Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Vol 62, No. 142

j;;*;swav.va%v.vav.v.v;v;*;*;v;
(200 Students,
{Faculty Air
(Gun Opinions
By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
$ About 200 students and
$ faculty came to a public
:*: hearing about guns on
:: campus Sunday afternoon in
: McCarty Auditorium.
:| The hearing was part of a

study by the Committee to Study the Removal and Control of
§ Guns on Campus. Anyone who wanted to express his opinion
was invited to speak. $
FATHER MICHAEL Gannon said he had come only to hear
evidence on the question of whether UF Police Department £
(UPD) officers needed to carry guns. $
Gannon told the group he had seen UF police called in many :j:
:j: situations, and could never see any reason why they needed
weapons.
> An officer on routine duties should not carry a weapon
* because it is a burden, both upon his body and upon his and my
conscience. I am just offended by anything that is £
>: death-dealing, Gannon said. £
>: UPD LT. DUDLEY D. Goulden, speaking for UF policemen, £
: said they felt it an insult to our integrity that the issue was £
£ brought up.
>: Four UPD officers quit last week, although not necessarily
: because of the student demand for disarming police, Goulden
said. x
Although no UPD officer had ever fired a gun at a human x
:j: being, Goulden said they were frequently involved in situations
j: where a weapon might be needed.
j: GOULDEN SHOWED the group a.2 5-caliber automatic that
x was taken from a man arrested the night before in die stadium. £
He was fighting, Goulden said. £
£ During the occupation of WalkerAuditorium,plainclothesmen £
v spotted three concealed pistols and a number of razors and £
£ other weapons, Goulden said. £
In previous years, a man had been shot in the Hume Hall $

[Mj j | L
|ll|
SENATE DEMOCRATIC
Leader Mike Mansfield says
he will sponsor war fund
cutoff bill .page 2
Campus Crier 12
Classifieds 10
Editorial 8
Letters :9
Movies .10
Sports 14
Whats Happemiag 3

The
Florida Alligator

... attends gun hearing §

parking lot and a student was :*
wounded by a .22 bullet on a :
playing field in the Graham :
area, according to Goulden. %
GOULDEN DREW a :j
derisive response from the
audience when he charged
that some of the students in
the march on the ROTC
building intended to bum it
to the ground and take over.
Committee member Larry
Woldenburg denied that the
mood of the crowd had been $
(SEE'HEARING'PAGE 2)
I*
w.Av.v.v.VrtvA'ttvXviv.v.w.v.'.v.'.i'

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

SGP BLAMED
Super Show Loss
Reported $20,000

See Related Story Page 4
By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
After the report that the
Super Show lost about $20,000
Sunday, Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder questioned the
manner in which the Super
Show was handled.
In the original planning of the
Super Show, contracts were
signed before the money was
allocated to Student
Government Productions (SGP)
by Student Senate.
FIRST OF ALL, they (SGP)
have overridden their power,
Uhlfelder said.
He said it will be necessary to
make many renovations in the
way SGP is set up.
The fact that they made
contracts before they had gotten
money from Student Senate tied
senate hands by the legal
complications of the contracts,
Uhlfelder said.
He said he plans to investigate
and make known why the
procedure was handled in the
manner it was.
(SEE 'UHLFELDER' PAGE 2)

Colleges Plan Memorials
For Slain Jackson Youths

See Editorial, Page 8
By United Press International
Antiwar protesters from
several colleges Sunday took
time off protesting the U. S.
involvement in Indochina to
plan memorials for two youths
killed Friday at Jackson State
University.

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DUEL DUTY
... umbrella beat off sun and rain
V

President James E. Cheek of
predominantly black Howard
University in the nations capital
said no more regular academic
classes would be held at the
university this semester. Cheek
said the move was an act of
mourning for the recent deaths
of the slain black youths by law
officers.

MIDNIGHT
CHEERS
Super Show audience
applauds Grand Funk Railroad
performance that ended near the
midnight hour Saturday night,
delayed by rain. See related
story page 4.
CLAY PHIPPS

Monday, May 18, 1970

HOWARD WILL remain open
and classes will meet Monday as
seminars on the shootings, black
history and other current topics.
Northern Illinois University
President Rhoten A. Smith
declared a two day moratorium
on classes for Monday and
Tuesday in memory of those
(SEE 'JACKSON' PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida AlKftatfer, Monday, May 18,1970

Women Ask For End Os Sex Restrictions

By AHi gator Services
The UF Womens Caucus, in its first
annual meeting, called for an end to
Florida laws governing private sexual
acts between consenting adults.
The 250 women also passed
resolutions urging an end to:
restrictions on abortions, except
that they be performed by licensed
physicians;

BSP Chairman Appointed
As Cunningham Resigns

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Journalism Instructor John
Jack Detweiler was appointed
chairman of the Board of
Student Publications (BSP)
Friday, according to Presidential
Assistant Rae O. Weimer.
Detweiler will replace present
Chairman Hugh Cunningham,
who said his own appointment
had been temporary from the
beginning.
THE BSP selects the editor
Uhlfelder
Questions
PAGE ONeJ
I WANT TO set up a
mechanism where no contracts
can be signed until it goes before
the senate, Uhlfelder, said. I
might cut back on SGP to make
up for their loss.
Despite the complications
and discrepancies about when
the contracts were signed and
approved by the senate, and at
what point we were obligated to
the groups, said Walter Morgan,
former student body president,
I thought it was a show that
was planned far better than any
other event on this campus.
AS FAR AS I am concerned,
it was welt worth it. Os what I
have heard we lost $20,000
which is a shock to most
students. But when you can
entertain and make happy that
many people, its worth it, he
continued.
Morgan said he thought the
Super Show was a beautiful
thing even though it was a risk.
If we could have advertised
outside the city, we would have
been in good shape, Morgan
said.
WE WERE hurt because the
campus was torn up last week
and people had other things on
their minds, Mrs. Eleanor
Roberts, UF public functions,
manager, said.
There were an estimated
8,000 tickets sold and about
$43,000 receipts, according to
Mrs. Roberts.
The total cost of the show
was about $63,000.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

URGE LEGAL ABORTIONS BY PHYSICIANS

alleged nepotism policies
discriminating against women;
t required home economics courses
in Florida high schools.
Another resolution called for
establishment and investigation of child
care centers.
THE KEYNOTE speaker at the
all-day conference on the UF campus
was Katherine East, executive secretary

and managing editor of the
Alligator as well as the editor of
the Seminole and Florida
Quarterly.
Thursday, summer editors for
the Alligator will be selected by
the present Board. Detweilers
appointment does not become
official until summer quarter.
Detweiler said he was
honored UF President
Stephen C. OConnell had
selected him for this important
position and looked forward to
working with the staff members
of student publications.
HE SAID he does not think
student publications should
copy the format of the
conmercial press.
Detweiler has been an
instructor in the College of
Journalism and Communications
since 1965. He was editorial
advisor to the Alligator from
January 1968 until August
1968.
HE RECEIVED his bachelors
degree at UF, in 1952. He
worked on the Alligator while an
undergraduate.
He received his masters degree
in journalism in Illinois and his
doctorate at UF in December
1969.
DETWEILER SAID he has no
plans for changing student
publications. There are
committees set up to decide on
changes and he said he would
be glad to work with them.
When I was editorial advisor,
I was also on the journalism
faculty. Thai was sort of unique,
but I hope to see it again.
Detweiler said he thinks this

BULLETIN
WASHINGTON (UPI) Senate Democratic Leader Mike
Mansfield said Sunday he will become a sponsor of an
amendment to cut off funds for all U. S. military operations in
Indochina by the end of the year.
Mansfields endorsement of the most powerful of a series of
Senate proposals aimed at extricating the United States from
Southeast Asia added an important voice to what was likely to
become a months-long confrontation between the Senate and
the Nixon administration.

FREDRICK
GARDENS
372-7555 1130 SW 16th Ave

Jmm. H.
JOHN DETWEILER
... new BSP head
was a good set up, and would
like to see certain classes held
in the Alligator office.
IT GETS people into the
Alligator staff and helps the
manpower situation as well as
being a learning experience,
Detweiler said.
Present BSP Chairman
Cunningham said Detweiler is a
capable and fine member of the
faculty who has had long
experience with student
publications.
I resigned the day I was
informed of the appointment in
October, but the president was
unable to find anyone else,
Cunningham said Sunday.
He resigned again in
December, but there was still no
one else who would assume the
position.
He said he stayed on as
chairman for OConnell, but that
Detweiler was a superb choice
in that he replaces me.

BURGER CHEF "SUPER SPECIAL
BIG SHEF "FOOD GOOD ENOUGH TO
r it P LEAVE HOME FOR
French Fries a Ai
Large Coke |%DA )
All three only wWW /
good Mon. tues. awed.
ONLY AT
715 N.W. 13th 13TH ST. agHiftfe. //,

of the Citizens Advisory Council on the
Status of Women, U. S. Department of
Labor.
It is astonishing that in the year
1970, American women are having to
seek an amendment to the constitution
to give them equal protection of the
laws, Mrs. East said.
A panel member responding to Mrs.
Easts address was author-journalist

Hearing Gripes

ITbom page onel
violent either then or later in
Walker Auditorium, or that
any weapons had been
brought in.
The only violence that I
saw in Walker Auditorium
was when the Gainesville
police rushed in, said
Woldenburg.
GOULDEN SAID later the
march had been orderly and
well-managed.
Asked if police would be
satisfied with having those in
patrol cars carry guns and
others equipped with
two-way radios to summon
help, Goulden said they
would not.
When a police officer fires
his gun, on the average, it is
at a range of six yards or less.
He has to make a split-second
decision. There is no time to
summon help, Goulden said.
IF UF POLICE were
disarmed, recruiting would
suffer in an already

Jackson Services
Held Off Campus

£Trom page one]]
killed in the Mississippi capital.
NIU observed a moratorium on
May 7 and 8 following the death
of four Kent State University
students.
In Jackson, Miss., where the
predominantly black college
draws more than a third of its
4,500 students, youths gathered
at a Masonic Temple a block
from the campus for services in
memory of the students.
DR. AARON SHIRLEY, a
Jackson physician, said state
authorities refused to allow the
memorial services to be held on
the campus. The school was
closed following the shooting for

Caroline Bird, who wrote Born Female
- Or the High Cost of Keeping Women
Down.
MISS BIRD said there is no organized
male backlash to womens liberation
because most men deny that a real
problem exists.
However, she did say that there is an
unholy reactionary state against
blacks, civil rightists, poverty and the
peace movement.

understrength force, and they
would more likely need
outside help in quelling a
disturbance, according to
Goulden.
City and state police are
armed by law and would not
be likely to give up their
weapons when called to UF,
Goulden said.
Student Body President
Steve Uhlfelder commented
on the proceedings: Its
important for us all to discuss
this problem, trying to
understand all the viewpoints.
President OConnell will act
on the findings of the gun
control committee.
We must stress
non-violence on this
campus, Uhlfelder said. We
are in need of a greater
understanding between all
people in this country.
Issues which have
recently provoked violence
should be discussed in classes
because people have to keep
aware of just what is
happening around them, he
said.

the remainder of the semester.
At the University of
Maryland, at least 22 students
have been ordered to leave the
campus. School officials said at
least 175 more would be
expelled as soon as possible.
National Guardsmen remained
on the campus and will do so
until graduation June 6.
ILLINOIS GOV. Richard B.
Ogilvie Sunday withdrew the
1,125 National Guardsmen from
Carbondale. Ogilvie had ordered
the men into the troubled town
where Southern Illinois
University is located after SIU
students demanded that classes
be cancelled for the remainder
of the school year so the
students could protest the war.



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CLAY PHIPPS
M/SS UF CONTESTANTS

From these contestants for the Miss UF Contest,
seven finalists will be chosen tonight at the Reitz
Union Ballroom. The contestants, pictured from left
to right, are: Carolyn Lee Jones, Judy Koons, Cindi
Fram bach, Cindy Seago, Sue Scranton, Deborah

Election Loss Sparks Disturbances

LAKE PROVIDENCE, La.
(UPI) A group of 150 Negroes
tossed rocks and bricks through
store windows in this Mississippi
Delta town Sunday when they
were angered by the defeat of
two black candidates in a local
election.
Two persons were arrested in
the melee which was brought
under control Sunday morning.
SHERIFF SAM L. House Jr.
said more arrests will be made.
House said the disturbance
apparently was touched off
WHATS
HAPPENING
GREAT POLITICIANS:
There will be an important
meeting of all political science
majors today at 4 pjn. in room
205 Peabody Hall. In this
meeting new members will be
elected to the departmental
student council.
DOCTORED: Dr. George
Elson will speak at 7:30 p.m. in
room 150-D in the Union
cafeteria on the subject of
Patterning Theory of Treating
Brain Damaged Children. Elson
is a Gainesville doctor in charge
of the Institute for the
Development of Human
Potential.
GATOR PICK: Semifinals for
the Miss UF Pageant are today at
7 p.m. in the Union Ballroom.
BLOW IT MEAN: The UF
Music Department sponsors
Music for Trumpets in the
University Auditorium at 8:15
pjn.
GATORTOWN
and
La Bonne Vie
Apts.
EXTRA-LOW RATES
FOR SUMMER
Call 378-3457
or
372-1091
Or Come by office
309 S W 16th Ave
Apt 140

by the defeat of two Negroes
running for mayor and marshal
in the city with a two-to-one
black majority. The towns
population is 5/781.
Leon Minsky, a white man,
defeated L. B. Jackson, a Negro,
for mayor Saturday by a vote of
1,524 to 962, and white
incumbent Henry C. Vaughn Jr.
retained his marshals post by
defeating Stewart Marshall, a
Negro, 1,399 to 1,092.
HOUSE SAID more state
troopers were called in to help in

Chevrolet Right Car.
Right Price. Right Now.
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With these Novas the day-night
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standard, are still available as options. than our previous lowest priced 4-door. than our previous lowest priced hardtop.
Place your order at your Chevy dealers. Americas most popular mid-size Now Americas lowest priced
sedan at a new low price. mid-size hardtop.
We took Americas best selling mid-size car. Then added
two new lower priced models. Lower priced they are But lower
priced looking and feeling they aren't.
Monte Carlo is hundreds of dollars less than
other luxury
Yet Monte Carlo's car of thickly padded
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Monte Carlo is every bit the luxury car.
Monte Carlo Luxury for only $3,123* Tr y the real thing at your Chevrolet dealers.
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MacCallum, Debbie Dalton, Pat VanDekerchkhove,
Pat Miner, Margaret Montgomery, Deborah McLeod,
Mary Diann Smith, Joanne Mandell, Stevie Tison,
Linda Seim, Linda Burr, Taunya O'Dell. Not
pictured are Cathy Suddyth and Kathy Dolan.

the troubled town.
The tension increased when
Anna Tatman, a white nurse of
about 50, was found dead,
bound and gagged, in her burned
bedroom.
However, House said the fire
was in the single womans
bedroom across town and south
of the area where the
disturbance occurred.
O. S. BROWN, editor of the
weekly Lake Providence
Banner-Democrat, said groups of
youngsters, white and black,

IN RESOLUTION
Kibler, Gator
Blasted By YDs

UF Young Democrats lashed
out at the Florida Alligator and
Regents Chairman Dr. D. Burke
Kibler in a brief resolution
released last week.
The resolution praised the UF
chapter of the American
Federation of Teachers (AFT)
for helping avoid a possible
violent clash during
demonstrations the previous
week.
THE ALLIGATOR was guilty
either of negligence or of
character assasination in its
editorials criticizing
frizzle-haired youth on an ego
trip, the resolution said.
Many frizzle-haired youths
provided vital constructive
leadership, it said.
Kibler was criticized for

male and female, gathered on
Levee Street and, when the
returns of the election came in,
started a demonstration.
However, the sheriff said he
saw no whites among the
demonstrators.
State police were called in
early Sunday to restore order in
this parish seat of East Caroll
Parish which borders the
Mississippi River.
Windows were knocked out of
the fronts of about a dozen
stores on Main Street during the
protest.

Monday, May 18, <1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

saying students had been used
during demonstrations.
WE HOPE that he will-select
his words with greater care in
the future, the resolution said.
AFT was praised for holding
an open faculty meeting May
6 and for providing faculty
marshals for demonstrations.
We, the Young Democrats of
UF, praise the AFT for its
leadership and thank those
faculty members both AFT
members and non-affiliated
who stepped forward last week.
Russians Attract
Berlin Tourists
(
BERLIN (UPI) One of the
tourist attractions of Berlin is
the chance to see Russians this
side of their own borders.
A favorite tourist spot in East
Berlin is the gigantic Soviet War
Memorial in Treptow Park, but
you dont have to cross the wall
to see Russian memorials or
soldiers. There is a Russian War
Memorial in the Tiergarten Park
in West Berlin, guarded by
Russian sentries who are bused
through the Friedrick Strasse
crossing daily.
Other Russians alternate with
American, French and British
troops in guarding Rudolf Hess
at the four-power war crimes
prison in the Spandau district of
the Citys British sector.

Page 3



, TO. Florid. Ml*.*". M
Page 4

'But It Hasnt Rained In Months

You out there are really the stars. You are the ones who
waited out in the rain.
-Grand Funk Railroads lead singer

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Lots of rain, lots of sound,
and lots of tired people sum up
Saturdays Super Show.
The day was beautiful and
students sat around on the grass
and in the stands enjoying the
presentations of Celebration,
Mecki Mark Men, James Cotton
Blues Band, Ten Wheel Drive,
and lan and Sylvia with Great
Speckled Bird.
THEN IT started to drizzle.
(But it hasnt rained in
months! was the redundant
cry.)
The Youngbloods came on
and so did the rain. As always on
Florida Field, when it rains it
pours.
The tent sagged and ripped.
Equipment was drenched, Crow
and Ewing St. Times made their
exits. The Youngbloods played
on.
Someone announced that if
the crowd could wait out the
rain, the show would continue.
THEY WAITED.
Wet and cold, huddled under
the bleachers, the crowd stayed
on.
The production crew worked
to clear the stages and set up to
go on. The rain stopped and kids
Rain Causes
Car Collision
Five Miamians suffered minor
injuries after their car struck a
light pole on north Fletcher
Drive on UF campus late
Saturday night.
The vehicle was moving north
on the street at 10 pm.,
according to a University Police
Department (UPD) report.
THE CAR, traveling at 30
m.pJi. in a heavy downpour,
missed an S-curve and hit a
street lamp, the report said.
Treated for cuts and bruises at
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
were Robert Mackesy, Patricia
Threatte, Manuel Senches,
Tonya Ward and Morris Fast.
The five were released after
treatment.
The sixth passenger,
Rutherford Snow, was not
treated at the health center.
THE GROUP had come to
Gainesville to see the Super
Show, according to UPD Lt.
V. K. Holliman.
Holliman said no charges were
filed against Tonya Ward, the
cars driver, because of the heavy
rainfall which had severely cut
visibility.
All 1712 W. University
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came back on the field. They
waited patiently.
You out there are really the
stars. You are the ones who
waited out in the rain, Grand
Funk Railroads lead singer said.
THEY PLAYED and everyone
was happy. The night was once
again beautiful and the sound
was great.
Sly and the Family Stone
came on.
You dont need darkness to
do whats right, Sly said when
the stadium lights were turned
off and then on.
There were problems with the
amplifiers and there was a break
to adjust them. They played and
the Super Show was over.
About 8,000 tired, wet, but
happy people left the stadium.
Behind them was a muddy field
covered with chicken bones,
trash, and bottles. "V
And behind them was a long
day.

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THE SHOW WENT ON
... after hard showers delayed show two hours

Photos By
Cloy Phipps

African Club Plans
Week of Celebration
A newly-formed campus group, the Organization of African Unity
(OAU), has set aside the last week in May as Africa Week.
The OAU charter was signed in 1963 in Ethiopia, and most African
countries set aside the week to celebrate the anniversary of the
signing.
PRESIDENT LAS UN Adigun of the UF African Club said the
organization on campus had 30 to 35 members. They are
collaborating with the Institute of Black Studies for the weeks
program.
We want to remember the various countries involved by
celebrating the week, Adigun said.
There will be a symposium on black problems May 26 and 27,
organized by the institute.
Saturday, May 30, the branch secretary of the New York OAU will
come to the campus to give a lecture on black achievements. His talk
will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Reitz Union.
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GATOR GIRL
Today's Gator Girl is Sharon Strickland. Sharon, lUC, is from
Gainesville, and a member of Delta Delta Delta sorority. She is also
one of the Gator Swim Fins, who performed last Friday at Florida
pool.

Pollution Os Water
Researched By IFAS

By Alligator Services
Pollution of ground water is
the subject of a study underway
at UF Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS).
How herbicides get into the
ground water is being
investigated by Dr. Robert S.
Mansell, an assistant soil
physicist who is conducting the
project through a three-year
grant from the Florida Water
Resources Center^
OURS IS basically a
pollution study, Mansell said.
We are studying the physical
and chemical properties of
different soils to see how they
affect the movement of
herbicides through them, he
said.
The objective of this
investigation is to measure the
movement of specific herbicides
in moist soil under environments
most favorable for
contamination of the ground
water.
MANSELL SAID several
physical factors affect how
much of a herbicide is absorbed

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and how much will pass through
the soil.
The amount of water present
in the soil at the time of,
herbicide application is one
important example, Mansell
said. Different amounts of
organic matter and clay also
affect how a herbicide moves.
Other factors affecting
herbicide movement are
temperature, flow velocity of
water through the soil, pH
(degree of acidity or alkalinity),
and biological effects in the
field, Mansell said.
LIME PRACTICES and the
water quality of irrigation water
also affect herbicide movement,
according to the soil physicist.
Once we get a thorough
understanding of the movement
of herbicides through varying
soils, Mansell said, we will
know how to vary farming
practices to reduce the
contamination of ground water
under some soils.
This basic information will
also provide a basis for more
effective utilization of
herbicides, according to an IFAS
release.

N VIRGIN ISLANDS

UF Divers Join Research
/

A UF research diving team is
packing gear to participate in
Tektite 11, the U. S. Department
of the Interior project to test
mans ability to live and perform
under the sea.
Six Communication Sciences
Laboratory (CSL) divers and
scientists left Sunday for a
month of research at Tektite,
Greater Lameshur Bay, St.
Johns, Virgin Islands.
THE GROUP will conduct a
series of speech and hearing
studies and a diver retrieval
experiment, testing the range of
communication equipment in
salt water.
They also will determine
whether there is a difference in
mans ability to localize sound in
salt water as opposed to fresh
water.
One work-study project will
observe the difference in
performance of two teams, one

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with communication equipment
and one without.
THE TEAM, also will conduct
the most extensive tests ever on
a new divers lexicon they have
developed in an effort to
improve underwater
communication.

Dairyman Gets Award
Extension Dairyman C. W. Reaves, Florida Cooperative Extension
Service, was honored by Florida dairymen with a check for $3,272 at
a state banquet Tuesday night. When all the funds are collected, the
amount will total some $4,600 for him and Mrs. Reaves to take a
vacation trip to Europe.
Reaves, who has served state dairymen for 23 years, was cited by
the dairymen as a man who has made a lasting contribution to the
dairy industry.
The banquet was a highlight of the Florida Dairy Production
Conference, which Reaves initiated seven years ago. At this years
banquet awards for excellence in dairy practices were presented to a
number of Florida dairymen.

Monday, May 18,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

CSL personnel participating
are: Dr. Harry Hollien, CSL
director; Mrs. Patti Hollien,
research diver; Dr. Rothman;
Patti Beatty, research associate
and diver; Charlotte Hardaway,
research diver, and John
Bedingfield, research diver.

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator. Monday, May 18,1970

New Front Opened In Cambodia

SAIGON (UPI) A 10,000-inan South
Vietnamese armored infantry column drove across
the border into Southern Cambodia Sunday,
opening a 12th allied front between its Gulf of Siam
coastline and the provincial capital of Takeo.
The South Vietnamese Defense Ministry, in
making the announcement, said the United States
will provide only aerial and logistics support in the
new offensive between Takeo and Kompong Som,
the port city formerly known as Sihanoukville. The
new front extends the allied offensive in Cambodia
along half of its 600-mile frontier with South
Vietnam.
THE ANNOUNCEMENT of the new front,
composed of tanks, armored personnel carriers and
naval craft as well as infantry, was made as
Cambodia military authorities in Phnom Penh
reported that their troops had moved back into the
strategic Mekong River town of Kompong Cham, 50
miles northeast of Phnom Penh. The Communists

Jackson BJack Youths Gather
In Memory Os 2 Dead Students

JACKSON, Miss. (UPI)
Black youths gathered Sunday at
a Masonic Temple a block from
the Jackson State College
campus for services in memory
of the two students killed in a
barrage of state police gunfire
Friday.
Dr. Aaron Shirley, a Jackson
physician, said state authorities
refused to allow the memorial
services to be held on the
campus, so they were moved to
the Masonic Temple.
THE PREDOMINANTLY
black college drawing more
than a third of its 4,500 students
from the Jackson area was
closed after the deaths of James
Earl Green, 17, a high school
student, and Phillip L. Gibbs,
21, a junior. Gibbs was to be
buried Sunday at Ripley.
Three black males among the
15 injured remained
hospitalized.
In Augusta, Ga., National
Guard troops stood by for
funeral services for five of the
six black men slain by police
during last Mondays riot.
Augusta has been relatively quiet
since the outburst but 1,000

Birthday Truce For Buddha
Called In South Vietnam
SAIGON (UPI) South Vietnamese and American forces in
Vietnam will observe a 24-hour truce beginning at noon Monday in
honor of the birthday of Buddha. Allied spokesmen said the
standdown would not apply to operations in Cambodia.
Actually, Buddhas birthday anniversary falls on Tuesday. But
Tuesday will also be the 80th anniversary of the birth of the late
North Vietnamese President Ho Chi Minh and the South Vietnamese
government obviously was taking no chances of confusion over whose
birthday was being celebrated.
The cease-fire, effective only in South Vietnam, will be the 15th of
the war called by the allies.

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troops remained on duty.
IN JACKSON, more than 500
National Guardsmen were on
standby duty at an armory.
Attorney General John
Mitchell, who ordered a federal
investigation into the campus
shooting, flies to Jackson
Monday to confer with Mayor
Russell Davis and Dr. John A.
Peoples, president of the college.
A black member of the
biracial fact-finding
comnittee appointed by Davis
said testimony by peoples shed
a lot of light on the cause of the
situation that will help the
committee.
ATTORNEY REUBEN V.
Anderson, one of two black
lawyers on the five-member
commission, said the
commission took testimony
Saturday from the college
president, city police officers
and witnesses to the campus
violence.
The commission recessed its
investigation Sunday and was
scheduled to interview Jackson
State administrators, teachers
and students Monday along with
newsmen who were in the area

Military operations in Cambodia have cost the
United States 142 men killed and 561 wounded, the
South Vietnamese 542 dead and 1,841 wounded and
the Communists 7,519 dead. ___
withdrew from Kompong Cham without a fight,
they said* although there was heavy fighting
reported on its outskirts.
UPI correspondent Robert C. Miller also reported
from Phnom Penh that the Communists had taken
the provincial capital at Stung Treng, 150 miles
northeast of the Cambodian capital and 25 miles
south of the Laotian border.
Cambodian government communiques said
Highway 7 linking Phnom Penh and Kompong
Cham was reopened on Saturday, but allied military
sources in Saigon said the Communists controlled a
40- to 100-mile-wide corridor east of the Mekong
River along which they are moving supplies

at the time of the shooting.
Davis ordered the committee to
deliver a report 10 days from
Friday on the full and
complete facts surrounding the
occurrence at Jackson State
College.
Davis said city police refused
to testify before the commission
until they were told the
commission had no legal powers.
The commission, lacking
subpoena power, is to deliver its
report to Davis, who has
promised to make it public.
BOTH CITY police and
highway patrol officers were at
the scene of the shooting but
District Attorney Jack Travis
said no shots were fired by city
police. He said a line of police
officers were advancing down
the opposite side of the
four-lane street while the patrol
unit was formed in front of the
dormitory.
Anderson said highway patrol
authorities have not yet
appeared before the investigating
committee. The patrol has
declined all comment.
Students deny there was any
sniper fire coming from the
dormitory. A preliminary report,
Davis said, indicates there was
sniper fire from the girls
dormitory and the opposite side
of the street before the highway
patrol opened fire with
shotguns.
Too Fast
Excessive speed was the major
factor in 1969s tragic highway
record. More than 56,000
persons were killed last year, and
more than 4,700,000 injured.

Violence Obsolete
Mrs. King Says
ATLANTA (UPI) The widow of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
said Sunday that the violence at Augusta last week shows this
country still suffers from a sickness which will not be healed
until we place a premium on human rights.
We must employ lawmen who will think before they act and
elect high government officials who condemn, not condone,
wanton violence, Mrs. Coretta King said in a telegram to the
Rev. C. S. Hamilton, a black leader in Augusta.
Our nation has a history of violence. However, violence is
now obsolete. Yet we, the most civilized, most affluent and
most scientifically advanced nation in the world, are the most
violent nation in die world.
The seriousness of what has happened in our cities and on
college campuses in the past two weeks should not be
camouflaged with superficial investigation and reports. It is my
hope that you will accept nothing less than a thorough
investigation and demand that those responsible for the murders
be brought to trial.
A spokesman for Mrs. King said copies of the telegram were
also being sent to members of the families of the six persons
killed in the Augusta riot.
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southward for the fighting in southern Cambodia.
U. S. MILITARY spokesmen said Sunday that
allied forays during the first 18 days of the
Cambodian operation had killed 7,519 Communists
and brought in more arms, ammunition and other
supplies than were taken from Communist caches in
all of South Vietnam last year.
The operation has cost the United States 142
men killed and 561 wounded; the South Vietnamese
542 dead and 1,841 wounded.
Weekend fighting in South Vietnam was
comparatively light, military spokesmen said.
Four members of the U. S. 101st Airborne
Division were killed and 30 others wounded
Saturday when a Communist force, estimated at
about 10 to 20 men, assaulted their night position
21 miles southwest of Hue, the old imperial capital.
Communists also assaulted a U. S. naval vessel on a
waterway 172 miles southwest of Saigon, killing one
sailor and wounding four others.



1 wj&BM
1970 S e ninole has arrived! |§i
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Monday, May 18,1970, Tho Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

i, TtM Florida Alligator, Monday, May 18,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

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Podnuh!
Nixon Wont Abandon

WASHINGTON Despite President Nixons
pledge to pull all U. S. troops and advisers out of
Cambodia by July 1, he has no intention of
abandoning the Lon Nol government.
There has been feverish activity behind the scenes
to arrange emergency weapons, mercenary forces
and possibly allied troops to prevent a communist
takeover of Cambodia.
The U. S. will furnish the weapons, finance the
mercenaries and even pick up the bills for any South
Vietnamese, South Koreans, Thais or Indonesians
who may volunteer to go to the rescue of Lon Nol.
The only limitation, apparently, will be on U. S.
personnel. Given the political climate at home, the
President has strictly prohibited the use of
Americans in the field in Cambodia after July 1.
Quiet preparations have begun, however, tc
expand the U. S. mission in Phnom Penh. The new
arrivals will include intelligence specialists,
communications experts, technological advisers and
military men in mufti, who will be available,
presumably, to give the Lon Nol government private
guidance.
Meanwhile, U.S.-trained, U. S.-financed
Cambodian mercenaries have already been rushed to
Phnom Penh minus their American advisers, of
course to help defend the Cambodian capital.
Asian allies, including Thailand and Indonesia, have
also been sounded out secretly about sending troops
to Cambodia if Lon Nol should need them.
The Camobidans have also presented the U. S.
with a long shopping list of military needs. This is
being handled with great delicacy by the White
House because of the outspoken congressional
opposition to Cambodian aid.
Apparently, the Lon Nol government wont be
given any sophisticated weapons that would require
American advisers. But the President is willing to
supply small arms, automatic weapons, light
artillery, mortars, jeeps, trucks and communications
equipment.
It remains to be seen whether the old adage about
a little pregnancy is applicable to military
involvement.
NOTES ON AGNEW
The nations governors came out of the White
House the other day disputing whether Vice
President Spiro Agnew had sounded off behind
closed doors against radicals and rascals on the
campuses.
A governor, who took careful notes for this
column, reported that it was Californias Governor
Ronald Regan, not Agnew, who raved against the
students.
All Agnew said, according to the notes, was that
radical elements made it impossible for officials
to keep the lines of communication open between
the government and the students.
I am sure no college would allow me to appear,
or if I did appear, they would never allow me to
speak what was on my mind, said the Vice
President.
Governor Regan, in contrast, talked for IS

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors
Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Merry-Go-Round
by Jack Anderson
minutes about the conspiracy on the campus. He
charged that the alleged conspiracy had its
headquarters in a room on the University of
California campus in Berkeley. Here, he said, the
revolutionaries plotted together and kept in
touch with other campuses.
Maines Governor Kenneth Curtis criticized
President Nixon implicitly at least, for describing
some young people as bums.
We cant call them names and expect them to
agree with us, said Curtis.
But Louisianas Governor John McKeithen
praised the President.
You lost Louisana, but if you ran there today,
you would win, boomed McKeithen. Our people
are behind you.
REPORT ON CAMBODIA
The President gave the governors, who sat around
a huge table in the state dining room, a briefing on
the Cambodian situation. He made these
newsworthy points:
A majority of American combat troops will
be out of Vietnam next spring, he said. He also
stressed repeatedly that all Americans will be
withdrawn from Cambodia by his July 1 deadline.
He declared that the U. S. had nothing to do
with the overthrow of Prince Sihanouk and the
establishment of a pro-western government in
Cambodia. There were no CIA people in there at
all, the President said.
He insisted it was never part of the plan to
capture COSVN, the communist military
headquarters, which he described as a mobile
headquarters that keeps moving around. This
contradicts what the President said, however, in his
televised report to the nation on the Cambodian
invasion.

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Craig Goldwyn
Assignment Editor Sports Editor
Earl Hartman Jamas Davis Fred VoHrath
Features Editor Assistant Assignment Editor Wire Editor
" 1
Chuck Partusch
Dan Vining Assistant Jeff Brain
Entertainment Editor Sports Editor Editorial Assistant

EDITORIAL
Eight Deaths
And Alienation
We tend to view charges of racism with a skeptical eye.
Such charges are made frequently, particularly by militant
blacks, generally from a deep- rooted frustration concerning
the slowness of social change, the barriers rerftaining in
American society.
Generally, we take a dim view of unsubstantiated
rhetoric, no doubt because we feel racism and
discrimination will fade, rather than be blasted away. For
that reason we have some difficulty understanding the black
militant approach. We have great difficulty, for example,
discerning the difference in effect between the rhetoric of
Spiro Agnew and that of Eldridge Cleaver. Both serve to
alienate; neither are constructive.
Recent developments in Mississippi and Georgia,
however, have given us a new appreciation for the black
militant viewpoint. Eight deaths came from those incidents,
six in a riot in Augusta, Georgia and two during a
confrontation at the Jackson State College in Jackson,
Mississippi.
Investigations by several law enforcement agencies will
follow the killings, and causes will be determined, but at
this point we can conjecture no reason for eight dead
human beings. Furthermore, we question whether the
deaths would have occurred were the young men rioters
of WASP stock.
Unfortunately, the killings will have ramifications far
greater than the death of eight humans; they will serve to
extend the ever-growing gap between black and white
America. Again, black America can point to carnage and
brutality and question white Americas sincerity. How can
such a question be argued? How well, for example, do eight
dead bodies compare with the 1964 Civil Rights Act? Not
very well.
In addition, such incidents engender the hate, the distrust
and the frustration, that causes such riots and
confrontations to be more commonplace and more lethal. If
allowed to escalate, a civil war of far greater dimensions
than the last one America suffered could conceivably result.
For that reason, we hope the UF black community can
accept our condolences and believe that white America does
not relish the sight of blood, that discrimination and racism
will fade from the American scene.
:0J
am '1

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88. or 89.
Business. Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82. 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the I lor id a Alligator arc those of
the editors .n of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of l lorida.



Out

Professor, the male voice
on the end of the phone began
last Thursday night, I just
learned that classes have been
canceled tomorrow, and I dont
like it. I was counting on
completing that project l had
started earlier in the week and I
was wondering ...
Hold it, I broke in, I dont
like having to miss a classtime
either... If it means that much
to you, Ill be there and you and
I will have class.
Before the evening was over
two other students had
telephoned, expressing a desire
to attend class.
ILL ADMIT their class with
me is a bit unusual. It meets all
day two days a week from
6:15 to 1:30 on Mondays and
from 8 to 5 Fridays at the
Gainesville Sun. Each student is
assigned a task in producing the
newspaper for the day or
something for the next day.
Missing one day of class means
missing five per cent of the
course, perhaps missing an
appointment scheduled from the
previous day or missing a
particular task that comes up for
each student only once each
quarter. Unusual? Yes, but then,
so is every day. Because every
day happens only once.
... So, at 8 last Friday
morning I reported to class to
meet my three students three
of 13 enrolled in the course.
Before the first hour was gone,
not merely three, but 11 showed
up, eight of whom, for all I
know, didn't have the faintest

MR. EDITOR:
There are people on this campus who
feel threatened by the presence of guns,
while others feel threatened without the
presence of guns. There are also those
who do not give the matter a second
thought, until their office is broken into,
until there is an attempted or successful
rape of a coed, until a dorm hall needs
cleaning up under the direction of a
vigilante group, or until four students are
killed.
Should a professor who may have a
lifetime collection of valuable literature
in his campus office have to settle for less
protection for his campus property
than he demands from city or county law
enforcement for his off-campus property?
Should a coed traveling to her dorm late
at night from off campus be entitled to
less protection the moment she steps on
campus property? Should a campus
resident who is leasing housing from the
UF be deprived of the protection
furnished to off-campus residents by the
city and county and should he have to
forfeit his rights as a citizen to own and
possess certain personal property simply v
because of where he lives? Should one

the small society

S<#VI&TW6S IT* AWFULLY
HAfcP To ge 7POB To
A YoU£ £-1*

idea, I would be there. I didnt
bother to ask why they came.
There wasnt time, with each
anxious to get his assignment
and get to work. But, you know,
that in itself answered why they
came.
These eleven students werent
the only ones in class Friday,
even though there were no
classes officially. One student
majoring in building
construction told of meeting
both his 8 oclock and 8:50
classes, both of which had about
half the members present.
Another student said she and all
her classmates reported to their
class in teaching at P.. K. Yonge.
Another student went to the
Catholic church across from the
campus to pray and meditate
because, he said, he didnt
approve of the lies being told on
the Plaza of the Americas.
YES, THERE WERE
approximately 1,000 students
on the Plaza of the Americas,
where we all know much truth
was also spoken, because my
eleven students and the others
Ive mentioned also despise war
and mourn the fact that four
students lost their lives at Kent
State ... But, they chose to
show their feelings in another
way... To do their own
thing ... in this particular case
to go to class and to learn, which
they apparently consider their
principal mission at this time.
Yes, approximately 1,000, many
of whom Im sure were
responsible for the fact that
classes were suspended in

Keep UPD Guns

Will Os The Minority

third of the students, who live on
campus, have less property ownership
rights than the two thirds who live off
campus? Should a student living off
campus have less property rights than the
non-student next door? Should students
anywhere be asked to sacrifice any of
their rights as citizens because they are
students? Should valuable state
collections and records housed in the
libraries and administration buildings
receive less equipped surveillance than a
privately owned warehouse downtown?
How about the members of our
Campus Police? Would they be willing to
assume responsibility for the lives and
property of the campus community with
nothing but their bare hands as weapons?
Why is the university community so
unique in this respect? To follow to its
logical conclusion the contentions of our
no-guns group we should disarm all of our
police both campus and non-campus. If
we did so the enforcement of law and
order in this country would be in a sad
state. Os no little consequence would be
the extreme difficulty of recruiting men
for police work. How many of our
non-gun advocates would be willing to
assume the responsibilities of policemen

response to their demands, were
on the Plaza of the Americas.
But what about the other
18,000? Eleven were in class
with me.
We know what the 1,000 on 1
the plaza did. The press was
there. Radio and TV were there.
After all, thats where the
action was and thats what
people want to read about, but
what about

EKeep Right" 1
Waiting In The Wings
By Fred VollrathJ

The Left has a fetish for comparing the United
States with pre-World War Germany. Its part of
their Fascist Conspiracy Complex.
Richard Nixon is cast in the role of Adolph
Hitler, with Spiro Agnew playing the part of
Herman Goering, I suppose. Believing this, the Left
pulls about itself a cloak of martyrdom and marches
forth confident of a superior moral virtue.
Lancelot going forth to slay the fascist dragon.
A more accurate analogy would be pre-Nazi
Germany, when elements of the National Socialist
Movement and the International Socialist Movement
were fighting for control of the streets.
The conservative government of the Weimer
Republic lacked the will and the ability to preserve
law and order.
The street fighting between the New Left and
construction workers in New York City last week
should give the New Left cause to pause and give
the incident consideration.
The Leftists glibly assume if they cause enough
disruption to bring down the government, they will
be the ones who step in and take control.
But they are not the only ones waiting in the
wings to pick up the pieces.
When an established order violently collapses and
loses control, a power vacuum is created. The

by Bficlcmon

with no weapons to protect themselves?
On the other hand no police instead of
no guns might be the real state of
affairs that is really being sought.
We could eliminate the campus police
entirely and rely on the city and county
police. But I doubt if they would be quite
as tolerant of this John
Dewey-generation-raised-on-a-steady Dewey-generation-raised-on-a-steadydiet-of-progressivism-and
diet-of-progressivism-and Dewey-generation-raised-on-a-steadydiet-of-progressivism-and -permissiveness
as have been the campus police.
A compromise can also be reached.
School patrols dont need guns, meter
maids dont need guns, nor do parking
sticker patrolmen need guns; however, to
disarm police performing other functions
would destroy their effectiveness and our
rights as citizens.
The Constitution guarantees ... the
right of the people to keep and bear
arms ... Lets not be too hasty in our
willingness to infringe upon our rights
indiscriminately, lest we become second
class citizens by our own acts.
JAMES ROYAL
Dont Disturb
MR. EDITOR:
Four people were killed on the campus
of Kent State University. I feel very sorry
that this loss of life occurred.
I must ask myself a very important
question concerning the reaction to this
event on our campus. Are the actions that
certain students are taking justified? Is it
right to try to force any student at our
university to strike? I believe that this
action is very wrong for it shows no
responsibility. It shows no respect for the
rights of others.
Strikers, it is your right to strike if you

impossible for the press, radio
and TV to tell about them all.
But, isnt their story really more
important? Isnt what they're
doing, what theyre thinking
really where the action is?
Ive tried in this small way to
tell what some few UF students
did while the small minority
imposed its will on the rest. I
know what Ive written isnt as
exciting as the marches, the

Monday, May 18,1970, Tha Florida Alligator, l

By Hugh Cunningham

faction with the greatest discipline, arms, training
and organization will fill it.
The New Left just doesnt fit the description.
The New Left revolutionaries are heavy on
rhetoric and short on ability.
It calls for control of the streets through
confrontation. Yet when confronted by a thousand
or so construction workers on those terms, they lost
badly and probably would have lost even worse if
the New York City police hadnt stepped in to
rescue them.
The Leftist radicals find themselves demanding
the police be disciplined for failure to control
counter-demonstrators and for their failure in the
performance of their duty, when they did not halt
the workers who broke up the Leftist protests.
I can just see the new protest posters in New
York City. You cant find a pig when you need
one.
The Leftists will not bring about more freedom
through their tactics. They will only succeed in
giving the forces of repression an excuse to crack
down.
If the Leftist street demonstrations get out of
hand and the government cannot or will not prevent
them, the danger of vigilante groups becomes a real
danger.

C Aim mi Vititot j
hope for the comPlSSS^^^

wish to do so. Dont allow certain radical
organizations to tell you to strike, use
your own mind. Think about the
possibility that young adults about your
age may have fired without fearing foe
their lives. Don't strike just because you
hate the military. We may need it some
day to defend our rights of free speech
and assembly. Remember above all
regardless of your actions that we are
here above all to get an education.
If you wish to strike do so but don't
disturb my classes.
JOHN V. NETTLES JR., 3ED
ROBERT MOXLEY.3B A
Cheers
MR. EDITOR:
Congratulations to the Florida Players
for the impeccable taste and execution of
Anouilhs 'Thieves' Carnival."
This production would trigger rave
notices in any European city; all Florida
students should get the chance to see it.
KENNETHS. MOST
LETTERS POLICY
Lettm must:
Be typed, dgnad, doubla graced and
not anoaed 300 words.
mot m apM witn pmioonyrn,
of writers.
.1. .. _ -in ..i J t.. H
. isamsa mu n nunnwi owy whim
drew just causa. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters foe pesos.
Writers ieiy submit longer eswya,
eohamne or letters to he eonahflared for use
as Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
Intersrtad In submitting a regular eahimn Is
to draw samples of hie work.

barricaded buildings, the
inflammatory speeches....
BUT, ARENT THE little
stories, the unexciting stories,
the really big story when you
combine them all?
Perhaps all of us should take
more time to bring our little
stories to the rest of the world.
Then, perhaps wed come to
know what the other 18,000 are
doing ... and thinking ...

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
AKC German Shepherds, 8 weeks
old, superb pedigree line bred Odin &
Pfeffer, excellent temperament -'8
conformation for breeding. Show and
Pets. Females, Black w /cream,
8100.00 Mrs. Scott, 2246 N.W.
Magnolia Road, Ocala. 629-4177.
(A-136-10t-p)
For sale: 1968 Kawasaki 650 twin If
Interested call 378-0491 after 5:00
p.m. and ask for Kevin. (A-139-st-p)
' LI
Pellex f 1.4 complete w/accessory
lens & cases. 200mm and 35mm
S4OO or best offer. Call 372-5516.
(A-10t-138-p)
69 CA 160 Honda electric tools,
helmet, manuals drafted must sell
weight set also 373-2173.
(A-st-139-p)
*69 Bultaco 250 3 months old 800
speedo miles street fairing perfect
condition owner has expensive habit
list price 850 will sell 470. 1015 N.E.
3rd St. 376-5632 after 5.
(A-2t-141-p)
\ Guns Guns Gun* -jj
< ( Inventory over 500. Buy j
] | Sell Trade Repair, j
1 1 Reloading supplies, layaway ]
( plan. Harry Beckwith, gun )
1 [ dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. j
, XH*X*i^*X*X*X*XvX*%fe*l*!*!v*
jy eS Mg
imm 1
* 4.. 1

'

FOR SA LE
Mesh side playpen,3 bookcases.stone
coctall/end table, washing machine,
TV stand, TV antenna, S 30 Mast,
Polaroid J 33, Yashlca Mat Reflex
378-1109. (A-4t-139-p)
KAWASAKI 500 '7O. I want to sell
or trade for VW bus. Cycle In good
shape Ught but powerful. Call J.
M. after 700 pm at 392-8821.
(A-3t-140-p)
Lady Yamaha 50cc Like new, only
750 ml. Elec, start Auto, clutch. See
at 304 SE 3rd St. North apt 5 9
pm $lB5. Easy and fun to drive.
(A-st-140-p)
Refrigerator, 12 cu. ft., 2 dr, IV* yr.
old, Gibson auto-defrost, $165. Grad.
June and moving Into sum. apt. Call
372-0311. (A-st-138-p)
REALLY. These fuzzy puppies are
lovely I Ma and Pa are both handsome
collie-shepherd mixtures. Call
378-0118, then come and seel
(A-st-140-p)
1969 Triumph 500 cc Twin cylinder,
' 4,800 miles, SBSO, 378-8884 student.
(A-4t-140-p)
Dual showman amp top clean towe
$175 1932 Ozark Guitar S4O 62
> Peugot Sedan $175 also records and
. other things call 376-9066.
. (A-139-st-p)
Trailer 8 x 42 $1,200, 8 x 35 SI,OOO,
8 x 30 SBOO rented trailer SSO
monthly Income only SI,OOO
378-0226 376-6831 Lot B Archer
Village. (A-st-141-p)
3 br. IV* bath 10 x 56 fur. trailer 1
br. fixed as study washer clothes
line fenced lot cable TV ln
park with pool AC 376-8517.
(A-st-141-p)
Mojave 250 Custom seat tank new
piston rings and electricals low
mileage. New 600. Need cash 3OO.
372-8933. BILL (A-3t-141-p)
Awal tape recorder, 4 track-stereo,
runs on batteries, car lighter, or 110
v. or 220 v AC. 7 inch reel, Int. spks.
$95.00. Call 378-6247 after 5:00 PM.
(A-5M41-P)
Diamond engagement ring 1/3 carat.
Perfect must sell!! Call 373-2277
for details (evenings). (A-3t-141-p)
For sale: Surfboard: Petrlllo Pintail
only S4O. Honda 250 Scrambler
S3OO. Cill 373-1249. (A-2t-140-p)
TREAT rugs right, theyll be a
delight If cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
Components Stereo, Garrard
turntable, Scott amp, huge marble
top walnut Empire Speakers. S6OO.
Call 378-7655 after 5:00.
(A-3t-142-p)
100% human hair fall! Shoulder
length, brown-frostedl Best offer
over $25. Head-stand Included I Call
i after 1:30 at 376-0266, ask for
Darlla. (A-st-142-p)
Purple-Yellow Honda 565,7300 ml,
recently tuned, Inspected,
dependable best cash offer over SBO,
helmet etc, Al after 7 evenings.
| 392-7329. (A-st-142-p)

at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOV THESE SPECIALTIES
MONDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
j Baked Meat Sauce and
Macaroni TO £
All you can eat
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Golden Fried Chicken

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 18,1970

' V:*
! a a a a a a a a a a a
aaaaaaaaa a a a-a a a a.a a,a a a.a,a_a_| > *_*, f *.a #
FOR SALr^
1967 mobile home, 12 x 48, 2
bedrooms, excellent condition, S4OO
down, assume payments of $77
monthly, original financing 6yrs, 4
yrs remaining to pay. 378-6797,
evenings. (A-st-142-p) --
Absolutely must sell now! 50x8
furnished 2 bedroom mobile home
central heating air conditioning
carpeting superb condition 378-8304
after 5 $1550 or best offer.
(A-st-142-p)
SEX? It Is true we carry a full line of
equipment for most any sport, but
lets be reasonable! B & B SPORTS
CENTER 5320 N.W. 13th St.
378-1416. (A-5M42-P)
New cap+ball musket 55cal plus
extras s3O Argentine Colt 45 plus'
ammo, extra cllps+holster ssO call
373-2750 before midnight.
(A-lt-142-p)
FOR RENT
aaaaae%reaeeeaeeaaaaaaaa aaaaaa a at
Frederick Gardens 1 bed. apt., need
roommate or will sublet. Female,
pool, S6O/mo. Available June 15,
June rent paid. 376-2909 after 5:30.
(B-st-141-p)
Need 1 or 2 roomates for summer qtr
2 bdrm. AC apt. 1 block from
campus ssO a mo. 373-2317.
(B-2t-141-p)
Sublease for summer 2 room apt.
furnished IV* blocks from campus
call between 8 AM noon
S4O/month 378-9627. (B-5M40-P)
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
1 BR furnished AC apt. 2 blocks
from campus. Sublet summer
quarter. $95/mo. Includes utilities.
Call 376-1331. (B-st-140-p)
Live It up this summer. Sublet 1
bdrm. French Qtr. apt. no. 38 choice
location, right on pool. Call
378-8980 after 5 PM. (B-3t-140-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court; Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-C)
Need male roommate for summer
University gardens alr-cond., carpet,
pool, etc. Only $45/month + V*
Utilities Call 378-6743. (B-3t-140-p)
Need to Sublease 3 bedroom house
Alr-cond., 180 a month; for summer
quarter only 1319 NW 3rd Ave.
(B-139-st-p)
Available June 4, Williamsburg Apt.,
1 BR., AC, pool, near Med Center,
will sublet. Call 372-1544 (Call 5 to
7 preferably.) (B-3t-141-p)
Sublet June 1, l bedroom apt.
central AC ww carpeting, quiet
behind the mall, sllO per month Call
after 5 PM. 373-2889. (B-st-141-p)

Foist iferEarr
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
summer qtr. Share house 2 blocks
from campus with 2 coeds pvt. room,
A/C, Call 378-6548. (B-st-137-p)
Modem 1 br. apt. beautifully
furnished AC, dishwasher, pool.
Available June 12 $l4O/mo Just off
campus Mt. Vernon Apt. Call after
6:30 p.m. 378-0260 (B-st-138p)
Sublet: 1 bdrm. furnished apt. June
through August. French Quarter. AC,
pool, Call 376-4165 after 5:00,
392-0510 weekdays. (B-st-137-p)
"Air-conditioned, 2 bedroom, quiet,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6.
Avail. June 1." (B-7t-138-p)
Room MALE FEMALE carpets TV
Air kitchen liberal yet quiet. Summer
or fall see 5 to 6 PM or Call 392-0700
or 378-0286 1204 NW 3 Ave.
(B-st-138-p)
2 br. furnished AC apt. SBS mo.
Sublet June Ist. 372-4179 anytime.
(B-3M39-P)
2 br. sum. apt. for summer fun, AC,
pool, rsvd. pkg; quiet, upstairs, beaut,
view, spacious, Avail. June 1, Vlll,
Park, 86;372-1114. (B-st-139-p)
Sublet for summer or longer 1
bdrm. A/C, pvt. patio, furnished,
slls/mo Village 34, no. 27, Call
378-7000. (B-139-st-p)
House in the country, sublease, 3
bedrooms, AC 3% acres of forest, 5
min. from school, $125 per month
378:2809 1560 NW 29 Rd.
(B-139-st-p)
Sublet summer qt,.' Olympia Apts,
next to campus, 1 bedroom,
furnished, carpet, A/C, summer rates
$95.b0 per month. Call 378-6247
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-141-p)
Sublet summer quarter: large cool 3
rm apt sum: lto bath screen porch
large yard. SBO mo. 376-4918.
(B-2t-142-p)
Sublet Sum. Qtr. 1 bdrm. garage apt.
AC, ww carpet, beautifully furnished,
tv cable. SIOO/mo. + ut. 1908 NW
3rd Ave. 373-2700. (B-6t-142-p)
Luxruy living In air conditioned
comfort this summer. 2 bedroom
townhouse, wall to wall carpets,
unfurnished. slls month 376-6690.
(B-2t-142-p)
Sublease at reduced rate. Luxury
living, A/C, wall to wall carpeting. 2
bedroom and fine furnishings $l4O
month 376-6690. (B-2t-142-p)
Summer living In A/C comfort at
reduced rate. 1 bedroom, wall to wall
carpeting with fine furnishings SIOO
month, 376-6690. (B-2t-142-p)
1 br townhouse, Landmark 164
sublet for summer or longer. June
rent paid $145/month. Dishwasher
376-0453. (B-3t-142-p)
SAVE sllO 4-man Vllllage Pk apt.
To sublet for summer. Fum, balcony
over pool, end apt for spacious
parking. SIOO each for entire
summer. Call 373-1347 anytime.
Apt. 94. (B-st-142-p)
Sublet sum 2-br apt. summer qtr.
Fully carpeted, central A/C,
$ 120/month. Call 373-1867 on
weekend or after 4:30 p.m. on
weekdays. (B-st-142-p)
Summer quarter only 2 bedroom
and two full baths S2OO per month
apart, for only $l5O Pt. West Apart.
Call 378-9809 anytime hurry first
come first serve. (B-st-142-p)
2 br TH Unique, modem design In
quiet NE section. You must see It at
508-3 NE 4th Ave. As low as
$ 165/mo sum. Call 373-1612.
(B-3t-142-p)
Sublet-summer 1 bedroom wood
panel Apt. A/C, private patio, pet fee
paid, lots of extras slls a month
Village 34 Apt 37 call 378-5809.
(B-st-142-p)
Private a/c rooms, linen, maid service.
One block campus. Telep. 372-6263.
(B-3t-142-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom townhouse apt no.
160 Hawaiian Village June August
Cable T.V., w/w carpeting, pool
dishwasher central a/h 376-4788.
(B<3t-142-p)
Room near college P. Office. 1714
N. Third Place To Graduate
students. Phone 372-8227.
(B-2t-142-p)
, .
Sublease summer qtr. poolside 2 bdr.
French Qtr. Apt. near laundry room
fun living A/C contact Unde or
Jackie anytime phone 372-6768.
(B-5M42-p)
HO LIOAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)

S*SWmW;ww?wnv.v.v.-
FOR RENT
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included completely
fumlghed ample parking swim
. pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372- Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-C)
WANTED
2 female roommates needed for June
1 Williamsburg 2 bedroom
townhouse A/C, pool,
$52.50/person. Mt. Vernon apt. 11
Call 372-6098. (C-st-141-p)
Trallermate for summer term. Your
own room In new trailer. A/C'
$45/mo + Vi util. Grad student pref.
Moblleer Park. 378-4775 after- 7 PM.
(C-st-141-p)
Female Roommate Wanted Summer
43.00 a month one block from Tlgert
air-conditioned, own bedroom call us
at 378-0963 1210 SW 3rd Ave, apt. 8
(C-st-141-p)
2-4 roommates for summer qtr. La
Mancha apt. Pvt. bdrms, 2 bath, 2
blks to campus, pool, AC, laundry,
utilities Inc. Call: 376-6951.
(C-st-141-p)
Poolside! Williamsburg Apt., 2 bd.
furnish >wnhouse. Wish to sublet
for SUi.Miwr. Call 373-2358 now! All
the conveniences! (C-st-139-p)
FEMALE Roommate for Summer
Qtr. Share 1 br. apt. A/C TV Quiet
Landmark Apts. Call 376-7693 after
5:00 PM. (C-st-142-p)
2 roomates to share 5 bedroom flat
fall quarter at the PLACE phone
373- ask for Butch or 392-8940
ask for Dale. (C-3t-142-p)
1 female rommate wanted for Point
West apt. 2 bedroom, 2 full baths
No deposit s7s for summer
quarter call Robin 378-7188 5-Bpm
or 392-2925 8-1 lam. (C-6t-142-p)
2 fern roommates for- Frederick
Gardens apt fall qtr. AC, carpeted,
pool, etc. Call Melissa or Barb
373-2480. HURRY I (C-3M42-P)
JUNE RENT FREE 4 to Share 2 bdr
2 bath Point West apt $125 ea for all
summer poo) ac dishwasher call
376-9924 or 372-5970 after 5 must
be 21. (C-10t-142-p)
One female roommate for summer
quarter. Mount Vernon rent
$5 2.50/month. Air conditioning,
pool, dishwasher, Call Pat 392-7629.
(C-3t-141-p)
Female wanted for summer $42.00
plus utilities for own bedroom In
house one block from campus. Move
In anytime after June 11. Call
378-2828. (C-st-139-p)
Needed one female roommate for fall
quarter. Colonial Manor apts. one
block from campus. Call 378-9597;
ask for Debbie. (C-3t-140-p)
Cocktail waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary will
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dub's
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-125-p)
Need a Job? All routes student
operated. Charles Chips Home
Delivery service potato chips,
pretzels, cookies, 376-6943.
(E-10t-137-p)
Like to sell or would you like to try?'
How about a Job with good pay pi os
a chance to win Elucatlon Grant. Cad
Fuller Brush 376-0121. (E-10t-134-p)
2 Experienced smart painters,
flrdener* tools furnished -7. also
girt for House Cleaning Beautiful
Lake estate near
GalnesvJMe-permanent. Hours to
wages. Telephone
533-2361 or write Rt. no. 1, Box 361
Htway 16 A Starke, Fla. (E-2t-140-p)
waitress. Coney Island Rest. 210 SE
First SL 372-9288 Must be 21. Full
time. (E-4t-141-p)
Looking for mother to take care of 3
children In her home while on
vacation following graduation. If
Interested please call 372-3846.
(E-St-142-p) ~7
'
Camp Counselors, Boys' Camp In
New England (Lenox, Mass. 42nd
year.) Men from alt parts of country
and Europe. Fine staff fellowship.
Openings (p tennis, (14 courts),
swimming, canoeing, over-night
camping, golf, archery, others.
(Counselors on campus for
Information). Write fully Camp
Mah-Kee-Nac, 137 Thacher Lane,
South Orange,\ NJ. 07079.
(E-2t-142-P) f
; ~..m L



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS
69 VW bug white wAed Interior
white sidewals like new 12,000 ml. l
yr. warrenty left $2064 new now
SI7OO. Must sell! Call after 5:
373-1654. (G-3t-140-p)
65 Austin Healy 3000 SI,OOO 220 SE
7th Street. 378-3831. (G-st-138-p)
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy clean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-C)
1969 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN 9,000
miles, excellent cond. l owner,
visiting faculty member, $1,500 Call
373-2990 before 10 am or after 7
pm. (G-st-141-p)
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission Is a winner
too! TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)
1960 Falcon, radio, heater, new tires,
repainted, engine work. Cheap
dependable transportation. Excellent
condition. 376-2909 after 5:30.
(G-st-141-p)
64 Corvalr, clean 4 speed, radio,
heater, $300; *65 Honda 90 good
condition, Call 378-6017.
(G-139-st-p)
1 96 9 VW Squareback
alr-conditloned, Fine shape $2,200.
1966 Slmca sedan good car. $550.
No reasonable offer refused on either
car. 372-1039. (G-st-139-p)
1965 Blue Triumph with brand new
engine. Must sell. SBOO. Call
378-7655 after 5:00. (G-3t-142-p)
Distinctive 1968 AMX. 390, 4-speed,
air, stereo tape, other extras. Must
sell, going camping $2300. Call
376-1853 evenings. (G-st-140-p)
Ford, 1962, Air, R & H, 4 dr. six
white, S4OO, VW Bug, 1968, Air, R &
H, Sunroof, Extras, Excellent car,
$1590, Call 372-2303. (G-3t-140-p)
1963 Rambler FULLY EQUIPPED
RUNS PERFECTLY $399. Call Tom
at 373-1573 or 373-2747.
(G-st-140-p)
PERSONAL
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologist 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
To my favorite Scorpio (SAM 17):
Always may the sun shine brightly
for you and the stars guide you, for
you are the reason they shine. You'll
always be the one and only *N' man
gray hairs Included. "MTP"
(J-5M40-P)
GATOR J*> COURT
376-4667 JjK 41705 W
X 13th St.
spend where the
the night... price is right"
Iffift 1
HURRY...
LAST TWO
DAYS TOSEE
THE SMASH
A COCKEYED
[MASTERPIECE
YOUR EYES
WONT BELIEVE
ALL YOU HEAR
"THE
UWYE!
h COLOR A PMUIHUHT PCTURE
SUMMER MOVIE CLUB
tickets now on sale
12 SHOWS SISS

PERSONA L
Sex and the spirit in the sky. A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters in
Union Aud. May 21 7:30 pm
FREE FUN INTERESTING FREE
FREE ********* (J-st-141-p)
Free fruit juice for any campt
policeman who comes to the front di
Tlgert without his gun on we love
you but not your guns The hunger
strikers. (J-141-6t-p)
Is sex love? Find out at A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters in Union Aud.
on May 21 at 7:30 pm.lt's FREE
AND FUN!! (J-st-141-p)
Marsha Sex isnt the only thing I
love you too! Meet me at A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters In Union Aud.
May 21 at 7:30 pm me. (J-st-141-p)
Wanted: One wild Pook (FF, of
course) Know everything about their
care and feeding. Must have by June.
Already have ID band and cage. SU
(J-lt-141-p)
REWARD for return of contents of
missing suitcase. Lost at corner of 15
St. and 2nd PI. No questions asked.
Call 378-8546. (J-3t-140-p)
David Sex is beautiful. Lets learn
together. A Bridge Over Toubled
Waters. Union Aud. on May 21 at
7:30 pm Free Mary (J-st-141-p)
Edgar Cayce interest group meeting
Tues 8:00 pm. Faculty, staff,
students Invited to call 372-7883 for
Info on this and astrology
conference. (J-2t-142-p)
SOVIET UNION. Driving and
Camping 10 weeks, $1,350. Includes
air and all expenses. A. Llpson, 2
Garden Terr., Cambridge Mass 02138
or call (collect) 617-547-1127.
(J-6t-142-p)
Congratulations to the new brothers
of Theta Chi Hope it made the
weekend even better for you Good
luck from vour Dreamgirl and
Court. (J-2t-142-p)
Needed: Animal Lover to board 2
cats for summer quarter while owner
abroad. Will provide food plus S6O.
376-4918. (J-3t-142-p)
r DAYS i
nooMcKUEN'S

Monday, May 18,1970. The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL
Would you like to help someone In
need? Contribute your extra or
unwanted items, and visit the garage
sale Purpose The Royal Christian
Youth Center Is a Christian
organization non-denominatlonal,
Integrated serving children and
youth. Any donation Is given
completely to the youth work. 425
N.E. 7th St. (J-3t-142-p)
x-X:XxX:X:X:X:XxXxXxX;XxX>xXx
LOST dc FOUND
v.v/.v.v.v.^v.v.v.v.v.y.v.x.v.'.V.v,
LOST: May 7 during strike near
Mallory, Mens Accutron watch. I
must have It!!! Call 392-7312
LARGE REWARD ssssssssssss
(L-3t-141-p)
Found: One tire kitten grey
with black stripes at met/allurgy
bldg, across from East Hall. Call
392-1451. (L-141-3t-nc)
SERVICES
Are you fumbling In the dark? A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters will
turn you on! Union Aud. May 21
7:30 pm FREE (M-st-141-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-p)

-I
< |UV|f|X w*
mmZM
your trip longer them their potiuncu?

If you have kids, you know how they
can take the joy out of a pleasure trip.
And make their mood rub off on you.
Unless you keep them busy. Which is a
little hard to do from behind the wheel.
So we came up with a 40 page book
of.puzzles, games and contests de designed
signed designed to keep the kids from getting

bored.
And you from getting
bothered.
There are license plate
games. Sightseeing
games. Even a game to

__ :* r. *... <+****>.
V B 111 Wl fl
M m W M |L
AUTHORIZED
DEALER
MILLER-BROWN MOTORS
- 376-4552

Page 11

£3£R&888B88^^
AT THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 cant and 4 cant
and lowar, open until 9 PM. Thasls
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)
Alternators Generators Started
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
Grad student Needs Bread.
Experienced Accurate Typist. .45 per
page Call Lorrle 3 72-7973.
(M-Bt-140-p)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)

TONIGHT!
SYMPATHY for the DEVIL
at the Union Auditorium
admission $1:50
. 5:30, 8:00, 10:30 p.m.
sponsored by J.W. Reitz Union

y.v.V.V,V/W/AVMV.V. , , .W

test how well the kids are doing at not
annoying Dad.
Come in and test-drive a Volks Volkswagen.
wagen. Volkswagen.
You might like to try out the beetle.
Or the roomy station wagon. Or one
of the models in between.
Volkswagens come in all sizes, just

like families. In fact, if you
bring yours along, you
can try a Volkswagen on
for size. While youre test testdriving
driving testdriving the car, your kids
can test-drive the book.

SERVICES
rX-x-XwX£X-X-x-x;x*X-X-x-x ; : : x ; x : X
Rubys ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th SL 376-8506 Mrs.
Ruby Mills. (M-10t-135-p)
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent-alr
carports awnings add-a-rooms
supplies and accesories. Promt and
dependable service. D M sales and
service 373-1446. (M)
STEREO TAPES $4.00 very high
quality selection of 200 albums or
transfer from own. order blank
and/or Information, Sound & Cinema
Corporation P. O. Box 1064 E.
AuGallie, Fla. (M-st-142-p)
RECORDS! Oldies! 20,000 In Stock.
Send 35 cents for 2,000 listing
catalog. Mall orders filled. RECORD
CENTER 1895 W. 25th Cleve., Ohio.
Record Tapes. (M-4t-142-p)



Page 12

!, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, May 18,1970

I CampUS Ct* t 0 IT SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
GET INVOLVED IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT
I ARE YOU INTERESTED IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT? GET INVOLVED ... Applications are now available for
cabinet and other student government agencies for any interested students. COME ON UP TO THE STUDENT
GOVERNMENT OFFICES, third floor Reitz Union.
I A BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATERS
May 21 TWO IN ONE FLESH ... A frank discussion dealing with the sexual and spiritual aspects of marriage. Thurs.
May 21,7:30 p.m. Room 347, Reitz Union. Sponsored by University Religious Association.
HONOR COURT FORMS SPEAKERS BUREAU
The Honor Court Bar Association has formed a Speaker's Bureau. The purpose of the Bureau will be to furnish any
interested faculty or Student organization a qualified member of the Honor Court to talk about the Honor System, the
Honor Code, and the Honor Court. Any interested organizations should contact the Honor Court Office at 392-1631-2-3.
I
SAMSON NEEDS VOLUNTEER
SAMSON IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR SUMMER RECREATION VOLUNTEERS: Call 392-1608 or
Come by room 315, JWRU.
INTERESTED IN OCEANOGRAPHY
Dr. Robert Menzies of the Department of Oceanography, Florida State University will give a talk on Origin of the deep
sea Fauna. The talk will begin at 7:30 PM in Bless Auditorium, Tuesday, May 19th.
ARTS & SCIENCE STUDENTS
The listing of courses offered by the college along with the names of instructors is now available. Students may consult
these listings in the Dean's Office in Anderson Hall or at any of the department offices.
I BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE
Bulletin Board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it. Bring your material, 20 copies of each
sheet, to the Student Government office and you will get free publicity for your organization. No personal material will be
posted.
COME TOGETHER DAY
COME TOGETHER DAY May 31 When University joins Community 3lack joins White Young join Old- and
Everyone UNITES For UNDERSTANDING, COMMUNICATION, and a better world ... for YOU. All CONCERNED
INDIVIDUALS Call 373-2437, 373-2900, or 376-8304 for further understanding of our intentions.
GATOR GREATS VS FRATERNITY ALL-STARS
THE GATOR GREATS featuring Steve Spurrier, Larry Smith, and Larry Rentz, will take on the FRATERNITY
ALL-STARS coached by Carlos Alvarez, John Reaves, and Coach Jimmy Dunn Tuesday, May 19, at 7:30 PM in Florida
Field. Admission 50 cents. Tickets available at Stadium Gate, IFC Office, Record Bar. Sponsored by the Interfratemity
Council.
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER, MUST HAVE
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, 5:00 OF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. THANKS.
7 808 BERRIN
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
I STUDENTGOVERNMENT



destroyer sunk

Israeli Jets Hit Egypt

By United Pre International
Israeli warplanes pounded
Egyptian military targets along
the Suez Canal for the fifth
consecutive day Sunday, and
Cairo admitted an Egyptian
destroyer was sunk in Saturdays
raids on a Red Sea naval base.
A military spokesman in Tel
Aviv and Israeli planes flew two

Marches Protest
'Kill Mentality
ATLANTA (UPI) Mass marches in Atlanta, Chicago and Los
Angeles are planned for next Saturday to protest the shoot to kill
mentality in America, Southern Christian Leadership Conference
(SCLC)'President Ralph David Abernathy said Sunday.
Abernathy said he expected the march in Atlanta to draw
thousands of people, and he added SCLCs entire executive staff
has been mobilized for the event.
WE WILL address ourselves to ... the shoot to kill mentality of
the Lester Maddoxes of this country, Abernathy said.
He said the march also would memorialize the shooting deaths of
six blacks in Augusta, Ga., two black students at Jackson State
College in Jackson, Miss., and four white students at Kent State
University in Kent, Ohio. All 10 persons were killed during
demonstrations.
Abernathy charged there is a national climate of fear and
repression which has been created by a national administration in
pursuit of a racist political Southern strategy and a militaristic foreign
policy.
ABERNATHY, WHO inherited SCLC leadership after Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. was assasinated two years ago in Memphis, said the
Los Angeles march would be directed against the policies of Gov.
Ronald Reagen.
In Chicago, the marchers would be showing their contempt for
the police state in the ghettos, Abernathy added.
Abernathy said recent activities in the United States have forced
the SCLC to put its entire program in high gear.
IT LOOKS now like we wont even be able to wait until this
summer because of whats happened, he said. The current mood of
the administration has made us re-evaluate our whole program.
He said the SCLC campaign would include conducting voter
registration and political education campaigns through the South and
in selected Northern communities.
* **
Emergency Meeting Called
By Black College Leaders
ATLANTA (UPI) Dr. Hugh M. Gloster, president of
predeminandy-black Morehouse College, said Sunday an emergency
meeting of presidents and student leaders from every black college in
America has been called for May 24.
The meeting is the result of the slaying of two Negro students at
Jackson State College in Mississippi last week and of growing campus
unrest. It will be held in Atlanta.
GLOSTER SAID the college leaders would prepare for President
Nixon and state governors descriptions of the pressing problems of
black colleges and the reactions of the black academic community to
the extension of the Indo-China war as well as the Jackson state
shootings.
In recent months very little attention has been given by the
executive branch of the national government to the special problem of
black colleges and black students, Gloster said. As a result, a
widening gulf is separating the President of the United States and
black colleges in this country.
The main purpose of the meeting on May 24 will be to point out
national trouble spots to the Nixon administration and to offer
proposals for immediate corrective action.
Spokesmen said invitations were being sent to representatives at
123 Negro colleges and universities in the United States.
TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVEI
1 STARKE 01 FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORtTE DEA LER Cf
- HOURS HOURS>
> HOURS> WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

separate raids Sunday lasting a
total of 95 minutes against
Egyptian positions on the
northern, central and southern
sectors of the Suez Canal front.
He said all planes returned
safely.
AN EGYPTIAN spokesman
said one Israeli warplane was
shot down and another damaged

by antiaircraft fire on the central
front. He said the Egyptians
suffered no casualities or
damages.
The strikes Sunday followed a
four-hour aid raid Saturday on
the naval base at Cape Ras
Banas, 280 miles south of
Israels fortress of Sharm El
Sheikh on the southernmost tip
of the occupied Sinai.
Israeli pilots reported sinking
an Egyptian destroyer of the
British World War II *Z class
and a Soviet-built Class C Komar
missile boat.
AN EGYPTIAN spokesman
said the destroyer, which was
not identified, went down
Sunday despite efforts of the
officers and crew to save it. No
mention was made of the missile
boat.
The Cairo spokesman said 10
Egyptian sailors were wounded
in the raid by a large force of
U. S.-built Israeli Phantom jet
fighter-bombers. He said two of
the Israeli planes were shot
down by antiaircraft fire and
were seen crashing in flames into
the sea near the Egyptian-
Sudanese border. Israeli denied
losing any of its planes in the
raid.

are your
contact lenses
more work than
theyre worth?

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er smoother and non-irritating.
Cleaning your contacts
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Lensine is sterile, self selfsanitizing,
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And you get a removable
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tom bottom of every bottle, a

New Miss USA
Likes Football
MIAMI BEACH (UPI) Debbie Shelton, a Virginia dentists
daughter who likes football, began her reign Sunday as Miss
USA, a job her predecessor called instant zoo.
The 21-year-old green-eyed brunette from Norfolk got the
traditional breakfast in bed Sunday morning and dazzled
photographers with a sheer, baby blue shortie nightgown.
DEBBIE, A junior art major at Virginias Old Dominion
University, said she entered the contest for the excitement and
travel and never expected to win.
After beating 50 other contestants in Saturday nights
televised finals of the week-long contest Debbie could only say
that her win was great, simply great... wonderful.
She will carry her five-foot-eight frame and 39-24-36 figure
into the Miss Universe pageant here later this year.
DEBBIE SUCCEEDS another Virginian, Wendy Dascomb,
who disgustedly said of her reign as Miss USA of 1969 Ugh,
instant zoo.
Debbie, the daughter of Norfolk dentist John P. Shelton, was
also named Miss Pixable by news photographers covering the
beauty contest.
The first runner-up was Vidd Lynn Chesser, Miss South
Carolina, of Mount Pleasant. The other finalists were Miss
Nevada, Sheri Schruhl, Miss Tennessee, Donna Marie Ford and
Miss Georgia, Sherie Stephens.

Lensine exclusive for
proper lens hygiene. It
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that improper storage
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Thisisasurecauseofeye
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Monday, May 18/1970, The Florida Alligator,

Bacteria cannot grow in
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with Lensine, from the
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M
I IIP

Page 13



The
Florida
Alligator


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JOHN PARKER
... best miler

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GATOR SPORTS

HAPPY HOUR!
:i i!
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY
8-9 PM
! 11l SHINES 550 |
BEEROI PITCHER i
633 NW 13th ST.

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Five Firsts Gamers
Second For Cindermen
By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Sports Writer
Florida played the bridesmaid to the University of Tennessee
Saturday as the Volunteers won their seventh straight Southeastern
Conference track Championship.
The Gators won five events, more than any other team, but could
not match the tremendous depth of the Tennessee squad.
4 THE UF HAD several pleasant surprises during the meet. The first
came in the mile run when senior John Parker came from behind to
win the event in 4:06.7. Parker trailed Dickie Kleier of Tennessee for
the first two laps than increased the pressure in the third lap. He took
the lead in the final lap and finished 10 yards ahead of Kleier flashing
the victory (peace?) sign as he broke the tape.
The closest event of the meet was the 220-yard dash. A1 Coffee of
Louisana State and Jim Green of Kentucky battled to a photo finish
in the race. Both men crossed the finish with a time of 20.8 seconds
but the judges ruled from a photograph that Coffee was slightly
ahead.
Gator Ron Jourdan won the high jump as he cleared the bar at 6-10
but the magic seven foot mark eluded the super star.
SCOTT HURLEYS performance in the pole vault brought a
rousing cheer from the stands as he cleared the 16-foot mark and won
the event. Hurley could not have picked a better time to make his
highest vault in competition.
UFs Ron Coleman won the triple jump and placed second in the
long jump to grab the third highest individual point total of the meet.
Tennessees behemoth, Bill Skinner, intimidated all his competition
in the javelin with a toss of 253-feet-3. Skinner has dominated the
javelin for the last two years in SEC competition.
VIC NELSON of Kentucky put on one of the most impressive
shows of strength and endurance of the meet in the 3-mile run. Nelson
lapped half of the field in his record-breaking run. He broke his old
record of 14:00.1 with a great 13:46.9 jog.
Floridas most impressive showing came in the 880 yard run. The
UF placed five men in a field of nine and copped three places.
Eamonn O'Keefe, the Irish Gator, won the event with a time of
1:49.9. Benny Vaughn placed third with a time of 1:50.8, and Ken
Bumsed tied down fourth with a 1:50.9.
Tennessee amassed 74 points for first place, the UF took second
with 54 points, Kentucky won four events and placed third with 43
points. Louisiana State was next with 37 points followed by Alabama
with 26, Mississippi State and Auburn had 16 each, and Georgia 6.
. Mississippi and Vanderbilt did not score.

Photos By
Phil Bannistmr

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 14

Clip the
Pizza Inn
Buck v 3
below for a special treat! 11 I
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(pi\ j./ vQNE)
pizza inn BucTT!^?t

\, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 18,1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

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UNIVERSITY PLAZA
BARBER S STYLE SHOP
3 Roffler Stylists
5 Barbers
Roffler Sculpture
Kut for longer hair
Hair straightening
and relaxing
6 to 8 week guarantee
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Analysis of hair and
scalp problems
1620 W. University Ave.
373-1196 \



Golfers Finish Distant Third In SEC

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ANDY NORTH
... places sixth

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| Intramurals I
MWBMWWMIHUMMIIIM Wmi. By StCe Rofuill llllllj
ENGINEERING LEAGUE: IEEE won the Engineering
championship by coming up with the top record in a one-bracket
league. Top hitters for the IEEEs included Wes Shelton, and captains
Paul Abdullah and Randy Anderson.
INDEPENDENT LEAGUE The P.E. Petes and the Silver Streaks
moved" into the finals of Independent softball with wins over Alvin
Lees and the French Quarter respectively.
The Petes scored a lopsided 10-3 win over Alvin Lees despite a fine
performance by Lees' first sacker Alan Trumpkin. Chuck Fessler hit a
homer and a double for the Petes but was bested by younger brother
Bob who hit a triple and two singles.
The Silver Streaks came off a 39-10 win over SAPHER to edge the
French Quarter 4-0. The Streaks did manage to rap out 13 hits while
holding the Quarter to only five. Juan Montes once again swung the
big bat for the Streaks with a single, a double and a homerun.
FRATERNITY LEAGUES: All Campus Orange and Blue League
tennis and track teams have been officially announced by the
Intramural Department.
DU dominated the Blue Tennis team placing Buck Blankner and
Jeff Walker in singles and the team of Alexander-Ellis as the sole
doubles team. Kappa Alpha placed Jim Stringer in singles.
In the Orange League the Pikes monopolized the All Star Team
placing Dwight Rogers and Jeff Graf in singles and the team of Brown
and Mandeville in doubles. The Pikes won the tennis championship.
Second place TEP placed the team of Lee Borden and Rodney Margol
in doubles and the SPEs placed Greg McFarlin in singles.
The Orange League track All-Stars are: William Wilson, 100 yd.,
SAE; Randy Holcomb, 880 yd., BTP; John Cook, 120 hurdles, PKA;
David Haines, 220 yd., SPE; Halling-Krist Diebel-Trapp, 880 relay,
SAE; Johnson-Krist Wilson-Diebel, 440 relay, SAE; Tom Christian,
discus, PDT; Greg Bonner, high jump, PDT; Rick Vogel, shot, PDT;
Bob Young, broad jump, PKT.
Blue League Track All-Stars are: Bob Hulzer, 120 hurdles, TX;
Frank Palaez, 880 yd., PKP; Mark Schumaker, 220 yd., TX; Mike
Murphy, 100 yd. PKP; Butler-Buel Brewer-Schmirer, 440 relay, PKP;
Antista-Cotton Butler-Schmirer, 880 relay, PKP; Bill OByme, shot,
DU; Geary Cotton, broad jump, PKP; Willie Gregory, discus, TX; Ray
Crawford, high jump, AGR.
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We just came in third, said
disappointed gold coach Buster
Bishop after the Southeastern
Conference Golf Championships
ended Saturday at Calloway
Gardens, Ga.
The Gators finished 24
strokes off the pace set by the
victorious Georgia Bulldogs, who
fired a team score of 1,105 to
the UFs 1,129 over the par 72
Mountain View course.
LSU FINISHED second, one
slim stroke behind the Bulldogs
who captured their second
straight title and 10th in the last
14 years.
Sophomore Andy North had
the best individual performance
for the Gator squad finishing
sixth behind individual

V.V.V.V.'.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.
Vm almost certain that we'll
receive a hid to the NCAA."
Coach Buster Bishop

champion Tommy Valentine of
Georgia.
Valentine h a
three-under-par 213 for the
54-hole tourney, two strokes
better than LSUs Jimmy
Wittenberg. North shot a 222
total and was nine strokes off
Valentines winning pace.
Other Gator individual scores
were Mike Killians 224, David
Barnes 225, Wendell Coffees
225 and Ron Mahoods 234.
Following the third place
Gators were Tennessee, 1,138;
Auburn, 1,140; Kentucky,
1,152; Alabama, .1,153;
Mississippi, 1,164; Mississippi
State; 1,170 and Vanderbilt;
1,187

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Kickers End
With Win
The UF Soccer Club finished
its season with a 2-0 win over
Santa-Fe Jr. College Wednesday
at Fleming Field.
After a scoreless first half the
Gators kickers gained control of
the game and Carlos Zometa
scored from Stewart McLarens
pass into the goal area.
Left-winger Bill Silvey
outraced several defenders with
a pass from Keith Parker to
score the second point with a
left-footed drive.
The victory gave the Gators a
13-4 record for the '69-7O
season.
Receiving special awards were
co-captains Kevin Sufferin and
Carlle Fllori. Sufferin also
received best defender. David
Weaver, best fullback; Manuel
Wills, and McLaren shared top
goalscoring honors; Sergio
Monterio, playmaker award;
Rodney Murphy, most loyal
member; Stan Roark, most
improved player; Keith Parker,
old mans award and Mike
Schikorr, president's award.
After the awards were made
McLaren was voted to be the
clubs president for the '7O-'7l
season.
NOW
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for
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LEASE OFFICE
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Across from
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Coach Still Optimistic
By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
-*>
No coach likes to finish third, but golf coach Buster Bishop isnt
exactly dissatisfied about his teams third place finish behind Georgia
and LSU in the Southeastern Conference Golf Championships
Saturday.
In fact, Bishop said Sunday on the phone he was pleased with the
teams performance. And he has good cause to be pleased because,
except for seniors Ron Mahood and Wendell Coffee, he has a very
young squad of linksmen who have been gaining valuable experience
all year long.
ALTHOUGH THE Gator golfers didnt win the SEC this weekend,
it doesnt mean anyone can count them out of contention for the
upcoming National Collegiate Athletic Association Golf
Championships June 23-26 in Columbus, Ohio.
Os course all this is dependent on whether the golfers will receive
an invitation to play in the NCAA championships.
Im almost certain that well receive a bid to the NCAA, said
Bishop. Well know for sure by Thursday.
BESIDES THEIR third place finish in the SEC, which has beer beerrepresented
represented beerrepresented for many years by three teams in the NCAA finals, Coach
Bishops squad has won the Senior Bowl and Miami Invitational
tournaments and placed second in the Florida Intercollegiate
Tournament. Not to mention that the Gators were the fifth place
team last year in the NCAA and finished eighth in this years Houston
All-American. All of this is merit enough for the Gators to get their
bid.
Coach Bishop, who is on the NCAAs District Three Bid
Committee, said that usually seven teams are picked by the various
committee members by phone hook-ups and that he and the team will
not know until late Wednesday night the decision of the bid
committee.
If the golfers dont get a bid to the NCAA tourney then, their
season is over until next year, so until Thursday the big wait is on.

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Monday, May 18,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

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Page 15



Page 16

The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 18,1970

Curt Flood Vs. Baseballs Powers

By VITO STELLINO
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK Curt Floods law suit to overturn
baseballs reserve clause, filed in Federal Court four
months ago, reaches the trial stage in U. S. District Court
on Tuesday.
The trial itself is expected to last less than two weeks
but it is only the second major step in the case which may
be appealed all the way to the U. S. Supreme Court. The
appeals could take at least another year before a ruling by
the high court ultimately decides the issue.
IN THE FIRST STEP, Judge Irving Ben Cooper, after a
one-day hearing, denied Floods bid in March for an
immediate injunction that would have had the effect of
making him a fee agent.
In a 55-page decision, Judge Cooper ruled, If Flood is
to achieve by court action the fundamental changes he
seeks in the reserve system, we believe such a
determination on a matter of vital importance to
organized baseball must at least be the result of a full
trial.
Flood could have appealed to the Circuit Court of
Appeals for an injunction but decided not to risk a delay
and pressed instead for an immediate trial.
IF FLOOD LOSES this case, the reserve clause will
remain in effect and is unlikely to be challenged again in
the near future.
The so-called reserve clause actually is a misnomer.
What Flood is actually fighting is the series of interlocking

/ I*l SI'ORTS SHOUTS

Aaron Hits Three Grand

HANK AARON of the
Atlanta Braves became the ninth
player in the history of major
league baseball to reach the
3,000-hit plateau Sunday when
he singled off Wayne Simpson
in the first inning of the second
game of the doubleheader with
the Cincinnati Reds.
Aaron, who started the
doubleheader with 2,999 hits,
went hitless in four tries in the
first game against Jim Merritt.
Ty Cobb heads the all-time hit
list with 4,191 followed by Stan
Musial with 3,630, Tris Speaker,
j. 3,515, Honus Wagner, 3,430,
Eddie Collins 3,311, Nap Lajoie
3,251, Paul Warner 3,152 and
Cap Anson 3,081.
Willie Mays of the San
Francisco Giants went into
Sundays game needing 44 more
hits to reach the 3,000-hit mark.
* *
CHUNKY HOMERO Blancas
chipped in a 45-foot birdie on
the 16th Green Sunday as fellow
Texan Lee Trevino stumbled to
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 17 IS .531
New York 18 16 .529
St. Louis 16 16 .500 1
Pittsburgh 16 20 .444 3
Philadelphia 13 21 .382 5
Montreal 12 21 .364 SVi
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 27 10 .730
Los Angeles 20 15 .571 6
Atlanta 19 16 .543 7
Houston 18 19 .486 9
San Francisco 18 20 .474 9%
San Diego 17 22 .436 11
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bogeys and Blancas 34-33 67
won him the Cdlonial National
Invitation Title with a
seven-under-par 273.
He picked up the $25,000
first money by being the only
man in the 100-player starting
field to play four rounds under
par over the 7,142-yard, par
35-35 70 Colonial Country
Club Course.
Trevino wound up with a
33-36 69 and Gene Littler
shot a 33-34 67 to share the
runner up spot at 274. They
split $23,150. That shot
Trevinos winning to about
$ 107,000 and made him the first
tour golfer to soar past the
SIOO,OOO plateau this year.
* *
PERSONALITY, the fust
classic winner for the Jacobs
Stable after a half century of
racing, was shipped home to
New York from Pimlico Sunday
morning after winning
Saturdays Preakness Stakes, but
Dust Commander, the defeated
Kentucky Derby winner, stayed
behind with a sore anlde.
There is filling back in the
ankle again. Its not a lot but its
there and there is a chance we
will have to stop him, said Don
Combs, Dust Commanders
trainer.
*
Y.A. TITTLE, the dynamic
quarterback who led the New
York Giants to three consecutive
Eastern Division titles in the
National Football League in the
early 19605, was signed today as
a coach by the Giants.
Tittle, who guided the Giants
if |
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agreements by all the clubs in organized baseball under
which no team will try to sign a player under another
teams control. Since a player signs a contract which gives
the club the option on his services for another year, the
player is effectively bound to a club for life unless he is
traded or released.
Flood claims these agreements violate the anti-trust
laws and is trying to overturn the 1922 Supreme Court
ruling that baseball is not subject to interstate commerce.
In 1953, the court refused to overturn that ruling by
saying it was a matter that should best be decided by
Congress.
IN 1955 AND 1957, however, the Supreme Court ruled
that both boxing and football are subject to the anti-trust
laws although it admitted that it might seem
unrealistic, inconsistent and illogical to have those
sports subject to anti-trust laws while baseball isnt.
Since CongresjHhasnt acted in the 17 years since the
1953 ruling, Flood is hoping that the courts will throw
out the reserve clause. If Flood does win, there will be
changes in the present system and the matter might then
go to Congress.
Flood decided to challenge the reserve clause when he
was traded in December by the St. Louis Cardinals to the
Philadelphia Phillies. He wants to stay in St. Louis because
he played there 12 years and has many business
interests there.
FLOODS ST. LOUIS attorney, Allan H. Zerman, got
former Supreme Court Justice Arthur J. Goldberg now
a candidate for governor in New York to represent him

to titles in 1961-62-63, will join
the Giants at their training camp
on July 15 as quaarterback
coach.
* *
NOT EVEN the Stanley Cup,
one of pro sports oldest and
most sought-after trophies, can
stand between Harry Sinden and
his family.
The young Boston Bruin
coach of the newly-crowned
Stanley Cup champions
suddenly parted ways Thursday,
but only because the 38-year-old
Sindon insisted on the
stability of an industrial job.
I wanted to coach but it was
not a career I wanted to follow
forever, Sinden explained after
astonishing the hockey business
in general and the Bruins in
particular with his sudden
announcement only four days
after Boston had captured its
first Stanley Cup in 29 years.
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in the legal action. The Major League Players Association
is also backing Flood although he said he would have filed
the suit even if they hadnt.
Flood is passing up a SIOO,OOO-a-year salary offer from
the Phils while he contests the suit. Hes now 32 and
claims I dont think Ill ever play again because the case
may not be decided until the 1971 season is almost over.
Beleagured baseball, under attack on many fronts,
claims the sport will be ruined if Flood wins because the
rich teams will be able to buy the best players and kill
competition. The baseball owners are also facing a lawsuit
over their move of the Seattle team to Milwaukee and
further havent been able to get players to accept a new
basic contract. The players are threatening a strike.
THE MOST SERIOUS threat in the past to baseballs
reserve clause came in 1949 when an appeal court ruled
2-1 in favor of Danny Gardella, who was barred from
baseball after jumping to the Mexican League. Judge
Jerome Frank ruled in that case that the reserve clause
results in peonage for the players.
But before the case reached the Supreme Court,
baseball settled out of court with Gardella for a reported
$60,000. Flood, though is highly unlikely to settle out of
court for money because hes passing up such a big
salary to contest the case. Hes said hed settle only if
baseball would agree to a modified reserve clause but
baseball might prefer to take its chances in court rather
than modify the clause.
Thats why the case is expected to ultimately go to the
Supreme Court.

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