Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
All Amimm.

Vol. 62, No. 147

FSUs Flambeau
Staff Walks Out,
Make Demands
By RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff Writer
The staff of Florida State Universitys (FSU) newspaper walked off
the job until the FSU Board of Student Publications (BSP) initiates a
new means of editor selection.
The resignation of the Flambeau staff means the BSP becomes
responsible for putting out the newspaper and living up to an
estimated $6,000 of advertising commitments.
GARY SMITH, acting editor, said the main reason for the staff
resignation was because four student members of the BSP
participated in irregularities before and after the selection of the
editor. Smith refused to elaborate on the irregularities.
Smith asked the four student BSP members to resign or he would
consider impeachment proceedings against them.
The BSP selected Richard Gordon Leslie to be editor from June to
May. Leslie, an arts and science graduate student, said I had
indicated to the board that my actions were contingent to some
degree on theirs.
LESLIE ADDED, Im rather proud of the board because they
didnt require me to be interim editor, referring to the current
walkout period.
The BSP originally selected Jack Radical Jack Lieberman, FSU
(SEE 'FLAMBEAU' PAGE 2)
Strikers End Fast
After 256 Hours
By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writer
After 10 days and 16 hours, the hunger strike on the lawn in front
of Tigert has ended.
The strike came to an end Friday at 10 a.m. as the strikers ate a
celebration breakfast consisting of familia, egg hickel, milk shakes
and matzohs. The first meal for the strikers in more than 256 hours
was provided by Hillel Foundation, Miss Frieda Brown, and Assistant
Prof. John Mugar.
STRIKERS VOTED Thursday evening v to terminate the strike

i :
| Rep. Fuqua |
| Asks Troop j
! Withdrawal i
By Alligator Services
;

: Representative Don Fuqua, j;
: D-Fla., renewed his call for :j
i immediate withdrawal of :
|i American troops from :j
i Southeast Asia in a meeting :j
with members of the j
j: Indochina Crisis Committee j
i Friday.
: Once the decision to end :
: the war had been made, every :
American death in Indochina :
: was a needless loss, according i
> to Fuqua. j
AMERICAN TROOPS :
should be brought home as \
: rapidly as planes become jj
: available, Fuqua said.
: Fuqua has voted against \
: measures to cut off funds for \
; the Cambodian operation, j
I however. Since American ;j
troops are involved there, it j
would be dangerous to tie the :
j President's hands in this way, \
! he said.
: (SEE 'CAMBODIA' PAGE 2) >
i \
\ mJULmJUI-m mm mmmm a

The
Florida Alligator

Friday morning.
We felt all our demands had
been met, strike spokesman
Wayne Hieber said, so there
was no need to continue
striking.
The strike was definitely a
success, Hiebar said. We all
feel we succeeded.
I THINK WE went into this
hunger strike with limited goals,
realizing our potential was
success in this area. We
succeeded far beyond what we
expected.
The catalyst that brought an
end to the strike was a report by
one of the strikers concerning
the report of the gun control
committee to be released today
which is said to be favorable to
the strikers demands.
We werent striking until
everyone was disarmed on this
campus. We were striking until
the gun committee came out
with a favorable report, Hieber
said. It is unfortunate some
people dont realize that.
THE OTHER two main
striker demands having the
University Senate consider the
status of ROTC on the UF
campus and consider demands
from the Black Student Union
were met last week when the
(SEE 'HUNGER'PAGE 2)

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

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PHIL BANNISTER
ANY PIGS HERE?

After thorough investigation the Alligator
discovered that, yes indeed, UF did have pigs. The
pigs, owned by the agriculture department, are kept

DORM REPAIRED

JACKSON, Miss., (UPI)
The campus of Jackson State
College was almost deserted
Sunday for the first time since
two black youths were shot to
death 10 days ago during an
eruption of violence at the
predominantly Negro school.
' Workmen under the
supervision of the State Building
Commission removed the last
jpwjpwjji-.
THE TROUBLES of
Florida Field still arent
over cleaning is still
needed page 2
Campus Crier 12
Classifieds 10
Editorials..-. 8
Letters 9
Movies 10
Sports... 14

Jackson State Calm;
Students Hold Vigils

remnants of bullet-shattered
window glass and metal panels
from Alexander Hall, a girls
dormitory that was riddled by
gunfire from state highway
patrolmen May 15.
AUTHORITIES
MAINTAINED they received
sniper gunfire in the area of the
college when they moved in to
break up a noisy rock-throwing
demonstration by students.
Students insisted, however,
there was no sniper fire from the
dormitory and that the deaths of
the two Negroes, one a student
and the other a teen-ager, and
wounding of several other
students, were without
provocation.
The shattered dormitory had
become a symbol and rallying
point for students protesting the
shootings and a graphic focal r
point for dignitaries including
Attorney General John Mitchell
and Sen. Edward Brooke,
4 v * . .' <4 VV V. '* r * + # ¥ v

on the farm. It should also be noted, these pigs do
not carry guns, and contrary to popular opinion,
they do not wear uniforms.

/*- aSffJS^*4

Monday, May 25, 1970

R-Mass., who toured the college
facility.
STUDENTS HAD held
all-night vigils at the dorm the
past week when concern grew
that the panels and windows
would be removed by the state.
The windows were removed
Saturday, and a new
confrontation was headed off at
the last minute by Assistant
U. S. Attorney General Jerris
Leonard.
Leonard flew into Jackson to
assure disgrunteled students that
the evidence would be turned
over to federal authorities for
safekeeping.
STUDENTS HAD wanted the
dormitory left unrepaired until
after the funeral of 17-year-old
James Earl Green of Jackson
Friday.
The other victim, Philip L.
Gibbs, 21, a student at the
college, was quietly buried
shortly after the shooting at his
hometown of Ripley, Miss.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 25,1970

More Help Needed To Clean Florida Field

TOM KENNEDY
FLORIDA FIELD
... it gets cleaner
Mautz Highlights
Publications Fest
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Managing Editor
The democratic system may be slow and unresponsive, but until
you can find a better way, you had better stick with it, State
University Chancellor Robert Mautz said Friday night.
Mautz was the guest of honor at the annual student publications
banquet in the Reitz Union Arredondo Room.
MAUTZ TOLD the staff of the various publications that the
Florida State Legislature is mirroring some of the tremendous
frustrations brought about by the convergence of four great forces
in our society.
Mautz said the four forces are:
social upheaval for both blacks and whites, creating stresses and
strains unlike ever before.
the second industrial revolution, resulting in a rural population
unable to cope with the more technological society.
t a foreign policy emphasizing the preservation of peace
throughout the world resulting in what seems to be a continuation of
war.
the population explosion, with results far beyond the obvious.
THE CONVERGENCE of these forces has resulted in our
institutions being tested, he said, and the institutions have perhaps
failed to change as rapidly as they should.
But Mautz told of a Florida State University coed who is in the
process of proving that the system can work. She is lobbying to repeal
a law which provides for automatic suspension of a student arrested
for the sale or use of drugs.
Mautz was presented with a Student Publications Service Key
Award. Special Assistant to the President Rae 0. Weimer was made an
honorary member of Alpha Phi Gamma publications honorary.
THE STUDENT of the Year Award was presented to Business
Manager Mike Davis and the Outstanding Newcomer Award was given
to Gwenn Meyer, Seminole section editor.
Service key awards, for over one year of outstanding service in
publications, were presented to Doug Case, Phil Cope, Carol Still, Neal
Sanders, Jim Okula, John Sugg, Joyce Hughes, Ken Driggs, Kerry
Dupree, Tom Kennedy and Darrell Dobresk.
UlUlkha
*_- i it^rrioves
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be. responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

NO APOLOGY NEEDED FROM AA

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
Student volunteers have more
work ahead before Florida Field
is cleaned up, and the Athletic
Association (AA) may bring in
high-powered vacuum cleaners
to get broken glass out of the
turf.
About 20 volunteers worked
on the field Saturday morning
but did not succeed in getting all
the glass up, according to
Leonard Tanner, chairman of
Student Government
Productions (SGP).
MORE VOLUNTEERS will
be called later, but the date has
not been set, Tanner said.
SGP demanded last week that
AA officials apologize for
allegedly misrepresenting the
condition of the field after the
SGP Super Show. No apology
has been made as yet, Tanner
said.
I would like to see some
official statement made that it
(the field) was not as bad as they
thought, Tanner said.
ABOUT 90 per cent of the
litter could have been avoided
by prior planning, such as
providing trash cans on the field,
Tanner said.
. Although AA netted a
possible $4,500 from
concessions sold at the show,
they did not provide any
receptacles for trash, Tanner
said.
AA Business Manager Ray
Daniel said broken glass was the
real problem on the field, and
added that other litter had been
expected and would pose no real
problem.
NONE OF THOSE people
who were at the show would
have been willing to play
football on that field the next
morning, Daniel said.
His original istimate of $4,000
to $5,000 damage to the field
had been on the high side and
included some costs of some
repairs that would have been
made anyway, Daniel said.
Daniel said Assistant Athletic
Director Dan Beard was trying
to borrow a large vacuum
cleaner to get glass fragments
out of the turf. The machines
are used to clean golf courses
and Astroturf, and one may be
available from a golf club, Daniel
said.
AA PUBLICITY Manager
Norm Carlson said Thursday
there was never any attempt to

CHEESEBURGER SPECIAL
3 BURGER CHEF EQ
CHEESEBURGERS
Special good Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday §
"Food good enough \
to leave home for \
l L &aaH^iiJ
* 1
OFFER GOOD ONLY AT 715 N.W. 13th ST \ % / I

defraud anybody, and that he
had not been shown any
exaggerated or misrepresenting
statements attributed to him.
There will be no problem in
preparing the turf for the
football season, but the smaller
slivers of glass may never be
gotten out, according to Dr.
Granville Horn.
Horn, of the IFAS
Ornamental Horticulture
Department, is studying the field
for AA.
I dont think there was any

Hunger Strikers End Protest

FfBOM PAGE ONEjj
University Senate agreed to
consider these matters at its next
regular meeting Thursday.
Since the end of the strike,
various organizations either have
treated the strikers to free meals
or plan to do so within the next
week.
Friday afternoon First Step, a
sympathetic group, provided the
strikers with microbiotic food.
Sunday, the Gainesville Society

Flambeau Walks Out
ROMPA6E ONeI
Young Socialist Alliance leader as editor. The board later changed its
decision and picked Leslie.
Smith said advertising commitments for a 16-page supplement,
scheduled to come out Thursday, represented about a $2,000 loss if
the edition didnt go to press. Leslie said the paper could lose $6,000
in advertising revenue if die paper is not published this week.
ALL THE MEMBERS of the staff, between 30 and 40, have
walked off, Smith said. The resignation was unanimous. The
walkout started after Fridays publication. No one reported for work
Sunday.
Our argument is with the entire selection process, in that our staff
had no real voice in it, Smith said.
I have been given a vote of affirmation by the staff. Many will be
available for rehiring in the summer, Leslie said.
Friday the entire staff met with (FSU) President Dr. Stanley
Marshall, Smith said. He added Marshall was going to investigate the
situation.

Cambodia: Tactical Mistake

PAGE ONeJ
It was a tactical mistake for
the President to announce that
all troops would be withdrawn
from Cambodia by June 30,
Fuqua said.
FUQUA SAID he had met
with many student groups
protesting the war and was

maliciousness on anyones part.
Its just a problem you run into
when you allow glass bottles on
the field. They should never
allow glass on that field, by the
audience or anyone else, Horn
said.
UF ATHLETIC Director Ray
Graves recommended to the AA
last week they do not allow any
more audiences on the field.
Spring Frolics will be held on
Florida Field as scheduled, but
there are no plans to allow
spectators on the field.

of p riends (Quakers) served the
strikers lunch at the Quaker
meeting place.
IN THE NEXT week, The
Black Student Union and the
Student Mobilization Committee
have both invited the strikers to
meals this week.
Strikers have dismantled their
camp in front of Tigert and
have stored their equipment at
the Presbyterian Student Center.
People who loaned items to the
strikers may pick them up at the
center.

impressed with their sincerity
and knowledge of the issues.
Meeting with Fuqua were Dr.
John K. Mahon, chairman of the
Department of History; Dr. W.
Jape Taylor, College of
Medicine; Dr. Gladys Kammerer,
Department of Political Science;
Dr. Abraham M. Stein,
Department of Biochemistry;
and Barry Mesch, Department of
Religion.



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( Blue Key Taps j
V V
:: Thirty-six students were tapped Saturday into Florida Blue ::
:: Key, UF leadership honorary fraternity. :j
Those tapped were Rick Lazara, Dave Holbrook, Mac Stein, :j:
Tom Albdnour, Mike Davis, Eddie Floyd, Sol Fleischman, John $
Sugg, Richard Spool, Frazer Solsberry, Archie Maldonado and j:
Jj Gavin Lee. :
:j: Others tapped were Alan Howes, Scott Gabrielson, Tom Ball, : :
Harvey Alper, Mitch Dasher, Miles Wilkins, Bob White, Charles j:
£ White, Marvin Sylvest, Henry Solares, Andy Owens, and Bob j:
5 Morris. >:
Also tapped were Bob Martin, Walter Morgan, Barry Malter,
Howard Lubel, Scott Holloway, Ira Hatch, Bob Griffin, Jack :
Dicks, Kevin Davey, Bob Cusumano, Bruce Bodreau, and >
Ronnie Bloom.
Â¥ Seven people were given honorary Blue Keys: Father Michael :
Gannon, James Wershow, Dr. Clement H. Donovan, Dr. Henry :
Â¥ Schmucher, Dr. Robert Gaither, Dr. James Wattenbarger, and :
Dr. Harry Sisler.
The newly-tapped members were taken to lunch with the $
: FBK brothers at Holiday Inn.
v They will be initiated June 2.

Gator Editor
Selection Set
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
The Board of Student
Publications (BSP) has again
moved the date for editor
applications from June 1 to May
27.
Brenten Myking, director of
student publications and
executive secretary for BSP said
the application date was moved
because it would have pushed
the voting date to June 3.
THAT IS getting into the
last week of classes and is not a
very good time to hold the
elections, Myking said.
Applications can be picked up
for the positions of summer
editor and managing editor, and
fall-winter editor and managing
editor in room 330 of the Reitz
Union.
Deadline for turning in the
applications is May 27 at 5 p.m.
also in room 330.
THIS IS THE second time in
as many quarters that the BSP
has moved the original
application dates back.
Last quarter the BSP moved
the dates back two weeks to
solicit more applications.
This quarter the date was
moved from May 18 to May 27
for the same reason.
THEY MAY HAVE had a
reason for changing the date, but
I feel that the board had
preconceived conceptions of the
candidates* qualifications who
had applied by the regular date,
said Harvey Alper, new BSP
member.
I think the board members
wanted to continue the
precedent that they started last
year, Alper said.
Miss Karen Eng, 4JM, is the
only applicant for editor-in-chief
for the summer quarter. She is
presently Alligator managing
editor.
APPLYING FOR the
managing editorship for the
summer quarter are Ken Driggs,
4JM, Seminole 1969-70 editor
and Les Gardieff, 3JM, Alligator
itaff writer.
Neal Sanders, 3JM, Alligator
assignments editor and Sam
Pepper, 4JM, former Alligator
sports editor and current
co-editor of the Florida Probe,
are applying for the position of
editor-in-chief for the winter-fall
term. Also applying is Ken
Driggs.
Alligator staff writer jdiss
Phyllis Gallub, 4JM, has applied
for the fall-winter Alligator
mtmging editorship.

The Citroen.
It's so difieienL it will take
courage to bug It
SF (m M"
After you get to know it, it will take
courage to buy any tiling else.

No matter how often most guys tell themselves that
other peoples opinions dont matter, they kind of still do.
Unless something happens thats really convincing.
Well, were going to try to make that happen. Con Convince
vince Convince you that the Citroen, ton for ton and dollar for dollar
is the finest, best engineered, and safest car in the world.
Bar none.
Tall order. We kn page alone.
So were going to ask you not to believe anything we
say here about the $4,000 Citroen. Fair enough?
Not to believe that it sips gas like a seventeen hundred
dollar Volkswagen (27 mpg) even though its a full sized
luxury car that will seat five in patrician comfort.
Not to believe that its air/oil suspension virtually makes
bumps, potholes and ridges disappear. (This is the same
suspension that Rolls Royce uses on the Silver Shadow).
Not to believe that our test drivers couldnt turn it over
until they finally cannonbaUed it into a right-angle turn at

Citroen
THE ONE CAR THATS ALL CARS IN ONE
EDS MEHARI CITROEN
Soles & Service
4308 N.W. 13th St. 372-7044
Specialists in All Foreign Car Repairs

ZPG Sponsors State Official
In Birth Control Talk Tonight

PHYLLIS GALLUB
a -a
Miivgnof oiin nnw
Birth control will be the topic of discussion in
Little Hall, room 109, tonight at 8.
Zero Population Growth (ZPG) is presenting a
speech and discussion by Dr. A. F. Caraway, chief
of the Bureau of State Health Department in
Jacksonville, Dr. Seymour Block said Sunday.
HE WELL FILL us in on the work which has
been done in this area, as well as the needs and
problems, Block said.
This question is of particular interest in
Gainesville at this time because the two birth
control clinics here were closed in February due to
lack of funds, he said.
We will want to discuss this with Caraway. He is
in charge of all the birth control programs in
Florida.
THE COUNTY and UF have been trying to work
together to get the clinics re-opened, Block said.

better than 100 mph. (Dont worry, our drivers are fine.)
Not to believe that its turning circle is smaller than any
car even approaching its size (all that means is you get
much more control with much less effort).
Not to believe that almost every motoring magazine
editor has said things like safest car in the world, most
comfortable car in the world, most innovatively engi engineered
neered engineered car in the world, best handling, most luxurious,
and on and on.
No. Dont believe any of that.
Just go to a Citroen dealer and drive one yourself. Drive
it hard. In the roughest conditions you can find. With a
closed mind and a narrow eye.
Well, obviously we think that kind of test drive will
open your mind. And your eyes. And absolutely convince
you of everything weve said here. ''
And after that if you can still buy anything but a
Citroen, maybe courage will be the wrong woid to describe
what youll be doing.

Monday, May 25,1970, Tha Florida AMaator,

Now, he said, they hope that by getting a state
representative involved they will be able to get
something done.
You dont know until you investigate. Maybe
Caraway can be the catalyst, he said.
Something has to be done because the number of
children bom to indigent mothers generally rely for
support upon the county. This means they place a
heavy burden on the taxpayer, Block said.
There will be a chance to ask questions after the
speech, Block said.
SEPUL Meet Tonight
Students for Equal Protection Under the Law
(SEPUL), will meet tonight at 8 in room C-4 in the
colonade of the Reitz Union.
The organization is inviting all signers of the
refund request and all other students interested in
the Work of SEPUL.

Page 3



Page 4

l The Florida AMfrtor, Monday, May 25,1970

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TH/S /S GATOR COUNTRY! SUNNV BARLOW

Vessir. After decades of bragging that 'Gator
Country was that area west of 13th Street and south
of University Avenue, one of our intrepid

'Pennies For Pollution Campaigns

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
Brothers of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity plan to
collect Pennies for Pollution tonight from UF
dorm residents.
Pennies from the campaign will be given to the
Balance Fund Foundation, a national organization
which is the promoter of the environmentalist sign
of man in balance with his environment.
THE PI KAPPA Phi brothers will go through the
dorms with buckets to collect the pennies, and with
five petitions which they will ask the students to
sign.
The petitions:
ask the sign for balanced environment to be

Africa Day Set
About 40 UF African
students will celebrate Africa
Day today to commemorate
the signing of the charter
establishing the Organization of
African Unity (OAU).
The charter was signed on this
date seven years ago. The
organization now has 42
member nations on the African
continent.
A symposium will be held
Wednesday evening at 7:30 in
room 122 of the Reitz Union
when the topic, Will the OAU
Survive? will be discussed by
faculty members in African
studies.
TOYTIME
Toys Hobbies
Juvenile Furniture
A complete line of swim
goods and playground
equipment.
1315 N.W. 16th Ave.
376-4576 Phone 376-4577

La Bonne Vie
LEASING NOW!
A choke of 4 apartments
all with
Abundant living space,
emphasizing outdoor living.
e 1,2,&3 Bedroom Apis, and 2 Bedroom townhouses
from $156
Draperies and fumishingi throughout
Walk-in Closets in Master Bedroom
Dishwashers
e 2 Club Size Swimming Pools
Abundant Parking
e Tennis Courts
e Fabulous Lounge Area i
Recreation Room
o Attentive Management
9 & 12 Month Leases
3 Month Summer Leases
1840 S. Main Street at SW 16th Ave.
Telephone 368-3457

photographers found a place that certainly fits the
name more than UF.

used in a postage stamp.
6 oppose the use of disposable bottles.
6 support Senator Gaylord Nelsons proposed
constitutional amendment which guarantees U. S.
citizens a clean and decent environment.
6 call for repeal of Florida abortion laws.
6 support a national cabinet-level post for
population and environment.
THE CAMPAIGN will be directed by Frank
Telaez, a Pi Kappa Phi brother.
According to Hal Barcey, director of the Balance
Fund Foundation, the money collected by the
campaign will be turned over to the foundation,
which will use it for the purchase of a typewriter.
This is the last major pollution (hive of the
quarter, Barcey said.

KS Bias Charge
Sent To Committee
By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
Charges of racial discrimination against Kappa Sigma fraternity will
go before the Committee on Student Organizations, but a hearing
probably will not be held until next quarter.
Dean of Men Frank T. Adams Jr. advised committee chairman Dr.
Frank Maturo Jr. to investigate the charges after a meeting with
Interfratemity Council (IFC) President Charles Brackins last week.
IFC ASKED that the committee consider the charges after
suspending recognition of Kappa Sigma in a preliminary investigation.
If the charges are sustained, the committee may recommend that
recognition of Kappa Sigma be withdrawn, according to Maturo.
It is the first time the committee has considered withdrawing
recognition of an organization, according to Maturo.
THIS IS A novel situation for me and, I am sure, for the other
members of the committee, he said.
Committee members will be informed of the matter at their regular
meeting Thursday and will decide then how to deal with it. Because of
a crowded agenda, the hearing is unlikely to be held before next
quarter, according to Maturo.
Minutes of the IFC hearing would not be made available before the
hearing, he said.
I AM NOT inclined to make this part of the public record at this
time, Maturo said.
Kappa Sigma comptroller Chris Tompkins earlier characterized the
IFC investigation as an inquisition and said he thought the faculty
committee would be more interested in the facts than the IFC.
Brackins asid he felt the IFC had a solid case against the fraternity,
although discrimination was hard to prove.
Rains Postpone Plaza Musical
Tell It Like It Is, billed as a folk musical about God, was
postponed Sunday due to rain.
The folk musical was scheduled for 1 p.m. Sunday on the Plaza of
the Americas. It was postponed when Gainesville received .43 inches
of rain.
The date for the performance of the musical will be announced
later this week.
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Poison Gas Goes
iM -W -'''V-I --
North To Alaska

WASHINGTON (UPI) The White House
decision to consider shipping controversial nerve gas
to Alaska instead of Oregon failed Sunday to
dampen a congressional demand the chemical
warfare agent be kept out of the country entirely.
Sen. Warren G. Magnuson, D-Wash., who
introduced an amendment last week to bar funds
for shipping the gas from Okinawa to the United
States, told UPI Sunday the White House decision
did not alter his plans.
I CANT understand the mechanics of the logic
when they say they wont send it into Oregon and
Washington because of problems involved and then
we sent it to Alaska, Magnuson said.
Alaskas three congressmen could not be reached
for comment.
The White House dropped its proposal to ship
13,000 tons of the potentially deadly gas to Bangor,
Wash., and then by rail to the Umatilla Ordnance
Depot at Hermiston, Ore. The Pentagon followed
that with a statement that it was now considering
Kodiak, Alaska, as the site.
BUT MAGNUSON said, It doesnt change

Two Charred Bodies Found By Fishermen

ANDYTOWN, Fla. (UPI)
The charred bodies of a woman
and a young girl who may have
been doused with gasoline and
burned alive were found Sunday
in a small clearing between U. S.
Highway 27 and a roadside
canal.
Dr. Jack Mickley, Broward
Countys assistant medical
examiner, said the victims may
have been a mother and a
daughter. Their identities,
however, were not immediately
known.
IT WAS ONE of the worst
things Ive ever seen, Mickley
said. My feeling is that
someone poured a flammable
liquid over the bodies while they
were still alive and set them on
fire.
Mickley made an initial
examination of the bodies
Sunday afternoon, but said he
would know more Monday after
performing a detailed autopsy.
Sheriffs Lt. Daniel Heim said
there was no apparent motive
for the slaying.
THE BODIES WERE found
by a fisherman who was going to
launch his boat into the canal
from a partially-finished boat
ramp some two miles south of
Andytown on U. S. 27.
Dr. Mickley said X-rays of the
charred bodies indicated they
had not been shot. He placed
their time of death at about 11
p.m. Saturday.
Sheriffs deputies hoped to
identify the woman through one
of her hands that was not severely
burned, plus what an
investigator called some
unusual dental work. Both the
girls hands and feet were burned
off, investigators said.
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investigators found the charred
remains of a purse and some
other personal items.
Dr. Mickley said the woman
appeared to be between 30 and

"...kind of a mixture of Leadbelly,
a steam engine, Calamity Jane,
Bessie Smith, an oil derrick and
rot-gut bourbon...
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in Florida Field. Tickets are only $5.50a couple
and sellinq fast at: mu Box Office Rec r d Bar ;
Recordsville

anything as far as Im concerned, unless the people
of Alaska want it.
It appeared the citizens of Kodiak were as
divided on the controversy as were the citizens of
Hermiston.
Mayor Pete Resoff of Kodiak called the decision
like getting a Christmas present of a sack full of
snakes.
BUT KARL ARMSTRONG, editor of the Kodiak
Mirror, represented the other viewpoint, said the
risk of exposure to the gas was worth the extra
payroll to the town.
Magnuson said the gas should be destroyed. I
dont think it should be around any place at all. If
its not needed in our defense arsenal it ought to be
destroyed.
But the Defense Department said the gas was
needed. These munitions are part of our national
security deterrent stocks, the Pentagon said
Saturday in its announcement that we are studying
the federal facilities available at Kodiak, Alaska, to
see if moving the munitions there would be
feasible.

40 years of age. She was wearing
a dress. The girl, he said,
appeared to be about 12- to
14-years-old and was wearing
jeans and a short blouse.

( JV.V.V.%V*W.V.V#V%VAVA%V.VA%VAW.WAV.V.V.V.%V.VrfWWWr*rrM-Wr*..
i Nixon Promises
%
{Kent Investigation
J: WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon will appoint this
week a high-level commission to get to the bottom of the Kent
j: State tragedy in which four students were shot dead by
National Guardsmen, an administration official said Sunday.
White House Communications Director Herbert G. Klein
made the disclosure as he raised the possibility of continued
American air strikes inside Cambodia in support of South
Vietnamese forces after U. S. ground forces withdraw June 30.
ij: KLEIN SAID Nixon would name to the Kent State
commission prestigious individuals with the ability to look
with an unquestionable investigative mind at all the facts.
The four students at Kent State, a university in Kent, Ohio,
>: were shot May 4 during a rally protesting Nixons decision to
:j send American forces into Cambodia.
>: The following day Kent President Robert I. White urged
Nixon to appoint a commission to investigate the shootings with
i; the same thoroughness that went into the Warren Commission
: investigation of President John F. Kennedys assassination.
KLEIN SAID young White House staff members have fanned
: out to campuses in all sections of the country in the past week
in a previously unpublicized move to see how we can better
: communicate with students.
: He was interviewed on television, CBS Face the Nation.
: Asked if the United States would give logistical or air support
S to South Vietnamese forces remaining in Cambodia after the
: promised American withdrawal, Klein said:
: Our aim is to protect the security of American forces.
| Whether there will be a specific strike after June 30,1 wouldnt
rule it in or out.

Monday, May 25,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 25,1970

Page 6

- - w #
| UP I Around
!... The World 1
;! !
ft SAIGON American 852 Stratofortresses flew scattered :
j: bombing missions over South Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos £
i Sunday, hitting targets from the air as monsoon rains began to £
£ reduce the effectiveness of ground operations. £
In the only significant ground activity reported, Cambodian £
£ and South Vietnamese troops were reported to have moved into £
£ the Mekong River town of Tonle Bet in Cambodia. A Cambodian £
£ military spokesman said they were cleaning out the last pockets £
£ of resistance in and around the town that had been held by Viet £
£ Cong and North Vietnamese troops since May 11. £
£ LIMASSOL, Cyprus Part of the arms stolen Saturday from £
£ Limassol police headquarters have been covered and SO persons
£ were arrested by police seeking the 70 raiders who escaped with
:! the weapons, police said Sunday.
The weapons were stolen early Saturday in a lightning raid on :£
the police building by 70 Greek Cypriots who cleaned out the
ft armory and left the guards bound and locked in jail cells.
... The Nation |
PITTSBURGH Independent steelhaulers returned to their |
jj jobs Sunday, ending a two-month strike that slowed the delivery f.
:j of steel to a trickle. :j
; The steelhaulers, seeking to gain the right to represent :
£ themselves in negotiations with the various steel companies, £
j: went on strike last March 25. j:
£ HOUSTON Vice President Spiro T. Agnew urged the £
£ nations of the world Sunday to rise above narrow self-interest £
£ and work together to make the next 10 years the decade £
£ against disease. £
:£ The solution to the problem of cancer will take diligent ;
:£ research, long-term investment of time and energy, and ; :j
: optimistic faith that the problem can be solved, and a £
: dedication to the improvement of human life, he told the 10th >
> International Cancer Congress. 5
: Is this not what your youth are demanding, and is this not ai|
: proper battle for them to join? ij
NEW YORK An advertisement signed by 67 New York £
j: Daily News editorial employes condemning U. S. actions in j:
Indochina ran in the New York Times Sunday after the News £
: refused to print it. ft
: The ad, costing $l,lOO was submitted to the News Friday :
j: night but the paper's advertising department rejected it without j
Ijjj explanation, a spokesman for the employes said. A spokesman £
]\ for the paper later said the ad was turned down by £
: management. £
The ad reads: £
The following editorial employes of the New York Daily S
| News condemn our government's actions in Indochina as
> abhorrent, as a source of daily atrocities, and in contradiction to ij:
> the historical principles of this nation.
NEW Y(RK The New York Times and its printers reached
a tentative contract agreement early Sunday, averting a i|:
shutdown of the newspaper. £
The agreement, which must be ratified by Local 6 of the j
International Typographical Union, provides for a wage increase ft
of 41.69 per cent spread over three years, a cost of living clause .ft
and unique language allowing the union to break the contract if S
> federal wage-price controls should be imposed that would £
; invalidate the wage increase. ft
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Mass Transportation
A Must For Florida

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Sen.
Ralph Poston and Rep. Vernon
Holloway are mass transit
nuts and dont mind
admitting it.
With Disneyworld threatening
to flood the state with
thousands even millions of
additional tourists by 1975,
these Miami legislators are
convinced time for starting to
plan a balanced system to
move great masses of people by
means other than automobile is
running out.
THEIR HOPES for a feeble
start are pinned on a bill far
down on the calendars of both
houses doing away with the
restriction on expenditure of
vast sums of gasoline tax revenue
for any purpose except roads.
Roads are still the primary
means of moving traffic and will
be for many, many years to
come.
But Florida must start
planning for the future a
coordinated, integrated
transportation system to move
masses of people, Poston said
in an interview.
HE RECALLED that studies
show that unless other means
of moving people are provided
Interstate 4 from Tampa to
Orlando must be expanded from
era
moves]

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four to 16 lanes by 1975 to take
care of traffic generated by
Disneyworld.
This could be a prime target
area for planning, he said,
citing as an example the
limitation of the present McCoy
airport near Orlando.
A study might show a need
to re-locate the airport to
Disneyworld, he said.
BOTH POSTON and
Holloway said such things as
monorails are not justified by
the present density of
population in any urban area.
Poston opined that the first
step will be to buy larger
right-of-ways and plan corridors
in the center strip of
expressways for fast trains to
carry large numbers of people
into the heart of metropolitan
centers.
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Another possibility, he said, is
express buses, with turnoffs and
parking areas provided off of
expressways for discharge and
pickup of riders.
FUNDS ALSO could be used,
Holloway said, to plan and
purchase areas outside urban
centers where people could park
their cars and board fast buses
for downtown.
Holloway got the officials of
Tallahassee so excited about the
prospects that federal funds are
being applied for to plan such an
area to move traffic to and from
the Capitol building.
Poston said small amounts of
gas tax funds could be used as
seed money to attract millions
of dollars in federal funds for
mass transportation planning.
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Reporter Held 8 Hours By Viet Cong

PHNOM PENH (UPI) The Cambodian soldier said the
road to Takeo was open.
He was wrong.
five miles past his checkpoint, UPI photographer
Kyoichi Sawada and I were stopped and detained
Saturday by the Viet Cong.
THE VIET CONG courteously held us for eight hours,
then escorted us back to no-mans-land and allowed us to
return to Phnom Penh Saturday night.
The incident occurred on the Phnom Penh-Takeo
Highway 31 miles south of the Cambodian capital.
At 1:35 p.m. a black-trousered soldier stopped our car
and we-stepped into a semicircle of pointed guns.
THE VIET CONG smiled and bowed. We also smiled,
but nursed fear inside.
Sawada and I were invited to walk down u tree-lined
road that led to another road, Highway 3.1 joking down
the narrow dirt road, we saw dozens of black-trousered
soldiers lurking in bushes.

Congress Turns Attention
To Domestic Concerns

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Congress, while continuing the
big degate over Cambodia,
Europeans
Fear Pullout
By America
ROME (UPI) Secretary of
State William P. Rogers flew to
Rome Sunday for talks with
Allied foreign ministers, likely to
be dominated by European fears
of a major American troop
pullout in mid-1971.
Diplomatic sources said
Rogers will seek to give a new
push to Allied attempts to open
negotiations on troop cutbacks
by both the Western and
Communist Warsaw Pact
alliances.
SO FAR THE Soviets have
cold shouldered all such efforts.
Rogers will attend the annual
spring meeting of North Atlantic
Treaty Organization (NATO)
foreign ministers here Tuesday
and Wednesday. He flies to
Madrid Thursday to renew the
U. S.-Spanish defense pact.
European NATO leaders were
known to feel deep uneasiness
that the United States may cut
back sharply its present, strength
of about 310,000 troops in
Europe after June 1971.
France pulled but of the
military side of the alliance in
1966 and Canada is slashing her
10,000-man NATO force in
Germany this year by about
one-half.

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zeroes in this week on domestic
problems of pollution, the rising
national debt, whitecollar crime,
the supersonic airplane and its
own ethics.
The Senate plans another
week of arguments over
attempts to write an end to the
Cambodia military exercise.
IN THE HOUSE, the Ways
and Means Committee on
Monday hears the Nixon
administration appeal for an
increase of up to sl6 billion in
the national debt ceiling to cover
government borrowing.
The panel is sure to approve
an increase in the $377 billion
ceiling in light of forecasts of a
budget deficit of at least $l.B
billion in this fiscal year, and up
to $8 billion in the next year,
starting July 1.
Later this week, the House
will vote whether to appropriate
another $290 million for
development of the controversial
supersonic airplane, which
liberals claim will cause a major
noise pollution problem.
THE HOUSE ALSO is certain
to approve creation of a new
House-Senate committee on
environment and technology to
deal with environmental and
pollution problems.
Whitecollar crime gets
attention in the House also,
when that body takes up a
measure designed to curb the use
of secret Swiss bank accounts
used to hide funds from tax
collectors.
The bill requiring Americans
to disclose their foreign financial
transactions and banks to
photocopy checks, is supported

TOLD THE ROAD WAS OPEN

We declined with thanks. The invitation wasnt pressed.
Then we were invited into a wooden house at an
intersection. We compromised by squatting in the shade,
hoping that by remaining cohspicuous some of the passing
bicycle and motorbike riders would report our
predicament.
WE WERE TOLD we would remain in captivity at least
until morning.
Darkness obscured the paddy landscape. We were
offered food but refused it.
Finally, a Viet Cong lieutenant informed us we would
be allowed to return to Phnom Penh, but would have to
see the chief before leaving.
WE SPOKE IN English and one Viet Cong who
understood served as interpreter in the strange interview
that followed.
A wide range of questions and answers were exchanged.
Among other things, the chief, speaking in Vietnamese,
said he was childless and had been separated two years

by the administration.
REGARDING THEIR own
ethics, House members will be
required to disclose their outside
speech-making fees of more than
S3OO and their creditors to
whom they owe at least SIO,OOO
under a bill which comes up
Tuesday.
The Senate, meantime, starts
another week of debate over an
attempt to legislate an end to
the U. S. incursion into
Cambodia. But no vote on the
proposal by Sens. John Sherman
Cooper, R-Ky., and Frank
Church, D-Idaho, is in sight.
The proposal would deny the
President funds for retaining
U. S. forces in Cambodia beyond
June 30 unless Congress
specifically sanctions another
forary into that country.
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from his wife, who is in Hanoi.
The chief said, There are seven million people in
Cambodia. All of them want Prince Sihanouk to return.
The old people all have his picture on the wall, but hide it
when the Lon Nol troops come. We are here to restore
Sihanouks government and wipe out the graft and
corruption of the Lon Nol regime.
ON AMERICA AND Americans, the Viet Cong chief
said, They have been causing trouble all over the world
for years. Now they have come here to try to prop up the
Lon Nol government which is so weak it cannot find
enough Cambodians to fight for it.
We were placed aboard a Mercedes automobile and
taken five miles down the road past groups of silently
watching Cambodians along the roadside.
In convoy with a small station wagon and the
lieutenant leading on a motorbike, the Mercedes headed
back toward Phnom Penh. At a kilometer marker, the
motorbike and station wagon turned back, and we were
allowed to walk away.

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Monday, May 25,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 25,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

L^^T-K^T-TUfvw'iAflAjtnJ
We wz7/ m/55 you John McCormack, but we shall carry on with the same sure
hands ..."
CBS Charged

WASHINGTON A caustic White House memo,
intended for internal use only, accuses the Columbia
Broadcasting System of irresponsibility and
questions whether the Federal Communications
Comission should investigate.
All that holds back the White House from
referring the charges to the FCC, an aide told this
column, is concern that the motive might be
misunderstood.
Since Vice President Agnews attack upon the TV
networks, CBS has been the boldest about
continuing its criticism of the Nixon
Administration. Some aides fear, therefore, that an
FCC investigation would look like an attempt to
intimidate CBS.
The White House memo, charging that CBS has
been involved in highly questionable activity,
cites these alleged incidents:
The CBS news department (1) faked honor
scenes from Vietnam on at least three occasions; (2)
planned a staged invasion of Haiti; (3) staged
incidents of police brutality during the 1968
Democratic convention; and (4) arranged to film an
illegal pot party in Chicago.
The memo suggests tartly that CBS shouldnt be
allowed to use freedom of the press to get away
with fraud by the press.
Attached to the memo is a report from the
Pentagon on the phony horror scenes. The most
dramatic was an October 7, 1967, film of a GI
attempting to slice the ear off a dead enemy soldier.
Alleges the Pentagon report: Don Webster and
John Smith of CBS were involved in an incident in
which a soldier attempted to cut off the ear of a
dead enemy soldier with a knife furnished by
Smith.
After the film was shown on the Walter Cronkite
news show, Specialist George A. Pawlaszky was
arrested for the deed. Continues the Pentagon
report:
Both Smith and Webster were subpoenaed at the
trial .. but neither appeared Specialist
Pawlaszky was found guilty as charged. At the
request of the American Embassy, no further action
was taken against Smith, who was listed as a
principal in the case.
Two years after the ear-cutting episode, the same
Don Webster narrated another knife scene. A South
Vietnamese soldier was filmed on Nov. 3, 1969,
stabbing a captured Viet Cong in the presence of
U. S. personnel.
The Pentagon report alleges that Webster refused
to cooperate with file Army investigation, claiming
protection of news sources. The investigation
established that the film was taken by a
Vietnamese and that Webster was not present during
the filming.
The American Embassy later reported that the
CBS-film was a cut and paste job involving
different locales and personnel. The Army was
unsuccessful in gaining the assistance of CBS
during the investigation. To date, the personnel
involved in the incident have not been identified.
Again on February 17, 1970, CBS showed a

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors
Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Merry-Go-Round
liiiiiiitiiiiuiiigiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiisyiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiii
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIW
by Jack Anderson
South Vietnamese soldier covering the face of a
detainee with a towel and pouring water on it,
thereby restricting his breathing. Also included was
a brief shot of an alleged U. S. adviser watching the
incident.
But CBS again refused to cooperate with the
Army investigators who, consequently, have been
unable to identify the personnel involved. In
contrast, NBC furnished the Army with full
information about a filmed beating incident that a
U. S. officer watched, leading to disciplinary action.
CBS news director Gordon Manning explained to
the Defense Department: It is our policy to protect
the security of our people in the field and the
sanctity of news judgments and editing processes.
There can be no defense for faking the news, and
CBS would be better advised-to cooperate with the
Army in clearing up the allegations.
Rap Browns Whereabouts The Central
Intelligence Agency has been asked to investigate a
report that black militant H. Rap Brown, high on
the FBls most wanted list, has slipped out of the
country and joined fellow rabble-rouser Eldridge
Cleaver in Algeria. Brown ducked out on his trial for
allegedly inciting a riot in connection with the May
1967, racial disorders in Cambridge, Md. The report
that Brown is now in Algeria, though unconfirmed,
is considered highly reliable.
Captured Newsman Richard Dudman, the St.
Louis Post-Dispatch reporter captured by the Viet
Cong in Cambodia, never let danger interfere with
getting the facts. Colleagues recall that a grenade
exploded near his car during the 1965 Dominican
civil war. Dudmans two companion journalists
dived from the auto into the gutter. Dudman
glanced quickly up toward the balcony from which
the grenade came, made a brief scribble in his
notebook, then dived from the car. Reports filtering
out of the Cambodian jungles say farmers saw
Dudmans balding figure being led from his car at
gunpoint into the underbrush. He was protesting to
his captors, say the reports, that he wanted to jot it
all down in his notebook.

Alligator Staff

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor

Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor

EDITORIAL
Everyones Baby
You are ignoring a chance to save as much as $873,000.
The City of Gainesville and Alachua County have this
golden opportunity and for some reason they just dont
seem to want to take it.
Last February, the two birth control clinics here were
closed due to lack of funds, Dr. Seymour Block, Zero
Population Growth (ZPG), said.
But this is false economy. Birth control information can
be dispensed to a woman for approximately S3O a year,
where as it costs about $ 1,000 a year to raise a child
$20,000 to raise him until age 20.
Last year, 450 babies were bom to indigent mothers.
Approximately this many more were bom to near
indigent mothers, Block said. v
These children are likely to become your financial,
responsibility you, the taxpayer. In one way or another,
the majority of unwanted children become at least partially
reliant upon some type of welfare.
So the burden once again falls upon the taxpayer. It is
true, the taxpayer is the one who pays for dispensing birth
control information, but wouldnt you rather give S3O a
year than up to $ 1,000?
And what of the child -a person who has no real family,
but was only bom because his mother didnt know or
couldnt afford to prevent it.
In this area, there are 4,000 indigent women between the
ages of 15 and 44 the childbearing ages. There are
probably more than 4,000 near-indigent.
Something must be done. Last year, when it was possible
to obtain this birth control information, 900 unwanted
children were bom to these dependent women.
What will happen this year when such information is not
readily available?
Tonight ZGP is presenting a lecture and discussion by Dr.
A. F. Caraway, the chief of the Bureau of State Health in
Jacksonville. Caraway is in charge of all birth control
programs in Florida.
Block said representatives of the county and UF have
been trying to get the clincis re-opened. Maybe the state
representative, Caraway, can be the catalyst, Block said.
We urge all concerned people to attend the speech
tonight, 8 p.m., room 109 in Little Hall.
Lets help Dr. Block convince Mr. Caraway that we are
prepared to spend S3O to save a possible SB7O.
see where afewop^v
' PRESIDENT HAS

Jeff Brain
Editorial Assistant

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Horidu Alligator are those of
the editors jr of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of llorida.



Keep Right

The abolishment of ROTC
will only serve to harden and
further isolate the military from
the rest of the nation. Those
who call for it will only have
themselves to blame for a totally
alienated military.
The Lefts greatest failing is
its inability to bridge the gap
between defining the problems
and solving them.
ITS GREATEST contribution
is pointing out weaknesses and
failings in our society and
prodding those in power to act
to correct them.
The task is a necessary one
because the Right often feels if a
problem is ignored long enough
it will go away. Some do, but
they all dont, and those that
remain fester and grow until
they reach crisis proportions and

Unarm The Campus

MR. EDITOR:
It is regrettable that in the current
discussion about guns on campus, an
unfavorable reflection has been cast on
the University Police Department and its
members. It is particularly regrettable
that some members of the department, as
Lt. Dudley D. Goulden reported to the
Committee to Study the Removal and
Control of Guns on Campus (May 17),
look on the discussion about police
weapons as an insult to our integrity.
Personally, I should like the
department to know that I, and I think
the great majority of university people,
hold our campus police in the highest
esteem. They are intelligent, well-trained,
competent and dedicated men. I cannot
say enough about the manner in which
they handled themselves during the
demonstrations of two weeks ago. It was
an admirable performance.
The issue of gun-bearing on campus
ought to be discussed independently of
the questions of campus police integrity,
for that is something everyone recognizes
and accepts.
For my own part, I continue in the
opinion that there is no need for police at
the traffic checkpoints to carry weapons.
Guns are symbols of violence and death.
There is no need for their presence at the
gates of our institution, nor does there
seem to be any need for their presence,
much less for their use, at the gym,
football stadium or Plaza of the
Americas.
On the other hand, I am convinced
that officers on patrol in their vehicles are
perfectly justified in bearing weapons, for
their own protection as for the security
of students and others on our campus
who might be threatened by persons of
criminal intent. Certainly every officer
answering a complaint has a right to
this protection.
What we need, I may conclude, is not a
disarmed police but an unarmed
LETTERS POLICY
LttMV mu*:
Be typed, signed, double pieeerf end
not eueead 300 winds.
Not be signed ehh e pwurtonym.^^
Names' will be wWriiold only if writer
diene Toot cause. The editor rsssrves the
right to edit all letters for qtaoe.
Writers may submit longer eamy*
columns or letters to be considered for use
es "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
bwuteited in submitting a regular column is
edged to contact the editor and be prepared
jo snow MRipHS Os ills wont.

require immediate and massive
attention.
The Left has correctly defined
one of the greatest dangers in a
democratic society, the growing
of a military machine
which has lost touch with the
civilian populace it is supposed
to represent and protect.
BUT, IN THEIR blind fury to
weaken the military-industrial military-industrialumon
umon military-industrialumon complex, Leftists aim
their efforts at one of the few
military institutions keeping it in
touch with the civilian
population, the Reserve Officer
Training Corps (ROTC).
They see ROTC as evidence of
the military intrusion into the
civilian community life.
They cry for its abolishment.
IN THE NAME of getting the
military out of the civilian

campus. Just as there is no place for
guns at our gates, so there is no place for
guns in our dorms. If all our talk about
peace is to amount to anything, we might
begin by abandoning the lethal devices in
our own possession.
FATHER MICHAEL GANNON
Impeach
MR. EDITOR:
Some 8,000 persons attended a rock
fest which cost SG about one dollar per
student in losses and caused about 62
cents in damages per patron some
$5,000. All in all, Uhlfelders Folly cost
us, the students, some $25,000. Many of
the same persons were, undoubtedly,
among the 6,000 who forced Uhlfelders
strike on the UF, among the 5,000 who
signed Uhlfelders petition to President
Nixon opposing the War, and among the
400-600 who staged the carefully-staged
walkout at the Orange-Blue Game to
emphasize the Uhlfelder speech and
Uhlfelders rally against the Gators.
The Athletic Association is asking
interested students to donate one dollar
per game to watch the Gators next fall.
Uhlfelder has made this a cause, and yet.
Uhlfelders Folly cost me the price of a
football game, plus damages, and
Uhlfeldexs strike cost me $3.65 for a lost
day of classes. Thus, Uhlfelder has
already cost me almost the price of a
season ticket and I havent gotten one
damn thing back.
The question I would like to raise is for
whom is Uhlfelder spending my money
and Whom does he represent? Is it the
Fraternity-Sorority Bloc which supported
him in the name of golden patronage; the
8,000 destructive Rockettes who made a
dump of Florida Field; the 6,000 strikers
who forced the destruction of the UF as a
learning institution for a day; the 1,500
who voted to support him in the recent
referendum, or perhaps the few who
walked out on the Gators? Bear in mind
that not all of these are even students and
it leads to my next question:
How does one impeach a student body
president?
' Steve Uhlfelder does not represent the
13,000 who did not drink in the Rock-in,
or the 15,000 who stayed in classes, or
the 1,100 who voted against his
referendum, or the 18,000 who didn't
give a damn about it, or the 8,000 who
stayed at the Orange-Blue Game. Yet, he
has cost us all one day of classes and one
dollar, plus damages, to support his

In The Blind Fury

sector, they will create a
situation where the military
becomes even more inbred than
it is today.
Most officers come from the
ROTC program. They put in
their two or three years and get
out. They have no vested
interest in a strong politically
orientated military because at
heart they are civilians in
uniform.
Cut off this source of officers
and the military will procure
them from other sources. They
will expand the size and number
of military colleges, service
academies and officer candidate
schools.
THE IDEA of an officer corps
composed of nothing but

stupidity, his folly and his minority
clique. Impeach Steve Uhlfelder? Why
not; he deserves it.
PETER LANGLEY, ILW
Sentiments
MR. EDITOR:
May I thank James Royal, who
expressed my sentiments completely in
his letter, which appeared in the May 18
issue of the Alligator.
I too, resent the demand to disarm all
the campus police. They are here for our
protection and have proven themselves to
be capable of carrying weapons time and
time again. Put yourself in their place.
Would you answer a call for help without
anything to defend yourself? I wouldnt.
I also think that Michael S. Hawkins,
whose letter appeared May 19, brought to
the surface a fact which many people
seem to have overlooked: The President,
who may just have a few more facts
before him than Joe College, made a
decision which hopefully will enable the
U. S. to continue to withdraw safely and
on schedule. I think Mr. Nixon proved
his sincerity by making this decision, even
though it may have cost him the next
election.
ANNE C. KOMOROWSKI
LINDA C. LOCKE
Fir*
MR. EDITOR:
Abolishing ROTC because one doesnt
approve of wars seems rather akin to
abolishing the Fire Department because
one doesnt approve of fires.
GEORGE DANIELS, ILW

the small society

WHbNTMB what pip
LIKE TUB WAV (L \ AAINP-.
THi^tSSjjp|^
wimin . m £-2£

graduates of West Point, the
Citadel, and Virginia Military
Institute is frightening to me.
It is not that graduates of
these institutions are military
dictators in the bud, but the fact
remains they have been in a
military environment all their
adult lives and think in certain
frames of reference.
I do not wish to see a
situation where son follows
father into a military career and
has little or no exposure to
civilian life.
The ROTC program and the
military are in need of reforms.
But, the arguments used by the
Left against them are arguments
for reform, not abolishment.
OFFICERS IN the military
who do not like the military

FORUM:^.
C Ainia mi DiMit )
hope fr>r (ft,-

Monday, May 26,1970, The Florida Alligator,

By Fred Vollrath

system are not encouraged to
stay in and advance in rank to
the point where they can reform
or modify it by anybody.
Those who buck the system
are not encouraged to stay in by
their senior officers, who too
often believe any constructive
criticism of the military could
not have anything but sinister
motivation.
Nor are they encouraged by
their civilian contemporaries to
stay in.
Thats a lot of pressure for
anyone to take. So those who
would change it dont, because
they leave when their initial
obligations are met. Only those
who approve of the system stay
and climb up the chain of
command into policy-making
positions.

# Silent Majority
MR. EDITOR:
This letter is in reply to the pledge
written by Ray Hunt and James Devore
which appeared in Tuesday, May 19,
Alligator. To the authors of the letter I
would like to say the following:
Just because someone is against the
war in Vietnam and Cambodia, just
because someone is against violence and
killings on our campuses, and just because
they want to demonstrate that they are
against these things and change what they
feel is wrong, does not mean they are
unpatriotic, as you implied.
In fact, I believe they are more
patriotic than you and your silent
majority. They believe that by stopping
the war in Vietnam and Cambodia and by
stopping the killings of students on our
campuses, they will make this a better
country.
They take the time and effort and
make the sacrifices they feel will bring
about these changes, while you and your
silent majority are waving your flags
and boasting about how patriotic you are.
Would you or your silent majority
go on a hunger strike if it would help
keep the war going? Would you go to
Washington to demonstrate and march in
favor of the war?
Finally, you made the statement that
you thought continuing the war in
Vietnam and Cambodia was in the best
interest of America. Isnt it time we gave
consideration to what is in the best
interest of the people of Vietnam and
Cambodia. After all, aren't we supposed
to be helping them?
MARC KAYE, lUC

by Brickman

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
50 x 10 Schult trailer; AC; washar;
carpal; 20 x 10 screen porch; all In
excellent cond. Lot 5 Pinehurtt Pk.
378-5450. Best Offer. (A-10t-145-p)
HONDA 150 Good condition
dependable cheap transportation
$155. Two trial S tires 4.00 lB
Good condition 825 372-1297.
(A-146-21-P)
PRINTS, paintings 424 SE 7th Street
378-3614 after 5. (A-146-31-P)
AsHex f 1.4 complete w/accessory
lens A cases. 200mm and 35mm
S4OO or best offer. Call 372-5516.
(A-10t-138-p)
78 acres horse and cattle ranch
318-335 2 miles due east of Wllllston
on corner of 2 highways contact
R. T. Lewis 528-6562 not collect.
Route l box 157 Wllllston.
(A-st-143-p)
Must Selll Hangstrom 12-Strlfl?
Guitar Dual Pickup With Casa. A-i
Condition Sacrifice 8125. Call
392-7673. (A-st-143-p)
8x24 mble home A/C load leveling
hitch 8700 mono tape recorder 840
'67 TrHimph, 650 8700 20-Inch fan 85
wife 8100 Prices flexible 372-5078.
(A-st-143-p)
Refrlg Bike TV 825 Each Music*
Stand 81 Port. Movie Screen 85
Cassette Recorder 810 Port B try
Record Player 810 378-0226.
(A-St-143-p)
MUGS! MUGS! MUGSI For the BIG
or small drinker. Beautiful
hand-made ceramic mugs. Various
Sizes A Colors Call Steve Paskosky
392-8777 (A-5M44-P)
1966 Triumph Spitfire excellent
condition radio heatgr and many
extras asking 81000.00 can be seen at
922 SW 7th Ave or call Dean
378-6041 (A-4t-144-p)
Bausch A Lomb binocular
mlcroscopet 4 objectives, lOx wide
field eyepieces, excellent condition
call 378-7854 after 5 pm.
(A-st-144-p)
GUITAR 12-strlng electric, Hagstrom
2-plckup, like new with hard case.
New over 8250. Also 2 channel
reverb amp. 392-8905. (A-st-144-p)
Parkwood mobile home-2 bdrm. 12x
56 Spanish decor, 2 atrcondltloners
Is furnished, carpeted. A-l shape
Two yrs old 84500.439-2725 Flaglei
Bch. (A-st-144-p)
I ' |
1967 Porsche 911 excellent cond;
Konls Webers radio. Car Is In great
shape. Must sell 84,500. Call
376-9789. Ask for Lea. (A-St-144-pf
Fender ampllefler contains JBlj
D-140 speaker, 8350 or best offer;
excellent £ofWtlon pnone> 372-3867
(A-st-144-p)
Honda 305 Superhawk showroom
condition excellant mechanical
Includes metatflake lime helmet and
passenger helmet megaphones call
392-8190.(A-5t-144-p)
For sale ig. mixed breed pups. Two
knean rtdvl end tables Volkswagen
parts call 475-1158 after 6pm.
(A-3M45-P)
1968 Sears 50cc Motorcycle;
excellent, like new, runs perfect, call
BlltsFHtl*X or see 103 NW 10 St.
Apt 2. 8120. (A-5M45-P)
BRAND NEW PORTABLE T.V.
never been used. A real beauty,
walnut style finish, only 885! will
bargain, call 392-8824. (A-3t-145-p)
Tape recorder, Webcor, portable, two
track mono. 3 speakers, microphone.
Input extension cord, 2 speed, record
on both sides of tape without real
turnover. 845. 124% NW 20 Drive.
(A-st-14 S-p)
MONKEY Tame Capochln, leash,
food, etc. 870. Call 378-0181
mornings or after 10 p.m.
(A-147-St-p)
1969 HONDA 350 cc Dream, Ilka
new only 4,000 miles, sacrifice at
only 375.00 Call 378-8072 after 5:00
p.m. (A-147-3t-p)
1955 Ford station wagon, runs good,
reliable trans. For student around
town 8150.00 Cheap, call 378-8072
after SiOO p.m. (A-147-3t-p)
...
FANTASTIC COMPONENT
STEREO VALUE, Scott amplifier,
Garrard turntable, large cabinet,
Jensen speakers, Sony tape deck.
Original cost over 8500. Financial
trouble must sell. 8225 or 8150
minus tape, Call 372-6845.
(A-147-st-p)
l Guns Gum Guns J
E Inventory over 500. Buy -1
j Sell Trade Repair. J
E Reloading supplies. Layaway I
f plan. Harry Beckwith, gun J
S dealer, Mlcanopy. 466-3340.}

FOR SALE
-X:x;xvwvx?x-x-x*w ,, x*r-x->>x*!*>;*xv
Microscope Zeiss Binocular Med
School approved. Variable light
8350. Call Steve Bloomfield
376-8442. (A-147-st-p)
1963, T. Bird. Power break. Power
steering. Good condition. Only 8395.
Call 392-7805, or 376-2901.
(A-147-3t-p)
HONDA 160, Scrambler: Engine Just
overhauled, runs well. Call 373-1737.
(A-147-2t-p)
SPOTS before your eyes on your
new carpet remove them with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer 81.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
Pooltable, cues, balls, racks, and
extras. 3 mo. old, exc. cond., Grad,
senior, must sell. All 860. Call Bob or
Ed at 3 76-9410. Anytime.
(A-147-st-p)
Stereo system, 40 watt Tochebla
' AM-FM multiplex system. Garrard
turntable two speakers Call after 6
PM. 373-2973. (A-st-147-p)
FOR RENT
?S-SSRW:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-s-; ; x-xv?x : r-x-x- 1
- -- - * $
Sublease or need 3 fern, roommates
available June 1. Tanglewood 2
bedroom townhouse. No deposits.
Call 372-0360. (B-146-st-p)
2 br. Landmark apt. for summer qtr.
Perfect location. All dishes, pots,
pans, etc., Free. Be where the action
Is and get all the xtras. Call
373-2364. (B-146-3t-p)
Married? Sublease for summer.
Furnished apt. 3101/month AC good
neighbors PH: 373-1935 evenings.
(B-146-st-p)
Must sublet for summer-. June free.
Need 3 or 4 people. Own bedroom,
desk, etc., Were willing to take loss.
Call 378-7026. (B-146-2t-p)
French Quarter Apts. 114 Sublease
summer qtr. 845 mo. End apt. very
quiet. Call Doug, PH: 373-2306.
(B-146-st-p)
2 bedroom A/C apt. for summer.
Only 3300 for entire summer I Come
check It out 501 N.W. 15th Ave.
378-8408. (B-146-3t-p)
YOU am live at CLO all summer and
pay only' 9195 for your room and;
BOARD Can sec 376-9473 fOf
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
sublet: I bdrm. furnished apt. JW
through August. French Quarter. AC,
peoi. Call 376-4165 after 5:00,
392-0510 weekdays. (B-5M37-P)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1799 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fast
Reservations Now. Summer Rates oh
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-c)
~ -'L.
Several 1 br. apts. l bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, 3120 mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372-7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY TrtESE SPECIALTIES
MONDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Baked Meat Sauce and
Macaroni TO a
All you can eat
- i i i.
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Golden Fried Chicken

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 25,1970

FOR RENT
:-:-x-:-x-:-:w
Available June 14. A/C eff. apt Bth
eve apts 1222 NW Bth ave. quiet,
plenty of parking. 585./mo. call
373-2137 between 6 and 7:30 pm.
(B-st-143-p)
Sublet Sum. Qtr. 1 bdrm. garage apt.,
AC, ww carpet, beautifully furnished,
tv cable. 8100/mo. + ut. 1908 NW
3rd Ave. 373-2700. (B-6t-142-p)
Across Street from campus Studio'
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities Included completely
fumlghed ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372- (B-109-ts-c)
Sublet for summer or longer T
bdrm. A/C, pvt. patio, furnished,
3115/mo Village 34, no. 27, CaH
378-7000. (B-139-st-p)
Sublet 1 br apt furnished,' ac>
dishwasher, pool, available June 12.3
3120/mo. Just off campus. Mt.
Vemon apts. Call jailer 6:30 PM
378-0260. Available June 15, Unlv. Gardens one
bedroom apt for summer and next
year, beautifully furnished plus
extras. June rent free. 376-8958.
(B-st-143-p)
Need to rent for the summer, a 2
bedroom A/C Mobile home, 390 per
month call JOHN 373-1581 evenings.
(B-st-143-p)
SAVE 3110 4-man Vintage Pk apt.
To sublet for summer. Furn, balcony
over pool, end apt for spacious
parking. 3100 each for entire
summer. Call 373-1347 anytime.
Apt. 94, (B-st-142-p)
~ ''-
Sublet-surtwW l' bedroom wood
panel Apt. A/C, private patio, pet fee
paid, lots of extras 8119 a month
Village 34 Apt 37 call 378-5809.
iB-St-142-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
summer qtr. Share house 2 Meeks
from campus with 2 coeds pvt. room,
A/C, Call 3796548. (B-St-137-p)
Large house to sublet for summer: 3
bdrms, 2 baths, kitchen, etc 1 blk.
from campus Interested call
373- or come by 1128 SW Ist
Ave. (B-10t-145-p)
FRENCH QTR. 2 bdrm. apt.,
sublease for summer, poolside. 3150
a month. Call after 6:30 pm.
376-5412. (B-3t-145-p)
FRENCH QUARTER. SuMeaNk* 2
bdrm apt on pool tor-summer no. 82.
Call nights 373-2381. (B-4t-144-p)
1327 NW 7th Ave one bedroom apt
well furnished duplex walking
distance 875 mo. call 378-8641 after
6 pm. (B-st-145-p)
Frederick uanwns one-bedroom for
summer. June rent paid. Call
376-0808 or borne by no. 66.
(B-st-145-p)
Landmark townhouse I 2 bedroom
four person apt available mid-June.
A/C, dishwasher, disposal, gas, grHls,
rent 846.25/mo. apt. 126 ph.
378-6277 now! (B-5M45-P)

FOR RENT
Sublet summer qt. 2 bedroom
Landmark Apt. 103 June rent free
call 378-9052 or come by.
(B-5M44-P)
Sublet summer qt. Olympia Apts,
next to campus, 1 bedroom,
furnished, carpet a/c, summer rates
$95.00 per month, call 378-6247
after s:oopm Att who called this apt
still open call back. (B-6t-141-p)
We can get It for you wholesale 2
bdroom summit house apt sum
carpet a/c pool rag $167 summer rate
$l2O June paid 373-1782 evenings.
(B-st-145-p)
Sublet Summer Quarter: one bedrm.
apt; close to campus, mad center &
V.A. Hosp; furnished, with pool and
air cond; 6130/mo; call
372-
Best Deal In Town!! 2 BR. apt.
Beautifully Furnished, Central Air,
fully carpeted, 5 min. from campus.
sl4 5/mo. 373-1573 or
373- 7.(8-5t*144-p)
The closest complex to campus-Mt.
Vernon. Sublease single br. pad.
Furnished, carpeted, all the extras.
Like new. Evenlngs-378-4877.
(8-4t-144-p)
FRENCH QUARTER apt 114
summer lease $45. per month air
conditioned, pool, tv, study lounge
etc. Call John 373-2306. (B-3t-145-p)
HAWIIAN VILLAGE sublet for
summer. 2 bdrm 2 bath townhouse.
Furnished, central a/c, dishwasher,
pool, patio, maid serv. apt. 140
373-2520. (B-5M45-P)
Sublet 1 bdr. a/c Apt. 2 blocks from
campus summer rates June 13
contact In person after 4 1100 S.W.
Bth Awe apt. no. 205 Olympia Apts.
(B-st-145-p)
Two apartments, each one bedroom,
private bath. Also one efficiency apt.
available, occupation June 15;
Inquire at 102 NW 15th St. or call
372-9855. (B-3t-145-p)
WOW 2 bedroom apt. central heat
and air ww carpeting special low rate
for summer 2 pools outdoor grills
TOM 378-9582. .ONLY $1.02 a day to live In luxury
at Landmark. Beautiful apt can be
yours for S9O for entire summer. 2
bedrooms call 373-2393.
(B-st-145-p)
Men 3 blocks from campus central air
conditioning single $155.00 double
$l2O each for summer quarter
378-8122. (B-lOt-145-p)
ragjQ] LAST
Maiiliilaltl 1 |4pays
From fh*
country
41 that gavo you
+ "I A Woman".
1 Inga" and
+ I Am Curious' MM;
fwi *[Qp|
J? W"T'\
A Best Actress t JgH+
n < 2! laggie CMI
* Smith R*
I TO W. fchrin y 4in [
INSTANT J 1
- M.Y. Post

FOR RENT
Village Park 1 bdr. apt. no. 29, CaH
378-0323 after 5 weekdays anytime
weekends. (B-147-st-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE for summer
qtr. Share house 2 blocks from
campus with 2 coeds pvt. room, A/C,
Call 378-6548. (B-st-137-p)
Village park 1 bedroom apt. sublease
for summer, pool, A/C, have a great
summer at Sin City apt. 24. Call
378-3554. (B-147-st-p)
TWO BLOCKS to campus men
women room TV carpet wood panel
kit. Prlv. See Diane, Brenda or Rick
1204 NW 3 Ave. 378-0286 392-0700
(B-147-st-p)
BARGAIN SBO each for entire
summer. Two girts In Village Park top
floor, Poolside, Call 373-1501 pfter
3. (B-147-st-p)
Private room and bath, private
entrance, AC, linens, 3 blocks from
campus $55/mon. 378-7925 2018
N.W. 3rd Ave. (B-147-2t-p)
One bedroom apt. Gatortown $350
for whole summer thru Sept. 15 No
damage deposit. Call 376-5694 must
rent by June 6. (B-147-st-p)
Village Park need female roommate
open now thru summer apt. on pool.
Call 372-4918 anytime. (B-145-st-p)
Sublet summer quarter Landmark
Apt. 104, Near Pool, Call 378-9041.
(B-147-st-p>
2 Roommates wanted Summer
Quarter Alr-conditloned, carpet,
dishwasher, other extras, located near
pool, Landmark no. 60 373-2207.
(B-147-st-p)
Room In prlv. home for mature male
student. Unen and maid serv.
alr-cond., separate entrance, off
street parking. Call 376-5360.
(B-147-3t-p)
WANTED
Uve all summer at La Mancha for
$l4O Inc. utilities, pvt. bedroom, pvt.
balcony, pvt. phone, walk-in closets,
pool, AC Call 373-1414. (C-146-st-p)
Cbeds for summer qtr. Have your
own room In a house 10 blocks from
Norman S7O + utilities for the entire
iKimmer. Call 373-1748. (C-St-144-p)
GATOR COURT
376-4667 /gjK 4J7OSW
spend where the
the night... price is right*'
JianL.
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TNeaOeee 7454 I 1 | I
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GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
Listeners Wanted: Will pay s2.oorfor
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearihg. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and 4 pm for
appointment. 392-2049. (C-st-143-c)
Want a beautiful summer? Live at
Landmark. 1 or 2 girts wanted for
summer quarter. Air-conditioning, 2
pools luxurious living. 376-0687.
(C-3t-145-p)
Two roommates for summer point
west apts. 2 bedroom 2 bath a/c
dishwasher pool reduced rate on
rent call 378-9947 around 9 am or 6
pm. (C-st-145-p)
1 Female roommate' for French
Quarter poolside air cond. apt. for
summer $lO5 for summer come by
apt 102 or call 373-1225.
(C-st-143-p)
1 female rommate wanted for Point
west apt. 2 bedroom, 2 full baths
No deposit s7s for summer
quarter call Robin 378-7188 5-Bpm
or 392-2925 8-llam. (C-6t-142-p)
Male roommate for summer quarter
at La Mancha. Live all summer for
$l5O Inc. utilities; pool, a/c, own
bedroom. Call 372-8046 anytime.
(C-st-143-p)
JUNE RENT FREE 4 to share 2 bdr
2 bath Point West apt $125 ea for ail
summer pool ac dishwasher call
376-9924 or 372-5970 after 5 must
be 21. (C-10t-142-p)
FRIENDLY Apt. needs co-ed
roommate. ONLY SIOO for summer.
Townhouse In Landmark. Call Carol
3 72-9764 or Debbie 392-9880.
(C-st-144-p)
2 female roommates needed fall
quarter $l2O per qtr. plus utilities.
Call Barb 3 92-7696 or Chris
392-7715 soon. Pool, air
conditioning, kitchen. (C-146-3t-p)
ROOMMATE for the Summer. Only
$l5O in a nice Duplex on 309 S.W.
19th St. 3 blks from Stadium. Cali
392-0550 Chem. Grad office for
Barry. (C-146-2t-p)
Legal Secretary with previous
experience. For Interview call David
M. Anderson; Fagan, Crouch,
Anderson & Folds, 376-5295.
(C-146-10t-p)
Poolside Williamsburg Apt., 2 bd.
furnished townhouse need to sublet
for the summer call after 5 during the
week 372-8716. (C-st-145-p)
GIRLS YOU name your own rent for
Pt. West Apt., deposits paid, available
June 1, Two bedrooms two full
baths Call 378-8771. (C-146-st-p)
- , ,d>
3 Male Roommates Frederick Apts,
pool, wall to wall carpet, air. cond.,
summer quart. S3B/month 378-7104
(C-147-4t-p)
1 hip female for THE PLACE starting
Sept. Call 392-8657 or 373-2671.
(C-147-3t-p)
WANTED 3 pre-law, pci, majors
for off-campus housing. To be
mutually agreed on as to area. Must
be able to communicate. Call Chuck
at 392-7172. (C-147-2t-p)
Male roommate (s) wanted for
summer. 2 br. Frederick Garden
Apartment Sin City, pool, a/c, all
summer: SIOO. Apt. 8, Phone:
372-6051. (C-147-2t-p)
2 roommates needed In
summer term for Gatortown apt. 2
weeks free rent, $36 66/mo + <
utllit, A/C, pool, dishwasher, 3 bdr. 2
bath call 378-6423 (C-147-st-p)

S m jM
I J m
I 77?e J. Wayne Reitz Union w/f/? f/?e I
I cooperation of Celebration '7O is proud to I
I present an Exhibition of Pop Art including
three works by Andy Warhol. This week 2nd
I floor gallery Union.

Monday, May 25,1970, The Florida Alligator,

WA ItfTP!
Wanted: l, 2 or 3 Female
Roommates Escaping the dorm?
Locked out of the house? Find a
home at 99 Landmark. Pay July and
fcl 5 47.3,p7 y Ci 378 6422
tt#tt>X;X*&*:\'X*x*X'X*:*x*x*x-x-x*Xv
HELP WANTED
YMCA day camp counselors needed
June 15th to July 29th approx. S7O a
week those qualifing for work-study
preferred call Jerry Erkert 378-8533.
(E-4t-144-p)
SUMMER JOBS Jacksonville
Gainesville Miami S3OO per month
salary plus bonus Reitz Union rm
118 Wed May 27 330 pm.
(E-st-145-p)
Co-ed wanted room and board In
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
SUMMER JOB! See the US as a ramp
hand for the worlds greatest auto
thrill show. For information call
373-1247. (E-st-143-p)
Coctall Waitress part-time or
full-time, no experience necessary,
will train. Must be 21. Apply after 4
Dubs lounge 376-9175.
(E-24M25-P)
Seel beautiful FAMILY reference
bibles full or part time top pay.
Weekly training now. W. H. Magee
gator court Room 5. 376-4667.
(E-146-3t-p)
AUTOS
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy clean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
1967 Buick Sun Crusier wagon radio
AC power steering and brakes
chrome wheels excellent condition
2295 Call 378-0070 after 6:00.
(G-3t-145-p).
64 Chevy Impala conv. VB,
Autotrans power steering. Good
mechanical condition. Make offer,
376-4165 after 5. (G-st-143-pj
69 Camaro automatic radio warranty
going overseas must sell. Call Louis
376-7098. (G-st-145-p)
CORVETTE Convertible. A true
classic 1960. Perfect mechanical,
body and interior. Fresh overhaul.
Sacrifice, only $1,375. 376-5962.
(G-146-3t-pJ
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission Is a winner
too! TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)
1968 TRIUMPH GT6 British racing
green, wire wheels, luggage rack,
17,000 miles call 372-2135 after 6
pm. (G-st-145-p)
64 2-door auto Plymouth; good
cond; very clean; new battery; good
tires; radio; trailer hitch; S4OO cash;
Ollendorff 392-3611 / 376-0921.
(G-st-144-nc)
6 3 Ford econoline van, good
condition, $435. See at 2018 N. W.
3rd Ave. Phone: 378-7925 after 5
PM. (G-147-2t-p)
1967 Opel, A/C, Excellent
Condition, Call Joel 378-9758 or
378-2401 or see at 1113 S.W. Ist ave.
(G-st-143-p)

Page 11

xX-x-x-x-x-x-x-XviXXrrvi-XxXxX-Xx
AUTOS
x:;::XvX.x-Xv:;Xr:-x-:-:-::-x:-:-:-:-:-:-x-:-:-:-:-:
1966 MG Midget wire wheels, stereo
tape, excellent condition, inside and
out. Asking $l,lOO. Call 373-1979 or
see at 26 26 W. Univ. Ave.
(G-147-3t-p)
Save SIOO, beautiful compact, 64
falcoln, very good condition. S4OO.
Must sell, Need money for
Honeymoon. 378-4642, 376-2248.
(G-147-st-p)
PERSONAL
Need to get your stuff up North? We
are renting a truck and will take
anything you want between here and
Hartford, Conn. Need to know this
week. Call 378-6107. Ask for Brad or
Rich. WILL TAKE BIKES.
(J-st-145-p).
There can be in this country a
not-so-silent majority for peace"
John Lindsay. CITIZENS FOR
LINDSAY. 37 6-3 852
Pd. Pol. Adv. (J-146-3t-p)
Wanted good homes for 2 male
kittens. Just weaned ready and
waiting for you. Very clean and
dainty. After 7 PM Call 466-3601.
(J-146-2t-p)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
Groovy Saluki (Persian Greyhound)
needs a home for the summer and
foster parent while Im overseas
Worth $75 to me to find a loving home.
Call 376-4945. (J-st-144-p)
GIRL needed for cooking and light
housekeeping in exchange for room
and board in luxurious apt! Call
376-4863 after 11 p.m. (J-3t-145-p).
ILMEC. (J-st-143-p)
WABE: I love you. COOC
(J-147-lt-p)
THE APOLLONIAN
ALTERNATIVE Handmade
sandals you can wear to the
super show in foot deep mud and
rain and still wear them the next day
and the next and the next and for the
next year and we guarantee it. About
$15.00 108 N. W. 7th Street. Open:
12 to 6 daily. PAX (J-147-st-p)
Rent a luxury Tanglewood apt. 2 br,
2 bath, ac, etc. Sublet for Sum. Total
cost less than S9O. NO Damage
Deposit, Call 372-9705 anytime.
(J-147-st-p)
Original caste Handmade jewelry,
gold or silver. Wedding rings, other
custom things. Call Hope White at
373-1947. (J-147-st-p).
Want a date? Get the courage to ask a
girl out... Two lonesome co-eds.
Please reply In ALLIGATOR.
(J-147-2t-p)

y&tf J
It moves with fast and bold I
private world that features (V jl Qw ] \
I INDIVIDUAL, PRIVATE V/ f\\ 1
I BEDROOMS. Just two blocks \ I

PERSONAL
For sale: 1966, Triumph Bonn, many
extras cerianl front forks perfect
cond., also 61 comet S3OO or best
offer. Also Portable TV & Stereo
BOTH In perfect condition All
must be sold Call 378-7966 or
378-6695. (J-147-2t-p)
y
LOST FOUND
...a *
:yX;.:.y.:.;.\v/.:.v.v.v.y.;.v.v.:.v.v.y.v.:
Glasses with brown-amber frames and
case in the Reitz Union parking lot
on Friday, May 15 at 5 PM whoever
found them please call 372-7395
eves. (L-2t-145-p)
FOUND: By McCarthy: Photo of a
boy at Xmas on a hobby-horse.
Fireplace scene sailboat above.
Color IF YOURS Call Roberta
Huff 3 92-16 81, 376-0701.
(L-3t-l(L-3t-146-nc)
LOST in Med. Center area One
beeper $25 reward with no questions
asked. Call JOHN at 392-2867.
(L-st-145-p)
Lost: Purse with prescription
sunglasses, ID, key. Reward
372-1115. (L-146-2t-p)
Lost mixed Shepard pup white tip on
tail near NW llth Ave. Call
372-2628. FOUND: Text Music History
Found at Weil Hall to claim call
378-6595. Lost: Set of keys, gold key chain
with blue cameo near GPY building,
Depserate phone: 372-9673, Lost on
THURSDAY, NOON. (L-147-lt-p)
FOUND: Rings in AND 307. Call
376-2392 to identify. Ask for Diana.
(L-147-3t-nc)
SERVICES
At THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 cent and 4 cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
singles 1718 W. Univ. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)

MAY 28-29 30
CONSTANS THEATRE I /\Y
B=OOP.M. if,Oh/
\ ll 1 MOSS HART'S
;V- HIT COMEDY

SERVICES
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S. W. 4th Ave, across from
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480.
(M-ts-107-c)
There can be In this country a
not-so-silent majority for peace
John Lindsay. CITIZENS -FOR
LINDSAY -376-3852. Pd. Pol. Adv.
(M-147-2t-p)
Horses boarded new barn tack room,
green pasture and riding ring & trails.
Complete care less than 15 minutes
from campus on 5R234 Phone:
373-1059. (M-147-st-p)
STEREO TAPES $4.00 very high
quality selection of 200 albums or
transfer from own order blank and/or
information, Sound & Cinema
Corporation P.O. Box 1064 Eau
Gallie, Fla. (M-5M42-P)
Free inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone*
372-5804. (M-32 127-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. iVlain. (M-107-ts-c)
Grad 'Student Needs Bread.
Experienced Accurate Typist. .45 per
page Call Lorrie 372-7973.
(M-Bt-140-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pick-up delivery 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-143-p)
Suburbia Dl Theatre
N.W. 13th ST.-ACROSS
FROM MALL PH 372-9523
2 COLOR HITS
FUNNY GIRL AND
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL
SHERIFF



Page 12

Th> Florida Alligator, Monday, May 25,1970

Campu^Cder
I "**r V SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
YOUNG DEMOS PRB. SPEAKS ON "AIACHUA COUNTY POLITICS
Chuck Ansel I f President of the Alachua County Young Democrats, a member of the Alachua County Democratic Executive
Committee, a Gainesville Jaycee officer and a local merchant, will speak to the U of F Young Democrats, Monday, May
25th, on "Alachua County Politics." Mr. Ansell will speak at 8 p.m. in rm. 361 of the Reitz Union. His speech will include
the Alachua County Democratic Party's plans to appeal to the young voter and to the student voter.
0 ,J
FLORIDA PLAYERS PRESENT:
Moss Hart's hilarious hit comedy LIGHT UP THE SKY will be presented by the Florida Players as their final production of
the 1969-70 season. Tickets are now on sale for the play which will be performed in the Constans Theatre, Thursday
through Saturday, May 28-30, at 8:00 P.M. Admission for UF students is $.75. All seats are reserved.
A BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATERS
- May 28-BABIES AND BUDGETS & ALIMONY TO DIVORCE ... A frank discussion dealing with the financial and legal
aspects of marriage. John Stewart and Robert Furlong will lead the discussions. May 28, 7:30 p.m. Union Auditorium.
Sponsored by University Religious Association.
UNIVERSITY COMMITTEE OPENINGS STILL AVAILABLE
Any student interested in serving on a University Committee please fill out an application in the Student government office
room 305. Interested students are needed for die summer and fall quarters. These are some of the committees which are
Still open. Student Affairs Campus Housing Curriculum
Student Board of Publications Public Functions Policy & Lectures Intercollegiate Athletics
Union Board of Managers Admissions Petitions
Parking & Transportation Student Conduct Disadvantaged Students
HOMECOMING POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Anyone interested in holding a major position for the 1970 Homecoming Program can pick up an application in the
Florida Blue Key Office, 3rd floor, Reitz Union.
SAMSON NEEDS VOLUNTEERS
SAMSON IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR SUMMER RECREATION VOLUNTEERS: Call 392-1608 or
Come by room 315, JWRU.
BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE
Bulletin Board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it. Bring your material, 20 copies of each
sheet, to the Student Government office and you will get free publicity for your organization. No personal material will be
posted.
COME TOGETHER DAY
COME TOGETHER DAY May 31 When University joins Community Black joins White Young join Old and
Everyone UNITES For UNDERSTANDING, COMMUNICATION, and a better world ... for YOU. All CONCERNED
INDIVIDUALS Call 373-2437, 373-2900, or 376-8304 for further understanding of our intentions.
ATTENTION: FOOTBALL BLOC SEATING
All campus groups and organizations are reminded that the drawing for the 1970 Bloc Seating will be held Wednesday,
June 3, at 7:30 in room 346, J. Wayne Reitz Union. All representatives from groups or organizations must be present. An
explanation of the present state of student seating will be given. Extra applications for Bloc Seating can be picked up in the
student government offices, 3rd floor Reitz Union.
70 SPRING FROLICS Friday may 29
FEATURING
"The Rotary Connection
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 5 00 OF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAYS CAMPUS CRIER.
THANKS.
BOBBERRIN
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
mm^ ___^^^^^^^^^^TUDENMJOVENMENT^^^^^^



FOR SUNDAY, MAY 31

Frat Plans Together Day

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writer
Come Together Day, a
coming together for the
common goal of harmony and
understanding, is being planned
by Pi Lambda Phi Fraternity for
May 31.
The come-together will £ike
place on the ROTC Drill Field at
noon May 31. The event will
begin with a march from City
Hall to the Drill Field. The
march will be led by community
leaders, according to a press
release from Pi Lambda Phi.
FROM 1 TO 7 P.M. a barbecue
will be held on the field with
other activities taking place at
the same time. A choir is
scheduled to sing. Three bands
including Celebration, Ten
Wheel Drive and Power will play,

UF Student Awarded
Fulbright-Hays Grant
A UF graduate student in physics has been awarded a
Fulbright-Hays grant for one year of post-doctoral study in England.
Eugene E. Clark plans to receive his doctoral degree in August, then
go to the University of London, Kings College, for study of the effect
of rotation on time and light. The grant is effective in September.
A graduate of Miami Edison High School, Clark earned both his
undergraduate and masters degrees from the UF.
He applied for the grant through the Institute of International
Education, competing nationally with other college and university
students for one of the 500 grants that were given.
Clark is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Clark, 420 NE 90th St.,
Miami. He and his wife, Toni, a research assistant in zoology and a
graduate student, live at 1012 SW Third Ave., here.
Building Construction Degree
\'* >
Required Courses Reduced

Total credit hours and
number of courses have been
reduced in a revised curriculum
for a bachelors degree in
Building Construction, College
of Architecture and Fine Arts.
According to Department
Chairman Loys A. Johnson, the
revised curriculum provides a
typical upper division student
program of three to four courses
and fifteen to sixteen credit
hours and follows the
curriculum proposals of the
Action Conference and the
recommendations of UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
and the University Curriculum
Committee. All Department
courses are now 4 or 5-credit
hours.
The program is a realistic one
which the incoming freshmen
can expect to complete in four
years and which the junior
college transfer student can
complete in two years of upper
division work.
Department students and
alumni assisted the faculty in a
special curriculum study which
began over a year ago. Topics,
course content and emphasis,
and credit hours were reviewed
with the result that each quarter
koiwood
Golf Club
STUDfNT MEMKRSHr
THRCI MUNIHS FO* $25 + TAX
SKOAL RAH
WEEKDAYS $2 AU DAY
WEEKENDS $3 AU DAT
For information tail
4 376-0090
& reoivwoop
cm* *

and various civic leaders will
speak.
The Rev. T. A. Wright, Father
Michael Gannon, and Rabbi
Michael Monson will speak on
communication at the event.
Communication is the key to
the Come Together Day,
according to Pi Lambda Phi
spokesman Neal Lubow.
COME TOGETHER Day
means involvement with
people, Lubow said,
understanding people regardless
of skin tone or social position.
Come Together is a positive
approach. Were trying to
further communication between
blacks and whites.
Come Together Day grew
from a service project in which
brothers from Pi Lambda Phi
worked with children in a black
housing project. But this event is

of the junior year (first year in
upper division) consists of two
5-hour courses and one 4-hour
course.
This totals nine courses and
forty-two credits for the three
quarters. This contrasts with the
current twelve courses and
forty-seven credits.

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
I STARKE 0 1 FLORIDA
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
f MMOa I Ok
*MDEROSA
JML STEAK HOUSB i
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320

different, according to Lubow.
It is designed to get everyone
involved, not just the
fraternity.
Pi Lambda Phi has enlisted
support from a great number of
university and Gainesville
sources. The administration,
Interfraternity Council,
Panhellenic Council and Student
Government support the Come
Together.
The Gainesville Ministerial
Council, the Alachua County
Commission, Pops Restaurant,
and James Hermann from the
University City Bank also have
Jbacked the Day.
MRS. CORETTA King,
widow of Dr. Martin Luther
King, has sent word that she
backs the day although she
cannot attend. The Southern
Christian Leadership Conference
is sending a representative to the
event.
Money for the event is being
raised through donations from
local merchants, civic groups,
state and national figures,
door-to-door solicitations by
underprivileged children, sale of
original Come Together posters,
and the sale of tickets to the
barbecue. Barbecue tickets cost
$1 each.
Pi Lambda Phi fraternity feels
Come Together Day will be a
success, and is planning to make
it an annual event. Furthering
communication among men is
both a necessary and vital need
of all people, a Pi Lambda Phi
statement said.
Mistrust, alienation, racism,
militancy, prejudice, and war are
but a few of the realities that
can be mitigated if only more
channels of communication
among people were explored,
the statement said.
Park Planner
Frederick Law Olmstead
designed New Yorks Central
Park in the early 1860 s.

BRASINGTONS
pp % M HU
JjJkM. jBLi Ak
I /" ./ //
TO BUY A PRE-OWNED CAR!
1969 CADILLAC SEDAN DE VILLE $5295
Gold, completely powered. Air conditioned, radio, neater.
1968 CADILLAC $4395
Sixty Special. Four door sedan, turquoise with matching Interior. Air
conditioned, full power, belted tires.
1968 CADILLAC CALAIS $3895
Four door hardtop, beige with matching Interior. Air conditioned, full power,
electric windows and seat.
1969 OLDSMOBILE $3795
White over gold 4Mlth matching Interior, air conditioned, full power equipped,
sold and serviced by Braslngton.
1968 OLDSMOBILE $2295
Delmont 88 white four door sedan, air conaltioned, radio, heater, power
steering and brakes. Locally owned and serviced by Braslngton. 2 to choose
from.
1967 PONTIAC BONNEVILLE $2195
Four door hardtop. Beige with white vinyl Interior, radio, heater, air
conditioned. Power steering and brakes.
1966 BUICK RIVIERA $2295
Two door hardtop. Turquoise with matching Interior. Air conditioned, full
power, cruise control, tilt steering wheel.
1967 FORD 'TBIRDS $2195
Pick from 3 In stock assorted colors, all air conditioned, full power and
automatic transmissions.
1969 VOLKSWAGEN $1895
White "bug automatic stick shift, low mileage. Very clean car In mint
condition.
1968 RAMBLER $1295
American. Two door hardtop, automatic transmission, radio, heater, low
mileage.
1967 PONTIAC eeeeeeassseeeeeeeeeefteeeeeeeeaeee $1695
Tempest station wagon, VB, air conditioned, standard transmission, power
steering good vacation wagon I
1967 VOLKSWAGEN $1295
"Bug radio and heater nice and clean.
1966 FORD GALAXIE 500 $1295
Two door hardtop coupe. VB, air conditioned, automatic transmission, radio,
heater, power steering, new rebuilt motor.
1966 VOLKSWAGEN ...$1095
Two door sedan, blue. Radio and heater.
60 LATE MODEL USED CARS IN STOCK
BRASLNGTON
Cadillac-Oldsmobile,
Inc.
SALESMEN
Brence Roberts Bud Miller Buford Brunson
George Bradley, Used Car Manager
2001 NW 13th Street 378-5301
Lost youp Contact?
\
CjatO AOs ITlAke Contacts!

Monday, May 25,1970, The Florida AMfator,

Page 13



The
Florida
Alligator

Us-BU Series: 3-2
The year may be over for the Gator baseball team
but at least they have the satisfaction of being the
only team this year to win its season series against
FSU, the nations third-ranked team.
The Gators accomplished this feat winning three
games out of five, including a 4-3 squeaker Friday in
Tallahassee, before dropping a day-night
doubleheader 1-0 and 9-4 Saturday. The Gators beat
the Tribe 3-1 and 5-4 in Gainesville over a week ago.
THUS COACH DAVE FULLERS squad has
done what no other team has been able to do in 50
chances against the Seminoles, who will be going to
the NCAA District 111 regional play-offs in Gastonia,
N.C. May 28.
Word from Tribeland prior to Fridays game was
that the Seminoles were on the warpath and were
going to scalp the Gators three times before all
hometown chiefs, hunters, squaws and papooses.
But the Seminoles underestimated 01 Albert again
and three Gators (Glen Pickren, Larry Sheffield and
Laurie Vidal) personally ate up the red devils 4-3 to
send the warriors to the unhappy hunting grounds.
But Saturday was a different story for Albert and
fellow Gators as one of the young chiefs (FSU ace
pitcher Gene Ammann) out-fought the Gators for a
10-inning 1-0 shaving. Tasting Gator meat for the
first time this year the Seminoles went wild and
roasted the Gators 9-4 at dusk.
SENIOR WAYNE ROGERS, who had beaten

OKeeffe, Jetter Top AAU Meet

Eamonn OKeeffe ran twice
his normal distance and pretty
Linda Jetter won three womens
events to top the list of excellent
performances in Saturdays state
Amateur Atletic Union (AAU)
at Florida track.
OKeeffe, the SEC 880 champ

¥ ¥
Shorter Paces Parker
By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Sports Correspondent
Frank Shorter gave a demonstration of true sportsmanship at
Florida Track during the state Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) meet
Saturday.
Although the wiry NCAA six-mile champion has finished with or
barely behind Olympian Jack Bacheler in every major distance race in
the country this year and has qualified for the national AAU meet
many times over, the Florida Track Club grad runner intermpted his
rigourous training schedule long enough to lead UF miler John Parker
through a two-mile run in 8:51.4.
THE OBJECT was to qualify Parker for the AAU in Bakersfield,
Calif. June 26 with a time of 8:55 or better, because Parkers best
time of 8:56.9 would not qualify for the meet.
The two runners were the only entries in the race, which was run at
dusk to avoid the hot afternoon sun. Shorter simply paced off
accurate quarters and Parker stayed at his heels, pulling up at the last
lap to cross the finish line hand-in-hand.
For Shorter, an 8:51.4 time trial is little more than a pain in the
neck. When he runs the three-mile in international competition, he
often comes past the two-mile mark in 8:50 flat.
IN ORDER not to completely crimp his training program, Shorter
had to run 15 miles the day before the race, plus 7 miles the
morning before pacing Parker. Then the two ran seven miles after
their race.
Shorters playing rabbit for Parker was a perfect example of
unselfishness and sacrifice between fellow athletes. Although a new
school record for Parker, the time meant little or nothing to the Yale
graduate, except the satisfaction of helping a friend and running
companion. And one other thing, perhaps.
It felt good to blow out the pipes a little, said Shorter.
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GATOR SPORTS

in 1:49.9, switched to the mile
and came from behind in his
typical fashion to defeat Jerry
Slaven of the Brevard Striders
for a personal best time of
4:13.7, OKeeffe had only run
the mile in competition once
before.

'-'V'
ST 1 t 4 \ && jgyv
GLEN PICKREN
... gets one in Tally
FSU 3-1 a week ago, suffered his fifth loss. Rogers
has won eight this year.
Tom Seybold was the victim of Ammanns
five-hit pitching, although he only gave up six hits
himself. Seybold, a junior, now has a 6-4 record for
the season.
The Gators finished the year with a 27-17 mark
and the Seminoles will take a 42-7-1 record into
their 12th District 111 tourney.

MRS. JETTER won the 440,
javelin and shot put with ease in
her senior womens divison.
Distance Ace Johnnie Brown
ran away from teammate Mark 7
Bir to win the grueling six-mile
run in 30:21.1 for a new school
record.
SEC champ Ron Coleman
won the triple jump with 48
feet-2H leap and law student
Frank Saier took the high jump
with 6-6. Hot from an
SEC-winning 16-0 vault, Scott
Hurley cleared 15-0 feet to take
the event with little trouble.
John Courtney captured the
discus with a 165-2 toss.
In the final event of the day,
track clubber Frank Shorter and
UF SEC mile champ John Parker
tied in a two mile run in 8:51.4,
qualifying both men for the
national AAU meet in
Bakersfield, Calf. June 26.

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Sports Editor

Page 14

Jets Sign Tannen

The New York Jets
announced Saturday that they
had signed Steve Tannen, then thennumber
number thennumber one draft selection.
Tannen, a three-year
letterman for the Gators, said he
was satisfied with the terms of
the contract, and so was Jets
Coach Weeb Ewbank, who came
to Gainesville for the signing.
The 6-1, 194-pound comerback
said he would receive a
comparable salary for a rookie.
THE CONTRACT is for one
year and doesnt contain a
no-cut clause. Tannen said he
prefers it that way, so if he
doesnt make the team he just
wont play pro football. He still
needs several quarters to earn his
bachelors degree.
Ewbank reports the Jets have
now signed 11 draft picks,
including the top three.
The Jets are reportedly
counting on Tannen to be a
starter in his rookie season. He
should replace All-American
Football League cornerman
Johnny Sample who was

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, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 25,1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

released by the Jets earlier this
year.
Tannen is one of five
defensive backs drafted by the
1969 Super Bowl Champions,
who have several veterans
returning and traded for another
from the Houston Oilers.
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UF'S SOLE AIRCRAFT TOM KENNEDY
A
. ... Worid War II design
'Blue Goose Flies Southeasts Skies

By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Writer
The UF coaches and athletes fly the friendly skies of the Blue
Goose.
Blue Goose is not a airline. It is the name affectionately given to
the UFs athletic departments sole aircraft, a DC-3.
The UF acquired the plane as a gift from Bradley Aviation,
Houston, Texas. Bradley also gave a similar type aircraft to Tennessee
and Georgia.
DR. ROBERT BRASWELL of the College of Engineering is the
chairman of the plane committee for the athletic department. Dr.
Braswell said, When we aquired the plane it was in pretty bad shape.
We replaced thousands of bolts, every light in the aircraft, some of the
instruments, both the engines were overhauled, and put new fabric on
the control section. When we were finished we had a dam fine
aircraft.
Ken Cassel of Cassels-in-the-Air, where the Goose is parked, said,
the plane is one of most reliable every built. There are more DC-3s in
service on regularly scheduled flights than any other aircraft in the
world.
Cassel said, the only trouble that we have ever had with the
aircraft is when an engine went bad over a year ago at Tallahassee, and
the heater has a habit on not working in the winter. But we have since
fixed the heater and the aircraft is in fine shape.
THE GOOSE carries twenty-four passengers and costs about one
hundred and seventy-five dollars an hour to operate. The UF saves
almost sixty percent of the cost of leasing an aircraft by owning the
Goose. The UF has saved thousands of dollars by owning the
aircraft and it is used extensively by the basketball, swimming,
baseball, and track teams.
At present the Goose is suffering from financial pains because of
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an out-of-date law which prohibits state agencies from using state
funds to operate private aircraft.
Cassel said, there have been over fifty requests by large university
groups to use the aircraft but they have to be refused because of the
existing law and political structure.
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR Ray Graves said we are the only state
university to my knowledge that does not have a pool of aircraft at its
disposal. The University of Tennessee has a Convair, a four engine
jet, for use by the athletic department.
Braswell said it would be ideal if we could acquire another smaller
aircraft. If we could get another like the DC-3 it would be great.
The plane is also an asset, if the UF decided to get rid of the
aircraft it would have no problem at all in selling it.
The Goose is manned by a Federal Aviation Agency certified
crew and is equiped to go into any airport in the country.

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Monday, May 25,1070, Tho Florida AHiftnr,

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIWII
We are the only state
university to my knowledge
that does not have a pool of
aircraft at its disposal.
Ray Graves, Director
of Athletics
iiinmniiiiiiiiiiiinuiiiinim

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 25,1970

Benvenuti Packs Punch

IT TOOK Nino Benvenuti
almost eight rounds and a
crushing one-two to dispel
whispers he no longer packs the
biggest wallop in the
middleweight division.
The 32-year-old Italian world
champion smashed challenger
Tom The Bomb Bethea to the
canvas Saturday night in the first
title fight ever held in a
Communist country.
It was sweet revenge for an
eighth round TKO defeat, the
first time benvenuti was ever
stopped, by Bethea in
Melbourne, Australia, three
months ago.
It also earned him a reported
SIOO,OOO and scuttled reports
Nino was slipping.
The authority Benvenuti
displayed in knocking out the
26-year-old challenger from
Lumberton, N.C., was
impressive. Even Bethea
conceded Nino had the
necessary armament for a
champion.
That wasnt the same man I
beat, Bethea said, nursing a cut
right eye and bruises on his
cheeks, forehead and nose.
That was a champ.
* *
COACH GEORGE Allen of
the Los Angeles Rams said today
that he does not expect to
return to the National Football
League club after next season.
I figure this is my last year
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 29 13.690
New York 24 19.558 5%
Detroit 18 20 .474 9
Washington 18 22 .450 10
Boston 17 22 .436 10%
Cleveland 14 23 .378 12
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 26 12 .684
California 27 14 .659 %
Oakland 22 20 .524 6
Kansas City 16 24.400 11
Chicago 16 25 .390 11%
Milwaukee 13 26 .333 13%
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 21 17 .553
St. Louis 20 19.513 1%
New York 20 21.488 2%
Pittsburgh 20 23.465 3%
Montreal 16 24 .400 6
Philadelphia 16 25 .390 6%
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 31 12 .721
Los Angeles 24 18 .571 6%
Atlanta 23 18 .561 7
San Francisco 21 23 .477 10
Houston 20 24.455 11
San Diego 19 27.413 13%
'MS*
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Detroit

Boston

EAST

WEST

with the club, he said. If they
want me back, I would have
heard from them by now.
I havent had any indication
that they want me back at all.
As far as the 1970 season is
concerned, Im going at it as if I
had a 10-year contract. Im
giving it everything Ive got but
next January, I figure Ill be
looking for a job. Ill take the
best thing I can get, he said.
Allen has one season left on a
five-year contract. His record
with the Rams is 40-13-3 and his
team last season was 11-3.
The Rams coach was fired
the day after Christmas during
the 1968 season by Los Angeles
owner Dan Reeves because of a
personality conflict. Reeves
rehired Allen in the first week of
January 1969 following an
outpouring of public support for
the coach.
* *
THE MERGER of the two
pro football leagues has not
damaged the statistical brilliance
of George Blanda.
The Oakland Raiders kicker
and reserve quarterback leads all
active players in points scored,
with 1,477. He is 300 points in
front of Gino Cappelletti of the
Boston Patriots, according to
figures released by the national
football league.
Blanda will be 43 years of age
when he opens his 21st
professional season. He seems a
sure bet to reach the 1500-point
mark, which lies just 23 points
ahead.
* *
BRAZIL handed the United
States its second straight defeat
Sunday, 69-65, to gain the silver
medal in the World Basketball
Championships.
The U. S., beaten by

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A STRAIGHT SHOT FROM THE UNIVERSITY ON 2ND AVENUE

Yugoslavia Saturday in a game
that wrapped up the tourney
championships for the European
team, received adequate support
from Rod McDonalds 19 points
and Mike Sillimans 13, but it
wasnt enough to contain Brazil.
U. S. chances for gaining
second place on the final day of
the tourney were hampered by
Tal Brody and Bob Wolf leaving
the game with five personals.
The Americans outscored Brazil
7-2 in the last two minutes of
play, but could get no closer
than the final 69-65 achieved on
McDonalds field goal in the last
minute. McDonald then missed
two free throws with six seconds
remaining.
Hal Fischer, coach of the U.S.
squad, refused to allow the press
into the American dressing room
after the game. He would not
comment on the U. S. loss,
either.
Brazilian team coach Togo
Soares credited his teams
victory on its ability to keep the
U. S. from driving for layups and
hurrying the Americans on their
medium range shots.
* *
ROBERT R. Nathan, an
internationally known
economist testifying in behalf of
Curt Floods suit against
baseballs reserve clause, said
Friday that there was no parallel
between baseballs reserve
system and any other business.
Nathan, testifying in Federal
Court before Judge Irving Ben
Cooper, said the reserve system
create an inbalance between
employer and employe in
bargaining negotiations.
The system has a depressing
effect on wage levels because
theres no opportunity to
negotiate with the user of his
services, said Nathan.

Giants Manager
Fired After Loss
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) Clyde King, manager of the San
Francisco Giants, was fired Saturday shortly after his team lost a
17-16 marathon slugfest to the San Diego Padres that lasted more
than five hours and produced 44 hits.
The announcement was made by Giants President Horace
Stoneham.
I JUST FINISHED an unpleasant task, said Stoneham following
the game. I talked with Clyde and told him I thought we could
improve the situation, or whatever you want to call it, if we changed
managers.
Stoneham stressed it wasnt a snap decision. I discussed it with
club officials the last couple weeks and we reached a decision
Saturday morning, he said.
King, a solid baseball man who learned his trade Branch Rickeys
knee, has been offered any job he likes in the Giants front office.
After saying goodbye Sunday, Clyde left for his home in Goldsboro,
N.C.
MR. STONEHAM has asked me to stay with the Giants, King
said. I want to go home a few days and think about it. I also have
had offers from three clubs already. I dont want to make a decision
now.
Charlie Fox, a Giants organization man for more than 20 years, was
named manager. He said he had no changes in mind for the present.
The players I have in the lineup today all are solid, Fox said.
Furthermore, I know all of them, having served the Giants as a coach
before, so there isnt much for me to learn about them from a
personality viewpoint.
Fox won his first game as a manager when the Giants beat the
Padres Sunday 6-1 on homers by Willie McCovey, Bobby Bonds and
Willie Mays. Fox didnt have to make a move as Gaylord Perry went
the distance to register his sixth victory in 11 decisions.
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