT WMfe
PATibHT- MAYfe
Hefe JlteT
AMviSMfnjrH.

What Price Over Population?

Stop Pretending

Not Enough Belly Laughs

be much happier about the
whole thing, and Spiro Agnew
would walk around in a state of
perpetual orgasm.
Imagine how the boys from
Stalag 13 would handle the
invasion of Cambodia:
WELL COLONEL HOGAN,
here we are in the Viet Congs
SECRET CAMBODIAN
SANCTUARY. What do you
think?
Its very nice, but where is
it?
Were standing on it, sir. Its
a hole in the ground containing
much secret information,
communications equipment and
weapons.
YOU MEAN THAT bag of
rice, post card from Saigon, and
the transistor radio with the two
dixie cups and a string?
Yes sir.
We found one of those
yesterday, how do you know
this is THE SANCTUARY?
This one has wall to wall
carpeting.
OR HOW ABOUT the soap
commercial writers handling My
Lai:

photograph the chickens, so I
left. Outside, however, I heard
the unmistakable sound of baby
chicks.
As it turned out, there were
three trashcans full of chicks
unwanted baby roosters as I
later found out. They were
neither dead nor diseased.
Newborn chicks, wedged
between old newspapers and
cracked shells were chirping.
Some, caught in plastic bags,
were suffocating. Others hopped
or huddled, stepping on chicks
further down in the trash.
9
One still hatching, reached a

generally results from the breakdown of
diplomacy. One concrete way to avoid
war is to strengthen our emphasis on
diplomacy. The United States* first step
toward world peace should be the
diplomatic recognition of Red China,
Cuba, North Vietnam, etc. We will never
solve any international problem
peacefully if we continue to pretend that
our adversaries dont exist. If we will take
this first step, stop our massive armament
(including ROTC), and are willing to
compromise on issues, then war is not
inevitable.
FREDERICK REPLOGLE, 4FY

Ladies, these men have just
taken part in a massacre of over
190 men women and children.
Could you get their gore-stained
uniforms clean with YOUR
detergent and cold water?
Maybe Gomer Pyles writers
could consent to write a few
prisoner interrogation scenes.
Gaaawuleee, Sarge. I found

r 'i
WE'LL FREE weU FREE -and
souravtrauM nos amok __

yellow claw up and broke out of
his shell, not realizing that life
had been officially ended
before it began.
It brought the question to
mind, what happens when we
start hatching too many
people?
life is already cheap in China
or India. Even in Gainesville,
police are still looking for a
mother who recently left their
unwanted child in an alley.
Perhaps there is little analogy
between chickens piled in
garbage cans and human babies,
but at our present, uncontrolled

by Brickman

ROTC
MR. EDITOR:
Forty years ago, I enrolled in ROTC at
the University of Wisconsin. During the
thirties we were booed from the sidelines
by the Communist fringe of our fellow
students. The Peace organizations to
which those students belonged then were
as phoney as those and the peace
symbol to which the Replogles refer
today. Are the students (and some of the
faculty) so uninformed as to not
recognize the phoney symbol from that
of the Dove? I would hope that parents
make an attempt to recognize the Dove as
the true peace symbol.
Do any of you remember the quackery
of the Communist sympathizers before
World War II? Their activities for peace
were the same as they are today. Then
Russia and America after both were
attacked found themselves comrades
in arms and the quackery peace
activities ceased!
The ROTC and its reserve program
made possible the formation and training
of an. inwtsjont, fora; suffideift to enter
Europe and destroy Hitler jjand' h
whfTO. ntn thf bdafce^ fi

this here Viet Cong sneaking
around our camp. What should I
do with him.?
SIJOOT HIM.
But wont that hurt?
Not if you hold the gun so it
doesnt fly back and hit you in
the face.
YOU SEE WHAT I mean.

pr \ 6 MmW ; ml^^mm l v *3hmf *' fX
'" .'migsi \ aia ?%^
r x 'MHH9RMnHHHHHB^>:o
. v s v&jll i
A --i i < ---- Nss l -i'| l v .<&&&: ~ *|9*' A Jv >' < vifeis, <,> 4.
gwp||M
llg \
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growth, there may one day be.
Still, even little chicks are
alive. To desecrate life as it

FORUM:
C Aim ml 'DuamT J
no hope for t^^ Tn p ]ncerX^00^'>^

Wednesday, May 27, t 970. The Florida Alligator,

By John Parker

Spiro Agnew was right about the
television news media in this
country. They are all biased
against humor. If we could get
some real talent writing the war,
American people could prop up
their feet and watch it go on
indefinitely.
Youve got to look on the
lighter side of things.

By Sunny Barlow

volunteers then who could build such a
force?
Do our readers on the left realize that
the UF is a benefactor of the Morrill Act
which created Land Grant Colleges with
the proviso that Military Science is
offered. Do we destroy the university in
order to remove ROTC from the
curriculum?
Yes, after four years of ROTC I was
privileged or rewarded with six years
active military service as an officer in
World War II and the Korean War. This
being the case, how do you think I feel
when cheap trash desecrates the
American Flag? I stand to be counted in
support of the Flag and the leadership of
the United States. I would hope that
more of the others who cringe under the
shelter of the Bill of Rights with its
Freedom of Speech and Freedom of
Press will realize that with those
freedoms goes an equally important sense
of responsibility to their country.
r v v FREDERICKT. BOYD
ds,oi; mu professor ofagronomy
:ll to LT. COL RETIRED reserve

enters the world is nothing but
waste. Life isn't equal to trash,
and should not be thrown away.

Page 9



i,Tte Florid* A4Ugrtor,V*il ***&* W

Page 10

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BELK-LINDSEY
For those evenings of entertainment try this outfit from McKay of
Miami. This all white pantsuit made of cotton is just the thing for
those coming summer days of entertaining. Modeled by Debbie.
B
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m

MAAS BROTHERS
The double "layered" look is the perfect expression for summer.
Focus on stripes that go round and round this tank top covering a
yellow ribbed pullover. Tanya adds a hip-hugger belt that fits loosely
over ribbed straight-legged pants.
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Perky pleats add a special kick
Sporty in its simple way, but ju
it's ready for that special date. I
Rita.
= l jflmp- I Cr/ *P|
COI
Malinda knows just how to
pants-dress by Jerell of Texa
sandals by Daniel for the comp
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I
SEARS
k to this all occasion polyester dress,
jst add beads, a hat, and gloves ... and
From Sears Junior Bazaar, modeled by
H 0 9|
LONY SHOP
beat the sizzling summer sun in this
s. To accent this outfit she adds cork
>lete summer fun look.
%
m

FIGURE FAIR
Be as free as a breeze in a Baby Doll set of Caprolan Nylon. Pleated
ruffle at the bottom is lined with embroidery trim. The V-neck also
has the same trim. Matching bikini pants. Sizes: petite; small; and
medium. Modeled by Kathy.
jt .-ft r jr jm
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COUSINS
The pantsuit marches on. You didn't think a little thing like summer
was going to stand in the way of progress, did you? Putting it across
into warmer weather ... the light, unbeatable coolness of polyester.
Modeled by Pam.
*' yM A ; > .^Kys&p
ISimPV' 1
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SUSAN SCOTT
"Sea-throughs" by Petit are beautiful to sea and be seen in. A cotton
crochet knit has the delicate look of lace, but the durability of cotton.
The pants are part of a suit that features a midriff top. Modeled by
Diane.
I I
M I H * 4 f H I
SILVERMAN'S
From "Tootique's" land and sea collection, Madi models this nautical
drawstring midriff top end short shorts. Slacks also available, all in
comfortable nubby cotton.
jtv. : :Hv;
K**' ,**,% V.W''.' t *^RVj > }J//// JP\.' VV.V/;
. r w

Wednesday, May 27, 1970, The Florida Alligator

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
50 x 10 Schult trailer; AC; washer;
carpet; 20 x 10 screen porch; all In
excellent cond. Lot 5 Plnehurst Pk.
378-5450. Best Offer. (A-10t-145-p)
196 8 Sears -50 cc Motorcycle;
excellent, like new, runs perfect, call
Bill 373-1561 or see 103 NW 10 SL
Apt 2. $l2O. (A-5M45-P)
Tape recorder, Webcor, portable, two
track mono. 3 speakers, microphone.
Input extension cord, 2 speed, record
on both sides of tape without reel
turnover. $45. 124% NW 20 Drive.
(A-st-145-p)
MONKEY Tame Capochln, leash,
food, etc. S7O. Call 378-0181
mornings or after 10 p.m.
(A-147-st-p)
1969 HONDA 350 cc Dream, like
new only 4,000 miles, sacrifice at
only 375.00 Call 378-8072 after 5:00
p.m. (A-147-3t-p)
1955 Ford station wagon, runs good,
reliable trans. For student around
town $150.00 Cheap, call 378-8072
after 5:00 p.m. (A-147-3t-p)
FANTASTIC COMPONENT
STEREO VALUE, Scott amplifier,
Garrard turntable, large cabinet,
Jensen speakers, Sony tape deck.
Original cost over SSOO. Financial
trouble must sell. $225 or $l5O
minus tape, Call 372-6845.
(A-147-st-p)
Pooltable, cues, balls, racks, and
extras. 3 mo. old, exc. cond.. Grad,
senior, must sell. All S6O. Call Bob or
Ed at 376-9410. Anytime.
(A-147-st-p)
Stereo system, 40 watt Tochebla
AM-FM multiplex system. Garrard
turntable two speakers Call after 6
PM. 373-2973. (A-st-147-p)
Microscope Zeiss Binocular Med
School approved. Variable light
$350. Call Steve Bloomfield
376-8442. (A-147-st-p)
60cc cycle xlent condi. plus helmet,
only SIOO Call Dennis 392-7509.
(A-3t-148-p)
1963 MGB mint year excellent
condition will last forever. Good
tires, 48,000 miles, new metallic
paint Job 378-7930 ask for Pam.
(A-st-148-p)
Honda 160 1967. Leaving $75 or
offer. Call Bob 373-2216 or stop by
1824 3B N.W. 3rd PI. With all this
space I want to say Right Onl
(A-3M48-P)
New Kustom 200 amp with fuzz,
trem, rev, and sel. boost. 3-15"
Jensen speakers. Vox Continental
organ. Shure microphone. Call
392-8225. (A-st-148-p)
ONE of the finer things of life Blue
Lustre carpet and upholstery cleaner.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
STEREO turntable S4O, amplifier
$45, speakers S4O, Call 378-4200.
(A-5M48-P)
Sublet-summer 1 bedroom wood
panel Apt. A/C, private patio, pet fee
paid, lots of extras slls a month
Village 34 Apt 37 call 378-5809.
(B-st-142-p)
Camera nlkon sp rangefinder lenses:
50mm 1.4 85mm 2.0 case and lens
hoods. Excellent cond. call 378-9024
after 6pm. (A-2t-149-p)
8-track car units $38.95 lots of tapes
on sale everyday at $4.99. All others
$5.88 Muntz 14 NW 13th Street.
(A-Bt-149-p)
Economical living: cozy, remodeled
8x32 trailer, furnished, carpeted,
screened 12x22 cabana $995
378-3196, after spm. (A-2t-149-p)
White silk organza wedding gown.
Long chapel train and veil. Size 5 call
372-2740 after five. SSO.
(A-3M49-P)
Standel Amp. $550, Fender prec.
Bass $l5O, call 372-8095 after 5:00.
(A-3t-149-p)
10x51 mobile home in good
condition 2 bedrooms, washer, and
air conditioned. Call 376-6372.
(A-3t-149-p)
8x34 aluminum trailer, has screened
porch and Bxlo added room, student
park near campus. SIOSO
alrcondltloned, $950 without
376-8082 anytime. (A-st-149-p)
VW square back 1968 air-conditioned
radio 23000 miles excellent
condition SIBOO call 378-6029.
(A-3t-149-p)
1963 T. Bird. Power break. Power
steering. Good condition. Only $395.
Call 392-7508 or 376-2901.
(A-147-3t-p)
MUST SELL 1984 Triumph Spjtfke
Engine Recently RebuHt Low MWage
$350 call 376-1018 anytime YOU'D
BETTER HURRY. (A-2M40-P)
Honda 50 Must sN'Perfect eofidltlon
Best Offer 370*2009. (A-st-14frpr f

a r
a***
*.*
FOR SALE
For sale: 1962 SAAB 33m1/gal
Excellent mech cond S3OO 735 S.E.
sth Ave. From 5 to Bpm.
(A-4t-149-p)
Hip roomates wanted for summer
qtr. or will sub-lease air-con house
behind Norman. No deposits. Call
Sherry 376-8080 618 SW 10th St.
(A-7t-149-p)
Female Roommate wanted for
summer. La Mancha Apts, private
bedroom, air cond, pool, walking
distance from campus. June rent free
378-9611. (A-st-149-p)
Sell Hoble 96 surfboard Good
shape. Best offer. Call 378-3833
Week days ASK FOR TOM.
(A-st-149-p)
1 Bedroom Apt Available June 14
Private Patio AC Dogs Welcome Call
373-2982 After 5:00 p.m.
(A-st-149-p)
FOR FT ENT
Sublease or need 3 fern, roommates
available June 1. Tanglewood 2
bedroom townhouse. No deposits.
Call 372-0360. (B-146-st-p)
Married? Sublease for summer.
Furnished apt. slOl/month AC good
neighbors PH: 373-1935 evenings.
(B-146-st-p)
French Quarter Apts. 114 Sublease
summer qtr. $45 mo. End apt. very
quiet. Call Doug, PH: 373-2306.
(B-146-st-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE PoR
summer qtr. Share house 2 blocks
from campus with 2 coeds pvt. room,
A/C, Call 378-6548. (B-st-137-p)
Frederick Gardens one-bedroom for
summer. June rent paid. Call
376-0808 or come by no. 66.
(B-st-145-p)
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND.
BOARD call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:'
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fail
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-C)
"Sublet Sum. Qtr. 1 bdrm. garage apt.
AC, ww carpet, beautifully furnished,
tv cable. sloo/mo. + ut. 1908 NW
3rd Ave. 373-2700. (B-6M42-P)
13*7 NW 7th Ave one bedroom apt.
well furnished duplex walking
distance $75 mo. call 378-8641 after
5 pm. (B-st-145-p)
Large 3 bedroom duplex available by
mid June no damage deposit required
call after' 6pm 378-5594.
(B-3t-149-p)
Modem bedroom apt, quiet behind
the mall, ww, central a.c. 100 per
month, regular sllO call after 5
373-2889 can move in June 1.
(B-st-149-p)
Sublease for summer 1 bedroom
furnished apt., unit ac, available June
14, 4 blocks from research library librarys9O
s9O librarys9O per month phone 372-3260.
(B-3t-149-p)
Sublease summer qtr Landmark apt 2
* br 2-4 persons a/c dishwasher grills
poolside. Dishes, pots, pans, kitchen
utensils left for you. 378-3851.
(B-3t-149-P)
Sublet for summer 1 bedroom house,
1 block from campus, ae. $125 for the
summer. 378-3757. (B-2t-149-p)
3-bedroom apt., offstreet parking,
full bath, kitchen, living rm, 16,500
B.T.U. A/C. Min. of 1 qtr. lease.
$l3O mo. 408 TIE Ist Ave. 376-0317.
(B-5M49-P)
30 yards behind Norman Hall. 2
bdrm. l bath no lease ac furnished
$35 for June $75 a month 1103 SW
7th Ave. 378-5410 after spm.
(B-st-149-p)
FREE one month rent, extra
bookcases, kitchen & bthroom equip,
and more. Sublet 2 bdr. apt for
summer. 141 Landmark or call
373-1968. (B-5M49-P)
For fall quarter only (Sept-Dec) 7BA
needs roommate for 1 bedroom
Landmark Townhouse $65 month +
utilities call 372-9317 Mike.
(B-3t-149-p)
Will sacrifice Two bedroom sum.
French Quarter apt. Beautiful,
spacious townhouse 2 pools Call
373-2643 make offer We promise
you the best price! Call and SEE!!!
(B-3M49-P)
Sublet SI4QAno Mt Vernon 1 br apt
for slls/mo. Beautifully furnished,
ac, pool, Just off campus, available
June 12. Call after 6:3opm
378-0260. (B-3M49-P)
Several 1 Br apt 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet 2120 mo. Colonial Manor
opts. 1218 SW 2nd Ave. 372-7111
Grad students preferred. rates
, ***** l w

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 27,1970

FOR RENT
Large house to sublet for summer: 3
bdrms, 2 baths, kitchen, etc. 1 blk.
from campus Interested call
373-2268 or come by 1128 SW Ist
Ave. (B-10t-145-p)
For rent for fall, air-conditioned
apartments near campus. SBO to
$145 per month, pool. University
Apartments. Call 376-8990 evenings.
(B-Bt-149-p)
Furnished 1 bdr. super clean & nice.
Next to LaMancha. SBO/mo. summer.
SBS/mO. fall. 376-2738 or 376-3442.
(B-3t-149-p)
Sublet or rent 1 brm apt furnished air
conditioned rent slls/mo patio call
373-1080 or 376-4807 Village 34.
(B-st-144-p)
Across street from campus studio
apts. for both one & two students,
ww carpet ac cable tv utilities
Included completely furnished
ample parking swim pool. College
Terrace Apts. 1225 S.W. Ist Ave.
Phone. 378-2221. Summer rates!
(B-109-ts-c)
Sublet 3-bedroom house Vz block
from campus $125/mo. 378-7726 or
392-9259 1224 SW 1 Ave. furnished
full kitchen. (B-st-149-p)
Sublet 1 bdr. a/c Bpt. 2 blocks from
campus summer rates June 13
contact In person after 4 1100 S.W.
Bth Ave apt. no. 205 Olympia Apts.
(B-st-145-p)
We can get It for you wholesale 2
bdroom summit house apt sum
carpet a/c pool reg $167 summer rate
$l2O June paid 373-1782 evenings.
(B-st-145-p)
Men 3 blocks from campus central air
conditioning single $155.00 double
$l2O each for summer quarter
378-8122. (B-10t-145-p)
Village park 1 bedroom apt. sublease
for summer, pool, A/C, have a great
summer at Sin City apt. 24. Call
378-3554. (B-147-st-p)
TWO BLOCKS to campus men
women room TV carpet wood panel
kit. Prlv. See Diane, Brenda or Rick
1204 NW 3 Ave. 378-0286 392-0700
(B-147-st-p)
BARGAIN SBO each for entire
summer. Two girls In Village Park top
floor. Poolside, Call 373-1501 after
3. (B-147-st-p)
2 Roommates wanted Summer
Quarter Alr-conditloned, carpet,
dishwasher, other extras, located near
pool, Landmark no. 60 373-2207.
(B-147-st-p)
Village Park 1 bdr. apt. no. 29, CaH
378-0323 after 5 weekdays anytime
weekends. (B-147-st-p)
Room In prlv. home for mature male
student. Linen and maid serv.
alr-cond., separate entrance, off
street parking, Call 376-5360.
(B-147-3t-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts.. Within walking distance of
campus, A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Sublet summer qt. 2 bedroom
Tanglewood Manor apts. A/C, pool,
landscaped, Quiet. June 15 Sept
15., pay only 2 months rent, Call
373-2706. (B-st-148-p)
Sublet Landmark summer
quarter pool suana dishwasher
slls per person plus refundable
deposits. Call now 376-2768.
(B-3M48-P)
Must sublet Village Park apt. for
- summer qtr. Great place good offer.
Call anytime 373-1962. (B-3t-148-p)
Landmark Phase II apt. 164 1
bedroom sublet for summer June
rent paid dishwasher AC $145/mo,
Call 376-0453. (B-3t-148-p)
Sublease apt. 28 1716 N.W. 3rd
Ave. for the summer. Only $ 96/mo
June rent paid for close to campus
1 bdm.-alr/heat Only If married.
372-2257. (B-3t-148-p)
Sublet or rent 1 brm. furnished
alr-conditloned patio Village 34
slls/mo Call 373-1080 or 376-4807.
(B-st-148-p)
One bedroom apt. Gatortown $350
for whole summer thru Sept. 15 No
damage deposit. Call 376-5694 must
rent by June 6. (B-147-st-p)
Village Park need femele roommate
open now thru summer apt. on pool.
Call 372-4918 anytime. (B-145-st-p)
Sublet summer quarter Landmark
Apt. 104, Near Pool, Call 378-9041.
(B-147-st-p)
Summer In a lovely apartment at
Point West will be one to rsmsmbet
June 15 to Aug. 81 as little as
$300.00 for two apartments for 4
from- $350.00 A quiet community
for people wfto want the best. You
*

FOR RENT
S >:-:-:-:;:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:*: ; : ; :->:-:-:-:-: ; : ; : ; : ; : ; :-: ; : ; :-:->:-: ; : ; :->
Frederlck Gardens one-bedroom apt.
for summer. Available June 14. June
rent paid. Call 376-2909 or 392-0911
ask for Unda. (B-148-St-p)
Sublet or roommates for summer.
107 Landmark, 2 bdrm. poolside &
woodslde extra features + gym, bar
BQ, sauna, good parking. Call
373-1208. (B-st-148-p)
Summfcr Bargain, $375 complete,
Village Pk. no. 86, 1001 S. W. 16th
Ave, 2 br. furn., upstairs, AC, pobl,
rsvd. pkg, quiet, spacious, call
372-1114. (B-st-148-p)
Landmark townhousel 2 bedroom
four person apt available mid-June.
A/C, dishwasher, disposal, gas, grills,
rent $46.25/mo. apt. 126 ph.
378-6277 now! (B-st-145-p)
FOR RENT: Singles: Swing Into
summer in a luxurious air-conditioned
poolside apartment. Private bedroom
Walk to campus. S7O includes
iUtHjtJes. 378-7224. (B-15t-148-p)
v.'.v.\\v.v,;.;,y,v.v.v.v.v.v.>vo>;OXw
%%V*%%VVaVVaVeVe%VeViVeWrWVW# e
WANTED
Live all summer at La Mancha for
$l4O Inc. utilities, pvt. bedroom, pvt.
balcony, pvt. phone, walk-in closets,
pool, AC Call 373-1414. (C-146-st-p)
Two roommates for summer point
west apts. 2 bedroom 2 bath a/c
dishwasher pool reduced rate on
rent call 378-9947 around 9 am or 6
pm. (C-st-145-p)
FRIENDLY Apt. needs co-ed
roommate. ONLY SIOO for summer.
Townhouse in Landmark. Call Carol
372-9764 or Debbie 392-9880.
(C-st-144-p)
JUNE RENT FREE 4 to share 2 bdf
2 bath Point West apt $125 ea for ail
summer pool ac dishwasher call
376-9924 or 372-5970 after 5 must
be 21. (C-10t-142-p)
Poolside Williamsburg Apt., 2 bd.
furnished townhouse need to sublet
for the summer call after 5 during the
week 372-8716. (C-st-145-p)
WANTED: Coed to share luxurious
alr-conditloned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Male roommate to share luxurious
alr-conditloned poolside apartment.
Private bedroom. Walk to campus.
S7O Including utilities. 378-7224.
(C-15t-148-p)
Roommate wanted Summit House 3
mo. only SBO. Alr-cond., pool, Call
378-0043 or 392-0505 ask for Rich.
(C-3M48-P)
1 male roommate for summer qtr. for
La Mancha $125 all summer Inc. util
A/C, carpet, furn, own bdr.
372-5833. (C-st-148-p)
Female roommate wanted to share a
two-bedroom alr-conditloned house,
own room, only $65/mo. Close to
campus Call Carla 373-1992.
(C-st-148-p)
Need 1 co-ed roommate for 1 bdrm.
AC apt. 2 blks from campus. Price is
S9O for entire summer. Call
378-0551. (C-146-st-p)
3 Male Roommates Frederick Apts,
pool, wall to wall carpet, air. cond.,
summer quart. S3B/month 378-7104
(C-147-4t-p)
1 hip female for THE PLACE starting
Sept. Call 392-8657 or 373-2671.
(C-147-3t-p)
2 roommates needed In
summer term for Gatortown apt. 2
weeks free rent, $36 66/mo +
utlllt, A/C, pool, dishwasher, 3 bdr. 2
bath call 378-6423 (C-147-st-p)
GIRLS YOU name your own rent for
Pt. West Apt., deposits paid, available
June 1, Two bedrooms two full
baths Call 378-8771. (C-146-st-p)

Wanted: 1,2, or 3 Female
Roommates Escaping the dorm?
Locked out of the house? Find a
home at 99 Landmark. Pay July and
Aug. only. Call 378-6422.
(C-147-3t-p)
} 2 ?r 3 girls. Spend entire summer
In WILLIAMSBURG For $125. Great
apt. on pool. Call Mussy
at 372-7882 apt. 4. (C-lt-149-p)
Suburbia Dl Theatre
N.W. lath ST.ACROSS
FROM MALL FH-172-*523
2 COLOR HITS
FUNNY GIRL AND
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL
SHERIFF
GATOR COURT
378-4887 4170 SW
] 13th SL
* rofcfv where tut v v

FOR RENT
2-3 roomates for summer qtr. Village
Park apt, tv, stereo, bar, pool. alr
cond. SIOO per qtr. each. Call
372- (C-4M49-P)
Roommate needed for summer
quarter to share 3 bdrm. house. Have
your own room with double bed.
$45/mon. plus utilities. Call Nick
376-9450 or Pete 392-7112.
(C-3M49-P)
2 Female roomates needed 72 Village
Park SIOO whole quarter Call
373- after 5:00 Linda.
(C-2t-149-p)
Male roommate wanted for fall. 2br,
2 full bath, A/C, La Bonne Vie apts.
Call: 378-8319. (C-3t-149-p)
Leaving school for the summer? Let
me buy or rent your ten speed bike
while you are gone. Call Alan
373-1743. (C-2t-149-p)
Female roommate. S9O/summer +
1/3 utilities. Own room In large
comfortable house three blocks from
Med. Center. Call 376-7166 anytime.
(C-3t-149-p)
Want to share Landmark or La Bonne
Vie Apartment with three male
students for fall qtr. Call 392-7656
and leave name and address.
(C-3t-149-p)
Desperate fmale rmmt needed Imm
Lamancha only $l4O incl utit for
entire summer no deposit last mos
rent paid Call day 392-3601 night
378-0768. (C-4t-149-p)
Wanted male roommate for summer
Mt. Vernon apt. Call 376-5151
(C-4t-149-p)
MALE Roommate for summer June
rent paid. Pool A/C tv Frederick
Gardens apt. 57 call 373-1887 or
come by office. (C-3t-149-p)
HELP WANTED
SUMMER JOBS Jacksonville ~
Galnesvllle Miami S3OO per month
salary plus bonus Reitz Union rm
118 Wed May 27 330 pm.
tE-st-145-p)
Co-ed wanted room and board In
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
Coctalf Waitress part-time 'or
full-time, no experience necessary,
will train. Must be 21. Apply after 4
Dub's lounge 376-9175.
(E-24M25-P)
] [ Guns Guns Guns j
[ Inventory over 500. Buy j
] [ Sell Trade Repair. J
, ( Reloading supplies. Layaway j |
[ plan. Harry Beckwith, gun l
! [ dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. j |
WltlHsl 1 |2 DAYS
W From the ( JC )
* c#un,r v
4* that gave you
* I A Woman".
J "Inga" and
4 Am Curious"
A (Yellow i
Best Actress JK
HMaggie (M*
* Smith *SR*
*?be3+imeqr +
Missfjeaafltrodie
***** ,,,
I CTW,
> Ml WSTAMT g
CLASSIC.. .Bes*
RICHARD Hie
*M^BURTO^^Kj*



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

hE LP wanted
.-moving to west palm
reach? secretary II
POSITION OPEN WITH STATE
AGENCY IF INTERESTED CALL
-378-1876" (E-3M48-P)
Male part-time, full-time
employment. Immediate openings for
summer or remainder of Spring terms
aooiy now at Arbys Restaurant 1405
| P W. 13th Street. (E-148-3t-p)~
Legal Secretary with previous
experience. For Interview call David
M. Anderson; / Fagan, Crouch,
Anderson & Folds, 376-5295.
(E-146-10t-p)
Repairman for 8-tracK tape units
experienced man preferred good pay
MUNTZ 373-2333. (E-st-149-p)
Due to an unexpected cancellation,
an opening is available In a two-year
ophthalmic Assistant's Training
Program at the Medical Center.
Ophthalmic assistants work with
ophthalmologists in the evaluation of
patients. Pre-requisite for the training
program is two years of college
and/or previous medical experience,
i.e., a military corpsman. Course
begins July 1, 1970. Details can be
obtained by contacting Miss Maija
Uotlla, Department of
Ophthalmology, University of
Florida, telephone 392-3451.
(E-st-149-p)
Male: Summertime openings for
carhops and grill. Must be neat. Good
hourly wage. Apply King's Food
Host 1802 W. Un. Ave. or 1430 S. W.
13th St. After 2:00 PM (E-ts-c)
Female: Full and parttime waitresses.
Must be neat. Good wages. Apply
Kings Food Host 1802 W. Un. Ave
or 1430 SW 13th St. After 2:00 PM
(E-ts-c)
Counselor positions available at
Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville,
N. Male or Female Archery
Instructor, Male only overnight
camping trips operate truck big
and strong, Male only Go-Kart
Specialist mech. Inclined, Male
only Cabin counselors (activity,
escorts and leaders), Male only ski
boat operator (exp. 160-220 h.p.),
Male or Female Riding Instructor,
For application: T. R. Robertson,
1414 Fetch Ave., Jax., Fla. 32207.
(E-st-149-p)
HELP WANTED MALE Mens
Clothing Salesman. Full or part time.
Salary commensurate with
experience. Apply Wilson
Department Stores, Inc., 22 E.
University Avenue. (E-st-149-c)
AUTOS
196 0 Chevrolet impala. Good
condition. Power steering plus two
new tires. 303 NW 17th St. Apt. 5
phone 373-2901. Only $l5O.
(G-st-149-p)
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy clean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
69 Camaro automatic radio warranty
going overseas must sell. Call Louis
376-7098. (G-st-145-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
WEDNESDAY
Jumbo Baked Chopped
Steak and Yellow Rice 79<
THURSDAY
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<

Wednesday, May 27,1970, The Florida Alligator,

>:-:-:-:-X-:-:-:-x-x*x-XvX:X:X:::X;X;:;X;X:::::::
AUTOS
ejejejejejejejejejejejejej.j.*. .V
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McConnell and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission is a winner
tool TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)
1966 MG Midget wire wheels, stereo
tape, excellent condition, inside and
out. Asking $l,lOO. Call 373-1979 or
see at 26 26 W. Unlv. Ave.
(G-147-3t-p)
1968 TRIUMPH GT6 British racing
green, wire wheels, luggage rack,
17,000 miles call 372-2135 after 6
pm. (G-st-145-p)
6l VW Sunroof, radio, 62 engine,
excellent tires, good condition.
Getting married cant afford
unkeep of 2 cars. $375. Call Mai
392-7571. (G-st-148-p)
1960 Falcon inexpensive reliable
transportation. Radio, heater, good
tires, engine In excellent shape. Call
376-2909 or 392-0911 ask for Linda.
(G-148-st-p)
64 Chevy Impala conv., white, power
steering, and brakes, vB, auto trans.
low milage, good mechanical shape.
376-4165 after 5:00 392-0510 days.
(G-4t-148-p)
Save SIOO, beautiful compact, 64
falcoln, very good condition. S4OO.
Must sell, Need money for
Honeymoon. 378-4642, 376-2248.
(G-147-st-p)
63 TR4-wrecked needs body work
will sell whole car Cheap or parts.
Eng. 5 wire wheels, trans etc. Call
378-7082 and leave message.
(G-2t-149-p)
p E t
wwxSxw
Money and law what
do you know, is it enough? Come
and learn, frank, fun and friendly. A
Bridge Over Troubled Water May 28,
Thursday, 7:30 (J-3t-148-p)
Legally what does marriage
mean. Do you know? Come & learn.
Free, A Bridge Over Troubled Waters
Union Aud. 7:30 Thursday May 28,
Free Free (J-3t-148-p)
How to buy babies on the installment
plan**** A Bridge Over Troubled
Waters frank discussions about
marriage. Union aud. 7:30 May 28,
Thurs. (J-3t-148-p)
THE APOLLONIAN
ALTERNATIVE Handmade
sandals that you can wear to the
super show in foot deep mud and
rain and still wear them the next day
and the next and the next and for the
next year and we guarantee It. About
$15.00 108 N. W. 7th Street. Open:
12 to 6 daily. PAX (J-147-st-p)
Free kittens, male black, female
variegated, healthy, housebroken,
3720 S. W. 15th St. 372-3597.
(J-st-148-p)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)

PERSONA L
::^:::>/::::::::::::::::X;: : X;::X:X;X::;X xwx:X:
Married couples lnterested In
improving communications and
understanding each other better?
Participate in a Marital Enrichment
Group experience. Increase your
awareness of the strengths in your
marriage. For information call
Marriage and College Life Project.
392-1590. Its free. (J-st-149-c)
ALL MARRIED COUPLES Become
more aware of each other. Discover
in the privacy of your own
relationship how to become more
real with your spouse. Intimacy
Encounter Tapes, Marriage & College
Life Project. Free. Call 392-1590.
(J-5M49-C)
SOVIET UNION, Driving and
Camping 10 weeks, $1,350. Includes
air and all expenses. A. Lipson, 2
Garden Terr., Cambridge, Mass
02138 or call (collect) 617-547-1127
(J-6t-142-p)
Need to get your stuff up North? We
are renting a truck and will take
anything you want between here and
Hartford, Conn. Need to know this
week. Call 378-6107. Ask for Brad or
Rich. WILL TAKE BIKES.
(J-st-145-p).
Rent a luxury Tanglewood apt. 2 br,
2 bath, ac, etc. Sublet for Sum. Total
cost less than S9O. NO Damage
Deposit, Call 372-9705 anytime.
(J-147-st-p)
EUROPE Go this summer. Fly NASA
for student rates. Flights leaving till
August. For info call 373-2520 5 to 8
pm. (J-st-149-p)
Would one of the two lonesome
coeds please call John at 392 7272; a
lonesome engineer. (J-2t-149-p)
Beautiful black kittens need home. 5
wks. old only 4 left. Call Jackie
378-6692. (J-4t-149-p)
Grad student hitchhiking to Calif,
leaving about June 10 anyone care to
come along? Call Graham 372-9317.
(J-3t-149-p)
In response to two lonesome coeds
and any other coeds I am ready.
Call 392-7529. (J-lt-149-p)

FEATURE AT... I
fiHSjjUSLn SicVtfa iodouf 1:37 3:37 g 37
Sr' * j'J -Cyy.'yy l '-fr'/y.: .AKV-'.'fo-.r-iy-.':.: yi'.'-s. S' l 'V l
' -S'y" *£ !V *s' 1,1 *'J-'',?*>, jSSilr Vj p 1 v
'* -V )v. \v,, [y v< y&s j* V t J \
a
RICHARD HARRIS as
M A MAX CALLED HORSE
Also Starring DAME JUDITH ANDERSON Co-Starring JEAN GASCON
MANUTUPOU Introducing CORINNATSOPEI
bki c PtterSellers I
> |
1 1 op G Magic Qirisdaif ]
.. SUMMER.MO WE CLUBTiCKETS NOW ON SALE I2,SHOWS sl^o

Page 13

XvV.v.v.x.Xv/XvlwXvlwXwXvXi!
Dump: Love Lump (J-lt-149-p)
VICKIE I cant wait until were
married! I love you. STEVE
(J-lt-149-p)
Original caste Handmade jewelry,
gold or silver. Wedding rings, other
custom things. Call Hope White at
373-1947. (J-147-st-p)
DIVORCE How,
why, and on what grounds****** A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters, Frank
discussion about marriage May 28,
Union Aud. 7:30 FREE (J-3t-148-p)
- ' '
Before you do it Know the
consequences*****FEE****** A
Bridge Over Troubled waters Union
Aud. 7:30 Frank discussions about
marriage** **COME******
(J-3t-148-p)
Babies and Budgets Alimony
to divorce
Frank answers to honest questions
about marriage *********** Union
Aud. 7:30 May 28, Thursday, free.
(J-3t-148-p)
Strange bedfellows? Are they legal?
Before you act learn the
facts ... Union Aud. 7:30 A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE******
(J-3t-148-p)
LOST dc POUND
! X;XxX:X:X;X;X ::X ; X:X:X:: : X:XxX:X:X ; : ;
LOST: A small black song notebook
Call Debbie at 392-9100. If you
have found It need badly for a
summer camp job. (L-3t-148-p)
Lost brown purse left in fiat after
receiving ride from Hume several
weeks ago please call 392-8672
thanx. (L-lt-149-p)
FOUND: Rings in AND 307. Call
376-2392 to identify. Ask for Diana.
(L-147-3t-nc)
FOUND: Text Music History
Found at Weil Hall to claim call
378-6595. (L-147-3t-nc)

LOST <& FOUND
Found: A brown shlney leather
jacket with silver snaps and snap
down pockets. Found by Gator pond
by McCartney Hall A Sebrlng s z. 42
392-9824. (L-3t-148-p)
FOUND: A set of keys near BRYAN
Hall old law building on 5-21-70. If
yours call Janice 372-2958 after
5:30. (L-3t-148-nc)
LOST In Med. Center area One
beeper $25 reward with no questions
asked. Call JOHN at 392-2867.
(L-5M45-P)
X:X:X:XvX;X:X:X;X;XxX:X;X:Xx : x : : : x-x
SERVICES
XvXtX-WvXvXw
Tutoring by certified teacher, english
through high school, german levels 1
and 2. Call 378-7641. (M-st-149-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pick-up delivery 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-143-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S. W. 4th Ave, across from
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480.
(M-ts-107-c)
Horses boarded new barn tack room,
green pasture and riding ring & trails.
Complete care less than 15 minutes
from campus on 5R234 Phone:
373-1059. (M-147-st-p)
Babysitting SSO per month done In my
home during the day I have a boy 16
mos. old. call Vicki Marable
376-1938 285-7 Corry Vlg. anytime.
(M-2t-148-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
AT THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 pent and 4 cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone*
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)



Page 14

V The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 27,1970

I UPI Around.
I '... The World
v V
£ ROME President Nixon assured Americas European Allies ij ijj:j
j:j ijj:j in NATO Tuesday the United States will pursue its policy of
$ withdrawing U. S. troops from Vietnam even if North Vietnam jij
jij continues to block peace negotiations. jjj
j:j Nixon made the point in a letter read to the opening session jij
jij of the spring meeting of the NATO Council. Secretary of State jij
jjj William P. Rogers backed it up by saying that the United States jjj
ijj is primarily interested in a diplomatic and political solution to ij:
£ the war rather than a military victory. ij:
ATHENS Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis sipped an ij:
jj apertif in an Athens bistro Tuesday and shrugged off reports ijj
jj that she and her husband were having a tiff over attentions he jjj
jj was paying to opera singer Maria Callas. jij
jj Oh my God, what will they think of next? the former jij
jj American First Lady told reporters quizzing her about the jij
:j reports published by two Greek newspapers. jij
jj KHARTOUM jbt Sudan Sudan nationalized all foreign jij
ij 'banks, two domestic banks and six groups of companies jij
ij Monday on the first anniversary of the nationss military coup, jij
Ij 1 Maj. Gen. Gaafar el-Numeiri, Sudans leader, told a rally: ij:
jj; This step was aimed at controlling the country's economic ij:
iji resources and liberating the banking system and eliminating £
jji foreign influenee that went with it. ij:
jjj ROME Raffaele Minichiello, the U. S. Marine who staged ijj
j:j the world's longest aerial hijack, made a five minute appearance jjj
jij in court Tuesday to be told his trial was being postponed jij
jij because of a lawyersstrike. iji
..... The Nation \
i-j WASHINGTON President Nixon and Indonesian President j:j
jij Suharto joined Tuesday in expressing the need for concerted jij
jij efforts on the part of Asian nations to bring peace to Indochina, jij
ijj Welcoming Suharto to the White House for a round of j-j
jjj conferences, Nixon called attention particularly to the recent jj:
I*l conference in Jakarta of leaders of 11 Asian nations. He said it ij:
ij: was an excellent example of Asians attempting to find :j:
£ solutions for Asian problems and contributing to peace and jji
jjj security in Asia. jji
ji CHICAGO Cabinet member George Romney defended the jij
j: Nixon administrations Indochina policy Tuesday but declared jij
j; that U. S. involvement in Vietnam was a tragic mistake jij
jj complicated by failure to follow constitutional procedure of jij
ji declaring wars. jij
... The State
S v
£ TALLAHASSEE While the state's general appropriations jj!
jj: bill sped toward conference committee to work out a SIOO jij
jij million difference, the Senate authorized another $1,517 j:
8j million in spending for a mandatory food stamp program for the ji
jj needy and inspection of juvenile detention facilities. ji
| The Senate, moving swiftly to make up for two days spent jj:
debating it's no new tax $1.276 billion general spending bill, ji
lalso watered-down and returned to the House a package of bills iji
aimed at preserving Floridas beaches and water bottoms. jj
TALLAHASSEE A group of youthful legislative aides jjj.
S banded together Tuesday to promote public acceptance of the ij
§ constitutional amendment lowering the voting age to 18. ij:
ji Ric Rumrell, chairman of the Aides for 18/ said about 20 ij:
jji legislative assistants all between 21 and 25 will work in ij;
ij: coming months to separate two confusion-prone amendments iji
iij on the November ballot. Along with the senate's amendment iji
! lowering the voting age, the House held out for an amendment jj
dropping the age of legal majority to 18 and the questions jji
will go before the public as individual issues. jjj
j-j FERNANDINA BEACH Search was underway Tuesday by jij
iji the Coast Guard and Florida Marine Patrol for four men who jij
ijj disappeared while on a small river raft near here early Monday, ijj
ij; Coast Guard Chief John Stites said three aircraft and several iji
§ boats were participating in the search which covered a 50-square iji
§ mile area along the coast. ;ji
jji Stites said the men left a fishing camp on the Amelia River iji
fij intending to paddle the seven-man raft to a boat moored at the g
ij Nassau Fertilizer and Oil Co. dock a few hundred yards away jij
jjj about 2 ajn. Monday. They have not been seen since. $
lolkwo^t/w
I EXPERT SERVICE J
PORSCHE CARE AND PREPARATION
__ VrT
and Accessories / Foreign Makes
535 w..v/jflfeSSSi

CHARGES ISRAELIS

Soviet Mideast Challenge
Reaches Dangerous Stage

By United Press International
Israeli Premier Golda Meir
charged Tuesday that Soviet
military involvement in the
Middle East has reached an
advanced and dangerous stage.
Secretary of State William P.
Rogers said the United States
was reconsidering Israels request
for more warplanes because of
the Russian buildup.
ON THE WAR fronts, Israel
sent a patrol against Arab
guerrillas in Lebanon for the
second consecutive day and said
Israeli fighter-bombers attacked
Egyptian targets along the Suez
Canal.
Thousands of workers in
Lebanon staged a one-day
nationwide strike in a move to
force the government into a
stronger military stance against
Israel.
Mrs. Meir spoke in Jerusalem,
delivering a 6,000-word policy
statement to Parliament in
which she said that Russian
involvement in the Middle East
had reached unprecedented
levels
SOVIET ANTIAIRCRAFT
missiles have been placed in
Egypt and the Soviet Union has
assigned Russian pilots to the
Egyptian air force.
The principal feature of the
escalation and tension in the
region is an advanced and
dangerous stage in the Soviet
involvement in Egypt at the
service of the Egyptian
aggression and the violation of
the cease-fire, Mrs. Meir said.
Mr. Meir spoke two days
after Israeli Foreign Minister
Abba S. Eban returned from
Washington where he met with
U. S. officials and requested
urgent delivery of 50 Phantom
jet fighter-bombe and other
American weapons to counter
Soviet penetration. v
Speaking Tuesday in Rome at
a NATO meeting, Secretary of
State Roge said the request for
Phantoms was being
reconsidered. U. S. sources said
the United States would be
unlikely to reopen a study on
the matter only to veto it a
second time.
In Washington George W. Ball
said Tuesday increased U. S.
entanglement in the gluepot of
Southeast Asia had encouraged
Russia to build up its strength
WOULD YOU BUY IT?
Book Review of
The Selling of the
President 1968
tomorrow, 8:00 p.m.
Union lounges 122-123
onmM by th JWRU
v*- > y

and influence in the Middle East.
Ball, former No. 2 State
Department official and later
U. S. ambassador to the United
Nations, testified at a House
hearing as the Senate continued
to debate legislation to limit
U. S. action in Cambodia.
He said it would slow
withdrawal of U. S. troops from
Vietnam, but possibly even more
important was the effect on the
Middle East.
WE ARE encouraging the
Soviet buildup of strength and
influence in the Middle East,
Ball said. How can anyone
doubt that Soviet leadehip is
so consciously factoring into its
calculations about the Middle

Dialogue with a Theologue
PASSIM,, (MMite
8 coq\279q[l) WUm atf
fltoOOQG)
Pastor Fred Castor,
Lutheran Student Center
Father George Kirkpatrick
Catholic Student Center
Rabbi Hlkhael Rloasoa,
Hillel Foundation
Wednesday, May 27, 4:00 i
|^^ffllM>g^
**

East our increasing entanglement
in the gluepot of Southeast Asia
and the rising violence of a
divided and angry America.
Ball said the Russians might
be able to neutralize the Israeli
air force through increased aid
to Egypt. This, he- said, could
result in destruction of Israel.
That would shift the balance
of power catastrophically against
the west in the Middle East,
Ball said.
bJfcw*



TWILIGHT I
CONCERT^
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Little Theatre Shows
Broadway Comedy
Luv, the Murray Schigal Broadway comedy will be presented at
the Gainesville little Theatre this weekend and June 4 to 6.
This is the last play of the current season and will star Bill
Stensgaard, Chuck LaPointe, and Cathy Huber.
LUVr WHICH was first produced in 1964, is directed by Eleanor
Roberts, director of UF Office of Public Functions. Mrs. Roberts has
contributed to a variety of Gainesville little Theatre productions.
Harry Berlin, played by Stensgaard, assistant director of UF
Physical Rant, is one of lifes failures who has been around the world
twice, and still does not understand what love is all about, and so is
determined to end it all by jumping off a bridge.
Milt Manville, played by LaPointe, a speech pathologist at the
Veterans Hospital, is Harrys old college buddy who has become a big
success in life, but sees his jumping off the bridge as the only solution
to his love problems.
THE LADY IN this love-triangle is Ellen Manville, first Milts wife,
then Harrys, and is played by Mrs. Huber.
Tickets for Luv can be reserved by calling the Gainesville Little
Theatre box office at 3764949 or by going to the theatre at 4039 NW
16 Blvd.
I WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM I
SATURDAY BAM IPM I
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KIDS AND MUSIC
Music is kids, and kids dig
music. Twilight concerts
sponsored by the Music
Department attract many UF
students and little children who
watch the light of day merge
into the shadows of night while
listening to music in the Union
Colonnade.
PHOTOS BY MIKE HENSON

FINAL CLEARANCE f||EynHP|~^7
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Wednesday, May 27,1970, The Floride Alligator,

Page 15



The
Florida
Alligator

i BOOKS |
New Book Blasts
Military Justice
Military Justice Is To Justice As Military Music Is To Music, by
Robert Sherrill.
(Harper and Row, $6.95)
The title of this angry analysis and denunciation of military justice
was borrowed from Clemenceau, and the anthor contends:
As epigrams go, this one is unusually accurate. Both military
music and military justice have purposes narrower than music and
justice; one is supposed to keep the boys pepped up, the other is
intended to keep them tamed down. But neither John Philip Sousa,
nor the Uniform Code of Military Justice is what it used to be, in its
effects on the men in the ranks."
Every year 100,000 servicemen face courts martial without bail,
trial by peers or guarantee of an impartial judge and due process all
basic Constitutional rights for other citizens. Their fates are often left
to whimsical commanders who rely on expedience rather than justice
to silence dissent and maintain discipline according to Sherrill.
He argues the Army convicts 95 per cent of all men court
martialed, and he uses the Presidio incident, the Dr. Howard Levy case
and others to question the evidence presented.
The stockade system of punishment without rehabilitation also
comes under fire.
Using a slick magazine style, Sherrill is able to entertain, but the
facts he presents are enough to hold a readers attention.
William Verigan(UPl)
*
The Environmental Revolution, by Max Nicholson.
(McGraw-Hill, 57.95)
British writer Max Nicholson, author of The System, comes
forward with another important ecology handbook, The
Environmental Revolution, A guide for the New Masters of the Earth.
Nicholson, optimistic and comprehensive, delving into all sides of the
issues, sees an awakening in man to the maltreatment and
degradation of the environment* and the sudden desire to do
something about it.
He points out, not without hope, that we barely have begun to
scratch the surface in dealing with the problems. The greatest
problem" today, he says, is to ensure that the governmental servants
of the citizens awaken from their widespread lethargy and ignorance"
of environmental issues and work with efficiency, zeal, and not least,
imagination.**
It is a revolution against technocracy, Nicholson says, and man
must develop an ecological eye ... reject and scrub out the
complacent image of Man the Conqueror of Nature, and of Man
Licensed by God to conduct himself as the earths worst pest."
Nicholson, an erudite historian and geographer as well, traces the
progress of ecology and conservation from the days of Teddy
Roosevelt to the 19605. And he shows an over-all view of the world as
it exists today.
Michael S. Barrett (UPI)
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FEATURING ROTARY CONNECTION

Queen Os Soul Here
For JFC Frida y

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Friday night is when Janis
Joplin will be here for the
Interfratemity Councils Spring
Frolics. With her on the bill will
BESTSELLER
LIST
(Compiled by Publishers* Weekly)
Fiction
LOVE STORY Erich Segal
THE FRENCH LIEUTENANTS
WOMAN John Fowies
DELIVERANCE James
Dickey
TRAVELS WITH MY AUNT
Graham Greene
THE GODFATHER Mario
Puzo
LOSING BATTLE Eudora
Welty
MR. SAMMLERS PLANET
Saul Bellow
THE GANG THAT COULDNT
SHOOT STRAIGHT
Jimmy Breslin
A BEGGAR IN JERUSALEM
Elie Wiesel
THE ANDERSON TAPES
Lawrence Sanders
' Nonfiction
UP THE ORGANIZATION
Robert Townsend
EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS
WANTED TO KNOW
ABOUT SEX David
Reuben
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS
Antonia Fraser
THE NEW ENGLISH BIBLE
Oxford University Press and
Cambridge University Press
LOVE AND WILL Rollo May
THE SELLING OF THE
PRESIDENT 1968 Joe
McGinnis
THE SENSUOUS WOMAN
J
I KNOW WHY THE CAGED
- BIRD SINGS Maya
Angelou
THE GRAHAM KERR
COOKBOOK Galloping
Gourmet
AMERICAN HERITAGE
DICTIONARY OF THE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
William Morris, editor-in-chief

Page 16

be Rotary Connection.
Joplins talent cant be
doubted. Shes had hit records
both singles and albums, the
most recent album being Mama
I Got Them Cosmic Blues
Again album which is selling
well and has some fine music on
it.
MISS JOPLIN began, as we all
must know, in the San Francisco
music scene with Big Brother
and the Holding Company. She
and the group split within the
last year or so and she formed a
band of her own with some of
file personnel of the old group
and some new ones. A leading
performer in that second group
was Snookie Flowers, a sax
player and top brass man
generally.
Now Joplin has a new backup
band new for the last month
or so and her sound should
have changed some. The way in
which it changed wont be
known until we hear her Friday
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Vk Mil* South 3500 S W 13 ** ST STof
of STof Holiday Inn ", ON BIVAN ARM LAM
j PHONI 378-2931

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 27,1970

night, but she has said about the
group that a country blues
influence is present with what
was there before.
Rotary Connection was here
before and everyone seemed to
like them. There are two lead
singers in the group a black
girl and a black guy and both
are good, together and apart.
The guys name I dont
remember, but the girl's name is
Minnie Ripperton. She has an
incredible stage presence. That's
a euphemism.
ROTARY HAS done several
albums three I think or maybe
four. The sound is one
influenced heavily by soul but
completely fresh and new. I
remember the bass player as
being particularly good.
The show begins at 8 pm.
but not on Florida Field.
Tickets are priced at $5.50 a
couple and are available at the
Union Box Office and local
record stores.
Gnrttoc\
# OVERHAULED Soedoftl
PASO )
GENERATOR SERVICE
x USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKA MERICARD.
Mon.Fri. Bam-7 pm Sot. til spm



By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
The Fifties. Now those were
the good old days. Actually they
werent at all but its fun to
think that.
Having fun thinking that is
w hat a thing at the Reitz Union
next week is all about. We all
have a chance to get back for a
while. Therell be seven old
movies from the good old days
shown that week.
I GOT THE idea for it while
drunk one night with some
similar pals and the people in the
Union were happy with the idea.
We got together, chose a bunch
of films, and theyre here.
We had at heart getting the
crummiest remnants of those
bobby socks and
hickies-on-the-neck days and
adding some finer (more
delicate) films made by a little
more serious (but far less
For Wally
No Plans
To Race
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) The
polliwogs are plentiful in the
little creeks right now, said
Wally Cox, the humorous little
man.
Its fitting in this time of
ecological awareness that Wally
speaks up. He has been a flower
and bird watcher most of his
life.
HIS BAG is nature. All
wildlife, flora and fauna alike,
has been his passion. While other
performers swim and ski or play
golf or tennis, Wally tramps the
Hollywood Hills and the Santa
Monica Mountains, discovering
streams and canyons untouched
by man.
Cox is working on a television
special of his own, Wally Coxs
Los Angeles. He is doing all the
photography himself.
There wont be any
buildings, cars, billboards or
works of men in it, the actor
explained. It will consist of
flowers, birds, trees, mountains,
greenery and running water, all
within the city limits.
EVERY OTHER day he
tramps the fields and hills,
sometimes without his camera.
A friend of Marion Brando
since childhood, the two men
see one another often, although
Brando doesn't share Wallys joy
for field and stream.
They do agree about clothes.
Wally dresses as casually as
possible. He has worn the same
suit on the television show for
four years. For variety he wears
different neckties.
When Mr. and Mrs. Cox
entertain at home the party is
usually restricted to a half dozen
guests. Any monuthan that, he
feds, eliminates the possibility
of good conversation.
For kicks Wally rides a
motorcycle. Slowly. He has no
plans to enter races.
f- JTyj-Sii Jlivi

Fifties Flicks: Hardee Har Har

financially successful)
moviemakers.
The resulting choice of films
may just have the potential to
take you back (if you want to go
back). All the films for all the
nights cost 25 cents a night to
get in. There are shows at 7 and
9:30 pm. in the Union Theater.
The week of memories begins
Tuesday night with Marilyn
Monroe in Bus Stop, a film
directed by Joshua Logan thats
been called her best
performance. Don Murray also is
in it. The picture was made in
1956.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT is the
kick in the head. On the same
giant bill is Rock Around the
Clock with Bill Haley and the
Comets and Girls Town with
Mamie Van Doren. Its almost
too much.
Heres the description the film
catalogue gives for Girls

Would you believe
me if I scud
that some people are_ -
going to Frolics g||J
just to see
Rotary Connection IS?
Em Yes!
IFC Spring Frolics 1 70 starring Janis Joplin and Rotary Connection,
this Friday at Bpm in Florida Field. Tickets are
only $5.50 PER COUPLE and going fast at:
JWRU Box Office. Record Bar, Recordsville
: / / v v-.* />* mV*ViVV ''
* ... *. A7i7m.V.7 * V tV.V..V.v, Y WAY- *,*!: *** ivv, / ** .v.v *

NEXT WEEK AT THE UNION

Town: A fast-moving story of
juvenile delinquency centering
around a young girls
rehabilitation in a detention
home and her dragstrip gangs
involvement in murder.
Starring in addition to Miss Van
Doren are Paul Anka, Mel Torme,
and a cast of thousands of
unknowns (then and now).
Rock Around the Clock is
pretty well known. Haley and
the Comets have done as much
as any to begin rock music. The
Platters are in it too.
Thursday night is going to be
a good one too. Its Jailhouse
Rock and Love Me Tender.
Os course Elvis is the star of
both. Love Me Tender was his
first. Its about a Southerner
who comes home. Elvis is the
Southerner. Jailhouse Rock is
about a guy who learns to play a
guitar while doing ten to twenty
for murder and gets out and
becomes a star. He gets the
bighead (thats what we always
used to say bighead) and falls

falls falls. His old buddies from
the prison help him back up up
up. Its going to be something
else.
FRIDAY NIGHT is the most
serious night of the week of
movies. We scheduled two for
that night both of them real
classics with incredible leading
men.
James Dean is the star of
Rebel Without a Cause, one of
his best and all of them were
damn good. Natalie Wood was
the co-star in this one as in
Splendor in the Grass and the
resulting picture is so beautiful.
Sal Mineo is in it too.
On the same bill is perhaps
even a better picture, The Wild
One with Marlon Brando and
directed by Stanley Kramer. The
story is a well known one a
gang of motorcyclists terrorize a
small town. Its absolutely
fantastic. This could be the best
movie thats been done about
the conflict between the young
and wild and the old and easy.

Widnwdiy, May 27,1970, Tha Florida Aiigator,

Brando, needless to say, is
powerful in the role.
SO THAT'S the week of
films. The main problem in
selecting them was to narrow the
field down. I ws tempted sorely
to order Senior Prom and a
host of other super losers but
the prospect of being able to
show the Brando picture and
another work of James Dean
here was too much to resist.
A great way to get the feeling
of what is going to happen here
next week is to go look at the
old posters in the glass case
across from the theater ticket
window on the second floor of
the Union. Theyre the originals
and say in a minute all that
crassness and wild funkiness that
was in The Fifties.
So stick your white socks on.
Get drunk behind your parents
back. Give your girl something
to remember you by on her
tender neck. Come back to the
time when we all were full of the
joy of our own simplicity and
youngness.

Page 17



>. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 27,1670

Page 18

The
Florida
Alligator

Sideline Policy Set
By SEC Coaches

POINT CLEAR, Ala. (UPI)
Southeastern Conference
athletic directors and football
coaches adopted a rule Tuesday
designed to give relief to fans
who are paying more for tickets
but seeing less of the game.
The ruling, in effect this fall,
would keep sideline spectators
15 feet instead of six feet away
from the playing field.
IT ALSO CALLS for the
wearing of armbands by persons
with sideline passes, making it
easier for police to patrol the
area.
The big thing is to help
people who pay for tickets to
see the game, said SEC
Commissioner A. M. Tonto
Coleman. It will also keep the
sidelines from being cluttered up
so the game can be better
played.
The new ruling came on the
final day of a two-day spring
meeting of athletic directors and
head football and basketball

NHL Boss Testifies
NEW YORK (UPI) National Hockey League President Clarence
Campbell, the last witness to testify on behalf of Curt Flood, said
today that professional hockey could not exist without a play-control
arrangement and pointed out that his sport has no such thing as
playing out options, a system used by both professional basketball
and football.
Campbell, however, also said that salary agreements, if
unsatisfactory to either the player or owner, are referred to an
arbitration panel of three and that hockey does not have a reserve
clause, the baseball system by which a player is bound to the team
which holds his contract.
Flood, the 12-year veteran of the St. Louis Cardinals who refused
to accept an off-season trade to the Philadelphia Phillies, is challenging
the reserve clause because he feels it favors the owners and is unfair to
players.
The player-control arrangement (in hockey) is reasonable and
necessary, Campbell testified. If it were not for that security which
the league affords to its members and its property interests it just
couldn't be done
Campbell pointed out that each year the 12 current NHL teams
contribute $200,000 for the expense of minor league clubs and
another SBOO,OOO to develop amateur leagues from which their talent
is drawn.
Earlier today, National Basketball Association Commissioner Walter
Kennedy testified that professional basketball operates with a player
option clause similar to the one used by pro football.

New Swim Coach
Naned By Dogs
ATHENS Pete Scholle,
assistant swimming coach at
Florida State University, the
past three years, has been named
head swimming coach at the
University of Georgia, Bulldog
Athletic Director Joel Eaves
announced Tuesday.
He succeeds Alan Gentry,
Georgia coach the past three
years, who recently accepted a.
similar position at the University
of South Carolina.
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coaches from the 10 SEC
schools.
LOUISIANA STATE
University Coach Charlie
McClendon explained that
players, coaches and trainers will
have an area between the
35-yard markers reserved for
them.
McClendon said football
prospects will no longer sit on
benches with the team but will
be seated in special areas of the
stands. They will see more of
the ball game than theyve ever
seen before, he said.
The coaches and athletic
directors also approved use of
solid officiating crews in
inter-conference football games.
Under the ruling, teams from the
SEC and another conference can
agree to have either officials
from just one of the conferences
or a split crew with members
from both conferences.
The old rule provided only for
split crews in inter-conference
football games.

GREAT NEWS!
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ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(except Body Shop repairs)
TO INTRODUCE YOU TO GAINESVILLE'S NEWEST CHEVROLET DEALER,
HARBER CHEVROLET IS OFFERING STUDENTS A 10% DISCOUNT ON YOUR
ENTIRE REPAIR BILL. A
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*

TEN UF SIGNEES

South All-Stars Named

A 33-man South roster for the
annual prep football all-star
battle against the North, August
1, was announced Saturday by
Carey McDonald, Executive
Secretary of the Florida Athletic
Coaches Assn.
The squad, which includes 10
future Gators includes:
Ends: Frank Mitchell, Miami
Springs; Joe Goldsmith,
Lakeland Kathleen; Henry

giimifmimnniinimiiiiinimiiiiniuniiinimimiiminuiiHitiiniiiiinuiiHiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiinnnniiiiit^
| Intramurals j
iiHiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii By Steve Rohan niiinfi
Strong second and third quarters propelled the Pi Kappa Alphas
into the Orange League Presidents Cup.
The Pikes won two sports, handball and tennis, both of which are
minor 120-point sports. But they could win softball and thus be the
leagues only three sport winner.
THE YEAR, however, was characterized by strong performances in
some sports with disastrous performances in other sports.
The Sigma Chis won two sports, but no wins in swimming, tennis
and handball had the same disastrous result on them.
THE FALL OF the Betas was due to four one-win sports.
The year started off slowly for the Pikes as they won only 50
points in the swim meet. Two victories in vollyball and a trip to the
semis in football put them in the running, although at the time they
were far down from the Betas.
They started the second quarter by going to the semis in bowling.
The Pikes, who later cheered the TEPs on to victory over the Betas in
softball, werent cheering for the TEPs at that point as the TEPs,
heavy underdogs, upset them.
NO VICTORIES in basketball certainly didnt help them however,
but the Pikes were now ready to make their move toward the Cup.
They ended the second quarter with a championship in handball and
opened the third quarter with a championship in tennis.
Then came what appeared to be the crucial sport for all the
contenders, golf. The Pikes placed ninth in the prelims but discovered
an illegal player in another fraternity and moved into the finals.
This may appear to be unfair at first glance but it is an established
practice for the fraternities to police themselves and the action taken
by the Pikes was not unique or unethical, and was what any other
fraternity would have done. As a matter of fact, some eight
fraternities visited the Intramurals Office to make different protests
concerning eligibility in golf.
THE PIKES WENT on to prove themselves in golf by moving from
eighth place to sixth place in the finals.
They finally took the lead for good in track when they finished
only one point behind the SAEs in the meet.
The stage was set for softball with them leading the Betas by only
five points. They promptly proved that they could take the pressure
by moving into the semis and the championship, and are still in the
picture.
So the Pikes, who, while not completely overpowering the league,
did manage to come up with the most points. The achievement is
further heightened when it is considered that the Pikes finished in last
place only two years ago.

Coleman, Riviera Beach
Kennedy; Mike Raymond, Key
West. Tackles: Tony Christiani,
Brandon; Thod Stirling, St.
Petersburg Gibbs; Dave
Hitchcock (signed with UF)
Winter Haven; Gene Killian,
Brandon; Jim McDowell (UF),
Vero Beach; Ken Booth (UF),
Sarasota.
Guards: Jim Bouie, Coral
Gables; Sid Joiner, Titusville;
Steve Brockman, Tampa

Robinson. Centers: Keith Reid,
Miami Palmetto; Walter Hobbs
(UF), Tampa Plant. Linebackers:
Ed McGlammory, Belle Glade;
Bill Rebol (UF), Fort
Lauderdale Senior; Mike Flynn,
Miami Columbus; Doug Burton,
North Fort Myers; Mitch Berger,
Coral Gables; John Lacer (UF),
Brandon; Lonnie Coleman,
Miami Jackson.
QB: Mike Moore (UF), Fort
Lauderdale Nova; Barry
Stafford, Plant City. Running
Backs: Donnie Crowder (UF),
Lakeland; Jack Brasington, Coral
Gables; John Wilson, Miami
Jackson; Bob Bums, Tampa
Chamberlain. Defensive Backs:
Bobby Bennett, Tampa Blake;
Decoven McCarthy, Auburndale;
Jimmy Ridell, Tampa
Hillsborough; Jim Revells (UF),
Merritt Island. Flanker: Joel
Parker (UF), Clearwater.
I Ujbfcto
ALL YOU CAN EAT!
X I
O I
o I
o it
o i
in |
TONIGHT
5-7 P M
(NO TAKE OUT, PLEASE)
TOUTT



Golf Team: See-Saws To NCAA Bid

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the second of a series that will
review Gator sports in the
1969*70 season with a look at
the prospects for the 1970-71
season.)
By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
Despite operating in a
see-saw fashion throughout
""
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... gets tip from Coach Bishop

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the golf year, Gator Golf Coach
Buster Bishop said he was very
pleased with his young golf
teams performance, a season
performance that has earned
them an invitation to play in the
NCAA Golf Championships June
23-26 at Columbus, Ohio.
THE YOUNG golfers started
the 1970 golf campaign by
winning the Senior Bowl in
January, but they sawd when
they should have seed and came
in second to FSU in the Florida
Intercollegiate during February.
Continuing in their
playground ways the linksters
won the tough Miami
Invitational, beating FSU, and
finished second again to FSU in
the Cape Coral Invitational.
Trying to mature they finished
eighth in the rugged Houston
All-American Invitational and
third in the difficult
Southeastern Conference Golf
Championships.
The SEC is a perfect
example of what Im talking
about, Bishop said. We had
two good rounds as a team and
then one bad round and wound
up third in the tournament. We
came in where we should have
come in playing this kind of
inconsistent golf.
COACH BISHOP quickly
pointed out, however, that he is
pleased with his team
considering how young they are.
Except for seniors Ron Mahood,
Wendell Coffee and captain Mike
Estridge, the remaining linksmen
are basically an all sophomore
group.
But a very talented group of
sophomores that is led by
All-SEC performers Andy North

(first team) and David Barnes
(second team). And right behind
them pushing for a top six
starting berth is Mike Killian,
Tony Kindred, Joel Eastman and
a lone freshman, Stacy Russell.
Coach Bishop said he doesnt
like to refer to this year as a
rebuilding year and he is quick
to point this fact out.
BISHOP SAID, We have
been operating with a new group
of players who have the
potential but so far not the
experience to put three or four
good below-par rounds of golf
together.
Last years golf team, which
was fifth in the NCAA
Championships as the defending
champions, was altogether
different from this years
youthful edition, Bishop pointed
out.
The 1969 squad was a
senior-led team captained by
National Amateur Champion
and three time All-American
Steve Melnyk. Also on that
powerful team was All-American
John Darr and starting seniors
Richard Spears and John Sale.
North and Barnes were the only
non-seniors that broke into the
starting six.
BUT THIS years bashful
bunch of swingers has been just
that, because no one man has
dropped down low enough
consistently to lead the team
like Melnyk did so very often
last year.
Coach Bishop said that when
the team goes to the NCAA
championship tourney in June
he really believes they have a
good chance to put it all
together and win it.
IF. WE CAN play good
consistent golf at the NCAA we
are going to be very close to
winning the championships,
said Bishop, Tve got that much
confidence in this group because
they have the right attitude.
But no matter what the
outcome at the NCAA the
1970-71 season promises to be a
little more steady with the
return of experienced linksmen
in the form of North, Barnes,
Stretch Caught
Stretching
Astro pitcher Larry Dierker
admits in the current issue of
Sport Magazine that San
Francisco slugger Willie
Stretch McCovey is the
toughest hitter hes ever faced.
When I came into the
league, says Dierker, I didnt
get McCovey out until the ninth
time I faced him. And that time
he was thrown out at third
trying to stretch a double.

Killian, Kindred, Eastman and
freshman Russell.
And add to that list Gary
Koch, the high school Florida
State Champion and U. S. Open
qualifier, who recently signed a

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WwfnKday, May 27,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

UF scholarship for next year.
But the 1970-71 season is a
long way off. The foremost
challenge now is the NCAA and
how to cart home another
trophy, maybe.

Page 19



Page 20

The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 27,1970

iri smuts sinners

Players Take Poll
GOING INTO the mail today to all members of the Major League
Baseball Players Association are the official ballots asking the players
to accept or reject a new contract with the club owners.
Marvin Miller, executive director of the association, said Monday he
would urge the players to accept the offer, which would bring the
players an estimated $4 million over a three year period.

The new proposal improves
playoff money distributed and
termination pay, and also seeks
improved scheduling as well as
certain considerations in meal
money allowances, moving
expenses and grievance
procedures.
The 162-game schedule,
however, is still under
consideration, with the owners
pointing out that long-term
radio and television contracts
prevent a shorter season.
The money agreement covers
the playoffs in particular. The
owners will absorb expenses, so
that the player pool increases by
a quarter of a million for each of
the next three years. Losers in
the world series and league
playoffs, as well as second and
third place teams are also in line
for more money.
* *
GALE SAYERS accepted an
award Monday night as the most
courageous player is pro
football but then said in an
emotional speech that the honor
should go to his cancer-striken
teammate Brian Piccolo.
Sayers, the all-pro halfback of
the Chicago Bears, who came
back from a knee operation and
regained his form as one of pro
footballs top runners, received
the George Halas Award as the
most courageous player at the
third annual dinner of the New
York Pro Football Writers.
Halas presented the award to
his star runner and said, In my
memory, and Ive been around a
few years, I doubt Ive ever seen
any athlete work so hard to
overcome an injury. But when
Sayers accepted the award, he
said that Piccolo, who was
operated on for a tumor before
the season ended, should have
received the award.
Think of Brian and the
courage he has shown the last
few months, not being sure at
any time what the score might
be. Brian Piccolo is a man of
courage and while this award is
mine tonight it will be Brians
tomorrow. I have grown to love
Brian Piccolo, Sayers said.
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 21 17 .553
St. Louis 20 19.513 Ift
New York 20 21 .488 2ft
Pittsburgh 20 23 .465 3ft
Montreal 16 24 .400 6
Philadelphia 16 25 .390 6ft
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 32 12 .727
Loa Angeles 24 18.571 7
Atlanta 23 18 .561 7ft
San Francisco 21 23 .477 11
Houston 20 24 .455 12
San Diego 19 28 .404 14ft
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Mtoto 30 13 .098
Mew Turk 24 2# .548 6ft
DsStodt 19 20 -487 9
flirt to 23 .442 10
HMfegtsa 18 23 .409 10ft
Hi riTnr~* 14 24 .348 13
WBST W L PCT GB
MtaMnsto 27 12 .692
-,gfnrr 27 14 .659 1
Gnfefttod 22 20 .524 6ft
ran tip 17 24.415 11
* CNWMO V.\ 54 24 .381 12ft
SSto 19 27 .325 14ft

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Eisenhower Does r Odd Jobs

Baseball buff David Eisenhower, son-in-law of
President Nixon, has taken a temporary job with
the Washington Senators, the White House said
Tuesday.
David, 22, will be doing odd jobs with the
American League club, helping on statistics and
writing profiles on players, a White House
spokesman said. He went to work Monday.
The job will be shortlived. David and his wife

Julie, 21, will fly to Japan June 26 to represent
Nixon at United States Day at the Osaka
Worlds Fair.
Young Eisenhower substituted for the
President on the opening day of the baseball
season last month by throwing out the first ball
in the traditional presidential opener here
between Washington and Detroit.