Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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CLAY PHIPPS
HERES MISS UF
Her name is Carolyn Jones and this new title is added to a list of
others that includes the winning of the Citrus Pageant and being
named second in the UF Military Ball competition. The sophomore
majoring in broadcasting also is a little sister of Kappa Sigma
fraternity, an Army R.O.T.C. Sweetheart, and a sister of Kappa Delta
and rush chairman for the sorority. She'd like to enter law school
upon her graduation from the College of Journalism.
McCormack Says
Not Another Term

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Speaker John W. McCormack
called it quits today after 42
years in the House. Tired, 78,
and with an ailing wife, he
announced he will not seek
another House term.
He told reporters he will serve
out the year in the
$72,500-a-year speakers post, to
which he has been elected six
times, but that he will not stand
for a 22nd election to the House
from south Boston in November.
If Democrats still control the
House next year, most members
said the best bet to succeed
McCormack is Rep. Carl Albert,
D-Okla., who has served as
Democratic leader since
McCormack was elevated from
that post in 1962 after the death
of the late speaker Sam Rayburn
of Texas. Albert is 62.
One likely prospect to get
llIgMIMilil!
lliiliKiMiiill
CONTROVERSY HAS arisen
over the function of the
committee studying police
disarmament page 4
Classifieds 14
Editorials..; 8
Entertainment 20
Letters 9
Sports 20
Whats Happening .4

Alberts job possibly running
with him as a ticket is Rep.
James G. OHara, D-Mich.
OHara is 43.
McCormack confirmed he was
quitting at a news conference
after reports swept the Capitol
that he was planning to retire.
Before the news conference,
McCformack called together
Democratic congressmen from
his home state of Massachusetts
to tell them of his decision.

Young Vote Question Clears Legislature

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) With a cry of hallelujah, the
compromise package to let the people decide if the age for voting and
other rights and responsibilities of adulthood should be lowered from
21 to 18 finally cleared the legislature Wednesday.
It passed amid predictions the whole package will be defeated at
the polls in November.
WHEN THAT HAPPENS, youre going to hear bum baby bum
like you never heard it before, Sen. Dempsey Barron, D-Panama
City, warned as the Senate accepted the controversial constitutional
amendment making 18 the age of legal majority in Florida.
An hour later, the House swiftly completed action on the separate
amendment, sending both to the ballot for a public vote. House
approval of the voting bill was on a vote of 83-23, followed by
Speaker Fred Schultz shout of hallelujah.
The Senate bowed to the House and adopted a House passed
constitutional amendment making 18 instead of 21 the age of legal
majority in Florida.
IT CLEARED BY a vote of 36-11 but 16 of thoite making
passage possible put into the journal an explanation that they opposed
the legal majority amendment and voted for it only because the
House refused to pass 18-year-old voting without this companion
measure.
Sen. Lawton Chiles, D-Lakeland, called it a legitimate compromise
that divides the questions and lets the people decide.

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol. 62, No. 145

FOR DEFRAUDING PRESS
Super Show Heads
Ask AA Apology

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Super Show managers
Wednesday called for an apology
from Athletic Director Ray
Graves and Assistant Director of
Athletics Norm Carlson for
statements in Florida
newspapers on the condition of
Florida Field.
Super Show Chairman
Leonard Tanner and Executive
Producer Marc Glick said in a
statement they were shocked
that Ray Graves and Norm
Carlson, men who we have
always respected, would defraud
the state news media by
exaggerating and
misrepresentating the fact of the
conditions of Florida Field to
gain possible public relations
value.
Neither Graves nor Carlson
could be reached for comment.
THE STATEMENT said the
Athletic Associations (AA)
actions were a prelude to a call
for support to finance the
artificial turfing of Florida Field
and the raise in ticket prices.
Stories in various state
newspapers called the gathering
at the Super Show all hippies.
The St. Petersburg Times said,
Florida Field is a cavernous
garbage dump following
Saturdays so-called Super Show.
A hairy horde of hippies
completely destroyed the
mint-colored playing field.
To look at the field today
after it had been worked over
with a fine tooth comb by the
Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity, you
couldnt tell that any more than
a football game had been played
there, Glick said.
GLICK SAID the Super Show

University of Florida, Gainesville

|lbb9
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LEONARD TANNER
...shocked
managers couldnt sit still and let
the news media print the stories
submitted by the AA.
We sincerely request that the
AA in general, and Ray Graves
and Norm Carlson in particular,
apologize for their reactionary
precedent both to the students
of this university and the press
by retracting their false
statements, the statement said.
Not even $5 worth of damage
was done to Florida Field or the


Florida Field Stays
As Site For Frolics
Widespread anger over broken glass and other refuse left on Florida
Field following last Saturdays Super Show will not prevent th*
Interfraternity Councils (IFC) Spring Frolics from being held there,
Production Chairman Buzz Underill said Wednesday.
The contracts have already been signed to perform there and the
show will go on as planned, Underill said.
ACCORDING TO Underill the show will be run just like any other
(SEE 'AUDIENCE' PAGE 2)

But Sen. Beth Johnson, R-Cocoa Beach, finding herself in a double
box in swallowing the compromise, seemed to speak for many of her
colleagues in summing up the frustrations of the Senate.
THE SENATE has Succumbed to everything the House feels is
important, she said, and everything tfce House feels is important is a
get the Senate bill.
Mrs. Johnson is opposed to both propositions, but promised
teenagers in her district that shed vote to let the public decide the
voting age. But she said she never intended to support full rights of
adulthood for teenagers and resents being forced to swallow one to
get the other.
Barron, an advocate of 18-year-old voting, said adoption of the
other bill is paving the way to greater dissent among the young
people.
I WISH, he said, that we had the guts to do whats right.
Teenagers will campaign for 18-year-old voting and against the legal
majority amendment.
Sen. Welbom Daniel, D-Clermont, said the people may be confused
and think theyre giving teenagers the right to frequent race tracks and
cocktail bars and reject both propositions.
Im going to hold my nose and vote for it, he said, but added he
did not think the legal majority amendment gives 18-, 19- and
20-year-olds any rights other than to sue and be sued and sign
contracts.

Thursday, May 21, 1970

RAY GRAVES
... defrauded media?
turf that Steve Spurrier trod
on, Glick said.
ANYONE WHO is familiar
with the policy of the AA knows
that in the beginning of June
Florida Field is plowed under to
allow for a new turf to grow.
This is why the Super Show
and the upcoming Spring Frolics
were permitted to be held on the
"* field, the statement said.



Page 2

'tTbPi AlUptoir, Thupjdfy J v T97O

Uhlfelder Names
13 For Cabinet
By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder Thursday released
names of 13 students chosen to fill positions in his
administrative cabinet.
Brad Raffle has been appointed to the position of
administrative assistant. President of the Environmental Action
Group (EAG), Raffle will aid Uhlfelder in the execution of his
duties.
THE NEW Cabinet Director, Marsha Madorsky, has served in
the Student Senate and in the capacity of Budget and Finance
Committee chairman.
Gail Merein has been appointed Secretary of Academic
Affairs. She has worked as coordinator of university
committees, assistant director of Student Commission for the
Reorganization of Education (SCORE), and in the teacher
evaluation program.
Secretary of Athletic Affairs Art Wroble, has been in the
Student Senate and chairman of the Excuse Committee.
JERRY SIEGEL, secretary of community affairs, is director
of the Comer Drug Story.
To the office of consumer affairs, Uhlfelder has appointed
Lee Schwartz, a member of the senate and former undersecretary
of the interior.
Eliot Abbott has filled the secretary of finance office. Abbott
has worked in the Interfratemity Council as comptroller and
was formerly an assistant to the student body treasurer.
SECRETARY OF INTERIOR Craig Hunter, was formerly
director of elections and labor.
Doug Henson, past co-chairman of Gator Gras and College
Preview, is now in charge of legislative affairs.
Linda Roberts, Uhlfelders new appointee in public functions,
has worked in the senate and was formerly secretary of interior.
PAM IBANEZ is secretary of student affairs. She has worked
in the past as a vice presidential secretary, chairman of the
Florida Student Congress and a member of the Committee on
Student Organizations.
The office of Student Services is headed by newly-appointed
Lee Sasser. Sasser has advanced from undersecretary of student
services and was director of the book exchange.
Dave Dowling has been chosen secretary of transportation.
Dowling has served on the Student Senate, the Student Rights
Committee and the Information and Investigation Committee.
Uhlfelders executive staff consists of Joel Buchanan, director
of inter-university affairs; Dianna Leach, executive secretary;
and Herman Hoehn, office director.
Remaining cabinet positions will be announced by Uhlfelders
office immediately following their appointments.
Audience To Sit In Stands
tjROM PAGE ONEj
IFC frolics show.
The audience will not be allowed on the field, the stage will be
moved nearer the stand and the University Police Department (UPD)
will be used to maintain order and keep people off the field just like
always, Underill said.
Athletic Director Ray Graves, who earlier this week recommended
that the Athletic Association allow no more spectators on the field
during events in the stadium, had left for the SEC convention in Point
Clear, Ala., and could not be reached for comment.
However, both Assistant Athletic Director Norm Carlson and
Assistant Head Coach Gene EUenson said they understood from
talking with Graves the show was contracted to be held on the field
and would be held there.
Neither said they were aware if Graves had provided for any
precautions.
Both Janis Joplin and the Rotary Connection are scheduled to
perform at the May 29 show.
Students Discuss Suing UF
Mel Pearlman and Ken Hart, UF law students, will discuss their
efforts to sue the UF and the State of Florida on the WRUF
Dialogue show tonight at 11:05.
Both are members of Students for Equal Protection Under the Law
(SEPUL), an organization demanding a tuition refund for the day of
class cancelled by the student strike two weeks ago, says Bob Moore,
the narrator of Dialogue.
Topics for discussion will include an analysis of orderly methods by
which students can dissent, Moore said.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during studeht
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the.official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

'ASHAMED TO BE WHITE

Lawmakers Shocked
By Scene At Jackson

JACKSON, Miss. (UPI)
Federal lawmakers looked at the
bullet-riddled dormitory at
Jackson State College Tuesday,
interviewed survivors and said
the slaying of two black students
by state patorlmen was little
short of obscene.
What weve seen here is
enough to make a grown man
cry that something like this
could happen in America, said
Sen. Birch Bayh, D-Ind.
THE VIOLENCE at Jackson
State last Friday, he said, was
symptomatic of a national
i 11... Its young versus old and
North versus South. Were going
to destroy ourselves within
unless we find some way to turn
this thing around.

r Peaceful Majority* At GHS
Condemns Campus Violence

By Alligator Services
Calling itself part of the
peaceful majority of youths,
the student government at
Gainesville High School Tuesday
passed a resolution condemning
violent student activists.
The freedom of dissent is
being threatened by a group of
agitators that preach peace,
create civil disobedience and
threaten civil war, the

State Legislature Gives Honors
To Outstanding UF Journalists

Two UF students, the College of Journalism and
Communications, and a team of award-winning
writers, were honored Wednesday in a resolution by
both Houses of the Florida Legislature.
Raul Ramirez, 4JM, this years champion in the
William Randolph Hearst Journalism Awards
scholarship program, became the second Cuban
refugee honored by the Florida Legislature this
year. Carlos Alvarez, UFs star receiver, was cited in
a 1969 special session.
The resolution honoring the team of writers and
the college noted that Ramirez is a Cuban refugee
who moved here at the age of fifteen and learned to
master the English language in Florida public
schools. Ramirez is from West Palm Beach.
The resolution was proposed in the House by
Rep. Ralph Turlington, and in the Senate by Sen.
Robert Saunders. It was passed with resounding

NOW
OPENING
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LEASE OFFICE
309 l\!W 13th St.
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.lilt;
place)

lllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllH
What weve seen here is
enough to make a grown
man cry that something like
this could happen in
America.
I
-Sen. Birch Bayh
IIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIiIHI 11111111111111111111
Others with Bayh included
Sen. Walter Mondale, D-Minn.,
and Reps. Don Edwards, D-Calif.
and William Clay, D-Mo., and
Roy Wilkins, head of the
NAACP.
Mondale said an assault on
the dignity of this country was
made here in an utterly

resolution stated.
The student group said it is
time for us, as part of the
peaceful majority of youths, to
clarify this unjust blanket
labeling of our generation, the
resolution said.
The Gainesville High students
also appealed to those on other
campuses to eliminate the
battleground of these minority
groups.
PEACE AND freedoms, the

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yeas in both houses.
Journalism Professor Hugh Cunningham,
representing the college, told the lawmakers, This
is truly the year of the Cuban at the UF.
Also on hand to receive standing ovations from
both the House and the Senate; was David Osier,
4JM, who was a national finalist in the writing
championship, having won first place in the
monthly investigative writing category.
The Journalism College won first place in the
school category of the Hearst contest, making it the
only school to win the honor in three consecutive
years and four times overall in the ten-year-old
awards program.
The team of writers included, besides Ramirez
and Osier, Carol Sanger, 4JM, Dan Vining, 3AS, and
Larry Jordan, 4JM, and Mary Sue Copeland, a UF
graduate. They were honored in absentia.

disgraceful fashion. Its little
short % of obscene; jf s
unbelievable.
WE CAME here hoping to
find out what happened, and I
think we did, said Edwards.
As a white man, I am deeply
ashamed.
Clay said the reports of sniper
fire which allegedly prompted
police to open fire Was part of
an established pattern in this
country of genocide toward
black people.
Two students told the
delegation they saw a pop bottle
thrown at police from the
opposite direction of the
dormitory and a coed said she
saw a rock thrown. All denied
there was any sniper fire.

resolution stated, are being
undermined, and the very
structure of our republic is being
threatened by these few
militants. We, the majority of
todays youth, must not let
them succeed.
The resolution was approved
by the Gainesville High Student
Senate and House of
Representatives. A copy was
sent to Congress.



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JOPLIN AT FROLICS
Janis Joplin will be belting the songs out at Interfratemity Council
Spring Frolics Friday, May 29, on Florida Field. The Rotary
Connection will also be appearing. Tickets, at $5.50 per couple, are on
sale at the Reitz Union box office, the Record Bar and Recordsville.

Urban Historian
Speaking Tonight
Dr. Richard Wade, one of the top urban historians in the nation,
will speak tonight at 8:15 in room 1058 of the Architecture and Fine
Arts Complex.
The Natural History of Urban America: From Walking City to
Exploding Metropolis will be the topic of Wades presentation.
WADE, PROFESSOR of history at the University of Chicago, was a
consultant for the National Riot and Violence Commissions.
He is author of several historical books and editor of the Oxford
University Press Urban Life in America Series.
Wades appearance is sponsored by UF Department of History and
the Bureau of Urban Studies. The public is invited without charge.

Environmental Group Evaluates
Legislators Stands On Issues

Environmental Action Group
(EAG) plans to evaluate state
and national legislators on basis
of their stand toward
environment, race relations and
the Indochina war.
Initial action will begin
tonight at 7:30 in Walker
Auditorium.
WERE DOING THIS
because we refuse to divorce
ourselves from the other major
issues of the day, said Brad
Summer Jobs
Jacksonville
Miami
Gainesville
$ QCOO PER WEEK
SALARY
WEDNESDAY
MAY 27 RM 118
J.W. REITZ UNION
3:30 PM

Raffle, EAG information
chairman.
Raffle said the group plans to
write to the powers in
Tallahassee for voting records
of state legislators for the past
two years.
Then the group will decide
where each lawmaker stands on
the racial, environment and war
issues and make these public
throughout the state through
news releases, Raffle said.
Products which may draw a
boycott are one-way bottles and

Gainesville Trade Market
4506 NW 6th St.
Open Every Thursday & Friday
Truckloads of Farm Fresh Produce
And you can sell, buy or trade
anything of value in our
Flea Market
Cloan out your attic or garage
and bring what you have.
Buyers and Dealers Welcome

NATION IN 'CHAOS

Mao Urges Revolution
Against 'U.S. Imperialism

HONG KONG (UPI)
Communist Chinese leader Mao
Tse-tung Wednesday urged
revolutionary forces around the
world, including those in the
United States, to unite in a
struggle to destroy U. S.
imperialism abroad and the
Fascist Nixon administration
at home.
In a rare public statement,
BSP To Hold
'Gator Editor
Interviews
The deadline for Alligator
editor-in-chief and managing
editor applications is noon today
for the summer term and the
combined fall-winter quarter
term.
Miss Karen Eng, 4JM, is the
only applicant for editor-in-chief
for the summer quarter. She is
presently Alligator managing
editor.
APPLYTNG FOR the
managing editorship for the
summer quarter are Ken Driggs,
4JM, Seminole 1969-70 editor
and Les Gardieff, 3JM, Alligator
staff writer
Neal Sanders, 3JM, Alligator
assignments editor and Sam
Pepper, 4JM, former Alligator
sports editor and current
co-editor of the Florida Probe,
are applying for the position of
editor-in-chief for the winter-fall
term. Also applying is Ken
Driggs.
Alligator staff writer Miss
Phyllis Gallub, 4JM, has applied
for. the fall-winter Alligator
managing editorship.
The Board of Student
Publications (BSP) meets at 2:30
this afternoon to interview the
applicants.

cans. High nutrient-load
detergents which can breed
water plants that choke
waterways are also being
considered, Raffle said.
We need people to come
who want to work, especially
this summer, he added.

FREDRICK
GARDENS
. . now leasing
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave

Mao said the danger of a new
world war still exists, and the
people of all countries must get
prepared, but made no military
threats against the United States
and gave no indication Red army
troops would intervene in the
war against American
aggressors in Indochina.
THE CHAIRMAN of Chinas
Communist party pictured the
United States as a nation in
chaos over racial and other
issues, isolated by world opinion
and foundering in Indochina.
U. S. imperialism, he said,
was not only massacring the
people in other countries but
slaughtering the white and black
people in its own country.
Nixons Fascist atrocities
have kindled the raging flames of
the revolutionary mass
movement in the United States,
Mao said. The Chinese people
firmly support the revolutionary
struggle of the American people.
I am convinced the American
people who are fighting valiantly
will ultimately win victory and
that the Fascist rule in the
United States will inevitably be
defeated.
RADIO PEKING broadcast in
full what it termed an
important statement by Mao.
Mao, who will be 77 in

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Thursday' My 21, Is7o, The Florida Alligator,

December, has made no public
speeches in the past 20 years but
has issued statements from time
to time. The last was in 1965
when U. S. troops were sent into
the Dominican Republic by
former President Lyndon B.
Johnson.
The Nixon government is
beset with troubles internally
and externally, with utter chaos
at home and extreme isolation
abroad, Mao said. The mass
movement of protest against
U. S. aggression in Cambodia has
swept the globe.
He reiterated Communist
Chinas support for the
revolutionary armed struggles
of the people of Southeast Asian
countries ... the struggles of the
people of Korea, Japan and
other Asian countries ... and of
the Palestinian and other Arab
peoples . the national
liberation struggles of the Asian,
African and Latin American
peoples, and the revolutionary
struggles of the people of North
America, Europe and Oceania.
Mao said the situation in the
war of resistance in Indochina is
getting better and better and
said a law of history has shown
that a weak nation can defeat a
strong, a small nation can defeat
a big nation.

Page 3



Page 4

l,.Thp Florida Alligator, Thursday. May 2.1,1970

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Senate Elects Vaughnf
ji President For 4th Term]
By CHARLES TRENTLEMAN :j;
Alligator Staff Writer
I S
jj: Jack Vaughn was elected to his fourth term of office as >j
president of the Student Senate Tuesday night. :j
jj Vaughn, elected by the senate in a 40-27 vote, was opposed ij
* py Focus party nominee Rick Horder. ij
IN DEBATE before the balloting, several senators favoring ij
: Horder said the senate would have to be made more responsive ij
ij to the needs of the students. Vaughns backers said the senate ij
ij should try to regain control many of the powers it used to hold, ij
j: such as the Board of Student Publications and the Athletic ji
j: Association. ji
ji Vaughns proponents cited his past experience and said if the j:
j: student body was in the state of flux other senators described, j:
ji someone with experience would be needed to head the senate, ji
j: BOTH VAUGHN and Horder asked the senators to ignore j:
ji party affiliations and vote your consciences. ij
jj Tom Tworoger was elected president pro tern. He was ij
ij unopposed. ij
ij A bill to reapportion the UF for future elections was sent to ij
ij the investigation and information (I and I) committee for >j
ij investigation of discrepancies in the voting districts. ij
ij SEN. IRA HATCH said the bill made no provision for :j:
ji students who live in outlying areas and commute to the UF, ij:
:j: thus disenfranchising them. ij:
ij; The bill divides the student body into districts according to ij:
:ji where they live, instead of by colleges. ij
iji Sen. Sam Poole said the bill will insure all students are jjj
j:j represented in the senate on a one man-one vote basis. : ij
A RESOLUTION was passed which expressed the senates jij
jij opposition to bill H.R. 13957 of the Florida Legislature. jij
| H.R. 13957 contains an amendment which would require any jij
jij animals being used for scientific experimentation be put to sleep jij
jij first and killed instead of awakened afterwards. jj
SG Begins Voter Drive
Student Government has begun a voter registration drive in
anticipation of passage of a bill in the state legislature which would
lower voting age to 18.
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder commented on the effect
of the voter registration drive.
WE ARE URGING all students 21 or over to make certain that
they register. They may register in Gainesville if they have lived here
for six months, Uhlfelder said.
Students who wish to register at their home precincts are being
encouraged to follow through their intentions.
Information has been made available in Student Government
offices explaining procedures to take in registering.
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SAL

FUNCTION CONTROVERSY

Questions A riseln Gun Studies

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
f
Controversy has arisen over the function of the
Committee to Study the Removal and Control of
Guns on Campus.
The committee, headed by former Alligator
editor Raul Ramirez and UF attorney Tom Biggs, is
studying alternatives concerning guns on campus.
MISLEADING information has been circulated
by various segments of students, faculty, and the
University Police Department (UPD) regarding the
purpose of the committee.
Many possible choices and recommendations are
open to the committee. We are not bound by
extreme alternatives of any nature, Andy Kramer,
committee member explained.
A petition by the UPD has implied the
resignation of most of the force if their guns are
removed. Members of the committee felt this action
was a result of a misinterpretation of the
committees purpose by the police.
THE POLICE have not understood the
committee was set up to explore areas for improved

WHAT'S HAPPENING

THE SPIRIT OF SEX: Tonight in the Union
Auditorium at 7:30, Dr. Nell Potter and Father
Michael Gannon will discuss the sexual and spiritual
aspects of marriage. This is the second in a series of
frank discussions about marriage A Bridge over
Troubled Waters. All married, engaged, or just
interested are invited.
RELIGION IN LIBERATION: Dr. James Hal
Cone of the Union Theological Seminary and
Barnard College in New York City, will lecture on
Black Theology and Black Liberation today at 8

PLAZA OF THE AMERICAS
Sunday, May 24, 1970 1:00 p.m.

and more effective means of insuring campus
security. This does not mean the guns are either to
stay The committee is examining all possible
alternatives in order to make recommendations only
after careful reflection and discussion.
The hunger strikers have not been an influence on
the time in which the committee takes to reach its
conclusions. It is the opinion of the committee in
general the strikers are exhibiting a moral protest,
however that protest is separate from the purpose
the committee is seeking to fulfill.
KRAMER EXPRESSED the feeling of urgency
among the members of the committee regarding
their committment of reaching sound conclusions.
In general we agree that our job is to take
careful consideration of the issue, weighing all
proposals. We dont plan to jump the gun in our
recommendation by hurrying ourselves along into
hasty proposals, Kramer said.
The committee was formed before students went
on a hunger strike. The operation of the committee
is not a result of the strikers demands, but a result-*
of the request made in demands by students during
UFs shutdown May 8.

p.m. in the Union Ballroom. Lecture sponsored by
the University Religious association.
URBAN THING: Dr. Richard Wade, professor of
history at the University of Chicago will speak on
The Natural History of Urban America: From
Walking City to Exploding Metropolis, tonight in
the Architecture and Fine Arts Auditorium.
MUSIC ANYONE?: The Music Department
presents Music of Khachaturian, lecture recital at
the University Auditorium tonight at 8:15.
PRESS MEET: SMC press conference today at 10
ajn. in room 363 of the Union.



Thursday, May 21,1970, The Florida Alligator,

SOUTHERNERS CHARGE

Court Destroys

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Delegations from four Southern
cities told a Senate judiciary
subcommittee Tuesday that
sweeping court desegregation
orders are destroying their
schools.
The cities represented in the
first of two days of hearings
were Greenville, S. C.,
Winston-Salem and Charlotte,
N. C., and Atlanta.
Sen. James O. Eastland,
D-Miss., chairman of the full
committee, formed the ad hoc
subcommittee to study effects
of recent court demands for
immediate racial balance in the
schools.
THE WITNESSES said these
orders requiring overhaul of
school systems in midterm
through wholesale pupil busing
and teacher transfers have
created turmoil where there had
been progress.
All four cities were described
as having been leaders of the

Rep. Rivers Questions
Student Deferments
WASHINGTON (UPI) Rep. Mendel Rivers, D-S. C., said Tuesday
that in view of the recent strife on Americas campuses he no longer is
sure that students should get automatic draft deferments.
Im becoming disenchanted with these deferments after seeing
over 350 schools closed down by these dedicated students who have
been deferred, Rivers said. Im not sure college deferments are
doing what they are supposed to do.
RIVERS SAID key members of his Armed Services Committee are
studying whether to relax their earlier insistence on mandatory college
deferments.
Rivers also told the House Rules Committee that he might wish to
modify the deferment provision for ministers.
I think it may be a mistake to defer all these people that call
themselves preachers, Rivers said.
RIVERS TOLD the committee that there was another means
besides ending draft deferments to curb student unrest. He suggested
mandatory haircuts for troublemakers.
Referring to last weeks student unrest at the University of South
Carolina, Rivers said:
Down in South Carolina the other day we had some people try to
take over a building. The governor ordered them out. They didnt go.
About 50 of them went to jail. While they were there, they cut their
hair ...
THEY DIDNT like that. I told the governor that every time he
arrested somebody he ought to follow the same procedure. It had a
very fine effect, very fine.
Rivers himself is noted for the rather long cut of his silvery mane,
but he does not favor the current student fashion of shoulder length
hair for males.
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Page 5

South in meeting federal
desegregation standards. The
witnesses said the issue is not
integration but disruption.
I do not believe our area is
filled with segregationists, said
Dr. Joseph Bryson, a Greenville
physician.
BUT HE ADDED that after
Greenvilles court order, our
children are learning what real
fear is assault, harassment.
Our children are learning school
is a lousy place to get educated.
Others testified the forced
integration by racial ratios has
polarized the whites and
Negroes, causing tensions where
there had been racial peace.
Greenvilles system was
described as the largest Southern
school system affected by the
mid-term racial quota orders,
and Winston-Salem was called a
carbon copy of Greenville.
CHARLOTTES SYSTEM, its
delegation said, has received the
most extreme decree issued by
any federal court in that it

Schools
requires the most busing of
pupils between neighborhoods.
The decree, delayed by an
appeal, would require busing of
24,000 pupils at a cost of $3.5
million, one witness said.
~a Luther House, a local
Parent-Teacher Association
president, labeled as false the
myth that Atlanta has solved
its school integration problems.
IN MY JUDGMENT, Atlanta
has seen the end of its public
school system as a quality
system, House testified.
Atlantas recent court
mid-term decree affected only
teachers, requiring that they be
assigned by race on a ratio of 60
per cent Negro and 40 per cent
white, House said.
Although this did not involve
immediate wholesale pupil
busing it has touched off racial
dissention, dropouts of both
teachers and pupils and has
stepped up moves by whites to
more distant suburbs.
HOUSE PREDICTED that
Atlanta proper soon will have a
90 per cent Negro population as
a result of the moves.
Sen. Strom Thurmond,
R-S. C., who opened the hearing,
said in his opinion the nation has
no greater crisis than the
potential disruption of our
public schools by the court
orders.

A
BRIDGE
OVER
TROUBLED WATERS
Frank discussions about marriage
miiiiii
tonight
union auditorium
7 Dr. Nell Potter, noted for her frank and
9 informative programs on sex education will lead a
discussion on the psychological aspects of the
How? What? and Why? of a sexual relationship in
L marriage.
Father Michael Gannon, Associate Professor of
Religion at the University of Florida and Pastor of
the Catholic Student Center will discuss the
spiritual dimensions of marriage.
' ( ** *
Two in one Flesh -
Sexual and Spiritual
' sponsored by the university religious association

Fiery Sen. Gore
Lashes At Nixon
' W\VP 3 At; -*> P
WASHINGTON (UPI) Fiery Albert Gore drew applause
from the Senate galleries Tuesday when he charged that
President Nixons war policies mean boys now 15 and
16 ... will have to go to Vietnam.
The casualties are terrible! shouted the white-haired
Tennessee senator. This war has gained us nothing. There is
nothing to be gained.
BUT SEN. GEORGE Murphy, R-Calif., citing the internal
threat to the nation from Communism, said, They have caused
riots, burned our cities, our schools. Whether they are the
enemy or dupes of the enemy ... doesnt make much
difference.
They may be doing the work of those who would destroy
us, Murphy said. The enemy may not have to wait to bury us.
We will bury ourselves.
While the floor debate over the Indochina War raged with
emotional rhetoric, Senate moderates searched in the
cloakrooms for softer language for an amendment opposing
U. S. involvement in Cambodia.
ON BOTH SIDES of the aisle, moderates were hopeful they
could find an acceptable substitute for legislation to cut off
funds for U. S. military operations in Cambodia an
amendment that now appears to have support of the majority of
the senators.
Sen. Robert Dole, R-Kan., who often is allied with the White
House, said the climate has improved for some changes in the
amendment sponsored by Sens. Frank Church, D-Idaho, and
John Sherman Cooper, R-Ky.
Dole suggested everyones interests would be satisfied if the
preamble of the amendment were changed to make it clear the
Senate is not slapping down the President, but passing
legislation in accordance with policies already announced.
FORMER AIR FORCE Secretary Stuart Symington, now a
senator from Missouri, blamed Vietnam and Cambodia for
setbacks on the stock market, campus disorders, diplomatic
disasters and the loss of faith by citizens in their government.



Page 6

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BEAUTIFUL DOWNTOWN MICANOPY
... one main street and lots of Spanish moss

W '' ; *£i i £ r Mk ST
fHH&WIK
* p^Ti^w
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a£aSi y|p fi
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CADILLAC AND SHACK
... good living for some in town

Micanopy, Gainesvilles grandest shadow, lies 11
miles south of UF near 441.
Micanopy was the home of the East Florida
Seminary, forerunner to UF, sometime prior to
1852, and it was at Micanopy that the tiny school
made its first expansion -two classrooms, one for
the boys and one for the girls.
To UF students, Micanopy is an exit off 1-75, or a
speed zone south of Lake Wauburg, but at one time,
it was a bustling city with its own newspaper.
Originally an Indian town, Andrew Jackson
raided the town during the first Seminole war, and
the Indian village was left to the white men. The
village reached its peak in 1860, but the Civil War
sapped much of the strength the town had built.
Today, Micanopy lies a shadow to Gainesville, the
city it once dwarfed. Its residents: fishermen,
laborers, and UF instructors.
\ .' '' / v,.
i
Photos by Sunny Barlow

I \C
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gi.i i in ijiiiijjii II ii| \
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B
GRAND OLD HOUSES
... the only midant it a dog on the step,
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8%. s** fiy!! B J
#:*'r ... 111 'Bfpjl 1
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FISHING COMPANY
... nearby lakes provide recreation, income



dpi ~|
. . The World
MOSCOW An undetermined number of persons have been
killed in disastrous floods that have swept away entire villages,
and washed out roads and railroad tracks in the western
Ukraine, Moldavia, Bukovina and Carpatho-Russia, the
Ukrainian press reported Tuesday.
The floods have been caused by torrential rains.
SAIGON Communist troops attacked an American camp
inside Cambodia with rocket grenades Tuesday night killing two
f the defending Gls and wounding eight. The new casualties
raised U.S. losses in Cambodia since May 1 to 157 dead and
640 wounded.
Military spokesmen said Communist losses, if any, in the
battle one-half mile inside Cambodia and 84 miles northwest of
Saigon, were not known.
. . The Nation
SAVANNAH Aided by tips from the neighborhood, police
arrested a 16-year-old Negro boy Wednesday and charged him
with the murder of a long-time local black leader.
Officers said they found a .22-caliber pistol in the boys home
when they arrested him.
Ballistics tests were run to determine whether it was the gun
used in the Tuesday night slaying of James M. Floyd, a
57-year-old member of the executive committee of the local
branch of the National Association for the Advancement of
Colored People.
LITTLE ROCK Orval E. Faubus, the segregationist who
left the Ozarks to become governor of Arkansas for 12 years,
re-entered politics Wednesday, announcing he will run for
governor again.
Faubus first faces an Aug. 25 Democratic primary which
could feature as many as 10 contenders.
Alta Haskins Faubus, his first lady during the days in the
governors mansion announced Wednesday she will not be a
candidate, despite an early pledge to get in the race if Faubus
did.
They were divorced in February, 1969, and Faubus married a
woman 30 years his junior within a month.
WASHINGTON President Nixon met for more than three
hours with his Cabinet Tuesday, discussing U.S. military
intervention in Cambodia, the violent protests it aroused and
the state of the economy.
It was the first time in more than a month the President had
called his Cabinet together the first time since he ordered U.S.
troops into Cambodia, the Kent State and Jackson State campus
slayings and the most recent stock market declines.
WASHINGTON Supreme Court Justice William 0. Douglas
Tuesday said he has no power to grant bail to Timothy F.
Leary, exponent of hallucinogenic drugs, who is under prison
sentence in California for possessing marijuana.
Leary, a former instructor of psychology at Harvard
t University, was convicted in Superior Court in Orange County,
Calif., Feb. 19 along with his wife, Rosemary and son, John. He
drew a jail sentence of from one to 10 years.
ALBANY, N.Y. Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller approved a bill
that could practically ban mass gatherings such as the
Woodstock Music and Arts Festival at White Lake last August.
The bill, approved without comment, would require a state
Health Department license for all festivals attracting more than
5,000 persons.
Assemblyman H. Clark Bell, sponsor of the bill, said strict
sanitary and health conditions would have to be met before a
permit could be issued.
According to state police estimates, about 450,000 persons
attended the Woodstock festival.
. . The State
TALLAHASSEE The Senate Ways and Means Committee
sent a $1.275 billion general appropriations bill to the calendar
after refusing to include SB3 million in educational
equalization funds.
The only addition to the bill prepared by the appropriations
subcommittee was $48,000 for a S3OO pay increase for teachers
at the deaf and blind school in St. Augustine.
TALLAHASSEE In a major shift of position, the House
adopted the first half of a compromise on 18-year-old voting
Tuesday and sent the issue to the Senate by an 83-33 vote.
The compromise passed with surprising ease, following an
earlier 63-50 vote which fell eight votes short of the necessary
three-fifths vote needed to pass a constitutional amendment.

Ironwood
Golf Club
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Angry Students Smash
Fresno State College

By United Press International
A band of angry black students roved the Fresno
Calif. State College campus Wednesday smashing
windows and pulling down bookshelves.
The fresh vandalism followed a firebombing
which destroyed the schools new $1 million
computer.
CLASSES AT Chicago City Colleges southeast
campus were suspended Wednesday for the
remainder of the academic term after a building
takeover by black students Tuesday in which
furniture was overturned and files rifled.
At troubled Jackson Miss. State College, black
students burned copies of an order by a federal
judge authorizing dismantling by state investigators
of the bullet-riddled walls of a dormitory where two
youths died in a barrage of police gunfire last week.
Most campuses across the nation were free of
major disorder.
WISCONSIN GOV. Warren P. Knowles released
1,800 National Quardsmen who had been on duty
since May 5 after antiwar violence broke out at the
University of Wisconsin.
At Fresno, classes were brought to a virtual
standstill as angry blacks armed with pipes smashed
windows, rampaged through a library and
overturned tables in a cafeteria.
The students apparently were angered by an
administration recommendation not to rehire eight

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lecturers and the chairman of the schools ethnic
studies program.
FIREBOMBS THROWN through a window of the
business administration building Tuesday night
touched off an electrical explosion in the computer
system. x /
A college spokesman said the computer was a
total loss. An 18-year-old major in business
administration was arrested and booked on
suspicion of arson and^conspiracy.
Fifteen Negro college presidents conferred with
President Nixon at the White House. They said they
told him of their anger, outrage and frustration at
his administrations civil rights policies.
THEY SAID in a statement they believed the
Presidents policies were partly to blame for racial
turmoil in the nation.
The educators, who asked to see Nixon to express
concern over the slayings of blacks in Jackson State
and in Augusta, Ga., said the administration gives
insufficient support to education, especially of
colleges and schools attended largely by blacks.
Hall of Fame shortstop Lou Boudreau asked a
joint session of the Illinois General Assembly, called
to honor him, for a get tough policy against those
who break the law, particularly dissident students.
The Illinois House Tuesday ordered an estimated
100 college administrators to appear next Monday
for questioning about student protests.

Page 7



Page 8

i.TrWFfbrthi AlUflator, tfiuradfey; May 21,-197 0

The Robert Fraser Karen Eng
Editor-1 n-CHief Managing Editor
All - ffo John Su 99 Carolyn Pope
/^AAA fe cllUl News Editors

The price of freedom
- ii
is the exercise of responsibility.

'\ > r \i A / lUIMm >c
6/ ii E H.;^ :
As .yOW SOW .
U.S. Airways Unsafe

WASHINGTON A special task force, assigned
to investigate a marked increase of close calls in
the skyway over the nation's capital, has found
dangerous, sometimes chaotic, flying conditions.
All too often, inexperienced and overworked
controllers use incorrect procedures and
substandard, faulty equipment to guide the tourists
into Washington.
This is the substance of the task forces report,
one of several inside documents slipped to this
column. Combined, they tell a chilling story of
ineptness within the Federal Aviation
Administration, which is responsible for air safety.
Four veteran controllers made up the task force,
which studied the operations of the Washington Air
Route Traffic Control Center. Their report cites 24
hazardous flight incidents* in 1969, although
insiders assert at least twice that many went
unreported. Sometimes the pilot narrowly escaped
disaster by swerving out of the path of an oncoming
plane only yards away from a collision.
FAA BLUNDERS
Similar frightening conditions .exist, say the
insiders, over many busy airports. FAA blunders
and bad equipment have come close to costing
hundreds of lives.
Mistakes usually occurred, the task force found,
when controllers were doubling up on their duties
for lunch relief, coffee breaks and other reasons.
It was determined that eight of the incidents
were the result of low proficiency or experience
level, stated the report.
In another nine near-misses, the task force found
that supervision was inadequate at the time of the
incident. The supervisor shortage was hard to
correct, declared the report, because of the limited
number of qualified controllers available.
At least 16 near-misses were blamed on lack of
attention by the controllers. The report suggested
that controllers may have been influenced by
illness . use of medication or
drugs . fatigue . stress of personal
problems ... (and) susceptibility to job stress.
Controllers must rely on substandard
equipment, the report charges, for their picture of
the traffic pattern which often turns into a
whirling vortex of planes as the traffic builds up
over the Washington airports.
EQUIPMENT FAILURES
Controller performance may be effected, said the
task force, by partial or complete equipment
failure, equipment out of service for
maintenance or substandard performance of
primary radar.
Requests for more or better equipment, added
the report, usually met with lack of attention
from top FAA officials.
The FAA, meanwhile, has come up with an
ingenious plan for improving Washingtons near-miss
record. This can be accomplished, the FAA
reasoned, simply by not asking pilots to file reports
on their close calls.

Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Merry-Go-Round
IIIHIIIIIIHUIIIIIIimiIIimHIHIIIUIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIIIIHHIIIIIIHnUHIUIIIIIIiIMHIHIHiIUIM
inininiiiniiiiiiiiiiviiviiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininHMMiiifliinN
by Jack Anderson
In a February 11,1970, order, Joseph R. Wilson,
the Washington facility chief, quoted an FAA rule:
Control personnel shall no longer ask the crew
member DO YOU INTEND TO FILE AN
OFFICIAL NEAR MIDAIR COLLISION
REPORT?
Wilson stressed that near-miss reports shouldnt
be solicited by adding: Repeat shall no longer.
Contacted by this column, Wilson explained that
he was merely repeating a three-year-old FAA rule
and denied that he intends to doctor his centers
near-miss record.
Footnote: This column recently told of an air
tragedy over Weldon, N.C., where six men were
killed on April IS because of a malfunctioning radar
that the FAA had been warned to correct. The story
troubled 10-year-old Billy Joe Martin of Clinton,
Md., who wrote an urgent letter to President Nixon.
Six men were killed. They were killed in two
planes, reported Billy. The radar system was
broke. Please send money to fix it. Taped to the
letter were a dime and five pennies. The money is
from me and friends, he explained.
Who will now explain to Billy that the Presidents
economy program doesnt leave enough money to
fix the faulty radar?
WASHINGTON WHISPERS
Moynihan and ADA President Nixons
Cambodian action almost got his resident liberal,
Pat Moynihan kicked off the board of the
Americans for Democratic Action. The ADAs
convention happened to coincide with the move
into Cambodia, and the delegates were in an uproar
over it. The nominating committee,, meeting in
secret to review the 55-member board, angrily
struck Moynihans name off the list. But Joe Rauh,
the liberal gadfly, pleaded that Moynihan was the
ADAs last tie with the White House. At a quick
session outside the meeting hall, just before the
convention was to approve the new board, the
nominating committee reversed itself in a split vote.
The convention, accordingly, accepted Moynihan
for another term but passed a resolution calling for
the impeachment of his boss, Richard Nixon.
Self-Appointed Chairman Sherman Unger, the
Housing and Urban Development Departments
Edwardian general counsel, has proclaimed himself
the new chairman of the Federal National
Mortagage Association. This organization, more
popularly known as Fannie Mae, supports the flow
of funds into the housing market by buying and
reselling mortgages. Ungers private announcement
that he intends to take over the chairmanship has
caused such an uproar inside Fannie Mae that
HUDS Secretary George Romney has passed down
orders to cod it.

editorial
Another Way
What would you do if you were pregnant, but for one
reason or another, just couldnt have the child?
Unfortunately, there isnt much you could do legally
that is.
Even a respectable married woman is forced either to
go through with an unwanted pregnancy or to have an
illegal abortion.
One-half to two-thirds of children bom to married
university students are unplanned, according to UF clinical
psychologist Mary McCaulley. These people have decided to
take the socially acceptable route.
But last year more than one million American women
didnt. For them, abortion was the answer. All but a few
thousand of these abortions were illegal, and the majority
were performed on married women.
We cant help but wonder why any woman must be
forced to degrade herself and go through a painful,
dangerous and Illegal operation. It does seem foolish,
especially when we realize that if the same operation were
performed under sanitary conditions, early in pregnancy,
abortion would be as safe as, or safer than, childbirth.
For example, in Yugoslavia and Czechoslavakia, where
abortion is legal in state clinics, the death rate is about 4 per
100,000. In the United States, 20 women out of 100,000
5 times as many die of complications involved in ordinary
childbirth.
Most abortion laws date back to the time when any
surgery was dangerous. It is time we modernized our laws,
along with our methods. Unfortunately, 20th century
medicine is being restricted by 19th century law and
morality.
Dr. Edmund Overstreet, professor of obstetrics and
gynecology at the University of California Medical School,
said, One of the continuing problems in many hospital
committees is the member physician who manifests a
punitive attitude toward the results of an illicit sex
activity.
Youve had your fun, now pay for it, continues to be
the expressed or implicit sentiment of many medical
professionals.
We must ask who is really being punished the most. We
weigh the right to be bom against the right to be loved,
and find the right to birth wanting. An alarming number of
those children who were unwanted are those who
eventually commit crimes as teens and adults.
We are not advocating forced abortions the choice
should be left to the mother and her doctor, but not to her
neighbor or her neighbors conscience.
Sen. Robert Saunders and Reps. Ralph Turlington and
William Andrews voted for liberalizing existing abortion
laws.
We applaud them and hope they will continue to support
liberalization of these outdated laws.
But, Rep. Kenneth Mac Kay voted against the bill when it
was presented in the House. We hope Rep. Mac Kay can see
his way clear to join his colleagues in the next vote.
mHmm / i / 1 JR 1 \



Speaking Out

I am writing to answer a letter
by Elizabeth Guy which
appeared in The Alligator.
Like Mrs. Guy, I do not wave
banners or shout in the streets,
yet I am concerned about
violence in America. I believe
that violence is tied up with
dehumanization, the failure of
Americans to realize that every
individual is a human being. I
will try to offer some of the
partial solutions Mrs. Guy found
lacking.
We must immediately
withdraw our armed forces from
Asia. Here is terrible violence
which begets violence in
America. It is neither pompous
nor righteous to demand an
end to this war. I too fear
Communism, but our action
in Asia cannot stop Communism
in America; it can only aid
Communism. An attack upon
the United States can be
prevented by a strong potential
for retaliation, for example, our
Polaris submarine missiles, and
internal subversion can be
stopped only by a people who
are convinced of the value of the
American system. We are only
weaker for pouring out
economic resources and
destroying brave young
American soldiers in Asia. Nor is
it isolationism to realize the
strengths and weaknesses of our
own nation.. Our strength is
being depleted in Asia for our
strength is in young Americans
belief in the American system.
Our leaders have already given
up a military victory in Asia so
that it is terrible violence to
ignore the deaths of Americans
and Asians for no purpose
except to save face or to justify
a mistake already made.
YES, OUR SCHOOLS suffer
from violence, but the solution
is to strengthen our society by
recognizing the humanity of all.
Racial strife occurs because of
the contempt of one race for
another.

We Must Look Beyond

MR. EDITOR:
After having given a great deal of
attention and thought to the many
differing opinions voiced in the Alligator
both through editorials and letters to the
editor concerning the Kent State
incident, it occured to me that several
basic thoughts had not been given any
jooUdMation whatsoever:
The ngnt to dissent under the U. S.
Constitution has never given rise to a
right, implied or otherwise, to employ
violence as a means of effecting change in
LETTERS POLICY
Littm must:
Be typed, signed, double speced end
not eaeeed 300 words.
Not be signed withe pseudonym.
t Here addressee end telephone numbers
of writers.
Nemos will be withheld only If writer
shows Just cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit ell letters for pteoe.
Writers may submit longer esssye,
ooluiims or letters to bo eoneidered for use
OS Spooking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column h
ariced to contact the editor and be prepared
to show samples of his work.

Young People Are H

No agents of subversion are
needed when the white man is
ignorant of the deaths of
thousands of black'men on the
voyage to America, the terror of
slavery and the destruction of
ones family, and of the
hopelessness of being forever set
off from white society. No
Communist infiltrators are
necessary when the black man
has contempt for the white who
cannot see that all races are
human beings. The solution is
not easy for it requires a
government of leaders
courageous enough to lead
Americans up from the hate and
fear they hold toward other
races. We do not have that
government now. American
priorities must be redirected.
We must stop the destruction
of our youth with drugs by
treating drug users as human
beings. Undercover agents
resembling secret police and
heavy punishment of drug users
cannot stop the spread of the
problem. Our nation must
provide complete and humane
treatment and support of the
heroin addict. The
indiscriminate manufacture of
dangerous drugs by domestic
drug concerns must be stopped
and our police must be free of
entanglements with organized
crime if they are to act. By
prohibiting pot while we allow
alcohol we encourage pot users
to deal with purveyors of heroin
and we demonstrate the
hypocrisy of our society.
It is not glib to quote from
Hitler for we must study the
nature of man if we are to
protect ourselves. Hitler
dehumanized and murdered the
Jews. His ultimate evil was his
success in convincing the
German people that the Jews
were subhuman. In our own
country we have murdered and
confined the American Indian
and the African. It is righteous
and pompous to ignore these

our country. Such an end is left to the
machinery of legal and legislative process.
This being the case, it would seem to me
an affront to the integrity of any true
advocate of world peace or adversary to
the war in Southeast Asia that his cause
even be associated with the public
disorder and violence at Kent State or
any other campus. Such hipocrisy is not
only contradictory, but indeed
outrageous. Yet three days of
unjustifiable violence and disorder
supposedly founded on ideals of world
peace preceeded the deployment of Ohio
National Guard troops on the Kent State
campus. With these thoughts in mind, it
seems to me that the actual causational
sequence of the deaths at Kent State
should be re-evaluated:
Ohio Guardsmen were ordered to the
Kent State campus as a legal and
necessary exercise of the police power of
the State after continued illegal outbreaks
of violence. The impropiety of their
actions on that campus remains to be
seen, and will be established or denied in
the future only on the basis of whatever
proof comes to light; summary judgement
on this issue serves no purpose but

evils. Unless we do something to
right these wrongs we share
much with Hitlers Germany.
ALSO WE MUST appreciate
that our young people are
human.
They are subject to emotion,
but they are also subject to
idealism. They have come to
disbelieve and fear their own
government. They cannot
believe a government that sends
them to kill and be killed in Asia
while the United States is not
defended by this action. They
disbelieve a government that
fails to act against racism and
speaks glibly of benign
neglect. How can our nation

: Fluted Columns

Tuesday night my faith was restored in the
American democratic process.
But to get the full impact of the emotion, picture
this scene : here we are in Maas Brothers surrounded
by 4,567 color television sets, half of them tuned to
Sen. George McGoverns program on ending the
Vietnam war, the other half (very fittingly) were
assaulting us with the pride of all American
haybrains, Hee Haw.
Sen. McGovern, his earnestness belying his easy
smile, spoke with calm assurance that the war could
be ended immediately by congressional action,
meanwhile from the set above Buck Owens flashed a
big awshucks country smile and impliedly invited
his audience to fergit all their worries and cares
and be gently caressed into that great abyss of
nightime fluff and nonsense that has come to be
known as the great wasteland.
The irony was obvious and moving.
The question now is how many people chose to
back their congressional representatives in ending
the war, and how many opt to be lulled into
oblivion by those clever and contented
representatives of the proud crime of silence.
For me the choice isnt even academic.
Demonstrations accomplish next to nothing. At
least they accomplish the very minimum for the
amount of energy they take. Their only effect is the
impression made by sheer numbers. And no matter
how many thousands show up to protest the war,
there are that many more sitting comfortably at

confusion. However, I think it should be
clear at the outset that to allow honest
dissent to deteriorate into mindless,
irrational violence is unjustifiable in any
event. So why do we not look beyond
superficialities and ask if the Kent State
deaths were not in fact caused by the
students who actually gave impetus to
illegal, senseless violence.
ALLEN C. SCOTT, H,3LW
Guns
MR. EDITOR:
Mr. Skadowski, in his letter published
the smoll society

!T MAN IN Hl-s ?oe\l\o\\
A l UUAAOL& ..

uman

prevail against Communism if
our youth becomes convinced
that the American system is not
preferable to Communism?
The list of partial answers for
Americas ills and the violence
they cause can go on and on. We
must control the sale of guns
and other instruments of
violence. We must pay public
servants, our teachers and our
police, properly. We must do
away with capital punishment
which is cruel and unusual, and
the draft in peacetime which is
slavery. We must go this far if
young Americans are to believe
us.

Hee-Haw

FORUM
( jAAiiu ml Vii&Mt J

Ttripy r MY 41* 1970, Th Florid. AlUgrtpr,,

By Steve Rubinstein

By John Parker .-.-..

home saying maybe I should be there or I dont
have all the facts, so ..
Protest, at this stage of the game, is an excercise
in futility.
We have now been given a viable, workable,
constitutional, and AMERICAN way to make our
feelings known and to end a paranoids nightmare of
a war in Indochina: A constitutional amendment
cutting off all funds for fighting in Southeast Asia.
Congress has abrogated its right to make war
decisions for far too long. It is too great a
responsibiltiy for one man. History has shown that
American political inertia is too great a force for our
presidents to contend with. They are too proud, too
powerful, too aware of international prestige, and
they have too many military advisors who cant
flush a toilet without an engineering division and a
two-ton winch.
Take away the money that Nixon is making war
with. Take away his right to make war without a
direct mandate from Congress. Put the war-making
function back with the Legislature where it belongs,
according to our Constitution.
Get a petition that says I support the
amendment to end the war and carry it around in
your back pocket or purse and when it is filled send
it to George McGovern in Washington. Then start a
new one.
Do it. Give yourself an answer for 40 years from
now when your grandchildren ask you what you did
about the Vietnam war.

May 13, says a Santa Barbara student was
killed by a fellow students gun.
Admittedly it has been back page news
but he should know that Kevin Moran
died from a policemans bullet. David
Grosselin, a five-year veteran of the Santa
Barbara police force, has admitted that he
killed Kevin. Incidentally, Officer
Gosselin is still on the police force.
*
KEN SCHULTZ, 7EG
by Brickman

The tactic of demonstration
serves only to unify those
already concerned about our
society. Yes in a violent
America, an America where guns
are not controlled, and our
government is feared and
disbelieved, they will cause
violence. But to do away with
demonstrations would not stop
the more terrible violence of war
and racial conflict.

Mrs. Guys letter was sincere
and courageous for to remain
silent while the survival of
America is at stake is the
popular course. This letter was
not intended to debate hers but
to express my own beliefs.

Page 9



Page 10

I. Tha Florida AUigator, Thunday. May 21,1970

Thousands Demonstrate For Nixon

NEW YORK (UPI) White and bluej
collar workers estimated unofficially by
police at 100,000, massed as far as the
eye could see around City Hall during
their lunch hour Wednesday in a giant
rally in support of President Nixons
Vietnam War policy.
There was some minor scuffling as the
rally broke up but no arrests.
IT WAS THE largest

Cowboys Lose
To Navajo Indians

HOSPAH, N. M. (UPI) The
cowboys lost to the Indians
Wednesday.
Cattlemen, trying to drive 600
head of French bred charolais
across the Navajo reservation
from New Mexico to Colorado
were turned back because the
Indians didnt want the animals
on their grass.
SO THE Great Western Land
and Cattle Co. was forced to
load the animals in trucks for
transport across the reservation.
As the trucks rolled by,
Indians in bluejeans stood firmly
beside barbed wire fences they
put up to keep the cattle out
and preserve their grasslands.
Navajos said a similar cattle
drive last year damaged their
range.
IF THEY had ever, at any
time, asked our permission to
come across the reservation
without trucks, we would have
helped them obtain permission
from landowners, said Navajo
land administrator William B.
Bonner. But they didnt.
Grant Loftin, a Great Western
spokesman, said an Indian who
leased some of the land blocked
off told me he was mad the
fence was put up. He said hed
have enjoyed seeing the cattle on
his land.
Cowboys loaded the charolais
cattle into trucks shortly after
dawn. Loftin said the herd
would be corralled for
Wednesday night on the north
side of the 36-mile strip of
reservation land.
AFTER THE loss to the
Navajos, the cowboys now must
face the Apaches. But that battle
is expected to be friendlier.
Well be going onto the
Jicarilla Apache reservation
probably sometime Thursday,
Loftin said. Weve got cattle
trailing permits from the Apache
'* and theyll be real happy to let
us on their land.
.Loftin also said the drives
oldest cowboy, Gus Wynn, 70,
RENT NOW!
FOR THIS SUMMER AND
SEPTEMBER, 1970
FALL LEASES 9 & 12 MONTH
Fcstitrlftt
0 2 MrMffli
Uppf or Lowr
FurnMnd
0 Air ContfltioiMd
3 Pools
0 ftoeroatlon Halt
0 Study Room
So* today. Movo rfatit hi
VILLAGE PARK ~~
A
FRENCH OUARTER
APTS.
1001 S.W. 1001 St.
L.- fEtstn J

pro -administration demonstration held
here since helmeted construction workers
began daily demonstrations in the
financial district May 8 to counter rallies
by hippie-type anti-war protestors.
On the first day, City Hall was stoned
and the construction workers beat up
hippie protestors and college students.
Thousands of policemen, including
2,700 officers brought in on overtime,

of Levelland, Tex., dropped out
because of his age and the heat.
He got pretty tired, Loftin
said. But he said hed meet us
at Pagosa Springs, the trail's end,
if he could.
The drive began last Sunday
at Grants, N. M. Great Western
planned to drive the cattle 200
miles to Pagosa Springs, Colo.,
for summer pasture.

HAPPY
NEW YEAR
C-
A
_ * )
Q
In May? Unbelievable, but true. We're celebrating the
arrival of the 1970 SEMINOLE and already full of ideas for
the New Year. Yes, our year begins where we left off.
The SEMINOLE needs more than just a year to record,
more than just the events and people that make it. It will
take a staff of talented and hard-working individuals to
record a year that is already going full-speed. We need
writers, designers, layout artists and people with a desire to
record the year which they've lived.
Make a resolution to contribute your special talents, ideas,
and creativity to the 1971 SEMINOLE.
You are the new year.
V
We will be interviewing for the 1971
SEMINOLE staff Thursday, May 21, I QoTYT *| rr
7:30 8:30 p.m., in J. Wayne Reitz OC/llllllUltJ
Union, rooms 121 and 122.
- *> - v ~ T
-O_. r r.

DEMAND 'NO SURRENDER

Two Men Plan Marriage ;
Ask For Church Wedding

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (UPI) Jack Baker, a
law student, and Jim McConnell, a librarian, have
applied for a marriage license. Both are
28-year-old men.
* Robert Anderson, senior deputy clerk in
Hennepin County District Court, said Baker and
McConnell, who is from Kansas City, filled out
the form and paid a $lO fee Monday and they
may pick up the license Friday unless there is a
legal impediment.

were assigned Wednesday to the area but
they had no trouble with the flag-carrying
demonstrators, including construction
men, long-shoremen, communications
workers and office workers.
UNION LEADERS exhorted the
workers over loudspeakers to keep it
peaceful, and they did.
Many of the placards carried by the
demonstrators demanded Impeach the

Red Mayor and Impeach Red John
Lindsay, while others read We Support
Nixon on Vietnam, Dump Anarchy
and No Surrender. Lindsay was hung in
effigy.
Lindsay arrived in an unmarked car
while the demonstrators were still
massed, but after a brief speaking
program was over the police made a path
for his car through the crowds.

ANDERSON ADVISED the two men that
County Attorney George Scott would be
consulted on whether the license may be issued.
The matter may be decided in court.
Baker, who is a student at the University of
Minnesota, said he would go to court if the
license is refused.
He said he met McConnell three years ago at
Norman, Okla. and they hope to be married in a
church wedding Dec. 31.



BbB
K B
r& / a Saturday May 23
Florida State University
Campbell Stadium
Featuring
Pacific Gas & Electric
. t
Zephyr
r~i The Illusion
/>,) Rhinocerous
V and including
Plymouth Rock Funk, Inc.
Nate & John Puppetmasters
Changing Tymes City Wide Delivery
\
with Special Guests
Pam Rose and Jim Pierce
8 ~ "~ -
Presented by Student Government and Day Attractions

Thursday, May 21,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



!, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, May 21,1970

Page 12

W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BEEF NATURALLY AGED" A
S CHUCK ROAST .§Pr
Everyday Low Prices
THRIFTY MAID
USDA CHOICE WD BRAND PORTERHOUSE STEAK OR W-D BRAND HANDI-PAK GROUND. h A DftDlf 9 DCAMC No. 300 1A (
T-Bone Steak >1 Round Steak .99' O S "
USDA CHOICE W D BRAND BONELESS SIRLOIN USDA CHOICE W D BRAND BEEF BONELESS if lAW I I |UE BOX gj
Tip Roast... > $ 1 39 Chuck Roast 89 c Qc aGARETTES .s 3
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND FULL CUT BONELESS USDA CHOICE W D BRAND BEEF IfOOST 0#
Round Steak *1 19 Chuck Steak 79* BAiSUH £ Tom. wedges 2^29'
USDA CHOICE WD BRAND SIRLO,NOR TOP USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BONELESS BOTTOM VA V k*i 1 VllOpS >-B | TALL THRIFTY MAID
Round Steak . $ 1 29 Round Roast $ l O9 ,!Xi^(!: K * 3 N 39<
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BONELESS STEAKS USDA CHOICE WD BRAND BONELESS RUMP OR EYE OF fllAnr >1 29 f|| IQ |||| If A Nol amm
Delmonico .. *1 69 Round Roast n 39 M,LK * 3 ~f 7
kj M Chops 79 c JOWEIS 4= *1"
GR. BEEF .. 3 $ 1 79 5 $2 a* TOM. juice ... 3as *r
jr 0c ORANGE JUICE 3SI M
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Ctnvi Cfufalf SI 59 uiciiiia caiic a <-. tioo
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ll Pork Roost 59 3 & 7jc
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FIRM HEADS
FRESH LETTUCE 2 49 c
VINE RIPE
W CANTALOPES 2 89'
VENT VU
115' POTATOES 10 £ 69*
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1 39' Lemons... 12 . 49 c Oranges.. 5 49 c
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Fry Potatoes ... 3SL *1 00 Heath Bars 2 -=, s l
Itjf |"W M CMRIMP * lemonade 8 & *1 ## Pie Shells 3S£ s l
VBB l _ Cream Style Corn 5 M OO Chocolate Cake . < 55'
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JUILE O NS A # srimP5 rim P 89' Corn Toastees 29'
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WITH -twtf.tn WC 'lMOenvl O* ** aa a(n.l|i (* M Wndtl p nrtn nlMIHAB l W..R Oi *th HLA' J IUPYMLU C> | AIVIPjI M Ib -02. "m f
WSSfI BPIot iUfti ,w n 7ri Vi LIIPPCA prr W-0 BRAND I| SUPCtaiANO l lONCACM FRIED ONE PKG w 0 BEEF I Hr 1 Tlllvvjv PKG §
Ground ! !! Cott. Choose | HMfc&Cfr Chicken Steakotto* PALMETTO FARMS
GOOO THRU MAY 27 i, V GOOO THRU MAY 27 I £££ JOB GCX)D THRU MAY 27 £3j4HF GOOD THRU MAY 27 i ,T. *** m
No 6 "P&is n 0 .7 >IBSiB N - 8 No 9 i n GOODTM,u <,A 7 R? ~ u. #Ac
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Potatoes 63 c Gulf Spray 43 c Dog F00d.... ... 43= Cheese ... 89*
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Oreo s 53' Apricot Nectar.. 2/35 c Burger Rounds ... 27' Cheese Food 69*
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Lemon Coolers 49' Beet Liver .33' Comet Cleanser... 19 c Biscuits 3t£sl9*
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. PACKER BARREII MELLOW STICK
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST. Cheese . 69*



O 0 FOLGER'S
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RDF A A A iSkEs flQ^
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I SUGAR & ||| ft# DIXIE DARLING BROWN & SERVE FLAKY OR TWIN PK.
i CREAMER LJ fashion right I £ A 12 PK Si 00
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Thursday, May 21,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Pellex f 1.4 complete w/accessory
lens & cases. 200mm and 35mm
S4OO or best offer. Call 372-5516.
(A-10t-138-p)
78 acres horse and cattle ranch
318-335 2 miles due east of Wllliston
on corner of 2 highways contact
R. T. Lewis 528-6562 not collect.
Route 1 box 157 Wllliston.
(A-st-143-p)
1967 mobile home, 12 x 48, 2
bedrooms, excellent condition, S4OO
down, assume payments of $77
monthly, original financing 6yrs, 4
yrs remaining to pay. 378-6797,
evenings. (A-st-142-p)
Absolutely must sell now! 50x8
furnished 2 bedroom mobile home
central heating air conditioning
carpeting superb condition 378-8304
after 5 $1550 or best offer.
(A-st-142-p)
Purple-Yellow Honda 565,7300 ml,
recently tuned, Inspected,
dependable best cash offer over SBO,
helmet etc. Al' after 7 evenings.
392-7329. (A-st-142-p)
Awai tape recorder, 4 track-stereo,
runs on batteries, car lighter, or 110
v. or 220 v AC. 7 inch reel, int. spks.
$95.00. Call 378-6247 after 5:00 PM.
(A-st-141-p)
Diamond engagement ring 1/3 carat.
Perfect must sell!! Call 373-2277
for details (evenings). (A-3t-141-p)

>>
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Wt'//////, Pick up your book today through '/////,
m'////// Friday, on the north side of the '///////M
WL'//////, Second F,oor JWRU. '///////M
K/////// / ///////wk
///////: ////////
limited number of books are still V/f////^k
on sale for six dollars. Bring
checkbook. ////////
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;///////////////, 10 a.m. o p.m. ;//////////////////
wC////////////////////'/////// //// /
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FOR SALE
100% human hair fall! Shoulder
length, brown-frosted! Best offer
over $25. Head-stand included! Call
after 1:30 at 376-0266, ask for
Darlla. (A-st-142-p)
GIBSON electric Jazz guitar. For
discriminating musician who
demands high quality, superior tone.
Strap, case, strings. sllO 373-1659
aft. (A-3M43-P)
SEX? It is true we carry a full line of
equipment for most any sport, but
lets be reasonable! B & B SPORTS
CENTER 5320 N.W. 13th St.
378-1416. (A-st-142-p)
Refrig Bike TV $25 Each Music
Stand $1 Port. Movie Screen $5
Cassette Recorder $lO Port B try
Record Player $lO 378-0226.
(A-st-143-p)
1969 KAWASAKI F 3
BUSHWHACKER. Motorcycle Low
mileage, just like new, only S4OO.
Phone 372-5787 after 6:00 p.m. for
more Information. (A-4t-143-p)
A 1969 modernage trailor 2
bedrooms air conditioned, carpeted,
S6OO. down and take over payments
of $95.00 a month call after spm
378-0208. (A-3t-143-p)
3 br. l*/2 bath 10 x 56 fur. trailer 1
br. fixed as study washer clothes
line fenced lot cable TV ln
park with pool AC 376-8517.
(A-st-141-p)

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 21,1970

Page 14

FOR SALE

Must Sell! Hangstrom 12-String
Guitar Dual Pickup With Case. A-l
Condition Sacrifice $125. Call
392-7673. (A-st-143-p)
8x24 mble home A/C load leveling
hitch S7OO mono tape recorder S4O
67 Triumph 650 S7OO 20-inch fan $5
wife SIOO Prices flexible 372-5078.
(A-st-143-p)
AIR CONDITIONER 14,000 BTU.
Only 8 months old.
16-3/4x26-3/8". $l5O. Call
373-2436. (A-st-143-p)
MUGS! MUGS! MUGS! For the BIG
or small drinker. Beautiful
hand-made ceramic mugs. Various
Sizes & Colors Call Steve Paskosky
392-8777 (A-st-144-p)
196 7 Honda cl 16 0 scrambler
Excellent shape S3OO call 378-5996
after 1 p.m. and all day Saturday or
Sunday. (A-3t-144-p)
1967 Bultaco Campera 175 cc. 3300
miles. Excellent woods bike. New
paint. $350 call 392-1727 days and
378-8688 nights. Ask for Mike
Wlnegar.(A-3t 144-p)
1968 Kawasaki 175cc~ln excellent
condition. Low mileage. Two
helmets. Phone 378-5033. S3OO.
(A-2t-144-p)
2 br air conditioned trailer Bx4o
with 16x18 addition; pool, clean,
good condition. Near campus. S2OOO
or terms 372-1346.(A-3t-144-p)
1966 Triumph Spitfire excellent
condition radio heater and many
extras asking SIOOO.OO can be seen at
922 SW 7th Ave or call Dean
378-6041 (A-4t-144-p)
1969 Penton motocross and Enduro
racing cycle includes racing extras
street equip. Cost S7OO new, sell
$460 1321 NW. 4th Lane or
392-7159. (A-3t-144-p)
ill HELD
EISSFfcJjI OVER!
EXTRA DAYS... R
A COCKEYED
MASTERPIECE!
LJI STARTS I
I cdi
| 178-2414 LJ j I rill.
Will the real
Magic Christian
please stand.
cPeterSellers
&> G RingoStaiT
in
uC Qk G Magic
Christiaif
LAST 'THE
DAY LAWYER"

for saLe
Bausch & Lomb binocular
microscope: 4 objectives, lOx wide
field eyepieces, excellent condition
call 378-7854 after 5 pm.
(A-st-144-p)
GUITAR 12-string electric, Hagstrom
2-pickup, like new with hard case.
New over $250. Also 2 channel
reverb amp. 392-8905. (A-st-144-p)
Parkwood mobile home-2 bdrm. 12x
56 Spanish decor, 2 airconditioners,
is furnished, carpeted. A-l shape.
Two yrs old $4500. 439-2725 Flagler
Bch. (A-st-144-p)
1967 Porsche 911 excellent cond.
Konis Webers radio. Car is in great
shape. Must sell $4,500. Cali
376-9789. Ask for Lee. (A-st-144-p)
Fender ampliefier contains JBL
D-140 speaker, $350 or best offer,
excellent condition phone 372-3867
(A-st-144-p)
Honda 305 Superhawk showroom
condition excellant mechanicly
includes metalftake lime helmet and
passenger helmet megaphones call
392-8190.(A-5t- 144-p)
Camera nikon sp rangefinder lenses:
50mm 1.4 85mm 2.0 case and lens
hoods. Excellant cond. call 378-9024
after 6 pm. (A-st-143-p)
CARPETS a fright? Make them a
beautiful sight with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-167-lt-c)
Must selk 1965 Yamaha under 80000
miles. Perfect running condition best
offer takes it. Call 372-7104 after
5:30. (A-2t-145-p)
Color organs best buy over 20
sold: 2 chanels 525.; 4 channels
SSO. All solid state circuits 2OO
watts per channel. Phone 376-5400
after 5. (A-lt-145-p)
sxlo Schult trailer; ac; washer;
carpet; 20x10 screen porch; ail in
excellent cond. lot 5 Pinehurst Pk.
378-5450 everything goes S3OOO.
(A-10t-145-p)
For sale Ig. mixed breed pups. Two
oven stove end tables Volkswagen
parts call 475-1158 after 6pm.
(A-3t-145-p)
For sale: 1965 Honda 305, just
tuned, bored out with oversized
pistons fast, clean, reliable, $275 call
372-7189 after 5 need cash going
In army. (A-2t-145-p)
196 8 Sears 50cc Motorcycle;
excellent, like new, runs perfect, call
Bill 373-1561 or see 103 NW 10 St.
Apt 2. $l2O. (A-st-145-p)
BRAND NEW PORTABLE T.V.
never been used. A real beauty,
walnut style finish, only SBS! will
bargain, call 392-8824. (A-3t-145-p)
$45. 124V2 NW 20 Drive.
(A-st-145-p)
Taperecorder, Webcor, portable, two
track mono. 3 speakers, microphone,
Input extension cord, 2 speed, record
on both sides of tape without reel
turnover. $45. 124V2 NW 20 Drive.
(A-st-145-p)

at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Fish Almondine and
French-Fried Potatoes
89 <
GAINESVILLE MALL

FOR RENT
Frederick Gardens 1 bed. apt., need
roommate or will sublet. Female,
pool, S6O/mo. Available June 15,
June rent paid. 376-2909 after 5:30.
(B-st-141-p)
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
Sublet June 1,1 bedroom apt.
central AC ww carpeting, quiet
behind the mall, sllO per month Call
after 5 PM. 373-2889. (B-st-141-p)
Sublet: 1 bdrm. furnished apt. June
through August. French Quarter. AC,
pool, Call 376-4165 after 5:00,
392-0510 weekdays. (B-st-137-p)
Sublet for summer or longer 1
bdrm. A/C, pvt. patio, furnished,
slls/mo Village 34, no. 27, Call
378-7000. (B-139-st-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.w. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-C)
Sublet Sum. Qtr. 1 bdrm. garage apt.
AC, ww carpet, beautifully furnished,
tv cable. SIOO/mo. + ut. 1908 NW
3rd Ave. 373-2700. (B-6t-142-p)
Sublet for summer, furnished English
Tudor house, entire upstairs. Walking
distance to campus, 2 huge
bedrooms, central A/C and heat,
modern kitchen and bath, living
room, wood paneled, carpeted,
sunken den 180/mo. 373-1049.
(B-4t-143-p)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included completely
furnighed ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372- Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
French Quarter Apt. 94 Sublet for
summer $l4O. A/C Pool Great
location. Partially decorated. Fully
Furnished. Two bedroom townhouse.
(B-3t-143-p)
2 bedroom Village Park apt. to
sublease for the summer quart. $95
for entire summer phone 373-2661
or come by apt 12 Village Park.
(B-4t-143-p)
Sublet 1 br apt furnished, ac,
dishwasher, pool, available June 12.
$l2O/mo. just off campus. Mt.
Vernon apts. Call after 6:30 PM
378-0260. (B-st-143-p)
Available June 15, Unlv. Gardens one
bedroom apt for summer and next
year, beautifully furnished plus
extras. June rent free. 376-8958.
(B-st-143-p)
Available June 14. A/C eff. apt Bth
ave apts 1222 NW Bth ave. quiet,
plenty of parking. $85./mo. call
373- between 6 and 7:30 pm.
(B-st-143-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
Sublet for summer qtr 2 br Mt
Vernon apt $l7O per month. Luxury
for less, call 378*8338 after 4pm.
(B-3M43-P)
Sublease Landmark Apts. Sublease
for 1-4 openings call 373*1509
after 4pm Located on pool.
(B-3t-143-p)
Need to rent for the summer, a 2
bedroom A/C Mobile home, S9O per
month call JOHN 373*1581 evenings.
(B-st-143-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, l*bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B*tf*c)
SAVE sllO 4-man Vintage Pk apt.
To sublet for summer. Furn, balcony
over pool, end apt for spacious
parking. SIOO each for entire
summer. Call 373-1347 anytime.
Apt. 94. (B-st-142-p)
Summer quarter only 2 bedroom
and two full baths S2OO per month
apart, for only $l5O Pt. West Apart.
Cali 378-9809 anytime hurry first
come first serve. (B-st-142-p)
Sublet .-summer qt. Olympia Apts,
next to campus, l bedroom,
furnished, carpet, A/C, summer rates
$95.00 per month. Call 378-6247
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-141-p)
Sublet turn 2-br apt. summer qtr.
Fully carpeted, central A/C,
$l2O/month. Call 373-1867 on
weekend or after 4:30 p.m. on
weekdays. (B-st-142-p)
Sublet-sumi.Mir 1 bedroom wood
panel Apt. A/C, private patio, pet fee
paid, lots of extras slls a month
Village 34 Apt 3? call 378-5809.
(B-st-142-p)
Private a/c rooms, linen, maid service.
One block campus. Telep. 372-6263.
(B-3t-142-p)
Sublease summer qtr. poolside 2 bdr.
French Qtr. Apt. near laundry room
fun living A/C contact Linda or
Jackie anytime phone 372-6768.
(B-st-142-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
summer qtr. Share house 2 blocks
from campus with 2 coeds pvt. room,
A/C, Call 378-6548. (B-st-137-p)
FRENCH QUARTER. Sublease' 2
bdrm apt on pool for summer no. 82.
Call nights 373-2381. (B-4t-144-p)
2 Female. Lamancha. June rent paid.
$75 mo. Includes utilities call
evenings 373-1466. (B-2t-144-p)
Sublet summer qt. 2 bedroom
Landmark Apt. 103 June rent free
call 378-9052 or come by.
(B-st-144-p)
Air-conditioned 2 bdr trailer with
cabana shaded by giant live oaks,
Ideal for lovers or other couple. $l5O
for all summer call 378-8205.
(B-3t-144-p)
Sublet Summer Quarter: one bedrm.
apt; close to campus, med center &
V.A. Hosp; furnished, with pool and
air cond; sl3 0/m o; call
372-
POOLSIDE 2 bedroom Landmark
apt. no.llo to sublet for summer qt.
$46.25 a person per month OR need
2 fern, roommates 376-2842 June
free. (B-2t-144-p)
Male roommate for summer qtr.
French Quarter SIOO plus V utilities
call 373-2525 after 7 or come by
appt. number 88. (B-2t-144-p)
Best Deal In Townil 2 BR. apt.
Beautifully Furnished, Central Air,
fully carpeted, 5 min. from campus.
$145/m'o. 373-1573 or
373-
Sublet or rent 1 brm apt furnished air
conditioned rant slls/mo patio call
373-1080 or 376-4807 Village 54.
(B-st-144-p)
The closest complex to campus-Mt.
Vernon. Sublease single br. pad.
Furnished, carpeted, all the extras.
Like new. Evenlngs-378-4877.
(B-4t-144-p)
Frederick Gardens one-bedroom for
summer. June rent paid. Call
376-0808 or come by no. 66.
(B-st-145-p)
Help! Must sublet 1 br apt w/bath
kltchen/ac/cafpet/furnished & pool.
Will talk terms. Butler Gardens 968
sw 16 Ave. 378-9657 pm Jerry.
(B-2t-145-p)
Landmark townhouse! 2 bedroom
four person- apt available mid-June.
A/C,'dishwasher, disposal, gas, grills,
rent $46.25/mo. apt. 126 ph.
378-6277 now! (B-St-145-p)
1327 NW 7th Ave one bedroom apt
*11 furnished duplex walking
distance $75 mo. call 378-8641 after
5 pm. (B-st-145-p)
Village Park need 1 roomate open
now thru summer apt on pool. Call
372-491$ anytime.
FOR FI IE INT
Needed: 2 male roommates to
sublease 3 bedroom fully furnished
home for the summer. Only S4O per
mo. per person. $l2O per mo. total.
Call 373-1162 after 7:00 pm for
details. (B-2t-145-p)
Large house to sublet for summer: 3
bdr ms, 2 baths, kitchen, etc. 1 blk.
from campus Interested call
373-2268 or come by 1128 SW Ist
Ave. (B-10t-145-p)
Sublet summer qt. Olympia Apts,
next to campus, 1 bedroom,
furnished, carpet a/c, summer rates
$95.00 per month, call 378-6247
after s:oopm Att who called this apt
still open call back. (B-6t-141-p)
FRENCH QUARTER apt 114
summer lease $45. per month air
conditioned, pool, tv, study lounge
etc. Call John 373-2306. (B-3t-145-p)
HAWIIAN VILLAGE sublet for
summer. 2 bdrm 2 bath townhouse.
Furnished, central a/c, dishwasher,
pool, patio, maid serv. apt. 140
373-2520. (B-st-145-p)
NEED 1 or 2 roomates for summer
qrt 2 bdrm AC apt. 1 block from
campus ssomo. 373-2317.
(B-2t-145-p)
Furnished apt for rent 3 br 2 baths
cen air very quiet $l5O per mo Apt 1
315 NW 19 Lane available June 15
years lease required phone 376-2829.
(B-2t-145-p)
Sublet 1 bdr. a/c Jpt. 2 blocks from
campus summer rates June 13
contact in person after 4 1100 S.W.
Bth Ave apt. no. 205 Olympia Apts.
(B-st-145-p)
Landmark Apartment to sublease for
summer. June rent paid apt. 31 call
373-2241. (B-2t-145-p)
French Quarter Apartment to sublet
for summer 1 bedroom apartment
no. 31 call 378-7203. (B-st-145-p)
FRENCH QTR. 2 bdrm. apt.,
sublease for summer, poolside. $l5O
a month. Call after 6:30 pm.
376-5412. (B-3t-145-p)
Men 3 blocks from campus central air
conditioning single $155.00 double
$l2O each for summer quarter
378-8122. (B-10t-145-p)
Two apartments, each one bedroom,
private bath. Also one efficiency apt.
available, occupation June 15;
inquire at 102 NW 15th St. or call
372-9855. (B-3t-145-p)
WOW 2 bedroom apt. central heat
and air ww carpeting special low rate
for summer 2 pools outdoor grills
TOM 378-9582. (B-4t-145-p)

V

Thursday, May 21,1970, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT
We can get it for you wholesale 2
bdroom summit house apt furn
carpet a/c pool reg $167 summer rate
$l2O June paid 373-1782 evenings.
(B-st-145-p)
ONLY $1.02 a day to live in luxury
at Landmark. Beautiful apt can be
yours for S9O for entire summer. 2
bedrooms call 373-2393.
(B-st-145-p)
WANTED
1 Female roommate for French
Quarter poolside air cond. apt. for
summer $lO5 for summer come by
apt 102 or call 373-1225.
(C-st-143-p)
Male roommate for sum. qtr.
S2O/mo. + util, efficiency, ac. pool. 5
min. walk to campus. Call Paul
373-2758. FEMALE Roommate for Summer
Qtr. Share 1 br. apt. A/C TV Quiet
Landmark Apts. Call 376-7693 after
5:00 PM. (C-st-142-p)
Listeners Wanted: Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and .4 pm for
appointment. 392-2049. (C-st-143-c)
1 female rommate wanted for Point
West apt. 2 bedroom, 2 full baths
No deposit s7s for summer
quarter call Robin 378-7188 5-Bpm
or 392-2925 8-llam. (C-6t-142-p)
Trallermate for summer term. You
own room in new trailer. A/C
$45/mo + Vz util. Grad student pref.
Mobileer Park. 3784775 after 7 PM.
(C-st-141-p)
FRIENDLY apt. needs co-ed
roommate. ONLY SIOO for summer.
Townhouse in Landmark. Call Carol
3 72-9764 or Debbie 392-9880.
(C-st-144-p)
JUNE RENT FREE 4 to Share 2 bdr
2 bath Point West apt $125 ea for all
summer pool ac dishwasher call
376-9924 or 372-5970 after 5 must
be 21. (C-10t-142-p)
Live in paradise. Share 2 bedroom
house In paradise 4 miles from
campus. Private bedroom. $47 per
mo. includes everything. Discount to
Spanish speaker. Ph 378-8005
evenings. (C-3t-143-p)
Male roommate for summer quarter
at La Mancha. Live all summer for
$l5O Inc. utilities; pool, a/c, own
bedroom. Call 372-8046 anytime.
(C-st-143-p)

Page 15

WANTED
2-4 roommates for summer qtr. La
Mancha apt. Pvt. bdrms, 2 bath, 2
blks to campus, pool, AC, laundry,
utilities Inc. Call: 376-6951.
(C-st-141-p)
Female Roommate Wanted Summer
43.00 a month one block from Tiger!
air-conditioned, own bedroom call us
at 378-0963 1210 SW 3rd Ave, apt. 8
(C-st-141-p)
2 roommates summer V* .for 2
bedroom Williamsburg Apt ri0.42
373-1216 close to Med Center.
(C-3M44-P)

Starts TODAY! f fjrjp
jrjp fjrjp From the country that
i gave you M I, A WOMAN
|'4|P INGAand I AM CURIOUS
m f S^>' : Jfcj FANNY HILL is a porno-classic!"
9| -ARCHER WINSTON
in there with sex and love
: Sp Jerry Gross and Nicholas Demetroutes
Fanny Hill
new...V ants from Swedca
ItwMjCMrAwftJ
HBW W2A HELD OVER!!
ACADEMY
q/
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... HAS THAT YOUTHFUL ACCENT WHICH PLACES
IT IN A LEAGUE WITH ZEFFIRELLIS ROMEO AND
JULIET. -John Mahoney, FM and Fine Arts Magazine
'^jSp£^ l,l
AN INSTANT CLASSIC. IT HAS A HAMMER-LOCK ON
HISTORY, PERFORMANCE, PATHOS AND ROOTING
interest! -Archer Winsten, N.Y. Post
EPIC BATTLE OF THE SEXES.- Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times I
Richard Burton
at HENRY VIII
Genevieve Bujoid [rpl
as ANNE BOLEYN I
IN THE Hal Wallis PRODUCTION I
(yAttne (oftfteTfiousatjb T)ays

WANTED
2 female roommates needed for June
1 Williamsburg 2 bedroom
townhouse A/C, pool,
$52.50/person. Mt. Vernon apt. 11
Call 372-6098. (C-st-141-p)
Coeds for summer qtr. Have your
own room in a house 10 blocks from
Norman S7O + utilities for the entire
summer. Call 373-1748. (C-st-144-p)
FRIENDLY apt needs co-ed roommate
WANTEOTwo female roommates
for the Place-Sophmores in
Sept-Pleasell Call 392-8499 before
Thurs nitel (C-3t-144-p)



GATOR GU&SSXPnasiW

WANTED
EE Grad studant with 2 bdrm apt
needs 1* 2, or 3 roommates for the
summer quarter. Call Jim 378-9129,
500-7 SW 34 St. Point West Apts.
(C-3t-144-p)
Want a beautiful summer? Live at
Landmark. 1 or 2 girls wanted for
summer quarter. Air-conditioning, 2
pools luxurious living. 376-0687.
(C-3t-145-p)
Two roommates for summer point
west apts. 2 bedroom 2 bath a/c
dishwasher pool reduced rate on
rent call 378-9947 around 9 am or 6
pm. (C-st-145-p)
One male roommate for summer
quarter to share house 1220 SW Ist
Ave. 1/2 sllO plus expenses call
378-9330. (C-2t-145-p)
Poolside Williamsburg Apt., 2 bd.
furnished townhouse need to sublet
for the summer call after 5 during the
week 372-8716. (C-st-145-p)
HELP WANTED
Looking for mother to take care of 3
children In her home while on
vacation' following graduation. If
Interested please call 372-3846.
(E-st-142-p)
SUMMER JOBI See the US as a ramp
hand for the world's greatest auto
thrill show. For Information call
373-1247. (E-st-143-p)

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///////////////////////////////////////////////////
I 1970 m
seminole
I is here!
//////////////////////////////////////////////////
wfc'/Z'///, p *ck up your book today through
Wyy/,l'/,', Friday, on the north side of the '///////M
Wy/Zw Second F,oor JWRU JWRUWL'//////,
WL'//////, JWRUWL'//////, A limited number of books are still '////////I
/////// ////////
mC'//////, on sale for six dollars. Bring your '///////Jm
checkbook. '//////s*m
WL"/////////////, 10 a.m. 3 p.m. "///////////////flm,
ty/////////////"////"/////////////"/////////////ym

HELP WANTED
Co-ed wanted room and board In
exchange for domestic duties. Call.
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
Need full time saleslady for ladles
retail department. Some experience
preferred. Pay according to ability.
For Interview apply In person at
Silverman's, 225 W. University Ave.
(E-4t-143-p)
Need a job? All routes student
operated. Charles Chips Home
Delivery service potato chips,
pretzels, cookies, 376-6943.
(E-10t-137-p)
Waitress, Coney Island Rest. 210 SE
First St. 372-9288 Must be 21. Full
time. (E-4t-141-p)
YMCA day camp counselors needed
June 15th to July 29th approx. S7O a
week those qualiflng for work-study
preferred call Jerry Erkert 378-8533.
(E-4t-144-p)
SUMMER JOBS Jacksonville
Gainesville Miami S3OO per month
salary plus bonus Reitz Union rm
118 Wed May 27 330 pm.
(E-st-145-p)
AUTOS
>£X;XvX;^
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission Is a winner
tool TRY ITI Gbddlng and Clark 2nd!
.Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (d-135-ts-c)

Page 16

The Florida Alligator, Thursday. May 21.1970

AUTOS
rXrX^XrXr^XwXrX^rrrX^rXvvl'X-lvX-:
1968 TRIUMPH GT6 British racing
green, wire wheels, luggage rack,
17,000 miles call 372-2135 after 6
pm. (G-st-145-p)
MG Midget 65 MKII wire wheels,
WW tires, Excellent paint and top.
G ood Economical transportation.
376-0681. (G-lt-145-p)
196 9 BMW 1600 new engine,
stlckshlft, blue w/ black Interior.
Make offer. Call 372-6474 after 2
pm. (G-3t-144-p)
69 Camaro automatic radio warranty
going overseas must sell. Call Louis
376-7098. (G-st-145-p)
64 Chevy Impala conv. VB,
Autotrans power steering. Good
mechanical condition. Make offer,
376-4165 after 5. (G-st-143-p)
Distinctive 1968 AMX. 390, 4-speed,
air, stereo tape, other extras. Must
sell, going camping $2300. Call
376-1853 evenings. (G-st-140-p)
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy dean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
1967 Opel, A/C, Excellent
Condition, Call Joel 378-9758 or
378-2401 or see at 1113 S.W. Ist ave.
(G-st-143-p)
1960 Falcon, radio, heater, new tires,
repainted, engine work. Cheap
dependable transportation. Excellent
condition. 376-2909 after 5:30.
(G-st-141-p)
1969 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN 9,000
miles, excellent cond. 1 owner,
visiting faculty member, $1,500 Call
373-2990 before 10 am or after 7
pm. (G-st-141-p)
64 2-door auto Plymouth; good
cond; very dean; new battery; good
tires; radio; trailer hitch; S4OO cash;
Ollendorff 392-3611 / 376-0921.
(G-st-144-nc)
Ford 1962, Air, R & H, 4 dr, six,
white, $350, VW Bug, 1968, Air, R &
H, Sunroof, Extres, Excellent car
$1,530, Best Offer Buys, Call
372-2303. (Q-3M44-P)
1967 Bulck Sun Crusler wagon radio
AC power steering and brakes
chrome wheels excellent condition
2295 Call 378-0070 after 6:00.
(G-3t-145-p).
:-:-x-X!X-:-xXvXWXrX^^:->^:-:.
CO-EDS, FacliM Hair removed forever
fast low coat gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologlst 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
Groovy Saluki (Persian Greyhound)
needs a home for the summer and
foster parent while >*m overseas
Worth $75 to me to find a loving home.
Call 376-4945. (J-st-144-p)
Sex and the spirit In the sky. A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters In
Union Aud. May 21 7:30 pm
FREE FUN INTERESTING FREE
FREE ********* (J-st-141-p)
Free fruit Juice for *ny campus
policeman who comes to the front of
Tlgert without his gun on we love
you but not your guns The hunger
strikers. (J-141-6t-p)
k
GIRL needed for cooking and light
housekeeping In exchange for room
and board In luxurious apt! Call
376-4863 after 11 p.m. (J-3M45-P).

PERSONAL
Is sex love? Find out at A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters In Union Aud.
on May 21 at 7:30 pm.lt's FREE
AND FUN!! (J-st-141-p)
3 cute kittens for free. Potty trained,
clean, and fun. Call John 372-4408
after 5. (J-lt-144-p)
TO MY INVISIBLE Frlehd, It was a
great time. Always look out for the
little people and dont let your
Invisible friends get wet. Can I be one
too? Thanks for all. (J-2t-144-p)
ILMEC. (J-st-143-p)
Will a turquoise camlgras dog inhabit
room no. 5 at the SPE House next
year? Chow. (J-lt-145-p)
SOVIET UNION. Driving and
Camping 10 weeks, $1,350. Includes
air and all expenses. A. Upson; 2
Garden Terr., Cambridge, Mass
02138 or call (collect) 617-547-1127.
(J-6t-142-p)
Will the chick who was handing out
copies of Probe at the Super show &
wearing blue Jean bells & a black &
white swimsuit top pi. call 378-1998.
(J-2t-145-p)
CALENDAR QUEEN: No matter
what happens tonight, there's only
room for one No. 1 In my life. All
my love to you no. 1 forever,
sandbar. (J-lt-145-p).
To "The Drummer," Your sound
leaves me "Feelln Alright. Thanks.
(J-3t-144-p)
Today is the 2397th anniversary of
Platos birth. All Lovers of Wisdom
are asked to observe the occasion by
cogitating on the Form of the Good
for several hours. "Nothing In mortal
life Is worthy of great concern."
Republic, 604 C. (J-lt-145-p).
Need to get your stuff up North? We
are renting a truck and will take
anything you want between here and
Hartford, Conn. Need to know this
week. Call 378-6107. Ask for Brad or
Rich. WILL TAKE BIKES.
(J-St-145-p).
When the rain came they ran to hide
their heads. Will the chivalrous guy
who gave me his hat during the rain
at the Super Show, call Unda,
392-9647 and Ill return It.
(J-2t-145-p).
David Sex Is beautiful. Lets learn
together. A Bridge Over Toubled
Waters. Union Aud. on May 21 at
7:30 pm Free Mary (J-st-141-p)

I: IBT : I
I V|M fc AST :|
I \||V| yr Streisand *I
|: 'ftRA STREISAND OMAR SHARIF ; I
I ->\v(Q)n v< FUNNY ART
I PLUS CO-HIT ; I
IHJi II MJi 11 *Ji i| ill B
iMHAfeHppypHHipUl
BT*T , ,. , ? Sj .' ,| PH 372-9523 B

Florida Fencers Inc.
demonslralion
today at IKIO
Union Colonnade
Touche!
spontofd by th JWRUnion

PERSONA t
Happiness is Twlnsl! Wappy, Happy
20th to my Guys R and R All Love
Sharon
LOST & FOUND
FOUND: Suzuki motorcycle key.
Call 378-4676. (L-3M44-NC)
Lost mixed shepard pup white tip on
tall near NW llth Ave. Call
372- (L-4t-144-p)
FOUND: Sandals with initials
D LA-picked up by mistake at
Saturdays Celebration. Call
373- (L-3M44-NC)
Marsha Sex isnt the only thing I
love you tool Meet me at A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters In Union Aud.
May 21 at 7:30 pm me. (J-st-141-p)
Grad student Needs Bread.
Experienced Accurate Typist. .45 per
page Call Lorrle 372-7973.
(M-Bt-140-p)
STEREO TAPES $4.00 very high
quality selection of 200 albums or
transfer from own order blank and/or
information, Sound & Cinema
Corporation P.O. Box 1064 Eau
Gallle, Fla. (M-st-142-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pick-up delivery 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-143-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone*
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
AT THE COPY CENTER
*EfcOQRAPHY 5 cor* 6*o i cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)
Are you fumbling In the dark? A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters will
turn you on! Union Aud. May 21
7:30 prn FREE (M-st-141-p)



"Super-Right" Freshly Ground Special!
CHUCK 79*
Frozen
H!** Allgood Sugar Cured Sliced Speciall
Chef Boy-Ar-Dee Frozen (w/Sausage 69c, w/Pepperoni 79c)
Froitn Dr
mimhm^rWfM
Copeland's Delicious Pure Pork Capfn John's Frozen SHRIMP J IJ Bag Sausage ...... 69' Cocktail ...3-I* 0 fSjSaM>**U**J&
Swift's Premium Frozen (White & Dark) Quick Frozen(for your Pet) f [
Turkey Roast ..£ $ 2 89 PetPac % 29* j£jpifflV A JjHfc
Jane Parker Delicious Extra Special; r^t_^Lu
PINEAPPLE PIES a J7
POTTEDMUMS^r^^^HffiSs
At A&P you save two ways... 4fc
r 1 1 ; : - 3-23-70 ] _^ew*> 'w? I'
~ Woy74 I
low /oit 1 prices plus Plaid Stamps H^.

Thursday, May 21,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

I. Th# Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 21,1970

K Get up to GOO extra
*"'*-;M S & H Green Stamps
R/ |j||D| I y \W *- ( /h Coupons 1 & 3 are worth 400 stamps on a purchase of S2O through $24.99.
rII nil A IH V / coupons 2& 3 are worth 500 stamps on a purchase of $25 through $29.99.
.f-ilrlPld'. #jDl R\ markets /A \ 7 Coupons 1, 2 & 3 are worth 600 stamps on a purchase of $30.00 or more.
iti fpwuxT Rhixj
1 0SMj3iaa te E^r|
r IPHhI tP BALLPEN OF k.wffin.BK
3M§ BARGAINS P=E(
*Wmm is SrflL FLVfWG HIGH 1
Beauty oflitk Wpectak J I ' cm rrj>
Mvr Alka-SeHzer J
Rath's Black Hawk Flavorful 9 M3OO EXTRAS
Sliced Bacon ;J. b : 79* 1 green stamps |
Armour's Star Nutritious Sliced H .. M rck*. totaling SIS.OO to SIO.OO P
1 BU#AH JL A \ 4U Hits coupon may also be used in combiiutiofl with other igl
VVrVee fce wWI ### lb. Qx S& H Gr*#n stamp Coupons IB this ad tttt litf jfe,
Copeland's Tasty Smohed
Braunschweiger 49*
Hot Begs i£ 69*
Oolicious Imported
Danish Salami 15: *1 J
Tarnow Wieners 'i 49*
Florida
Seafood treat. Medium
Premium
Inspected Shipped, D&D, Fresh not Frozen, \l oWslr X
USDA Grade A g/Sw* Watty Wept.
Swift's Premium Meaty (with ribs) f A
Fryer Breasts ..>.59*
Swift's Premium Tasty Ar.to.rt Ml,. Wlsc-al.. oc cto.
gm _ p||c Pimento Cheese Spread 53*
Fryer Thighs 59 * * swifts premium proten govt.
~-.>5...- -.. > w '!?!** 65 INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE
Drumsticks ... 59* ariM ;;: 2 ** ILlrJdjliPJiHj^l^lttVMjllJl
Swift's Premium Tasty BiSCUitSooeoooeoo.ee. * 31* Swift's Premium Bone-In
mwO A (Sw*tmilk. Outt.rmilk. Ovtter.Tastiii') m mm ba
Fryer Wings .. 39* ?h.;;.spread..... 3 m Pot Roast 79*
Qy /Tt 44 Tlh (Pimento, Ollo, Plneepplel Swift's Premium Boneless
swift-. Premium r qJt at ept. (Qur Weflcatetten %*. Imperial Roast .99*
Smoked Daisies ..99< MMiosuef.rsf -..,,..,.
22" *-* oo* Boot Roast .I,^l
BrOWII Ml t C D^l Shrift's Premium Sliced LlmO SUpTOmO 49* ChlflCk CtGMIrC 9AC
Wafer Thin Meats u; 35* Macaroni Salad > e... 39* #ib



Libby's Tansy-Flavored
Tomato Juice 29*.
SAVE 4Rc, Libby's Bartlett I INCREDISLE eature (May 21 thru 27) 1
Pear Halves 4 :r s l oE IrPHiiiwl
SAVE 16. Libby's Fruit g X
Cocktail 4" $ i kibaJ
Golden Corn 5 *1 Ihu , 2l
111 .3 v ou may buy 1 P 1 *** l
lOc-off label. Dishwasher Detergent <1 iwaii
_ m m 1 h purchi* oi i thru Wed. May 27
Cascade o9*
Garden Peas. 5 WNERWARE
SAVE 25c, Libby's Cot W \\ \ 1
Green Beans. 5 "" $ l |(OS§§I
SAVE 17c, Spanish, Rib Roast, Drumstick, 1 -'/ CC J 1 We reserve
Garden Medley, Fried ft /^' E \ j I
f: 3 - $ l HOW *;'*
1 QtTIP llmit quantities
SAVE 4c, Heinz Condensed
Tomato Soup 10*
SAVE 10c, Jif Regular or Crunchy
Peanut Butter 39*
% SAVI l6c Swi,t '* Pr m
Luncheon Meat.... 49*
\ SAVE
SAVE 16c, Lipten's
I A I Instant Tea % 99*
V 4k A J SAVE Kralt's Reg., Smoked, or
V m / Bar-B-Cue Sauce .. Lr 39*
SAVE 6c, Apple Keg
Lady Rotty
Sesame'Snacks X ViS
KeebTer Cookies 'X 53' WEklfc
1I j \\jj if p UBi
SDT j f
Mirada f
Chunk Tuna /)nmPmiiut lam
Plain or lodized
Limeade er Jjl
Lemonade 6 t.V. 89 c doz. AU y M
Prazen
Cheete, Holloway Novae No. Potatoes B
Baked Potato 39' Red BIiSS 10 £ 79*
Cool Whip r 59' !£-' Fj.rM~.~w.
L-,, Yellow Squash a 19*
Cream Pies 3 pks *1 Tasty Florida-Grown
NTbtoscSr:^... -x 29* Zucchini Squash ~. 19* *ttla
l p n{ Tender Florida-Grown r M.
pw Wept. White Squash 19*
Kraft's Mivieram ov a*. Soled-PeHact Florida [
?££r* % ' w Cucumbers 3-25* f^IUK
Marshmallow C 23* Ir.,Uun* Fresh Florida A
Marshmallows .. X a.- Orange Juice 69*

PUBLIX

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. University Avenue of 34th Street

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1014 N. Main Street
Store hours 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat

GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th StrMt

Thursday, May 21,1970, Tha Florida Alligrtor,

L FREE! .0
THIS COUPON IS GOOD FOR ONE FREE
ENVELOPE OF NESTEA ICED TEA MIX
1.7 OZ. AT ANY PUBLIX MARKET
limit one please
dapira. W.d. May 27. 1*70)
0 WORTH [S
200 "M
on the purchase of
Giant Ajax
with coupon 49*
without coupon, 69f
(txyirat Wad.. May 17, 1*70)
EXTRA iF^J
WITH TMIS COUPON ANI PUICMASI Os
(Skip Cleaner
27 oz. can $7.15
or Skip Soalor
27 oz. can $1.49
1 llayira. Wad.. May 17. I*7e)
EXTRA
wWGreenStampspgj
I Comstock Boon Salad
3-#303 cans $1.17
2. Iliytm Wad.. May 17. 1*70)
Ifllll^GreenStamps^^
IStouffer's Lasagne
Casserolo
30 oz. pkg. $2.19
3. (laplre* Wad.. May 17. I*7*)
EXTRA iP s ^!
gig
>
12c-off label
Dry Ban Anti-Perspirant
4 oz. can 93c
4, dxpira. Wad., May 17, 1*70)
EXTRA
[bJ
Colgate
i; Dental Cream
]| 6.75 oz. tube 79c
j! 5. (lapiret Wad., May 17, 1*70)
EXTRA
*WGreenStampsP|
WlfM THIS COUPON AMP PUICMAtI Ol BhiiaMi
Breakfast Club
Corn Oil Margarine
1 lb. ctn. 39c
A <
(lupiros Wad., May 27, 1970) <
EXTRA EXTRAjWSiwnStampsfppj
jWSiwnStampsfppj EXTRAjWSiwnStampsfppj
> j
Singleton's Frozen
Cooked Shrimp
10 oz. pkg. BSc
i 7. (taplre. Wad May 17. 1*70)
Renuzit Lavender, |
j Pino, Bouquet, Powder Room |
| Air Froshonor 1
j 7 oz. con 49c |
,,r ** I
EXTRA P Ba^ l
dJWGreenStampsfwj
WlfM f MIS COO POO AMP POBCMASC OP Wwidl
Kraft's 1000 Island Dressing ;[
B oz. bet. 41c or
Kraft's Catalina Drossing
8 oz. bet. 43
9. dapirae Wad.. May 07, 1*70)
ifoooaMftMMaLflLMMMeoedMiseesdsonaiediauOijooair

puin

Page 19



The
Florida
Alligator

New Book Takes A Look
As Nashville Music Scene

The Nashville Sound; Bright Lights and Country
Music, by Paul Hemphill.
(Simon and Shuster, $5.95)
From its obscure beginnings among the pickers
and fiddlers of the deep South, country music has
grown into a multimillion dollar popular music
phenomenon reaching fans on at least four
continents.
Paul Hemphill, a former Atlanta newspaperman,
traveled 18,000 air miles, interviewed about 150
people and listened exclusively to country music for
seven months in preparing The Nashville Sound.
The result is an intimate portrait of the country
music world, the stars, institutions, fans and spirit
of the music.
Hemphill captures the Southern idiom without
resorting to dialect. He takes the reader to the
Grand OP Opry in Nashville, on the road with Billy
Anderson and the Po Boys, and behind the scenes
at a taping of the Glen Campbell Good time Hour.
The roots of country music its White Soul
are examined. The great stars etch portraits of
themselves with their own and the authors
revealing anecdotes.
Johnny Cash talks about drugs and prisons; Tex
Ritter remembers the days of the singing cowboy ;
Chet Atkins tells what makes a good country song.
Both country music buffs and curious
non-country listeners will find The Nashville Sound
an interesting portrait of down-home musics
climb to social acceptance and commercial success.
John Battenfeld (UPI)
* *
Going Down, by David Markson.
(Holt, Rinehart & Winston, $5.95)
Going Down is a drama of hopelessness. Its the
story of three Americans, two women and a man
living together in a small Mexican town. They have
alienated themselves from the rest of the world and
offer little resistance to perhaps even encourage
and welcome their ultimate disasters.
The story, told in flashbacks, involves Steve
Chance self-proclaimed poet who thrives on

GATORTOWN
and
La Bonne Vie
Apts.
EXTRA-LOW RATES
FOR SUMMER
Call 378-3457
or
372-1091
Or Come by office
309 SW 16th Ave
Apt 140

lalright folks,!
I tills is!
I the onel
I youve been!
I waiting fori
I FLORIDA I
I quarterly!

... 1 H H JHh 181 Hm;BJHsjhlb mL,, IBmbl

BOOKS'

f t- :
FLAVORFUL ALMOND-FILLED 12-01.
V | Coffee Cake
VI e A>
N f e,ch sy { |
PLAIN OR WITH SESAME, 13-oz.
s French Bread
- Z9
(NO LIMIT)
| DANISH BAKERY S
Gainesville Mall
Special Orders Call 372-3885

intellectual puns and classical illusions and his
two concubines.
One of them is killed, Chance is arrested for the
murder. The next day, he hangs himself.
His second mistress, Fem Winters, bom with a
deformed hand and haunted by feelings of
inadequacy since childhood, is the sole survivor of
the trio. She is, one character observes, beautiful
even with the deformity or is she beautiful because
of it?
She becomes a prostitute, lives with and supports
a man who seems little short of a moron, and spends
her spare money on art supplies to paint only pietas
always bearing the faces from her past.
The book is dramatic, suspenseful and at times
obscure.
Carolyn A. Bowers (UPI)
* *
Reason Awake Science for Man, By Rene
Dubos.
(Columbia University Press $6.95)
Prof. Dubos efforts are to awaken reason in all of
us for the purpose of so shaping the development of
science and technology that the future will be a
willed one.
Reason is only a beginning. Hence he lacks
specifications. This distinguished scientist and
popularizer of scientific thought sees us as poised
between passive acceptance of scientific technology
for its own sake, violent rejection of it or conscious
use of it for some ultimate concern.
With reason, man still has a chance to control
his destiny by imposing a direction on the scientific
endeavor and, in particular, by consciously planning
the scientific technology which will shape the
modern world.
Reason has its chance to work because scientists
are confused and there is social ferment among
them. Scientists talk of pure science and science
for sciences sake alone, yet they direct their efforts
toward the popular appeal that assures financial
support.
As readers of Prof. Dubos previous books know,
he reasons well, in felicitous and simple prose.
Appropriately for a man of his academic standing, it
is an intellectual exercise but a charming one.
Delos Smith (UPI)

Page 20

Useless Facts About
Obscure TV Star
By VERNON SCOTT
UPI Hollywood Correspondent
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Susan Seaforth, a regular on Days of Our
Lives, leads an off-center life in a 27-room mansion with her mother
and grandmother in an old section of Los Angeles.
Built in 1902, the house has seven bedrooms but only four baths.
THERE ARE FOUR separate staircases, Philippine mahogony
panelling and stained glass windows in every room of the three-storied
dwelling.
Susan, a buxom and beautiful brunette, says all the rooms are put
to use. Shes lived there for 25 of her 26 years. Guest bedrooms are
frequented by friends and visiting members of the family. The house
has a library, sewing room and music room.
The kitchen is one of the largest chambers in the house with a
special bakery room to one side and a butlers pantry on the other.
If nothing else, the huge abode keeps the Seaforth females busy
cleaning and scrubbing. They have no domestic help except for a
gardener.
SUSAN, her mother and grandmother entertain frequently,
usually at dinner parties in which all three take part in the kitchen.
Recently Susan has become a sewing buff. She is determined to
make most of her own clothes. Toward that end she has sewing bees
at home, inviting in friends to encourage them to sew, too.
Susans day begins at 5:30 with the alarm clock clanging away. She
rises, fixes herself a skimpy breakfast, then drives the freeways almost
15 miles to NBC-TV studios in Burbank, arriving at 7 ajn. to begin
rehearsals.
By 3:30 in the afternoon her work day is complete.
But instead of returning to her roomy manse, Susan goes shopping
for Oriental rugs, browses in antique shops or visits art museums.
SEVERAL AFTERNOONS a week she attends a private art class in
the San Fernando valley, an hours drive from home.
For the past three years Susan has been the steady date of a
television newsman who owns his own airplane, which accounts for
Miss Seaforth being one of the most traveled actresses in Hollywood.
With her beau at the control of the single engine aircraft, Susan
takes off almost every weekend for one or another resort in the
western states.
AS MUCH AS travel, Susan delights in her home.
I sometimes change bedrooms, she explains. For a long time I
lived in one bedroom with nine walls. They were all sharp pointed and
I thought it might affect my personality.
RAZZLE DAZZLE
/ /f / BIG SLEEVES, LONG COLLARS,
'' BODY SHAPES ... FROM $17.00
YOUNG AMERICAN SHOP
208 W. UNIV. AVE.
GAINESVILLE, FLA.

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 21,1970



Come To The Rocks And Be Gentle

(EDITORS NOTE:
Entertainment, like God, takes
many and varied forms. There
are many noisy things which
entertain us. I guess they do it
by forcefully taking our heads
away from what troubles us. But
there are quiet things that
entertain too, things which
gentle us by speaking to us in an
easy voice. This is about a
quietly entertaining thing. DV)
By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
We made bets in the dark
about where the sun would
come up, the actual point on the
horizon where it would first rise
out of the water. I guessed too
far north and she guessed too far
SOUth. :
Ive been up all mght a lot of
times. I suppose we all have. The
sunrise after a night of reading
or driving or walking can be a
desolate and depressing thing. Its
subtlety and slowness dont
convince us that there is a real
end to the dark.
BUT THE SUNRISE at the
beach is a different thing and the
sunrise at a beach just south of
Marineland can be so much.
Now theres entertainment for
you.
The beach is about an hour
and a half or so drive from here
byway of Palatka and a road
out of Palatka and then AIA,
the highway along the Atlantic.
To make the sunrise and the nice
things before it, you have to
leave here about five in the
morning. Leaving at that time, it
will still be pretty dark when
you make it to the beach and
youll get to see the whole show.
I dont think the beach Im
.talking about has a name. My
family has always called it The
Rocks and others Ive come
across who know about it call it
The Rocky Beach.
It has rocks on it. Thats why
they call it that. I dont know
why or really care why, but
there is a formation of coquina
rocks about 50 yards wide and
about two miles long starting a
little south of Marineland and
running until it ends (I already
said it was about two miles
long.)
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ft HAPPENS EWrY MORNING

? $ % V g :* * jr*.
THE ROCKS run out into the
water like the backbone of an
animal and some incredible
things happen to the waves
around them. The dry rocks all
have round holes in them (Some
are big enough to sit in. You
should) and theres always all
kinds of trapped pieces of wood
and shells and things. There are
fifteen thousand birds there at
any given moment. Dolphins
often too.
Before I get back to talking
about the much-heralded and
long-awaited sunrise (actually it
should be Sunrise or even
SUNRISE), I wanted to tell you
exactly how to get there.
Drive out the Hawthorne
Road (the extension of
University Ave.) beyond
Hawthorne and Interlochen and
the other little towns to Palatka.
Drive on through the Pulp Mill
City, across the bridge and turn
left at the first opportunity past
the cattle auction hall. Thats
the road that leads to Hastings,
the Potato Capital of the Free
World. Drive on past Hastings,
across U. S. 1 and to Crescent
Beach. Turn right at AIA at
Crescent Beach and drive south
about a mile past Marineland.
Theres a deserted motel on the

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beach where you can park.
Youre there.
THE WATER is remarkably
flat in the early morning. Its
gray color adds to the feeling of
flatness about it. To say its like
glass is an understatement. Its as
smooth as a babys eye. The
only thing smoother is the flight
of the gulls that drop into the
eve of a wave and ride there,
looking for food, wrapped up
and kept dry by some kind of
magic.
But you cant see any of that
at first. When you first get there
its dark as hell but not really
dark enough to make the stars
important or even a full moon.
That early in the whole thing
you can only sense the quietness
and flatness of the water and the
birds and the fish that are under
there, sleeping with their eyes
open.
And then the awakening
begins. The birds get louder first.
Fish begin to come out of the
water, flying like birds. The
waves break like glass. If you are
ready at that point, you can take
a seat in one of the unexplained
round holes in the shellrock.
Believe that it is all there for
you.
The clouds get their bottoms

lit up first making them look
like things on fire. Maybe its
trite to say that they look like
ships with sails. God knows
enough bad poets have said that,
but hell its true. They do look
like that and they look like
animals with hair on fire and like
many other wild and spiritual
things.
THE SUN RISES finally, like
an eye coming over a fence. The
sky changes color a hundred
times, suddenly each time. And;
consequently, the water changes
color and your face will too.
Blue and green go together so
well at that hour.
All this takes about a half
hour to do what it does. What a
dynamite half hour.
And it doesnt have to end
with the sunrise. Its probably
dangerous to swim where the
rocks are but theres a clear
beach south of the rocks and
that would be a nice place to
stick your skin in the water. If
you get to one of the isolated
spots early enough, you can

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And its the college kids who drive the
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This didnt seem quite sporting. So Volks Volkswagen
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The Ghia scrimps and saves on gas. You
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Thursday, May 21,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

swim naked which is very cool.
Illegal probably, but very nice.
Its a real nice place to picnic,
too. Theres a grill about
halfway down the strand of
rocks but its a grim place.
Although the place holds such
incredible natural beauty and is
very rustic and youd think
anyone could know that the
goofs who built the pavillion the
grill is under made it out of
concrete in a Danish modem
style and painted the whole
thing turquoise. Its such a sore.
Those are the same kind of
engineers wholl probably pull
all the rocks out in a few years
and throw a couple of motels
up.
So, go why dont you go. Its
really very nice. It happens every
morning. Its free and freedom
and easiness are there to be
found somehow. Youll come
away wanting to be a bird or a
dolphin but thats good. We all
need to dream of flying and
sleeping underwater with our
eyes open.

Page 21



The
Florida
Alligator

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FRATBACK TOM KENEDY
... Hank Salzler (Beta) scrambles
"^AK^HESOMNUT^R/V^nT^
SAVE!
baldwin^^A
1 STARKE, FLORIDA I
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER \|f
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT I

JOB APPLICATION
AND
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TAKEN ONE DAY
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#W #W-11^6-1657
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' '

m

GATOR SPORTS

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TOM KENNEDY
STEVE SPURRIER
... Throws under pressure

Stars Shine Over Greats

By BOBTEBOW
Alligator Writer
Hank Salzler lead the iFratemity All Stars to an
early lead, then held on for a 26-20 upset victory
over the Gator Greats Tuesday night under the stars
at Beta Field.
Ex-basketball player Mike Rollyson (SAE) shined
for the Stars as he caught seven Salzler (Beta) tosses
for three of their four touchdowns and one of their
two extra points.
THE ALL STARS, coached by Dr. Robert Allen
of the Intramurals Dept., scored all three times they
got the ball in the first half, but it was their defense
that gave them the lead, holding a Steve Spurrier-led
team to one touchdown in four tries. The defense
was lead by the tenacious play of Mike Reider
(ATO), Paul Mittman (TEP), and John Geiger
(SPE). It was Reider and Gieger who made great
individual efforts, breaking up the Greats last
attempt to score in the first half. Reider and
Mittman were named the outstanding defensive
players of the game. Salzler and Rollyson won
honors as the games most outstanding offensive
players.

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CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

\. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 21,1970

Page 22

The Gator Greats were no easy victim as Spurrier
completed 38 passes in 56 attempts for 321 yards
and three TDs. The leading receiver of the game
was Los Angeles Rams Larry Smith, who caught
eight passes for 104 yds. and two PATs. Paul
Maliska, Gene Peek, and Randy Jackson each
grabbed six passes for the talent-laden team. Steve
Tannen, playing good defense, came in for Maliska
and caught a 37 yd. pass, when Maliska collided
with Reider and bruised his calf muscle.
ALL THE proceeds from the 1,200 attendance
will go to Palmer King Day Care Center, an annual
IFC charity. Coach Allen remarked, Much credit
should be given the ex-varsity athletes, some of
whom are paid professionals, for their willingness to
take the time out to play for charity.
Coach Allen said we had a great team effort, and
they had great individual effort. Salzler said, Our
game plan worked perfectly, we shut off their long
passes and threw short, hoping to get an early lead.
Salzler threw 44 times completing 28 for 219 yards.
His percentage was .636 as compared to Spurriers
.678.

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor



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ANDY NORTH
... First team
3*m mm
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DAVID BARNES
... Second team
Run For Fun
A 12-minute, 30-minute and
one-hour run will be held Friday
at 6:30 pju. at Florida Track for
anyone interested in comparing
their conditioning with Major
Coopers conditioning charts in
his book Aerobics.
The 12-minute run will go
firsthand then the 30-minute
and one-hour runs will go next
together. Runners will be
allowed to drop out after
30-minutes or continue for the
complete hour if they can make
it.
The big electric clock at the
south end of the track will be
running to give everyone a
continuous check on their
elapsed time. Men and women of
any age are welcomed to
participate and there are no
requirements or obligations. Just
come and run.
Cupid Practice
Budding young Robinhoods
get their chance Saturday to
prove their skill in the UF
Archery Clubs Campus Open
Meet.
All UF students, faculty and
employes may enter into their
respective classes and compete
for awards.
Equipment will be furnished
by the Intramural Department
for all interested archers.
Practice time is at 9:30 am. and
official competition begins at 10
ajn.

Sophs North, Barnes All-SEC

By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Writer
Sophomores Andy North and
David Barnes were named to the
All-Southeastern Conference
golf team, that was announced
Monday by SEC Commissioner,
A. M. (Tonto) Coleman.
North, who finished sixth in
the SEC Golf Championships at
Calloway Gardens last week, was
named to the first team by the
coaches of the 10 SEC schools.
NORTH IS on the talented
first squad of golfers that
include Tommy Valentine of
Georgia, who won the SEC
individuals championship,
two-time All-American Allen
Miller of Georgia, Jimmy
Wittenberg of LSU, Vaughn
Moise of LSU, and Tennessees
Mickey Mabry.
Barnes was named to the
second team All-SEC with Rick
Sirmon of Alabama, Tonny
Evans of Louisiana State, Gary
Holloman of Georgia, Bill
McDonald of Auburn and
George Cadle of Tennessee.
Barnes said, I am very happy
to be named to the team and it
is a real honor. When asked
what he thought of the

.V/AViViVfVAVAVtV/AVfVtV/tVtV.V/.V.V/.V.V.V.v.w.W-W-*-*-* .
j Run For Ribbons
;: The annual Florida Amateur Athletic Union Track an 4, Field £
j Meet for juniors and seniors and men and women will be $
>: Saturday at 4 p.m. at Florida Track.
> All amateurs, including college trackmen, are eligible to !:
ij compete for ribbons and medals and a chance to qualify for the
regional and national AAU meets.
: Gator Coach Don Hester, chairman of the Florida AAU, said
: the meet is also beneficial to the women and girls because it :
: offers them a chance to compete against other top competition. :
: This is particularly true for women training for possible :
: Olympic competition.
: The senior division is for men and women 19 years of age and
J older, and the junior division is for all competitors under 19.
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EXPIRES AT THE END OF THIS MONTH. YOU HAVE 6 MONTHS TO PICK UP YOUR
CHICKEN!
A STRAIGHT SHOT FROM THE UNIVERSITY QN 2ND AVENUE

championship play Barnes
replied, I thought we could
have played better than we did.
The last round hurt us.
Everybody seemed to be off, we
just had a bad day.
BARNES SAID, We are all
looking forward to the NCAA
tournament, everybody is going
to work real hard and we have a
chance to win it. We are just as
good as any team in the SEC and
our chances are as good as
Georgia and LSU.
Coach Buster Bishop
commented, As far as the team
played in the SEC every member
had one bad round out of three.
This hurts the team and you
cannot compete in a top
tournament or most any
tournament and expect to win.
Thats why we finished third in
the SEC, we did not have any
consistency to our play. You
cannot expect to get into high
class competition with
inconsistent scores.
When asked his feelings on the
selection of North and Barnes to
the first and second All-SEC
teams Bishop said, Andy
deserves it, he is one of the
stronger golfers in the SEC.
David has never been more

serious about golf then he is
now. I am very pleased over
both of their selections.
Bishop said, The team now
consists of several groups and ir
we can bring the groups together
to play a consistent four rounds

I Intramurals I
55
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiin By Steve Rohan iiiimi
A dark gloomy cloud befell the Beta Theta Pi house when it was
realized that after leading the Orange League for practically the whole
year, the Pikes had won the Presidents Cup.
There are two related maxims that relate to the loss. The first is
that the first game counts just as much as the last.
THIS WOULD provide some consolation to the Beta softballers
who lost the big game when the Presidents Cup was within their
grasp.
Indeed, the loss of the Presidents Cup might be placed on the
bowling, basketball, handball, and tennis teams, each of which won
only one game.
Another classic line quoted from an old intramural philosopher is
the team that wins the Cup has got to win the big ones.
THE BETAS DID win one big one, swimming, in which they came
from behind to win the championship. Outstanding performances in
golf and track can also go on record as big ones.
Losses, however, in the football finals and the volleyball semis must
go on record as big ones that werent won. Os course the loss to TEP
in softball had to be classified as the biggest one because all the
marbles were on the table and the championship was up for grabs.
Then of course there was the break for the Pikes that the Betas had
no control over. The Pikes, out of the running in golf, found an
ineligible player on a qualifying team which sent the Pikes into the
finals of golf and enabled them to pick up 30 additional points.
IN ALL, A good deal of credit goes to the Betas. They started off
the year like champs finishing first, second, and third in the opening
three sports.
Experts figured a complete collapse would follow but the Betas
managed to hang in and very well could have won the Cup.
In the end, they managed only one sports championship,
swimming. If the Betas would have won the Cup, it would have been
in stark contrast to previous years when the Cup winners had won
from two to four championships.
No one fraternity was able to dominate the others this year as in
the past. This was due most probably to a more balanced and talented
Orange League as a whole. Statistics in the individual sports bear this
out.

Thuraday, May 21,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

we can win the NCAA
tournament in Columbus. What I
want is a solid group, we have
been playing with our ups and
downs and if we can straighten
this out in the next thirty days
we will be in fine shape.

Page 23



Page 24

IrThe Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 21,1970

Huff Turns Coach, Clay Can t Fight

SAM HUFF gave up the
violent world of playing football
and politics Tuesday to become
a full-time assistant coach for
the Washington Redskins.
Redskin coach and general
manager Vince Lombardi said
Huff would be in charge of the
teams linebackers.
Huff, former all-league star
for the New York Giants and the
Redskins, came out of
retirement last season to be a
player-coach under Lombardi.
On May 12, he was defeated in a
Democratic primary for a West
Virginia congressional
nomination.
* *
THE STH U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals in New Orleans
refused Wednesday to enlarge
the bail of Cassius Clay so the
former heavyweight boxing
champion could fight champion
Joe Frazier at Toronto, Canada.
Attorneys for Clay had asked
the court to enlarge the fighters
bail to SIOO,OOO so he could
travel to Toronto in July for a
period of 18 hours. The fight
with Frazier was to take place at
the Maple Leaf Gardens, home
of the Toronto Hockey Team.
It is the order of the court
that the enlarging motion ... is
hereby denied, the appeals
court said in a brief order.
Clays attorneys had
requested that federal marshals
accompany the fighter during his
entire stay in Canada to ensure
his return to the U.S.
Clay has been fighting his
conviction for refusing to be
drafted into the Army.
* *
THE DENVER BRONCOS
announced Tuesday they have
signed former Washington
Redskin placekicking specialist
Charlie Gogolak to a free agent
contract.
Gogolak, brother of the New
York Giants Pete Gogolak,
kicked 22 of 24 field goal
attempts and added 39 extra
points in his first year of pro ball
at Washington in 1966. He was
third highest scorer in the
National Football League that

p 1
Baseball

AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 25 10 .714
New York 20 17 .485 6
Boston 16 17 .485 8
Detroit 15 17 .469 B Vi
Washington 15 20 .429 10
Cleveland 11 20 .355 12
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 24 10 .706
California 11 20 .355 Vi
Oakland 18 19 .486 IVi
Chicago 15 21 .417 10
Kansas City 13 23.361 12
Milwaukee 12 23 .361 12
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 18 16 .529
New York 19 17 .528
St. Louis 17 17 .500 1
Pittsburgh 17 21 .447 3
Philadelphia 14 22 .389 5
Montreal 13 22 .371 SYi
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 28 11 .718
Los Angeles 21 15 .583 SVi
Atlanta 19 16 .543 7
Houston 19 20 .487 9
San Francisco 19 20.474 9 Vi
San Diego 17 23 .425 11%

year.
A leg injury sidelined Gogolak
most of 1967 and he scored only
57 points in 1968. He was
placed on waivers by the
Redskins last season.
Denver coach Lou Saban said
Gogolak, a graduate of Princeton,
will compete with veteran
Bobby Howfield and rookies
Marher Barakat of South Dakota
Tech and Frank Kalfoss of
Montana State for the Bronco
kicking job.
If he can get back to his
1966 form, we have a place for
him, Saban said.
*
FIRST-YEAR manager Frank
Lucchesi warned his Philadelphia
Phillies in a pre-game prep talk
in Pittsburg that the regulars
better start hustling or there
will be a shake-up around here.
The Phillies then went out

You only go around once in life.
So grab for all the gusto you can.
-> Even in the beer you drink.
Why settle for less? Kjjflff
* .v.vXv.%v.v.v.
youre out of beer
RBI jiiiiif
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Tuesday night and beat the
Pirates, 2-0, ending a 10-game
losing streak.
Its just a matter of the older
guys taking some of the pressure
off our kids, Lucchesi said after
the game as he lit up a 60-cent
cigar.
I bought this cigar today
figuring Id smoke it if we won.
If we would have lost Id have
smoked my usual 2-for-15 cent
Tobies s
Chris Short, who said he
pitched his best game of the
season in allowing only four hits,
striking out 10, and walking
none, said Lucchesis pep talk
was low key but produced
desired results.
I think hes right, Short
said. Some of us regulars
needed shaking up. I know I
thought about it when I went
out there tonight. I figured

maybe Id better start producing
or Id lose a starting job.
* *
COLLEGE FOOTBALL could
very well be headed back to the
one platoon system despite
professional influence.
One member of the NCAAs
powerful rules committee, Joe
Zabilski, the New England
football coaching dean at
Northeastern and a newly
elected member of the rules
group, says he expects to have
three or four players going both
ways this fall. He will support a
return to the two-way player in
rules committee sessions.
Its due time we reflected in
college football what
professional football would like
us to do, Zabilski explained.
The pro scouts come to us with
the ruler and the stopwatch to
measure our kids for height and

check them for speed.
But I think we do a
disservice to the players by
limiting them to one-way ball
and the trend is back to one
platoon football. You see it in
high school and you see it in the
smaller colleges and the
professionals.
* *
THE FORMAL TRIAL of
Curt Floods case to overthrow
the baseball reserve clause,
certainly destined to be a long
season, continues today after a
days recess.
It likely will be a year or more
before the final decision is
handed down, since the ruling of
the New York District Court
Judge Irving Ben Cooper will be
appealed by the loser and the
process of appeals is expected to
be followed all the way to the
Supreme Court.