Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
TZofoL
Ad Amtum

Vol 62, No. 144

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FLORIDA FIELD LITTERED
... by Super Show fans
STUDENT DEMANDS CITED
Campus Police Give
Reasons They Quit

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
One UF University Police
Department (UPD) officer who
decided to quit last week said
the student demand to disarm
campus police was one of his
reasons for quitting.
The demand just put the
icing on the cake of general
dissatisfaction with student
treatment of campus police,
according to Norman McElroy.
MICHAEL WHITE, another
officer who quit last week, said
the demand made no difference
to him.
McElroy complained of being
insulted by students while on his
beat and during demonstrations.
Ive been called some names
I never even thought of before,
by men I hadnt even seen

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CLAY PHIPPS
MISS UF FINALISTS

Miss UF ptgNfit finalists and sponsors ara
Carolyn Jonas, no. 1. Kappa Mta; Cynthia Soaps,
no. 4, Haifa Dalti Date; Joanna Mandalt, no. IS,
w- /*.&*>. $

The
Florida Alligator

before, and sometimes by
women, McElroy said.
I WOULDNT mind it if I
deserved it, but ... I was
brought up to know better than
that. I dont talk that way to
anyone, he said.
This treatment came from
only a small minority of
students, but the minority was
being allowed to run the UF in
incidents like the take-over of
Walker Hall, he said.
I thought 1 was working for
the UF. When it gets to the
point where President (Stephen
C.) OConnell and the
administration let 40 or 50
students control the UF, then l
dont want to work for it,
McElroy said.
McELROY SAID he enjoyed
working for UPD, and that his
complaint doesnt go for the

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Omega; Mary Diann Smith, no. 14, Sigma Nu;
Margaret Montgomery, no. 12, Delta Gamma; and
Kedty Dolan, no. & R Bate Phi. Finals wilt bo
fate*! v.

University of Florida, Gainesville

majority of students.
White said he had quit for
reasons that had nothing to
do with student demands. He
had no opinion on whether UF
police should carry guns.
I wasnt there long enough
to be sure whether they needed
them or not, White said.
TOMMY DOWNS of
Micanopy and Tom Smith of
Otter Creek, who also quit last
week, could not be reached for
comment.
Downs will go to a new job
with the State Department of
Natural Resources, according to
UPD Chief Audie Shuler.
Smith, whose official
explanation for quitting was
only personal reasons, may
have takert a job with the beach
patrol at St. Petersburg Beach,
according to White.

Stadium Cleaned
By SGP, AEP;

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
And CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writers
Somebody decided to clean
up the mess on Florida Field left
by more than 8,000 rock fans
Saturday night.
Monday night, brothers of
AEPi fraternity swarmed over
the grass picking up bottles,
paper cups, squashed
watermelons, and bras.
THE PLANTS and Grounds
Department denied lis the use of
their rakes, David Winton,
2UC, president of AEPi, said.
We had to bring our own.
Student Government
CLAY PHIPPS
POLLUTED RIVER
... Gator dugout after show

U.S. Acknowledges
Troops In Laos
WASHINGTON (UPI) The Pentagon acknowledged for the first
time Monday that American troops acting as advisers may have
accompanied South Vietnamese forces on raids inside Laos.
But the Florida White House said there are no American ground
forces in Laos and no change in our activities in Laos.
BOTH STATEMENTS came after South Vietnam Foreign Minister
Tran Van Lam disclosed at a Southeast Asia conference in Jakarta
that his countrys forces have pursued Communist troops into Laos
from time to time.
j*-- It has been an open secret in Vietnam for several years that both
South Vietnamese and American troops have conducted clandestine
guerrilla raids across the Laotian border to intercept enemy supplies
coming down the Ho Chi Minh Trail.
But there has been no public confirmation of this by the United
States or South Vietnam and no acknowledgments until now that
U. S. and South Vietnamese are permitted to enter Laos for any

\ > /

Wednesday, May 20, 1970

Productions (SGP) asked
students to donate one hour of
work on Tuesday to help defray
the 4,000 to $5,000 estimated
cost of cleaning and repairing
the damage.
Being civic minded and
concerned about our actions we
took offense on the position
taken by the newspapers
(Gainesville Sun and St.
Petersburg Times), Winton said.
He pointed out there were no
incidences of violence during the
show.
The St. Petersburg Times
story said Florida Field is a
cavernous garbage dump
following Saturdays so-called
Super Show. A hairy horde of
8,000 hippies completely
destroyed the mint-colored
playing field.
IN REFERRING to Ray
Graves statement
recommending that the Athletic
Association allow no more
spectators on the grass during
events on the field, Winton said,
Florida Field is not only a
place for football players to
meet at the gridiron, but for UF
students to use.
Leonard Tanner, chairman of
SGP, pointed out there were no
fights, no arrests, and that the
crowd was extremely orderly.
The responsibility of
cleaning the stadium is clearly
that of the Athletic Association
as was written into the
contract, Tanner said. iKwas
lack of foresight that large
recepticals were not placed on
the field for trash.
AS NIGHT WAS falling,
picking up the refuse became
difficult. The maintenance men
sat and watched as the fraternity
brothers picked up the trash.
Getting the lights turned on
was difficult. The maintenance
men did not know where to find
(SEE 'CLEANUP' PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 20,1970

Strike Continues,
May End Soon
By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writer
After 200 hours, at 8 a.m. this morning, 48 students are still on the
hunger strike. But there is optimism among the strikers that the strike
can end soon.
A lot of progress has been made, strike spokesman Wayne Hieber
said. There has been a great deal of discussion on the subjects we
have been striking for, and we are hopeful that we can be off the
strike very soon.
TWO OF OUR demands have been met, he said. Technically,
the amnesty demand for the strikers the first week (after the Kent
State slayings) has been met, because according to the university
catalog, students are not required to attend class except in lUC.
Also, the University Senate Steering Committee held an
emergency meeting Monday and they put the Black Student Union
demands on the action agenda for their next meeting May 28, Hieber
said. That means the demands will be discussed and voted on at that
meeting.
The suggestion concerning ROTC will be referred to a committee
which will report by the June meeting so that demand can be voted
on then.:
THE THIRD demand, about guns off campus, has been blown all
out of proportion, Hieber said. We dont want all guns taken from
the police. We just want a situation that would lower the tension
lessen the paranoia.
Actually, the aspect of taking guns away from police was a minor
corollary. The major aspect of the demand was removing all guns from
campus especially in the dorm.
Other strikers report continued help and sympathy from
non-striking students and faculty. Frieda Brown and John Mugar
have been the most helpful people weve had. They deserve some
recognition, Leibovit said.
Sunday seven ministers from various Gainesville churches and an
estimated 70 people from their congregations met in front of Tigert
Hall to offer a prayer for peace.
TUESDAY MORNING 22 members of the Society of Friends
(Quakers) held vigil from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. They meditated or prayed
sitting on the steps of Tigert Hall.
Hunger strikers say the ones who have dropped out of the strike
have done so because they became sick. Two girls who were not
previously anemic have become so since the strike began. One striker
passed out during a gun control meeting Sunday night.
Strikers say they have lost an average of 11 pounds each.

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PHOTOS BY MIKE HENSON
LIQUID DIET
... water, fruit Juices

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when Its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.
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HERE NOW!

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THE CONCERNED STOP AND CHAT

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... with strikers on Tigert lawn

Clean up
pROM PAGE OReT
the switch.
Winton called the University
Police Department and they said
they would send the electrician
to turn on the lights.
At 10:30 p.m., the electrician
finally showed up but he did not
turn the lights on. Finally, he
turned on two small lights.
The brothers left at 11:30
p.m. after finishing the clean up.
TUESDAY AFTERNOON, a
small maintenance crew worked
at picking up small debris left on
the field. They found chicken
bones, some fruit rinds, and
cigarette butts.
They also found that the
turf that Steve Spurrier stood
upon was still there and in
normal condition.

AAs Job
THE ARTICLE in the St.
Petersburg Times was
completely overexaggerated,
erroneous, and unfactual,
Tanner said.
There were no hippie feuds
and no car burnings, he said.
By the time the two big acts
got on there were at least 4,000
free admissions because we had
to open up all the gates in the
stadium when the crowds took
shelter under the stands during
the rain.
And the statement that
those who attended were all
hippies is false, Tanner said.
At least half of the Gator
Football Team was there.
The field now is 60 to 70 per
cent cleaned according to
Tanner. Most of the trash is in
the West stands where bottles
were broken on the concrete
not on the mud in the field.



Special Committee Studies
UPD Gun Control Demand

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
The Committee to Study the
Removal and Control of Guns
on Campus met Tuesday to
further investigate alternatives
open regarding the possession of
guns on the UF campus.
The biggest single problem
confronting the committee is a
general misunderstanding among
campus police, students and
faculty members as to the
purpose of the committee.
THE COMMITTEE consists of
faculty and students on the
campus, appointed jointly by
President Stephen C. OConnell
and Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder.
The express purpose which
the committee fulfills is to
examine and
information, testimony and
recommendations regarding the
control of gun possession on the
UF campus.
A basic misunderstanding
encountered has been in the
suggestion by several students
and members of the campus
police that the committee is
making only one of two
decisions: either to disarm the

Senate Attempts To Quiet FAMU

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
ln an acknowledged move to
quiet unrest at the
predominately black Florida
A&M University, the Senate
permitted introduction as an
emergency measure Tuesday a
resolution strongly supporting
the autonomy and continued
existence of FAMU, adequately
funded.
The resolution, drafted by
Sen. Mallory Horne,
D-Tallahassee, is aimed at
eliminating continued talk of
closing down A&M or merging it
with predominantly white
Florida State University.
A&M STUDENTS marched
on the capitol last session to
urge that their university be kept
in tact. There has been no overt
demonstration this year, but
Home said there is considerable
unrest.
He also said that he
discovered from talks with
officials that it is important that
the resolution clear the
legislature before the weekend.
An appropriations
subcommittee, headed by Rep.
Robert Graham, D-Miami,
proposed in 1967 that A&M be

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Ms. I tip! .9K
RAUL RAMIREZ
... committee co-chairman
campus police or permit them to
function as they have.
COMMITTEE MEMBER
Larry Woldenberg expressed
concern over possible alienation
of campus police. We do not
intend to detract from the role
of the police. We wish to
enhance their duty, not deter
it.
An editorial in Tuesdays
Alligator implied incorrectly
that the committee has called
for and considered disarming

phased out for both academic
and economic reasons. It didnt
get anywhere and there has been
no serious proposal since, but
the rumors persist.
THE BOARD OF Regents has
taken a stand in favor of
continuing the institution, but
Home said while there is any
suspicion of contrary legislative
action, private developers wont

Musical Instruments
Collected By Vets
The UF Veterans Club is collecting brass and percussion
instruments for use by Sunland Training Center students.
Trombones, trumpets, baritones, bass horns, French horns, drums,
cymbals, tambourines, marching bass drum, money and music stands
can be contributed by calling Ron Wohl, 4NR, at 378-3110, Hans
Kirsten, 4BA, at 372-6185 or Dennis Blackblirn, a Sunland Training
Center academic school general music teacher, at 373-1378.
Blackburn described the students as mildly retarded and said, I
was hoping to have a marching band eventually.
Presently five groups averaging seven students each study music
under Blackburn. I could use a lot more kids if I had the
instruments, he said.
Blackburn said music provides an outlet, a release for the
students.
Most of his participants will eventually leave Sunland Training
Center, he said.

campus police. At the close of
yesterdays meeting, the
committee had not brought to a
vote any proposals or
recommendations. Information
is still being considered
according to members of the
committee.
Co-chairman Raul Ramirez
summed up three main feelings
which are agreed upon by
members of the committee,
although no definite
recommendations have yet been
drawn to these ideas.
It is the feeling of the
committee that:
i The housing office enforce
stricter forces than those
presently concerning prohibition
of guns in university housing.
The Interfraternity Council
take measures necessary to see
that guns are not housed in
fraternities.
i Substitution of police
wearing guns at campus
checkpoints be made, replacing
them with unarmed personnel
performing the checking.
The gun control committee
will meet again on Thursday,
possibly making formal
recommendations at that time.

build necessary housing and the
ability of FAMU to attract white
students is hampered.
The black community has a
great deal of pride in this
university, Horne said, winning
unanimous consent to introduce
the resolution, although the
deadline for all but emergency
bill introductions passed a week
ago.

£§mFJ
PAGEANT MOOD
Margaret Montgomery is caught in a soft mood as she plays the
piano in the talent competition of the Miss UF pageant Monday night.
She was selected one of seven finalists who compete tonight.
FROM THE INSIDE: The Florida Speleological Society meets at 7
p.m. in room 362 of the Reitz Union.
GOOD NIGHT: The Music Department presents another Twilight
Concert this evening at 6:45 on the University Auditorium lawn.
RELIGION: Dialogue with a Theologue tonight presents Dr.
Sidney Jourard in the discussion Can a Human Being Be Religious,
at 4 p.m. in room 122 of the Union.
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Wednesday, May 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i, The Florida Alligator, Wad nod ay. May 20,1970

CLAY PHIPPS
LEAPING BEAUTY
... Miss UF contestant Taunya Odell
)
Petition, Uhlfelders Letter Ask
Nixon To End SE Asia War

The signatures of 5,050 UF students have been
placed on petitions to President Nixon pleading for
an end to U. S. involvement in Southeast Asia.
The petitions, accompanied by a letter from
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder, will be sent
to Washington this week.
ORGANIZATION OF interested and concerned
students began during the days following the killings
at Kent State University. During that time, several
tables were kept open at all rally functions in an
effort to exert some positive protest of events
affecting citizens of this country.
Uhlfelders letter asks Nixon to ... consider
these petitions, I hope you will show that efforts of
these students as well as those across the nation

House Passes Vote Referendum

By RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff Writer
The 18-year-old right to vote,
with two referendum proposals
to be placed on the November
ballot, was passed by the Florida
House Tuesday.
The bill still faces the Senate,
but Senate President Jack
Matthews, of Jacksonville, said,
I think its going to pass.
ORIGINALLY the bill was
rejected by the house, but after
a lunch recess and clearing up a
procedural misunderstanding the
proponents of the bill gathered
an 83-33 vote to pass the
measure.
The two referendum
proposals are to cut the voting
age to 18, and the other would
lower the age to 18 and include
all rights and responsibilities of
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adults.
Matthews said the separate
questions on the referendum
would give the Florida electorate
a choice between 18-year-olds
voting ; or 18-year-olds voting,
drinking, making contracts and
participating in parimutuel
wagering.
THE CONTROVERSIAL bill
came out of the House-Senate
Committee yesterday and was

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have not been in vain.
Stress was placed on the need for the President to
focus more attention on the complaints and
suggestions of the nations youth.
THE TEXT OF the petition is a plea for ceasing
killings, in Southeast Asia and in our own borders.
But the time has come to do more than mourn
individually. We have joined together here to make
our grief known to your, Mr. President...
Uhlfelder expressed hope for consideration of the
petitions as representative of a large portion of
concerned students on the UF campus.
We believe in Life not Death, Love not Hate,
Peace not War, and we believe in our country, read
the petition.

passed on to the house which
approved it.
State Senator Jerry Thomas
from West Palm Beach also said
the bill has a good chance of
passing the senate. He added
that the usual debate could be
expected but perhaps 6 or 7
senators will oppose (the bill).
He added that some senators
oppose allowing 18-year-olds to
be legally bound by contracts.

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f X
j Legislature Prepares {
! University Budgets f
!;
jj By RON SACHS jjj
?: Alligator Staff Writer j:j
1 §
:< The Florida Legislature, now in its sixth week of meeting, is jjj
jjj working out its figures for the funding of the state universities j!j
i for the 1970-71 term. S
S The House Appropriations Committee has ottered a general j:j
5i funding bill that is SIOO million above the figure proposed by jj
Gov. Claude Kirk. In specific areas, the committee has proposed ij
5! f lgures for the public universities which are over 30 per cent ;j
§ higher than the $12.6 million for capital outlay asked by the jj
$ governor. j:
E FLOOR DEBATE is expected on Thursday regarding the
jij feasibility of the general funding bill. The senates bill of similar jj
!! nature is designated for first reading later this week.
jij The senate has proposed a $4.1 million cut of the governors -j
jij fund request for the universities, and has instead offered a bill ji
jij requiring five per cent increase in the productivity ratio of g
| faculties. This would expectedly produce the same effect, ji
utilizing less money. jj
jij An analysis being done by the office of Business Affairs jj
5: regarding the consequences of this and other proposals is jj
underway on the UF campus. Vice President of Business Affairs ||
William Elmore was not available for comment on the analysis, ij
:j: SEVERAL OTHER bills facing the legislators, of interest to J
ij university students and personnel, include free courses for :j:
ij employes in the university system, a tuition equalization grant, :j:
:ji and measures to assure the application of uniform admission ;j:
ij standards. jjj
i: The bill allowing university personnel meeting academic jjj
J: requirements to enroll for a maximum of six credit hours has j:j
j: been approved in both the Senate and House Education jjj
j: Committees. jjj
:ji The instruction would be free and exist on a space available j:j
;ji basis. jjj
jjj THE SENATE Education Committee has passed a bill jij
jji allotting $1.5 million for students to attend private colleges jij
jji under tuition equalization grants. jij
jjj The uniform admissions standards bill, having passed the jjj
jjj senate, has met opposition in the House Higher Education jjj
jjj Committee. jjj
j:j The bill would require all state universities to maintain the :j:
j:j same admissions qualifications. jj:
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*"*'*'*''**' ** **** ** *v.v.v*%v/avavav.v,v.v.wava%VjiV>>x*:k*>;^
| U. 5. Air Power j
I Hits Cambodia I
i'
:! SAIGON (UPI) Monsoon rains have sharply curtailed U. S.
strikes against North Vietnams Ho Chi Minh supply trail $
through Laos into South Vietnam and Cambodia, military $
sources reported Tuesday.
:jj Scores of American jet fighter-bombers were reported jjj
ijj diverted by the weather from targets in Laos and thrown into $
; the Allied campaign in Cambodia against Communist troops
j near Phnom Penh.
CAMBODIAN INFANTRY and tanks moved into blocking
: positions 25 miles south of Phnom Penh Tuesday in a pincers
: against North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces trying to escape
j South Vietnamese units moving through Takeo Province.
: Artillery fire was heard in Phnom Penh for the first time. :j:
: Across the border in South Vietnam, Communists shelled 61 jj;
Allied targets in the heaviest round of raids in any 24-hour -j;
j* period in 11 days. The attacks coincided with the 80th j:
: anniversary of the birth of the late North Vietnamese President
| Ho Chi Minh.
j; At the same time, the Cambodian monsoons will turn -I;
Communist sanctuaries along the South Vietnamese border into
quagmires and restrict American and South Vietnamese §
operations designed to destroy North Vietnamese and Viet Cong |*|
bases and destroy supply caches. >j
X '*
j U. S. headquarters reported 155 Americans killed and 632 :
$ wounded since U. S. forces first entered Cambodia on May 1. :
J
South Vietnamese losses were placed at 564 men killed and j:
* 1,937 wounded. The Allies reported killing 8,181 Communists j
and capturing 1,165 more. \j
X j
FIELD REPORTS said the Allies have seized 14,286 ;j;
Communist weapons, 3,222 tons of rice and hundreds of tons of ;jj
$ ammunition and other supplies.
X y

Mitchell Says
Nation Will
Live By Law
CLEVELAND, Miss. (UPI)
Attorney General John N.
Mitchell deplored the student
shooting deaths at Kent State
and Jackson State Tuesday and
said: This is a nation
determined to live within the
law.
Neither violent
demonstrations nor unrestrained
reactions are part of that law,
Mitchell said in a prepared
speech drafted by the White
House.
IN HIS APPEARANCE before
the Delta Council at Cleveland,
the attorney general said the
deaths of four white students at
Kent, Ohio, and two black
students at Jackson State
symbolized the saddest
semester in the 5 history of
American education.
He then spoke out on the
need for law and order,
declaring: There are 200
million innocent bystanders in
America who must be protected,
and the first duty of
peace-keeping forces is to protect
the innocent.
AN FBI REPORT on the
death May 4 of four Kent
students in a confrontation with
the Ohio National Guard has
been sent to the White House
and is being circulated among
top administration officials
before it is made public.
Mitchell spoke of Nixons
cool judgment in meeting the
campus crisis brought on by his
Cambodia venture and the
student slayings..
This administration will do
everything that responsive
leadership and cool .judgment
can do to hasten the return to
the tradition of peaceful
change, Mitchell declared.
. .r. '-<* VJ t.V <* < T

NEXT WEEK
under the stars at
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1 m

SEN. SYMINGTON CHARGES

Indochina War Cancer
In American Society

WASHINGTON (UPI)- The Indochina War was
described on the Senate floor Tuesday as a cancer
eating at the fabric of American Society. But
Republican leaders said the public was solidly
behind the expansion of the conflict into Cambodia.
Led by Sen. Stuart Symington, D-Mo., a former
Air Force secretary, backers of stiff antiwar
legislation blamed Vietnam and Cambodia for
setbacks in the stock market, campus disorders,
diplomatic disasters and the loss of faith by
citizens in their government.
SYMINGTON, IN AN uncharacteristically
emotional speech, charged that the war had created
a cancer on the worlds future. He said it had
resulted ih heavy financial reverses for millions of
Americans and was responsible for murder
indictments against servicemen accused of killing
Southeast Asian civilians.
And the youth of the country continue to
protest, because they are unwilling to die for a cause
in which they do not believe, he said.
A PENDING amendment to block funds for
retaining U. S. ground troops in Cambodia won
unexpected support, meanwhile, from Nicholas De
B. Katzenbach, attorney general and undersecretary
of state in the Johnson administration.

Wednesday, May 20,1970, The Florida AlUgetar,

Katzenbach, who clashed bitterly with antiwar
senators when he was in office over President
Lyndon B. Johhsons legal authority to carry on the
war, said Congress not only has the legal right to
impose the restricton but passage of the measure
was a matter of great national importance.
President Nixon, who opposes the amendment,
met for 90 minutes with GOP congressional leaders
but they reached no conclusions on how to block or
sidetrack the measure.
SEN. HUGH SCOTT, Pa., and Rep. Gerald R.
Ford, Mich., the GOP congressional floor leaders,
both said they found surprising support for Nixons
Cambodian policy in weekend trips to Ohio and
Pennsylvania.
The antiwar measure, sponsored by Sens. John
Sherman Cooper, R-Ky., and Frank Church,
D-Idaho, appeared to have enough support for
passage.
Scott said he was still trying to work out a
reasonable compromise to spare the administration
what would be regarded as an embarrassing defeat.
- r
Backers of the amendment, however, contended
it would force military commanders to do nothing
that President Nixon has not already pledged a
withdrawal of troops from Cambodia by June 30
and no further expansion of the war.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 20,1970

LONDON Britains political parties went into action Tuesday,
seeking the initiative in the June 18 general election campaign.
Prime Minister Harold Wilson ordered Labor party officials to speed
the partys platform to the voters a platform expected to exhort
Britons to retain the government that has brought prosperity after six
years of economic austerity.
Political sources said it will call for another five years in office for
Labor to lead Britain farther down the road to socialism.
EGYPT Egyptian commands slipped across the Suez Canal early
Tuesday and battled Israeli forces on the occupied east bank of the
waterway. Israeli warplanes struck again at Egyptian targets along the
Suez front and Israeli and Jordanian troops dueled across the Jordan
River.
The air attacks and ground fighting came as East European
diplomats in London said Soviet crews will fire the SAM 3 missiles
against Israeli planes penetrating beyond the Suez Canal front lines.
Israel already has warned it will fight the Russians in Egypt if
necessary for self-defense.
JAKARTA Former Army Brig. Gen. Supardjo, condemned to
death more than two years ago for his role in the 1965 Communist
coup attempt, was executed by a firing squad last Saturday, a
presidential palace spokesman reported.
The execution was carried out in a remote forest area south of
Bangun in west Java after his request for clemency was denied by
President Suharto, his superior officer before he joined the abortive
Communist power grab.
WASHINGTON Vice President Spiro T. Agnew, with his
assessment of the actual breadth of feeling among American students
on the war issue:
I certainly dont agree that the demonstrations that took place in
Washington and some of the demonstrations that have taken place on
the campus are really indicative of the deep-seated student hostility to
the Cambodian situation. I think a lot of those students were out on a
typical spring lark.
ELIZABETH, N.J. The 19-year-old son of Sen. Ernest F.
Hollings, D-S.C., was arrested Sunday night for unlawful use of
marijuana after a car he was riding in was stopped for speeding on the
New Jersey Turnpike.
Michael M. Hollings was released on $515 bail pending arraignment
today. Police said he was very cooperative.
Hollings companion was not charged. Police said a state trooper
here found a quantity of marijuana inside the car when he pulled it
over for a speeding violation.
SAN DIEGO-Mrs. Emily R. Winne, mother of George M. Winne Jr.,
23, who set himself afire as a protest, in a letter to Nixon:
Our son George Jr. set himself afire on the ... c impus on May 10.
Before dying, he told us he had picked the most dramatic way he
could think of to call peoples attention to the most deplorable
condition of the world and of this country. He made me promise to
write that he felt you, as President, were contributing to the violence
and chaos...

| the UF Board of Student Publications is accepting applications for j
Editor, Managing Editor, j
I* Term IV, 1970 Summer Term, Only 1
Editor, Managing Editor, j
Florida Alligator j
' Terms I& II Fall 1970; Winter 1971 j
' t
- General Instructions
i *r
t All applications are to be picked up and returned to Room 330, J. Wayne
Reitz Union between Bam 4 pm.
i Each applicant must return an original plus two clean copies of his application.
Applications must be delivered to Room 330, Reitz Union, by 12 iioon, May 21.
f Board meeting will be held Thursday, May 21 at 2:30 in Room 316, Reitz Union.
A schedule of interviews will be posted on main bulletin board in
| Room 330, Wednesday, May 20.
I to iTvr j OC:3 oe* j j iMk # f
# >:*** T TAP i/lOte % I I I

UPI
Around
. .The
World
...The
Nation
. . The
State

FREDRICK
GARDENS
. . now Icdsirw
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. The gubernatorial runoff between George
C. Wallace and Gov. Albert P. Brewer on June 2 offers, perhaps, the
most critical test of the real power of the black voter in Alabama.
The line was drawn before the May 5 democratic primary and, as
expected, Wallace has tried to make political hay with the charge that
Brewer got a mass black vote in the election.
Before the first primary, in advertisements signed by Wallace
campaign aides, it was charged that the black bloc vote was backing
Brewer.
NEW YORK A Puerto Rican nationalist arrested when he
allegedly tried to place a time bomb at an Army recruiting station has
been charged with plotting or carrying out at least 35 similar actions
here in the past seven months.
The suspect, a building superintendent and cabinet maker from the
Bronx who apparently led a quiet family life, admitted he was a
member of Mira, the revolutionary group which has been linked to a
number of bombings of American-owned business in Puerto Rico, the
police said.
MEMPHIS, Tenn. Bishops of the Christian Methodist Episcopal
Church adopted a resolution Sunday blaming the national
administration and certain governors for creating an atmosphere in
which the killing of blacks and students is easy.
We hold blamable the extreme rhetoric of both the president and
vice president, and, especially, the governors of those states in which
these atrocities have occurred, for creating a climate in which what is
happening to black people all over this nation can so easily happen,
the resolution said.
CAPE KENNEDY Britains fourth missile firing submarine, the
nuclear-powered HMS Revenge, arrived here Tuesday to test-fire
Polaris A3 missiles down Americas Atlantic test range.
The Revenge, similar in size to the U.S. Navys newest Polaris
submarine, sailed from the Royal Navys submarine base at Faslane,
Scotland, under the command of Cmdr. Basil Watson.
TALLAHASSEE Police said firebombs were thrown at two
businesses here Sunday night, causing about $50,000 damage.
Authorities said the Southern Mobile Home Co. across the street
from Florida A&M University was hit by a firebomb that destroyed
five 60-foot mobile homes and damaged three others.
r STEAK SHAKE "I
Student Special
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Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
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S^W. Gainesville |



'Have Not Marchers Trek To Atlanta

PERRY, Ga. (UPI) A march of the have-nots, with
12 symbolic coffins prominently displayed, stepped off
on a 110-mile trek to Atlanta Tuesday to protest recent
killings by police and National Guardsmen on the nations
campuses and in the Augusta rioting.
About 200 people, all but about a dozen of them black,
were in the line of march when Hosea Williams, a leader of
the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC),
signaled the start of the long hike, scheduled to end with a
mass rally in Atlanta Saturday. :
THIS IS NOT a scuffle between the whites and
blacks, Williams told his followers. This is a struggle
between the haves and have-nots, the oppressors and the
oppressed ...
I hope you understand the significance of what we are
doing. Its just lucky it wasnt you and I in those coffins
just plain lucky.
The coffins, carried on two trucks, were to signify the
six victims of the Augusta rioting, the four students killed

Cramer Says Carswell's
Campaign Bid Helps

MIAMI (UPI) Rep. William
C. Cramer, R-Fla., says he feels
his Senate campaign has actually
been helped by former Judge G.
Harrold Carswells bid for the
U. S. Senate and he has no
intention of attacking Carswell
in the campaign.
Cramer said in a question and
answer interview in Tuesdays
Miami News that Carswells
candidacy has caused a lot of
enthusiasm.
MY SUPPORTERS are with
me more strongly than ever
before. Weve got a colorful
primary for the Republican
party now and thousands of
people are coming over to
participate in it. Thats good.
Im delighted to be in a
campaign that means
something.
Cramer was asked if he had
been a senator would he have
voted for Carswells nomination
to the Supreme Court.
I certainly would have, he
replied. Ive known him for 20

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years. Were good friends.
ASKED IF there was any way
for him to attack Carswell,
Cramer said: I have no
intention of attacking Mr.
Carswell. I dont run that way.
Im running on my record, what
Ive been able to do and what I
hope to do in the future.
In the interview Cramer
reaffirmed that President Nixon
had asked him to run but said he
didnt expect the White House
to participate in the campaign.
Questioned about charges by
Carswells opponents that he was
mediocre, Cramer replied:
WELL, I THINK I have
outstanding qualifications which
he doesnt and that the people
will realize it. But Im not going
to call anybody any names.
On other matters, Cramer
indicated he:
Doesnt think the
Democrats have a conservative
candidate to oppose him,
including former Gov. Farris
Bryant, who has indicated he

CARRYING 12 COFFINS

at Kept State in Ohio, and the two persons who died in a
hail of police, gunfire aU jadbon -State College in
Mississippi l&t Friday.
THE STOPPING POINT for the march the first night
was Fort Valley, Ga., 12 miles north of Perry in the heart
of Georgias peach-growing region.
A rally was scheduled later Tuesday night.
Although Williams told the demonstrators they might
be killed before reaching Atlanta, the marchers were in a
happy mood as they headed north on U. S. Highway 341
in the muggy, 85-degree heat of Tuesday afternoon.
IF WERE GOING to die, were going to die facing
them, Williams declared. We wont be shot in the back
like the others. He referred to the fact that an autopsy
showed the six Augusta victims had been shot in the back.
The marchers, most of them in their late teens or early
20s, walked in pairs and were strung out along the
roadway for about two-thirds of a mile:

will decide by June 1 whether to
run for the Senate.
I Believes Florida is basically
a conservative and Republican
state.
Thinks busing is not
required either by the
Constitution or by good sense
in order to fulfill the legal
requirements of desegregation.

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Those at the front carried -a huge sign reading,
Coalition against Repressions Another large sign at the
end of the procession asked, How many more murders?
ALSO TOWARD the front of the procession was a
wagon drawn by two mules, one brown and one white.
The marchers nicknamed the white one George Wallace,
after the former governor of Alabama.
Organizers of the march originally planned to have
mule carts haul the coffins, but found they could not get
enough mules. As a result one of the carts had to be
loaded aboard a truck.
Gov. Lester Maddox made a last minute appeal to the
SCLC to cancel the march, and rejected a request that the
state provide a police escort.
Despite the refusal of an escort, however, state troopers
were keeping watch on the marchers, and clearing
intersections of traffic as the demonstrators tramped
northward.

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Wednesday, Mey 20,1970, The Floride Alligator,

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Page 7



Page 8

t, Tlm Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 20,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Soviets Aren't Acting

WASHINGTON President Nixon is directing
the Cambodian operation with one eye on
Cambodia and the other on the Kremlin.
His decision to send U. S. ground forces into
Cambodia, he told his cabinet, was intended as
much to establish credibility with the Soviets as
to knock out the communist sanctuaries.
He noted that Hanoi had disregarded his warnings
and had continued to build up the sanctuaries. He
wanted to demonstrate to Moscow as well as Hanoi
that he was prepared to back up his warnings with
action.
For if he showed weakness in Southeast Asia, he
confided to the cabinet, the Kremlin might
conclude that he would be weak, too, in the Middle
East. He also felt that decisive and
unpredictable moves would keep the Soviets off
balance.
The president, therefore, is watching the
diplomatic dispatches from Moscow as closely as the
battle reports from Cambodia. In their preliminary
moves at least,,the Soviets havent reacted at all as
he had anticipated.
Immediately after the Cambodian action, the
president sent word to the Soviets that they should
consider carefully their overall relationship with the
U. S. before seeking a propoganda advantage from
the Cambodian affair.
He believed the Kremlin would put
Soviet-American cooperation, say insiders, ahead of
short-range propaganda benefits. Instead, Premier
Alexei Kosygin called a dramatic press conference,
his first in five years, to denounce the Cambodian
incursion.
The Nixon administration also dropped sly hints,
intended for Kremlin ears, that Russia had as much
to gain as the U. S. from blocking the expansion of
Chinese influence into Cambodia. It was pointed
out that the Chinese had organized the coalition to
restore Prince Sihanouk to power; indeed, that
Sihanouks statements were written for him in
Peking.
But instead of widening the Chinese-Russian
breach, the Cambodian move had precisely the
opposite effect. At the personal intervention of Mao
Tse-tung, the Chinese and Russians virtually
abandoned their feud and joined in a united stand
against the U. S.
Old Mao, who had been under withering Soviet
attack before the Cambodian developments, sought
out Soviet diplomat V. G. Gankovsky to urge the
resumption of Sino-Soviet talks. The chief Soviet
negotiator, Deputy Foreign Minister V. V.
Kuznetsov, immediately returned to Peking.
The White House is now watching anxiously to
see whether Soviets will use Cambodia as an excuse
to sabotage the SALT talks, which are intended to
head off an escalation of the costly strategic arms
race. President Nixon, having made a public
prediction that a Soviet-American agreement would
come out of the talks,is now uneasy about it.
It has been two decades since the late Senator Joe

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors

Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Merry-Go-Round
by Jack Anderson
McCarthy began hounding homosexuals out of
government. Now the campaign has apparently been
quietly reopened.
During the interim, the government has denied
security clearance to homosexuals who might be
susceptible to blackmail. This wouldnt affect an
announced homosexual who made no secret of his
deviation and, therefore, couldnt be blackmailed
because of it.
Such a man, Otto Ulrich, Jr., has held a
secret-level clearance for nearly three years as a
translator with the Bionetics Research Laboratories
near Washington. In his application for a clearance,
he stated frankly that he was a member of the local
chapter of the Mattachine Society, an organization
principally of homosexuals.
Not until last year did the government make an
issue of his sex life. He was summoned to a secret
hearing at the Pentagon last July and was asked a
series of shockingly vulgar questions about his
private life.
He refused to answer them, charging that they
had nothing to do with his eligibility. The hearing
board, however, accused him of criminal conduct
and sexual perversion. It charged that he is not
reliable or trustworthy.
Pentagon officials admitted that Ulrich was not
charged with susceptibility to blackmail and that he
had never been arrested. They noted,however, that
certain homosexual acts are illegal in a number of
states. At the same time, they acknowledged that
pre-marital heterosexual behavior, which is also
illegal in many states, is not a cause for action.
After the formal charges were brought against
him, Ulrich was sent the same set of vulgar, graphic
questions that he refused to answer at the hearing.
Again he refused. As a consequence, the Pentagon
has suspended his security clearance.
The case is regarded as a precedent for a new
crackdown on homosexuals.

Alligator Staff

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor
Earl Hartman
Features Editor
Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor
Fred Voilrath
Wire Editor
Jeff Brain 1
Editorial Assistant

EDITORIAL
WE DEMAND!
We are living in demanding times. <£
Every day lends proof to that statement, as every day
finds some group or individual making a demand on another
group or individual.
Hunger strikers are making demands, minority students
are making demands, striking students are making demands
and non-striking students are maiking demands.
Not to be outdone, therefore, the Florida Alligator has
Some demands to make. We demand:
a beer dispenser in the Alligator office. It would
probably make for a somewhat sloppy newspaper, but the
improvement on our morale would be immeasurable;
more money for Alligator salaries. We can see no
reason why we should not be paid on a scale comparable to,
for example, the New York Times;
greater prestige for our staff. Editors should be
referred to as Venerated Editor while staff writers and
copy editors rate an Honorable prefix;
t greater observance of the power of the press. This area
needs a great deal of work. We have observed a profound
laxity on the part of the Richard M. Nixon and Spiro T.
Agnew duo, the U. S. Senate, the Florida Legislature, Gov.
Claude Kirk, UF President Stephen C. OConnell and the
student body at large concerning the implementation of our
editorials. They are not daily suggestions, they are daily
demands and meant to be met quickly.
additional privileges for everyone connected with the
Alligator. Purple all-area parking stickers would be a solid
start. They would enable all students to recognize us and
salute.
the word Alligator should be said only in muted,
respectful tones and then with the speakers eyes upon the
ground.
The question will probably be asked us, What will you
do if your demands are not met? Its a good question and
worthy of comment.
Like most demanding students we dont have the foggiest
idea in hell what we will do if our demands are not met. If
we refuse to print our daily newspaper, a possible lever, we
will lose what little bargaining power we have. We cannot
take that chance.
So we will undoubtedly continue publishing and wait for
the day this university is structured as a democracy or the
opinions of students are recognized for their sagacity.
Unfortunately, it could be a long wait.
But then again, these are demanding times.
MoGOVERN-UATFIEED
( \ /xJCHMtDjOL.DBOV, THe\ VW /
yJ [ (fIVXxRE&t) vs F\Nto.L-/ / v /
V I \ DOVMQr tsOHCTHVMQr \ J y /

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union:
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the I lorjda AlTigaforaVc those of
the editors jt of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of l lorkla. "



Staff Writings

WASHINGTON A youthful
representative of the
underground press smashed a pie
into the face of a member of the
U. S. Commission on Obscenity
and Pornography to express his
opposition to this
unconstitutional, illegitimate,
unlawful, prehistoric, obscene,
absurd keystone committee.
* *
It is with great pleasure that I
announce the existence of at
least one sensible protestor in
these United States. And I might
add, its about time. To the guy
with the pie, I salute you.
For years Soupy Sales has
been throwing cream pies at
people he didnt like or agree
with, and it is only now, after
that great father of true peaceful
protest is no longer gracing the
airways, that his real genius is
coming to light. But then, the
greatest ideas are usually the last
to take hold. Christ preached
peace on earth almost 2,000
years ago and earth still hasnt
caught on.
But any step in the right
direction is better than no step
at all, and this is definitely in the
right direction. What policeman
could get mad because someone
threw a pie at him in the name
of peace? Who knows, he may
even thank the thrower for the
chance to have a snack. At the
same time the thrower has made

MR. EDITOR:
It fell my lot to be in attendance at
some special classes at the UF last week
when some misguided student leaders,
supported by some uninformed and
intellectually hysterical students,
blackjacked the administration of the
university into closing the school classes
for several days because they felt that,
should they not do so an angry mob
might develop which could result in more
of the barbaric conduct of students who
so audaciously tried to categorize
themselves as intellectuals.
It was my unfortunate experience to
witness not one but two demonstrations
relative to two separate causes in less than
a weeks time, and to witness very little
interest by a large number of students for
the purpose of attending the university,
that being to get an education so that
when they are seasoned and mature
enough to take over the reins of the
government and business of this country
they will be prepared to do so.
I am at a loss to understand where the
students of the universities have acquired
the feeling that the schools belong to
them and they have a right to dictate how
they will be administered. They should
stop and assess the fact that the schools
are there for their use, but they have been
provided by the older generation
whom they are so prone to condemn. If it
the small society

THE -SILENT
AWJtf £iTY SoLVbP ffiY
~ IPENTITV
iii .I '! | nio'm Mui m

Wait Your Turn

his point that hes mad enough
to throw something and gotten
the throwing out of his system,
all in one motion, and
everyones happy.
Isnt that a lot better than
throwing bricks? Besides being
dirty and unattractive, bricks are
heavy and put undue strain on
the arm of the thrower, not to
mention the head of the person
on the receiving end of said
throw. The same goes for rocks
and, to some extent, bottles.
None of these can hold a candle
to a nice light, beautifully
sculptured cream pie.
Who knows. Maybe after
protestors have tried throwing a
few pies in anger theyll see that
makes about as much sense as
throwing all that heavier stuff
in other words no sense at all.
With that point established both
sides can then sit down on.the
bricks, take a drink from one of
the many bottles that always
seem to be floating around, have
a piece of pie and discuss
matters like the grownups they
claim to be.
*" *
A resolution was introduced
to the Student Senate recently
which, if passed, would have
censured the Alligator for failure
to provide what the three
authors of the bill felt would be
proper coverage of the hunger

had not been for the provisions made by
my generation and our predecessors,
these young radicals would not have the
forum with which to propound and
pursue their warped promotions against
everything that has been handed down to
them through generations of blood, sweat
and tears by their forebears. Rather than
constantly jumping on bandwagons to
criticize, they ought to be giving thanks
to the older generation for handing them
a nation in which they can get away with
their present day shenanigans. The
students have neither inherited nor
earned the right to take over the control
of this country and 1 think it is
reasonable to state they should wait their
turn, as my generation has, rather than
trying to usurp the rights that my
generation has earned by hard work and
waiting its turn. 1 never could quite
understand the sanctimonious attitude of
these young radicals which in effect
promotes their right to fight for the right
not to fight.
If the students at the universities in
this nation really want to do something
constructive, they can stick to their
education and prepare themselves to take
over the job which is quite obviously
much too big for them as ill-prepared and
immature as they are at this time.
WIELIAMG. PRICE
PRESIDENT
FIRST BANK OF IMMOKALEE
by Brickman

A Pie For Peace

strike now in progress in front of
Tigert. I have no complaint with
the charge of a lack of coverage
- sometimes that happens on a
newspaper. Stories which should
be printed can be and are left
our for a number of different
reasons: lack of space, missed
deadline, accident.
1 do, however, disagree
strongly with the action deemed

THEY WE A t\T / \
VOvJ / \
KNCVj! I. LJL

Police
MR. EDITOR:
In the confusion of the last few days
many of us have overlooked the
outstanding work of the Campus Police.
Faced with unreasonable abuse that no
one should have to take in a civilized
society, these men have kept their cool
and done their job. They are dedicated to
protecting the rights of all of us.
Although not responsible for the
situation that exists, they are the ones
who have to take the filthy names and
obscene remarks and actions that would
incite most of us to violent action.
No doubt confrontations for one
reason or another will continue to take
place on this campus. In many cases the
Campus Police will be found in the
middle trying to protect all of our rights.
When this occurs, it is to be hoped that
everyone will act like responsible citizens
and avoid abusive language and actions.
For a change, lets put ourselves in their
place and think how we might feel if
someone treated us with the disrespect
frequently shown toward our police.
R. B. MARCUS
PROFESSOR
Castoffs
MR. EDITOR:
The plastic canopy hanging over the
north goal post had something going
inside it Saturday night.
The crew from the Corner Drug Store
came in before the show to set up
for... Music, moving to James Cotton
Blues Band, no, were not tripping, were
just with the music, man ... darkness
falling under ominous clouds turning
to ... Noah, build me an
everybody is frfedklrig Otlil I u
Or so if seemed under the lent with

necessary by the senators who
introduced the bill.
The Alligator to be able to
honestly call itself a newspaper
- must be kept completely free
of any governmental restraint or
control. Even though the
senators withdrew theiu
resolution after some debate, the
fact that they introduced it in
the first place shows they doubt

FORUM
C AAoiti wl j
hope for the

Wednesday, May 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

By Charles Trentelman

shivering and pneumonia taking second
place to holding on for dear life to our
fellow human beings, and nearly busting
some heads to get the curiosity seekers
out, to calm the environment in an
attempt to alleviate human suffering, and
our dear brother peace freaks hung on
watching.
Sharing blankets, holding close,
praying, too ( and Im an agnostic, it was
really strange for me to be talking up
there). Ambulances, four of them as I
remember, putting the fears to sleep with
thorazine. Id mention names, but were
not on an ego trip, some people were. We
know who we are, and we tried to help
our brothers, alcoholics and drug freaks
looked awfully similar under the tent.
Problems coming on too fast to handle,
hang on to ourselves, and reach out a
helping hand. Many people in the
audience did just that, some didnt. Some
people in this town didnt tell people
what they were taking, someone sold bad
acid, and a lot of people said: Hell, let
someone else take care of him, her, or it.
Thats what we got stuck with: your
castoffs. We kept them warm, cared for
them as best we could. What did you do
to reach out and care? Or were you too
worried about getting wet, or getting off?
MARK FREEDMAN, 6AS
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and
not exceed 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addresses and telephone numbers
of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer
shows just cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for space.
Writers may submit longar essays,
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column Is
prepared
J to shtt* sample* of tils wcwfc. h>
| J, ... J

the newspaper staffs capability
of covering the news on this
campus adequately and feel the
staff needs to be taken under the
protective wing of Student
Government.
I wonder what these senators
feel about the First Amendment
to the Constitution of the
United States or perhaps they
agree with Spiro Agnew.

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 20,1970

Page 10

I TS SOMETHING TO
mpSHOUT ABOUT!
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SUSAN SCOTT
This snakeskin look becomes
great; be it Frolics or that special
party. On its own or with pants
this is the look for you. Modeled
by Diane.

MAAS BROTHERS
A space-dyed cotton knit
skimmer by Juliano is even
dreamier when you belt it in
patches of alligator. Find Juliano
knits in our new Pacesetter
sportswear department. Modeled
by Sandi.

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COUSINS
Enjoy the liberated
i 100 k... free and easy, light and
J cool as seen at Cousins.

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FIGURE FAIR
For making memories historic
this outfit is merry as may and
younger than spring! Made mad
as mod. If fashions your passion
then this outfit is meant for you.
Wonderful for lounging or
entertaining. Colors in green and
orchid. Sizes, petite, small, and
medium. Modeled by Kathy.
SEARS
Sassy slacks with the bell
bottom flair teamed with a
striped tank top makes the scene
for the on-the-gogal. A fresh
approach to the sizzling summer
days. YouH find this outfit in
SeLs Junior Bazaar. Mo***
by Rita J:

"-'.' y V .v.; <\ l|^;;;:'% r : r

TWIG
Country Set long tunic vest is
daring red and white stripes with
clingy red slacks. This outfit is
sure to be an attention getter at
any The outfit can be
purchased as a separate. Also
shown with a red tank top great
for tlune hot summer days.
Modete*by Shelly.

> vs£ { jBUJR & £
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11
||

Wednesday, May 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

SILVERMANS
A cotton knit crochet from
Country Sets Taurus
collection in a rich natural shade
for summer. Hip-hugger pants
with a rope belt team up with
the popular tank top. Modeled
by Kathy.
COLONY SHOP
Galant Jrs. of California creates
this dark brown empire-waisted
dress accented with swingy
pleats and long puffy sleeves.
The outfit is off-set by shoes by
Coach and Four. by
Judy.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

,VAV.\.V.V//.V/.V/.%WAW/.'.V.V.V.V.
FOR SALE
Pellex f 1.4 complete w/accessory
lens & cases. 200mm and 35mm
S4OO or best offer. Call 372-5516.
(A-10t-133-p)
78 acres horse and cattle ranch
318-335 2 miles due east of Wllliston
on corner of 2 highways contact
R. T. Lewis 528-6562 not collect.
Route 1 box 157 Wllliston.
(A-st-143-p)
1967 mobile home, 12 x 48, 2
bedrooms, excellent condition, S4OO
down, assume payments of $77
monthly, original financing 6yrs, 4
yrs remaining to pay. 378-6797,
evenings. (A-st-142-p)

WOMEN IN LOVE I
ST ARTSTOMO RR w I
COLOR ||
Distributed byCINEMATION INDUSTRIES
I twllm Ckmir /T W XI
ntk s.
i ACADEMY AWARD WINNER I
MAGGIE SMITH I
Maggie Smith |
| Pwrhw Gel frith \
| 111 W. UdvnJtr
14 'Jcmciicw! THE ACTIVIST I
| ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
mm
Richard Burton
as HENRY VIII
Genevieve Bujold
as ANNE BOLEYN
IN THE Hal Wallis PRODUCTION I
4*/\t me (gftfte Tfiousonb DayS
CosUrvin|
Irene Papas
Anthony Quayle John Colicos
k*. jom m x near souso -mchmd sokokmmmku amoerson
kxNkCMAKUS JAMOTT hmm h HAi I WALLIS ,
umvtot hctiiw Tioeecot.oa* mum** IGPI

..v.y/.vv.v.v.v/.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.v
FOR SALE
Trailer 8 x 42 $1,200, 8 x 35 SI,OOO,
8 x 30 SBOO rented trailer SSO
monthly Income only SI,OOO
378-0226 376-6831 Lot B Archer
Village. (A-st-141-p)
Absolutely must sell nowi box
furnished 2 bedroom mobile home
centra* heating air conditioning
carpeting superb condition 378-8304
after 5 $1550 or best offer.
(A-st-142-p)
Purple-Yellow Honda 565,7300 mi,
recently tuned, Inspected,
dependable best cash offer over SBO,
helmet etc. Al after 7 evenings.
392-7329. (A-st-142-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 20,1970

*%*******-***************************
a a a a a a s.s.s.a a aa as aa
FOR SA LE
-XvX'-vX-X-X-X-X-X-XX'XX-X-X-X'X-X
Awai tape recorder, 4 track-stereo,
runs on batteries, car lighter, or 110
v. or 220 v AC. 7 inch reel, int. spks.
$95.00. Call 378-6247 after 5:00 PM.
(A-st-141-p)
Diamond engagement ring 1/3 carat.
Perfect must sell!! Call 373-2277
for details (evenings). (A-3t-141-p)
REALLY. These fuzzy puppies are
lovely! Ma and Pa are both handsome
collie-shepherd mixtures. Call
378-0118, then come and see!
(A-st-140-p)
Components Stereo, Garrard
turntable, Scott amp, huge marble
top walnut Empire Speakers. S6OO.
Call 378-7655 after 5:00.
(A-3t-142-p)
100% human hair fall! Shoulder
length, brown-frosted! Best offer
over $25. Head-stand included! Call
after 1:30 at 376-0266, ask for
Darlla. (A-st-142-p)
FOR better cleaning, to keep colors
gleaming, use Blue Lustre carpet
cleaner. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-166-c)
GIBSON electric jazz guitar. For
discriminating musician who
demands high quality, superior tone.
Strap, case, strings. sllO 373-1659
aft. (A-3t-143-p)
SEX? It is true we carry a full line of
equipment for most any sport, but
lets be reasonable! B & B SPORTS
CENTER 5320 N.W. 13th St.
378-1416. (A-st-142-p)
Refrig Bike TV $25 Each Music
Stand $1 Port. Movie Screen $5
Cassette Recorder $lO Port B try
Record Player $lO 378-0226.
(A-st-143-p)
Yamaha, 1970, DS6, 250 cc street,
3000 miles, \#/ith helmet and shield,
$575, call 372-6062, 6 oclock.
Enlarger s2s, speakers in cabinets
s2s for both. (A-2t-143-p)
1969 KAWASAKI F 3
BUSHWHACKER. Motorcycle Low
mileage, just like new, only S4OO.
Phone 372-5787 after 6:00 p.m. for
more information. (A-4t-143-p)
A 1969 modernage traitor 2
bedrooms air conditioned, carpeted,
S6OO. down and take over payments
of $95.00 a month call after spm
378-0208. (A-3t-143-p)
3 br. IV2 bath 10 x 56 fur. trailer 1
br. fixed as study washer clothes
line fenced lot cable TV in
park with pool AC 376-8517.
(A-st-141-p)
Must Sell! Hangstrom 12-String
Guitar Dual Pickup With Case. A-l
Condition Sacrifice $125. Call
392-7673. (A-st-143-p)
8x24 mble home A/C load leveling
hitch S7OO mono tape recorder S4O
67 Triumph 650 S7OO 20-inch fan $5
wife SIOO Prices flexible 372-5078.
(A-st-143-p)
Camera nikon sp rangefinder lenses:
50mm 1.4, 85mm 2.0 case and lens
hoods, excellant cond. call 376-9024
after 6 pm. (A-st-143-p)
AIR CONDITIONER 14,000 BTU.
Only 8 months old.
16-3/4x26-3/8". $l5O. Call
373-2436. (A-st-143-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
WEDNESDAY
Jumbo Baked Chopped
Steak and Yellow Rice 79<
THURSDAY
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<

FOR SALE
Lady Yamaha 50cc Lika new, only
750 mi. Elec, start Auto, clutch. See
at 304 SE 3rd St. North apt. 5 9
pm $lB5. Easy and fun to drive.
(A-st-140-p)
35mm film-kodak high speed
ektechrome color slides, 20 exp.
$1.75 roil, plus-X b&w 36 exp. 3
rolls for $2 also 38 cal ammo $4 box
372-1831 (A-lt-144-p)
MUGSI MUGS! MUGS! For the BIG
or small drinker. Beautiful
hand-made ceramic mugs. Various
Sizes & Colors Call Steve Paskosky
392-8777 (A-st-144-p)
1967 Honda cl 160 scrambler
Excellent shape S3OO call 378-5996
after 1 p.m. and all day Saturday or
Sunday. ,{A-3t-144-p)
1967 Bultaco Campera 175 cc. 3300
miles. Excellent woods bike. New
paiift. $350 call 392-1727 days and
378-8688 nights. Ask for Mike
W!negar.(A-3t 144-p)
1968 Kawasaki 175cc-ln excellent
condition. Low mileage. Two
helmets. Phone 378-5033. S3OO.
(A-2t-144-p)
2 br air conditioned trailer Bx4o
with 16x18 addition; pool, clean,
good condition. Near campus. S2OOO
or terms 372-1346.(A-3t-144-p)
1966 Triumph Spitfire excellent
condition radio heater and many
extras asking SIOOO.OO can be seen at
922 SW 7th Ave or call Dean
378-6041 (A-4t-144-p)
1969 Penton motocross and Enduro
racing cycle includes racing extras
street equip. Cost S7OO new, sell
$460 1321 NW. 4th Lane or
392-7159. (A-3t-144-p)
Bausch & Lomb binocular
microscope: 4 objectives, lOx wide
field eyepieces, excellent condition
call 378-7854 after 5 pm.
(A-st-144-p)
GUITAR 12-string electric, Hagstrom
2-pickup, like new with hard case.
New over $250. Also 2 channel
reverb amp. 392-8905. (A-st-144-p)
Parkwood mobile home-2 bdrm. 12x
56 Spanish decor, 2 airconditioners,
is furnished, carpeted. A-l shape.
Two yrs old $4500. 439-2725 Flagler
Bch. (A-st-144-p)
1967 Porsche 911 excellent cond.
Konis Webers radio. Car is in great
shape. Must sell $4,500. Cali
376-9789. Ask for Lee. (A-st-144-p)
Fender ampliefier contains JBL
D-140 speaker, $350 or best offer,
excellent condition phone 372-3867.
(A-st-144-p)
Honda 305 Superhawk showroom
condition excellant mechanicly
includes metalflake lime helmet and
passenger helmet megaphones call
392-8196.(A-st-144-p)
X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-Xw
FOR RENT
x-x ; x-x-x-x-x-xvx-x-x-x-:vx ; x*x ; x-x ;
Air-conditioned, 2 bedroom, quiet,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6.
Avail. June 1. (B-7t-138-p)

FOR RENT
Frederick Gardens 1 bed. apt., need
roommate or will sublet. Female,
pool, S6O/mo. Available June 15,
June rent paid. 376-2909 after 5:30.
(B-5M41-P) ____
Sublease for summer 2 room apt.
furnished IVj blocks from campus
call between 8 AM noon
S4O/month 378-9627. (B-5M40-P)
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
Sublet June 1,1 bedroom apt.
central AC ww carpeting, quiet
behind the malf, sllO per month Cali
after 5 PM. 373-2889. (B-5M41-P)
Sublet: 1 bdrm. furnished apt. June
through August. French Quarter. AC,
pool, Call 376-4165 after 5:00,
392-0510 weekdays. (B-st-137-p)
Sublet for summer or longer 1
bdrm. A/C, pvt. patio, furnished,
slls/mo Village 34, no. 27, Call
378-7000. (B-139-st-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 {B-tf-c)
Sublet Sum. Qtr. 1 bdrm. garage apt.
AC, ww carpet, beautifully furnished,
tv cable. SIOO/mo. + ut. 1908 NW
3rd Ave. 373-2700. (B-6t-142-p)
Sublet for summer, furnished English
Tudor house, entire upstairs. Walking
distance to campus, 2 huge
bedrooms, central A/C and heat,
modern kitchen and bath, living
room, wood paneled, carpeted,
sunken den 180/mo. 373-1049.
(B-4t-143-p)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included completely
furnighed ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-C)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372- Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
French Quarter Apt. 94 Sublet for
summer $l4O. A/C Pool Great
location. Partially decorated. Fully
Furnished. Two bedroom townhouse.
(B-3t-143-p)
2 bedroom Village Park apt. to
sublease for the summer quart. $95
for entire summer phone 373-2661
or come by apt 12 Village Park.
(B-4t-143-p)
Sublet 1 br apt furnished, ac,
dishwasher, pool, available June 12.
$l2O/mo. just off campus. Mt.
Vernon apts. Call after 6:30 PM
378-0260. (B-st-143-p)
Available June 15, Unlv. Gardens one
bedroom apt for summer and next
year, beautifully furnished plus
extras. June rent free. 376-8958.
(B-st-143-p)
Available June 14. A/C eff. apt Bth
ave apts 1222 NW Bth ave. quiet,
plenty of parking. $85./mo. call
373- between 6 and 7:30 pm.
(B-st-143-p)
Sublet for summer qtr 2 br Mt
Vernon apt $l7O per month. Luxury
for less, call 378-8338 after 4pm.
(B-3t-143-p)
Sublease Landmark Apts. Sublease
for 1-4 openings call 373-1509
after 4pm Located on pool.
(B-3t-143-p)
Need to rent for the summer, a 2
bedroom A/C Mobile home, S9O per
month call JOHN 373-1581 evenings.
(B-st-143-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
1 br townhouse. Landmark 164
sublet for summer or longer. June
rent paid $145/month. Dishwasher
376-0453. (B-3t-142-p)
SAVE sno 4-man Vintage Pk apt.
To sublet for summer. Furn, balcony
over pool, end apt for spacious
parking. SIOO each for entire
summer. Call 373-1347 anytime.
Apt. 94. (B-st-142-p)
FOR RENT
"v!-X*X-X'X*X*X*XvX*X-X-X-X-X-X-X*X-!-£
Summer quarter only 2 bedroom
and two full baths S2OO per month
apart, for only $l5O Pt. West Apart.
Call 378-9809 anytime hurry first
come first serve. (8-st-142-p)
. 1 >""
, t Guns Guns Gum 1
Inventory over 500/ Buy -j
] J Sell Trade Repair. l
t ( Reloading supplies, Layaway j
Beckwith, gun j
, f-dfialec, Micaf>py. 466-3340. ]



gator classifieds

FOR RENT
O(MI_V $1.02 a day to live in luxury
at Landmark. Poolside apt can be
ours for S9O for entire summer. 2
Ld/ townhouse call 373-1285
apil6. (B-st-143-p)
2"br TH Unique, modern design in
quiet NE section. You must see it at
508-3 NE 4th Ave. As low as
$165/mo furn. Call 373-1612.
(B-3t-142-p)
Sublet -summer qt.; Olympia Apts,
next to campus, 1 bedroom,
furnished, carpet, A/C, summer rates
$95.00 per month. Call 378-6247
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-141-p)
Sublet furn 2-br apt. summer qtr.
Fully carpeted, central A/c,
$l2O/morith. Call 373-1867 on
weekend or after 4:30 p.m. on
weekdays. (B-st-142-p)
Sublet -sumi.a< 1 bedroom wood
panel Apt. A/C, private patio, pet fee
paid, lots of extras sll6 a month
Village 34 Apt 37 call 378-5809.
(B-5M42-P)
Private a/c rooms, linen, maid service.
One block campus. Telep. 372-6263.
(B-3t-142-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom townhouse apt no.
160 Hawaiian Village June August
Cable T.V., w/w carpeting, pool
dishwasher central a/h 376-4788.
(B-3t-142-p)
Sublease summer qtr. poolside 2 bdr*
French Qtr. Apt. near laundry room
fun living A/C contact Linda or
Jackie anytime phone 372-6768.
(B-st-142-p) r~:
1 BR furnished AC apt. 2 blocks
from campus. Sublet summer
quarter. $95/mo. Includes utilities.
Call 376-1331. (B-st-140-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
summer qtr. Share house 2 blocks
from campus with 2 coeds pvt. room,
A/C, Call 378-6548. (B-st-137-p)
FRENCH QUARTER. Sublease' 2
bdrm apt on pool fdr summer no. 82.
Call nights 373-2381. (B-4t-144-p)
2 Female. Lamancha. June rent paid.
$75 mo. Includes utilities call
evenings 373-1466. (B-2t-144-p)
Sublet summer qt. 2 bedroom
Landmark Apt. 103 June rent free
call 378-9052 or come by.
(B-5M44-P)
Air-conditioned 2 bdr trailer with
cabana shaded by giant live oaks,
ideal for lovers or other couple. $l5O
for all summer call 378-8205.
(B-3t-144-p)
Sublet Summer Quarter: one bedrm.
apt; close to campus, med center &
V.A. Hosp; furnished, with pool and
air cond; $l3O/mo; call
372-
POOLSIDE 2 bedroom Landmark
apt. no.llo to sublet for summer qt.
$46.25 a person per month OR need
2 fern, roommates 376-2842 June
free. (B-2t-144-p)
Male roommate for summer qtr.
French Quarter SIOO plus V* utilities
call 373-2525 after 7 or come by
appt. number 88. (B-2t-144-p)
Best Deal In Town!! 2 BR. apt.
Beautifully Furnished, Central Air,
fully carpeted, 5 min. from campus.
sl4 5/ mo. 373-1573 or
373-
Sublet or rent 1 brm apt furnished air
conditioned rent slls/mo patio call
373-1080 or 376-4807 Village 34.
(B-st-144-p)
The closest complex to campus-Mt.
Vernon. Sublease single br. pad.
Furnished, carpeted, all the extras.
Like new. Evenings-378-4877.
(B-4t-144-p)
WANTED
1 Female roommate for French
Quarter poolside air cond. apt. for
summer $lO5 for summer come by
apt 102 or call 373-1225.
(C-st-143-p)
Male roommate for sum. qtr.
S2O/mo. + util, efficiency, ac. pool. 5
min. walk to campus. Call Paul
373-2758. (C-3t-143-p)
2 fern roommates for Frederick
Gardens apt fall qtr. AC, carpeted,
Pool, etc. Call Melissa or Barb
373-2480. HURRY! (C-3M42-P)
FEMALE Roommate for Summer
Qtr. Share 1 br. apt. A/C TV Quiet
Landmark Apts. Call 376-7693 after
5:00 PM. (C-5M42-P)
Listeners Wanted: Will pay s2.oofor
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
1 and 4 pm for
appointment. 392-2049. (C-st-143-c)
GATOR COURT
37G 6 v SSL 4i7osw
) 13 th St.
Pend where the
the night... price is right

Wednesday, May 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

WANTED
xx^x^xx^Xx^xWx^x^+x+x+x::::
>A ( fe ma,e romm ate wanted for Point
West apt. 2 bedroom, 2 full baths
o deposit s7s for summer
quarter call Robin 378-7188 5-Bpm
or 392-2925 8-llam. (C-6t-142-p)
Trallermate for summer term. Your
own room in new trailer. A/C
$45/mo + V 2 util. Grad student pref.
Mobileer Park. 378-4775 after 7 PM
(C-st-141-p)
FRIENDLY apt. needs co-ed
roommate. ONLY sioo for summer.
Townhouse in Landmark. Call Carol
372- or Debbie 392-9880.
(C-st-144-p)
JUNE RENT FREE 4 to share 2 bdr
2 bath Point West apt $125 ea for all
summer pool ac dishwasher call
376-9924 or 372-5970 after 5 must
be 21. (C-10t-142-p)
Live in paradise. Share 2 bedroom
house in paradise 4 miles from
campus. Private bedroom. $47 per
mo. includes everything. Discount to
Spanish speaker. Ph 378-8005
evenings. (C-3t-143-p)
2-4 roommates for summer qtr. La
Mancha apt. Pvt. bdrms, 2 bath, 2
blks to campus, pool, AC, laundry,
utilities Inc. Call: 376-6951.
(C-st-141-p)
Female Roommate Wanted Summer
43.00 a month one block from Tlgerl
air-conditioned, own bedroom call us
at 378-0963 1210 SW 3rd Ave, apt. 8
(C-st-141-p)
Male roommate for summer quarter
at La Mancha. Live all summer for
$l5O Inc. utilities; pool, a/c, own
bedroom. Call 372-8046 anytime.
(C-st-143-p)
2 roomates to share 5 bedroom flat
fall quarter at the PLACE phone
373- ask for Butch or 392-8940
ask for Dale. (C-3t-142-p)
2 female roommates needed for June
1 Williamsburg 2 bedroom
townhouse A/C, pool,
$52.50/person. Mt. Vernon apt. 11
Call 372-6098. (C-st-141-p)
Coeds for summer qtr. Have your
own room In a house 10 blocks from
Norman S7O + utilities for the entire
summer. Call 373-1748. (C-st-144-p)
FRIENDLY apt needs co-ed roommate
WANTED-Two female roommates
for the Place-Sophmores in
Sept-Pleasel! Call 392-8499 before
Thurs nite! (C-3t-144-p)
2 roommates summer for 2
bedroom Williamsburg Apt n 0.42
373-1216 close to Med Center.
(C-3t-144-p)
EE Grad student with 2 bdrm apt
needs 1,2, or 3 roommates for the
summer quarter. Call Jim 378-9129,
500-7 SW 34 SL Point West Apts.
(C-3t-144-p)
HELP WANTED
Looking for mother to take care of 3
children In her home while on
vacation following graduation. If
Interested please call 372-3846.
(E-st-142-p)
YMCA day camp counselors needed
June 15th to July 29th approx. S7O a
week those qualifying for work-study
preferred call Jerry Erkert 378-8533
(E-4t-144-p)
64 2-door auto Plymouth; good cond;
SUMMER JOB! See the US as a ramp
hand for the world's greatest auto
thrill show. For Information call
373-1247. (E-st-143-p)
Co-ed wanted room and board in
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
Need full time saleslady for ladies
retail department. Some experience
preferred. Pay according to ability.
For Interview apply In person at
Silvermans, 225 W. University Ave.
(E-4t-143-p)
Cocktail waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary will
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dub's
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-125-p)

Dialoque with a Theoloque
(-ICAN a HUMAN
r-l BEING be
L, J J RELIGIOUS?
a discussion led by
Dr. Sidney Jourard
with
Dr. Harold Stahmer
Rev. John Talbird
Mr. Dan Beardsley
today at 4:00 pm Union Lounge 122
M sponsored |jy die U.R.A. & J.W.R.U.
y i i 11

Page 13

x-Xi-XX-ivX'X'X-x-X'X'X-X-X-XXfXXv
HELP WANTED
Waitress, Coney Island Rest. 210 SE
First St. 372-9288 Must be 21. Full
time. (E-4t-141-p)
Need a Job? All routes student
operated. Charles Chips Home
Delivery service potato chips,
pretzels, cookies, 376-6943.
(E-10t-137-p)
AUTOS
rXvXXtXxXvXrXtXxXrXXXrXXvX:-
196 9 BMW 1600 new engine,
stickshift, blue w/ black interior.
Make offer. Call 372-6474 after 2
pm. (G-3t-144-p)
Ford 1962, Air, R&H, 4 dr, 51 X, whit
To The Drummer," Your sound leave
winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission is a winner
tool TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)
Married student with 2 cars needs
only 1. 62 Chevy Impala. Tires body
engine & Interior In fine shape. Runs
good $250 call 373-1046.
(G-st-143-p)
64 Chevy Impala conv. VB,
Autotrans power steering. Good
mechanical condition. Make offer,
376-4165 after 5. (G-st-143-p)
1965 Blue Triumph with brand new
engine. Must sell. SBOO. Call
378-7655 after 5:00. (G-3t-142-p)
Distinctive 1968 AMX. 390, 4-speed,
air, stereo tape, other extras. Must
sell, going camping $2300. Call
376-1853 evenings. (G-st-140-p)
1967 Opel, A/C, Excellent
Condition, Call Joel 378-9758 or
378-2401 or see at 1113 S.W. Ist ave.
(G-st-143-p)
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy cfoan used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
1960 Falcon, radio, heater, new tires,
repainted, engine work. Cheap
dependable transportation. Excellent
condition. 376-2909 after 5:30.
(G-st-141-p)
1963 Rambler FULLY EQUIPPED
RUNS PERFECTLY $399. Call Tom
at 373-1573 or 373-2747.
(G-st-140-p)
1969 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN 9,000
miles, excellent cond. 1 owner,
visiting faculty member, $1,500 Call
373-2990 before 10 am or ester 7
pm. (G-st-141-p)
64 2-door auto Plymouth; good
cond; very dean; new battery; good
tires; radio; trailer hitch; S4OO cash;
Ollendorff 392-3611 / 376-0921.
(G-st-144-nc)
Ford 1962, Air, R & H, 4 dr. six,
white, $350, VW Bug, 1968, Air, R &
H, Sunroof, Extras, Excellent car
$1,530, Best Offer Buys, Call
372-2303. (G-3t-144-D)
PERSONAL
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
3 cute kittens for free. Potty trained,
clean, and fun. Call John 372-4408
after 5. (J-lt-144-p)
Groovy Saluki (Persian Greyhound)
needs a home for the summer and
faster parent while Im overseas
Worth $75 to me to ffnd a loving home.
Call 376-4945. (J-st-144-p)
Sex and the spirit In the sky. A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters in
Union Aud. May 21 7:30 pm
FREE FUN INTERESTING FREE
FREE ********* (J-st-141-p)
Free fruit juice for any campus
policeman who comes to the front of
Tlgert without his gun on we love
you but not your guns The hunger
strikers. (J-141-6t-p)

PERSONA L
NEED RIDE TO S. MIAMI Friday
after 10:15 call Grace 392-9373
anytime. (J-lt-144-p)
ILMEC. (J-st-143-p)
Junl Happy Birthday to the best
girl In the world. Maybe the fritzes In
your hair will straighten out when
you get your present me.
(J-lt-143-p)
David Sex is beautiful. Lets learn
together. A Bridge Over Toubled
Waters. Union Aud. on May 21 at
7:30 pm Free Mary (J-st-141-p)
Is sex love? Find out at A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters in Union Aud.
on May 2l at 7:30 pm. Its FREE
AND FUN!! (J-st-141-p)
To my favorite Scorpio (SAM 17):
Always may the sun shine brightly
sos you and the stars guide you, for
you are the reason they shine. Youll
always be the one and only N* man
gray hairs included. MTP
(J-st-140-p)
Needed: Animal Lover to board 2
cats for summer quarter while owner
abroad. Will provide food plus S6O.
376-4918. (J-3M42-P)
Would you like to help someone in
need? Contribute your extra or
unwanted Items, and visit the garage
sale Purpose The Royal Christian
Youth Center is a Christian
organization non-denominational,
integrated serving children and
youth. Any donation is given
completely to the youth work. 425
N.E. 7th St. (J-3t-142-p)
TO MY INVISIBLE Friend, It was a
great time. Always look out for the
little people and dont let your
Invisible friends get wet. Can I be one
too? Thanks for all. (J-2t-144-p)
To The Drummer, Your sound
leaves me "Feelin Alright. Thanks.
(J-3t-144-p)
x : x:
LOST Sc FOUND
v>.%XX*X*X FOUND: Suzuki motorcycle key.
Call 378-4676. (L-3M44-NC)
Lost mixed Shepard pup white tip on
tail near NW llth Ave. Call
372-2628. (L-4t-144-p)

pXTRA TH^!I!T7
1 DAYS T **-iaS3. I--J| SMASH! I
1 SUTHERLA ml
I HURRY!
I wrni the
I EJIB UNINHIBITED SEVENTIES I
I COMES
OBthe ural
mSB/Bm A different honk of youth. When he I
speaks, you listen. You wonder about
freaky things you hear and the
I l wMmm people he raps with.

LOST FOUND: Sandals with initials
D LA-picked up by mistake at
Saturdays Celebration. Call
373-1042. (L-3M44-NC)
Marsha Sex isnt the only thing I
love you too! Meet me at A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters in Union Aud.
May 21 at 7:30 pm me. (J-st-141-p)
Grad student Needs Bread.
Experienced Accurate Typist. .45 per
page Call Lorrle 372-7973.
(M-Bt-140-p)
Rubys ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th St. 376-8506 Mrs.
Ruby Mills. (M-10t-135-p)
STEREO TAPES $4.00 very high
quality selection of 200 albums or
transfer from own order blank and/or
information, Sound & Cinema
Corporation P.O. Box 1064 Eau
Gallie, Fla. (M-st-142-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pick-up delivery 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-143-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
11US. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
Free inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
Are you fumbling In the dark? A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters will
turn you on! Union Aud. May 21
7:30 pm FREE (M-st-141-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-p)
AT THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 cent and 4 cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)



Page 14

1, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 20,1970

Presbyterian Center Gets Involved
k v *? ij. r>y "T.. ;.

By RICK ROSKOWE r :
Alligator Staff Writer
The days when churches refused to be involved with controversial
community subjects are passing.
Take the example of the University Presbyterian Center, which has
given the St. Pete Defense Fund working space and donated a
minimum amount of funds to the Florida Probe magazine.
THE ST. PETE Defense fund, an organization which raises bond
money for students arrested in demonstrations has found a home at
the center. Rev. John Talmage, Presbyterian minister at the center
said, We have given them working space for the defense fund,
adding that the group is not officially backed by the center.
St. Pete Defense Fund is one kind of group we work with,
Talmage pointed out. He said the Presbyterian Center has a Thursday
evening ecumenical communion service, holds seminars for foreign
students and the International Culture group also meets there.
Rev. Daniel Beardsley said that although the St. Pete Defense Fund
may be controversial it doesnt make them (the group)
unacceptable. We just provide a space for those guys to get
together, Beardsley said. A phone was provided, but they pay for
it, he added.
THEIR AIMS are reasonable, Beardsley said. They are
non-violent and are merely raising bond money for students arrested
in demonstrations.
There are some things we support, Talmage said. Among these
are freedom of speech and a whole, moral and just society, the
Presbyterian minister said.
To have a whole and just society it must be possible for groups to
speak their minds, Talmage said. I dont believe this group is
dedicated to violence. I feel they are dedicated to raising money for
the defense of the defenseless.
Beardsley said the Florida Probe magazine was initially housed in
the center. We invited them to get together, he said, And we
provided them a minimal amount of funds.
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MANS BEST FRIEND
Bicycles are safe, they do not pollute the air, they do not ride at
dangerous speeds and they are fun. UF students taking this as part
of their philosophy are going to the two-wheel drive for fun, play and
plain old transportation. The pooch does't seem worried about the
competition.

I I
Student Special
Any car or color!
|
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
?0t 7 hi
H Ph. 373-|saS
Hi

CENTRAL AUTO SHOP
MAJOR TUNE UPS
MINOR TUNE UPS
ENGINE OVERHAULS
RING AND VALVE JOBS
CLUTCH JOBS BRAKE.WORK
£ if ABBUBETORiBEBUiykjNG

KuM''
~! 0 W r* ~ ~ i --nrrr£gjsyy t S£S||B|iji*HHii^^^^^^^^'* < **' 6 A
pK
&%'. ->" *** i\ - ,''~-'' >*. .*'- . i / /., v
UNIVERSITY PRESBYTERIAN CENTER
... houses Florida Probe, St. Pete Defense Fund
Greek Magazine Emerges

Insight, a new general interest magazine
sponsored by the Interfratemity Council and
Panhellenic, will be distributed next Monday.
The 20-page magazine includes articles on racism
at UF by Mitch Dasher of the Black Student Union,
Womens liberation, and the proposed changes in
University College, said Editor Jack Dicks.
DICKS SAID there is also an article dealing with
the chances that a long-haired, hippie type has in
the business world.
Insight is replacing the old Gator Greek magazine,

SUPER SHOW CONTRACTS
Uhlfelder Questions Procedures

By RON SACHS
Alligator Writer
In a statement released
Monday, Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder
questioned the methods of
contract used by Student
Government Productions (SGP).
I am deeply concerned at the
way SGP managed the events
leading up to the Super Show,
the statement said. Although
the technical aspects of the show
itself were handled well, I still
feel it is necessary to propose
significant changes concerning
negotiations and contractual
agreements involving future
shows.
THE PROBLEM was that
negotiations were made by SGP
and contracts were signed by the
past presidents of the student
body (Charles Shepherd and
Walter Morgan) before money
had been officially allocated by
the Student Senate.
If I had been president of
the student body when the
arrangements had been made
this situation would not have
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
BARBER S STYLE SHOP
3 Roffler Stylists
5 Barbers
Roffler Sculpture
Kut for longer hair
Hair straightening
and relaxing
6 to 8 week guarantee
Capiloscope Free
Analysis of hair and
scalp problems
IfiTH
373-1195

occurred. This is the reason I
feel immediate action is
necessary to make significant
changes in the operations of SGP
to make certain that this
situation will not occur again,
Uhlfelder said.
Uhlfelder plans to submit his

WED. NITE SPECIAL^
IESH SEA SQUAB OR GROUPER
iciuding ALL YOU CAN EAT! £-,75
nch Fries ADULTS
sh Puppies Pirates' Slaw CHILDREN $1.15
ES COVE LOBSTER HOUSE
A FOOD FRESH FROM THE SEA
HBHI BankAmericard wbmbwwi
SERVING DAILY FROM 5 P.M.
OCALA GAINESVILLE
301.44 1 op EN SUNDAY 5-10
AMikWh 1 3500 S^ J l3th ST.
>1 Holiday Inn I ON
ONI 622-6356 f >- RHONE 378-2931

Dicks said, because IFC thought that Gator Greek
was outdated.
It was just an in-house publication and we
decided that with the sa T .c amount of money we
could publish a magazine that would be more
interesting and be appealing to more students,
Dicks said.
We are trying to go more in depth into the
things that students face, he said.
Insight will be published quarterly and delivered
to greek houses, living areas and other distribution
points.

proposals to the Student Senate
and the Public Functions
Authority.
Uhlfelder proposals will
include a method of limiting the
ability of a group to contract for
entertainment before funds have
been allocated.



Jobs Available In Crisis Prevention

By CARLOS J. LICE A
Alligator Writer
UF students interested in
finding summer employment
m ay find it with Operation
Safety Valve a Hot Line
crisis prevention center in
Miami Beach.
Operation Safety Valve was
started by Dr. Milton L.

Frosh Curfew Policy Under Study,
DecisionTo Come From Housing

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Freshmen curfew and open
house policies are being
discussed by UF Housing
Division, Harold C. Riker,
director of housing, said
Tuesday.
We should have some
decision on freshmen womens

Biological Control Os Pests
Not 'lmpractical Dream

Is biological control the
magical solution to all the
farmers pest problems? Or is it
merely an impractical dream of
long-haired professors?
Dr. W. H. Whitcomb, the
entomologist who heads
biological control programs for
the UFs Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS),
says the truth lies somewhere in
between.
WHITCOMB defines
biological control as controlling
insects by the use of other
organisms whether they be the
size of a bird or of a
micro-organism.
Biological control is a
powerful and useful tool, Dr.
Whitcomb said. But he said the
development of such a program
requires considerable time. An
enormous amount of knowledge
of organisms, of insects, and of
ecology is needed, he said.
To think that we can go in
tomorrow and replace all the
insecticides with biological
control is absurd. I personally
feel that if we want to, the use
of insecticides can be greatly
reduced in most cases in from 10
to 15 years with the proper
financial support and adequate
personnel, he said.
A GREAT DEAL of the
contamination of the
environment up to now is due to
the misuse of insecticides,
Whitcomb said. In many cases
the entomologists
recommendations are not even
followed.
Whitcomb favors getting
away frdm preventive
treatment and starting to apply
insecticides only when pests are
boxwood
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMBERSHR*
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 + TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 AU DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
for information colt
£ 376-0080 r
P? mmwoop ho i
STC 3HCWW v I
T w.i.

Grossman, director of adolescent
medicine at the Mount Sinai
Hospital in Miami Beach and
professor of pediatrics at the
University of Miami.
THE PROJECT is a 24-hour
telephone service in the greater
Miami area to help young people
who call because they find
themselves in crisis situations.

curfew within the next couple of
days, Riker said.
A PROPOSAL to give 24-hour
open house to Towers is under
discussion, but no change is in
view according to Riker.
Returning dorm residents and
entering freshmen will request
whether they wish to live in
areas with open house policies.
We knew that there would

present to be killed. He admitted
that on certain high value, low
acreage crops where almost no
insect damage can be allowed,
preventive treatment is still
necessary.
But Im convinced that if
well work towards applying
only when needed, theres no
reason we cant in some cases
reduce insecticides within two to
three years by 25 to 50 per
cent, Whitcomb said.
Biological control is a long,
slow, hard, difficult approach, so
in the meantime we will
continue to use insecticides, but
with discretion.
WHITCOMB EXPLAINED
that biological control can mean
any of three approaches:
importing predators,
parasites, and pathogens from
abroad to combat domestic
insect pests,
mass producing predators,
parasites, and pathogens (usually

/apple RECORDS NO. AR 34001)1
THE BEATLES
\ Let it be
\ NOW IN STOCK /
\ ONLY /
V $4.59 /
\ RECORDSVILLE /
\ GAINESVILLE MALL /
Vx
di ' *ii W J jaa i

'OPERATION SAFETY VALUE

One of the goals of the
project is to coordinate the
facilities of various Dade County
organizations helping young
people.
Another goal is to train those
who want to learn how to
handle crisis situations over
telephone lines, so they can start
similar projects in their

be a demand from students
requesting sections with no open
house privileges, W. E. Neylans,
assistant director of housing
said.
WE WILL set up sections to
accomodate those requests,
Neylans said.
Present open house hours are
10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 10 to 2

domestic) for mass release on
pest infestations,
manipulating the
environment to increase the
beneficial insects and pathogens
which prey on pest insects.
The third approach appears to
hold the most promise. The
only serious objection to this
method is the time necessary to
develop such control, he said.
The problem with mass
producing parasites, predators,
and pathogens for release is that
it is an expensive process with
only comparatively temporary
results. Importing predators and
parasites from abroad is most
practical in cases where the
insect pest is itself an imported
one.
SETTING UP such a
program will take 10 years in
most crops, Whitcomb said,
but during the interim I use
what predators and what
insecticides I already have in a
program of integrated control.

communities.
GROSSMAN SAID the center
will be manned by paid staff
which he now is recruiting. He
feels the center can be
controlled better this way.
Operation Safety Valve is
currently funded by a number of
organizations, among them the
Rose Gachet Foundation and
Mount Sinai Hospital.

a.m. on Friday and Saturday.
I dont see any change in
open house policies, Miss
Phyllis Mable, assistant director
of housing, said.
Sometimes our plans arent
finalized until sometime in the
summer though, Miss Mable
said.

THE ___ |
ECOLOGY MAJOR!
SAID I
CONSERVATIVELY: I
MILLER I
MAKES IT RIGHT! I

Wednesday, May 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

The project will start with 21
students to handle the
telephones, with a reserve of
about 20. Dr. Grossman visited
UF to sign up students for his
work. He spoke Monday night to
a group of students in the Reitz
Union.
APPLICATIONS FOR work
with Operation Safety Valve
can be picked up at the
placement center in Tigerts
basement, at the Corner Drug
Store (1823 NW 2nd Ave.) or by
calling Mark Tyson at 378TT431.
Tyson will also furnish more
information about the project.
Grossman said many of the
hot lines have failed in the past,
but currently there are about
120 such projects in cities across
the United States. Gainesville
has one, the Crisis Intervention
Center.
There are about 200 more
such projects that are starting
now, Grossman said.

Page 15



Page 16

i. Til* Florida AlHgator. Wadnaaday, May 20,1070

STUDENT-MOM CHAIRMAN

Mona Tichenor-
Corner Drug Store
By Alligator Services
Mona Tichenor, a tall brunette, sat relaxed at the board
meeting of the Corner Drug Store at the UF.
Mrs. Tichenor, from St. Petersburg, admitted that balancing
her roles as mother, student and co-chairman of the Comer
Drug Store was not very relaxing.
HOWEVER, SHE seemed to approach them all with a poise
that suggested it had borne heavier things.
Mark Tyson, a senior psychology student from Miami Beach,
shares with Mona the official leadership of the youth-operated
facility, created to meet drug problems in the community.
It is a place in which concerned members are open 24 hours a
day to requests for help or information on drug abuse.
THEY ALSO are committed to providing friendship and
activities as a substitute for drugs, and what they say is the
greatest cause of drug use loneliness.
Although the 23-year-old education major had not worked in
a professional capacity with drug addiction, she has known
many friends who either have been through the drug scene, or
are helping to stem its abuse.
Im not shocked by anything I see, she said.
LITTLE SEEMS to upset the slim girl, who has been through
more in six years than most her age.
In 1964, she left St. Petersburg as an entering freshman at the
UF. During her second year she married, quit her education to
put her husband through his, and later cared for their child.
Then came divorce. She found jobs in Gainesville and saved
enough to pick up her original goal of earning a masters degree
to teach college English.
THROUGHOUT THE interview her voice remained even,
pronouncing the words carefully. It quickened and softened,
though, when the subject turned to her 3-year-old daughter,
Lisa, who learned of poetry and flowers at the Baby Gator
Nursery.
Gainesville has been good to live in; it has a nice blend of
privacy and friendliness, she said.
She admitted her adjustments after divorce werent as
traumatic as they could have been due to friends, and an
established place in a town she knew.
UPON RETURNING to school in January, Mona did research
on drug use in the high school for a class and the Corner Drug
Store.
She presently is interning as a ninth grade teacher at a local
school.
Independent is a word that might describe her; yet, she has
no die-hard views on womens liberation movements: Im not
really interested.
MY LITTLE girl, my work and the Drug Store these are
the realities I have to face every day. They are my concern, in
that order, Mona said.
No one has stepped on my toes yet because I was a woman.
But I do agree with a lot of what they say, particularly about
equal salaries, she said.
If she marries again, Mona wont be the dominant one.
WEARING THE pants in the family doesnt appeal to me,
she said. Im a mother.
She hasnt had a hard time keeping her mind on her studies.
When youve been around as much as I have, you dont kid
around anymore. Its a maturing process, she said.
Channel 5 Producer
V)
Gets Award To Study

Marvin I. Ogden, UF assistant
professor of journalism, has been
awarded an internship for study
at the National Center for
Experiments in Television,
beginning June 1.
Ogden is a producer and
director for WUFT (Channel 5)
television station. He is the first
UF broadcaster to be selected
for the internship program.
DURING THE six-week
internship in San Francisco,
Ogden will explore the medium
of television in depth, study the
basic problems of television and
society, and undertake a full
range of artistic, technical and
psychological subjects pertinent
to television and broadcasting.
Criteria for the 12 interns
selected nationwide are
experience, skills evidence of
imaginative achievements in
broadcasting and the station
managers recommendation.

' The internship program is
operated by the National Center
for Experiments in Television
exclusively for members of the
public television community.
The center is sponsored by the
Corporation of Public
Broadcasting.

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UF ducks are a favorite campus attraction for
many students and visitors. But they're getting as
populous as they are popular. Twenty-three new

Former UF First Lady
Receives Honorary Ph.D.

A former first lady of UF, a
former teacher and a former
student will receive honorary
degrees at commencement
exercises June 13.
Mrs. J. Hillis Miller, wife of
the former UF president, will
receive the honorary doctor of
humane letters; Andrew N.
Lytle, former lecturer in English,
will be awarded the honorary
doctor of letters, and Dr. J.
Barkely Rosser, a UF graduate,
will receive the honorary doctor
of science.
A GRADUATE of Madison
College in Harrisonburg, Va.,
and recipient of a masters
degree from Columbia
University, Mrs. Miller retired as
head of the Office of Patient
Services at the Shands Teaching
Hospital in 1968. The hospital is
a part of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, named for her
late husband.
Prior to that position, she was
assistant director of the Wesley
Foundation, a student
organization for Methodist
Church youths attending the
university.
A member of several civic
organizations, Mrs. Miller is an
honorary member of Mortar
Board and Altrusa International,
and was UFs Mother of the
Year in 1965.
LYTLE HELD a lectureship
in the Department of English
from 1948-61. His creative
writing courses caused the
university to become a mecca
for serious-minded writers from
all over the nation.
A graduate of Vanderbilt
University, Lytle taught at

Southwestern College, the
University of the South and the
University of lowa before
coming to UF. Currently, he is
editor of Sewannee Review
literary magazine.
Lytle returns tb UF in June
for the first Florida Writers
Conference where he again will
be a lecturer.
DR. ROSSER received his
bachelor of science degree from
UF in 1929 and the masters
degree in 1931, subsequently

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earning the Ph.D. from
Princeton.
He is currently professor of
mathematics and computer
science at the University of
Wisconsin and director of the
Mathematics Research Center at
Madison.
Dr. Rosser is the author of
numerous research articles as'
well as four books in logic, one
in mathematics and one in
mathematical theory of rocket
flight.

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BOOKS-
Local Anaesthetic:
From Gunter Grass

H Local Anaesthetic, by Gunter
(Grass
(Harcourt, Brace & World,
56.95)
Ever since Gunter Grass
emerged upon the international
library scene in the early 1960 s
with The Tin Drum, he has
written about war guilt. This
new novel satirizes that very
preoccupation.
it is savagely funny, lacking'
none of Grass characteristic
black and bitter humor.
Example: the book -about pain
l as the most enduring human
condition takes place largely
I in a dentists chair.
I On a television screen
I provided by the pompous,
I philosophy-quoting dentist to
I distract the patient, narrator
I Eberhard Starusch projects
I scenes from his past which
I merge almost indistinguishably
I with fantasies about what might
I have happened. They involve his
I days as an industrial engineer
I and a former fiancee and her
I father, a general, who relight
I World War II battles in a
sandbox.
Starusch, now a
schoolteacher, also has present
problems. He must deal with his
favorite students plan to burn
his dachshund alive to protest
the use of napalm in Vietnam,
the students Maoist girl friend
and his own girl friend, a fellow
teacher brooding over her past as
a Nazi youth leader.
The present problems are
resolved, the past is left even
more in doubt and Starusch
develops new dental problems.
Nothing lasts, Grass writes.
There will always be pain.
Peggy Polk (UPI)
s|e s|g
Conor Cruise OBrien
Introduces Ireland, edited by
Owen Dudley Edwards.
(McGraw-Hill, $7.95)
This book is a potpourri of
Ireland a bit of history, a bit
of travel information, a study of
the culture, a look at politics. In
BESTSELLER
LIST
BEST SELLERS
(UPI)
(Compiled by Publishers Weekly)
Fiction
THE FRENCH LIEUTENANTS
WOMAN John Fowles
LOVE STORY Erich Segal
TRAVELS WITH MY AUNT
Graham Greene
MR. SAMMLERS PLANET Saul
Bellow
THE GODFATHER Mario Puzo
THE GANG THAT COULDNT
SHOOT STRAIGHT Jimmy
Breslin
A BEGGAR IN JERUSALEM Elie
Wiesel
ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF
SOLITUDE Gabriel Garcia
Marquez
THE HOUSE ON THE STRAND
Daphne du Maurier
THE INHERITORS Harold
Robbins
Nonfiction
EVERYTHING YOU HAVE
ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW
ABOUT SEX David Reuben
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS
Antonia Fraser
E SELLING OF THE
PRESIDENT 1968 Joe
McGinnis
UP THE ORGANIZATION Robert
Townsend
LOVE AND WILL -Ro 11 o May
AMERICAN HERITAGE
DICTIONARY OF THE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE William
Morris, editor-in-chief
THE GRAHAM KERR COOKBOOK
~ Galloping Gourmet
THE PETER PRINCIPLE
h3P '
WELLINGTON Elizabeth Longford

o
sum, a palatable mixture of the
elements that go to make up this
fascinating country.
Conor Cruise OBrien, the
versatile diplomat, critic and
historian, has assembled an
excellent group of writers who
take up various aspects of
Irish life with honesty, verve and
not without criticism.
As OBrien points out: Each
contributors experience shapes
for him an Ireland which differs
at least slightly in its contours
from anyone elses Ireland.
The comments and anecdotes
are lovely. On Mass-goers their
overall heterogeneity is as
startling as their numbers.
William Butler Yeats visiting a
pub for the first time, downing a
sherry and declaring: I have
seen a pub now kindly take me
home.
Joan Hanauer (UPI)

j|p % 11
ijfpl ...v. -V _'* f*''* **, V
Wr Wi W t ?lFT| wm 111

In a recent ad we reported that our survey has
proven beyond doubt that ownership of a KLH
stereo set makes you a far more loving person.
This week, we wish to report that our survey
also found that to own a KLH increases human
contact.
How do we know this ?
In our survey we asked each respondent to say
how much hed spend, above his present outlay,
to keep his telephone; a means of communicating.
Here are the crucial data.
KLH owners said they would pay $4.84 more
than persons who do not own KLH equipment.
KLH owners, then, are more interested in conver conversation
sation conversation by almost five dollars!
Now when our previous ad appeared, demon demonstrating
strating demonstrating that KLH also produces more loving
persons, there were those who accused us of jug juggling
gling juggling the statistics, or at the least interpreting
them to our own advantage.
While we admit such statistical juggling is pos possible,
sible, possible, in all candor, reader, we ask you this:
If KLH owners are not achieving greater joy
and human understanding through conversation,

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IFC Spring Frolics Nears;
Janis Joplin Tops Bill

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
With Celebration 7O, the Super Show, and some
fine acts appearing at The Rathskeller, this has been
an incredible quarter talent-wise on campus.
And, Im glad to say, the good things arent over.
Janis Joplin, an energetic young lady who may be
the top female rock vocalist in the World, is going to
be here May 26 for the Interfraternity Councils
Spring Frolics.
ALSO ON THE bill is Rotary Connection, a top
group with two black singers -a man and a woman
and a beautifully driving sound. Theyve been
here before playing at The Rat and it will be
good to hear them again.
Joplin ,is touring with a good-sized band now
since shes gotten rid of Big Brother and the Holding

KLH & CONVERSATION

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then why are they valuing phones so highly?
So much for that.
Turning now to what it is in all KLH equip equipment,
ment, equipment, record players and FM radio alike, which
creates such open, generous qualities in people:
First, there is the superb walnut cabinetry. (See
photo above.) Then too there is the throaty full fullness
ness fullness of our woofers and the delicate precision of
our tweeters and the very notion of the three
piece music system of supreme quality, allowing
every smidgen of musical nuance to reach your
ears without enormous cash outlays for more
complicated systems.
There is no doubt that with such equipment as
this, you will hear music as if for the first time,
and thenceforth your ears will be forever alive to
all manner of sound, voices included.
There you have your explanation.
Yes.
Hear the nuances 10-6
every Day Monday
and Friday til 9.

*r
Wednesday, May 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Company. The new band includes one or two of the
former musicians and a brass section thats changed
her sound appreciably -for the better, I think.
Theres a lot more rhythm and blues now and it
feels good.
The show will be in the stadium, hopefully under
dry skies and with that same good high stage that
was used for the Super Show. I dont know for sure,
but I imagine the show will begin around 8 p.m.
Joplin has been known to do nice long shows, too,
so we can expect a good nights entertainment for
the money.
As soon as it is revealed to me in a vision, I will
say more about the particulars of the show exact
admission cost and time and all and you can plan
further at that point. Oh momma, I got them ol
cosmic blues again.

Page 17



The
Florida
Alligator

Dobies, Two More
Named By SEC

Gator outfielder Tony Dobies,
catcher Will Harman and pitcher
Wayne Rogers all gained
Southeastern Conference
baseball honors with Dobies
earning the most recognition
getting named to the All-SEC
first team.
Harman and Rogers were
named to the SECs All-Eastern
Division team in Mondays
announcement by SEC
Commissioner A.M. (Tonto)
Coleman.
Dobies, a junior from Miami,
led the Florida hitters with his
.345 average and 20 runs batted
in. He also led the team and the
SEC in most hits banging out 49
in 38 games. Dobies also tied
with Harman for most doubles
with nine and with Rod Macon
for slugging with a .444
percentage.
HARMAN, a 5-foot-8, 190
pounder, led the Gators and is
tied for second place in the SEC
for stolen bases with 11 bags. He
was second only to Dobies in
hitting with a .315 average and
19 RBIs.

( Intramurals (
By Steve Rohan iiiiiiiie
INDEPENDENT LEAGUE r The Silver Streaks captured the
Independent League softball championship by stomping the P.E. Petes
11-3.
The Streaks banged out 14 hits while capitalizing on four Petes
errors.
Streak pitcher Jose Lopez held the Petes to no runs and only three
hits over the first five innings before the Petes finally erupted for
three runs on five hits in the final two innings.
IN THE MEANTIME Walter Morales was leading a Streak hitting
attack by smashing a homer and three singles. The Streaks scored
twice in the first, once in the second and six in the fourth.
Ralph Pena opened the fourth with a single and he was followed by
Lopez reaching on an error and Orlando Morenos single. Juan Sollozo
reached on an error and Morales emptied the bases with a homerun.
Don Davey closed out the scoring in the inning with a solo homerun.
The Petes runs came in the fourth on doubles by Chuck Fessler
and Mike Healy and in the fifth on singles by Keith Tennant, Brian
Jetter, and Bob Russell.
BLUE LEAGUE: Chi Phi has officially won the Blue League
Presidents Cup, according to statistics compiled by the Intramural
Departments chief statistician Chuck Fessler.
Going into softball the Chi Phis had accrued 983 points compared
to 861 for second place KA and 855 for Delta Upsilon. This
amounted to a healthy 122 point lead. Since the most points that can
be gained in softball is 100, the Chi Phis needed only to enter to win.
The Chi Phis entered softball and though they lost their first game
to the AGRs, it made little difference.
Theta Chi and DU are both undefeated in two games in Blue
League play.

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GATOR SPORTS

Over on the throwing side
Rogers led the Gators in
victories with eight, against four
losses. He also has a low 1.80
earn run average and was Coach
Dave Fullers main stopper in
crucial games.
SEC champions Mississippi
State and runner up Tennessee
dominated the All-SEC first
team. The Bulldogs and the
Volunteers each placed four men
apiece on the team.
Heres the team by position:
Jocko Potts, Mississippi State,
first base; John Shaw, Ole Miss,
second base; Archie Manning,
Ole Miss, shortstop; Steve
Tingle, Kentucky, third base;
Phil Garner, Tennessee, utility
infielder; Sam Ewing and Bobby
Tucker, both of Tennessee, and
Dobies, Florida, outfield; Dave
Phares, Mississippi State, utility
infielder; Fred Yilling,
Mississippi State, and Andy
Merchant, Auburn, catchers; and
Brantley Jones, Mississippi State;
Jimmy Lee, Tennessee, and Bob
Cannon, Georgia, pitchers.

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BHHHHF Jr
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M- >* * **.*+& ililpi
TONY DOBIES
... leads SEC in hits

FSU Bumped
In Poll After
Loses To UF
Florida State University lost
its first place ranking this week
in the college baseball poll
conducted by the newspaper
Collegiate Baseball. FSU fell
to third place after taking two
losses from UF last week.
Southern California regained
the top spot with Texas taking
the number two ranking.
JACKSONVILLE University
moved up a place to number 18
in the national ranking while
Miami dropped three places to
19th. In the small college
division Florida Southern
retained its sixth place ranking.
FSU will be going to the
NCAA District 111 tournament
May 28 at Gastonia, N.C. The
winner of this tournament will
go to the College World Series.
The top 10 in the national
poll were: Southern California,
Texas, FSU, Ohio State,
Mississippi State, Ohio
University, Arizona, Tulsa,
Southern Illinois and Clemson.
The second 10 were
Washington State, Tennessee,
Texas A&M, Minnesota, Santa
Clara, Pan-American, Mississippi,
Jacksonville, Miami of Florida
and lowa State.
Homer Output
ST. LOUIS (UPI) John
Mize led all National League
home run hitters with only 28
round-trippers in 1939. In 1947
Mize hit 51 to tie the Pirates
Ralph Kiner for the crown.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 18

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I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 20,1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
' X



Floods First Appeal Is Mistreatment

By ROBERT EVANS
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK Curt Flood
took the stand in Federal Court

M|ffnilllllMllllMllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHllllllllllllllllllllllHllllUlimHHininmmiuiiiiniiiimimM^n|||
| On Wheels 1
gniinunuiiiHtfiiuiiiuiiiiiiiiiiniimiiiiiuiiiiinititiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii By Bo Berry mil
Seven hundred miles per hour on four wheels? Yes its possible for
an automobile to go that fast and there are men who want to drive
them.
Since the time of the first primitive motor car man has been
fascinated by the speed of travel possible. In 1898 a Frenchman set
the first Land Speed Record for the mile at a dizzying speed of 39
m.pli.
From then on it has been a challenge that has lured such men as
William Vanderbilt, Henry Ford, Sir Malcolm Campbell, Mickey
Thompson, Art Arsons, Craig Breedlove, and now a Californian Gary
Gabelich.
BREEDLOVE AND ARFONS battled it out in the early 6os for
the record and in 1965 Breedlove pushed his Spirit of America to
600.601 m.pJi.
Its a strange world the men live in who drive these fantastic speeds
in search of the record. They live only to drive their jet or rocket
engined machines down a black strip at the Bonneville Salt Flats in
Utah. And when they break the record and achieve their ultimate goal
there is nothing else to do.
That is the situation Breedlove found himself in after he broke the
record. No one wanted to sponsor him with $250,000 to build
another speed car.
A NEW CHALLENGER has come to try for the record. He is Gary
Gabelick. Next September he will try for the land speed record with a
38-foot rocket-powered car which runs on hydrogen peroxide and
liquid natural gas.
The Blue Flame is designed to travel 1,000 m.p.h. Thats right
faster than the sound barrier. To give you an idea of this mind
boggling speed the car will accelerate from a standing start to more
than 750 m.p.h. in 7.5 seconds. That makes drag racing look like a
baby carriage race and a drive down the freeway seem a snails pace.
The men who drive these cars must live in a different world, but
it must be some indication of how fast our world is moving. It all
makes one wish to take a slow walk and gather some sense to it all.
700 m.pJi. on four wheels is too fantastic to comprehend.
* *
AT A LITTLE slower speed A1 Unser won the pole position for the
Memorial Day Indy 500 at 170.221 m.pJi. Johnny Rutherford and
A.J. Foyt make up the rest of the first row. Last years winner Mario
Andretti will be starting from the third row on race day alongside
Bobby Unser, the 1968 winner.
Dan Gurney put his Eagle on the fourth row with a speed of
168.860 m.pJi. Gurney has said that if he wins Indy this year he will
go back to Formula One racing, but not in his own Eagle cars. That
leaves a lot of room for guessing.
Some non-qualifiers that will try to get into the field this weekend
are Bruce McLaren, Jack Brabam and Lloyd Ruby. Lee Roy
Yarbrough a stock car ace has decided to pass up Indy because he
didnt qualify last weekend and this coming weekend he will be
unable to be at the speedway. Instead he will be racing in the World
600.

... giving
Gainesville twice
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Tuesday on the first day of his
suit against baseball and said he
didnt like to be treated as a
piece of property.
Flood, by baseballs

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RESERVE CLAUSE SUIT

Players Association, has filed
suit in an attempt to overturn
the sports reserve clause, which
binds a player to one team for
the extent of his career. A team
can sell or trade a player at will
to another organization.
FLOOD WAS TRADED last
October to the Philadelphia
Phillies in a deal that sent Richie
Allen to St. Louis, but he
refused to report to his new
team.
I didnt think that after 12
years I should be traded like a
piece of property, said Flood,
who admitted that he was
earning $90,000 a year. I
wanted to continue playing for
the Cards.
Under cross examination from
Mark Hughes, attorney and
spokesman for all the defense
attorneys named in the suit
attacking baseballs reserve
clause, Flood said he decided
last October he wouldnt play
for the Phillies. In December he
made the decision to file suit.
THE 32-YEAR-OLD
outfielder, who conceivably
could be sacrificing the rest of
his career by sitting out at least a
year to test the constitutionality
of the reserve clause, testified
that he wrote to baseball
commissioner Bowie Kuhn to
complain that he was being
traded. He said he didnt think it
was fair because he is a human
being.
Kuhn answered, according to
Flood, that he agreed Flood was
human but said there was
nothing he could do about the
transfer of the contract because
it was a customary practice of
baseball.
Flood said he then spoke to
Phils general manager John
Quinn and advised him I wasnt

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going to play baseball. Im going
to retire. He told me he thought
I should not because
Philadelphia had the nucleus of a
fine club and it was worth my
while and to my advantage to
join the team. I told him Id like
a little more time to think about
it and he said that was alright
with him. -s
EVENTUALLY FLOOD
made his decision to file suit
after several consultations with
lawyers.
Under questioning from
Hughes, Flood first admitted
that the Playeis Association was
paying the expenses of his law
suit, but then added, thats
what I understand.
When Hughes pressed for an
answer to this question, Floods
attorney, former Supreme Court
Justice Arthur Goldberg,
interceded and told Federal
Judge Irving Ben Cooper that
the Association was funding the
expenses but so far we have
received no money.
HUGHES RETORTED, Im
sorry to hear that, bringing
laughter from those gathered in
the court room.
Several times during the days
session Flood had been asked to
keep his voice up, and at this
point, Judge Cooper turned to
him and said, this is a public
trial. Many have come here to
see you and to hear you. They
have a right to know whats
going on, really you almost have
to show what' you have to say
without being prompted.
Hughes then asked Flood if he
would drop the suit if the
Players Association and the
owners came to some decision
on modification of the reserve
clause.
FLOOD SAID YES, then

Wednesday, May 20,1970, The Florida Alligator,

qualified his answer to say he
wanted to abolish the whole
system so that a player at the
end of a season would become a
free agent and play for the team
that made him the best offer.
Flood said he would play for
any team that made the best
offer and 1 would play for
Philadelphia if they made the
highest offer.
Earlier, Flood had referred to
his outside business interests,
including two photo studios and
one portrait studio, as reasons
that would make it difficult to
leave St. Louis.
FLOOD WAS signed out of
high school as a free agent by
the Cincinnati Reds and made
no objection when he was
transferred to the Cards on Dec.
5, 1957. Asked if he knew that
players could be transferred
from club to club at the time he
signed the uniform players
contract, Flood replied, Yes, I
guess I did. I didnt know how it
was done, but I knew it was in
the contract.
HOT I
DOGS
5e
TONIGHT
5-7 P M
Train

Page 19



Page 20

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 20,1970

Pikes Win Cup
After leading the Orange League all year, the Betas saw the
Presidents Cup for fraternity intramurals vanish for good
Tuesday afternoon after dropping an extremely close 4-3
decision to the TEPs.
As a result of the Beta loss, the Pikes became the official
Orange League champs and recipients of the Presidents Cup.
THE PIKES, not the Sigma Chis, as erroneously reported in
Mondays Alligator, were holding a slim point advantage over
the Betas going into softball competition.
The Betas needed to win their bracket and advance into the
semis and finals to earn enough points for the championship.
The Betas almost pulled it off when they took a quick 2-0
lead on Gene Newmans two-run homer in the second inning.
That lead was short lived as the TEPs erupted for four singles
and a double to bring home four runners and the eventual
victory.
Craig Savage gave up six hits to the Betas as more Pikes than
TEPs cheered him to victory.

Hogan To Play
'On Flat Course

FORT WORTH (UPI) Ben
Hogan, completing his second
tournament of competitive golf
in three years, said Sunday he
would play again where there is
a flat golf course where they are
holding a tournament, and then
turned philosophical about why
he wants to continue in the
game.
Hogan wound up his 21st
Colonial National Invitation
Golf Tournament over his home
course Sunday with a
two-over-par 72 and ended the
tournament at 291, 11-over-par
and far behind the leaders. He
had won here five times, the last
time in 1959.
HE STARTED his brief spurt
of golf at the Houston
Champions International two
weeks ago, where he shot a
three-over-par 287 and finished
in a tie for ninth.
I am disappointed in the way
I scored, he said Sunday. I hit
the ball pretty good though, and
I am pleased with that. But you
have to play competitive golf a
lot to score well. You just cant
come and go like I have done for
years.
Hogan was asked why, at 57
and with a painful left knee,
does he go through the physical
strain of practicing and playing
competitive golf. The knee
prevents him from playing uphill
or downhill lies with any hope
of a good shot.
IVE PLAYED a lot of golf
its true, Hogan said. But I
have been out a lot of years. I
lost three years in the service. I
lost one year because of the
wreck (an accident in 1949 that
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almost took his life and left him
with the damaged knee which is
still the main factor in limiting
his appearances).
I lost two years with a bad
shoulder and this knee has kept
me out two years more. 1
havent really done all the things
I would like to do. I guess I
never will. But time is pretty
short and I enjoy playing in
tournaments and the
competition.
Hogan said when he next
plays, whenever that is, it will
not be in back-to-back
tournaments.
It might have taken
something out of me physically
to play at Houston last week,
he said. I wouldnt have played
here at all if it was not Colonial.
I shouldnt have played.
I really dont know where I
will play next. I have to find a
real flat golf course where they
happen to be having a
tournament that week.

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FOLLOWS YEAR OF FEUDS

Coadmg Shakeup At bwa

IOWA CITY, lowa (UPI)
The University of lowa athletic
board fired football coach Ray
Nagel and accepted the
resignation of athletic director
Forest Evashevski Tuesday,
culminating a drawn-out power
struggle between the two men.
Both men were under
contracts which expire on June
30.
THE BOARD action came
after a year of turmoil in the
lowa athletic department in
which numerous coaches
resigned amid reports of
personal vindictiveness, the
football teams black athletes
walked out on the squad, and
there were investigations of the
football operations.
One investigation, by the state
auditor into expense accounts of
members of the athletic
department, still was in progress,
and it was learned that another
investigation by an athletic body
had been concluded. However,
no accusations have been made
against any individual.
Evashevski and Nagel
reportedly had feuded almost
I Frats Win I
x $
Hank Salzler of Beta Theta ji;
Pi connected with Mike j:
Roily son of SAE for three |j:
:j: touchdowns to ease the
i; fraternity All-Stars by the
ex-varsity Gator Greats last
$ night 26-20.
t; Salzler praised the work of
the defensive team for
holding 1966 Hiesman
:] Trophy winner Steve :j
Spurrier. :|i
The All-Stars lead 19-7 at j
:j the half. :
X.v/.vv.w.vAVAv.v.v.v.v.VAVAV.y.^

constantly for control of the
athletic department and football
program, which Evashevski
headed from 1952 through
1960.
THOUGH EVASHEVSKI
made no statement against
Nagel, he indicated his concern
in the struggle with a statement
that never have I been a party
to or tolerated any practice
which was contrary to university
policy or procedure.
Evashevski was the most
successful football coach in lowa
history in his nine years at the
helm with a 52-274 record. His
teams won or shared the big ten
title three times and twice
represented the conference in
the Rose Bowl.
He began his career at lowa in
1952 and was named the
universitys chief athletic
executive in 1960 when he was
at the height of his football
coaching career.
NAGEL AND his staff
assu m e d the f ootb all
responsibilities at lowa in
December, 1965. He came to
lowa after an eight-year tenure
at Utah, where his successes
included a 1964 conference
championship and a Liberty
Bowl victory.
In his four years at lowa,
Nagel compiled a 13-26-1

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record. The last two seasons he
recorded identical 5*5 marks.
Nagel was the second football
coach since Evashevski. Jerry
Burns, who took over the
program from Evashevski, was
fired after five seasons.
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 18 15 .545'
New York 18 17.514 1
St. Louis 16 17.485 2
Pittsburgh 17 20 .459 3
Montreal 13 21 .382 5%
Philadelphia 13 22 .371 6
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 2711.711
Los Angeles 21 15 .583 5
Atlanta 19 16.543 6V2
Houston 19 19 .500 8
San Francisco 18 20 .474 9
San Diego 17 23.425 11
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 24 10 .706
New York 20 16.556 5
Detroit 15 16 .484 7%
Boston 15 17 .468 8
Washington 14 20 .412 10
Cleveland 11 19 .367 11
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 23 10 .697
California 24 12 .677 V 2
Oakland 18 18 .500 6V2
Chicago 15 20 .429 9
Kansas City 13 22 .371 11
Milwaukee 11 23 .324 12Vi