Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
EVEN WITH LONG HAIR

Kirk To Hire Radicals

By 808 FRASER
Alligator Editor-in-Chief
The governors office is looking for students to
work in government and industry in Tallahassee this
summer and not necessarily the clean-cut type,
say two aides to Gov. Claude Kirk.
We dont care if they have hair to their
shoulders, governors aide Warren Wankleman said.
Were looking for a student who thinks he has a
better way and wants to get involved. The governor
wants to see radicals come up here.
TWENTY OR MORE positions will be open,

Florida Alligator

Vol 62, No. 146

ANTIWAR AMENDMENT

Opposing Senators
Threaten Filibuster

WASHINGTON (UPI) An
apparent Senate majority
demanding quick withdrawal of
U. S. forces from Cambodia may
not get the chance to write then thenwishes
wishes thenwishes into law. But they have
an ace in the hole to counter a
threatened filibuster.
Opponents of legislation to
cut off funds for the Cambodian
venture made it clear Wednesday
they would hold up a vote on
the measure at least until
American forces are withdrawn.
That would practically nullify
the effect of the amendment,
since its chief purpose is to hold
President Nixon to his promise
to get out of Cambodia by June
30.
BUT BACKERS of the
amendment, sponsored by Sens.
John Sherman Cooper, R-Ky.,
and Frank Church, D-Idaho,
were not worried.
Their safety valve is that all
appropriations for the war in
Southeast Asia expire June 30.
Unless Congress acts before then
to release funds for another year
of the war, the U. S. military
operation there and everywhere
else in the world would be cut
off without a nickel.
While no one in Congress has
even remotely suggested that as
a tactic to get out of Vietnam or
even to break a filibuster, it does
give the backers of the
Cooper-Church amendment a
sizable lever to force a
showdown vote.
If the end of June approached
1 Inside j
pHpWippi
KENT STATE students and
others will speak at SMC
sponsored rally planned here
for May 29 page 3
Classifieds 10
Editorials 8
Entertainment 16
Letters 9
Movies 11
Orange and Blue ; 12 ~
Sports..-. 17
What's Happening 14

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

and Congress had not
appropriated any money for the
war because of a filibuster of the
Cooper Church resolution, then
there would be a crisis of
incalculable proportions. The

OConnell Accepts
Refund Petition

UF President Stephen C. OConnell received a petition Thursday,
requesting that money be refunded for the day. of school lost May 8,
from the Students for Equal Protection Under the Law (SEPUL).
The official statement released by SEPUL after meeting with

OConnell said:
PRESIDENT OCONNELL
was sympathetic to our
arguments and indicated his
commitment to insisting that the
university remain open as
scheduled.
SEPUL is prepared to
initiate legal action to insure
that others value judgments are
not imposed on us against our
will.
WITH RESPECT to the
strikers, SEPUL recognizes and
respects the right to strike and
requests that those who strike
and the u niversity
administration equally respect
the non-strikers right to attend
undisrupted classes.

SEPUL is preparing to seek a
judicial determination of whether the May 8 closing of the university
violated student rights. Progress in this respect will be announced
shortly.
Another copy of the statement was presented by SEPUL to
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder.
WE HOPE to be able to cooperate with Student Government in
achieving our goals, said Mel Pearlman, SEPUL spokesman.
Pearlman said OConnell was going to consider the statement, and
he would give an opinion after he had consulted his legal staff.
SEPUL will decide on what action to take, depending on
OConnells decision.
Uhlfelder said he feels SEPUL has the right to do what they are
doing, but he does not agree with their actions trying to get
money back from the UF.
UHLFELDER SAID OConnell was right to dose UF during the
strike. We should listen, and not try to infringe upon the rights of
others Uhlfelder said.
o*Conndl's position, however, was a little different. I stand on the
statement they (SEPUL) issued, he said.

depending upon how much cooperation industry
will lend the project in the next three weeks,
Wankleman said.
Were not looking for students to come up and
re-establish the establishment, Wankleman said.
The governor desires change and were looking
for students with ideas to make recommendations.
Were not saying we will always act on their ideas,
but well listen. Heres their chance, said John
Sloane, the governors aide.
(SEE 'KIRK'PAGE 3)

The

Constitution clearly states that
not a dime can be withdrawn
from the Treasury for guns,
butter or anything else unless
Congress has appropriated the
money.

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer

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Friday, May 22, 1970

STEPHEN O'CONNELL
... sympathetic

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MIKE HENSON
STILL STRIKING
One hunger striker said, early in the strike, that there is nothing
more American than dissent. The strike entered its tenth day
yesterday at 8 p.m. and the nearly 50 strikers still demand a
disarmament of campus police and the abolition of ROTC.
BSP Extends
Editor Deadline
The Board of Student Publications refused to choose Alligator
editors or managing editors Thursday and extended the application
deadline for the Summer and Fall-Winter editorships to June 1.
BSP Chairman Hugh Cunningham, a journalism professor, said the
number of applicants was inadequate for the board to make a
decision. He said the boards feeling was that it had to be consistent
with a decision made winter quarter when it re-opened applications so
more could be considered.
CUNNINGHAM SAID an ad hoc committee would solicit
recommendations from the College of Journalism and
Communications faculty for additional applications.
The board was scheduled to choose and editor and managing editor
for the summer quarter and another duo for the fall and winter
quarters. The summer editor and fall-winter managing editor positions
had one applicant each. Two students applied for the summer
managing editor position and three for the fall-winter editorships.
Board member Barry Diamond, 3LW, cited an insufficient number,
quality and variety of applicants for the positions. Harvey Alper,
3LW, disagreed, saying the applicants were qualified and the editors
should have been chosen.
During the meeting the board reversed itself, Cunningham said, at
first agreeing to go into an executive session but upon consideration,
with the exception of Alper, decided against it.
Cunningham predicted the board would select editors on June 3,
regardless of whether more applications ate received.



f. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 2*, 1970

Page 2

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' GIRLS ON THE BEACH
... but many of them are local high schoolers

A J/n/" j| jJ/C*<_
JLJ sj^ £s,//a£ i jrl
j^k £- 7 PALATKA yC/C/C^
\\ \ (SLOWDOW/ A zjr^UAvMAAeepoe. \QSH) 0
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Photos by Sunny

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k AND AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE
... a line of cars all the way to St. Augustine

-PROTECT
YOUR RIGHTS
REGISTER TO VOTE
Young Democrats

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August wherf its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Fjorida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable, : , L
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

FREDRICK
GARDENS
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave
dMHHHHHHHHHaUIHHHHHHHHUHHI

ESMMBBBBeiBSIMiSifBIIIi.

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VOLKSWAGEN A LA SUR F
... any kind of car can drive on the beach

Theres no place in the world
like Crescent Beach.
It doesnt even show up on a
lot of road maps, but to 20,000
UF students its heaven for a
Saturday or Sunday of sun.
Each weekend, the line of cars
stretches from St. Augustine
eight miles down the beach to
Crescent, and then a few miles
more as students seek a place in
the sun where they can be alone,
or with other people.
Frisbees, football, and just
plain sunbathing are the
mainstays of Crescent. For the
hardy few, theres surfing, and
swimming but the water at
Crescent Beach stays icy until
well into June.
For food, theres two snack
stands where the prices are
reasonable, but dont take a
shower at a gas station that
costs a quarter.
Crescent Beach where relief
from the Gainesville heat is an
hour and fifteen minutes away.
Summer Jobs
Jacksonville
Miami
Gainesville
$ QCOO PER WEEK
SALARY
WEDNESDAY
MAY 27 RM 118
J.W. REITZ UNION
3:30 PM

PilsP|'"
wLb^i
j|[ jfl £ / v^ 3 B£ r *f JH iftfiriHlHMHH^^P
9WiMpi |L 1111 ISW JS v
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gffiafci -'. jrWvjfc* -*;>.,; -. .Js* :
5aJP&*& ::> -K*.;
-z^rnt*. ? t fa**: ~
STUCK IN THE SAND
... there's more than one way to attract the guys
Gainesville Trade Market
4506 NW 6th St.
Open Every Thursday & Friday
Truckloads of Farm Fresh Produce
And you can sell, buy or trade
anything of value in our
Flea Market
Clean out your attic or garage
and bring what you have.
Buyers and Dealers Welcome



Kent Students To Speak
At UF Antiwar Rally

By Alligator Services
William Kuntsler, attorney for the Chicago
Eight and William Sloane Coffin, Yale chaplain
arrested with Dr. Benjamin Spock for draft
violations, will head up two antiwar events May
29 and June 8.
Eyewitnesses to the Kent State, Jackson State
and Augusta incidents will also appear at the May
29 event.
STUDENT MOBILIZATION Committee
(SMC) is sponsoring a strike to open up the
university for antiwar activity on May 29 and
Kuntsler will appear at a separate engagement
June 8.
Also speaking May 29 is Linda Jenness,
Socialist Workers candidate for governor of
Georgia and an antiwar and womens liberation
activist.
At a press conference Thursday, SMC called
upon students and faculty to open the
university for antiwar activity.
DR. ABRAHAM Stein, a biochemistry
professor, spoke for a community-wide
organization, the Indochina Crisis Committee
(ICC).
He said the ICC endorsed a march planned this
Saturday in St. Petersburg and the antiwar

Doctor Says Hunger Strikers
Receive Infirmary Examinations

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Strikers may be hungry, but
precautions are being taken to
safeguard their health, according
to infirmary Dr. Ewen Clark.
Students who planned to
strike were asked to come to the
infirmary for an examination
and tests, Clark said.
STUDENTS SAY there are 20
to 30 strikers, but only about 18
of them have seen infirmary
doctors, he said.
We have invited them to
come back once a week or any
other time if they want to, the
doctor said. We have left the
door open, but it is their choice
whether they wish to take
advantage of it.
Clark said tests were
performed on people who came
into the infirmary and
appropriate advice was given.
HE SAID TO his knowledge
none of the students have
become seriously ill, although
they are probably tired and
hungry.
But they are taking a very
4
VingV
... giving
Gainesville twice
the service...
1802 W. UNI V.AVE.
1430 S.W. 13th ST.

adequate liquid diet to sustain
them for many weeks, he
added.
Because the strike is taking
place in Florida, where the
caloric necessity is not as high as
some places just to stay alive,
strikers will be able to continue
for a while, Clark said.
HEAT IS a problem. Because
students are drinking and going
into air-conditioned buildings,
however, there isnt too real
danger of dehydration, he said.
Rae O. Weimer, special
assistant to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, said there

Power at the
&att)gfeeUer
v.

Jpfc SHHK'
/jCr
Friday-Shows 9 and 11 pm
Saturday-Shows 8 and 10:30
And don't forget our TGIF beer
. 7 '.' "* :' ~"T 7 \
special-FRIDAY-15< a glass and
SI.OO a pitcher 2:30-6:30

activity planned on campus next week and June
8.
Plans for May 29 include a 10 ajn. rally on the
Plaza of the Americas, teach-ins and speakers
later in the day. Coffin and the Kent State,
Augusta and Jackson State speakers will speak in
the University Auditorium at 7 p.m.
THE STATEMENT issued by SMC reiterated
the demands made during the recent strike and
by the hunger strikers:
t Disacreditation and eventual removal of
ROTC from the UF campus.
Disarming of campus police.
Support of Black Student Union demands
for more black students, faculty and
administrators.
WE URGE ALL members of the university
and surrounding community to participate in the
rallies, discussion and teach-ins planned for May
29 and also to hear Kuntsler June 8, John Sugg,
SMC steering committee member said.
At the press conference, Frank Lord, an SMC
member, said SMC was preparing for a march in
St. Petersburg, scene of an alleged police
attack on antiwar demonstrators last month.
Lord said rides could be obtained to St.
Petersburg at 9 ajn. Saturday in the Graduate
Record Library parking lot.

really have been no negotiations
with strikers.
WEIMER SAID THE
administration has been working
on such things as the
recruitment of more black
students for several months.
We are hoping the
enrollment of black students will
jump from the present
approximately 160 to 400 in the
fall, he said.
Weimer said the strikers have
been very peaceful and have
not caused any trouble. He said
the number of students in front
of Tigert varies, but they never
try to keep anyone from going
in.

Shuler Speaks To
Gun Committee
Campus Police Chief Audie Shuler and Vice President for Business
Affairs William Elmore appeared before the Committee to Study the
Removal and Control of Guns on Campus Tuesday.
Committee members asked Shuler questions regarding the function
and duties of the campus police force.
LENGTHY DISCUSSION was held on the training of campus
officers, with a conclusion that training is identical to the training of
municipal policemen.
Questions were raised on the duties of campus police, especially the
manning of checkpoint booths and the infirmary transportation
service.
Discussion entered into reasons for guns worn by campus police at
functions such as athletic events and concerts.
COMMITTEE MEMBERS Jim Kersey asked about the lack of
adequate communication of mutual concerns between police and
students.
Kirk Wants Radicals To Work
PAGE OWEjj
Sloan explained the program as consisting of working in one of the
nine agencies under the governor, or in the governors office.
PROGRAM COORDINATOR Wankleman said the students would
act as liaisons with other students working for other departments, or
on specific projects in Tallahassee.
The projects would entail working with the State Road
Department, for one example, seeing the problems related to road
building and trying to solve them. We want them to appreciate the
problems of government, Wankleman said.
Pay would be a living wage, hopefully SIOO a week, he said.
WANKLEMAN SAID Kirk had mentioned the program at Florida
State University and the University of Miami during trips there. The
-project is in the formulative stages as this is its first year, Wankleman
said, and its success depends on how much support and interest are
generated on the states campuses.
Applications will be available at 11 a.m. today at the Reitz Union
information desk.
r ~ "STCfIK SHfiKC "!
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d 6W 13th St. ___ Gainesville \
I CAMPUS TWIG MAM. TWIG
1131 W. UNIV. AVE. IN THE G'VILLE MALL
sfl||| 'IjHf*VVjF
I PRE-GRADUATION SALE
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Including pajamas, shortie PJs,
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half slips and slips NOW '3 OFF
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HANDBAGS, KEYCASES, WALLETS, GLASSES, A TO
CASES, CIGARETTE CASES, CIGARETTE CASES, w
JEWELRY, SCARVES, BOWS ALL /2 OFF

Friday, May 22, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 22, 1970

Student Volunteers Help
Clean Up Lake Hyacinths

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Students are being asked to give a helping hand in
the cleaning of Lake Alice this weekend.
We need students who are willing to wade, said
spokesman Don Goodman, Also, if anyone has a
canoe, we could use it.
THE WORKERS will not have any strenuous
tasks Goodman said. All they will be asked to do is
push the hyacinths from the shore to the middle of
the lake so that motor boats and airboats can nudge
them to the west side, where they will be hauled
away in trucks.
Theres nothing to worry about, Goodman
said. Weve seen about three alligators, but they
stay their distance.
Alligators are very curious, he said. But they
wont attack.
PEOPLE WHO CAN work may come to the lake
anytime Friday afternoon or Saturday and Sunday
all day starting at 8 am.
Royal Crown Cola will supply Gatorade to the
workers.
The work is being done by contractor Buck
Johnson in conjunction with the UF physical plant
and grounds department and student volunteers.
STUDENTS FROM Santa Fe Junior College have
come out to help. Last Saturday, UF and Santa Fe
students combined amounted to about 100 workers.
We wanted to come out and help UF, said
Gary Hill, president of the Santa Fe Biology Club.
His group comprises most of the Santa Fe workers.
Working in a comer of the lake, two mothers and
their five children raked up the hyacinths.
THEY WERE FACULTY wives of law and

3 Youths Arrested In Union /
Charged With Possesion Os Pot

By RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff Writer
Three 18-year-olds, one a UF
student, were arrested in room
614 at Reitz Union Wednesday
night. They are charged with
possession of marijuana.
Bond was set at $2,000 for
the two males arrested and
SI,OOO for the female in County
Court Thursday
Arrested by university police
were Evelyn Brown, 369 Taylor
Way, Costa Mesa, Calif.; Arthur
Engel, 227 Garden Rd., Palm
Beach, and Alan Lindsay 260 El
Pueblo Way, Palm Beach.
University Police Department
Officer Gene Watson said
marijuana roaches and seeds
were" discovered by a maid,
cleaning up the occupants room
in the Union.
The maid reported her
findings to the Union supervisor
who called the police.
Chemical tests on the stuff
proved to be positive, Watson
said. He added that police
picked up many marijuana seeds
and roaches from the floor of
the hotel room along with two
ounces from their luggage. Two
GATORTOWN
and
La Bonne Vie
Apts.
EXTRA-LOW RATES
FOR SUMMER
Call 378-3457
or
372-1091
Or Come by office
309 SW 16th Ave
Apt 140

hash pipes were also
confiscated.
Reitz Union employes were
requested by the police
department to say nothing about
the incident until after a court
trial. .

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Robbie has a little love for you at

geology professors. We felt that the children
should be involved in the environmental problem,
one lady said.
Less than twenty feet away from the children, a
ten-foot alligator rested in the water only mildly
interested in the goings on.
Not all of the tangled vegetation will be taken out
of Lake Alice. Enough will be left to bring back the
wildlife. Already ospreys, fish hawks, have been
seen in the area.
BIRDS AND MOST wildlife were forced to leave
the lake when the plants overgrew the area.
By getting rid of most of the vegetation, the
wildlife will be brought back.
Whats to prevent the same thing from recurring?
GOODMAN SAID the growth in Lake Alice
began in 1964 when the university started to
dump treated sewage into the lake.
The sewage, rich in phosphates and nitrates, made
the vegetation grow out of hand. Its like
fertilizer, Goodman said.
Today, UF dumps 3Vi million gallons of treated
sewage per day into the lake. The steam plant,
which provides air conditioning for the health
center, dumps 12 million gallons of warm pure
water per day into the area.
THE PROBLEM IS what to do with the sewage
when you cant dump it into the lake any more.
Our solution is ecologically sound, Goodman
said. Wed like to re-channel the treated sewage
and pure waters into the universitys sprinkling
system.
People attach some stigma to the thought of
using sewage on the lawns, he said. But what they
dont realize is that the treated sewage is more pure
than the waters that we use now that have a high
sulphur content.

Watson said that three
checked into the Union on
Sunday evening. He said the
police department picked up
excessive amount of traffic and
phone calls to and from the
room.

Folk
PLAZA OF THE AMERICAS
Sunday, May 24, 1970 1:00 p.m.
Mam Stot/ieiA
GAINESVILLE MALL
lets play
Great fashion pastime. \ ft jhji
with stitch detail, SB. \/ /
Meeting its match, / /
awning striped scooter, / /\
buckled down to / \
camouflage shorts, sl4. / / l \
The Village Shop // \ \
\



South Viets Drive Into Cambodia

SAIGON (UPI) South Vietnamese forces drove 20
miles into Cambodia along the coast of the Gulf of Siam
Thursday in a move to choke off Communist supply lines.
Heavy fighting was reported on another Cambodian
battlefront 50 miles from Phnom Penh, the capital.
PENTAGON REPORTS said COSVN the Communist
headquarters for the Vietnam War which President Nixon
said was a major goal of the Cambodian offensive has
been moved to jungles outside the 21 -mile limit imposed
on U. S. troops.
In Saigon, U. S. headquarters reported 217 Americans
were killed in action in Veitnam and Cambodia last week
highest toll for any seven-day period in nine months.
Military sources said 77 Americans were slain in the
Cambodian theater of operations.
Military sources in Saigon said South Vietnamese
infantrymen and armored columns were meeting little
resistance in their thrust 20 miles deep into Cambodia
along the coast of the Gulf of Siam.
THE SOUTH Vietnamese column was reported to have
driven past the port of Kep and near the outskirts of

(Pro Nixon Rally j
! Draws 150/000 i
NEW YORK (UPI) Several thousand students and workers
rallied today near City Hall to protest the war in Southeast Asia j
| and racism at home. j
:|i The turnout was markedly less than Wednesdays j
j; pro-government rally by an estimated 150,000 blue and white j
collar workers.
j; ABOUT 5,000 took part in Thursdays rally and the j
;! demonstrators were predominantly young. Many blacks
j:j espousing black causes also took part. \
J The most marked difference between the demonstrations was
> the relative absence today of American flags.
fcoWX >:o:OKXWBWiWWW*>y*>y.y.v.:.;.;.;.;.;.v.y.:.y.v.;.v.v.>>v,y.y.y

Mansfield Alarmed
At Kys Statements

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Senate Democratic leader Mike
Mansfield said Thursday South
Vietnams leaders have territorial
designs on Cambodia.
The Montana senator, a
student of Asian history, said he
was alarmed at statements by
Nguyen Cao Ky, South
Vietnamese vice president, that
Saigons troops would remain in
Cambodia after American forces
are withdrawn.
IT APPEARS to me that
theyre going to conduct their
own campaign and well become
involved with advisers and
supports troops, Mansfield said.
Asked if he believed South
Vietnam had territorial designs
on Cambodia, he said he did.
He added that he felt the
Nixon administration was aware

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Kampot 50 miles from Kompong Som Cambodias
largest post.
U. S. and South Vietnamese warships prowled the gulf
in a blockade against Communist supply vessels.
An official communique issued in the Cambodian
capital of Phnom Penh said Cambodian forces had
captured Tonle Bet, 50 miles northeast of Phnom Penh
but field reports said bitter fighting was continuing.
UPI correspondents at Tonle Bet said Cambodian
forces, spearheaded by mercenaries flown in from bases in
South Vietnam, were trying to encircle the town on (he
east bank of the Mekong in an effort to cut off a battalion
of North Vietnamese dug in the burning town.
CAMBODIAN FORCES recaptured Kompong Cham
from the Communists last weekend.
Correspondent Mike Nicholson of United Press
International Television news said Thursday he saw at
least a dozen North Vietnamese dead in Tonle Bet and
that Cambodian forces suffered at least a dozen wounded.
He said two other North Vietnamese battalions were
reported in the area, one on the Tonle Bet side of the river

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Friday, May 22, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

and the other on the Kompong Cham side north of the
town.
THE PENTAGON reports on COSVN the Central
Office for South Vietnam said the Communist
headquarters has been relocated north of Momot, a city
six miles inside Cambodia in the Fishhook area.
This would be beyond the 21-mile limit imposed on
U. S. ground troops in Cambodia but the Pentagon
refused to say whether COSVN would also be immune to
American air attack.
President Nixon, in his address announcing the
Cambodian offensive on April 30, said destruction of
COSVN was a major objective of the campaign.
ALLIED MILITARY sources in Saigon said the drives
into Cambodia have killed 8,433 Communist troops and
brought in 1,175 prisoners.
U. S. headquarters said 166 Americans had been killed
and 677 wounded since U. S. forces first crossed the
border on May 1. South Vietnamese losses were placed at
591 killed and 2,042 wounded.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 22,1970

Fights, Jeers Mark East German Leaders Visit

KASSEL, West Germany
(UPI) Fistfights broke out
Thursday between pro and
anti-Communists, preventing
East German Premier Willi Stoph
from laying a wreath at this West
German citys monument to the
victims of Naziism and casting a
pall over his visit.
Stoph, making the first visit
to West Germany by an East

Crime Bill Passage
Urged By Mitchell

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Attorney General John N.
Mitchell Thursday urged House
passage of legislation to fight
organized crime, while his
predecessor called for Senate
defeat of other key
administration anti-crime
proposals.
Mitchell asked a House
judiciary subcommittee to
approve the Senate-passed
organized Crime Control Act,
saying that revenue from the
Mafias diversified enterprises
both legitimate and illegitimate
posed a serious threat to our
form of government and our
system of criminal justice.
FORMER ATTORNEY
General Ramsey Clark testified
at the same time before a Senate
judiciary subcommittee that the
administrations preventive
detention, no-knock and
wiretapping proposals are
inherently immoral and violent
practices.
They fail to demonstrate
how their proposals will protect
the public or what they will cost
in wasted effort, violence and
public confidence, he said, they
would violate basic principles,
sacrificing liberty on the altar of
fear.
The no-knock provision
would allow police to break into
homes with a special warrant to
search for material such as drugs
that can be disposed of quickly.
THE PREVENTIVE
detention measure would allow a
judge to hold in jail until their
trial suspects deemed potentially
dangerous.
The proposals are in the
House-passed version of a crime
bill for the District of Columbia.
They are considered a pilot bill
to test possible nationwide use.
Mitchell told the House
hearing that effective law
enforcement has been hampered
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German premier, ran earlier into
anti-Communist jeers from a
crowd that shouted murderer
as he drove through the streets
with West German Chancellor
Willy Brandt.
ONE MAN threw himself
across the hood of their car.
The incidents, coupled with
the ripping down of an East

by a public apathy which has
permitted most organized
criminals to escape prosecution
by corrupting officials,
intimidating witnesses and
terrorizing victims into silence.
One part of the proposed law
would designate as a federal
offense the obstruction of state
and local gambling laws through
the corruption or bribery of law
enforcement authorities.

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SETS BACK BRANDTS HOPES

German flag, appeared to be a
major blow at Brandts attempt
to negotiate an easing of tension
at his second summit meeting
with Stoph.
They remained far apart on
political viewpoints.
ABOUT 5,000 men and
women, evenly divided between
pro- and anti-Communist groups,
surrounded the city monument
in the Princes Park and blocked
most of the streets leading to it.
Police were unable to clear
the streets in time for Stoph and
fighting broke out.
After waiting at his hotel for
half an hour Stoph canceled the
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trip and his staff brought back
the wreath he had sent ahead.
A spokesman for Stoph said
the incident violated Brandts
promise that the East German
would be treated on a basis of

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equality. He noted Brandt had
been able to visit the
monuments at the former Nazi
concentration camp in
Buchenwald when the two chiefs
of government met in Erfurt,
East Germany, eight weeks ago.



UPI Around
... The World
PARIS North Vietnamese and Viet Cong negotiators at the Paris
peace talks accused President Nixon Thursday of increasing rather
than reducing the number of American troops in South Vietnam.
They charged Nixon sent in about 5,000 reinforcements in the past
month.
U. S. chief negotiator Philip C. Habib, after a SVi hour conference
session, accused the Communist side of evasiveness and said they
were still refusing to discuss basic issues.
SAIGON Vice President Nguyen Cao Ky said Thursday the allied
offensive in Cambodia was a decisive turning point in the war and that
South Vietnamese troops would remain on Cambodian soil as long as
the Communists fight there.
Ky also called for South Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Thailand to
form an anti-Communist front line to shorten the war in Indochina.
PHNOM PENH The first signs that the South Vietnamese army
had worn out its welcome in Cambodia appeared in Phnom Penh
Thursday. And a military spokesman said the Cambodians would
prefer death to rule by the Vietnamese North or South.
Four vividly colored posters in red ink were pasted at the entrance
of the press briefing room in downtown Phnom Penh Thursday asking
the Americans to send the South Vietnamese army home.
... The Nation
MACON Some 300 persons, mostly Negroes, continued their
march through Georgia today and their leader warned that violence
might be the price of getting their message across.
Hosea Williams, leader of the march in the absence of the Rev.
Ralph Abernathy, said he was sick and tired of hearing nothing
but threats of violence.
WASHINGTON lnterior Secretary Walter J. Hickel praised the
maturity and seriousness of the nations youth today and warned
against attitudes which he said could radicalize them and drive them
to violence.
Hickels remarks, in a prepared speech for a National Press Club
luncheon, echoed his defense of youth in a widely publicized letter to
President Nixon two weeks ago. In that letter, Hickel warned that
administration policies were threatening to alienate young people.
DETROIT Campaign GM scheduled a meeting here today in
advance of the General Motors Corp. stockholders meeting fully
expecting to lose a proxy battle but hoping to win a propaganda war.
WASHINGTON President Nixon has told the presidents of 15
predominantly black colleges they will see action on their complaints
about his civil rights policies.
The educators told Nixon the action they want to see includes a
nationwide television address in which the President will promise to
protect the lives of black citizens, and the appointment of a black
deputy attorney general committed to civil liberties.
... The State
TALLAHASSEE The moment of truth for 11 senators and a
number of lesser officials planning to seek higher office drew closer
Thursday as the bill requiring resignations to rim for positions with
overlapping terms sped to the governors office.
TALLAHASSEE A spokesman for the conservative faction of
House Democrats pleaded unsuccessfully for a delay in consideration
of the $1,353 billion general appropriations bill Thursday but
Republicans said they were ready to fight the spending package.
Rep. Miley Miers, D-Tallahassee, one of the leaders of the
Conservative Florida Democrats, said he wanted to study the bill
over the weekend in view of the fact that it proposes spending about
sll3 million in excess of available funds. He made the request in
speaking on the welfare of the house.
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Friday, May 22, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 22, 1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is thfi exercise of responsibility

MV
' h
Blocking Disarmament

WASHINGTON President Nixons press
conference prediction that there would be a
Soviet-American agreement to limit strategic
weapons was apparently a bit premature.
Both sides have acknowledged that an escalation
of the arms race not only would make this planet a
more dangerous place to live but would pile more
millions upon the already oppressive financial
burden of both nations. Yet the escalation is going
on, inexorably, as if it were an irresistible force of
nature.
At a recent diplomatic soiree in Moscow, a Soviet
official passed pleasantries with an American
diplomat. Suddenly, the Russian began speaking
intently, nervously pressing his fingertips together.
He wanted the American to know, he said, that
enlightened Soviet leaders wanted a strategic arms
agreement but that they were hampered by the
Defense Ministry.
Variations of this scene have been repeated at
least two dozen times during the past few weeks.
Soviet diplomats have taken aside Americans at
cocktail parties and have stopped them in corridors
to whisper that the Soviet military are obstructing
the SALT talks in Vienna.
PENTAGONS INFLUENCE
The Americans might have responded that the
Pentagon has had a similar influence upon the U. S.
negotiators, who have been unable to make a
proposal until it has been thoroughly reviewed by
the brass. In the backrooms, the generals have
fought every concession.
They have persuaded the president, for example,
to go ahead with installing multiple warheads next
month on our intercontinental missiles. Yet the
deployment of multiple-head missiles is the main
question that is supposed to be settled in Vienna.
Similarly, the Soviet military have pushed ahead
with the testing of multiple warheads and the
installation of SS9 missiles. These monsters pack a
devastating, 20-megaton wallop capable of knocking
out our own hardened, underground missile sites.
At the same time that the negotiators were
discussing arms control in Vienna, the Soviet Navy
also conducted provocative, world-wide maneuvers
under the code name, Okean.
In the Pacific, for example, U. S. naval forces
have teletyped and radioed in code a staccato of
submarine sightings. The list of Russian subs,
prowling the sea aortas leading from the U. S. to
Vietnam, has now reached 120. Os these, 35 are
known to be nuclear powered and 25 are armed
with 400-mile missiles.
INTELLIGENCE REPORT
An intelligence summary, slipped to this column,
declares that the Soviet subs operate out of the
Siberian ports of Vladivostok and Petropavlovsk.
This force, states the summary, has significant
capabilities including torpedo attack, cruise missile
and ballistic missiles with the ability to operate
anywhere in the Pacific.
The intelligence report also describes a Soviet
surface fleet of five cruisers, including guided
mfarfle cruisers; 25 destroyers, about half of which
are guided -missile equipped; and 25 ocean escorts.
Its guided-missile patrol boat force, of about 60

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors
Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Merry-Go-Round

by Jack Anderson
units, is the largest of any of the four (Soviet) fleets,
and its amphibians and naval auxiliary forces are
second in size only to those in the Baltic and
Northern fleets, respectively.
Another intelligence report declares ominously
that the Soviets have recently placed mooring
buoys in the Philippine Sea, which has been
dominated by the U. S. Fleet since Admiral Dewey
destroyed the Spanish fleet in 1898.
Meanwhile, the negotiators in Vienna are trying
desperately to stop the military spending spiral by
trading off a U. S. advantage for a Soviet advantage.
What the military men are doing, however, seems to
counter what the negotiators are saying. Thus, the
chances that President Nixons prediction will come
true are now rated less than 50-50.
Footnote: My associate Les Whitten reports from
Hong Kong that U. S. naval forces in the Pacific are
spread thin. He quotes Japanese authorities as
saying that a comparatively small U. S. Navy
force now calls at the giant Yokosuka naval base
south of Tokyo.
CUBAN AIRLIFT CHALLENGED
Rep. Bill Clay, D-Mo., will write President Nixon
next week urging him to terminate the Cuban airlift,
which brings about 1,000 refugees into this country
each week.
Clays opposition to the refugee airlift is based
upon a private staff memo which charges that it
constitutes an outright subsidization of the Cuban
government welfare program.
This policy of accepting and bearing the expense
of those who are either unwanted, unneeded, or
uncomfortable within the confines of their country
has no basis, declares the memo. We are trying to
solve the social problems of an enemy nation.
The airlift was begun by President Johnson in
1965 to offer safe, quick passage for a stream of
refugees who had been trying to get out of Cuba
since Fidel Castro seized control in 1959.
About 190,000 Cubans have been brought to this
country by the airlift. When they arrive, a number
of volunteer agencies help them to obtain
transportation to the place of their choice and
housing after they get there.

Alligator Staff

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor
Earl Hartman
Features Editor
Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor
Fred Voilrath
Wire Editor
Jeff Brain
Editorial Assistant

EDITORIAL
BSP Position
Is Consistent
The precedent was set last quarter.
The Board of Student Publications (BSP) delayed
selection of spring Alligator editors because only two people
applied for the position of editor-in-chief.
Now, they have re-opened applications for summer and
fall-winter terms because of an insufficient number of
applicants.
Frankly, we think Barry Diamonds observation
concerning a lack of quality in the applicants was incorrect.
We feel all the applicants have the ability to handle the jobs.
BSP Chairman Hugh Cunningham cited consistency as
one of the main reasons for the action.
We realize the boards position is not a comfortable one.
If they chose editors from a relatively small number of
applicants they would be charged with favoritism, and
rightfully so. What held last quarter, that Alligator
editorships should be as open as possible to the entire
student body, should hold this quarter as well. Hopefully,
the practice will continue, in the best interests of the
Alligator and the student body.
Now that the board has delayed the selection process we
expect some individuals to charge the decision is political
in nature. We do not feel there are any political
implications in the boards action, as was charged last
quarter. We do not feel this action is a move by the
administration to bring the Alligator under its control.
We understand the board wishes to find the best qualified
people for the positions. We agree with them.
But we disagree with their choice of date for the
interviews. June 3 is too late.
students, applicants and board members have term
papers due and final exams that week;
some of the applicants are awaiting the outcome of the
elections before deciding on other job offers and;
one applicant has made appointments for job
interviews and will be out of town that week.
We realize some time will be necessary to find new
applicants, and then process their records, but we feel it can
be done in less than two weeks.
We ask the board to reconsider and move the deadline for
applications up to May 27 and interviews to May 29.
This will give the board time to find other applicants, and
the students time to study.

KWTSRTE. OHiO
AUG4BJA, 6A.
JACKSON. MBS.
M
Law and Order

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union;
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83.
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the I lorida Alligator are those of
the editors >r of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of I lorida.



Speaking Out

President Nixons
compromising attitude toward
student demonstrators in the
past week serves two primary
purposes:
An immediate goal of
settling down the nations
universities and peacefully
returning the students to the
classrooms.
A long-term political goal
of attracting a share of student
support prior to the 1972
presidential election.
The recent decision to place
American troops in Cambodia
combined with the emotional
impact of the shootings at Kent
State University have created a
restless condition, sometimes
leading to violence, on the
nations college campuses. Even
at UF, normally a restrained
institution, antiwar protests have
generated considerable interest
among students and faculty.
Keenly aware of these
difficulties, President Nixon
announced that the
administration will soften future

MR. EDITOR:
The Alligator of Wednesday, May 13,
contained an article by Richard Anderson
entitled, Blind Followers. His
comparison of last weeks student march
with the pied-piper of Hamlet leading a
flock of sheep was no less than naive,
mud-slinging.
Opposition to student protest is Mr.
Andersons right and privilege as an
American, but to compare a sincere and
well-organized march, such as the one
which this campus witnessed, with a
fictional story appears to be his personal
obsession with cute little analogies.
The march on the ROTC drill field and
Tigert were sincere efforts by individuals
to express their feelings about both the
Cambodian situation and the Kent State
deaths. The students were not, as Mr.
Anderson stated, told to march on the
ROTC field, they went because it was a
perfectly legitimate means of making
themselves heard. No, Mr. Anderson, that
act in itself will not insure the
withdrawal of any troops as you so
sarcastically stated, but the event was
recognized widely and the opposition was
made known.
It seems that in his yearn for a
mud-slinging analogy between
pied-pipers and leaders, sheep and
students, Mr. Anderson has missed the
whole point. The marchers were not out
to set up a dictatorship at Tigert, which
he suggests or to take over the ROTC
building. They were simply using a very
orderly, Democratic method of
registering their dissent. But with your
fairytale antics, Mr. Anderson, you have
poked fun at a basic root of American
liberty.
Mr. Andersons alternative? Tell your

the small society

IF YoO £AN &&T
\ FlZo-AM&Zi Sw , __

A Sincere Effort

Nix on Must Push Now

vocal attacks on student
demonstrators. Furthermore, in
the hope of maintaining peace at
the weekend protest in
Washington, D. C., Nixon
granted the marchers permission
to use the Ellipse (a grassy park
behind the White House) as a
demonstration sight.
Even Vice President Agnew
took the presidents advice by
not delivering a speech on
Friday night in Boise, Idaho,
which would have criticized the
actions of student protestors.
These actions are designed to
settle down student discontent
across the nation. However, the
president probably realizes that
the so-called bums total about
eight million people who will be
eligible to vote in the next
presidential election.
In 1968, Nixon squeaked by
with less than a 250,000
plurality in the popular vote.
With Democrats like Sen.
Muskie, Sen. McGovern, and Ted
Kennedy of Massachusetts on
the scene, all of whom have
considerable student support,

mothers, your brothers, friends not in
college about the problems our nation
faces. What good would it do? Telling
Mother, Brother, friend, or whomever
you wish, is going to have little effect on
Richard Nixons policies. Only through a
combined effort, such as that made
possible by the college campus, are these
students going to be heard.
The solution which Mr. Anderson
offers to the problem of dissent is to
teach the masses to complain to their
congressman by writing letters. Letters
have been written since the Vietnam War
began, so is it not time to try something
else with the Cambodian situation?
Since analogous stories seem to be Mr.
Andersons bag, I ask him to make a
pied-piper out of the late Dr. Martin
Luther King. Did he obtain civil rights for
his sheep by writing his congressman or
did he march to wake up this country and
make his people heard?
MARVIN B. HARPER
Individuals
MR. EDITOR:
The Men of Tau Epsilon Phi officially
endorsed the recent strike. We feel there
are times at which the integrity of a
university is decided NOT through the
mere fact of it being open or closed, but
through channels compatible to free
flows of thought and opinion.
Regarding last week, we feel the
closing of the UF and the strike were
thoroughly justified. We applaud the
actions of those students concerned
enough to voice their opinions
non-violently.
A university, more than any other

Nixon knows he must attempt a
conciliation with the college
crowd if he ever expects their
support in 72.
During his news conference,
Nixon tried to relate to the

TO THE 1970 GRADUATING CLASS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
You graduate at a time when established
institutions and ideas are being questioned as
they have never been questioned before in our
history. Much of this questioning is being done
by the members of your generation, and it is
your generation which ultimately will have to
provide most of the answers to those questions.
I hope that as you look for those answers, you
will remember the obligation of every educated
man and woman to draw careful distinctions
between those ideas which must be readjusted
and those which should be preserved. The fact
that many accepted ways of thinking seem
artifical and unjust does not warrant the
rejection of all established standards. Nor should
our proper respect for the past and our legitimate

ByKrickman

From Washington

place, should be an institution which
discusses and analyzes social problems
always keeping in mind that the ultimate
goal is truth.
There should be times when the
university community STOPS pauses in
its regular routine, and REFLECTS on
issues totally relevant to those at the
university. It might be argued that not all
students, faculty, and workers of the
university should have to stop, and pause,
or reflect.
We, of TEP, have seriously considered
all aspects of this issue. We have decided
that an issue such as Kent State killings
and the U. S. Cambbdian involvement
warrants reflection more than going to
class and more than in a token sense.
We cannot ignore the ills of our society
until we are out of college. If we did,
then too, we would probably postpone
our concern again. The Brothers and
pledges of Tau Epsilon Phi have, and
hopefully always will, remain concerned
individuals.
THE MEN OF TEP
ROTC
MR. EDITOR:
In response to the Alligators editorial
of May 15, 1970, I would like to state
reasons why I oppose ROTC on campus.
I have heard the argument that ROTC
humanizes our future officers. Can
anyone give me the name of a ROTC
graduate cited for outstanding
humanitarian actions? I can give you the
names of two ROTC graduates who
allegedly were outstanding
unhumanitarian. I realize that two alleged
examples of unhumanitarian actions does
not condemn all ROTC graduates, but it
does cast some doubt on the tenet that
-ROTC,. necessarily humanizes., future
officers. t A
As for the argument that ROTC makes
the military more democratic, I would
like to give several examples which
indicate how democratic the military is.
The military does not tolerate freedom of
expression; underground newspapers are
repressed, a GI in Germany was arrested
because of his longish hair, and Gls were
disciplined for displaying symbols of
peace.
Furthermore, military tribunals do not
permit bail, do not grant the right to
indictment by grand jury, and do not

students by concluding that
America entered Cambodia to
achieve all the goals the students
desired. In the presidents view,
he and the protestors are striving
for the same ends, but using

FORUM:--.
( Aduia wi DiiAwt J
fin f or i^ e

Friday, May 22. 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

By Mike Weinstein

desire for stability lead us to defend
thoughtlessly that which is outmoded and
obsolete.
Your challenge will be that of reconciling
continuity and change, of giving new applications
and fresh expressions to our traditional
values especially our concern for the
dignity and integrity of every individual. By
meeting that challenge you can make this time of
rapid change a time of substantial growth and
fulfillment for yourselves, for your community
and for your nation.
As I extend to you my personal
congratulations and best wishes, I look to the
future with greater confidence because I know of
the exceptional qualifications you bring to the
exceptional demands of our time.
RICHARD NIXON

offer the right to trial by peers. Justice
Douglas stated in a Supreme Court
decision that courts-martial as an
institution are singularly inept in dealing
with the nice subtleties of constitutional
law. ROTC has been in existence for
100 years and in 1969 contributed at
least one-half of all new officers. With
such a dominant and long established
influence, why hasnt ROTC succeeded in
democratizing the military?
I dont think students should receive
academic credit for learning how to kill,
and I dont think ROTC should be
subsidized with student tuition and state
monies. To avoid denying some students
their rights, I would prefer that ROTC be
organized as a club, operating in the same
manner as other UF student interest
groups.
FREDERICK REP LOG LE, 4FY
GAIL REPLOGLE, 4ED
Wisdom
MR. EDITOR:
In 469 B. C. Socrates stated: an old
man has no title to respect because he is
old, unless he is also wise; or that an
ignorant parent has no claim to obedience
on the mere account of the parental
relation.
Armed in 1970 with this great mans
wisdom, I answer John J. Tock plus all
other advocates of blind support to the
president with this; Neither does an
ignorant country or president have claim
to obedience or support on the mere
account of the relationship consummated
by the tragic mistake made by the
American people on election day, 1968.
JULIAN HERTZOG, 4AS
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and
not exceed 300 words.
§ Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have add reams and taleohona numhan
ruse ssvaessssh^^^oeso
of writers.
Nemes will be withheld only if writer
shows just causa. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for space.
Writers may submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column is
asked to contact the editor and be prepared
to show samples of his work.

different means.
In addition, it was particularly
interesting to see Nixon
communicating face-to-face with
demonstrators at the Lincoln
Memorial.

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS


*****%******
FOR SALE
xxx*xx*x*x^**ra*xrex^^
50 x 10 Schult trailer; AC; washer;
carpet; 20 x 10 screen porch; all in
excellent cond. Lot 5 Pinehurst Pk.
378-5450. Best Offer. (A-10t-145-p)
HONDA 150 Good condition
dependable cheap transportation
$155. Two trial S tires 4.00 lB
Good condition $25 372-1297.
(A-146-2t-p)
Moving Selling everything
clothes, records, record cab, port,
dryer, hair dryer, make-up mirror,
kitchen appliances, more! Call
378-3746. (A-146-lt-p)
PRINTS, paintings 424 SE 7th Street
378-3614 after 5. (A-146-3t-p)
Pellex f 1.4 complete w/accessory
lens & cases. 200mm and 35mm
S4OO or best offer. Call 372-5516.
(A-10t-138-p)
78 acres, horse ard cattle ranch
318-335 2 miles due east of Wllliston
on corner of 2 highways contact
R. T. Lewis 528-6562 not collect.
Route 1 box 157 Wllliston.
(A-st-143-p)
1967 mobile home, 12 x 48, 2
bedrooms, excellent condition, S4OO
down, assume payments of $77
monthly, original financing 6yrs, 4
yrs remaining to pay. 378-6797,
evenings. (A-st-142-p)
Absolutely must sell now! 50x8
furnished 2 bedroom mobile home
central heating air conditioning
carpeting superb condition 378-8304
after 5 $1550 or best offer.
(A-st-142-p)
Purple-Yellow Honda' 565,7300 ml,
recently tuned, inspected,
dependable best pash offer over SBO,
helmet etc. Al after 7 evenings.
392-7329. (A-st-142-p)
*.
100% human hair fall! Shoulder
length, brown-frosted I Best offer
over $25. Head-stand Included! Call
after 1:30 at 376-0266, ask for
Darlla. (A-st-142-p)
SEX? It is true we carry a full line of
equipment for most any sport, but
lets be reasonable! B & B SPORTS
CENTER 5320 N.W. 13th St.
378-1416. (A-st-142-p)
Refrig Bike TV $25 Each Music
Stand $1 Port. Movie Screen $5
Cassette Recorder $lO Port B try
Record Player $lO 378-0226.
(A-st-143-p)
1 96 9 KAWASAKI F 3
BUSHWHACKER. Motorcycle Low
mileage, just like new, only S4OO.
Phone 372-5787 after 6:00 p.m. for
more information. (A-4t-143-p)
Must Sell! Hangstrom 12-String
Guitar Dual Pickup With Case. A-l
Condition Sacrifice $125. Call
392-76 73. (A-st-143-p)
8x24 mble home A/C load leveling
hitch S7OO mono tape recorder S4O
67 Triumph 650 S7OO 20-inch fan $5
wife SIOO Prices flexible 372-5078.
(A-st-143-p)
MUGS! MUGS I MUGS! For the BIG
or small drinker. Beautiful
hand-made ceramic mugs. Various
Sizes & Colors Call Steve Paskosky
392-8777 (A-st-144-p)
1967 Honda cll6o scrambler
Excellent shape S3OO call 378-5996
after 1 p.m. and all day Saturday or
Sunday. (A-3t-144-p)
1967 Bultaco Campera 175 cc. 3300
miles. Excellent woods bike. New
paint. $350 call 392-1727 days and
378-8688 nights. Ask for Mike
Wlnegar.(A-3t 144-p)
2 br air conditioned trailer Bx4o
with 16x18 addition; pool, clean,
good condition. Near campus. S2OOO
or terms 372-1346,(A-3t-144-p)
1826 w. UN IV. AVE.
,>- 372,-3225 -<
jjjjSiifflr
TALL TALES i SON6S
A "REAL*' s TMj teu£R
ALSO CLA<( .roKES
GKEG- Jo CO A ISAS
/o. _ sdrr of the
HOP MoVE- 6uuTEtsaMFHEH

a
FOR SALE
-x-xv^x-x-xvx-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-:
1966 Triumph Spitfire excellent
condition radio heater and many
extras asking SIOOO.OO can be seen at
922 SW 7th Ave or call Dean
378-6041 (A-4t-144-p)
1969 Penton motocross and Enduro
racing cycle Includes racing extras
street equip. Cost S7OO new, sell
$460 1321 NW. 4th Lane or
392-7159. (A-3t-144-p)
Bausch & Lomb binocular
microscope: 4 objectives, lOx wide
field eyepieces, excellent condition
call 378-7854 after 5 pm.
(A-st-144-p)
GUITAR 12-strlng electric, Hagstrom
2-pickup, like new with hard case.
New over $250. Also 2 channel
reverb amp. 392-8905. (A-st-144-p)
Parkwood mobile home-2 bdrm. 12x
56 Spanish decor, 2 airconditloners,
is furnished, carpeted. A-l shape.
Two yrs old $4500. 439-2725 Flagler
Bch. (A-5t- 144-p)
1967 Porsche 911 excellent cond.
Konls Webers radio. Car is in great
shape. Must sell $4,500. Call
376-9789. Ask for Lee. (A-st-144-p)
Fender ampliefier contains JBL
D-140 speaker. $350 or best offer,
excellent condition phone 372-3867.
(A-st-144-p)
Honda 305 Superhawk showroom
condition excellant mechanicly
Includes metalflake lime helmet and
passenger helmet megaphones call
392-8190.(A-5t-144-p)
CARPETS a fright? Make them a
beautiful sight with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-167-lt-c)
Must sell* 1965 Yamaha under 80000
miles. Perfect running condition best
offer takes it. Call 372-7104 after
5:30. (A-2t-145-p)
For sale Ig. mixed breed pups. Two
oven stove end tables Volkswagen
parts call 475-1158 after 6pm.
(A-3t-145-p)
For sale: 1965 Honda 305, just
tuned, bored out with oversized
pistons fast, clean, reliable, $275 call
372-7189 after 5 need cash going
In army. (A-2t-145-p)
1968 Sears 50cc Motorcycle;
excellent, like new, runs perfect, call
Bill 373-1561 or see 103 NW 10 St.
Apt 2. $l2O. (A-st-145-p)
BRAND NEW PORTABLE T.V.
never been used. A real beauty,
walnut style finish, only SBS! will
bargain, call 392-8824. (A-3t-145-p)

L J I ¥ I
n^Sfi^MriflfeHH^HiiiiilHHMMiiiiHHHflHHilHkflfl

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 22, 1970

Page 10

FOR SALE
#. *
Taperecorder, Webcor, portable, two
track mono. 3 speakers, microphone,
input extension cord, 2 speed, record
on both sides of tape without reel
turnover. $45. 124V2 NW 20 Drive.
(A-st-145-p) ___
FOR RENT
X->X ; xx-x*X*X ; x ; x ; X-x ; x : X ; x ; x ; X-x ; : ;
Sublease or need 3 fern, roommates
available June 1. Tanglewood 2
bedroom townhouse. No deposits.
Call 372-0360. (B-146-st-p)
2 br. Landmark apt. for summer qtr.
Perfect location. All dishes, pots,
pans, etc.. Free. Be where the action
is and get all the xtras. Call
373-2364. (B-146-3t-p)
Married? Sublease for summer.
Furnished apt. slOl/month AC good
neighbors PH: 373-1935 evenings.
(B-146-st-p)
Must sublet for summer: June free.
Need 3 or 4 people. Own bedroom,
desk, etc., Were willing to take loss.
Call 378-7026. (B-146-2t-p)
French Quarter Apts. 114 Sublease
summer qtr. $45 mo. End apt. very
quiet. Call Doug, PH: 373-2306.
(B-146-st-p)
2 bedroom A/C apt. for summer.
Only S3OO for entire summer! Come
check It out 501 N.W. 15th Ave.
378-8408. (B-146-3t-p)
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
Sublet: 1 bdrm. furnished apt. June
through August. French Quarter. AC,
pool, Call 376-4165 after 5:00,
392-0510 weekdays. (B-st-137-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-c)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included completely
furnlghed ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372-7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)

FOR RENT
Available June 14. A/C eff. apt Bth
ave apts 1222 NW Bth ave. quiet,
plenty of parking. $85./mo. call
373-2137 between 6 and 7:30 pm.
(B-st-143-p)
Sublet Sum. Qtr. 1 bdrm. garage apt.
AC, ww carpet, beautifully furnished,
tv cable. SIOO/mo. + ut. 1908 NW
3rd Ave. 373-2700. (B-6t-142-p)
Sublet for summer or'longer 1
bdrm. A/C, pvt. patio, furnished,
slls/mo Village 34, no. 27, Call
378-7000. (B-139-st-p)
2 bedroom Village Park apt. to
sublease for the summer quart. $95
for entire summer phone 373-2661
or come by apt 12 Village Park.
(B-4t-143-p)

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antiestablishmaitarian,antibeUum,
antitrust, antiseptic,antibiotic,
antisocial, & antipasto.
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FOR RENT
Sublet 1 br apt furnished, ac,
dishwasher, pool, available June 12.
$l2O/mo. Just off campus. Mt.
Vernon apts. Call after 6:30 PM
378-0260. (B-5M43-P)
Available June 15, Unlv. Gardens one
bedroom apt for summer and next
year, beautifully furnished plus
extras. June rent free. 376-8958.
(B-st-143-p)
GATOR COURT
376-4667 4170 SW
) 13th St.
.>&>J
spend "'A >Su where the
the night. . price is right



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
Sublet for summer, furnished English
Tudor house, entire upstairs. Walking
distance to campus, 2 huge
bedrooms, central A/C and heat,
modern kitchen and bath, living
room, wood paneled, carpeted,
sunken den 180/mo. 373-1049.
(B-4t-143-p)
Need to rent for the summer, a 2
bedroom A/C Mobile home, S9O per
month call JOHN 373-1581 evenings.
(B-st-143-p)
OLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
SAVE sllO 4-man Vintage Pk apt.
To sublet for summer. Furn, balcony
over pool, end apt for spacious
parking. SIOO each for entire
summer. Call 373-1347 anytime.
Apt. 94. (B-st-142-p)
Summer quarter only 2 bedroom
and two full baths S2OO per month
apart, for only $l5O Pt. West Apart.
Call 378-9809 anytime hurry first
come first serve. (B-st-142-p)
Sublet-sumi.rur 1 bedroom wood
panel Apt. A/C, private patio, pet fee
paid, lots of extras slls a month
Village 34 Apt 37 call 378-5809.
(B-st-142-p)
Sublease summer qtr. poolside 2 bdr.
French Qtr. Apt. near laundry room
fun living A/C contact Linda or
Jackie anytime phone 372-6768.
(B-st-142-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
summer qtr. Share house 2 blocks
from campus with 2 coeds pvt. room,
A/C, Call 378-6548. (B-st-137-p)
Needed: 2 male roommates to
sublease 3 bedroom fully furnished
home for the summer. Only S4O per
mo. per person. $l2O per mo. total.
Call 373-1162 after 7:00 pm for
details. (B-2t-145-p)
Large house to sublet for summer: 3
bdrms, 2 baths, kitchen, etc. 1 blk.
from campus interested call
373-2268 or come by 1128 SW Ist
Ave. (B-10t-145-p)
French Quarter Apartment to sublet
for summer 1 bedroom apartment
no. 31 call 378-7203. (B-st-145-p)
FRENCH QTR. 2 bdrm. apt.,
sublease for summer, poolside. $l5O
a month. Call after 6:30 pm.
376-5412. (B-3t-145-p)
Help! Must sublet 1 br apt w/bath
kitchen/ac/carpet/fufnished & pool.
Will talk terms. Butler Gardens 968
SW 16 Ave. 378-9657 pm Jerry.
(B-2t-145-p)
Air-conditioned 2 bdr trailer with
cabana shaded by giant live oaks,
ideal for lovers or other couple. $l5O
for all summer call 378-8205.
(B-3t-144-p)
I McHf CMIr TfwiSn
1 7 DAYS
[wiiiw.iw A
" From the l(X|
s[ country
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* "I A Woman".
9 and
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A Best Actress
WMag&e (Ml
T Smith
* tff
yUssifcan^Brodie
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INSTANT
- W.Y. Post

Friday, May 22, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT
FRENCH QUARTER. Sublease 2
bdrm apt on pool for summer no. 82.
Call nights 373-2381. (B-4t-144-p)
1327 NW 7th Ave one bedroom apt
well furnished duplex walking
distance $75 mo. call 378-8641 after
5 pm. (B-st-145-p)
Village Park need 1 roomate open
now thru summer apt. on pool. Call
372- anytime. (B-st-145-p)
Frederick Gardens one-bedroom for
summer. June rent paid. Call
376-0808 or come by no. 66.
(B-st-145-p)
Landmark townhouse! 2 bedroom
four person apt available mid-June.
A/C, dishwasher, disposal, gas, grills,
rent $46.25/mo. apt. 126 ph.
378-6277 now! (B-st-145-p)
Sublet summer qt. 2 bedroom
Landmark Apt. 103 June rent free
call 378-9052 or come by.
(B-st-144-p)
Sublet summer qt. Olympia Apts,
next to campus, 1 bedroom,
furnished, carpet a/c, summer rates
$95.00 per month, call 378-6247
after s:oopm Att who called this apt
still open call back. (B-6t-141-p)
We can get it for you wholesale 2
bdroom summit house apt furn
carpet a/c pool reg $167 summer rate
$l2O June paid 373-1782 evenings.
(B-st-145-p)
Sublet Summer Quarter: one bedrm.
apt; close to campus, med center &
V.A. Hosp; furnished, with pool and
air cond; $l3O/mo; call
3 72-5732. (B-3t-144-p)
Best Deal In Town!! 2 BR. apt.
Beautifully Furnished, Central Air,
fully carpeted, 5 min. from campus.
$1 4 5 /mo 373-1573 or
3 73-2747. (B-st-144-p)
Sublet or rent 1 brm apt furnished air
conditioned rent slls/mo patio call
373- or 376-4807 Village 34.
(B-st-144-p)
The closest complex to campus-Mt.
Vernon. Sublease single br. pad.
Furnished, carpeted, all the extras.
Like new. Evenlngs-378-4877.
(B-4t-144-p)
FRENCH QUARTER apt 114
summer lease $45. per month air
conditioned, pool, tv, study lounge
etc. Call John 373-2306. (B-3t-145-p)
HAWIIAN VILLAGE sublet for
summer. 2 bdrm 2 bath townhouse.
Furnished, central a/c, dishwasher,
pool, patio, maid serv. apt. 140
373-2520. (B-5M45-P)
NEED 1 or 2 roomates for summer
qrt 2 bdrm AC apt. 1 block from
campus ssomo. 373-2317.
(B-2t-145-p)
Furnished apt for rent 3 br 2 baths
cen air very quiet $l5O per mo Apt 1
315 NW 19 Lane available June 15
years lease required phone 376-2829.
(B-2M45-P)
Sublet 1 bdr. a/c dpt. 2 blocks from
campus summer rates June 13
contact in person after 4 1100 S.W.
Bth Ave apt. no. 205 Olympia Apts.
(B-st-145-p)
Landmark Apartment to sublease for
summer. June rent paid apt. 31 call
373-2241. (B-2M45-P)
Two apartments, each one bedroom,
private bath. Also one efficiency apt.
available, occupation June 15;
inquire at 102 NW 15th St. or call
372-9855. (B-3t-145-p)
WOW 2 bedroom apt. central heat
and air ww carpeting special low rate
for summer 2 pools outdoor grills
TOM 378-9582. (B-4t-145-p)

I 9 S I VTTYV9IH37H9rP^fc
STAR OF & WILLIE
B Y WAS I
I ncHHicotj* ROBERT REDFORD I
I PLUS 8:32 & I
H ACADEMY AWARD AT lfV'ld H
I JHIWMB TEewnMur

Page 11

FOR RENT
ONLY $1.02 a day to live in luxury
at Landmark. Beautiful apt can be
yours for S9O for entire summer. 2
bedrooms call 373-2393.
(B-st-145-p)
Men 3 blocks from campus central air
conditioning single $155.00 double
$l2O each for summer quarter
378-8122. (B-10t-145-p)
WANTED
Listeners Wanted: Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and 4 pm for
appointment. 392-2049. (C-st-143-c)
Want a beautiful summer? Live at
Landmark. 1 or 2 girls wanted for
summer quarter. Air-conditioning, 2
pools luxurious living. 376-0687.
(C-3t-145-p)
Two roommates for summer point
west apts. 2 bedroom 2 bath a/c
dishwasher pool reduced rate on
rent call 378-9947 around 9 am or 6
pm. (C-st-145-p)
1 Female roommate for French
Quarter poolside air cond. apt. for
summer $lO5 for summer come by
apt 102 or call 373-1225.
(C-st-143-p)
FEMALE Roommate for Summer
Qtr. Share 1 br. apt. A/C TV Quiet
Landmark Apts. Call 376-7693 after
5:00 PM. (C-st-142-p)
1 female rommate wanted for Point
West apt. 2 bedroom, 2 full baths
No deposit s7s for summer
quarter call Robin 378-7188 5-Bpm
or 392-2925 8-1 lam. (C-6t-142-p)
FRIENDLY apt. needs co-ed
roommate. ONLY SIOO for summer.
Townhouse in Landmark. Call Carol
3 72-9764 or Debbie 392-9880.
(C-st-144-p)
JUNE RENT FREE 4 to share 2 bdr
2 bath Point West apt $125 ea for all
summer pool ac dishwasher call
376-9924 or 372-5970 after 5 must
be 21. (C-10t-142-p)
Male roommate for summer quarter
at La Mancha. Live all summer for
$l5O Inc. utilities; pool, a/c, own
bedroom. Call 372-8046 anytime.
(C-st-143-p)
Coeds for summer qtr. Have your
own room In a house 10 blocks from
Norman S7O + utilities for the entire
summer. Call 373-1748. (C-st-144-p)
FRIENDLY apt needs co-ed roommate
FRIENDLY Apt. needs co-ed
roommate. ONLY SIOO for summer.
Townhouse in Landmark. Call Carol
3 72-9764 or Debbie 392-9880.
(C-st-144-p)
Live all summer at La Mancha for
$l4O Inc. utilities, pvt. bedroom, pvt.
balcony, pvt. phone, walk-in closets,
pool, AC Call 373-1414. (C-146-st-p)
2 roommates summer V 4 for 2
bedroom Williamsburg Apt n 0.42
373-1216 close to Med Center.
(C-3t-144-p)
2 female roommates needed fall
quarter $l2O per qtr. plus utilities.
Call Barb 392-7696 or Chris
392-7715 soon. Pool, air
conditioning, kitchen. (C-146-3t-p)
ROOMMATE for the Summer. Only
$l5O in a nice Duplex on 309 S.W.
19th St. 3 blks from Stadium. Call
392-0550 Chem. Grad office for
Barry. (C-146-2t-p)
Legal Secretary with previous
experience. For interview call David
M. Anderson; Fagan, Crouch,
Anderson & Folds, 376-5295.
(C-146-10t-p)

WANTED
One male roommate for summer
quarter to share house 1220 SW Ist
Ave. 1/2 SI 10 plus expenses call
378-9330. (C-2t-145-p)
Poolside Williamsburg Apt., 2 bd.
furnished townhouse need to sublet
for the summer call after 5 during the
week 372-8716. (C-st-145-p)
GIRLS YOU name your own rent for
Pt. West Apt., deposits paid, available
June 1, Two bedrooms two full
baths Call 378-8771. (C-146-st-p)
Need 1 co-ed roommate for 1 bdrm.
ac apt. 2 blks from campus. Price Is
S9O for entire summer. Call
378-0551. (C-146-st-p)
EE Grad student with 2 bdrm apt
needs 1,2, or 3 roommates for the
summer quarter. Call Jim 378-9129,
500-7 SW 34 St. Point West Apts.
(C-3t-144-p)
HELP WANTED
Looking for mother to take care of 3
children in her home while on
vacation following graduation. If
interested please call 372-3846.
(E-5M42-P1
YMCA day camp counselors needed
June 15th to July 29th approx. S7O a
week those qualifing for work-study
preferred call Jerry Erkert 378-8533.
(E-4t-144-p)
SUMMER JOBS Jacksonville
Gainesville Miami S3OO per month
salary plus bonus Reitz Union rm
118 Wed May 27 330 pm.
(E-st-145-p)
Co-ed wanted room and board in
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
Need full time saleslady for ladies
retail department. Some experience
preferred. Pay according to ability.
For Interview apply in person at
Silvermans, 225 W. University Ave.
(E-4t-143-p)
Need a job? All routes student
operated. Charles Chips Home
Delivery service potato chips,
pretzels, cookies, 376-6943.
(E-10t-137-p)
SUMMER JOB! See the US as a ramp
hand for the world's greatest auto
thrill show. For Information call
373-1247. (E-st-143-p)
Coctail Waitress part-time or
full-time, no experience necessary,
will train. Must be 21. Apply after 4
Dubs lounge 376-9175.
(E-24M25-P)
Seel beautiful FAMILY reference
blbles full or part time top pay.
Weekly training now. W. H. Magee
gator court Room 5. 376-4667.
(E-146-3t-p)
AUTOS
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy clean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
1967 Buick Sun Crusier wagon radio
AC power steering and brakes
chrome wheels excellent condition
2295 ,Call 378-0070 after 6:00.
(G-3t-145-p).
64 Chevy Impala conv. VB,
Autotrans power steering. Good
mechanical condition. Make offer,
376-4165 after 5. (G-st-143-p)
69 Camaro automatic radio warranty
going overseas must sell. Call Louis
376-7098. (G-st-145-p)
196 9 BMW 1600 new engine,
stlckshift, blue w/ black Interior.
Make offer. Call 372-6474 after 2
pm. (G-3t-144-p)
1967 Opel, A/C, Excellent
Condition, Call Joel 378-9758 or
378-2401 or see at 1113 S.W. Ist ave.
(G-st-143-p)
CORVETTE Convertible. A true
classic 1960. Perfect mechanical,
body and interior. Fresh overhaul.
Sacrifice, only $1,375. 376-5962.
(G-146-3t-p)
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission Is a winner
tool TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street s.E. (G-135-ts-c)
1968 TRIUMPH GT6 British racing
green, wire wheels, luggage rack,
17,000 miles call 372-2135 after 6
pm. (G-st-145-p)
64 2-door auto Plymouth; good
cond; very dean; new battery; good
tires; radio; trailer hitch; S4OO cash;
Ollendorff 392-3611 / 376-0921..
(G-st-144-nc)
Ford 1962, Ahr, R A H, 4 dr, six,
white, $390, VW Bug. 1965, Air, R A
H, Sunroof, Extras, Excellent car
$1,530, Best Offer Buys, Call
372-2303. (G-3t-144-ol
When the rain came they ran to hide
their heads. Will the chivalrous guy
who gave me his hat during the rain
at the Super Show, call. Unda,
392-9647 and I*ll return It.
(J-2t-145-p).
To "The Drummer, Your sound
leaves me FeeHn Alright." Thanks.
(J-3t-144-p)

HSONA t
Today is the 2397th anniversary of
Platos birth. All Lovers of Wisdom
are asked to observe the occasion by
cogitating on the Form of the Good
for several hours. Nothing in mortal
life Is worthy of great concern.
Republic, 604 C. (J-lt-145-p).
Will the chick who was handing out
copies of Probe at the Super show &
wearing blue jean bells A a black A
white swimsuit top pi. call 378-1998.
(J-2t-145-p)
Need to get your stuff up North? We
are renting a truck and will take
anything you want betweefc here and
Hartford, Conn. Need to know this
week. Call 378-6107. Ask for Brad or
Rich. WILL TAKE BIKES.
(J-st-145-p).
There can be in this country a
not-so-silent majority for peace"
John Lindsay. CITIZENS FOR
LINDSAY. 37 6-3 852
Pd. Pol. Adv. (J-146-3t-p)
DEE CEE: Sorry that I am late but
happy first, happy fourth, happy
twenty-eighth, and happy successful
trailer hunting. Love your baby.
(J-lt-145-p)
Wanted good homes for 2 male
kittens. Just weaned ready and
waiting for you. Very clean and
dainty. After 7 PM Call 466-3601.
(J-146-2t-p)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
Groovy Saluki (Persian Greyhound)
needs a home for the summer and
foster parent while Im overseas
.Worth $75 to me to find a loving home.
Call 376-4945. (J-st-144-p)
Free fruit juice for any campus
policeman who comes to the front of
Tigert without his gun on we love
you but not your guns The hunger
strikers. (J-141-6t-p)
GIRL needed for cooking and light
housekeeping in exchange for room
and board In luxurious apt! Call
376-4863 after 11 p.m. (J-3t-145-p).
ILMEC (J-st-143-p)
SOVIET UNION. Driving and
Camping 10 weeks, $1,350. Includes
air and all expenses. A. Llpson, 2
Garden Terr., Cambridge, Mass
02138 or call (collect) 617-547-1127.
(J-6t-142-p)
LOST Sc FOUND
Glasses with brown-amber frames and
case In the Reitz Union parking lot
on Friday, May 15 at 5 PM whoever
found them please call 372-7395
eves. (L-2t-145-p)
FOUND: By McCarthy: Photo of aj
boy at Xmas on a hobby-horse.
Fireplace scene sailboat aboW.
Color IF YOURS Call Roberta
Huff 392-1681, 376-0701.
(L-3t-l(L-3t-146-nc)
LOST in Med. Center area One
beeper $25 reward with no questions
asked. Call JOHN at 392-2867.
(L-st-145-p)
Lost: Purse with prescription
sunglasses, ID, key. Reward
372-1115. (L-146-2t-p)
FOUND: Suzuki motorcycle key.
Call 378-4676. (L-3M44-NC)
Lost mixed Shepard pup white tip on
tall near NW llth Ave. Call
372- (L-4t-144-p)
FOUND: Sandals with initials
D LA-picked up by mistake at
Saturdays Celebration. Call
373- (L-3M44-NC)
AT THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 cent and 4 cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
S. W. 4th Ave, across from
Greyhound Bus Station, 378-4480.
(M-ts-107-c)
Grad student Needs Bread.
Experienced Accurate Typist. .45 per
page Call Lorrle 372-7973.
(M-Bt-140-p)
STEREO TAPES $4.00 very high
quality selection of 200 albums or
transfer from own order blank and/or
Information, Sound A Cinema
Corporation P.O. Box 1064 Eau
Gallle, Fla. (M-5M42-P)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone*
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-io7-tf-c)
Del-Ray Typing Service: manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pick-up delivery 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-143-p)



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 22, 1970

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE
EXAMS' deadline is Friday, May
22- Graduate students need to
apply in the office of the
appropriate Foreign Language
Department to take the exam to
be administered on May 30.

Rim UNION AUDITORIUM
Jpaurptn]
x in the PAUL NEWMAN production of
HM rachel.
rachel
.SyiMWfSTfD FM MAT lift AUDIENCES |
TECHNICOLOR'FROM WARNER BROS. SEVEN AITS
5:30, 8.00, 1030 PM. Admission 50(
FRIDAY & SATURDAY MAY 22, 23
MMHj
** ft JFw 11
Three programs of 22 short films by the world's
leading flimmakers This Sunday Program 3 will be
shown at 7:00 & 9:30 p.m. at the Reitz Union
Auditorium. Tickets are SI.OO at the door. Sponsored
by J. Wayne Reitz Union, selected by the Classic Film
Committee. : h y

I DRIVE LIKE A KING
HI \\ Add to the trade-in value and at the A w
/ /$T \\ same time enjoy air conditioned com-
I vyT\ yy \\ fort.| ar rive re^ es^ec and wrinkle free!
M Vi UN| t ON W is a for'! OU
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

PLACEMENT
NOTICES
PEACE CORPS applications
are available for summer 1970
programs at the International
Center, south of Walker
Auditorium. VISTA brochures
may also be obtained.

BLUE BULLETIN

Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
June and August graduates
unless indicated otherwise.
May 25: Jacksonville
Episcopal High School; Collier
County Schools; Dekalb County
Board of Education, Georgia; St.
Lucie County Board of
Education; Okaloosa County
Board of Education; Marion
County School Board; Hendry
County Schools; Duval County
School Board; Tulare Dept, of
Education, Calif.; Tulsa Public
Schools, Okla.
May 26: Atlanta Public
Schools, Georgia; Monroe
County School Board; Florida
Division of Adult Corrections;
Columbia County Board of
Public Instruction; Taylor
County School System;
Hillsborough County Public
Schools; Union County School
Board
May 27: Dade County Public
Schools; Broward County Board
of Public Instruction; Gadsden
County Board of Public
Instruction; Sumter County
Public Schools; Hernando
County School Board; Volusia
County Schools; Baker County
Schools
May 28: Polk County Board
of Public Instruction
May 29: Pasco County Board
of Public Instruction
] [ Guns Guns Guns 3
*E Inventory over 500. Buy j [
j [ Sell Trade Repair. 3
, I Reloading supplies. Layaway j [
* t plan. Harry Beckwith, gun J
! [ dealer, Mi canopy. 466-3340. J;

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Friday
Union Movie, Rachael,
Rachael," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
Graham Area FREE Dance,
"RGF," Graham Rec. Room,
9:00 p.m.
Saturday
Gamma-Beta-Phi Picnic, Meet in
New Engineering Complex
parking lot, 10:00 a.m.
Union Movie, "Rachael,
Rachael," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
Faculty Club President's Ball,
Union Ballroom, 8:00 pp.m.
Union Dance, 'THE RIFF,"
Union Terrace, 9:00 p.m.
Sunday
Baptist Student Union Folk
Musical, 'Tell it Like it is,"
Plaza of the Americas, 1:00
p.m.
Music Dept: Chamber Music for
Woodwinds, University Aud.,
4:00 p.m.
Union Classic Film Series,
"Kinetic Art II," Union Aud.,
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:00 p.m.
if

at I
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA I
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
FRIDAY I
LUNCH AND DINNER I
Fish Almondine I
and French-Fried Potatoes I
89<

Campus
Calendar

Monday
Gator Amateur Radio Club
Meeting, 525 E & I Bldg.,
8:00 p.m.
Young Democrats Meeting,
Speaker: Chuck Ansell,
"Alachua County Politics,"
361 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Science Fiction Book Exchange
& Fan Club Meeting, 357
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
362 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Air Force Dames Meeting, Air
Force ROTC Library, 7:30
p.m.
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:30 p.m.
Modern Jazz Dance Lessons, 118
Union, 7:30 pjn.
Music Dept: Faculty Recital,
Earl Groth, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: IFC
Spring Frolics, $5.50 per
couple. Florida Players,
"Light Up the Sky," Univ. of
Fla Students, $.75, Students
SI.OO, and General Public,
$1.50



r~-& ft / A Saturday May 23
''gf
Florida State University
Campbell Stadium
Featuring
Pacific Gas & Electric
Zephyr
The Illusion
f 1 Rhinocerous
l **§ and including
Plymouth Rock Funk, Inc.
Nate & John Puppetmasters
Changing Tymes City Wide Delivery
with Special Guests
Pam Rose and Jim Pierce
~. J K
Presented by Student Government and Day Attractions

Friday, May 22. 1970. Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

Th Florida Alligator, Friday, May 22, 1970

Squires Make Study
Os Court Problems
By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writar
A 104-page report on the UF Honor Court will be released
May 27 by the University Squires.
University Squires is a a freshman and sophomore mens
leadership honorary formed two years ago by Omicron Delta
Kappa.
THERE IS a pervasive undercurrent of discontent in the
student body towards its honor system, Squires spokesman
Larry Rodd said.
Our report tries to determine the ideal purpose of the honor
system on campus, define its problems and present a workable
solution to these problems. We are looking for away to make
Floridas most cherished tradition, indeed that, Rodd said.
The extensive report is divided into three parts.
THE FIRST PART defines the problems with the Honor
Court organization.
The second part tries to determine why problems exist and
why there is discontent among students with the Honor Court.
The final part presents what the Squires believe is a
workable solution to the honor court problems.
Our primary sources of information on the Honor Court
have always been available to the general public sources which
have never been so widely tapped before, Rodd said.
The report is the result of a year-long study done by the
Squires. The study was headed by Rodd and University Squires
President Richard OBrien.

WHAT'S HAPPENING

BSU FILM: Martin Luther King film, Norman
Hall Sunday at 3 pjn.
PEACE MEET: SMC meets Sunday, 7pm., room
349 Union, to plan-May 29, a day they plan to
open up the university for antiwar activities.
BIG MEAL: Tickets are on sale for the 21st
Annual Journalism College Awards Banquet. Tickets
for the Sigma Delta Chi sponsored event may be
picked up in the deans office in the Journalism
building. The banquet will be held May 28 at the
Holiday Inn near 1-75 (west). Price ... $3.75 each.

j ... ;jV
You cant hold hands
when youre eating a WHOPPER
.j-.-w:n *~j .Ji > .: ' z *%.
WMto > < -f - -gwir
THE TWO FISTED BURGER
AT 8 N.W. 16th Ave. J iS#-

DOWN THE SEA: The Faculty Club Shipwreck
Reception and Dance will be tonight at 6 in the
Arrendondo Room of the Reitz Union.
BIG BALL: Faculty Club Presidents Ball at the
Union Ballroom Saturday at 8 p jn.
FAMU: Players and Edward Waters Choir in the
University Auditorium tonight at 7. Presented by
the Black Student Union.
FOLK MUSIC: Presented by the Baptist Student
Union in the Plaza of the Americas Sunday at 1
pm.

Savant Taps 26 Women
For Leadership Ability

Twenty-six UF coeds were
tapped Wednesday night for
membership in Savant, womens
leadership society.
Names of the new members
were released Wednesday
afternoon to the Alligator.
CHOSEN FOR membership
were Beth Ayers, 2UC; Tammy
Bowman, lUC; Francine Burton,
2UC; Nora Childs, 3ED; Linda
Comparato, 2UC; Debby Dalton,
3JM; Karen Eng, 4JM; Jessica
Everingham, 3AS; Victoria
Fagen, 3AS; Janie Gould, 4JM;
Nancy Kelly, 2UC.
Also chosen were Connie
Knight, 3HP; Gail Merein, 2UC;
Patricia Nichols, 3AS; Linda
Roberts, 2UC; Melody Roberts,
3AS; Susan Roberts, 3 BA; Carol
Sanger, 4JM; Susie Shapiro,
2UC.
Also, Linda Strauss, 3ED;
Patricia Tuck, 4PE; and Mary

Tunstall, 2UC; Denise Valiante,
3JM; Kerry Werner, 3ED;
Cynthia Utley 3NR, and
Marjorie Wise, 2UC.

>.. AMm
i%lwnsuN
'THE NEW LEADER IN SMALL CARS" OPEN 'TIL 7 PM
2MD AVE AND 2ND ST. S.E. MQN THRU SAT

The new members were
initiated Wednesday night in a
candlelight ceremony at the
Century Tower.



Sola res Selected Top Rep;
Shepherd Makes Decision

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Former Student Body President Charles Shepherd
has selected Student Body Vice President Henry
Solares as the Outstanding Student Government
Representative for 1969-70.
Solares was SG secretary of academic affairs
during the Shepherd administration.
CAROL BRUNSON was chosen as the
Outstanding Woman in SG. She was secretary of
public functions.
Shepherd chose Director of Housing Harold Riker
as the member of the UF faculty or administration
who has given the most outstanding contribution to
SG.
Student Senate awards were announced at the
senate meeting Tuesday night.
THE PAUL CLARK Memorial Award for the

UF PRSSA Members Visit Factory

Six members of the UF
chapter of the Public Relations
Student Society of America
(PRSSA) are traveling to the
Miller Brewing Co., Milwaukee,
today as the finale of a pilot
promotional project.
Miller Brewing made a
financial grant to PRSSA to plan
a public relations and marketing
program directed at the young
adult market. In Milwaukee the
program will be presented to the
executives of the company.
Working on this project since
January, the group has
experienced the challenge of
working for a major corporation.
Using marketing research surveys
and other tools, they have
become aware of the demands
made when working outside the
classroom situation.
*
II I 1712 W. university ||
\l a TEXTBOOKS B
Hll ART SUPPLIES
II ENGINEERING
SUPPLIES ||
IB 11 Customer Parking In
|H t The Rear
|H I we Welcome: H
1 jumk ssl
ilpi asaj
1
mMzj

PRSSA members working on
this project are Bob Stiff, Jack
Dicks, Eric Williams, Lee Sinoff,

{ I
/ I TACKSBY BASS |
V. I Bold says it all. Bold stitching. Bold
I styling. Original throughout.
I Dissenters even agree on these. I
Oxford, 20.00; boot, 23.00. Rare I
n Ifrif numbers for serious collectors. {
Mens Shoes. I
/Ml StotfieM
GAINESVILLE MALL

Outstanding Senate Committee Chairman was
given to Ralph Nobo, who chaired the judiciary
committee.
The John Michael Stratton Memorial Award for
the Outstanding Member of the Legislative Council
(the senate) was given to Jack Vaughn. Vaughn was
president of the senate, and was re-elected at
Tuesdays senate meeting.
Each year the president of the student body
decides on the three people who he feels have
contributed the most to the students.
The awards are generally presented at the
inauguration banquet of the following president,
but this year there was no banquet because Student
Body President Steve Uhlfelder said the money
should be used for more relevant things.
Therefore, the awards were presented
individually.

Bob Wolf, Curtis Werner, Terry
Biehl, Gwen Young and Linda
Dyer.

m
AT 11AM jl
MON-SAT
SSM! BgJ!/
Every Tuesday Nite Everyday
I A Free Keg of Baer \ ***?! fll.
ia\ To the Guy Who \ 9 l|V\
W Brings the Most Girls \ |
Famous ALANS
CUBANA

Friday, May 22, 1870, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

Th Florida Alligator, Friday, May 22, 1970

*#*********#****#**#**#**##
! WEEKEND i
i MOVIE FARE i

ANNE OF 1000 DAYS This should prove to be one of the top
shows to come through here in recent times. It stars Richard Burton
in whats been called his best performance. Hes King Henry. Hiswife
Anne is the Anne of the story. Its a love story and should be a good
one. Its new at the Florida.
* *
MAGIC CHRISTIAN Ringo Starr stars and Peter Sellers does too.
Rachael Welch does what she does with that ever-interesting exposure.
Terry Southern (the man responsible for all of Candy and some of
Easy Rider) wrote the script. Joe McGrath directed. The story line
is questionable but the whole thing should be fun. Ringo, drummer
for the reportedly now-defunct British Rock and Roll combo The
Beatles, should be a gas. Peter Sellers is a nun. The picture is at the
Plaza Two.
* *
DOWNHILL RACER Robert Redford stars in this ski thriller
thats gotten good reviews in many places and should be worth seeing.
The skiing scenes are supposed to be tough,the action away from the
slopes is a little less interesting. Its with a John Wayne one,
Eldorado, at the Gainesville Drivein.
* *
M*A*S*H Elliot Gould and others star in this spoof of a bunch
of medics in the Korean conflict. The rough and tumble docs will
keep you in stiches with their antics. Its on out at the Plaza One.
* *
FANNY HILL This is an updated version of the old 17th
Century (or whenever it was) tale. A young lass takes herself into the
big city and loses her sensability. Its from Sweden and is as dull as
stewed okra. Its in the Center One.
* *
THE PRIME OF MISS JEAN BRODIE Maggie Smith plays Jean
Brodie, the head of a school for little girls. Her performance won her
the Oscar for best actress. The story is a good one. There are many
nice moments in the film. The little girls are cute. Its showing at the
Center Two.
* *
lAM CURIOUS (YELLOW) I always hate to say for sure this
thing is going to be playing what with all the legal hassles the poor guy
out there is having to go through to make a buck. The film isnt, in
my mind, worth the trouble. Its pretty dull and the sex, raw and
frank as it is, is boring and lacks feeling. Its the story of a girl
whos curious mostly about politics and ends up in bed and on
the floor alot. Its (maybe) at the Suburbia Penthouses.
* *
FUNNY GIRL Barbra Streisand stars in this adaptation of the
Broadway play. It won some awards and should be good. Its on the
big screen at the Suburbia Drivein.
* *
RACHEL, RACHEL Joanne Woodward stars in this beautiful
story. Her husband, Paul Newman, directs and did a really fine job.
Its the story of a young woman who has no man and feels confused.
Miss Woodward plays that young woman and shes so beautiful in that
role. The supporting cast is good. The script is more than acceptable.
There are some top moments photographically in it. It should be seen
this weekend at the Reitz Union.
KINETIC ART, THIRD PROGRAM This is the second series of a
collection of short films from around the world. Its at the Reitz
Union Sunday.
FAT ALBERT SAYS
"YOU BETTER NOT rf>. A
MISS THIS TREMENDOUS
BUY ON BFG'S ...
LONG
MILER /V/Q
WIDER AND STRONGER
ONIY SIO9S
I exchange
tubeless
RUGGED NYLON CORD
5 RIB TREAD DESIGN
STRENGTH A ENDURANCE
Economy Priced
TOWN TIRE CO.
605 NW Bth Ave. 378-2333
BANKAMERICARD MASTERCHARGE

1

Kinetic Art Plans Third
Film Showing This Sunday

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
The first two programs of the
Kinetic Art series appearing on
campus havent been
overwhelming but both have
been good. The third program of
the series will be shown Sunday
and is worth seeing for sure.
The first two programs of
this, the second series of short
films to be released, was shown
earlier this quarter to fair-sized
crowds at the Reitz Union
theater. They were interesting
for the most part.
THERE WILL BE two shows
Sunday, at 7 and 9:30 p.m. It
will cost $1 to get in and
nothing to get out.
Included on the program is
Momentum, a visual light
show type film by Jordan
Belson, the guy who made
Re-Entry in the last program.
Other highlights of this program
should be Marie Pour
Riff At Union
Saturday Nile
Riff, one of the more
interesting of the local groups,
will be performing on the Reitz
Union Terrace Saturday night
from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Its free.
The group is hard rock and
good. Appearing with Riff
will be the Krishna Light Show,
another goodie.
Lead singer with Riff is a
guy named Herbie who is a
friend of Ward Scott and, like
Ward Scott, a man among the
worlds strongest men.
Old-Fashioned 'Bread*
In the late 1840 s, wheat,
worth $1 a bushel, served as
legal tender in Oregon.

GREAT NEWS!
10% DISCOUNT
ON YOUR ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
(except Body Shop repairs)
TO INTRODUCE YOU TO GAINESVILLE NEWEST CHEVROLET DEALER,
HARBER CHEVROLET IS OFFERING STUDENTS A 10% DISCOUNT ON YOUR
ENTIRE REPAIR BILL.
COME IN TODAY, AND PRESENT YOUR STUDENT ID. MEET THE NEW
DEALER IN TOWN WHO CARES MORE ABOUT SERVICE TEIAN SALES.
* > #* ."-Vx x3Awwf> tlfe* s&iy*: j£>&rr ; K. ' s < > ?s*\S'%r&£ 3*
1515 N. MAIN ST. 376-7581
\ !5

Memoire, a film by a new
French filmmaker Philippe
Garrel whos done some fine

_ Igi AND SALES
"CORVAIR SPECIALIST
GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 376-7771
- - - i
VSau)oi^M
I EXPERT SERVICE |
INTERN I 111 ll Ili I Mg
PORSCHE CARE AND PREPARATION
Speed Equipment y Service on All
end Accessories Foreign Makes
535 SW 4th Ave. 376-9381
JML < STEAK HOUSE i
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320

work in the past year or so.
Garrel is 19, too, and that makes
his talent even more impressive.

Service on AH
Foreign Makes

376-9381



The Florida Alligator

Rally With A H(e)art, And Gator

By 808 THOMAS
Alligator Writer
**
Someone once said a Tally- is the longest distance between two
points, and they were right.
Similar to a treasure hunt on four wheels, the rally is one of the
most popular of all motor sports. The Hart Rallye Team (HRT) of

Gainesville organizes and puts on
a rally every month and last
month sports editor Craig
Goldwyn and I entered.
WE ENTERED MY 63
Falcon under the banner of the
Alligator Rally Team and
Craig navigated while 1 handled
the driving. The cars were
started at one minute intervals
after being given a list of
instructions. We started number
12.

The instructions were pretty clear and easy to follow with only one
or two tricky places. Thanks to our blind luck we managed to keep
from getting lost and stayed on course the whole time.
But the fun part comes in answering the questions on the rally
sheet, which refer to the course. You answer the questions while
driving and navigating. There were ten of them and we managed to get
only five. Because they pertained to things along the way, its a good

UF "Spoilers Take On Seminoles At FSU

Alberts nineballers travel to
Tallahassee this weekend to play
the last three games of their
season against the defeathered
Seminoles.
The Gators beat the
Seminoles at Perry Field May
12-13 in the first two games of a
five game series that will be
completed Friday and Saturday.
The Seminoles were the number

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one ranked team in the nation at
the time but the two defeats at
the hands of the Gators bumped
them to third place behind
Southern California and Texas.
THE SEMINOLES will be out
to settle the score while the
Gators will try to finish their
season in a victorious fashion.
The three game series will be a
warm-up for the Seminoles who

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Friday, May 22, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

idea to stay on the course. Then there are the periodic check points
through which you must pass to keep from being penalized.
TIME IS NOT a factor in most HRT rallies for safetys sake. In
many rallies, the driver is also expected to maintain a specified average
speed, below the legal limit.
We emphasize safety as much as possible, explained Sherri

The Alligator Rally Team finished third in the guest class (out of
four enteries), which was good for a small dash plaque. This weekend
well be out again in the Bronco Buster Rally, one which promises to
take you someplace youve never been.
Registration starts at 12:30 in the Commercial Bank parking lot.
The entry fee is $1.50 per person, and all you need are a car, driver,
navigator and a lust for fun. f

travel to the NCAA District 111
tournament in Gastonia, North
Carolina, May 28. The winner of
that tournament will go to the
College Worljj Series.
The UF willjre/going to Tally
sporting a 2545 record and the
Seminoles sfan 4 d 37-5 for the
season .*Jef the competition with
the Seminoles over the years the

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

OBrien. Besides staging
non timed rallies, we also place
observers out on the course to
watch the entrants driving
habits. Running a stop sign can
cost a driver 10 points.
Perhaps the best part of the
rally was the dirt roads. You get
to discover places youve never
been, and in some cases couldnt
find again if you tried. At one
point we found ourselves in the
middle of a cow pasture.

Gators have a five game edge as
the record stands at 28 wins
against 23 loses to the
Seminoles.
The Gators have not had a
losing season since 1948 and
have captured three
Southeastern Conference titles
and four Eastern division crowns
in that span.

Page 17

Golfers Get
NCAA Bid
After one week of anxious
waiting Golf Coach Buster
Bishop got the word Thursday
night that the Gator linksmen
have received a bid to the NCAA
Golf Championships.
The announcement came after
the NCAAs District 111 Bid
Committee had completed their
telephone voting.
FSU, LSU, Georgia, Wake
Forest, Maryland and Memphis
State also were extended bids.
The NCAA Championships
will be held June 23*26 in
Columbus, Ohio at the Ohio
State University Golf Course.
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, .I. , .tV r 7
i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 22, 1970

Page 18

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808 THOMAS
It was boxing that got me interested in
handball. A friend told me that my
footwork was terrible and that I should take
up handball to improve it. When I found out
how much fun handball was, I quit boxing .
William Linton
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Spry 75-Year Old Still
Putting Irish On The Ball

By 808 THOMAS
Alligator Writer
If you were 75 years old and you wanted to keep in shape, chances
are youd be jogging around the woods across from Fraternity Row.
Not William Linton. He plays handball right alongside the young
bucks on the Murphree Area courts.
IT WAS THE boxing that got me interested in handball, he
explained. A friend of mine told me my footwork was terrible and
that I should take up handball to improve it. When I found out how
much fun handball was, I quit boxing.
Linton was born in Ireland in 1895. He came to the United States
in 1906 and lived in New Jersey. It was there that he got interested in
boxing and in 1914 went to the AAU finals in Newark to finish
second.
Ive finished second a lot, Linton recalled. I never seem to be
able to win very much. But he never gives up.
LINTON ALSO ran the half mile while in school and said he likes
Gator distance runner and fellow Irishman Eamonn OKeefe. He tries
to attend track meets when he can.
In 1916, Linton joined the Navy where he did some distance
swimming including a race across Chesapeake Bay.
I was leading when a thunder storm came up and they had to
postpone the race, he recalled. Then I caught pneumonia besides.
LINTON STAYED in the service until 1946 when he retired as
chief radio operator. Then at the age of 51, he came to UF to major in
agriculture.
I never graduated, Linton stressed. I just piddled around. I
graduated in handball.
He was active in intramural handball and went down to the finals
on several occasions only to finish second. He recalled one incident
where a student asked him to play for the Co-operative Living
Organization (CLO).
I DIDNT realize you had to belong to an organization before you
could play for them, he said. So I went ahead and played. After a few
weeks somebody found out I didnt live at the CLO and I was
disqualified.
I can still beat a few of the coaches in the Athletic Department,
Linton continued. I wont mention any names, but there are a few I
can still take. He said Coach William Benz is probably the best he has
ever played. They were on a doubles team that finished second in the
intramural championships while Linton was in school.
Its remarkable how a man his age can keep in such good shape,
said Benz. I hope Im that fit when Im 75.
Linton now has a small pecan farm in Earleton, about 20 miles
from Gainesville. He still manages to come in to the handball courts
once or twice a week to get in a few games with students.
When asked if he has ever had any heart trouble, Linton replied, I
go to Navy doctors. They dont let you have anything.

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Rico Leads Batting, But Loses Vote

RICO CARTY keeps right on
plugging along with that magic
bat of his and wondering all the
time what it will take for people,
especially in baseball, to start
noticing him.
Theres little doubt fans in the
various National League parks
know hes around. Carty has
taken care of that little chore by
batting away at a fantastic .422
clip, tops in the majors. He also
has 10 homers and 35 runs

Adderly Through
With Green Bay
GREEN BAY, Wise. (UPI) Star Defensive back Herb Adderley is
still so bitter against the Green Bay Packer coaching staff that he
would quit pro football rather than return, the Milwaukee Journal
reported Wednesday.
They can trade me or I can retire, the newspaper quoted
Adderley.
The Journal said Adderley said he was sufficiently well fixed
financially that he could afford to retire. Ive been making a few
investments right along, and theres a small movie part I could have,
he said.
ADDERLEY, IN a telephone interview from his Philadelphia home
with Terry Bledsoe of the Journal, reiterated that in any case he was
through with Green Bay.
He became angry last December when, he claimed, the coaching
staff had not recommended him for the Pro Bowl squad. He also
accused assistant coach Wayne Robinson of being too critical of the
players under his domain. Adderley took his complaints to the press,
which failed to endear him with head coach and general manager Phil
Bengtson.
The last thing I said to Phil Bengtson in Green-Bay last month was
that it would be mentally impossible for me to play there again,
Adderley was quoted. And Phil said, okay, Herb, Ill continue to try
to make a trade for you. And thats how we ended our little visit.
Everything 1 did would be in vain if I came back. I couldnt play
my heart out under these conditions, and that wouldnt be fair to my
teammates.
Adderley ruled out the possibility of playing out his option so he
could become a free agent a year hence. For one thing, he noted, he
would take a mandatory 10 per cent cut by playing in 1970 without a
contract.

NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 18 16 .529
New York 19 18 .514 16
St. Louis 18 17.514 16
Pittsburgh 18 21 .462 2 Vi
Montreal 1422 .389 5
Philadelphia 14 23 .378 516
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 28 11 .718
Los Angeles 22 16.579 516
Atlanta 21 16 .568 6
Houston 19 21 .475 916
San Francisco 18 22 .450 1016
San Diego 18 24 .429 1116
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 25 11 .694
New York 20 18 .526 6
Detroit 16 17 .485 716
Boston 16 18 .471 8
Washington 16 20 .444 9
Cleveland 12 20 .375 11
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 25 10 .714
California 25 13 .658 116
Oakland 18 20 .474 816
Chicago 16 21 .432 10
Milwaukee 13 23 .361 1216
Kansas City 13 24.351 13
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batted in and yet his name
doesn t appear on all those
ballots the National League is
distributing around for fans to
vote for players to the All-Star
game.
* *
BUD GRANT, who led the
Minnesota Vikings to a 23-16-3
record and one National
Football League championship
during his first three years as
head coach, was signed

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i n shorts SHORTS

Wednesday to a five-year
contract with the Vikings.
The signing was announced by
Vikings President Max Winter.
Winter said Grant had two
years to go on his previous
contract, but we tore it up and
agreed on a new one for the
remaining two years and an
additional three years.
Terms of the new contract
were not revealed.. It was
estimated that Grant was getting
about $35,000 a year under his
original contract.
* *
RENZO BARTVIERA scored
with six seconds remaining
Thursday night, enabling Italy to
upset the United States, 66-64,
and hand the Americans their
first loss in the World Basketball
Championships.
The U.S. led '33-32 at
halftime but Italy made a strong
comeback in the second half and
finally overtook the Americans
in the closing seconds.
The 4,0P0 fans, almost all of
them Yugoslavian or Italian,
chanted in support of Italy
throughout the second half and
the gallant underdogs responded
by playing the United States
point for point.
U.S. Coach Hal Fischer said,
I hope this defeat will have a
strong influence on our team.
Its better we lost a match now
than in the closing rounds
against Yugoslavia and Brazil.
* *
THE PHILADELPHIA
Phillies, with their dream of a
new ballpark shattered by a
construction stroke, gave up
hope Thursday and decided to
play all their home games this
season in 61-year-old Connie
Mack Stadium.
The Phils had once planned to
open the 50,000-seat

Philadelphia Veterans Stadium
on May 5, but the opening has
been pushed farther back.
*
BOBBY ISAAC let 20 other
drivers try their hand at the
Charlotte Motor Speedway
Wednesday, then calmly climbed
into his red Dodge Daytona
Charger and claimed the pole
position for Sundays World 600
stock car race.
Isaac, of Catawba, N.C.,
zipped around the mile and
one-half, high-banked speedway
at 159.277 m.pii. to gain the
number one starting position in
the 600 mile race, the worlds
longest for stock cars.
* *
CHARLIE METRO, the
hard-bitten manager of the
Kansas City Royals, sounded
like Casey Stengel
double-talking, but the message
is getting around the American
League loud and clear.
Rod Carew is the best hitter
in the American League, said
Metro. But somebody else isnt
getting him out besides us.

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Friday, May 22, 1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Friday, May zz, i7U, Tna Florida Aingi

Metro had a good excuse to
have his syntax scrambled
because Carew is on a tear that
could boggle any rival managers
mind. The 24-year-old
Minnesota Twin second baseman
is hitting .625 in his last seven
games and has raised his season
average to .432.
* *
BASEBALL HALL of Famers
Jackie Robinson and Hank
Greenberg told Federal Court
Judge Irving Ben Cooper
Thursday that baseballs reserve
clause is unfair to players and
should be eliminated.
Both former batting stars
testified for Curt Flood, who is
challenging organized baseballs
reserve clause which binds a
player to a team unless he is
traded or released.
Robinson predicted a player
strike unless there is a change in
the reserve system and
Greenberg, who played 13 years
in the major leagues before his
retirement in 1947, said the
reserve clause should be
eliminated entirely.

Page 19



Page 20

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, May 22, 1970

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