Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
I Ad AmVum

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NO GUNS, NO WORK CLAV PH,PPS
... all but two campus police state

Stadium Damage Possibly $4,000

By 808 WISE
Alligator otavr writar
Florida Field was trampled,
littered and filled with broken
glass to the extent of a possible
$4,000 to $5,000 in repair costs
during the Super Show
Saturday.
UF Athletic Director Ray
Graves said he would
recommend to the Athletic
Association that no more
spectators be allowed on the
grass during events at the field.
MOST OF THE damage was
from broken glass trampled into
the turf. Grass was completely
removed in some places and will
have to be re-sprigged, according
to Assistant Athletic Director
Percy Beard.
In addition, toilets in the

| By CARLOS J.UCEA
Alligator Writer
k
j:j Another group has joined voices with the
Students for Equal Protection Under the Law
:ji (SEPUL) in requesting the UF does not close its
>: doors if another student strike should break out.
Last week SEPUL was organized by law
:! students who want to ask the administration to
make refunds to those students who want the
tuition money for the day the strike closed the
UF.
ALSO LAST week, the Florida Alpha Chapter
; of Alpha Sigma Mu Metallurgical Engineering
11 Honor Society sent a memorandum to UF
i[ President Stephen C. OConnell and Student
ij Body President Steve Uhlfelder saying they do
i not want the UF to be closed again.
; SEPUL will start today and Wednesday to
I j collect signatures from the UF student body for
\\ the tuition refund request.
Mel PlMfcnan, SEPUL spokesman, also said
;i the petition also includes the request for an

The
Florida Alligator

UF Anti-Strike Move Grows

'k'k'k
SGP Asks Help In Field Cleanup
Student Government Productions (SGP) has appealed to those who
attended the Super Show to give an hour of their time to, help clear
the field of broken glass, today at 10 ajn.
Were trying to show the Athletic Department that we can get
together, Leonard Tanner, chairman SGP, said, and that we want
shows like this in the future.
There will be gloves, dust pans and other needed materials
furnished at the stadium.
The costs of repairs to the field have been estimated at $4,000 to
$5,000. If students will help clear the area, it will cut the costs
considerably, according to Tanner.


stadium were stopped up, and
the overflow seeped into offices
below.
It was the first time an
audience had been allowed on
the grass at Florida Field. There
had been some damage during

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

'w wk
f "f ij^K
MEL PEARLMAN
... spokesman for SEPUL

University of Florida, Gainesville

FOUR QUIT LAST WEEK ~~
UPD Officers Refuse
To Give Up Weapons

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writar
All but two members of the
University Police Department
(UPD) have signed a statement
saying they will not
compromise on our right to bear
arms while on duty.
UPD Training Officer Dudley
D. Goulden presented the
statement Sunday to the
Committee to Study the
Removal and Control of Qms
on Campus after it was
unanimously adopted in a
meeting of all UPD officers.
FOUR UPD officers quit last
week. Goulden said he did not

previous events, but nothing
like this, Beard said.
GRAVES SAID business
manager Ray Daniel made a
tentative estimate of $4,000 to
$5,000 in repair costs, but
students would defray some of
the cost by helping with work

injunction so the UF will not close its doors to :
those students who want to attend classes. :
According to the Gainesville Sun in a story last :
Sunday, a petition signed by about 1,000 UF
students and faculty was delivered Friday to j:
OConnells office.
SPECIAL ASSISTANT to UF President £
OConnell Rae O. Weimer said these groups
seeking to keep the UF open have a salutary S
effect on the university.
The silent majority has now become
involved, to speak out, Weimer said. That is
what the students are here for, and that is to get §
an education. £
Weimer said he does not know exactly how
many signatures have been turned in to his office
to keep the UF open, but he estimates having i
about 2,000 signatures. $
THE PETITION asked OConnell to keep the :
UF open. |
A petition by Alpha Sigma Mu, according to |
(SEE 'GROUPS' PAGE 2) ?.

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUHIIIIIIIIII
The officers statement
warned that city and
state police will enforce
the law and you will not
receive the cooperation
you have enjoyed with
the good old Kampus
Kop. 7 t
know if they quit because of
student demands. None of the
men could be reached for
comment Monday.
Ridiculous demands could
cause more resignations and

on the field.
The business office is
preparing a detailed estimate of
the costs which will probably be
available today, he said.
The Athletic Association will
probably take a hard look at
any requests to use the field in
the future, and probably will not
allow spectators on the grass
again, according to Graves.
ALTHOUGH MUCH of the
damage was due to abuse of the
field, heavy rains were a
contributing factor, Graves said.
Most of the broken glass
appeared to be from wine
bottles, but you name it and it
was on the field/ Beard said.
Leonard Tanner, head of
Student Government
Productions, was recruiting
students to help clean up the
field, according to Beard.

jjfc yitjy
jHj y

Tuesday, May 19, 1970

curtail recruiting, the statement
warned.
If this happens, the statement
said, it will mean city or state
police would have to be called in
to help during demonstrations,
and they will not be willing to
give up their guns.
THEY WILL enforce the law
and you will not receive the
cooperation you have enjoyed
with the good old Kampus
Kop. Think about it, the
statement read.
Goulden said he personally
would refuse to answer domestic
calls or police a demonstration if
he was not allowed a weapon,
and if he lost his job he would
appeal to the State Board of
Complaints.
The UPD statement pointed
out they had apprehended a man
fighting in the stadium Saturday
night who was armed with a .25
caliber automatic.
STUDENTS WERE armed
with knives, razors, chains and
even firearms during the
take-over of Walker Auditorium,
and there had been at least two
shootings on campus in recent
years, according to the
statement.
It is unfortunate and indeed
a disgrace four students were
killed at Kent State University.
However, may I ask you how
much publicity was given to the
four California Highway
Patrolmen killed in the line of
duty, on a routine stop and who
left wives and children behind,
the statement read.
UPD officers are as highly
trained as any in the area,
according to the statement.
Goulden, in charge of training,
formerly served as program
director for the state Police
Standards Council, and certified
28 of the 40 approved police
schools in the state.
The two who did not sign the
statement were the chief and
one man who had not seen it
yet, Goulden said.
ABOUT 75 students take
over administration
building at Florida
Memorial College ... .page 2
Classifieds 8 '
Editorials 6
Letters 7
Movies 8
Orange A Bias .4
Sparta 10
Whats Happening 2



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Tuoday, May 19,1970

Mitchell In Mississippi
To Investigate Deaths

JACKSON, Miss. (UPI)
U. S. Attorney General John
Mitchell was to arrive
Monday to personally
investigate the Jackson State
College violence in which two
young Negroes were killed.
Mitchell was expected
about midaftemoon for a
meeting with college officials
and Mayor Russell Davis, who
named five local attorneys to
a special fact finding
committee to investigate the
disorders.

Journalism College Re-accredited;
Needs f New Or Expanded Quarters

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Re-accreditation of UF
College of Journalism and
Communications was announced
Thursday by UF President

Groups Want UF Doors Kept Open;
Faculty, Staff, Students Join Forces

PAGE QNE^j
its president William L. Wilson, was signed by
about 30 students.
Those of us who signed the petition felt our
primary purpose here is to get an education.
THATS WHAT we paid for. If someone
wants to protest, they can do it in their own
time.
Pearlman said those studentswishing to help in
passing out the petition should contact SEPUL
representatives in their dorm areas.
The representatives are:
STEVE HOLDERMAN, Fletcher; Gayl Allen,
Rawlings; Bill DeCarlis, Engineering; William
Freeman, Sledd; Debby Ford and Carl Tollin,
Matherly.

WHAIS

NIGHT TIME: The Music Department presents
Twilight Concert on the University Auditorium
lawn at 6:15 p.m.
FINALLY: Miss UF Pageant finals tonight at the
Union Ballroom at 8.
. WAR THING: The Gainesville Indochina Crisis
Committee meets tonight at 8 in the Hillel
Foundation. Subject: Political action to withdraw
American troops from Cambodia.
NY UP: John Lindsay as a new alternative.
Meeting tonight -8- at 1528 NW 2nd Ave., two
blocks north of Graduate Library.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

MITCHELL EARLIER had
ordered a Justice Department
team to look into the
incident.
Police contend the violence
which erupted early Friday at
the predominatly black
campus was sparked by sniper
fire and rock-throwing
demonstrators.
Students and black leaders
said officers opened fire
without justification into a
girls dormitory.
THE COLLEGE has been
closed for the remainder of

Stephen C. OConnell after
receiving the American Council
on Education for Journalisms
visitation committee report.
The report praised the college,
its faculty and students and the
various curricula.

Eileen Feinberg and David Reiman will be
canvassing the fraternity and sorority areas.
Petitions for law students will be available at
the Spessard L. Holland Law Center lobby.
PEARLMAN SAID students who are unable to
sign .the petition should send a letter or postcard
with their name, student number, and college to
Ken Hart, c/o the Law School at the Law Center.
The petition will be circulated today and
Wednesday, Pearlman said, and will be
presented to OConnell late in the week.
Weimer said he had not seen the SEPUL
petition, but any reply will have to come from
OConnell as far as- refunding money.
CONCERNING the planned May 29 student
strike, Weimer does not foresee the UF being
closed.
The majority favors to keep it open, he said.

GOVERNMENT JOB: Any student interested on
serving on a university committee fill out an
application in the SG office, room 305 of the Reitz
Union. Interested students needed for the summer
quarter.
DlALOGUE:Sensitivity and encounter groups
methods in the college classroom will be discussed
in an opendine forum on Dialogue, sponsored by
Florida Blue Key and WRUF tonight at 11. Dr.
Anthony Clark of the speech department and Dr.
Walter Busby, of the College of Education n will
answer questions phoned in by listeners.

the term and most of the
students have left the
campus, situated in a
predominantly black
neighborhood.
The mayors biracial
committee, which includes
two Negro civil rights
lawyers, opened their probe
Saturday by interviewing
police who were at the scene.
The committee was
expected early this week to
talk. to highway patrolmen,
students and other witnesses.

IT MADE specific
recommendations in each
sequence and said the college is
seriously in need of new and
expanded quarters as its
enrollment continues to grow.
The college was re-accredited

I RED PM -o AI
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

20 DEMANDS LISTED

75 FMC Students Protest

OPA LOCKA (UPI) About
75 students took over the
administration building of
Florida Memorial College today
to protest lack of action by
school officials to a list of 20
demands, which include the
resignation of a dean and a
financial aid director.
The students took over the
small administration building on
the modem new campus at 8
p.m. by walking in and locking
the doors. They were led by
Johnny Farmer, a senior, who
said the group was prepared to
stay here until they meet our
demands.
College President R. W.

this year in the advertising,
broadcasting, and news-editorial
sequences.
We are greatful, OConnell
said, for the committees visit
and its evaluation of this unit of
the university.
WE ARE mindful of
shortcomings resulting from
inadequate financing in this unit
as well as others of the
university, OConnell said.
It is reassuring to note how
Dean John Paul Jones and his
faculty and staff are meeting
their responsibilities in the face
of severe handicaps, OConnell
said.
(
On the matter of curriculum
reform, the committee said
sequence requirements are too
rigid and should be changed to
allow for more electives within
the college.
THE REPORT said relations
between faculty, dean and the
students seemed generally
excellent. Student-faculty
relations are warm.
Obviously, better classroom
and college facilities are required
for teaching improvement and
better administration of both
program and faculty, the
committee said.
It charged the faculty to do
more to motivate students
beyond mere job objectives, to
understand broader human
service potential of careers in the
media, especially newspapers.

ENGLISH PEWTER MUG
flit ***
l SILLISCULPTS
y; U we ave a whole
great crew of funny
lovable little critters
CLOCK & WATCH REPAIR
McGtitrC Trophy & Engraving me w umv

Puryear ordered the electricity
in the building cut off at 9:30
ajn. while Farmer was reading a
list of demands over a loud
speaker system. Campus security
guards were on the scene but no
local police were called
immediately.
Florida Memorial was moved
from St. Augustine to the Miami
area two years ago. It has about
800 students, most of them
black, on a modem campus near
the Opa Locka airport.
Among the students demands
is one calling for the resignation
of John Wilson, dean of
academic affairs and Miss L.
Jones, financial advisor. The
students who were protesting
the $l5O increase in tuition fees
to $2,150 a year.
They demanded that Puryear
and his wife move out of the
Everglades Hotel, and live in a
home on campus, a move
Farmer said would save the
school about $20,000 a year.
Ive been sitting around
conference tables for four years
making these demands, Farmer
said. So far, none of them have
been met and it is time to take
stronger measures.
UF Foundation
Elects Head
GAINESVILLE Earl
Powers, prominent Gainesville
businessman and civic leader,
was elected president of the UF
Foundation Saturday at the
spring Board of Directors
meeting in Daytona Beach.
Powers, who succeeds Tampa
banker Henry Toland, and S. T.
Dell, Gainesville attorney who
was re-elected vice president,
will serve one-year terms. Other
officers include Fred H. Cantrell,
executive director; Charles G.
Furr, executive secretary;
William E. Elmore, treasurer,
and James G. Richardson,
assistant treasurer.
The foundation is a
non-profit, charitable
corporation established to seek
private gifts to aid the UF.
Tiny Deer
Predecessors of the modern
deer were no larger than house
cats about 25 million years ago.



Uhlfelder Asks Concern
Be Shown For Eight Dead

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
The deaths in Augusta,
Georgia and at Jackson State
University bring to light once
again the problems plaguing this
country, said Student Body
President Steve Uhlfelder, in a
statement Monday.
The issues prompting these
incidents, those concerning Kent
State and the U. S. involvement
in Cambodia should not bypass
the UF campus, according to
Uhlfelder.
THERE IS a lack of
understanding among all
segments and age groups in this
nation, he continued.
Uhlfelder called for the
members of the UF community
to remain aware of events taking
place and their significance to
the welfare of the country.
I think its necessary, now
more than ever, for people to

PERRY: MAY CHANGE

No Plans To Close A&M

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Dr.
Benjamin Perry said Monday he
has no immediate plans for
closing Florida A&M University
in sympathy for the two Negro
students killed last week at
Jackson State College, but is
keeping an eye on the prospect
of campus violence.
It would be best to close
rather than to have a repetition
of the incident at Jackson
State, said Perry, president of
the predominantly black
university. He said at a news
conference any decision on
closing FAMU will be reached
after consulting student and
faculty leaders on the chances of
National Guard
leaves Augusta
AUGUSTA, Ga. (UPI)
About 1,500 National
Guardsmen, the last of a
2,000-man force sent into
Augusta to deal with Negro
riots, were withdrawn Monday.
Brig. Gen. Andrew W.
McKenna thanked citizens for
their complete cooperation
with the guardsmen and said the
people of Augusta had shown
us complete courtesy.
The last of the six Negro
victims of last Mondays violence
were to be buried today. The
others were buried Sunday.
RENT NOW!
FOR THIS SUMMER AND
SEPTEMBER, 1970
FALL LEASES 9 & 12 MONTH
llHwum
Uppsr or Lowar
PumWMd
Air Coi4ltlaiwd
3 Pools
ftMTMtlOft Had
Study (town
Sm today- Mart rfglit in
VILLAGE PARK
A
french ouarter
APTS.
1001 S.W. 16th St.
ift

ML $
STEVE UHLFELDER
... common bond
discourage events which can lead
to violence and instead to
encourage discussion in their
classes, Uhlfelder explained.

a violent reaction to the Jackson
State deaths.
PERRY SENT telegrams to
President Nixon, Gov. Claude
Kirk, Mississippi Gov. John Bell
Williams and the president of
Jackson State, Dr. John Peoples
Jr., saying he is beginning to
wonder if any dissent will be
tolerated. He said the two
deaths at Jackson State, which
closely followed the deaths of
four Kent State University
students in Ohio, indicate a
sinister trend toward
suppression of dissenting views.
Oscar Davis, president of the
FAMU student government, said
the students are deeply hurt
and deeply concerned about
the Jackson State incident, and
Perry said FAMU identifies
strongly with the Mississippi
college because both schools are
predominantly black.

GOOD
PRICES
ONLY CHOICE MEATS USED
Try Our
DAILY LUNCHEON
SPECIALS
Meat, 2 Veg, Cole Slaw
2 Rolls and Butter, Coffee or Tea
1225 W UNIV. AVE
372-6666

EVERY CLASS should
either aside a few moments
in memoriam of those students
killed or enter into a reflective
discussion of attitudes toward
these issues, he said.
To allow students and faculty
to express their feelings and
concern over pressing problems,
Uhlfelder has unofficially called
today a Day of Reflection.
I urge professors and
students to show consideration
by taking time to talk of these
things in their classrooms today.
OUR CONCERN for the
dead and wounded students and
the events which precipitated
their injuries must not go
unnoticed, Uhlfelder said.UF
students share a common bond
with all students in this nation.
Regardless of their race,
creed'or color, we must come to
recognize that we share common
problems. Our concern, in order
to be effective, must also be
common, he said.

There appears to be no
national concern about the
murders at Jackson State, nor
was major concern registered
when students at South Carolina
State were shot several years
ago, Perry said. He said the
apparent lack of concern is
evidence of the reluctance of
society to place importance on
human lives of black people.
Perry also said that although
there are no immediate plans to
close A&M, it may change any
minute.
Thus far, our students have
acted with reason and have
restricted their dissent to an
Orderly vein, Perry told
newsmen. We are appreciative
of this and, of course have
informed the students of such
how long it will last, I do not
know.

EM JjM
BR
HUNGER STRIKER
... Doug Faulkner, Vietnam vet
Strikers Awaiting
O Connells Action
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
The hunger strikers in front of Tigert Hall are continuing in their
122nd hour of protest against the University Police Department
officers wearing guns at all times.
A committee met for the first time to discuss the campus police
gun issue Sunday but no decisive action was reached on the issue.
WE WILL CONTINUE to strike until a positive action has been
taken, Arnold Leibovit, one of the strikers said.
The strikers said they would not stop their fasting if the committee
made a recommendation.
We want positive direction stated by President Stephen C.
OConnell, Leibovit said.
WHAT KIND OF positive action or direction will halt the strike
was not explained.
Leibovit said that many people were confused about the issues that
prompted the strike.
This strike was called because we dont think the campus police
should cany guns in situations where guns arent specifically needed.
ESPECIALLY DURING the recent campus demonstration at the
ROTC building where guns in that situation were conducive to
igniting mob action, LaJeanne Jennings, another striker said.
The strikers said several policemen on UF had come to the strikers
and expressed agreement with their strike and what they were trying
to do.
Several of the participants have been feeling very sick and one
passed out after the committee hearing Sunday night, Leibovit said.
OVER THE WEEK-LONG strike more than 60 people have
participated. But we think lots of them have dropped out now its
hard to keep track of everyone, Jennings said.
The main problem the strikers are having is getting people to stay
involved with their protest. They said many people were beginning to
react to the strike as a publicity stunt and not an issue that is facing
everyone at the UF.
£OiL pfamii^.
( n (Qm Mdddm
///|Mi [Mi hid ijOfi.
V \ yV( Madeleine's makes
1 \J VJy the new look the
o
HAIR STYLIST
1250 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
FLAGLER INN ARCADE 378-6811 i
-- ' 3

TuMday, May 19,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 19,1970

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING will be held on
Thursday, May 21 at 130 pjn.
in Room 235, Tigert Hall.
'
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE
EXAMS' deadline is Friday, May
22. Graduate students need to
apply in the office of the
appropriate Foreign Language
Department to take the exam to
be administered on May 30.
PLACEMENT
NOTICES
PEACE CORPS applications
are available for summer 1970
programs at the International
Center, south of Walker
Auditorium. VISTA brochures
may also be obtained.

Library Schedule
-ii ... Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
?^ e L, | b ry Bam-11 pm 8 am-11 pm 2 pm-11 pm
u- 8 am-11 pm 8 am-11 pm 2 pm-11 pm
e Y ~ ,! Fl ? r,da H,stor V 8:30 am -5 pm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Special Collections 8:30 am-5 pm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Architecture & Fine Arts Library Bam spm
__Aroh. & Fine Artr Building 7pm-10pm Bam -12 N 6nm-10 pm
3 l Norman Hall Bam -10:30 nm 9am- Bnm 2pm -10-30 om
Engineering. Library Bam-spm 9am-12N
IT fT' ee l'', 9 ft** 1 "* 7 pm-10 pm Ipm-4 pm 7pm-10pm
Health & Phys. Ed. R. R. 8 am 5 pm ~
- 3 Ho d G yum 6pm 10 pm*** Bam -12 N 7pm -10 pm
Health Center Library
L 102 Med Saence Bldg. &3Q 3m -12 M 8:30 am-5 pm 2pm-12M
Hume (Agnculture) Library
u> MC^!r tY t la J! Bam-11pm Bam spm 7pm -11 pm
Journalism & Communications R.R. Bam- spm
337 Stadium 7pm- 10 pm* Bam -12 N Closed
Law Library
SXZEZL*** f^m-npm
Yonge Bldg. F. 8 am 4 pm Dosed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
8 am-5 pm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam-12N Closed 2pm-spm
6pmlo pm 6pm lO pm
lpm spm
III 8 cll* !!r 9 i, p n rtud V Wl on Sunday through Friday nightsfrom 11 p.m. -12 M.
The Education Library closes at 6:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
The Reading Rooms dose at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.

H e BECOME a chef...
J 1 -~Ol?l J Si-toXT'f £S i

Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement 8t Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
June and August graduates
unless indicated otherwise.
May 25: Jacksonville
Episcopal High School; Collier
County Schools; Dekalb County
Board of Education, Georgia; St.
Lucie County Board of
Education; Okaloosa County
Board of Education; Marion
County School Board; Hendry
County Schools; Duval County
School Board; Tulare Dept, of
Education, Calif.; Tulsa Public
Schools, Okla.
May 26: Atlanta Public
Schools, Georgia; Monroe
County School Board; Florida
Division of Adult Corrections;

BLUE BULLETIN

Columbia County Board of
Public Instruction; Taylor
County School System;
Hillsborough County Public
Schools; Union County School
Board
May 27: Dade County Public
Schools; Broward County Board
of Public Instruction; Gadsden
County Board of Public
Instruction; Sumter County
Public Schools; Hernando
County School Board; Volusia
County Schools; Baker County
Schools
May 28: Polk County Board
of Public Instruction
May 29: Pasco County Board
of Public Instruction

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Tuesday
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
362 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Univ. Stamp Club Meeting,
Doyle Connor Bldg., 7:30
p.m.
Pu Chi Theta Meeting, 356
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Modern Jass Dance Lessons, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:30 p.m.
Engineering Dames Meeting,
Univ. Women's Club House,
Newberry Rd., 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: Music for
Trumpets, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
ter
Wednesday
Music Dept: Twilight Concert,
University Aud., Lawn,
Symphonic Band, 6:45 p.m.
R ida Speleological Society
eetmg. 362 Union. 7:00
p.m.
Yoga Lessons, 122 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 362 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Miss Univ. of Fla. Contest,
Finals, Union Ballroom, 8:00
p.m.
M ". M6e,in9 Wnn i am eM:3o
i

Campus
Calendar

Thursday
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Asson. Meeting, Speaker:
W. W. Arnold, 362 Union
7:30 p.m.
UR A: "A Bridge Over Troubled
Water", discussion about
Marriage, 'Two in one
Flesh . Sexual and
Spiritual", Union Aud., 7:30
p.m. |
URA: Speaker: Dr. James Cone,
"Black Thologue & Black
Liberation", Union Ballroom,
8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: 'The Music of
Khachaturian'',
Lecture-Recital, University
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Friday
Union Movie, "Rachael,
Rachael", Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 8t 10:30 p.m.
Black Student Union, F.A.M.U.
Playmakers and Edward
Waters Choir, University
Aud., 7:00 p.m.
Union Dance, "Frosted Glass",
Union Ballroom, 9:00 p.m.
t u '~.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Florida Players, "Light up the
Sky", $.75, Univ. of Fla.
Students, SI.OO Students, $1.50
General Public.



Y. T. PARKER
... best hot food in town

By RON SACHS
Alligator Staff Writer
Parkers Barbeque is
located in the heart of the
citys ghetto. The sign out
front flashes the message
barbeque, and the
57-year-old owner claims he
makes the best hot food in
town.
Y. T. Parker owns and
manages Parkers Barbeque.
For the past 17 years his
restaurant has been doing
business with students and
residents of the Gainesville
area.
THE SMALL, modest
housing of the frame
restaurant cannot match the
modern franchise
constructions which fill the
city. The juke box inside is
probably the most modem
piece of equipment in the
building. And yet the food is
every bit as good as Parker
claims.
But there is more to
Parkers Barbeque than music
and food. The conversation
that anyone can have with.
Parker is the real attraction to
many.
He is an extraordinary
man, because he is content
being an ordinary man. As far
as Parker is concerned, an
ordinary man takes an
interest in his world. He is
not afraid to point out its
problems and mistakes.
At any time he is willing to
sit and discuss his ideas of the
errors we all make in our
encounters with other people.
He is a man who possesses a
simple eloquence, a profound
honesty, and hope. These
would seem to be the
attributes of a truly wise
man.
TWO MONTHS ago, when
a special on the life of Robert
Kennedy had ended on T.V.,
Parker closed his restaurant
early to do some
NOW
OPENING
for
Sept. Occupancy
LEASE OFFICE
309 NW 13th St.
Across from
Tigert Hall
.tllOl
place)

Y. T. Parker: An Ordinary Man

- ML?
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111 4 { x
ilk utp
ORDINARY, CONTENT
... takes interest in his world

contemplating. He voiced
many of his personal beliefs
that evening.
Bobby Kennedy was a
good man. When he thought
he was right, he wouldnt
compromise his principle. He
represented some real and
concrete hope for the black
man and the poor in this
country.
Parker felt depressed and a
bit inspired from the
television program. He began
to analyze the things which
are troubling the nation.
If this country is one of
democracy, then it should
also cherish fairness. When
God created man, I dont
believe he ever meant that
one person is bom superior to
another. As long as even one
man feels superior, and tells
another man he is inferior,
were in trouble.
PARKER RELAXED in
one of the old chairs which
surround the small dining
tables and sighed. Its no
wonder our young people are
restless. They have seen so
little justice in their lifetimes,
and some of our leaders have
such little regard for their
interests.
His ability to cite flaws in
our systems without
bitterness is one of Parkers
rare qualities. He has all the
wisdom of a worldly
philosopher, all the ideas and
motivations that a leader
should possess, and yet it

1505 2310
N.W. 13th St V V ) S.W. 13th St
Gainesville Gainesville
am
BREAKFAST SPECIAL
TWO FARM FRESH EGGS
HOT BUTTERED GRITS
GOLDEN TOAST
AND
FRESHLY BREWED COFFEE
From Opening to 11:00 ajn.

astounds Parker to hear such
comparisons.
THE RISE of militancy
among blacks in recent years
could easily have been
predicted, according to
Parker. J
He explained, Theyve
been stifled throughout their
lives, and they want justice.
All blacks will not be patient
and listen to more empty
promises or unenforced civil
rights laws.
Just because the black
man is supposedly in better
shape now than ever
before... no, thats no
reason for blacks to be
satisfied.
THROUGH COMMUNI COMMUNICATING
CATING COMMUNICATING to the public the
plight of the poor, the
disadvantaged blacks and
whites, and the young people,
Parker recognized the
possibibility of really
changing the state of affairs
which now exists. He
commented, Unless we let
people know what is wrong
and who is suffering, nothing
can ever change.
Parker looked to education
and economic growth as the
two avenues for blacks to
work at individually in
achieving self-pride.
Whatever a young black
has, his parents are probably
struggling for. Still, a young
black must learn everything
he can. If he can prepare

V & w|£K§§&|
ECONOMIC GROWTH
... education, avenue.for blacks

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FI^H^OU^INDS

himself to be able to take
advantage of opportunity, he
can find his place.
Knowledge is the way to
succeed, because from the
shoulders up a man really
proves himself, he said, as if
to sum up this thought.
Y.T. PARKER is an
ordinary man. Thats the way
he wants it. His real pride lies
in his family and his work. He
believes strongly that anyone
who sees something
wrong,... must shout it
out at everyone until
something is done.
Included in the ranks of
those who find emptiness in
the Vietnam war, Parker
spoke on that problem more
intensely than anything else.
His gestures became forceful
but his voice wavered as he
complained.
Its Vietnam that is really
killing this country. There are
young men over there who
have not even had the chance
to figure out their purpose in
life. Those who die never find
joiK
THE REVOLUTION
REGISTER TO VOTE
Young Democrats

Tuesday, May 19,1970, The Florida Alligator,

eg
JUDGE OF MANKIND?
... I'm a little like an old fool

out.
And now Parker was
sorrowful, for those who have
died and for those still
fighting.
SOME OF THOSE young
people might have been
writers, artists, or even new
leaders we will need. Most
would have been just men
who wanted no more than to
raise a good family. How can
we justify their deaths?
Parker was silent for a few
moments. Then he chuckled
away any idea of himself
being a judge of mankind.
I dont ever imagine
myself as being anything but
Y. T. Parker. I guess Im a
little like an old fool, but I do
know whats right and whats
wrong, and Ill never change
about that.
Parker began to clear the
tables in his restaurant. He
turned off the light out in
front, locked up his business
and drove home.
AN ORDINARY MAN.

FREDRICK
CiA}{ D E N S
. . now leasing
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave

Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 19,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Jti ix)
jj jF?il wfm
. >'. jj'i Y. :', N .... . -'. ; :-% i ; ' V '_ V' ' ~, ,' .;. Jt
No Action On Radar

WASHINGTON Six persons died needlessly in
a mid-air collision April 16 after penny-pinching
Federal Aviation Administration officials ignored
warnings that a radar system was inadequate.
Someone is going to get killed out there/'
controller John B. Saxman Jr. warned FAA officials
in a written report on Nov. 4, 1969. Why doesnt
someone do something to rectify the situation?
Five months later, the tragedy occurred exactly
as Saxman had warned it would. A T-39 Air Force
Sabreliner, returning to Langley Field with four
airmen aboard, appeared on the radar map over
Weldon, N.C. The T-39, flying blind through clouds,
needed constant surveillance.
Suddenly, the blip showing the T-39 ominously
vanished from the radar screen. The radar had failed
to show a TA-4 Navy jet trainer, with two men
aboard, on a collision course. All six men were
killed.
Two days later, the man who had foreseen the
tragedy was hastily transferred from the job he had
held for 12 years. Saxman was an air controller at
the Washington Air Route Traffic Control Center at
Leesburg, Va., which directs the air traffic over the
jam-packed, north-south skyways.
A copy of Saxmans report, obtained by this
column, shows that he tersely warned the FAA of
shockingly unreliable radar and the need for another
controller. He described the air congestion in the
Virginia-North Carolina area as quite often utter
chaos and pleaded that this area has become a
struggle for survival.
Saxman listed eight dangerous radar inadequacies.
He said the radar goes out of focus, inaccurately
locates some planes and fails completely to locate
others. His report described frequencies that fail
right at the crucial moment.
He called the sky over lower Virginia and upper
North Carolina from 16,000 to 23,000 feet a
danger area. It was in this area, at approximately
21,000 feet, that the two planes collided on April
16.
Saxmans complaint was addressed to William
Barton, the FAA planning officer, who bucked it
down to John V. Kelley, the south division
supervisor.
In a carefully worded, five-page memorandum,

Alligator Staff

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor
Earl Hartman |
Features Editor

PanViwim ,Jaffrain
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant f

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors
Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor

Frad Vollrath
Wire Editor

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Me rry-Go-Round
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IVmlVilHliniultnmllinillliniinnilllllllllnlminilllllllilmMMMMMMHMi
by Jack Anderson
Kelley sympathized with Saxman but rejected his
recommendations. The reason for not repairing the
dangerous radar, Kelley made clear, was the Nixon
administrations economy drives.
We have received numerous complaints of
faulty radar, Kelley acknowledged. He mentioned
technical improvements which might be made in the
radar but added: Since the radar system in
question has been programmed for replacement, it is
doubtful that these modifications will be made.
Kelley blamed budget cuts, economy drives by
the administration for bringing us to the point at
which we are. But he said nothing could be done.
Your concerns are real and understood... he
wrote to Saxman. I hope solutions can be resolved
in the near future.
But nothing was done, and the delay was fatal.
FOOTNOTE: Many FAA people familiar with
the tragedy are afraid to discuss it. But one who
asked to remain unnamed said it was not just the
radar but the whole system of procedures which was
to blame for the Weldon tragedy.
While inflation makes the dollar look more and
more like Confederate money, President Nixons
economic advisers have smiled benevolently on the
giant utilities which are seeking a record $2 billion
in rate hikes. The increase, of course, would be
tacked on to the customers telephone and electric
bills.
It is worth recalling, therefore, that Dr. Paul
McCracken, the Presidents chief economic adviser,
was a prominent company witness for the Bell
System at rate hearings before he came to the White
House.
The telephone companies are seeking another
S6OO million in rate rises in 13 states. And Mother
Bells influence with state regulatory bodies is such
that, in many states, it costs more to make a
long-distance call within the state than out of the
state.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Beard of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the l- loridf Alligator are -those r_
the editors or of the writer oLjhfc article and riot thdire
oftHetffiwsrsify t* IhwMvr f v fn? h r oc*

EDITORIAL

Dont Disarm
Campus Cops
The emotional furor following the slaying of four Kent
State University students has passed, almost.
Some interesting remnants still dot the UF scene,
however. Several groups, from hunger strikers in the front
of Tigert Hall to a special study committee appointed by
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder, and UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, have called for and considered
disarming campus police.
Frankly, we cannot agree. We believe it to be within the
best interests of all, including the police, if they remain
armed.
Weapons are ugly, we admit, and are capable of great
destruction, we know. In the hands of our police force,
though, we do not think them particularity dangerous.
If our police were ill-trained, ill-tempered Gestapo types
without a shred of discipline we would have second
thoughts concerning their weapons. But they are not;
indeed, we feel the UF police are among the best policemen
in north Florida. They are a trained, tolerant and courteous
force serving a community which must strain all of those
qualities.
To their credit, the campus police have never shot anyone
on the UF campus. Rather, their weapons serve as a
deterrent against anyone who would be tempted to take up
weapons. Fortunately, no one has tried to shoot it out with
UF police. But would this be true if they were unarmed?
In other words, we already know how much destruction
and death has come out of campus police guns zero. We
do not know how much bloodshed would occur if they
were not armed and, furthermore, we have no interest in
finding out.
Disarming campus police would be a disservice to the
community and to them. Aside from their role in deterring
crime, they could conceivably save someones life, perhaps
yours.
Furthermore, it would be asking a great deal to expect
the Kampus Kops to walk into potentially dangerous
situations, such as the twenty-odd sex offenses committed
on the UF campus last year, without some means of
protection.
Pistols may provide an excess of protection to our police
force but that situation is far more desirable than a dead
officer.
For these reasons we hope guns, for all their ugliness and
destructive potential, are allowed to remain on the hips of
our campus police.
M'; |



Days Os Decision

Ordinarily, Secretary of
Defense Lairds May 13
announcement that the U. S.
combat mission in Vietnam
would end by June 30, 1971,
would have been just cause for
jubilation. But the events of the
last two weeks have seen
President Nixons credibility
crumble to the extent that we
would all be well advised to
postpone the merriment.
Fortunately, though, the U. S.
Senate is in no mood to accept
the Presidents word on just
about anything least of all,
foreign affairs. Despite the
protestations of a group of
presidential aides sent to Capitol
Hill and a few of Nixons Senate
allies, momentum is gathering
behind the Cooper-Church
amendment to the Foreign
Military Sales Act, which would
forbid the Executive to expend
any funds, directly or indirectly,
for military operations in
Cambodia after June 30, 1970.
The President had promised
to do as much, but we are now
informed by Senator Stennis

MR. EDITOR:
More than a week has passed and our
hunger strike continues and shall
continue. A good many people have come
out to help and support us and to them I
give heartfelt thanks. But it is to the
majority of those who have not that I
address this letter.
The many faces who instilled concern
in the protests on this campus have been
hiding. Or perhaps they think that our
issues have been solved. Indeed, we have
put pressure on our administration. And
indeed, we have been able to bring many
out to try to discuss the problems facing
us as never before. But the discussion
cannot stop!
During the past week I have had an
education. More than any text can teach.
I have learned about our democratic
process. And how in the long run it can
be tedious and tiring. I have learned how
to teach and defend the issues that bother
many of us. I have learned far too
many are uninformed of the facts and
rest solely on emotion. Many stereotype
in a formulated phrase that can, within
only several minutes of discussion, be
reconciled with far more concern and
open-mindedness.
I have learned that people in general
can be so insensitive to the efforts
working with and for them! Our cause if
yours. We are not here to become
martyrs. We are concerned about issues
that have plagued this and every other
campus in the nation. We are here
because some things simply take
precedence over others... namely the
perpetuation of the United States of
America. Perhaps these people who have
not supported our cause believe that this
country has an alternative for some other
LETTERS POLICY
a* typed, ripral. double tptomi end
Notberipied wfHh a pudonym.
Names*w*| bo wHhhold only if writer
draws |uat cause. The editor reserves the
fltfit to etttt el letters for aos.
Writers may submit lonsr sways,
Cobbans or jotters ta be sunddired far use

Cooper-Church Amendment Grows

The Strike Continues

that the Presidents June 30
deadline was an estimate.
Stennis statement, made in
debate, prompted the following
reply from Senator J.W.
Fulbright: Youre confirming
what I thought. He (Nixon)
really didnt mean it...
The Cooper-Church
amendment, however, may well
be but the first skirmish in a
constitutional battle of historic
proportions. On May 9,1 sat in
the office of Senator Saxbe,
R-Ohio, while one of his aides
outlined the three-part legislative
strategy ; which will, hopefully,
redress the imbalance of
presidential power which has
existed far too long. The first
part of this strategy is the
Cooper-Church amendment. Its
expected approval will be
followed by the repeal of the
Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. This
second move will not be
opposed by administration
forces, since Nixon has never
claimed it as a legal basis for his
actions in Vietnam. Next comes
the third, most crucial, most

form of government. Or perhaps the
seriousness of the issues shall work
themselves out. I can attest to the former.
They shall not! Our country has been
based on change through reform. And
that form of change is a system through
protest. The so-called gift of freedom. It
takes infliction upon oneself to
appreciate those transitive things.
I speak for myself. I am an individual
with individual feelings. And I shall
remain with these feelings until some
positive action is realized, until more
enlightenment can be instilled, or until
my cause becomes the better of my life.
ARNOLD LEIBOVIT, 3JM
Get Involved
MR. EDITOR:
Lets get one thing straight. Just
because I do not happen to agree with the
views of certain individuals concerning
the war, the abilities of our President, and
student strikes, does not mean that I am
apathetic or unconcerned. I am very
much concerned.
I am concerned that many students are
not more thoughtful and less emotional
when considering events which have
occurred, situations that exist and
demands that are being made.
No one denies that the deaths of
students at Kent State were tragic. Most
people will agree that the National
Guardsmen made a thoughtless move
when they fired blindly into the crowd of
rioting students. But, how would you
have reacted? More basically, what is
right and what is accomplished by the
throwing of bricks and bottles and the
burning down of buildings? While it is
noble to turn the other cheek I doubt if
many of us would have done so after
being struck by bricks. The riots were
wrong but no one seems to admit that.
Why were the students rioting? They
'were helping to withdraw our men from
Vietnam, right? Absolutely no logic or
sense can be made of their actions. The
President, who may just have a few more
facts before him than Joe College, made a
decision which hopefully will enable the
U. S. to continue to withdraw safely and
cm schedule. Despite it being a poor move
r Nixon made the only
logical decision. I am confident that

difficult step the approval of
the Hatfield-McGovern
amendment (Amendment 609).
Briefly, this amendment would
prohibit the expenditure of
funds appropriated pursuant to
the act in three distinct
categories. Section C would
suspend funds for operations in
Cambodia thirty days after the
date of enactment of this act,
while Section B pertains to Laos
in a like manner, specifying
December 31, 1970, as a
deadline. Both Sections B and C
begin with the conditional
clause, unless Congress shall
have declared war. Section A,
moreover, provides the most
direct challenge to presidential
usurpation of Congress
war-making prerogatives. I will
quote this section in its entirety:
Unless the Congress shall have
declared war, no part of any
funds appropriated pursuant to
this Act or any other law shall
be expended in Vietnam after
December 1970, for any purpose
arising from military conflict;

history will prove this.
The North Vietnamese leaders are
obviously very intelligent and are aware
of current American sentiment. They
realize that they have nothing to lose and
everything to gain by escalating the war.
That is, this is what they thought. Our
President has different ideas however, and
Americans will continue to withdraw
only after their security and safety has
been assured. That makes good sense to
me. But then, I rely less on my emotions

; We Pledge ;

MR. EDITOR:
I
I We, students of the concerned Silent
Majority, object to demonstrations and
I desecrations to our flag promoted by
professional and amateur
| revolutionaries.
. The television networks are filled
I with interviews of people talking about
being turned off* and alienated from
1 their country.
We, the undersigned, have been
alienated too. We are alienated by the
I unpatriotic radicals we see and hear on
a campus and on our television screens.
We wish to indicate that the
unpatriotic student stereotype being
established by our sources of mass
I communication is not accurate.
I If you are going to listen, dont forget
that we, too, are students and
Americans.
We want you to listen not only to the
| angry mob, but also to the loyal,
fl concerned American students who

L _
the moll society by Brickmon
HOO-OCH'! IF ANY
fc>fel S6NT ANY > #-/

Provided that, funds may be
expended as required for the
safe and systematic withdrawal
of all United States military
personnel, the termination of
United States military
operations, the provision of such
assistance to South Vietnam in
amounts and for purposes
specifically authorized by the
Congress, the exchange of
prisoners, and the arrangement
of asylum for Vietnamese who
might be physically endangered
by the withdrawal of United
States forces, and Further
Provided, that the withdrawal of
all United States military
personnel from Vietnam shall be
completed no later than June
30, 1971, unless the Congress,
by joint resolution, approves a
finding by the President that an
additional staled period of time
is required to insure the safety
of such personnel during the
withdrawal process.
If the Presidents impulsive
fulminations against character
assassins in the Senate and

FORUM
C Admin wl "Di&iwt J
*s ftn JH-C
Tuesday, May 19,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

By Russ Taylor

those bums on the campus
can be taken as benchmarks,
then Dicky arid company will
probably treat us to a real
mud-slinging party when 609
comes up for debate. It will not
be surprising to hear that
Senators Hatfield, McGovern,
Goodell, Hughes and Cranston
are in league with Hanoi and the
NLF. Nixons press secretary,
Ronald Ziegler has already
referred to the Cooper-Church
amendment as an
infringement on the powers of
the President and a violation of
Article II of the Constitution,
which designates the President as
Commander-in-Chief of the
armed forces.
Whether Amendment 609 can
muster enough support for
passage is an open question:
Having considered the above,
however, I respectfully suggest
that it is the readers duty as a
citizen of a democracy to advise
his elected representatives of his
own views on this issue. These
are the days of decision. Decide.

and more on logical reasoning.
Oh, have you heard the latest? The
Russians are now supplying pilots along
with the aircraft they are sending to
enable the Arabs to defend 1 themselves
against the impending 11 Israeli invasion.
But then, thats O.K. isnt it? Just so we
dont become involved. Say, isnt that the
in-thing today ... to become involved?
You figure it out.
MICHAEL S. HAWKINS, 4EG

believe that change must come only
through constitutional means not by I
violence and threats of violence from a
small minority who attract the 1
television cameras. |
Our message to you is that we also
want the war in Vietnam to end. But we I
think your decisions in Vietnam and
Cambodia are in the best interest of
America.
Signature
If you believe as we do, please sign
the above petition and mail it to: P.O.
Box 14047, University Station, I
Gainesville, Fla., 32601. If you have
signed similar petitions, please do not |
hesitate to sign again since this petition
represents the students of the UF. I
We will collect your petitions and i
forward them through The Orlando 1
Sentinel to the White House. }
RAY HUNT, 7EG |
JAMES DEVORE, 4BA

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

a S ' -
(*
4
FOR SALE
xXvXv:-^
For sale: 1968 Kawasaki 650 twin If
interested call 378-0491 after 5:00
p.m. and ask for Kevin. (A-139-st-p)
Pellex f 1.4 'complete w/accessory
lens & cases. 200mm and 35mm
S4OO or best offer. Call 372-5516.
(A-10t-138-p)
69 CA 160 Honda electric tools,
helmet, manuals drafted must sell
weight set also 373-2173.
(A-st-139-p)
Lady Yamaha 50cc Like new, only
750 mi. Elec, start Auto, clutch. See
at 304 SE 3rd St. North apt. 5 9
pm $lB5. Easy and fun to drive.
(A-st-140-p)
Refrigerator, 12 cu. ft., 2 dr, IV2 yr.
old, Gibson auto-defrost, $165. Grad.
June and moving Into sum. apt. Call
372-0311. (A-st-138-p)
REALLY. These fuzzy puppies are
lovely! Ma and Pa are both handsome
collie-shepherd mixtures. Call
378-0118, then come and see!
(A-st-140-p)
1969 Triumph 500 cc Twin cylinder,
4,800 miles, SBSO, 378-8884 student.
(A-4t-140-p)
Dual showman amp top clean towe
$175 1932 Ozark Guitar S4O 62
Peugot Sedan $175 also records and
other things call 376-9066.
(A-139-st-p)
Trailer 8 x 42 $1,200, 8 x 35 SI,OOO,
8 x 30 SBOO rented trailer SSO
monthly income only SI,OOO
378-0226 376-6831 Lot B Archer
Village. 3 br. IV2 bath 10 x 56 fur. trailer 1
br. fixed as study washer clothes
line fenced lot cable TV in
park with pool AC 376-8517.
(A-st-141-p)
Mojave 250 Custom seat tank new
piston rings and electricals low
mileage. New 600. Need cash 3OO.
372-8933. BILL. (A-3t-141-p)
Awai tape recorder, 4 track-stereo,
runs on batteries, car lighter, or 110
v. or 220 v AC. 7 inch reel, Int. spks.
$95.00. Call 378-6247 after 5:00 PM.
(A-st-141-p)
Diamond engagement ring 1/3 carat.
Perfect must sell!! Call 373-2277
for details (evenings). (A-3t-141-p)
For sale: Surfboard: Petrlllo Pintail
only S4O. Honda 250 Scrambler
S3OO. Call 373-1249. (A-2t-140-p)
Components Stereo, Garrard
turntable, Scott amp, huge marble
top walnut Empire Speakers. S6OO.
Call 378-7655 after 5:00.
(A-3t-142-p)
100% human hair fall! Shoulder
length, brown-frosted! Best offer
over $25. Head-stand Included! Call
after 1:30 at 376-0266, ask for
Darlla. (A-st-142-p)
Purple-Yellow Honda 565,7300 ml,
recently tuned, Inspected,
dependable best pash offer over SBO,
helmet etc. Al after 7 evenings.
392-7329. (A-st-142-p)
1967 mobile home, 12 x 48, 2
bedrooms, excellent condition, S4OO
down, assume payments of $77
monthly, original financing 6yrs, 4
yrs remaining to pay. 378-6797,
evenings. (A-st-142-p)
Absolutely must sell nowi 50x8
furnished 2 bedroom mobile home
central heating air conditioning
carpeting superb condition 378-8304
after 5 $1550 or best offer.
(A-st-142-p)
SEX? It Is true we carry a full line of
equipment for most any sport, but
let's be reasonable! B & B SPORTS
CENTER 5320 N.W. 13th St.
378-1416. (A-st-142-p)
FOR better cleaning, to keep colors
gleaming, use Blue Lustre carpet
cleaner. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-166-c)
GIBSON electric Jazz guitar. For
discriminating musician who
demands high quality, superior tone.
Strap, case, strings. sllO 373-1659
aft. (A-3t-143-p)
Healthy playful five week old gerbils
for sale clean and easy to care for
contact 392-7628 real bargain SI.BO
each. (A-lt-143-p)
Camera nlkon sp rangefinder lenses:
50mm 1.4, 85mm 2.0 case and lens
hoods, excellent cond. call 376-9024
after 6 pm. (A-st-143-p)
F Student Special 1
J Any car or color!
j
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373*1665 J

.V.V.V.V..V.V^V.V/.V.V.V.V.V..V.V.V.
FOR SALE
AIR CONDITIONER 14,000 BTU.
Only 8 months old.
16 -3 /4"x26-3/8. $l5O. Call
373-2436. (A-st-143-p)
78 acres horse and cattle ranch
318-335 2 miles due east of Wllliston
on corner of 2 highways contact
R. T. Lewis 528-6562 not collect.
Route 1 box 157 Wllliston.
(A-st-143-p)
Refrig Bike TV $25 Each Music
Stand $1 Port. Movie Screen $5
Cassette Recorder $lO Port B try
Record Player $lO 378-0226.
(A-st-143-p)
Yamaha, 1970, DS6, 250 cc street,
3000 miles, with helmet and shield,
$575, call 372-6062, 6 o'clock.
Enlarger s2s, speakers in cabinets
s2s for both. (A-2t-143-p)
Must Sell! Hangstrom 12-String
Guitar Dual Pickup With Case. A-l
Condition Sacrifice $125. Call
392-7673. (A-st-143-p)
8x24 mble home A/C load leveling
hitch S7OO mono tape recorder S4O
67 Triumph 650 S7OO 20-inch fan $5
wife SIOO Prices flexible 372-5078.
(A-st-143-p)
1969 KAWASAKI F 3
BUSHWHACKER. Motorcycle Low
mileage, Just like new, only S4OO.
Phone 372-5787 after 6:00 p.m. for
more Information. (A-4t-143-p)
A 1969 modernage trailor 2
bedrooms air conditioned, carpeted,
S6OO. down and take over payments
of $95.00 a month call after spm
378-0208. (A-3t-143-p)
FOR RENT
Frederick Gardens 1 bed. apt., need
roommate or will sublet. Female,
pool, S6O/mo. Available June 15,
June rent paid. 376-2909 after 5:30.
(B-st-141-p)
Sublease for summer 2 room apt.
furnished IV2 blocks from campus
call between 8 AM noon
S4O/month 378-9627. (B-st-140-p)
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
Available June 4, Williamsburg Apt.,
1 BR., AC, pool, near Med Center.
Will sublet. Call 372-1544 (Call 5 to
7 preferably.) (B-3t-141-p)
Sublet June 1,1 bedroom apt.
central AC ww carpeting, quiet
behind the mall, sllO per month Call
after 5 PM. 373-2889. (B-st-141-p)
Summer living In A/C comfort at
reduced rate. 1 bedroom, wall to wall
carpeting with fine furnishings SIOO
month, 376-6690. (B-2t-142-p)
Sublet summer quarter: large cool 3
rm apt furn: IU2 bath screen porch
large yard. SBO mo. 376-4918.
(B-2t-142-p)
Need to Sublease 3 bedroom house
Air-cond., 180 a month; for summer
quarter only 1319 NW 3rd Ave.
(B-139-st-p)
Alr-conditloned, 2 bedroom, quiet,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6.
Avail. June l." (B-7t-138-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
TUESDAY
Golden Fried Chicken I
All you can eat 99<|
WEDNESDAY
Jumbo Baked Chopped I
Steak and Yallaw Rka 79<

Page 8

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 19,1970

FOR RENT
# 0
House in the country, sublease, 3
bedrooms, AC 3V2 acres of forest, 5
min. from school, $125 per month
378-2809 1560 NW 29 Rd.
(B-139-st-p)
Sublet: 1 bdrm. furnished apt. June
through August. French Quarter. AC,
pool. Call 376-4165 after 5:00,
392-0510 weekdays. (B-st-137-p)
2 br. furn. apt. for summer fun, AC,
pool, rsvd. pkg; quiet, upstairs, beaut,
view, spacious, Avail. June 1, VIII.
Park, 86; 372-1114. (B-st-139-p)
Sublet for summer or longer 1
bdrm. A/C, pvt. patio, furnished,
slls/mo Village 34, no. 27, Call
378-7000. (B-139-st-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-c)
Sublet Sum. Qtr. 1 bdrm. garage apt.
AC, ww carpet, beautifully furnished,
tv cable. SIOO/mo. + ut. 1908 NW
3rd Ave. 373-2700. (B-6t-142-p)
Luxruy living In air conditioned
comfort this summer. 2 bedroom
townhouse, wall to wall carpets,
unfurnished. slls month 376-6690.
(B-2t-142-p)
Sublease at reduced rate. Luxury
living, A/C, wall to wall carpeting. 2
bedroom and fine furnishings $l4O
month 376-6690. (B-2t-142-p)
Sublet for summer, furnished English
Tudor house, entire upstairs. Walking
distance to campus, 2 huge
bedrooms, central A/C and heat,
modern kitchen and bath, living
room, wood paneled, carpeted,
sunken den 180/mo. 373-1049.
(B-4t-143-p)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included completely
furnighed ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372- Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
Available June 14. A/C eff. apt Bth
ave apts 1222 NW Bth ave. quiet,
plenty of parking. $85./mo. call
373- between 6 and 7:30 pm.
(B-st-143-p)
Sublet I br apt furnished, ac^
dishwasher, pool, available June 12.
$l2O/mo. Just off campus. Mt.
Vernon apts. Call after 6:30 PM
378-0260. (B-st-143-p)
Available June 15, Unlv. Gardens one
bedroom apt for summer and next
year, beautifully furnished plus
extras. June rent free. 376-8958.
(B-st-143-p)
French Quarter Apt. 94 Sublet for
summer $l4O. A/C Pool Great
location. Partially decorated. Fully
Furnished. Two bedroom townhouse.
(B-3t-143-p)
2 bedroom Village Park apt. to
sublease for the summer quart. $95
for entire summer phone 373-2661
or come by apt 12 tillage Park.
(B-4t-143-p)

FOR RENT
ONLY $1.02 a day to live in luxury
at Landmark. Poolside apt can be
yours for S9O for entire summer. 2
bed/ townhouse call 373-1285
apll6. (B-5M43-P)
Sublet for summer qtr 2 br Mt
Vernon apt $l7O per month. Luxury
for less, call 378-8338 after 4pm.
(B-3t-143-p)
Sublease Landmark Apts. Sublease
for 1-4 openings call 373-1509
after 4pm Located on pool.
(B-3t-143-p)
Need to rent for the summer, a 2
bedroom A/C Mobile home, S9O per
month call JOHN 373-1581 evenings.
(B-st-143-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
1 br townhouse, Landmark 164
sublet for summer or longer. June
rent paid $145/month. Dishwasher
376-0453. (B-3t-142-p)
SAVE sllO 4-man Vllliage Pk apt.
To sublet for summer. Furn, balcony
over pool, end apt for spacious
parking. SIOO each for entire***
summer. Call 373-1347 anytime.
Apt. 94. (B-st-142-p)
Sublet furn 2-br apt. summer qtr.
Fully carpeted, central A/C,
$ 120/month. Call 373-1867 on
weekend or after 4:30 p.m. on
weekdays. (B-st-142-p)
Summer quarter only 2 bedroom
and two full baths S2OO per month
apart, for only $l5O Pt. West Apart.
Call 378-9809 anytime hurry first
come first serve. (B-st-142-p)
...i ...i ..i. i.. i.in .i i.iii.,
2 br TH Unique, modern design in
quiet NE section. You must see It at
508-3 NE 4th Ave. As low as
$ 165/mo furn. Call 373-1612.
(B-3t-142-p)
Sublet-sumixur 1 bedroom wood
panel Apt. A/C, private patio, pet fee
paid, lots of extras slls a month
Village 34 Apt 37 call 378-5809.
(B-st-142-p)
Private a/c rooms, linen, maid service.
One block campus. Telep. 372-6263.
(B-3t-142-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom townhouse apt no.
160 Hawaiian Village June August
Cable T.V., w/w carpeting, pool
dishwasher central a/h 376-4788.
(B-3t-142-p)
Room near college P. Office. 1714
N.W. Third Place To Graduate
students. Phone 3 72-8227.
(B-2t-142-p)
Sublease summer qtr. poolside 2 bdr.
French Qtr. Apt. near laundry room
fun living A/C contact Linda or
Jackie anytime phone 372-6768.
(B-st-142-p)
SKI HURRY..
LAST
R DAYI
ti STARTS WED.
1% THE FILM
tpIGIANT I
iar COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
/3|| i WILLIAM WYLER film
MORE
L- J days
Wilma Harrison had
a wealthy husband.
A big playboy lover.
A beautiful home.
TI I
AndahoniMedeath.
THE LAWYER

FOR RENT
1 BR furnished AC apt. 2 blocks
from campus. Sublet summer
quarter. $95/mo. includes utilities.
Call 376-1331. (B-st-140-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
summer qtr. Share house 2 blocks
from campus with 2 coeds pvt. room,
A/C, Call 378-6548. (B-st-137-p)
Sublet summer qt._ Olympia Apts,
next to campus, 1 bedroom,
furnished, carpet, A/C, summer rates
$95.00 per month. Call 378-6247
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-141-p)
WANTED
1 Female roommate for French
Quarter poolside air cond. apt. for
summer $lO5 for summer come by
apt 102 or call 373-1225.
(C-st-143-p)
Male roommate for sum. qtr.
S2O/mo. + util, efficiency, ac. pool. 5
min. walk to campus. Call Paul
373-2758. (C-3t-143-p)
One female roommate for summer
quarter. Mount Vernon rent
$5 2.50/month. Air conditioning,
pool, dishwasher, Call Pat 392-7629.
(C-3t-141-p)
Female wanted for summer $42.00
plus utilities for own bedroom in
house one block from campus. Move
in anytime after June 11. Call
378-2828. (C-st-139-p)
Poolside! Williamsburg Apt., 2 bd.
furnished townhouse. Wish to sublet
for summer. Call 373-2358 now! All
the conveniences! (C-st-139-p)
2 fern roommates for Frederick
Gardens apt fall qtr. AC, carpeted,
pool, etc. Call Melissa or Barb
373-2480. HURRY! (C-3M42-P)
Ironwood
Golf Cfab
STUDENT MEMBERSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 + TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL OAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For information call
p 376-0080
r teoKWOov
tcif ay
* N.l. 39th AVKNUC
I A ACADEMY AWAID j
I V MAaG.ESM.TH 1
HR ROOMeKUEN* A
rrnj l^l r SONQ J
jaanrol



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
1 female rommate wanted for Point
West apt. 2 bedroom, 2 full baths
No deposit s7s for summer
quarter call Robin 378*7188 5-Bpm
or 392-2925 8-1 lam. (C-6t-142-p)
JUNE RENT FREE 4 to share 2 bdr
2 bath Point West apt $125 ea for all
summer pool ac dishwasher call
376-9924 or 372-5970 after 5 must
be 21. (C-10t-142-p)
Trallermate for summer term. Your
own room In new trailer. A/C
$45/mo + Vz util. Grad student pref.
Mobileer Park. 378-4775 after 7 PM.
(C-st-141-p)
Female Roommate Wanted Summer
43.00 a month one block from Tigert
air-conditioned, own bedroom call us
at 378-0963 1210 SW 3rd Ave, apt. 8
(C-st-141-p)
2-4 roommates for summer qtr. La
Mancha apt. Pvt. bdrms, 2 bath, 2
blks to campus, pool, AC, laundry,
utilities Inc. Call: 376-6951.
(C-st-141-p)
Live in paradise. Share 2 bedroom
house in paradise 4 miles from
campus. Private bedroom. $47 per
mo. includes everything. Discount to
Spanish speaker. Ph 378-8005
evenings. (C-3t-143-p)
Listeners Wanted: Will pay $2.00 for
one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Darlene Weston
between 1 and 4 pm for
appointment. 392-2049. (C-st-143-c)

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WANTED
2 roomates to share 5 bedroom flat
fall quarter at the PLACE phone
373-2256 ask for Butch or 392-8940
ask for Dale. (C-3t-142-p)
Male roommate for summer quarter
at La Mancha. Live alt summer for
$l5O inc. utilities; pool, a/c, own
bedroom. Call 372-8046 anytime.
(C-st-143-p)
2 female roommates needed for June
1 Williamsburg 2 bedroom
townhouse A/C, pool,
$52.50/person. Mt. Vernon apt. 11
Call 372-6098. (C-st-141-p)
FEMALE Roommate for Summer
Qtr. Share 1 br. apt. A/C TV Quiet
Landmark Apts. Call 376-7693 after
5:00 PM. (C-st-142-p)
HELP WANTED
SfISSSS
SUMMER JOB! See the US as a ramp
hand for the world's greatest auto
thrill show. For information call
373-1247. (E-st-143-p)
Co-ed wanted room and board in
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-st-143-p)
Need full time saleslady for ladles
retail department. Some experience
preferred. Pay according to ability.
For interview apply In person at
Silvermans, 225 W. University Ave.
(E-4t-143-p)

Tuesday, May 19,1970, The Florida Alligator,

HELP WANTED
Looking for mother to take care of 3
children in her home while on
vacation following graduation. If
interested please call 372-3846.
(E-st-142-p)
Waitress, Coney Island Rest. 210 SE
First St. 372-9288 Must be 21. Full
time. (E-4t-141-p)
Like to sell or would you like to try?
How about a job with good pay plus
a chance to win Elucation Grant. Call
Fuller Brush 378-0121. (E-10t-134-p)
Need a job? All routes student
operated. Charles Chips Home
Delivery service potato chips,
pretzels, cooki )s, 376-6943.
(E-10t-137-p)
Cocktail waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary will
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dub's
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-125-p)
AUTOS
1965 Blue Triumph with brand new
engine. Must sell. SBOO. Call
378-7655 after 5:00. (G-3t-142-p)
Distinctive 1968 AMX. 390, 4-speed,
air, stereo tape, other extras. Must
sell, going camping $2300. Call
376-1853 evenings. (G-st-140-p)
1967 Opel, A/C, Excellent
Condition, Call Joel 378-9758 or
378-2401 or see at 1113 S.W. Ist ave.
(G-st-143-p)
Married student with 2 cars needs
only 1. 62 Chevy Impala. Tires body
engine & interior in fine shape. Runs
good $250 call 373-1046.
(G-st-143-p)
64 Chevy Impala conv. VB,
Autotrans power steering. Good
mechanical condition. Make offer,
376-4165 after 5. (G-st-143-p)
1963 Rambler FULLY EQUIPPED
RUNS PERFECTLY $399. Call Tom
at 373-1573 or 373-2747.
(G-st-140-p)
'64 Corvair, clean 4 speed, radio,
heater, $300; '65 Honda 90 good
condition, Call 378-6017.
(G-139-st-p)
1969 VW Squareback
air-conditioned, Fine shape $2,200.
1966 Simca sedan good car. $550.
No reasonable offer refused on either
car. 372-1039. (G-st-139-p)
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission is a winner
too! TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)

TONIGHT!
SYMPATHY for the DEVIL
at the Union Auditorium
admission $1:50
5:30, 8:00, 10:30 p.m.
sponsored by J.W. Reitz Union
AT 11AM
MON-SAT
Every Tuesday Nite I Everyday fl
ft A Free Keg of Beer \ B-7for A
i To the Guy Who \ th ** lrl [lyy
Mod Obh J
Famous ALAN'S
CUBANA
"-V 'WcXgZ \i'V 1 * f

Page 9

V.;;y.WAV.V.VA%V.V..V.V.V.V.V.V.V,
AUTOS
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy clean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-c)
1969 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN 9,000
miles, excellent cond. 1 owner,
visiting faculty member, $1,500 Call
373-2990 before 10 am or after 7
pm. (G-st-141-p)
1960 Falcon, radio, heater, new tires,
repainted, engine work. Cheap
dependable transportation. Excellent
condition. 376-2909 after 5:30.
(G-st-141-p)
'.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.'
PERSONAL
Sex and the spirit in the sky. A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters in
Union Aud. May 21 7:30 pm
FREE FUN INTERESTING FREE
FREE ********* (J-st-141-p)
To my favorite Scorpio (SAM 17):
Always may the sun shine brightly
for you and the stars guide you, for
you are the reason they shine. Youll
always be the one and only N man
gray hairs included. "MTP"
(J-st-140-p)
ILMEC. (J-st-143-p)
Junl Happy Birthday to the best
girl In the world. Maybe the fritzes in
your hair will straighten out when
you get your present me.
(J-lt-143-p)
Free fruit juice for any campus
policeman who comes to the front of
Tigert without his gun on we love
you but not your guns The hunger
strikers. (J-141-6t-p)
Edgar Cayce interest group meeting
Tues 8:00 pm. Faculty, staff,
students Invited to call 372-7883 for
info on this and astrology
conference. (J-2t-142-p)
Its never too early to consider REAL
political alternatives JOHN
LINDSAY for President In 1972?
Let's talk about it Now! Tuesday
May 19 Bpm 1518 NW First Place 2
blocks north of graduate library
Across from Sunshine School.
Refreshments. (J-lt-143-p)
To our 11 new Sigma sisters ll
weeks of pledgeship (coke bottles,
telephones, boring meetings, robbers,
and sidewalks) means growth into
sisterhood. Keep on growing and
sharing. Sigma love, your sisters.
(J-lt-143-p)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)

PERSONAL
:;::::::>:;:::<::;:::;:;:;:;:::::;:;:r:;:::t:*:r:r:::>*:;>^%r>
Congratulations to the new brothers
of Theta Chi Hope it made the
weekend even better for you Good
luck from vour Dreamgirl and
Court. (J-2t*l42*p)
Would you like to help someone in
need? Contribute your extra or
unwanted items, and visit the garage
sale Purpose The Royal Christian
Youth Center is a Christian
organization non-denominational,
integrated serving children and
youth. Any donation is given
completely to the youth work. 425
N.E. 7th St. (J-3t-142-p)
David Sex is beautiful. Let's learn
together. A Bridge Over Toubled
Waters. Union Aud. on May 21 at
7:30 pm Free Mary (J-st-141-p)
Marsha Sex isnt the only thing I
love you too! Meet me at A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters In Union Aud.
May 21 at 7:30 pm me. (J-st-141-p)
Needed: Animal Lover to board 2
cats for summer quarter while owner
abroad. Will provide food plus S6O.
376-4918. (J-3M42-P)
Is sex love? Find out at A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters in Union Aud.
on May 21 at 7:30 pm.lt's FREE
AND FUN!! (J-st-141-p)
LOST & FOUND
LOST: May 7 during strike ,near
Mallory, Men's Accutron watch. I
must have It!!! Call 392-7312
LARGE REWARD ssssssssssss
(L-3t-141-p)
Found: One tire" kitten grey
with black stripes at met/allurgy
bldg, across from East Hall. Call
392-1451. (L-141-3t-nc)
# mm m m m mm m
SERVICES
Grad student Needs Bre
Experienced Accurate Typist. .45 k
page Call Lorrle 372-7973.
(M-Bt-140-p)
Rubys ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th St. 376-8506 Mrs.
Ruby Mills. (M-10t-135-p)
STEREO TAPES $4.00 very high
quality selection of 200 albums or
transfer from own order blank and/or
Information, Sound & Cinema
Corporation P.O. Box 1064 Eau
Gallle, Fla. (M-st-142-p)
Del-Ray Typing Service: manuscripts
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
prompt, pick-up delivery 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-143-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
Are you fumbling in the dark? A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters will
turn you onl Union Aud. May 21
7:30 pm FREE (M-st-141-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-p)
AT THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 cent and 4 cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)

F 'll
NOW
BILLYS "66
SERVICE CENTER
TIRES BATTERIES 8, ACCESSORIES
BILLYS SERVICE
IS BETTER SERVICE''
505 N. W. 13th ST.


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ADS SELL! I


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The
Florida
Alligator

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BUDDY MILES
... freshman

UFs Favreau Third In AAUs
Jr. National Weightlifting Tourney

Competing against the best
junior lifters in the nation, UFs
Bob Favreau won a hard-earned
third place Saturday in the 1970
Junior National Amateur
Athletic Union Weightlifting
Championships at Brentwood,
N. Y.

Cricketeers Split Pair

The UF Cricket Club split a
two game series with the
Commonwealth Wanderers this
I weekend in games played
Saturday and Sunday
afternoons.
The victory Sunday was the
first time the UF eleven has
beaten the powerful Bahamas
team in four tries, and marks a
major victory for the UF
cricketeers. Playing for Florida
this weekend was Andy Smith,
the first American member of
the UF cricket club.
Saturdays game was won by
the Wanderers. At bat the UF
club could manage only 64 runs
using 11 batsmen, with captain
Alroy Chow the leading scorer
with 12 runs. When the
Bahamas team batted they
bettered the UFs snore tallying
69 runs needing only six batters.
Sunday was a different story,
with the UF cricketeers scoring a
resounding victory. The Florida
team batted first and scored an
GATORTOWN
and
La Bonne Vie
Apts.
EXTRA-LOW RATES
FOR SUMMER
Call 378-3467
or
372-1091
Or Coma by office
309 SW 16th Ava
Apt 140

GATOP

Hilley, Miles All-Conference

By RICK MADIGAN
Alligator Writer
Floridas Greg Hilley, a senior from Mobile, Ala.,
was named this weekend to the All-Southeastern
Conference tennis team.
In a vote of the SEC tennis coaches, Hilley was
the only Gator named to the six-man squad. Georgia
placed two men on the first team, with the
remaining spots going to Tennessee, LSU, and
Mississippi State. Florida freshman Buddy Miles was
named to the second team.
A PHYSICAL Education major, Hilley was the
number one singles player on this years team that
went 13-8 and finished fourth in the SEC
championships. He compiled a singles record of
18-12 this year and together with Kenn Terry made
a particularly potent doubles team that went to the
SEC finals before being eliminated.
A second team All-SEC performer last year, Greg
was the 1969 SEC champion in no. 5 singles and

Favreau, a 5-foot-3
sophomore from Orlando, lifted
725 lbs. on three lifts (press-230
lb., snatch-205 lb., clean and
jerk-290 lb.) in the 148 lb. class.
His press and clean and jerk
marks were personal highs.

impressive 138 runs, with
C. McCowan leading all scorers
with 52 runs. The Wanderers
could manage only 98 runs
against the UF bowlers. The
UFs best bowler was captain
Chow, who scored 5 wickets and
allowed only 15 runs.

JOB APPLICATION
AND
PASSPORT PHOTOGRAPHS
TAKEN ONE DAY
READY THE NEXT
CUI 376-7657 FOfi APPOINTMENT
TOTAL
PHOTOGRAPHY

Favreau finished behind Barry
Pensyl of the York Barbell Club
and Libro Taglianetti of the
Upper Darby (N. Y.)
Weightlifting Club. Pensyls
winning lift was 785 lbs., and
Taglianetti lifted 15 lbs. more
than Favreau in the snatch to
finish second with a 740 lb.
total.
Because of financial financing
difficulties, Favreau said he
doesnt know when hell be able
to compete again for the UF in a
national weightlifting meet.
Favreau said he needs to
compete in national meets if he
is to continue improving for
eventual Olympic competition.

teamed with Steve Owens to win the no. 2 doubles
crown.
On this years young and inexperienced squad, he
was an outstanding team leader. Comprised largely
of freshmen, this years team leaned heavily on
Hilley and other upperclassmen.
Tennis was a natural for Greg, who comes from a
real tennis family. His dad coached at Lamar Tech
for many years, fielding many top tennis teams.
After graduation Greg hopes to have a go at
professional tennis after a stint in the army. His loss
will be felt dearly by next years Netters. but Greg
feels the number of promising young players on this
years squad will more than make up the void.
Other players named to the first squad were
Norman Holmes and Danny Birchmore of Georgia,
Steve Faulk ol LSU, Tommy Mozur of Tennessee,
and Rob Cadwallader of Mississippi State. Joining
Buddy Miles on the second team were Mike Cmaylo
and Brant Bailey of Georgia, Tommy Wade of
Kentucky, Tommy Ducrest of LSU, and Jimmy
Ward of Tennessee. Georgias Dan Magill was named
SEC coach of the year.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 10

(^AKnHno"ANUTrDS!v^N^
SAVE!
I I STARKE. FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VOR/TE DEALER
I HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
I SATURDAY BAM IPM
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SPRING FEVER SALE
Clt fye pnibersitg j&Jpp
Savings from 50% to 60%
Womens Department
kWERE NOW!
I Skirts sl6 $3.99
Blouses $26 $.99-$12.99
' 328 $5.99-$12.99
A Bathing Suits $22 $3.99-$8.99
Dresses up to $42 $5.99-510.99
* Shorts up to sl4 $5 gg
Midriff Pajamas sl3 $8 99
PegnoirSets S2O 610 Q q
Shoes sl6 $399
(Broken sizes) /
Mens Department JjL.
WERE NOW! (j/Y
Slacks $6 to $lO $3 to 35
Shirts $6 to 510 s3toss W
Fraternity Ties 36 $199
Men's Sport Coats SSO-S6O sl9 99 B
Suits $55-585 $19.99 to $39*99 ft-
j&fop

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 19,1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

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GREGHILLEY
...senior



Gator Greats versus Frat All-Stars

The on-again-off-again Fraternity-Gator All Star Classic
is definitely on again and scheduled for Tuesday night at 7
pjn. on Beta Field,
After numerous delays and a switch of the site, the frat
men have worked themselves into a tizzy over the
encounter. They hope to catch the Gators stale and off in
their timing.
BUT STEVE SPURRIER is still expected to take his
favored former Gator Greats to a win on Beta Field,
Spurrier was the 1966 Hiesman Trophy winner and
All-American quarterback who held numerous Gator and
Southeastern Conference Records, before John Reaves.
Hes played in the shadows of John Brodie with the San
Francisco 49ers for three years but last year started and
beat the Baltimore Colts.
Spurriers top receivers are expected to be Larry Smith
and Richard Trapp. Smith, a 6B graduate, went on to a
spectacular. rookie season with the Los Angeles Rams.
Smiths receiving ability was highlighted last year when as
a running back he was the second leading receiver for the
Rams.
LAR&Y BLADE RENTZ will be back for his second
year in the classic. Rentz is the Gator who defied all his
critics by making the San Diego Charger team and saw
action on both kickoff teams.
Mark Ely will be bolstering the defensive backfield.
Mark, a three year letterman who just played his final year
will be flying for the Air Force upon graduation.
Gene Peek and Bill Gaisford will be back after
outstanding games last year.
BOYD WELSCH WILL also be back after being named
last years most valuable player in the classic as a pass
rushers Welsch lettered in basketball.
Other Gator stars include Mike Heally 6B, Skip Albury
69, Steve Tannen 69, Mike Polohach 69, Paul Maliska,
69, and Brian Jetter 67.
The Gators team captain is Tom Christian a 1968
player. r

Frat Cp Winner
Determined Today
The winner of the Orange
League Presidents Cup for
intramurals will be determined
today when Beta Theta Pi meets
Tau Epsilon Phi in softball.
The crucial game was forced
by Sigma Chi, who entered
softball five points ahead in the
standings. The Sigs beat Pi
Kappa Alpha 8-2 Monday,
finishing 2-1 in their bracket.
The Betas are currently 2-0 in
their bracket, and a win over the
TEPs will push them past the
Sigs and tie down the Presidents
Cup.
The Presidents Cup is
awarded to the fraternity with
the best intramurals record for
the year. Two cups are awarded
in different size categories. Chi
Phi has already clinched the Blue
League Cup for smaller
fraternities.
Game time is 5:30 pjn. oh Sig
Ep Field.
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 17 IS .531
New York 18 16 .529
St. Louis 16 16 .500 1
Pittsburgh 16 20 .444 3
Philadelphia 13 21 .382 5
Montreal 12 21 .364 stt
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 27 10 .730
Los Angeles 20 15 .571 6
Atlanta 19 16 .543 7
Houston 18 19 .486 9
San Francisco 18 20 .474 9%
San Diego 17 22 .436 11
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 24 9 .727
New York 19 16 .543 6
Detroit 15 16 .484 8
Boston 15 17 .469 8%
Washington 13 20 .394 11
Cleveland 11 18 .379 11
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 22 10 .688
California 23 12 .657 Vi
Oakland 18 18 .500 6
Chicago ils 19 .441 8
Kansas City 13 21 .382 10
Milwaukee 11 23 .324 12

The only beer that
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enough gj^otliep#
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'

/
4+o
STEVE SPURRIER
... 1966 Hiesman Trophy winner

Tuesday, May 19,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

After practicing for more than three weeks under the
watchful eye of Gator Offensive Coach Jimmy Dunn the
frat men feel they have all the tools to pull off the big
upset.
Starting at end will be Mike Rollyson, a two year
all-campus standout with SAE. Mike led the SAEs to
second and first place in football in consecutive years. His
career was highlighted this year when he was selected to
the Academic All-Campus team and was selected as
intramurals Outstanding End of the Year.
AT ANOTHER END will be Don Perrin of Beta Theta
Pi. Perrin is a four year performer who was voted the Most
Outstanding Athlete of Beta. He has been all-campus in
basketball, football and softball while being selected as
the years number two receiver.
Chris Hall of Beta will start at center. Hall is a three
year standout.
Mike Smith has been tabbed by the coaches as an
excellent varsity prospect. Mike, and SPE, is an
outstanding runner and catcher.
RICK KIRBY a tackle for SAE teamed up with
Rollyson to be the Dynamic Duo of intramurals this year.
At short back will be Herby Appell of Pi Lam who was
red shirted from intramural competition this year due to
an eligibility ruling.
The key man on the field will be the quarterback, Hank
Salzler of Beta. Hank is a former all-state high school
quarterback who played one year with the Gator
freshmen. He hopes to beat rusher Boyd Welch with a fast
delivery and quick release.
ON DEFENSE the key man for the frat men could be
the rusher, Mike Zem of Sigma Chi, who will have to put
the pressure on Spurrier.
Arthur Alvarez of Pi Kappa Alpha will be out to show
that his brother Carlos is not the only football player in
the family.
Mike Reider of ATO, Paul Mittman of TEP, and Phil
Petrozella of Pikes make up the fearsome threesome of
the frat men.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 19,1970

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