Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
1?*
Ad Amnia*.

Vol 62 No. 141

Gun Hearings Set
For UPD, Students

See Related Story Page 16
By 808 WISE
AMgrtor Staff Writer
A public hearing on the
question of guns of campus will
be held at 4 pan. Sunday in
McCarty Auditorium by the
newly-appointed campus
disarmament committee.
The hearing will go on as
long as there are people who
want to be heard on this
subject, according to Thomas
S. Biggs Jr., UF attorney and
co-chairman of the Committee
to Study the Removal and
Control of Guns on Campus.
BIGGS ASKED for all who
want to speak to contact his
secretary so a schedule can be
made. The floor will be free to
other speakers after those
scheduled have been heard, he
said.
The student-faculty
committee voted unanimously
to hold the hearing during a
Thursday afternoon meeting.
After the vote, witnesses were
called to testify on the subjects
of the arming of campus police
(University Police Department,
UPD) and firearms in UF
dormitories.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell appointed the
committee last week in response
to student demands.
Some members expressed
surprise Thursday the hunger
strike was still going on after the
committee voted to meet every
Tuesday and Thursday until it
reaches a decision.
UPD CHIEF Audie Shuler,
UF security director; William
giilliiiiiiilill
S EMIN OLE E DITO R Ken
Driggs foresees no
problem with nude art
in the yearbook page 3
Classifieds 11
Editorials 8
Entertainment 20
Letters 9
Movies 11
Small Society 9
Sports... 19
Whats Happening <.4

"How do you fool?"
"Hungry."
"I know. I wish this
wasnt nocossary.

The
Florida Alligator

Elmore, UF vice president for
business affairs, and Calvin C.
Greene, director of the physical
plant division testified on the
use of guns by the UPD.
Shuler said he did not
remember the date of the last
time a gun was used by a UF
policeman, but it involved a
student caught trying to siphon
gas from a car in a UF parking
lot.
The student rose from -a
crouching position with a
machete in his hand, and the
officer was very glad he had it
(his revolver), Shuler said.
ELMORE SAID the police
needed guns for the protection
of over 25,000 students, faculty
and staff and more than $1
billion worth of property on the
UF.

UFs Super Show
'Alive With Music
By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
The Super Show is set to go in the stadium Saturday afternoon at
four with some of the top groups in the country on stage. The hole is
about to be alive with the sound of music.
Sly and the Family Stone headline the super Super Show and its a
good bet theyll be real crowd pleasers. The hit singles released by the
group have been many, too many to name here. Im sure theyll be
singing and playing many of them for us tomorrow.
SECOND BILLED, or top billed depending on how hard you like
your rock is Grand Funk Railroad, a hard hard hard rock group that
was unknown for the most part until they agreed to play for nothing
at a pop festival last summer. Theyre dynamite on stage and made
hits out of themselves. Theyve released two albums since those days.
Both of them are good.
Heres where the ranking of the groups gets hard to do. All the rest
are great.
The Youngbloods are coming. Their single release, Get Together
made the top of all of the charts deservedly enough. James Cotton
Blues Band is coming. The blues. Crow Chicago drive. Ten Wheel
Drive a top girl lead singer. lan and Sylvia alive and warm and
energetic. Mecki Mark Men unknown but powerful. Ewing Street
Times fun and easy. Celebration local but not for long.
This thing is brought to us by Student Government Productions,
Celebration 7O and Falstaff Brewers.
The gates to Florida Field will open at 2 pjn. The show starts at 4
and goes until it's over. It costs $5.50 a head.

Hunger: Least Worry Os Tigert Strikers

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writar
It was the 32nd hour of the hunger strike.
The strikers were just getting up from their second night on
Die steps at Tigert HaU. People who work in Tigert were coming
to work.
A MIDDLE-AGED woman walked up the steps at Tigert,
stopped at the door, and spoke to one of the strikers.
How do you feel?" the woman asked.
Hungry.
I KNOW." She paused; the said: I wish this wasnt
necessary. I really feel badly for you folks."
The strikers wish the strike wasn't necessary either. But the

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

We have a moral obligation
to protect our community and
its citizens, Elmore said.
UPD OFFICERS are more
restricted in their authority to
use weapons than state law
requires. In particular, they have
no authority to shoot a fleeing
felon, Shuler said.
As long as a man is fleeing,
he is not dangerous, Shuler
said.
UPD REGULATIONS allow
the use of guns only to defend
the life of the policeman or
others, to kill a dangerous
animal or in weapons training.
Harold C. Riker, director of
the UF housing division, said his
office was tightening up
enforcement of the rule against
guns in campus housing.
(SEE 'GUN' PAGE 2)

Â¥
Ik
m Vr Jj flj
I m
H VBSHHk v
B
k |P BPjBHHHBQr N ||||
Hk i
B W m W V;1
B. IB a.mi
|||: x |9B^
i | : 111 I
v v '-;l
-k^J
' 1 f-'
j;^ K
|^BBH|^^fl^^B
*
H* -'* ?
M> V sJi'-*V> | f fl-'*? l rf f^ s
GRAND FUNK RAILROAD
... one of 10 groups appearing Saturday
No Ship Seizure

MIAMI (UPI) The State
Department Thursday denied
maritime radio reports that a
Miami-based lobster ship was
seized off the Cuban coast by a
Castro gunboat.
It is not true such a seizure
has taken place, a State
Department spokesman said in
Washington after investigating
radio messages that the 62-foot
motor vessel, Fram, carrying a
crew of four, was intercepted by
a Cuban patrol boat.
A COAST GUARD plane has
made visual sighting of the Fram
and she is fishing about 10 miles

events of the past few weeks have made them feel it is necessary
and they said they will continue the strike until their demands
are met.
The strikers are fasting to protest the war in Indochina and
conditions in America. They hope their strike will not let people
forget about what happened last week at Kent State.
WE ARE HERE on the steps of Tigert Hall as a personal
commitment against killing/* read a statement released Tuesday
by the strikers.
Our concern is for the lives of all human beings ... We are
here to remind you, the university community, that although
the mass demonstrations and marches of the past week have
ended, the issues still remain,** the statement read.
(SEE 'CONCERN' PAGE 2)

\^p/

Friday, May 15, 1970

from Guinchos Cay,* a
spokesman said.
Guinchos Cay is northwest of
Lob os Cay, off the northern
coast of Camaquey province,
where the alleged seizure was
reported to have taken place.
Evelio Crespo, administrator
of Atco Marine Service, Inc.,
operators of the Fram, said his
firm received a radio message
about noon from a vessel
identified as the Moonglow.
THE MOONGLOW said it was
relaying a report from the
tugboat J. W. Coppage that
(SEE 'SHIP'PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, Ttw Florida Alligator, Friday, May 15,1970

SEPUL Petition
Seeks Signers
By CARLOS LICEA
Alligator Writer
Students for Equal Protection Under the Law (SHPUL) plan to ask
UF students to sign a tuition refund request to be presented to the
administration.
The request would be return tuition money for Friday of last week
when UF was closed for the student strike.
THE REQUEST makes the Legal Action Committee of SEPUL
legal representative of those students who sign it, and who would like
to have tuition money refunded.
The request says:
I request a refund for one day*s tuition as restitution for the
universitys failure to hold classes on May 8.
I SUPPORT legal action designed to secure to every student on
this campus his contractual right to instruction and each student's
right to attend classes in an atmosphere conductive to the educational
process.
Therefore, I authorize the Legal Action Committee of SEPUL to
file suit seeking enforcement of my contractual rights and seeking an
injunction to keep the door of UF open at the times scheduled."
Last week two students at the University of Miami filed suit to
keep UM open.
Mel Pearlman, spokesman for SEPUL said the organization would
have three committes which will carry out what he called his plan of
attack."
A refund committee, headed by Ken Hart, ILW, and Marshall
Liphard, ILW, designed to handle the efforts of SEPUL to obtain a
tuition refund. V,
A Legal Action Committee, headed by Wayne Carroll, 4LW,
handling legal representation for SEPUL.
An Issues and Programs Committee, headed by Pearlman.
PEARLMAN SAID O'Connell was intimidated by a small group,
and he gave in too easily because the forces of violence cited in his
statement really did not exist."
Pearlman said he wanted to mourn the death of the Kent State
University students, but he could not because the campus left had
wrapped the whole package of demands in the demonstrations last
week.
Ken Hart said it was not the right of the president" to shut the
door of education, but he believed O'Connell had acted in good
faith."
Pearlman said SEPUL would be a forum for moderate students,
while the New Left combined everything into one package and said
take it all or leave it."
Gun Use Restricted,
No Shoot Authority

pROM PA6E Q*l
Student committee members
brought up the question of
prohibiting possession of guns
by students off campus.
ACCORDING TO Biggs, a
rule could be made against
student possession of guns off
campus under UFs authority to
make reasonable rules to
protect the health and safety of
students.
We probably could make
such a rule. I dont know
whether it would stand up in
court, however ... And it would
depend to a great extent on the
reasons for which the rule was
made, Biggs said.
According to UF rules,
firearms are supposed to be
registered with campus police
and stored in the police station.
About eight guns are kept there
now, according to Shuler.
BAHA'U'LUH I
promised wono redeemer!

mmmmm
UnS&gff Roiida'nd A te pSfrltehiS l£?tu
of their authors. to the Florida
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Js entered as second desk matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate to SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn iway copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice to given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of ah advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

THE MEETING began with a
sharp exchange between
committee members on whether
further steps should be taken to
meet the demands of those on
the hunger strike.
Some members felt the
conmittee should meet more
often, since the students were
still on hunger strike outside.
There was a committee
appointed in the fall that should
have dealt with this question,
but it took a killing at Kent
State .. These people are
willing to die out there," said
Susan Johnson, 2UC.
THEN THEYLL die,"
replied Dr. Alrfred Krezdom,
chairman of the fruit crops
department.
Krezdom said he felt the
committee was acting in good
faith and could not produce an
instant solution to the problem.
Whatever the strikers did, they
did voluntarily, he said.

FRRDRICK
(iAI{ I ) K N S

"WH
§y|x
AND THE BEAUTIES GATHER **""*

A bevy of beautiful coeds gathered Wednesday
night in preparation for the Miss UF Pageant The
Pageant will select the prettiest coed to represent

,>Nv.v.vAw.v^Kw.v. .v.v.%v.%y.:.:.:.:.:>x*>>:wswKW????KWKWi i sfi s
I §
Concern: A Reason)
jjFROM PAGE o*3
jij Its necessary the student body keeps thinking about what |ij
jij happened at Kent State," striker Andi McDonough said. They *j
all came out and showed their support, but it wasn't just a £
three-day thing. :
CANDLELIGHT marches are fine, but if people are really >
concerned, theey need to make a little self-sacrifice. I'm making ;
:j: a self-sacrifice because Im concerned." >j
j: Concern is the key reason most of the hunger strikers are :
\ going without food. There are no radicals among the group §
>: because fasting is not a radical action. Members of the strike are >!
i| fasting because of deep personal reasons. :*j
| Im concerned about this country, striker Ten Kintzer said. §
"No matter who you are, no matter if you support the war or iji
$ not, you can't support the war thats going on in this country. §
THE STRIKE began with 30 students Monday evening The :
: number had grown to 58 by Thursday afternoon. j:
The strike has already had some success. The University :
Senate has agreed to consider their demands. Strikers report £
:j: newsmen affiliated with NBC and CBS visited them Thursday j:
morning to cover the strike. >
:j: So far, the strikers have had help and encouragement. Four %
tents have been loaned for the duration of the strike. Students £
>: and faculty have donated either money for juice, or cans of fruit |
jij juice. ji|
OTHERS HAVE come by and encouraged the strikers. $
* Occasionally someone will drive past and yell crude remarks S
jij from their cars, but the strikers say that encouraging words far 5*
outnumber the crude comments. B
Eight a jn. this morning marked the 84th hour since the strike ?
jij began. S
Wilmer Coggins, UF Infirmary director, said there is no 2
A medical reason for the first few days of a strike being the $
hardest; it is just observation. Jj
* DR. COGGINS said several of the strikers haVe been in for $
>: physicals. Strikers encourage each other to go in for a physical $
jij every few days during the strike. j:
S As drags on, each individual gets progressively >
S weaker. Miss Kintzer admits she is a little afraid : :
? ~u re J, m afraid > * rn > only human. I wonder if I §
S unll he able to take it physically. I know I can take it mentally $
5 because I believe what lam doing will accomplish something $
S I m going to stay out here until our demands are met until i
§ can't move anymore, and they have to carry me away. §
--

Hillel Foundation Brunch
Sunday May 17 11:00AM Hum* Rec. Room
DR. RICHARD RUBENSTEIN xmmiim
Noted Theologian to speak on I oo non-members
JEWISH THEOLOGY AFTER AUSCHWITZ
AND SIX-DAY WAR
Dr. Rubenstein will also speak on God After
** D qth oT God 8:00PM at JWR Union.

the UF. Note the guys in the picture are not
running.

Dialogue Talk
Centers On
Sex, Sin
Is Sex Still a Sin? is the
subject of this afternoons
Dialogue with a Theologue.
Dr. Nell Potter of the UF
Infirmary will speak, along with
local ministers at the Union
sponsored event. It will be held
in room 122-3 Reitz Union.
Admission is free.
Ship Sighted:
Coast Guard
WE Olgl
Cuban nationals are aboard the
Fram.
The message added that
Cuban planes were circling the
air, Crespo said.
Aithought the radio report
indicated that the ship might
' have been seized, it did not
flatly say so. Crespo suggested
that at least the vessel
apparently was being searched.
PREMIER FIDEL Castro
Wednesday rejected a proposed
prisoner swap with Alpha 66,
which offered the 11 crewmen
taken prisoner from a Cuban*
fishing vessel by the exile
organization for nine Alpha 66
guerrillas Castro said he captured
in Cuba last month.
Alpha 66 spokesmen were
silent on their plans for the
prisoners, but said they would
not be brought to the United
States.
They were being held
somewhere outside U. S.
territory, the group said.



Parody 'Playboy Foldout In Seminole

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writer
Seminole yearbooks, to be
distributed Monday, are full of skin and
color, according to Editor Ken Driggs.
The yearbook features a parody
Playboy foldoutr
WE THREW out the old format of
the Seminole, Driggs said, and
arranged everything in chronological
vtVlyl

I* '|pP 8
v Wmk >
. MIKE HENSON
A MOOD
So why ruin it with never-quite-right words.
Outcome Undisclosed
In Kappa Sig Hearing
By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
IFC and administration officials met Thursday afternoon to decide
whether to bring the racial bias complaint against Kappa Sigma
fraternity before the Committee on Student Organizations.
The outcome of the meeting was not disclosed. Dean of Men Frank
Adams and committee chairman Dr. Frank Maturo will reveal the
decision to IFC President Charles Brackins in a letter in the near
future, Brackins said.
IFC SUSPENDED recognition of Kappa Sigma Monday after a
preliminary investigation into charges that the fraternity denied bids
to two blacks for racial reasons.
Adams, Maturo, Brackins and Jay R. Stormer, assistant dean of
men and advisor to fraternities, attended the meeting.
Maturo will make the final decision as the whether the committee
will hear the case, according to Brackins.
BRACKINS SAID he did not know if a fraternity had ever been
charged with racial discrimination on the basis of the blackball
system before, or how the charge could be proved.
Well just have to cross that bridge when we come to it, Brackins
said.
But if UF finds it has no authority to forbid racial discrimination
by a fraternity, he said, it could mean drastic changes in the present
relationship between UF and its fraternities.
If UF cant rule over a fraternity in a case like this, then this opens
the floodgates- for a whole bunch of things UF now requires
fraternities to do, Brackins said.

IN THE MALL- IN THE MALL
3 \ I
* /sX\
x
5 v_y i
x s
* SB
* i
2 p
THE MALL-IN THE MAU

'AGE OF AQUARIUS COMING MONDAY

It is the only yearbook I know of
that is arranged in chronological order.
Its the most innovative Seminole in
years, he said.
The theme of the 1970 Seminole is
The Age of Aquarius. It deals with
issues contemporary to college students
such as drug use, the draft,
demonstrations, and minority problems.
Its very different, Driggs said. I
suppose it could be controversial. But it
is all done in good taste.

Iyrvw* '-~v-v~ ryy>rrw w > rw^ i if-yyyw inr% M
NORTHWEST AMERICAN
| 3302 N. W. !3th Street Gainesville, Florida jj
|| SPECIALIZING IN VOLKSWAGEN REPAIR
; OVER 5 YEARS EXPERIENCE AT YOUR LOCAL AUTHORIZED VOLKSWAGEN DEALER !
Jj Maintenance of SIO.OO or More Provides Free Oil Change and Lubrication ;S
ji BRAKES MUFFLERS ALL WORK GUARANTEEDI
REAR END TUNEUPS FREE ESTIMATES /' j/' !\ |
5 TNGiNc V.'O?X FFOKT FKD A ' 1 L 1
i FUEL INJECTION AIR CONDITIONERS /J $
j; GENERAL REPAIRS ELECTRICAL REPAIRS J
j PHONE: 376-91 16 'I 1 ':-,:#' J|, I
B

No Difficulty Entering UF,
But Curfew Brings Gripes

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
Although a recent Associated
Press story charges sexual
discrimination in state
university admissions, UF
freshman coeds reported no
difficulty entering college.
Sexual discrimination charges
were made in the story of a
report to the Florida
Commission on the Status of
Women.
BUT FRESHMAN girls at UF
cant recall any discrimination in
their acceptance at UF.
In a telephone sampling, none
of the girls thought they had had
any trouble getting into UF.
The only complaint they had
since entering school has been a
curfew on freshman girls alone.
ACCORDING TO Malcolm F.
Scott, administration officer, its
the smaller number of girls
applying for admission that
keeps the percentage of women
students low.
The girls just arent applying
in as many numbers as men do,
Scott said.
Chairman Betty Armistead of
the Brevard Council for the
A Lotto Bull
MADRID (UPI) Bullfights
are not for everybody, but if
you want to sample one or
already are an aficionado
Madrid is the place.
It boasts the largest bull ring
in Spain, the Plaza de Toros,
which is considered the most
important arena in the world.
No matador can be considered
seriously until he has triumphed
here.

THE 1970 Seminole contains several
nude shots, but Driggs does not expect
adverse reaction to the pictures.
In 1956, the Seminole was not
distributed because of one picture in
which part of a female breast was
exposed. All the copies of that years
Seminole were burned.
Mike Davis, business manager of
student publications, said this years
Seminole should not have any problem
with the nude pictures due to what he

CAMPUS TWIG MALL TWIG 1
1131 W. UNIVERSITY IN THE GAINESVILLE MALL
I'ljN 1
ip W lu j
if If* Jr
{ffMSJ
Check these great I
GRADUATION SPECIALS I
OUR REGULAR STOCK OF BELGIUM LINEN 1
HANDBAGS by JOHN ROMAIN I
We are offering at a low 25% OFF
ALSO a group of SCARVES and a J
group of SLEEPWEAR at 25% OFF |
ALSO we have our once a year sale j
on BEAUTY MIST PANTYHOSE for 20% OFF I
' WI II,>BIWI^,MIII| P*" IIWMI^ M WBMPPPWW^iiPPPiWMPfPWP I i j*r

Continuing Education of Women
thinks that colleges should be
forced to enroll women as they
have been enrolling blacks,
according to the story.
AT UF, the story reports,
men make up 64.7 per cent of
the student population leaving
35.3 per cent women. Male

Friday, May IS, IflfFt, The FfarMi AMjpMar,

called a greater personal freedom these
days .
STUDENTS CAN pick up their
yearbooks Monday from 10 ajn. to 3
pjn. on the second floor of the Reitz
Union at the movie ticket window.
Students must have receipts to obtain
their yearbooks.
A number of extra Seminoles have
been ordered and will be sold on a
first-come-first-served basis for $6,
according to Davis.

instructors make up 89.9 per
cent of the staff.
The Florida Institute of
Technologys student body is
over 80 per cent male.
This past fall, 1,933 men were
admitted with 1,435 women as
freshmen. 1,935 men to 1389
women were listed as 2UC.

Page 3



V TM Florida Alligator, Friday, May 15,1970

Page 4

First Step Rally
In Plaza Today
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
First Step, a newly-organized communications group, will hold a
membership gathering today in the Plaza of the Americas.
The group has accumulated 150 volunteers.
WE WANT AS many people as possible who understand and feel'
what communication means, Andy Kramer, one of the organizers,
said.
The gathering will be held to meet with students, faculty and
administrators who want to carry students views to the grassroots
level in Florida.
We intend to meet the people at their level to break down
communications barriers and let people see how and why students feel
the way they do, Dick Larsen, a member, said.
FIRST STEP hopes to speak at American Legion meetings, sheriff
associations and womens dubs.
We dont want to go out and argue with people. We want to go
out and listen and understand the people talk on a heart-to-heart
basis about current problems, Larsen said.
Student Government is endorsing First Step in an early action move
by the new administration.
The official purpose of the group is to help dissolve the artificial
barriers which polarize our nation by means of active involvement and
communication on a person-to-person basis, according to the group's
official statement.
We would like to have all kinds of people participating in the
program. We aren't advocating support from one group or faction on
campus but want the entire university community to become
involved, Larsen said.
Employment Available
For Counseling Unit
Applications still are available for students from South Florida
interested in summer employment as creative listeners in the
Operation Safety Valve program lo be instituted by Mount Sinai
Hospital of Greater Miami.
The positions involve a 40-hour sensitivity training course, which
will prepare students to man the telephones of a hot-line crisis
intervention service. The course is designed to qualify them to offer
peer-group counseling and referral on such matters as drug abuse,
parental conflict and other problems which face the college-age
individual.
Those interested may obtain application forms from the student
placement office or by calling Made Tyson, 378-6431. Complete
details also will be available at a meeting at 8 pm. Monday in rooms
361-362 of the Reitz Union, where Dr. Milton Grossman, director of
adolescent medicine at Mount Sinai and coordinator for Operation
Safety Valve, will be guest speaker.

-, w ""toss p^^^HBBMBMBBBBBBBBBII^^^^K
**& STv^fVC ~, Ol\fir£ji :r : '
pp Jjtt Uf^^ :
BMP MMy!SNMllliil!iliiSlMMli§£RlliilflflMK§£ sSMWS* :^^V-:: :^l^^^B£* : l^^^^Vx::':' :
r W
Bk

Mr *7 1 2 Wt ¥
H mm If i M
WAUBURG CLEANUP

On Saturday, May 9, about 50 brothers and little
sisters of Delta Chi Fraternity engaged in a cleanup
project at Lake Wauburg. The Delta Chis' last

WHATS HAPPENING

TAKE ANOTHER STEP: Aquarius meets at
midnight... on the front steps of Tigert.
NEW GAME: The UF International Cricket Team
meets the Commonwealth Wanderers Saturday at
10 am. and 4:30 pm., Sunday, same times. In the
Alice Field -south of Fraternity Row across
from the Sigma Phi Epsilon house.
MOVIES:
Today: Brotherhood in the Union Auditorium,
5:30,8, and 10:30 pm.
Tomorrow: Same thing over again.
FINS SWIM: Today at the pool. And its
free ... Let Us Entertain You, presented by the
UF Syncronized Swim Team. Time 8 pm.
BIG TIME: The Ewing Street Times will be at the
Rat tonight and tomorrow night -at 9 and 11 pm.
GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY: Thieves Carnival
at the Constans Theatre tonight and tomorrow night
at 8.
SUPER SOUL: At the Super Show ... with Sly

service project of the year will aid the UF physical
plant division to open Lake Wauburg to Florida
students.

and the Family Stone. Tomorrow at Florida Field,
starting at 4 pm.. .BYOG.
URA: Rabbi Richard Rubenstein will speak
about God after the Death of God, in the Union
Ballroom Sunday at 7:30 pm.
TOLBERT FUN: Action, games, fun, prizes, at
the carnival sponsored by the Tolbert Area Council.
Saturday from 10 am. to 6 pm. Between North
and East Halls in the Tolbert Area, everyone invited.
VET SELECT: The Veterans Club will meet in
room 362 of the Union. There will be nominations
for elections. All Vets invited to attend.
LIVE AGAIN: Is God dead? ... come find out
for yourself. College life meets at the Chi Phi
fraternity house Sunday at 9:13 pm Sponsored
by the Campus Crusade for Christ.
MOVE MEET: SMC meets Sunday at 7:30 pm.
in room 349 of the Union. Plans will be discussed
for the May 29 mobilization and strike, also the
May 16 St. Pete march.



{SNOBS Start
:j f By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
:
Youve Got A Lot To Live, Pepsis Got a Lot
: To Lose.
: Choke Coke.
ji BEER FOR Peace.
ij Stay Free With Ice Tea.
*: These are a few of the slogans the Students
j National Organizations Boycott of Soft Drinks
(SNOBS) made up to dramatize a national
j:| boycott of soft drinks.
THE BOYCOTT is a form of economic
pressure to end the war in Southeast Asia, Bill
Mossman, UFs SNOBS organizer said.
Big businesses are in a position to pressure
the government where it hurts the
pocketbook, Mossman said,
g MOSSMAN AND fellow UF SNOBS are not
boycotting all soft drinks, as the national
j: organization advocates.
We dont want to destroy the Coke
v Company, so we are asking only that people stop
buying Cokes and not all the companys
J products, he said.
SNOBS official release stated there are 7
milhon college students in the United States

Students Write Consumer BUI,
Present It To Florida Legislature

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writar
Students from a UF consumer law class have
written two consumer protection bills and
introduced them into the state legislature, Prof.
Anita Morse, one of the class teachers, said
Thursday.
The first bill, introduced into the house, would
abolish the present holder and due course act.
THE PRESENT doctrine on holder and due
course allows third parties, such as banks, to collect
on notes or contracts which are sold to them by
merchants free of any defenses that the buyer
would have against the merchants, such as a
guarantee or warranty, Miss Morse said.
The second bill, which has been introduced into

'wSiPPw!wiTC;;v3(Pi^Si!?iSwH|w^R:v: S?§*#:33:S:::j:|s|:|:i:^
viv^fegx-vv/xxxvxxxy::::::::::::::-^---^^^
B ;-.,; || jP[ :
r . . *. **-'* 4. > 4> * .. - # *** .*. #,,.

Drink Boycott}
today. This is 20 per cent of the total $
population. c
IT TOOK only 10 per cent to stage the :j:
American Revolution. If we can get half of the >:
college students to participate in the boycott, we >
have an excellent chance for success. ;
Mossman says the SNOBS movement was a
new kind of unifying move. This will show mass
student pressure, power, and concern over an >
issue that we are directly involved in. $
The organizers of SNOBS feel that the past
methods of protesting the war are not useful jjj
anymore. $
ONE OF THE reasons for the governments
deafness has been that we, the young people of $
the United States, have little or no pressure or
power to bear in the governing of this country,
Mossman said. :

By boycotting a national product or
conpany, we can bring pressure to bear on a
person or group of people that have a voice in
the government, he said.
SNOBS are asking all persons against the war :
in Southeast Asia to support the move to
boycott Cokes.
It may seem impossible. But who knows until
we try? Mossman said.

both the house and the senate, is concerned with
door-to-door sales.
It would give consumers a three-day cooling-off
period to rescind sales that are made to them at
their homes or outside of merchants usual place of
business, Miss Morse explained.
ACCORDING TO Miss Morse the law school class
drafted these bills using provisions suggested in the
new uniform Consumer Credit Code (CCC).
No other bills like these have ever been
introduced into the Florida Legislature, although
similar bills have been recently adopted in other
states, such as New York and California, Miss
Morse said.
She added the bills were receiving a great deal of
opposition from lobbyists and would need strong
consumer support to become law.

POW Resolution
Passes Senate

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate
Wednesday night passed a
resolution calling for fair
treatment for American POWs
being held in North Vietnam.
The resolution, the
proponents admitted, could do
nothing directly to aid the
prisoners, but was intended as
part of the nationwide
movement by Air Force ROTC
and other groups to draw
attention to the prisoners
plight. Massive public opinion in
the United States and other free
world nations, they said, can
help and has helped the
prisoners.
THREE BILLS censuring the
UF Athletic Association and
withdrawing Student
Government funds from the
cheerleaders and 1970
Homecoming were introduced,
then withdrawn by the author.
Bill Gilmore, who wrote the
bills, said they will be
introduced again at a later

Wayzgoose Art
Show Canceled
Due to lack of sufficient exhibit interest and funds in general, the
art show scheduled for May 16, called Wayzgoose has been forced
to cancel, according to Celebration 7O spokesman Mel Libby.
Wayzgoose was to be a fine arts and crafts fair which would be held
for the first time on the UF campus during Celebration 70.

Friday, May 18, 1970, Tl Florida AMprtof,

meeting after further study by a
committee.
Other bills passed were
acceptance of the Blue
Cross-Blue Shield bid for student
insurance next year with no
changes in the premium but
added benifits and a bill to
add three new posts to the
presidents cabinet. The added
posts are secretaries of legal
affairs, environmental affairs and
community affairs.
A RESOLUTION censuring
the Florida Alligator for what
was described as minimum
coverage of the current hunger
strike was introduced by
senators Ed Taylor, Bill Gilmore
and Doug Jewett. The bill was
withdrawn after receiving
considerable criticism from the
senate.
Carol Sanger, a senator and
former Alligator executive
editor, said the bill was trying
to dictate the news judgment
and news priorities of a
newspaper.
Sen. Rick Horder said, To
me this sounds like a Spiro
Agnew of the left.

Page 5



Page 6

i, Tlw Florida Alligator, Friday, May 15,1970

Senate Congratulates Miami Students

TALLAHASSEE %
who got a chart |a|er halting, ]
plans of the Umvfe&itr&f Nlkria
to shut down so students could
concentrate on protesting have
been invited to say a few
words to the senate, State Sen.
Richard Stone said Thursday.
We may not want to
commend students just for
attending class, but we should
commend someone that gets a
precedent that students are
entitled to an education,
uninterrupted by any

168 Americans
Die In Indochina
SAIGON (UPI) U. S. headquarters announced Thursday that 168
Americans were killed in Vietnam-Cambodia fighting last week,
highest seven-day toll for U. S. forces in more than eight months.
Military sources said at least 60 Americans were slain in the
Cambodian theater.
THE WEEK ENDING last Saturday marked the first full week of
U. S. participation in the allied thrusts into Cambodia which were
kicked off by South Vietnamese troops April 29.
U. S. forces drove into Cambodia May 1 and reports Thursday said
114 Americans had been killed in the offensive since then.
The casualty communique Thursday on Cambodia-Vietnam action
last week said South Vietnamese losses 863 men killed and 2,259
wounded were the highest since the first week of the Communists'
Tet offensive in 1968 when 1,152 were slain and 3,349 were
wounded.
THE COMMIMQUE said allied forces last week killed 5,898 North
Vietnamese and Viet Cong, heaviest Communist toll reported since
the week ended March 1,1969, when 6,813 were listed as slain.
The U. S. toll of 168 killed and 1,001 wounded compared with 123
killed and 997 wounded the previous week, and was the largest
number reported since the week ended Aug. 30,1969, when 185 were
killed and 1,057 were wounded.
Through last Saturday, according to U.S. record, 41,901
Americans have been killed in the Vietnam War in a period dating
back to Jan. 1,1961.
At least 100,569 South Vietnamese soldiers are listed as killed in
the same period and the allies say overall Communist losses stand at
636056 killed.
11 10% OFF
ENTIRE STOCK
We have just received a nes stock of Pets and Pet
Supplies for your loving pleasure.
We invite you to come buy and see our most
complete selection ever. And for doing so, we wffl
give you 10% off any item pruchased, 'excluding
items reduced for clearance! HuHj
BUT HUftRYt SALE ENDS SATURDAY
KMbhevitdalevafaryeunt p-

demJ|stration, right or left,
thejjniami
'interview. eR I BNR
HE HAS ASKED Dr. Arthur
Cohen and George Kokus, the
law students that obtained the
Circuit Court injunction, to be
guests in the senate Monday.
An aide said Stone also would
welcome other nonmilitants
interested in attending
including a group of 1,700
persons, signing themselves as
citizens and taxpayers, who
wired Senate President John

THEY KEPT THE SCHOOL OPEN

Mathgws that they
i protect, the apparent dict|p|m
ot I feW militant students at Bur
state universities, and urged
that state officials recognize the
rights of the people who pay the
bills for the universities.
THE TELEGRAM, signed by
Joseph A. Mandni and bearing
signatures of 1,700 others, came
from Wauchula, and urged an
investigation of the sources of
these disturbances.
The University of Miami is a
private institution, but the state
subsidizes its medical school to
the tune of over $1 million a
year.
Stone introduced Thursday
for senate action Monday -a
resolution that congratulates
Cohen and Kokus for

I
Master Charge
JH Bank American! V
JB or 1
ffcgj
Who* Does It Take To Make A Young Floridian Happy? I
PCOOTER ... I
** BUS t 0 ** Lindse V in the Gainesville Shopping Center I

resolutely defending higher
education land pro'£io|i|fe the
general \wffj&:e r> of {seople df
Florida and the United States.
IN GOING INTO court, the
resolution says, the students
demonstrated initiative, a sense
of duty and courage.
This is the first precedent in
the United States where a
student has gotten a court to
rule that because he has a
contract and has paid tution, a
university cannot for political
reasons close down and deprive
him of his right to an education
every day, Stone said.
Stone, an attorney, said the
university is appealing the
decision and it will probably go
all the way to the U. S. Supreme
Court.

Co-sponsors of the resolution
\jJWStone are Sens. John
*Broxibn, D-Milton, and William
D. Barrow, D-Crestview.
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
BARBER % STYLE SHOP
3 Roffler Stylists
5 Barbers
Roffler Sculpture
Kut for longer hair
Hair straightening
and relaxing
6 to 8 week guarantee
Capiloscope Free
Analysis of hair and
scalp problems
1620 W. University Ave.
373-1195



UPI Around
- II" -<:
... The World
INDOCHINA Saigon The South Vietnamese began another push
into Cambodia with U. S. logistical support and were reported 10
miles inside the border in the Central Highlands. The U. S. Command
in Saigon said 168 Americans were killed and 1,001 were wounded in
Cambodia last week, highest U. S. casualties in eight months.
LONDON The Soviet Union has proposed to Peking that they
close ranks and establish a joint Indochina policy to pressure
American withdrawal from Southeast Asia, authoritative diplomatic
sources said Thursday.
Moscow also asked Communist China to allow unhindered stepped
up Soviet arms shipments to North Vietnam, they said.
Le Duan, the North Vietnamese Communist party chief and virtual
successor to Ho Chi Minh, has been traveling between Moscow and
Peking the past 10 days, carrying the Kremlins plan and Pekings
counterproposals.
PARIS United States says it shall act accordingly if
Communists continue to stall peace negotiations and intensify
Vietnam attacks.
MOSCOW Cuban Defense Minister Raul Castro left for home
Wednesday, ending a months visit to the Soviet Union.
... The Nation
WASHINGTON Defense Secretary Melvin R. Laird and top
presidential adviser Henry Kissinger conferred Thursday with Senate
Republicans in an effort to head off a burgeoning move to prevent
President Nixon from spending any more money for war activities in
Cambodia.
Laird and Kissinger were accompanied to a closed meeting of the
Republican members of the Senate by Undersecretary of State Elliot
Richardson.
WASHINGTON Spokesmen for direct mail advertising,
sometimes referred to by critics as junk mail, contended Thursday
their product is not merely socially acceptable but is, in fact,
welcome and wanted in the majority of American homes.
SAN FRANCISCO The president of the American Society of
Newspaper Editors said Thursday Vice President Spiro Agnews
attacks on the news media were a calculated campaign to weaken
the credibility of the press.
DETROIT Ford Motor Co. has turned down the Soviet Unions
request to help build the worlds largest truck factory in Russia,
Henry Ford 11, board chairman, said today.
Fords announcement at the annual stockholders meeting came two
days after Defense Secretary Melvin Laird told a meeting of the
Detroit Economic Club he was opposed to exporting American
Technology to the Soviet Union while they are sending trucks to
North Vietnam.
COLUMBIA, S.C. Police Wednesday began arresting youths
accused of taking part in the ransacking of a University of South
Carolina building Monday, sparking two nights of clashes with
National Guardsmen.
Gov. Robert E. McNair appeared on a statewide television network
with a promise to keep the campus open against the actions of those
with a strong determination to see the university closed.*
WASHINGTON Georgia Sen. Herman E. Talmadge advised the
Nixon Administration Thursday the Senate is not ready to go along
with a guaranteed annual income.
In advising the administration to rewrite some of the fundamental
premises of its welfare reform program Talmadge said it would
establish, by an act of Congress, the principle of a guaranteed annual
income.
He proposed an amendment changing the name of the bill from
The Family Assistance Act of 1970 to The Welfare Expansion
Act.
. The State
TALLAHASSEE lts common horse-sense that you can sell
more prestige at $lO than at $20, Sen. Verle Pope remarked
Thursday as senators wrestled with the problem of how much to
charge for an auto license tag with the owners name on it.
Pope, a St. Augustine Democrat, lost the argument and final vote
was for a charge of S2O in addition to the regular price of a tag.
TALLAHASSEE The head of the Florida Education Association
threatened today to go to court to void Gov. Claude Kirks executive
order banning collective bargaining by public employes.
Folk MASS? I
Sunday, May 17 Y~f J
| (
Voly Trinity Episcopal Church£ O
U 6 MX Ist St. tNursvy provided.) | v

GAINESVILLE MALL, 2546 N.W. 13th Street
I THE IN-FASHION STOREI
m iif > m w .jibhiihb
m ME. me
Bt IBiM* JWPBwC I
si
m Jinii CPI
k *1 M 111 i i VMH '
8 : B \ I
'' % >r WBBm
xfy v l|gj
L*§
£l%p x
* : y k > -v'
. jjj| j '**' t % i m
PHIL COPE I
COOL COMFORT
OUR NO-CARE POLYESTER SLACK I
COLLECTION IS THE GREATEST.
SEVERAL STYLES AVAILABLE IN I
WHITE, RED, NAVY, LAVENDER, BROWN
OR BLACK. I
CO-ORDINATE IT WITH A PRINT SHEER
MIDRIFF BLOUSE FOR COOL COMFORT I
& MINIMUM CARE I
SLACKS 8.99 & UP

Friday, May 15,1970, Tha Florida AMfMor,

Page 7



Page 8

I, Tin Florida AlilptOf, Friday,* May IS, ffr7o

The
Florida
Alligator

The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Nixon Holds Plans

WASHINGTON It may b$ denied because of
the anti-war ferment, but President Nixon has on his
desk detailed contingency plans calling for U. S.
ground troops to cross into North Vietnam if
Hanoi should attempt to break through the
demilitarized zone.
This daring move is part of the military action
that possibly would be taken if the North
Vietnamese should threaten the orderly withdrawal
of American troops from South Vietnam. The
President is prepared to conduct elaborate,
Cambodian-style forays across the North
Vietnamese border to knock out enemy
conmunications, supply and staging centers.
This is what he must have had in mind, say
insiders, when he told a press conference last week:
If the North Vietnamese did what some have
suggested they might do move a massive force of
250,000 to 300,000 across the DMZ against our
Marine Corps people who are there I would
certainly not allow those men to be massacred
without using more force and more effective force
against North Vietnam.
Later in the press conference, he added
significantly that the Cambodian action puts the
enemy on warning that if it escalates while we are
trying to de-escalate, that we will move decisively
and not step by step.
The intensity of the anti-war protests, however,
may deter the President. Those who consulted with
him on the Cambodian operation say he was
prepared to take bolder action if the public-opinion
polls had showed he had popular support.
Conversely, the anti-war frenzy has stunned the
President and may persuade him to pull his punches.
Another military move that has been taken up
with the President is a thrust into Laos to cut off
the North Vietnamese supply lines that wind
through Laos down the Ho Chi Minh network of
trails. But this proposal has been largely ruled out,
say insiders, because of the difficult terrain and the
dubious prospects.
Meanwhile, it is apparent that the Cambodian
action isnt going to destroy COSVN, the supreme
communist military headquarters, which the
President said was the primary target of the
invasion.
The President is furious with the Joint Chiefs for
misleading him about the possibility of destroying
COSVN. They visualized the enemy command
center, apparently, as a jungle version of their own
elaborate, Pentagon-style headquarters. Their
attacks upon the communist infra-structure, they
felt, had largely destroyed the underground network
and compelled the North Vietnamese to return to
conventional logistics.
But other intelligence specialists had warned the
COSVN, like a floating crap game, could be folded
up quickly and re-established later in some other
jungle hideout. The communists guerrilla style of
warfare, not unlike that used by our own
forefathers to wrest independence from the British,
still confounds those who fight by the book.

it I i llllw A /B7 I

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors

Kerry Dupree
Advertising Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Mike Davis
Business Manager

Merry-Go-Round
by Jack Anderson
Campus Agitators Secret films of the recent
violence on some campuses reveal that the hard-core
militants, who shouted the loudest for blood,
quietly pulled back when the violence erupted.
These professional agitators, apparently, are adapt
at ducking out on the the violence they stir up. In
this way, they can avoid arrests and move on to
other campuses. Only the suckers get hurt.
- Troop Withdrawals President Nixon has
carefully emphasized how many troops he expects
to withdraw from Vietnam, not how many he
intends to leave behind. His secret plans call for
continuing the pullout until the U. S. force is down
to about 60,000 men. They will remain to furnish
air, artillery and logistical support for the South
Vietnamese until a settlement is reached.
Thurmonds Tux Stem, erect Senator Strom
Thurmond, picked up an unexpected anecdote for
the law-and-order speeches he intended to deliver in
South Carolina last week. He packed his tux and an
extra suit and locked them in his car while he
attended a patriotic rally in downtown Washington.
When he returned, thieves had broken into his car
and made off with the Senators fancy tux and suit.
In the Middle Dow Chemical Company, the
object of violent left wing political assault, may also
come under attack by the right wing. Leftwingers
have been demonstrating against Dow because it
manufactures napalm. Now the rightwingers have
learned that Dow Chemicals Japanese subsidiary is
trying to do business with Communist China.
Northern Segregation The Health, Education,
and Welfare Department is quietly preparing to go
ahead with its new mandate to enforce school
integration in the North. J. Stanley Pottinger, the
new civil rights director, has called a conference of
his key people in Denver this month to lay out the
strategy. Meanwhile, 77 per cent of the nations
black children still attend predominately black
schools^

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor

Earl Hartman
Features Editor

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

*' t iii' > ./I ; f f

Alligator Staff ^

James Davis
Assistant Assignment Editor

Chuck Partusch
Assistant
Sports Editor

editorial
Some Reasons
Favoring ROTC
At times the issue with the strongest emotional appeal
has the weakest logical thrust when examined in the cold
light of reason.
Such is the case regarding demands from several groups
that Army and Air Force ROTC be removed from campus.
Os all the demands to come out of last weeks antiwar
protest, the removal of ROTC has the weakest grounding in
reason.
Consider the facts. According to a study conducted at the
UF during 1969, the Air Force requires 8,000 new officers a
year. It draws 5,500 of them from ROTC.
The Army demands are considerably higher. It requires
an average of 30,000 new officers every year and ROTC
supplies an average of 16,500 of them, says Col. Robert M.
Atkins, the officer in charge of Army ROTC at the UF.
One way or another, the Army and Air Force will have
their fresh supply of new officers every year. If it doesnt
come from college campuses, it will come from within the
ranks. While both services have an excellent supply of
enlisted men from which to draw officers, we fear their
orientation is too military for Americas good.
In other words, if the civilian officer element is removed:
from the services, a significant factor in keeping the military
in a semblance of constitutional balance will be eliminated.
Furthermore, we feel the matter comes under that great
abstraction, academic freedom. If a young man wahts to
study military science, he should be free to do so. Why one
student should feel the obligation to tell another student
what to study is beyond our comprehension. If, and
hopefully when, war becomes outmoded, ROTC will die a
natural death. It will, in the vernacular of the day, cease to
be relevant and eventually will be dropped from the
curriculum. Unfortunately military science is as relevant
today as it ever was.
In addition, flailing away at the symbol of evil is a waste
of time, particularity when the symbol is controlled by the
President of the United States. Therefore, make it
incumbent upon him to make war and ROTC irrelevant
studies. A good way to do that would be to restrict his
powers as commander-in-chief and/or support moves in the
Senate to deny funds for the war.
The cold light of reason, too, provides means for ending
the war.
M I m \ JM L
9 ivfkJtiW I I ¥l/1 iffti
1 \ ytnM\ f v/f "Ir
m. I f: f |\ U : liWkW
. , u V Iftflt I |i 1 : IBs
' | Ift Ift I i|-
ft -: v § : -. |I I
'ft |v| | r
B\B ': i f B 1111 l
>, ft v- V '*s.' jfti fRI | 11
- t *Hii Hi?
lli 1 !Vm SB 188
-11 111 JHh| ft

Craig GoWwyn
Sports Editor

Fred Voilrath
Wire Editor

Jeff Brain
Editorial Assistant

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the I lorida Alligator are those ol
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of I lorida.



Movement Left

The significance of last weeks
strike will only became fully
apparent in the coming weeks. I
dont want to speculate on
results here except to note that
mass radicalization which has
swept the rest of the nation and
much of the world has finally
come to Gainesville.
What I would like to discuss is
the shortsightedness and
ineptness and, even possibly,
irresponsibility of the Alligators
editorial policy regarding the
events last week.
THE STRIKES EXISTENCE
was at first ignored by Alligator
editorials. They told us instead
about Memorial Day even
though, as Ken Megill said, we
know its Strike Day.
I wont linger on last weeks
editorials. It isnt that they were
good or bad. They simply missed
the point that a great social
upheaval was underway and
concentrated on the most
miniscule aspects of the strike.
Die two editorials I which to
concentrate on are Mondays
and Tuesdays.
MONDAYS PIECE is of the
worst sort. Apparently the
writers, fair-weather liberals,
were appalled that, in a time of
social crises, someone should
talk of revolution or that strikers
had long hair.
One of the strengths of the
antiwar movement has been its
non-exclusionary nature. We
dont particularly care if
someone is a wildly flailing
frizzle-haired rebel
(as the editorial writers
apparently do). We dont even
care if they have a crew-cut.
What tactics does this
editorial use? Lets take one
quote: We dont know whether
the militant, and obvious
revolutionists in the group of

MR. EDITOR:
The following letter is my personal
response as a Strike Committee member
to the totally irresponsible, ill-conceived
and misleading editorial titled Anarchy
Fun? in the May 11 issue of the
Alligator.
You state we didnt know we had
been supporting revolution by supporting
involvement. At no point during the
strike did the Strike Committee allude to
revolution. If you bothered to read the
statement we sent to the Alligator, our
goals were concretely stated: the removal
of guns and ROTC from the campus and
compliance with the demands of the
Black Student Union.
You then go on to say hard-core
strikers want to continue their collective
ego trip by marching on the university
police station demanding guns off
campus. The strikers were concerned
LETTERS POLICY
Lattsrt must:
Be-typed, signed, double geeed and
notumadjTOOwgrihoigaus ssbno'
Not be rigned with e pseudonym. Jl( c
t Have add re was and telephone numbers
Names will be withheld only Iff writer
mows Just eeuse. The editor reserves the
right to edit aH letters for *mm.
Writers may submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be ooiwMwd for use
as "Speaking Out" eolumns. Any writer
hrtsrsstad in submitting a regular column Is
dead to contact the editor and be prepared
to show samples off his work.

strike leaders were genuine UF
students or not. We havS i
ih THIS, OF COURSE is the old
red-herring, the menace of the
outside agitator.
The strike produced its own
leaders. It was initiated by a
group of UF vets and led by
students, faculty and staff
throughout.
The best that can be said of
the outside agitator though is
an archaic ivory tower
concept of the university.
And if one speaks of outside
influence, I can only remind the
writers of this editorial that the
Pentagon has a whole building
on campus full of people who
exercise outside influence.
ALSO, I ASKED the writers
just who they suspected of being
a non-student. Their answer was
to point to photos of people
they didnt recognize. Did they
really expect to be able to
identify every one of 3,000 or
4,000 people on strike?
The only person positively
identified as a non-student was a
UF graduate now employed by
the university, a real outsider.
One final note. The primary
writer of this editorial was not
an Alligator staff member
although he was, formerly, a
managing editor. An outside
agitator.
ABOUT THE REQUEST
FOR AMNESTY, which
Mondays writers find strange.
The object of the strike was to
involve as many people as
possible i n antiwar activity.
Hence, it is not so strange we
should request amnesty since
one of the most likely ways the
administration or backward
professors could hope to break
the strike would be through
academic reprisal.

Who's Ego Tripping?

Fair Weather Liberals

students willing to miss class and to
assemble and demonstrate at the police
station. You, on the other hand, are
content to stay behind your typewriter.
Whos ego tripping?
For your next allegation you state,
good serious revolutionaries don't ask
for amnesty when they take over
buddings. Revolutionaries would never
have wasted time occupying Walker
Auditorium, they would have blown up
Tigert. Some professors have been giving
failing grades to those who struck last
Thursday and Friday. It is for cases such
as these that we have asked amnesty.
You then proceed to advise the student
body that petitioning through the
proper channels is the best way to get
guns off campus. Did you ever ask a
member of the Black Student Union what
happened to their unanswered letters in
the Alligator and their petitions?
Not satisfied with the above, you state,
no ones going to listen to a wildly
flailing frizzle-haired rebel. Since my
hair is frizzled, I assume you include me.
With the above refutations,! submit it is
you who is wildly flailing and
hopelessly out of touch with the student
body whom you are supposed to
represent.
Calling the strike leaders
revolutionists when they work to get
some sort of response to student
demands, calling strikers ego trippers,
praising proper channels long-proved
unfruitful and arguing against amnesty

In Tuesdays editorial, a week
late, it is finally admitted a new
student militancy has arrive.
(Or, is this ten years late?)
The entire message of this
editorial is to applaud the
removal of the struggle from the
streets back to established
phannpk **
IT IS INCREDIBLE to me
that the author does not realize
that the only reason any
progressive gains have been made
on this campus is because of
mass action in the streets. And
the only reason that our
demands will be met is because
OConnell knows we will go
back out again.
The so-called incidents that

Keep Right

You have your Silent Majority, and we
were able to put 100,000 people in the streets of
Washington with three days notice, a leader of the
student Left told me last Sunday.
We got 5,000 people to demonstrate against the
war on this campus and the Right couldnt mobilize
20, right on.
He was correct.
Since the Goldwater Movement in the early
1960 s the student Right on this campus hasnt
mustered the ability to organize a game of solitaire.
This must change and it must change now.
The student Right can no longer afford to hide
behind Richard Nixons eupherism for apathy,
ignorance and lack of conviction. I refer to the most
overpraised group in the country, the Silent
Majority.
The luxury of silence can no longer be tolerated.
The time has come to stop hiding behind the
administration and the police.
The Left does not own this campus. They do not
own the streets. They do not have a monopoly on
issues and demands to be made on the direction of
this country.
But, what do you expect us to do? asked a
conservative friend of mine. Do you expect us to

Right Must Act

for students makes it appear that you are
either: incompetent in representing
student views or are a mouthpiece for the
administration.
Considering that you were chosen
against the wishes of the past editorial
staff in the first place, I call for both a
new editor and a new means of choosing
him, so that he will better represent the
student body.
LARRY WOLDENBERG, 7AS
Understand
MR. EDITOR:
So this is what it's come down to.
Disarming the campus police, removing
ROTC, the Black Student's demands, the
Cambodian involvement, even the
the small society

A THINK VJ&'LL eVBK s.J< noqi
We ONLY
/riff/ rip / / IMv/APe
W>l <|H 'I *> Mr s!£

marred our campus last week
are the only reason Steve
Uhlfelder has the bargaining
power to pursue achievement of
the strikers demands.
The editorial speaks of the
point of a gun (referring to
the strikers) as contrasted to
maturity on the part of
Uhlfelder. 1 can only remind the
author that Steve was an active
and valuable participant in the
strike and the only attempt at
violence did not come from the
strikers. It came from
OConnell's campus police who
charged the demonstrators
leaving Walker. Only some rather
quick thinking faculty managed

Friday, May IS, 1970, Tha Florida AHigrtor,

get out there in the streets with them? Do you
expect us to go parading around this campus or hold
rallies in the Plaza of the Americas?
Yes I do.
Most conservatives don't speak out because they
are afraid they don't have any support. They feel
isolated and alone because all they ever hear or see
is the Left.
Through our inaction we have permitted the Left
to seize the issues, the time, the place, the initiative
and the ground rules for confrontation.
When the time comes for a policy decision to be
made the student Right is never consulted because
our opinion doesn't count.
The Left is well organized and experienced in the
art of public demonstrations.
We are not.
But, inaction in the past is no excuse for inaction
now. I propose the student Right get together in a
broad coalition to present effective organized
peaceful opposition to the Left.
It will not be easy.. Our first efforts will not be
impressive compared to the Left, but they have
been at it for years and we have not. Existing
conservative groups must serve as a nudeous to
serve as an organizational rallying point.

FORUMt
( Aim mi Dtrtttf J
hope for the

women's liberationists had their demands
and arguments to flaunt. Oh, let's all pick
a bandwagon and jump on it!
I'm sorry, but right now I feel just a
little too sick to join all you rah-rah
people. You go ahead and do what you
feel is important, but if you don't mind I
think 111 lag behind for just a bit, sit in a
quiet place, and meditate for a long time
about death, and killing, about how one
can point a gun at someone, and shoot
him and not really think too hard.
I guess what I'm trying to say is that
four kids are dead, at random, still. IH
walk through the darkness with you,
silent and carry a candle, and cry with
you or alone, but please, for all this other
stuff, go ahead if you want to, I'd like to
tarry a bit longer and think. Some friends
of mine are dead, and I don't understand.
JAMES C. FISH
-by Brickman

-By John Sugg

to stop the police (it was
claimed to. be a mistake).
O'Connell's comments about a
threat of violence were a
complete fabrication unless he
intended to perpetrate the
violence.
As an Alligator staffer, I am
distressed at a couple of things.
It's not so much the opposition
to the strike but the nature of
the opposition. The use of
innuendo, the attempt to divide
the strikers' force (Uhlfelder vs.
assorted immature, rabid,
irrational revolutionaries), etc.
are simply backing away from
the problems that confront this
campus and society.

By Fred Vollrath

Page 9



Page 10

>, The Fieri* AH4frtor, Friday, May 15,1*70

Orange and

ADDftlsC CALE N |
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING will be held on
Thursday, May 21 at 130 p.m.
in Room 235, Tigert Hall.

Library Schedule
Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
Collage Library* Bam-11 pm Bam -11 pm 2pm -11 pm
Research Library Bam -11 pm Bam -11 pm 2 pm-11 pm
PKY Lib. of Florida History 8:30 am -5 pm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Special Collections 8:30 am 5 pm B:3oam-12N Closed
Architecture & Fine Arts Library Bam spm
Arch. 8t Fine Arts Building 7pm lO pm Bam l2 Npm
Chemistry Library Bam spm 9am l2 Npm spm
216 Leigh Hall 7pm -10 pm Ipm- 4pm 7pm-10 pm
Education Library
_ 341 Norman Hall 8 am -10:30 pm** 9 am 5 pm 2pm 10:30 pm
Engineering & Physics Library Bam- 5 pm 9am -12 N 2pm- 5 pm
410 Engineering Building 7pm lO pm Ipm 4 pm 7pmlo pm
Health 8i Phys. Ed. R. R. Bam spm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6 pm-10 pm*** Bam -12 N 7pm-10 pm
Health Center Library ~
LlO2 Med. Science Bldg. 8:30 am -12 M 8:30 am -5 pm 2pm -12 M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall Bam ll pm Bam spm 7pm ll pm
Journalism & Communications R.R. Bam spm
337 Stadium 7pm lO pm*** Bam l2 N
Law Library
Holland Law Center 8 am llpm 8 am llpm 8:30 am llpm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School)
Yonge Bldg. F. Bam 4pm Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Office 8 am 5 pm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam l2 N 2pm spm
6 pm 10 pm 6 pm 10 pm
Ipm spm
The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday nightsfrom 11 p.m. l2 M.
** The Education Library closes at 6:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
*** The Reading Rooms dose at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.

I better business 4 ways
1 Like bringing the product or service to And like making business more responsive
1 the student. We help thousands of to the needs of their customers. We help
I students find what they want through them to find out what the student wants,
advertising.
I Advertise in the Florida Alligator.
I Like uniting the academic and business
1 communities. The two worlds most If you've got something to offer...so do we.
students live in come together on our
I pages.
I Like letting the student compare before Florid ft
he chooses. We help students plan their AIJ jofQ,tOF
I time and expenses. We help them save
I money. An ACP-rated All-American College Daily

mggZSi BPMfcfeXfIVIA,
I J y / Or any of the Bahamian "Out Islands"
W /t
Check with your travel agency V |\ H/fi S
vSbr how inex P ensive this vacation can be \s\m\//Zv S
1\ Jm ML if We 11 s* x you up with a vacation loan.
6AIMSV.ILILE. pi-QRIIjf, piWfUS

BLUE BULLETIN

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE
EXAMS' deadline is Friday, May
22. Graduate students need to
apply in the office of the
appropriate Foreign Language
Department to take the exam to
be administered on May 30.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Friday
Union Movie, Brotherhood,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Veteran* Club
Meeting, Nomination of
Officers, all Veteran*
welcome, 361 Union, 7:30
pm
Swim Fins Swim Club Annual
Show, "Let Us Entertain
You," Florida Pool, 8:00
p.m.
Florida Players: 'Thieves'
Carnival," Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Rathskeller: ''Ewing Street
Times," 9:00 & 11:00 p.m.
Saturday
Catholic Student Center Tubing
Party, Itchetucknee River,
10:00 a.m.
SPG: Super Stadium Show, "Sly
and The Family Stone" &
Others, Florida Field, 4:00
p.m.
Union Movie, "Brotherhood,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Florida Players: "Thieves'
Carnival," Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
American Society of Civil
Engineers Meeting, 349
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Rathskeller: "Ewing Street
Times," 9:00 & 11:00 p.m.
Sunday
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:00 p.m.
University Religious Association,
Rabbi Richard Rubenstein,
"God After the Death of
God," Union Ballroom, 7:30
p.m.
Union Classic Film Series,
"Torment," Union Aud.,
7:00 8t 9:30 p.m.

Campus
Calendar

Monday
Union Movie, "Sympathy for
the Devil," Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 8t 10:30 p.m.
Miss U. of F. Semi Final Beauty
Contest, Union Ballroom,
7:00 p.m.
Block & Bridle Club, Ralph
Cullen, Jr., "Politics in
Agriculture," 349 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Cicerone* Meeting, 122 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Science Fiction Book Exchange
& Fan Club Meeting, 357
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday
Children's Ballet Lessons, C 4
Union, 3:00 p.m.
"Sympathy for the Devil,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
362 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Modem Jazz Dance Lessons, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:30 p.m.
University Stamp Club Meeting,
Doyle Connor Bldg., 7:30
p.m.
Engineering Dames Meeting,
Univ. Women's Club,
Newberry Rd., 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: Music for
Trumpets, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: Florida
Players, $.75, SI.OO & $1.50.
Sly and The Family Stone,
$5.50.



ATOR CLASSIFIEDS

AKC German Shepherds, 8 weeks
old, superb pedigree linebred Odin &
Pfeffer, excellent temperament &
conformation for breeding. Show and
Pets. Females, Black w /cream,
SIOO.OO Mrs. "Scott, 2246 N.W.
Magnolia Road, Ocala. 629-4177.
(A-136-10t-p)
Big sale Chest sls; Zenith TV S4O;
rugs; lamps; linens; appliances; ladles
clothes (9-10); picture frames; movie
camera 372-7240; 306 N.E. 3rd
Avenue. (A-st-137-p)
For sale: 1968 Kawasaki 650 twin if
Interested call 378-0491 after 5:00
p.m. and ask for Kevin. (A-139-st-p)
PHOTOGRAPHERS! Nikon
Equipment 2 months old, Need Cash
Fast. Call 392-7387. (A-st-137-p)
Pellex f 1.4 complete w/accessory
lens & cases. 200mm and 35mm
S4OO or best offer. Call 372-5516.
(A-10t-138-p)
Need bread badly, stereo good sound
new diamond needle S7O also stereo
tape recorder Arvln + parts also
double bed best offers 373-1979 Bill.
(A-st-137-p)
Trailer 30 x 8 new furniture, rugs and
water heater. Must see to believe.
3301 SW Rocky Point Road Lot 27
B 378-6443 for Information. $725.00
(A-139-3t-p)
8 x 34 Aluminum trailer on shaded
lot In student park. Has large
screened porch and 8 x 10 cabana.
Alr-conditloned, clean, $1,150.
376-8082. (A-139-3t-p)
'69 CA 160 Honda electric tools,
helmet, manuals drafted must sell
weight set also 373-2173.
(A-st-139-p)
Mesh side playpen,3 bookcases,stone
coctall/end table, washing machine,
TV stand, TV antenna, S 30' Mast,
Polaroid J 33, Yashlca Mat Reflex
378-1109. (A-4t-139-p)
Refrigerator, 12 cu. ft., 2 dr, lfe yr.
old, Gibson auto-defrost, $165. Grad.
June and moving Into sum. apt. Call
372-0311. (A-st-138-p)
Distinctive 1968 AMX. 390,4-speed,
air, stereo tape, other extras. Must
sell, going camping $2,300. Call
376-1853 evenings. (A-st-140-p)
KAWASAKI 500 *7O. I want to sell
or trade for VW bus. Cycle In good
shape Light but powerful. Call J.
M. after 7:00 pm at 392-8821.
(A-3t-140-p)
Lady Yamaha 50cc Uke new, only
750 ml. Elec, start Auto, clutch. See
at 304 SE 3rd St. North apt. 5 9
pm $lB5. Easy and fun to drive.
(A-st-140-p)
Honda CB 160, Just tuned up, High
and low bars, other extras, S3OO. Call
Pat, 372-7789 or 3 9 2-9842.
(A-2t-140-p)
1969 Triumph 650 excellent
condition SBSO call Mike at
378-3587. (A-2t-140-p)
1969 Triumph 500 cc Twin cylinder,
4,800 miles, SBSO, 378-8884 student.
(A-4t-140-p)
REALLY. These fuzzy puppies are
lovely I Ma and Pa are both handsome
collie-shepherd mixtures. Call
378-0118, then come and see!
(A-st-140-p)

HE- ; ;.

:sf FOR SMfiLJU *=:
For sale: Surfboard: Petrillo Pintail
only S4O. Honda 250 Scrambler
S3OO. Call 373-1249. (A-2t-140-p)
NEVER used anything like It, say
users of Blue Lustre for cleaning
Carpets. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-ts-c)
Dual showman amp top clear, towe
$175 1932 Ozark Guitar S4O 62
Peugot Sedan $175 also records and
other things call 376-9066.
(A-139-st-p)
Trailer 8 x 42 $1,200, 8 x 35 SI,OOO,
8 x 30 SBOO rented trailer SSO
monthly Income only SI,OOO
378-0226 376-6831 Lot B Archer
Village. (A-st-141-p)
Such a deal! 69 Honda Scrambler!
350, exc. cond. $595 or best offer.
Inch helmet tools lnsurance.
Call 378-6949 before 5 PM or
anytime Sat. (A-lt-141-p)
3 br. lVz bath 10 x 56 fur. trailer 1
br. fixed as study washer clothes
line fenced lot cable TV ln
park with pool AC 376-8517.
(A-st-141-p)
69 Bultaco 250 3 months old 800
speedo miles street fairing perfect
condition owner has expensive habit
list price 850 will sell 470. 1015 N.E.
3rd St. 376-5632 after 5.
Mojave 250 Custom seat tank new
piston rings and electricals low
mileage. New 600. Need cash 3OO.
372-8933. BILL. (A-3t-141-p)
Awal tape recorder, 4 track-stereo,
runs on batteries, car lighter, or 110
v. or 220 v AC. 7 Inch reel, int. spks.
$95.00. Call 378-6247 after 5:00 PM.
(A-st-141-p)
Diamond engagement ring 1/3 carat.
Perfect must sell II Call 373-2277
for details (evenings). (A-3t-141-p)
FOR RENT
Sublease at 1716 NW 3 Ave. apt
Move In June 13th. Only $96/month
one bedroom alr/heat. Perfect
for young marrleds close to
campus 372-2257. (B-st-137-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfort*#*
apts. With la walking distance of
campus. A/C, l-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
1 n i mi .i '. %
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
summer qtr. Share house 2 blocks
from campus With 2 coeds pvt. room,
A/C, Call 378-6548. (B-st-137-p)
Sublet: 1 bdrm. furnished apt. June
through August. French Quarter. AC,
pool, Call 376-4165 after 5:00,
392-C5lO weekdays. (B-st-137-p)
Modern 1 br. apt. beautifully
furnished AC, dishwasher, pool.
Available June 12 $l4O/mo Just off
campus Mt. Vernon Apt. Call after
6:30 p.m. 378-0260 (B-5M38-P)
Male roomate wanted to share one
bedroom French Quarter apartment
in September for the 70-71 school
year. The senior premedical student
wants a non-smoker only. Rent Is
S7O. a month. Call 376-0428.
(C-3t-137-p)

The Rolling Stones +
Jean-Luc Godard +
Black Militants+
White Fascists+
The Revolution =
Sympathy For The
Devil (1 +1)
i/iorvi .ar
(DON'T MISS IT THIS TIMED
MON. MAY 18
TUES. MAY 19
5:30,8:00,10:30 pjn.
apomortd by JWRU

Friday, May 15,1970, The Florida Alligator,

FOR REjWT
"Air-conditioned, 2 bedroom, quiet,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6.
Avail. June 1. (B-7t-138-p)
Room MALE FEMALE carpets TV
Air kitchen liberal yet quiet. Summer
or fall see 5 to 6 PM or Call 392-0700
or 378-0286 1204 NW 3 Ave.
(B-st-138-p)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students*
*ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities Included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1229
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
Groovy no. 69 2 bedroom
Williamsburg apt. for summer,
furnished, AC, pool, dishwasher,
carpeted, near Med Center really
sharp, Call 373-2352. (B-136-6t-p)
2 br. sum. apt. for summer fun, AC,
pool, rsvd. pkg; quiet, upstairs, beaut,
view, spacious, Avail. June 1, VIII.
Park, 86; 372-1114. (B-st-139-p)
Sublet for summer or longer 1
bdrm. A/C, pvt. patio, furnished,
slls/mo Village 34, no. 27, Call
378-7000. (B-139-st-p)
House in the country, sublease, 3
bedrooms, AC 3V2 acres of forest, 5
min. from school, $125 per month
378-2809 1560 NW 29 Rd.
(B-139-st-p)
DRAFTED!!!III MUST sublet for
summer qtr. A 2 bdr. apt. reg.
$l9O/mo. BUT for you $l6O/mo.H
S9O off, just for you. Tanglewood.
378-7212. We only did It for you!!!!!
(B-lt-140-p)
Sublease for summer 2 room apt.
furnished IV2 blocks from campus
call between 8 AM noon
S4O/month 378-9627. (B-st-140-p)
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more Information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p)
1 BR furnished AC apt. 2 blocks
from campus. Sublet summer
quarter. $95/mo. Includes utilities.
Call 376-1331. (B-st-140-p)
Live It up this summer. Sublet 1
bdrm. French Qtr. apt. no. 38 choice
location, right on pool. Call
378-8980 after 5 PM. (B-3t-140-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-C)
Need male roommate for summer
University Gardens alr-cond., carpet,
pool, etc. Only $45/month + V 2
utilities Call 378-6743. (B-3t-140-p)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen/
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372-7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)

I SUNDAY--MAY 17-1 P.M. |ftflf||A D PaSQ I
M (practice at 11 am.) liflUiU RaCftS Jm
I NEWLY EXCAVATED TRACK LOCATED /£]
. A i DIRECTLY BEHIND THE DRAGON ART Aflffl
A THEATRE. ENTER AT THEATRE FRONT! M
WpQgAINESVILLE GATOR MOTORCYCLE CLUB PRESENTSffI&fIM
ISgP* ACTION! "jM
I I THE BIG BIKES, ROAR £A* I
I > Hhl INTO ACTION! I
I Mhl riders JUMPING AT Q{ W
p UNBELIE\ EABLE HEIGHTS! fflVI
1 :J- jgtgM T - coss M&W!(5! I
! (r^ :s W!r I
M&BB& V Ik If mi Kr .|IW j/' V

Page 11

FOR SALE
Frederick Gardens 1 bed. apt., need
roommate or will sublet. Female,
pool, S6O/mo. Available June 15,
June rent paid. 376-2909 after 5:30.
(B-st-141-p) r
Need 1 or 2 roomates for summer qtr
2 bdrm. AC apt. 1 block from
campus ssO a mo. 373-2317.
(B-2t-141-p)
2 br. furnished AC apt. SBS mo.
Sublet June Ist. 372-4179 anytime.
(B-3t-139-p)
GATOR COURT
376-4667 4170 SW
\ 13th St.
"spend where the
the night... price is right

Playing S
Thru |
: SUE WOOD
m jH I 2 COLOR HITS
NOW showing |
VBHRPPIPIIPiRRinPHg
aam N.W. 13th ST. ACROSS PROM MALL
| JR m PH-372-9523
5 M\ PLUSCO-HIT
AI|CO D ~'£*" i
: a VIIWW WrcddnsCnw!
w m M M m -www

for sale
Need to Sublease 3 bedroom house
Alr-cond., 180 a month; for summer
quarter only 1319 NW 3rd Ave.
(8*139-st-p)
Available June 4, Williamsburg Apt.,
1 BR. t AC, pool, near Med Center.
Will sublet. Call 372-1544 (Call 5 to
7 preferably.) (B-3t-141-p)
Sublet June 1,1 bedroom apt.
central AC ww carpeting, duiet
behind the mall, sllO per month Call
after 5 PM. 373-2889. (B-st-141-p)
[ Guns Guns Guns j
* C Inventory over 500. Buy j
] j Sell Trade Repair, j
( Reloading supplies. Layaway j
( plan. Harry Beckwith, gun l
' [ dealer, Micahopy. 466-3340. 1



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

y ..
SuMmn for summer, on# bedroom
Village 34 apt, $220 for June 16 thru
Aug. 31. Ideal for couple. Call
378*0117 after 4:30 p.m.
(B-139-3t-p)
Sublet summer qt.. Olympia Apts,
next to campus, l bedroom,
furnished, carpet, A/C, summer rates
$95.00 per month. Call 378-6247
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-141-p)

REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM
jRiH SUNDAY MAY 17
7:00, 9:30 P.M.
Admission 50< 'V#*
MBEBjKII = =T
37a 74i Ir | | JKGH
II M*A*S*H is what Ip M
the new freedom pit-i Jf
of the screen lip
is all about." Ami
Richard Schickel, Life ZQ*
ciMiuev
pf *#
LAST S DAYS!
lSs£s£Si \ 11 SUMMER MOVIE CLUB
m-LAui'eTeTl tickets on sale
XZSHIjEMrjk NOW -12 SHOWS $1.50
,,i rnrnTM
gn tniiKmPrni^^
I WITH THE I
1 UNINHIBITED SEVENTIES I
I GOMES (
1 I
so honest
MaliiL- and outrageous
he ought to It
*, I shake up
the p* ace
: K iBIBn Pretty 1
good.
mmm
He's not worried about his
future. He's almost got it made.
When he speaks, you listen.
You wonder about the freaky
things you hear and the
people he raps with.
Then after all is said and
i doneyou'll figure you
1 should tell your uninhibited
friends to go see what
1 you've heard. I
jgflgg xBR
[fISKSm I
k JTjhlyou hear H
1 P^ ffl tHEUWIi In COLOR S
I SiwNEWMAN 1
1 hnodGOULD oumMUIJDAUR wthuwOTOWLEY §
Mtak'SOCViRIKWIWaDNOSMI NtaUMMlina hUOR g§
|| fp|n^sSec

WWTOWWOTOTBSTOOTWWWOCW
Famale wanted for summer $42.00
plus utilities for own bedroom in
house one Mock from campus. Move
in anytime after June 11. Call
378*2828. (C-5M39-P)
Fall qtr. engineering senior needs
three male roommates French Qtr.
$45 per month plus M* utilities each,
call 373-2525 after 7 PM.
(C-2t-140-p)

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 16,1670

Page 12

WANTED #>
One female roommate for summer
quarter. Mount Vernon rent
$5 2.50/month. Air conditioning,
pool, dishwasher, Call Pat 392-7629.
(C-3M41-P)
Needed one female roommate for fall
quarter. Colonial Manor apts. one
block from campus. Call 378-959 Z
ask for Debbie. (C*3t*l4o*p)
Two coeds need apartment,
preferably dose to campus, for fall
quarter only. Call Mara 392*9724,
Gail 376-0738. (C-2t-140-p)
Two Together Keep It that way
A BRIDGE OVER TOUBLED
WATERS. FREE May 14, 21, 28
In the Union at 7:30 (C-136-st-p)
Trailer mate for summer term. Your
own room In new trailer. A/C
$45/mo + Vt util. Grad student pref.
Moblleer Park. 3784775 after 7 PM.
(C-st-141-p)
Female Roommate Wanted Summer
43.00 a month one block from Tigert
air-conditioned, own bedroom call us
at 378-0963 1210 SW 3rd Ave, apt. 8
(C-st-141-p)
2-4 roommates for summer qtr. La
Mancha apt. Pvt. bdrms, 2 bath, 2
blks to campus, pool, AC, laundry,
utilities Inc. Call: 376-6951.
(C-st-141-p)
2 female roommates needed for June
1 Williamsburg 2 bedroom
townhouse A/C, pool,
$52.50/person. Mt. Vernon apt. 11
Call 372-6098. (C-st-141-p)
Poolside! Williamsburg Apt., 2 bd.
furnished townhouse. Wish to sublet
for summer. Call 373-2358 now! All
the conveniences! (C-st-139-p)

I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA j
I ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES' 1
I FRIDAY I
1 LUNCH AND DINNER I
I fish Almondine I
I and French-Fried Potatoes I
_ 89<

I UNDER 18 ONLY MOVIE A fW THE DEFINITIVE EIImIfI
.DREQU.REU BEEN x jDIIUK THE NEWLY-FOUND
WAITING 10 rfkUnUUWK freedom
t-

1 Female needed to sublet Landmark
apt. for summer qtr. (June rent wee
546.25/mo.) Close to the laundry
and pool. Call Maddy at 373-2393 or
373-1192. (C-St-137-p)
38353*833*^
help wanted
Like to sell or would you Hke to try?
How about a job wRh good pay plus
a chance to win Elucatlon Grant. Call
Fuller Brush 378-0121. (E-10t-134-p)
Cocktail waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary will
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dub's
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-125-p)
Need a job? All routes student
operated. Charles Chips Home
Delivery service potato chips,
pretzels, cookies, 376-6943.
(E-10t-137-p)
TUTOR wanted for bright but easily
distracted second grader; reading and
writing. Call 372-4385 after 6 PM to
discuss salary, etc. (E-st-140-p)
2 Experienced smart painters,
gardeners tools furnished also
girt for House Cleaning Beautiful
Lake estate near
Gainesville-permanent. Hours to
suit-prevailing wages. Telephone
533-2381 or write Ri. no. 1, Box 361
Hiway 16 A Starke, Fla. (E-2t-140-p)
Waitress, Coney Island Rest. 210 SE
First St. 372-9288 Must be 21. Full
time. (E-4t-141-p)
Co-ed wanted Room and board in
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 PM. (E-st-138-p)

65 Austin Kealy 3000 SI,OOO 220 SC
7th Street. 378-3631. (Q-st-138-p)
Everyday transportation spadais: We
Also buy dean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(G-ts-C)
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission is a winner
tool TRY IT! Godding and IClartc 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)
1969 VOLKSWAGEN SEDAN 9,000
miles, excellent cond. 1 owner,
visiting faculty member, $1,500 Call
373-2990 before 10 am or after 7
pm. (G-st-141-p)
VW, 1968, Squareback, 22,000 miles,
air-conditioned, excellent condition,
$1,750, Call 378-6029. (G-lt-141-p)
1960 Falcon, radio, heater, new tires,
repainted, engine work. Cheap
dependable transportation. Excellent
condition. 376-2909 after 5:30.
(G-st-141-p)
Mercedes Benz 220 S Sunroof
Bucket-seats, British racing green
Fog-llghts FM-short wave radio must
sell I 1959. $550. Call 392-8729.
(G-5M37-P)
1966 Corvette 427 Air FMAM
radio, Immaculate, 34,000 miles. Call
Bill Baxter 372-9363 PIKE House.
(G-st-137-p)
*64 Corvair, clean 4 speed, radio,
heater, $300; 65 Honda 90 good
condition, Call 378-6017.
(G-139-st-p)
1969 VW Squareback
alr-conditloned. Fine shape $2,200.
1966 Simca sedan good car. $550.
No reasonable offer refused on either
car. 372-1039. (G-st-139-p)
64 Falcoln 4 door, stand, shift, 6
cyllnd., radio, heater, good tires, very
good condition. Clean, cheap, fun.
$475. 3 78-4642 or 376-2248.
(G-3t-139-p)
69 VW bug white w/red Interior
white sldewals like new 12,000 ml. l
yr. warrenty left $2064 new now
SI7OO. Must sell! Call after 5:
373-1654. (G-3t-140-p)
Ford, 1962, Air, R & H, 4 dr. six
white, S4OO, VW Bug, 1968, Air, R &
H, Sunroof, Extras, Excellent car,
$1590, Call 372-2303. (G-3t-140-p)
1963 Rambler FULLY EQUIPPED
RUNS PERFECTLY $399. Call Tom
at 3 73- i 5 73 or 373-2747.
(G-st-140-p)
Xyg?! SQNA 1"
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hair removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrologlst 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent, air
carports awnings add-a-rooms
supplies and accessories. Prompt
and dependable service. DIM Sales
and service 373-1446. (J-10t-130-p)
REWARD for return of contents of
missing suitcase. Lost at comer of 15
St. and 2nd PI. No questions asked.
Call 378-8546. (J-3t-140-p)
Jeng Congradulations BUT there are
407 steps from Yulee to Rawlings
YLS. (J-2t-140-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Congradulatlons to Thota Chi's now
brothers whet away to start
rum Girl Weekend! Hang on to
those pins and have fun. Luck and
Love, Cathey. (J-lt-141-p)
No Union Dance tonight. Sorry.
(j-lt-141-p)
Marsha Sex Isn't the only thing I
love you tool Meet me at A Bridge
over Troubled Waters In Union Aud.
May 21 at 7:30 pm me. (J-st-141-p)
David Sex is beautiful. Let's learn
together. A Bridge Over Toubled
Waters. Union Aud. on May 21 at
7:30 pm Free Mary (J-st-141-p)
Cool 21st sungoddess! Here's to the
best drum-beating tumlp ever. Today
Ed Sullivan, tomorrow the worldl
Vour mother, the Boozer.
(J-141-lt-p)
Is sex love? Find out at A Bridge
Over Troubled Waters in Union Aud.
on May 21 at 7:30 pm.lt's FREE
AND FUN!! (3-5M41-P)
Ride desperately needed to Naples or
vicinity Friday, May IS. Call Anne at
392-7744. (J-139-3t-p)

[ 150
PER CAR J
I 12:06 ...will rip you apart!l
I plus Burt Reynolds Barry Sullivan I
I AT 10:24 ARTHUR KENNEDY SILVIA PINAL I
'BACKTMOr
IN COLOR
I IMHES USURY DOUG McCUIRE *1 I

ADM. $3.00 A 's A
V
t !^,jv\ov
m OAIIV #3-7:00 10:0&\Bj^i l^fl
RHONE SUN. 1,1 SHOW 3:001BHmHB
Persons under 18 now showing
.no passes nor a a mine a playboy
Vllgot Sjomans complete and uncut / #4m Curious (Yellow) is a* PENTHOUSE
remarkable film (which) has been playing for a long time to droves of THEATRES
Swedes, and to several million people almost everywhere. It is the story of nc a 1 icca
a young girl who is, or was, curious about politics, nonviolence, Zen, iocateoatthe
commitment, socialism, other Swedes and, to be sure, sex. It is a serious suburbia drive in
film with a noble theme, and, in dramatic terms, it is original. says Look theatre
mgTlnf N.W. 13th ST. RH. 373-9523
ADMISSION RESTRICTED TO ADULTS acrossfromthe mail

one We'd like to, of course. probably wafting to be 1
restocked (j$; he isn't, tell I
2 But when you only come him to get oh it).
1# out once a quarter, you
have to print enough to Oh, we'll sell out eventually! I
maa last a quarter.
But not until you get yours. I
- And there are still enough n J
nasn ?rS r,0 " d I
sold So if your neighborhood fllfflrtCTly I
bookseller doesn't have I
them in the racks, he's You've got it coming. I

PE R SONATA
iVe

Transcendental Meditation lecture
has been rescheduled for Sunday
17, #t 7:30 p m M at at icture
(J-2t-l40p) fr m Unlver ,ty QHtary.
A frank discussion about marriage.
Married, thinking about It or just
Interested. May 14 A Bridge Over
Troubled Waters. (J-136-st-p)
Free fruit juice for any campus
policeman who comes to the front of
Tigert without his gun on we love
you but not your guns The hunger
strikers. (J-141-6t-p)
LOST To my favorite Scorpio (SAM 17):
Always may the sun shine brightly
for you and the stars guide you, for
you are the reason they shine. You'll
always be the one and only N man
gray hairs included. MTP
(J-st-140-p)
Sex and the spirit in the sky. A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters in
Union Aud. May 21 7:30 pm
FREE FUN INTERESTING FREE
FREE ********* (J-st-141-p)

Friday, May 15,1970, The Florida Alligator,

LOST
Lost: Black wallet near Gym. Need
ID's badly. Please call Chuck
392-8158. (L-139-3t-p)
Wanted: One wild Pook (FF, of
course) Know everything about their
care and feeding. Must have by June.
Already have ID band and cage. SU
(J-lt-141-p)
Found: One tire" kitten grey
with black stripes at met/allurgy
bldg, across from East Hall. Call
392-1451. (L-141-3t-nc)
LOST: May 7. during strike near
Mallory, Men's Accutron watch. I
must have it!!! Call 392-7312
LARGE REWARD ssssssssssss
(L-3t-141-p)
SERVICES
XV.|/.V.V/,V.|.v t v;..^. t .v.v.v.w.v.x*
Alternators Generators Starten
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
- j
Grad student Needs Bread.
Experienced Accurate Typist. .45 per
page Call Lorrle 372-7973.
(M-Bt-140-p)
********** ** Volkswagen **-
********** ******** Parts and
Service********* ***** Gainesville
Mach. Shop ****** ******** 1224
S. Main 376-0710*****
(M-10t-131-p)
Are you fumbling in the dark? A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters will
turn you on! Union Aud. May 21
7:30 pm FREE (M-st-141-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-p)
New Speed Queen Coin Op
Laundry in Sin City. S. W. 16th Ave.
Studnet special. Wash one load, get
second wash free. Offer good Tues.
through Sat. from 3 PM lO PM.
Air-Conditibned. Also Do it yourself
Dry-Cleaning. (M-139-3t-p)
AT THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 cent and 4 cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)
Free inspection*. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372- (M-32-127-P)
Rubys ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th St. 376-8506 Mrs.
Ruby Mills. (M-10M35-P)
Del-Ray typing service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.,
prompt, pick-up delivery,
373- 9-5, (M-st-115-p)

Page 13

REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM 5 3
' '
.* r-gSiM-A IS§| "<*
--?sps : pw
kiss
of
JB dMth
BROTHERHOOD
--IEWIS JOHN CttllNO
IURK DOUGLAS.'*> MARTIN RITT .-MKii I
: .: '?,% .i.: twi -StHift
tS 'PH .00..-.:.
L^~
Friday & Saturday May 15, 16
Admission 50< 5:30, 8:00, 10:30 P.M.
Mtciimf rtrrfr 1
fwTwfynlfi^i^ W Starts TODAY!
ALSNBATKOLffiREED J
GLENDA JACKSON JENNIE LINDEN j
testers msssrsm
j ACADEMY AWARD WINNER I
EXTRAORDINARY... SIMPLY GREAT.
! Maggie Smiths performance is staggering. J
i--.-.--...-.........__-..- a
m S (M ifCii- mmmmimmmmmmm tmm mamm
I HI W. UwjrJrrfty I
ffvi iJ!rtl 1
sumnsr 'nTpoleon
A RCOMAL. FILM NCIKAM TWCHMCOIOR* /w\ 1111 niM IllWn II iin.lWl I
I 1 (AgtlMiiiiaiMi.ylae.Wnma*)
kaaasaaaMHasisap m
A a a Am 9 # V ¥ r ? A 1 A A a a.......* ., .. -



Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 16,1070

ROTC
i
Medals ;
Awarded

Lower Division Course
Evaluation Ready For Fall

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Lower-division course
evaluations will be available to
freshman and sophomores for
the first time in booklet form
this fall.
/
Assistant Chairman Doug
Shachtman of the Course and
Teacher Evaluation program
(C%E), said about 10,000 copies
will be distributed.
THE BOOKLETS will be
made from evaluations teachers
have made or from outside class

j Ijp j $ acce ptj n g applications for
Editor, Managing Editor,
1 'i
Term IV, 1970 Summer Term, Only |
1
Editor, Managing Editor,
Florida Alligator
Terms I& II Fall 1970; Winter 1971 j
' **, i
*
'.V. 7 o' 1
- General Instructions
All applications are to be picked up and returned to Room 330, J. Wayne
Reitz Union between Bam 4 pm.
f Each applicant must return an original plus two clean copies of his application.
§ Applications must be returned prior to 4 pm, FRIDAY, MAY 15.
f Board meeting will be held Thursday, May 21 at 2:304n
f A schedule of interviews will be posted on main bulliffh board in
Room 330, Wednesday, May 20.
LAST DAY-TODAY

Thirty-one ROTC awards were presented to UF cadets
Thursday at 2:30 pm. on the drill field.
Names of the winners were announced Wednesday.
THE AMERICAN Legion Awards for General Military
Excellence were presented to Cadet Col. Thomas Cone, Army
senior gold medal; Cadet Col. Marvin E. Chavis, Air Force
gold medal; Cadet 2nd. Lt:. John Hellrung, Army junior
- silver medal; Cadet CapL John P* Wise Air Force junior
silver medal; Miss Elly Kuypers, Army Sweetheart bronze
medal; and Miss Nancy J. Goldman, Air Force Angel bronze
medal.
Winners of the American Legion Scholastic Awards are Cadet
2nd. Lt. Jeffery Davidson, Army senior gold medal; Cadet Lt.
Col. Pat T. Tidwell, Air Force senior gold medal; Cadet S. Sgt.
Bruce Stone, Army junior silver medal; and Cadet Capt. Roy
E. Thomas Jr., Air Force junior silver medal.
Sophomores selected for outstanding achievements are Cadet
Sgt. I.C. Larry Rodd of the Army, Cadet T. Sgt. Chris J.
Litherland of the Air Force, Army Sweetheart Linda Burr, and
Air Force Angel Michele McCartan.
DAUGHTERS OF American Revolution Awards go to Cadet
Ist. Lt. Richard Wallis of the Army and Cadet Col. Robert L.
Stevenson of the Air Force.
The Reserve Officers Association Award winners are Cadet
Capt. Sterling Close, Army senior gold medal; Cadet Lt. Col.

evaluations by interested
students.
Many teachers have already
volunteered for the evaluation
program," Shachtman said.
If interested students would
ask their teachers if they have
volunteered it would certainly
help us, he said. Then the
student or teacher could call us
at the CTE office and
volunteer.
IF THE TEACHER does not
volunteer an evaluation, students
in the class will be asked to
make out-of-class evaluations.

CTE has been working with
the administration in the
evaluations, but cooperation
may slow down if progress does
not continue faster, he said.
FREDERICK CONNER, vice
president of Academic Affairs,
sent CTE a memorandum
outlining the use of the
evaluations.
Conners outline never
mentioned availability of
evaluations to the public, but
only to administration and
academic heads, Schachtman
said.

Harmon S. Lewis Air Force senior gold medal; Cadet Capt.
Rick Horder, Army senior silver medal; Cadet Capt. Robert J.
Hasko, Air Force junior silver medal.
Cadet Sgt. Peter Lenk, Army sophomore bronze medal and
Cadet T. Sgt. Henry P. Phelps HI, sophomore bronze medal,
also received awards.
xaftv.v !v, .
THE RETIRED Officers Association award for outstanding
performance aj Army summer camp went to Cadet Lt. Col.
Edwin Winoker.
The outstanding junior Air Force cadet was awarded Air
Force ROTC goes to Michael S. Hawkins for achieving a high
scholastic recced.
Recipients of bronze medals from the Sons of the American
Revolution are Cadet Ist. Sgt. Marcy Dupre Army junior, and
Cadet Capt. Dennis R. Furman, Air Force junior.
CADET. LT. COL. John, Army senior, received the annual
gold scholarship key from the American Ordinance Association.
The Association of the United States Army (AUSA) was
presented its ROTC Leadership medal and certificate this year
to Cadet S. Sgt. Michael Edwards, Army junior.
AUSA also presented an award for excellence in military
history to Cadet Sgt. Richard Dobbins, Army sophomore.
Cadet Lt. Col. Mark M. Ely, air science senior, received a
merit award from the Air Force Times.

lost you Contact?
Qato AOs make Contacts!



Rathskeller To Offer Delicatessen

f By PHYLLIS GALLUB
I AHigator Staff Wrtor
I : Lifiwg joH
, j I Delicatessen sandwiches at the
Rathskeller?
I The answer will be yes starting in
September, according to Servomation
director William Overton.
I THE FOOD contract on campus is held
by Servomation. In the past, students
Icould buy food in the main cafeteria line
land bring it into the Rathskeller from 7

WEED REMOVAL UNDERWAY

Contractor Cleans Lake Alice

Lake Alice is beginning to look like a lake again.
After years of being covered by water hyacinths,
the lake surface is again becoming visible due to the
hyacinth removal project now underway.
Buck Johnson, a local contractor, is working with
the UF Plants and Grounds Department to remove
the water weeds mechanically.
This process involves pushing the hyacinths to
shore with air boats, lifting them out with a crane,
and hauling them away in trucks.
THE METHOD IS more expensive and
time-consuming than aerial spraying. However, it is
much more ecologically sound.
Sprayed water hyacinths sink to the bottom.
Their decay depletes the supply of dissolved oxygen
which fish and other aquatic organisms depend on.
The decaying hyacinths stay on the bottom for
decades making the bottom unfit for fish spawning.
This results from the nutrients in the water from

Mi A
CORNER MAIN
WITH PURCHASE OF fjg
MINIMUM V-.-V-£7tY^'v.
15 GAL LONS
STUDENT
SPECIAL FREE CAR WASH 2 VALue
v JrEvIML WITH FIU-UP MINIMUM 10 GALLONS
PRESENT THIS COUPON
with student id WEEK DAY HOURS-MON thru SAT BAM-6PM
{wSStSuh new SUNDAY hours 12 noon-spm
mmWW W' :i M$E!faM S i mi (
rasm no OR SHINt toiumtterdat e
Gainesville s Finest Car Wash s
== COURTESY COUPON
this coupon entitles bearer to
WITH § We Honor AMERICAN BANK AMERICARD MASTER CHARGE |
0 "JZtzZlr H CREDIT CARDS
OAINESVILLE. FLORIDA
snm£ wSkm ASK FOR OUR NEW FREE WASH PONCH CAR

ajn. until 7 pan., when the cafeteria
closed
) G3Mii£ JHJ lcim, t < nnA S- ni >
~/. Monday, food service in th*i mai*i
cafeteria was discontinued after 3:30
pjxi., Overton said.
Newly-appointed Director of the
Rathskeller Mike Brown said Servomation
has been losing money in the main
cafeteria, necessitating the elimination of
service after 3:30.
BUT, BEGINNING in September, at
least four different types of sandwiches
will be available at the bar from 3:30

algal blooms or renewed hyacinth growth.
Mechanical removal avoids such environmental
deterioration but has one difficulty of its own.
Airboats cannot get closer than a yard or two from
shore. These remaining shoreline hyacinths must be
removed by hand.
MAY 11, A PILOT study was conducted at Lake
Alice to determine the most feasible methods of
removing shoreline hyacinths. A major clean-up is
scheduled for this weekend.
Student help is greatly needed. Anyone interested
should be prepared to wade. Work will begin at the
lakes northwest comer on Radio Road at 8 am.
Saturday and continue throughout the day.
On Sunday, work will begin at 10 am. Anyone
who can provide either a boat or a canoe should
contact Don Goodman at 378-9609 as soon as
possible.

until closing at midnight, Brown said.
[hH ffThe Rathskeller wih probably carry
/ roast beef* baked-ham, baked ham sad
cheese and either salami or bologna
sandwiches, he said.
There will also be limited salads and
pickles, as well as the beer, potato chips,
popcorn and Cokes which are sold now,
Overton said.
THE SANDWICHES will be made to
order, not packaged like the Rathskeller
used to sell. The food will be purchased

ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
YZstxL, "CORVAIR SPECIALIST"
GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
l
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 3767771

MDEROSA
JML < STEAK HQUBB 4
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320

Ft**,** W, 1070.TheFlerMe ARRpisr,J

through the same suppliers Servomation
uses, he said.
However, it will be prepared by
Rathskeller* personnel, with the
assistance of Servomation people, if
necessary, Brown said.
In addition, there are plans to have a
buffet supper every night from 5 to 7,
Overton said. *
It will be a kind of budget special,
featuring either spaghetti, fried chicken, a
fish fry, baked beans and franks, he said,
or other things students would like.

Page 15



Page 16

. .%i-. ,;-.-,; f,V*r ;.;* ***/ v *.;-**-
L The Florida ANhlor. Friday. May 15.1070

:|9
|9, V
p* A MM
§K|
-X" s s
aSt ";* y *mmmm
-/..' * (
n'*: c V'
'.V,. *' \'*, v
fl h
I I
a u *;, ;
E.'L ..- I 1.
. 4' v
- & > 9 v;/' j\ ;
*
'**'*' if*- ** '- f § *' tfTf^rfVr
'< *s§Ls£#r -& >* x .?£*'' ~
CLAY PHIPPS
UHMMM ...
Let me see, is it first my right foot and then my left foot; or is it
my left foot first... Forget it. AUF student tries the mysteries of
the skate board. And if he does not do it right he may wind up on
his. i.

a Mister a
r Come in for the freshest donuts ever. \VI rj SWI
Jetly ones. Sugared ones. Custard. \' 4 '
coconut cinnamon ones. Donuts plain V
Donuts fancy. We also make muffins. \
brownies and the world s best cup of
coffee So say hello soon And don t
forget to bring along Mister Donut s M
money-saving open house coupon
OPEN 24 HOURS
[' SAY HELLO TO r"*? I
MISTER DONUT Us
"rr" w! Mister
O fIC OFF Donut*
MISTER DONUT WONT YOU PLEASE COME HOME I
tl H Ilk* dozen')
PCR DOZEN ; 2111 N WI3TH ST.
wmmmmmmmwmmiwm mwmmmwmm

Rattlesnakes Shot, But
Not People-Chief Schuler

rT Rrnn-m.n amGiikjxe VtujOJ
By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Police
Department (UPD) only shoots
rattlesnakes and injured
animals, according to UF
Director of Security A. I,
Sheeler.
We have never fired a
weapon at an individual, Shuler
said.
STATE STATUTES allow
police to fire at a fleeing felon
that is, a person who is known
to have committed arson, rape,
robbery, assault or murder.
University police are not given
this freedom.
If a person is running, hes
really no danger, Shuler said.
It is the policy of the UPD
that officers exhaust every
reasonable means of
apprehension before resorting to
the use of firearms, according to
Shuler.
PATROLMEN are allowed to
use weapons:
To defend his own life or
the life of another from death or
serious injury, and only when he
has a legal and moral right to
kill.
This means that a patrolman
has the right to protect himself
from an attacker. The
patrolman is morally obligated
to defend himself and others,
Shuler said.
To kill a dangerous animal
or one that compassion requires
must be relieved from suffering

COUCH'S
*T£N£I!L week-end
SPECIAL
sOlift TVStand
FRE
w *Mfg. suggested retail price
/woom-to-RoomS if \ I n I
Mobility / ¥ V I BUT
/ | 6 WAYS I
Th ROAMER e A1331
~ {*****H**fe??******i***i**9*m*omo*i*mmmo*99mmimS:
| PERFORMANCE GUARANTEED BY COUCH'S!
I OWN ZENITH MASTER TEpHNICAN'S WE DO I
i NOT FARM OUT OUR SERVICE f
****oo*9*o*o*
PA| irU'C 608 N MAIN ST
_ J PH-378-1562

and when other disposition is
impractical. (To kill a valuable
animal unnecessarily constitutes
ground for a civil suit against the
officer.)
t To participate in approved
firearm training.
POLICE ARE forbidden to
fire in these circumstances:
t To attempt an
apprehension or to prevent an
escape, even though the subject
is a felon and may be a
potential danger to others.
0 To fire as a warning or to
give an alarm.
0 To fire at or from a moving
vehicle.
When a patrolman does fire a
weapon the directed or acting
head of the department must
personally investigate the

rVollwagto
EXPERT SERVICE |
3^^231 |NTERNAt| natbeeMM
PORSCHE CARE AND PREPARATION
wu
Speed-Equipment ML.T Service on All
end Accessories / Foreign Makes
535 SW 4th Ave. 376-9381

incident and submit a detailed
written report of his findings to
President OConnell.
THE REPORT states whether
the shooting was justified in
accordance with established
policy and in accordance with
the law.
All university police go
through classroom instruction to
learn about the legal aspects and
libels of their weapons. Then,
they are given training on a
target range to teach them safety
rules.
Every six months, each
policeman goes back to the
training range for retraining.
Slavery, No!
The Massachusetts Supreme
Court outlawed slavery in 1783.



UC Students Select
Best Prof For Award

I FLAMBOYANT \ Vv 1
(in a quiet way, of course) f\ \ \ 1
Its a very exciting Gant shirt. Distinctively Gant,
we might add. The collar is bigger, bolder. The strip- \ E
ing exuberant. Tailored in a silky cotton broadcloth \ S
imported from England. The price? 14.00. Right on! <8
The 409 Shop. V\ <|
mam /Sarf/ieu 1
GAINESVILLE MALL <

-£>
University College students are voting for the
instructor they feel deserves the Thomas Jefferson
Award for teaching excellence.
The instructor receiving the most votes will
receive the sixth annual Thomas Jefferson Award
Scroll and SSOO.
Voting is open to UC students exclusively. UC
faculty, excluding full-time professors are eligible

Friday, May 15.1970, The Florida Allifetor,

for the honor. Students may cast their votes on the
third floor of Little Hall 'as they register for
academic counselling.
The award, sponsored by the Thomas Earl
McConnell Foundation, emphasizes free inquiry and
teaching excellence as voting criteria.
Voting will continue until Mav 22. A list of
eligible faculty members is posted at the Little Hall
polling place

Page 17



Page 18

t. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 15,1570

Native South American Language Taught At UF

By CARLOS J. LICEA
Alligator Writer
Kunas Aymar Aruxa? (What is
Aymara language?) The words
jump at the reader from a small
newsletter published by the UF
Department of Anthropology.
Aymara was spoken on this
continent before Spanish-,
English- or Portuguese-speaking
people ever dreamed of reaching
a new world. Today it is spoken
only in Bolivia and parts of Peru.
AS A MATTER of fact, one
million people one-quarter of
the population of Bolivia
speak only Aymara.
The UF is the only university
in the United States teaching
Aymara as a regular course. It is
listed as APY 430, a rather
cryptic denomination for what is
a fact of life to many Bolivians.
The course is taught by Dr.
Martha Hardman-de-Bautista,
associate professor of
anthropology who specializes in
Latin American indigenous
languages.
WITH HER, two Bolivians,
Juan de Dios Yapita and Miss
Juana Vasquez, try to bring
Aymara to the 20th century and
make American students aware
of one of the aspects of this
continent they know little
about.
Dr. Hardman has received a
$29,000 grant from the Institute
of International Studies, Office
of Education, U. S. Department
of Health, Education and
Welfare (HEW) to study the
Aymara language.
This research, which is
conducted in cooperation with
the UF Center for Latin
American Studies, is aimed at
providing analysis and
description of the Aymara
language.
CENTER DIRECTOR Dr.
William E. Carter said about the
project:
We were asked by the Office
of Education to undertake this
project, and since we had the
best personnel in Dr. Hardman,
the grant was given to us.
The research includes study of
the basic grammar of Aymara, a
three to five thousand item
computerized dictionary, and
the making of six basic units for

OPEN
AT 11AM A
MON-SAT
MUM **#?/
Evary Tuaaday Nlta I E w*v I
| A Fraa Kag of Batr 1 ***?? jjlJ
yif Brings tha Moat Giris \ I
Famous ALAN'S
I rim AN A

We were asked by the Office of Education to
undertake this project, and since we had the best
personel in Dr. Hardman, the grant was given to us.
-Dr. William E. Carter,
Center for Latin American Studies

teaching Aymara.
BUT WE HOPE to finish the
reading materials by next year,
Dr. Hardman said, since the
funds might be cut-off.
Dr. Hardman said she first
became interested in Aymara
while doing research at Cornell
University. She wanted to know
if Aymara was related to other
languages spoken in Peru.
However, she found nothing
in the library and she had to
travel to Bolivia to continue her
research.
WHILE IN Bolivia, she taught
a the Universidad de San Andres
in La Paz, the capital city of
Bolivia.
According to Dr. Hardman,
while she was there, she founded
the Instituto National de
Estudios Linguisticos (INEL),
the National Institute for
Linguistic Studies, which is now
under the Bolivian Ministry of
Culture.
The language itself seems
fascinating. Dr. Hardman
explained the particulars of
Aymara.
COMPARING the languages
is impossible, Dr. Hardman said
in fluent Spanish -r Yapita and
Miss Vasquez speak little
English. Things that are done in
English with 'small words,* are
done in Aymara with suffixes.
As an example, Dr. Hardman
said when the Catholic priests
arrived for the first time in
Bolivia, they translated
incorrectly the Lords prayer.
It was translated our God,
and not yours which meant the
white mans god was not for the
native people.
DR. HARDMAN is planning
to visit Bolivia again this summer
to continue her research.
Hopefully the course will be
taught again in the fall, Dr.
Hardman said. And it will be a
five-quarter hour course.
The class this quarter is small,
only four students are taking

AYMARA SPOKEN IN BOLIVIA, PERU

Aymara.
MRS. LAURA Barber, 7AS,
who is also a graduate assistant
working with Dr. Hardman, is
one of the students.
Miss Coleen Bedmar, 7AS;
Ransford Pyle, 7AS; and Adrian
Fajardo, 7AS are the other
students. Fajardo, who is from
Peru plans to use his knowledge
of Aymara to do research in
Peru.
Dr. Hardman said the class is
small because only a few student
knew about the course, but
more attendance is expected as
more students learn about the
course.
THE CLASS is conducted
largely in Aymara, and direct
translations are seldom used, to
give the students a chance to
learn the language as they speak
it.
We give them the papers
which constitute the class text
to help them remember, Dr.
Hardman said.
Besides working with the UF
as a teaching assistant, Yapita,
who comes from the community
of Qumpi, province of
Omasuyos, Bolivia, edits the
Aymara language newsletter,
which is sent to Bolivia.

I TACO M
Rancho jrood ~ M
Fiesta Plate 99 KV|pnjflflpH L*i
% lb. Hamburger... .49 NR
Beef Burrito .49 UM
TACO RANCHO BB W
BUSTS BEER BARRIER... Low-Low Prices jtf
DRAFT CAN 6 PJC 24 CASEM
OLD MILWAUKEE .20 1.00 4.00 pi
M BUSCH -15 .20 1.10 4.40 N
M A SCHLITZ .25 1.25 5.00 H
Wn-jpL BUD .20 .25 1.30 5.20 Rj
jRjjWNDOW^iRVIC^

MISS VASQUEZ, the other
assistant, is from La Paz,
although her family comes from
the province of Qalla Marka.
Yapita has also been involved
with Aymara research in Bolivia.
He said Dr. Hardman was the
best qualified linguist to study
the Aymara language.
Yapita said Aymara has to
grow and while anthropologists
are interested in the folk lore of

" STCAK* SHftKC !
Student Special
| (With The Coupon) |
I Our Regular 93< Steak burger
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value I W 90< plus tax |
Steak n Shake 1
610 S. W. 13th St. t ... L
r^Sc^H^oSfNIITRIwVEABPTj
SAVE! I
him mmm aiM
I I STARKE 0 1 FLORIDA I
SOONER OR LATER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
m. HOURS I
I WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
|GAINESVI^^HON^7ZOIO3ANYTIMEBYAPPOINTMENt]

file Aymara-speaking people, he
is more interested in the
advancing of the Aymara Aymaraspeaking
speaking Aymaraspeaking people
The INEL also offers to
Aymara-speaking people courses
on written Aymara and offers
Spanish-speaking Bolivians
Aymara courses as a foreign
language.
According to Dr. Hardman a
similar project is also being
initiated for Quechua-speaking
people in Bolivia.



The
Florida
Alligator

i' J>li wl |B I I I fWfIE&MMtMi / # / //// MMwlf \* 6 /j& y
|r,
.
$1 11 IK.Mrlr
|f iff MMSQjSjl|lgm&-- v e
-! ; t| M SPSim
,?>.. nh if -;'>.'j '';Mp -JL BBRgSF./ w : m^B^K^Hh^EHWP^E'i^
ag-VSM|Ba&*. aa inHtjWsi.:,;. _. ; A \ a a Mat l| ?>
* 4r' TBKwfOTn wltTt'
_ MaeL i 'iMjfeslil
? v ii^PISSSf^BI^B^EIf-B

fli
B* 4b
> x >
' A;. v a ?. ,<^H
H ?;
I 1 ; I jl^H
... he'* bringing the Family

' V- *-. p ;
VISIT BURGER KING
w % W ' 1 lf^M^Bar. f | jafigir^v-..^X^?fa.wgC'h-^t fe i **
i I I H I IS I ?
P -.* :L...,.. Bl i I I i EBHpr^lp v
"f v te-.. I *_ I
X A |BM II B
II I n I 1
E B H m ||| JjgiaJ|gii% a^f|i^ff^T^P^i^EiXiX&liisXffiM^^^^Bhh7M'jr' a rMMttfi'-.' j'l I B S M p
B > I II I II I I
l I II II I I II
fl fl| t 4 jH| 1 H B JB 1
B I
HOME OF WHOPPER
8 N.W. 16TH AVE.

MiiiifeillibiliiiiiiiiiMi : liiiiiiiiii&^
W W : I : M :KfISwI^V
L.IB I F Il I MlTliVir n I
: rBBiB: : : B : : : :Bv^BilllB :^: : :: B : : : :^ :^B':B::B:B: w : B^fciliiB :^B^::: B:v

... power and drive from Chicago

The Story
By DAN VINING
Alligator EnfMtainmant Editor
Listen. I think you should try
to go. It should be fun and it
doesn't cost much.

I RED PM qX I
NIGHT flO
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

9
LOOK:
THE
SUPER
SHOW

j Student Special "1
Any car or color!
|
Joy's Paint & Body Shop I
2017 M.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373-1665 J

Friday, May 15,1970, Tha Flarida AMaatar.

'
*
I "" uifi^frr x '&&$&
JH £f p|£ HL
JH Hl
' Jj9 I ; y I Hllll rt-'A^'j-Hfe'
.. it'* the Muat
GATORTOWN
and
' :
La Bonne Vie
Apis.
EXTRA-LOW RATES
FOR SUMMER
Call 378-3467
372-mi

Or Come by office
MSWUiAve
Apt 140
- in naii nn .-I

Page 19



Page 20

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, May 15,1870

j WEEKEND j
j MOVIE FARE
WOMEN IN LOVE This is a film adaptation of a story by D. H.
Lawrence and has, because of the authorship, every chance to be
worth seeing. It stars Alan Bates and hes done some good things on
screen. Its new at The Center One.
* *
THE ACTIVIST This is probably bad but who am Ito judge? Its
about the peace movement or thinks it is about the movement. It bills
itself as dealing with love among the hip, is rated X, and is made by
Art and Jo Napoleon, unknowns. It replaces Putney Swope, a fine
movie, at the Florida downtown. Its a shame Putney wasnt here
longer.
* *
THE LAWYER Heres another one that has a title beginning with
the article the. This one stars Barry Newman and is reputed to be
about lawyers. It should be on a double bill with The Activist the
way things are going these days in our courts.
* * l -
I, AM CURIOUS (YELLOW) This, supposedly, is the one weve
all been waiting for. I saw it in San Francisco for $4 and was bored by
it. At least the price here is less. It's about a young Swedish girl who is
curious. Its in black and white. Its dull. The sex has no feeling, not
even lust. Both Penthouses at the Suburbia are showing it.
* *
M*A*S*H War is funny. Thats whats behind this one and it's
funny. Elliott Gould stars and does a beautiful job. There are many
good moments. Theres real life in it. You should see it if you haven't
already. It's held over at the Plaza One. ......
*
SHARK The thrilling saga of the savings and loan business world
in America? The thrilling saga of billiards in this land of ours? No. It's
about fish. Did you know shark often eat their own young and that a
pine cone once was found in one caught off the Pacific coast? Yep.
The movie is at the Gainesville Drivein with Backtrack, a cowboy
picture with James Drury and Doug McClure.
*
THE PRIME OF MISS JEAN BRODIE From Broadway to the
screen, this one has gotten the praise of most of the critics and won
for Maggie Smith, its star, an Oscar. Its the story of a lady who is in
charge of a bunch of little young lady charges and loves them and is
loved in return. It's at the Center Two.
*
THE TORMENT This is Bergmans first big film and is considered
by many to be his best. Not much else needs to be said. Os course its
good. Its on Sunday at the Reitz Union.
*
THE BROTHERHOOD Kirk Douglas stars in this story of the
Mafia or a brotherhood. Italy is where it takes place. Alex Cord and
Irene Papas are in it'too. Its not too bad. I didn't get really involved
when I saw it in Istanbul last fall. Ah, will I ever forget that fall in
Istanbul? The picture is showing at the Reitz Union Theatre this
weekend.
WIN I
A ZENITH RADIO I
EVERY DAY I
in i
wuwu
I DIAL 1390 I
I LISTEN FOR DETAILS EVERY. DAY AS I
I WUWU SALUTES NATIONAL RADIO MONTH 1

I Advertise "1
n I
its good business I

Two More Nights To See
Players Thieves Carnival

OK. There are two more
nights to see Thieves
Carnival, the most recent
production of The Florida
Players. Tonight and Saturday
night at 8 pm. Are you going to
go or not?
The play is a comedy written
by Jean Anouilh about thieves.
Its offered to us here in a
BESTSELLING
BOOKS
(UPI)
(Compiled by Publishers Weekly)
Fiction
LOVE STORY Erich Segal
THE FRENCH LIEUTENANTS
WOMAN John Fowles
TRAVELS WITH MY AUNT
Graham Greene
THE GODFATHER Mario
Puzo
DELIVERANCE James
Dickey
THE GANG THAT COULDNT
SHOOT STRAIGHT
Jimmy Breslin
MISTER SAMMLERS PLANET
- Saul Bellow
A BEGGAR IN JERUSALEM
Elie Wiesel
THE ANDERSON TAPES
Lawrence Sanders
THE HOUSE ON THE STRAND
Daphne du Maurier
Nonfiction
EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS
WANTED TO KNOW
ABOUT SEX David
Reuben
MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS
Antonia Fraser
UP THE ORGANIZATION
Robert Townsend
THE SELLING OF THE
PRESIDENT 1968 Joe
McGinniss
LOVE AND WELL Rollo May
THE NEW ENGLISH BIBLE
The Oxford University Press
and the Cambridge University
Press
THE AMERICAN HERITAGE
DICTIONARY OF THE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
William Morris, editor-in-chief
RUFFLES AND FLOURISHES
- Liz Carpenter
THE PETER PRINCIPLE
Laurence J. Peter and
Raymond Hull
THE GRAHAM KERR
COOKBOOK Graham Kerr
NOW
OPENING
for
Sept. Occupancy
LEASE OFFICE
309 NW 13th St.
Across from
TlgfrtrtHall
.tm
place)

mixed-media presentation with a
special emphasis on music and
wild lighting.
ACTING IN IT are Kandi
McNett, Debbie Kondelik,
Fernando Fonseca, Johnny
Stephens, Gene Touchet and
others. Fonseca als6 composed
most *of the music for the
presentation.
Among the things the play has
to offer the audience is
involvement. The thing
continues after the action on
stage is over. According to
reliable reports, the play is as
much fun as anything done by
the Players in recent history.
The place to see the action is,
of course, the Constans Theatre
in the Reitz Union complex.
Up And Away
Deer can, from a standstill,
jump an eight-foot fence and
broad jump more than 30 feet
while on the run.

BiS DEPTHEADS I
I|HBVE LOOK WHArS COMING! I
Calculator Seminar I
of the Future. 11 models Coming Center at I
[on display. Space Science Research Bldg. [

"BIGGEST BARGAIN
JOIN Oil* UNIQUE FUGHI CIUB
Cessna 150 $ 9/hr
with club membership and dues
luspps^^
\/
V\ Aviaho* Inc.
c GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT
* 376-5326

It opened Monday night and
many people have seen it since
... giving
fieiaieeuillM liMuie
UMMIIIM iWm
6m savvies...
1802M.UNIV.AVE.
1430SJM. IStfiST.



The Florida Alligator
aaHHBBBK \k ?. 1 <
~*, Vr \ w.-
,>r..- TORI -.'.
H
UPS TIPSY DRIVER
A UF engineering student will drive a new 1970 Camaro on two
wheds, die side wheels, at Gainesville Dragway Saturday night.
Tim Chitwood, a junior in mechanical engineering, does this sort of
thing regularly. Some may remember that he led the Homecoming
Parade In a similar manner last fall.
Chitwood spends his summers on the road with the Joie Chitwood
Auto Thrill Show, of whteh he is half-owner. The two-wheel driving is
just a regular part of the thrill show. He has been doing this stunt for
three years and claims it is really quite easy.
A fireworks display will also be a part of the regular dragway
proyam Saturday night as a special student price of $1.50 will go into
effect. Races will get moving at 8:30 p.m.
Hog Riders Challenge
Backwoods Sunday
By KEN BROOKS
Aiivgnor vvmor
Motorcycle riders with a penchant for challanging their own
endurance and the durabiltiy of their machines will gather behind the
Dragon Drive-In at High Springs Sunday for an American Motorcycle
Association-sanctioned Moto Cross.
There will be no easy riding on this course the event entails 20
minute heats run over hills, jumps, and pits, designed to test the
toughest of the 120 self-styled Peter Fondas expected.
TT*S TOUGH on the riders and the machines stated Gator
Motorcycle Club Secretary-Treasurer Kathy Jasper, but mostly on
the riders. Their endurance gives out quickly.
Moto Cross is essentially a British sport; English Moto Cross
provides a tougher course over thirty minutes of riding. Were trying
to build up American Moto Cross to die same level as the
reported Jasper. We feel the best way to accomplish this is to start
out a little easier.
Practice for the event will be run at 11 am. Sunday, and, according
to Jasper, anyone can enter the competition at 1 pm. But they must
be AM A members or pay a $2 fee before entering she added. The
fee entitles the entrant to a year membership in the association.
The meet, held once every other month, is run in six classes and six
heats, according to engine size. Spectator admission is $2 for adults,
children are admitted free.
Hfsg mJm
"THUYEW LEADER IN SMALL CARS" OPEN 'TIL 7 PM

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Friday, May 15,1970. Tha Florida Alligator,

All-Stars Game
Is On Again!

Once again the fraternity All
Star-Gator Greats game has
reversed direction. It is back on
the schedule after being
cancelled earlier this week.
The game will be played
Tuesday, May 19 at 7 pm. on
Florida Field.
According to Miles Wilkins,
executive vice president of the
Interfratemity Council, the
game was rescheduled due to
the tremendous amount of
people who have expressed
interest in the game.
WILKINS CITED last weeks
student strike as the reason
behind the cancellation.
Tickets purchased previously
are still good and additional
tickets may be purchased at the
Record Bar, the J. Wayne Reitz
Union box office and at the
gate. The price is 50 cents.
a **** + ****
4
: TONIGHT! :
: free :
*
*
*
: DAIQUIRI
i WITH i
; this :
: ad :
* 4
4 Limit 1
* 4
*
* 4
*
j BEER J
j $1 ;
: pitcher :
* 4
: 4-7 pm :
* 4
* 4
4 4
4 4
4 4
: TONIGHT :
4 4
: is :
I THIRSTY TIME J
4 4
* 4
* AT
*
THIRSTY I
*
4 4
4
I 633 N.W. 13th St. J
4 4
4 4
4 ******** 4

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Page 21

IFCs executive committee
will decide Sunday what will be
done with the proceeds from the
game.

/ FIREWORKS Jr
in tribute to our
Military Men and
Armed Forces Day
THIS SAT. NIGHT
MAY 16
And
a mini-preview of their 1970 season Tim and Joie
Chitwood, the dare-devil brothers of Joie Chitwood's
Thrill Show will be balancing their brand new Camaro
on its side and trying to go the full quarter mile.
\
CAN THEY DO IT?
The Full Drag Racing Program
and all this at
SPECIAL PRICES
All military personnel, Nat.
Guard, Reservist, and Retired.
That's
1/2 Price f
All students with I.D.s
Gen. Adm. only $2.00
Children under 12 25 cents with adult
GATES OPEN 5:00
!
Time Trials to 8:00
RACES BEGIN 8:30
3% miles north of municipal
airport on State Rd 225.

n ImaIONESI
II 1 3ook and Supply W
All 1712 W. University H
II n e TEXTBOOKS f I
\| SCHOOL SUPPLIES I I
I I ART SUPPLIES ¥£
9 I ENGINEERING f
fl| ] SUPPLIES
& Customer Parkin9 In 9
|H 1 The Rear ;-V
I we Welcome: B
I 199 I
HIM aaa|



Page 22

I, Tha Florida AMptar, Friday, May IS, IS7O

6
/A] THMO MAN
3
GUIIY jn
r\ WICKET. UMPIRE M ~.
/ \ 7
iatsman J)
SHORT
COVER /> (YU
r A **
SHORT *2SI
EXTRA ffi7
23
r*-
Q IATSMAN
Irn umpire
d x ft
% 4

Cricket
Anyone?
>
By CRAIG GOLDWYN
Alligator Sports Editor

- iniiiii i miiii i ii __
£ Pit nr M
J|Hb|
ffp BBHP l^^B.
1 i 1 Pis r IpP, H
W J| r syfl
t%m sSs 'Mo{^Mfefe:iai!-':-;.yv'". &£;,-' s$ -, H.hV.,s -,
?f:
J
l&?
/ '*-"* £> *'"'l *>'' Y ) \ A y C I< ", r ** -'' v J - '£- -V "* ' ', -' r * ~"i *' "'- >>. -w 1 >' X ( '
TUSH AR GHOSH
I v < ,v * 4 ' **m&*mm> + +%
There'll be the UF eleven against the
Nassau eleven, and they 'll don their pads and
take to the Sig Ep Field, at 10 a.m.
Saturday, and quit for the night at about
4:30 p.m.
Then they'll start in again Sunday, same
time, same place, and finish the game.
A batsman, well padded and protected
against the hard little leather ball will step
defyingly in front of two hunks of wood
called wickets'' that are balanced delicately
on top of three poles called stumps."
About 40 yards away the enemy
until he passes another set of wickets 22
yards away from the batsman.
He'll hurl his projectile, stiff armed, at the
wickets hoping to knock at least one of
them off their perch atop the stumps.
And the batsman will stand there just
daring him to do it. Should the ball appear
to endanger his wickets the batsman will
protect them with a defensive hit. If he
thinks he can get away with it he'll take a
cut at it and attempt to score cl run.
Sound like fun? The British have been at
it for centuries. They call it a gentleman's
game. Os course they call rugby a
gentleman's game too, but in England if

:
Bkjs^V

&£&s. mt
- I^MMiMWWMK^;:-'^^.^^)> /aw
JHg
'i 85 5t

pvwv,v £, &' /tfg'', ^7-.'" XV'* \,^
STUMPED
... Staish Marathe of India
S'? :'; > f '.-' '.' ' V ? ;T< / .'. ; '.v ;

Photos By Juanita Shoaror
- *'** '* .' "' i.'l +
l | J|
Jrm
** fppV,
.it.-. .v.-.-.. Sam &&&,
| K |§| bBMM
v v*^<
v
CAPTAIN ALROY CHOW
... shows how he learned to bowl in Trinidad

somethings not just right its not cricket,
right?
Several foreign students transplanted to
the UF have organized a team and this
weekend they play their last match with the
Commonwealth Wanderers of Nassau.
When the game is over the scores will
probably be in the hundreds.
Os course there are hundreds of intricate
rules to the game too, but about all the
discriminating sports fan needs to know is
the basics.
A man scores for his team when he and
another batsman, stationed in the field near
where the bowler releases can exchange
places after a hit and before someone can
knock over the wickets urith the ball. They
can keep going until the risk is too high, or
they can save a few steps if the ball is hit out
of bounds, which is an easy six or
four if it has to roll out.
As in American baseball there are
i different types of pile \es and a s°y of
plays. 1 i *""****'
After six bowls ana no hit the referee calls
an over which means the batsmen
exchange places. This keeps up until all the
batsmen on a team have been up and out,
either at the stumps, while running, caught
on the fly, or commits a rule violation.
And they play for days. Os course there
are a few short breaks for sleep and tea...



IF HOPES for second

SECs Best Runners Here

By CALDWELL TUMIC
Alligator Correspondent
Tennessee is again the favored
powerhouse and UF may have
trouble fulfilling its perrenial
bridesmaid role at the SEC
championship meet at Florida
Track Friday and Saturday.
Kentucky, LSU, and Alabama
figure to give the Gators a run
for second place money. Friday
is reserved for qualifying trials in
most events, from 5 to 7 pun.
Saturday the field events begin
at 5 pjn. and the running starts
at 5:30 pjn.
HAVING THE meet in
Floridas May heat may provide
an interesting experiment.
Although sprinters and jumpers
usually find hot weather
beneficial to their explosive type
events, distance runners
generally tend to have a hard
time "of it. Hot weather distance
running causes such problems as
burning feet, heat exhaustion
and throat searing from hot air.
The mile event will pit UFs
SEC indoor champion John
Parker (4:093) against LSUs
young star John Stewart.
Stewart has a leading time in the
conference this year of 4:05.4.
Tennessee, never weak in any
event, will offer Dave Scire, last
years winner in 4:04.9 and
Dickie Kleir, last years
runner-up in 4:05.0.
In the three-mile event,
Stewart also has the lead with a
13:49.
TENNESSEE GETS the nod
in the 440 relay as the Vols have
covered the oval in 40.1.
In the 100-yard dash, Coffee
and Kentuckys Green have both
blazed 9.4s and the battle

Baseball

AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 22 9 .710
Detroit 15 14 .517 6
New York 17 16 .515 6
Boston 14 16 .467 7%
Washington 13 18 .419 9
Cleveland 10 17 ,370 10
WEST W L PCT GB
California 21 10 .677
Minnesota 19 10 .655 1
Oakland 16 16 .500 5%
Chicago 13 17 .433 7%
Kansas City 11 18 .379 9
Milwaukee 11 21 .344 10%
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 16 13 .552
New York 16 16 .500 1%
St. Louis 14 15 .483 2
Pittsburgh 15 18 .455 3
Philadelphia 13 19 .406 5
Montreal 10 20 .333 7
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 24 9 .727
Atlanta 18 13 .581 5
Los Angeles 17 14 .548 6
San Francisco 17 17 .500 7%
Houston 16 17 .485 8
San Diego 15 20 .429 10
RENT NOW!
FOR THIS SUMMER AND
SEPTEMBER, 1970
FALL LEASES Si 12 MONTH
FiiinNi
1 iNiiimi
UpgsrorLasar
FaraMhN
AleCaedlowa*
9 S Nod
O Haw How Haw
Stetfy Run
See today. Move right In
VILLAGE PARK
A
FRENCH OUARTER
APTS.
1001 S.W. 10th S.

between them could be
ferocious Saturday. UFs
improving Roger Carson (9.6)
will be in the thick of it.
Coffee also leads in the 220
with 20.5. In the 440 Coffee has
a conference leading 473.
THE HALF-MILE should be
the Gators event. UFs Irish
flyer Eamonn OKeeffe has run
1:50.4 this year and owns
1:48.8 personal best.
The 120-yard high hurdles
should be a one-man show, but
it will be a good one.
Tennessees Bill High was second
in the NCAA last year and has
run a conference leading 13.6.
Gator Jerry Fannin won the
440 hurdles easily last year in a
world ranking 51.0. This year he
is third in the conference with a
52.0. Tennessee switched
quarter-miler Hardee McAlhaney
to the event with a resulting
51.6 that leads the field. In the
mile relay, Tennessee leads with
a 3:08.
WORLD LEADING Ron

J.l mm: JR S' n9S ill w A m 1 t|
SB 98 8 8 I
'S lit
SPECIAL Fleetwing steel frame I
tennis racket I
9 1 compare at 29.95
Springtime values sale J 19<99
odd club S£U6. Nylon stringing, leather wrapped grip.
4V6 or 4% grip sizes.
irons, compare at 8.00 . sale! 3.99 IS
woods, compare at 11.00 ... sale. 5.9 s Spalding ACE handball*, meets AAU and
An ideal opportunity start or add to YMCA specs, (can of 4) 4.00
your present set. Wilson handball gloves, adjustable wrist
strap, ventilated fingers. Medium and
Fleetwing golf balls, regularly 5.00 dz. large sizes 0.00 pair.
... sale! 4.24 dz. golf head covers, broken sets, regularly
1.00- 1.50 sale! .55 .BB
Cosmic floating golf balls, regularly 4-player badminton sets, regularly 6.00
6.00 dz.... sale! 5.24 dz. -H 00 sale! *99 649

Jourdan has his name on the
high jump with a superb 7-2
leap. Gator Ron Coleman won
both the long and triple jumps
indoors this year but is second
and fifth so far this year as a
result of injuries. Leaders are
Kentuckys Bill Lightsey (24-10)
and Mike Stutland (49-8%).
In the Pole Vault, Gator Scott
Hurley has gone 16-2 in practice
and should give LSU David
Oliver (16-8) and Vol Steve
Owens (16-0) some competition.
Vol Bill Skinner, a world-class
competitor, leads the javelin
field with 2674.
UFs John Courtney has
thrown the discus 1644 and
could push leaders Mark
Lumpkin (LSU, 172-0) and Tom 4
Carmichael (Term., 170-9). The
shot put belongs to Kentucky T
John Stuart and Tom Johnson
lead with 57-foot throws.
Admission to the meet is $2
for adults, $1 for students, and
free to UF students with their
IDs.

WEEKEND SPORTS

TRACK
SEC Championships at Florida Track, preliminaries Friday
at 5 p.m., finals Saturday at 5 pjn.
GOLF
SEC Championships at Calloway Gardens, Ga. Friday and Saturday
SWIMMING
UF Syncronized Swim Team Friday at UF pool 8 p.m.
MOTOCROSS
Gainesville Gator Cycle Club meet Sunday behind Dragon Driva-I n
CRICKET
Gator Cricketeers meat the Commonwealth Wanderers at 10 a.m.
Saturday and Sunday on Sig Ep Field

Ironwood
Golf Club
STUDBIT MEMBHSMP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For information coB
3 76-0080
& tBONWOOD
W Nt IfthAVMMX

Friday, May 15,1970,Tha Florida Alligator,

CENTRAL AUTO SHOP
MAJOR TUNE UPS
MINOR TUNE UPS
ENGINE OVERHAULS
RING AND VALVE JOBS
CLUTCH JOBS BRAKE WORK
CARBURETOR REBUILDING
1027 S. MAIN 378-4843

Page 23



Page 24

I, The Florida AHigator, Friday. May IS. IS7O

BONANZA SIRLOIN PIT
A
THERE IS ONLY ONE* Jik
2445 S.W. 13 ST. I#
BONANZA OPEN DAILY-FROM 11-9 PM Lr/tf'S
"Congratulates the p LA YE R of the WEEK IXH
Player of the Week
Come get your FREE t** .b.
STEAK DINNER Bonanzahur9er IOO% beef, French
9 ml i Mm Our steaks are served with a steaming-hot, buttery
baked potato, Texas green
.'Bunkhouse Special lb. 100% chopped
Rib Eye 6 oz., tender cut steak
Sirloin Strip ll oz., savory, hearty meat,
r WKKm
Out 378 0946
EVERYBODY LOVES BMW!
' Whatever your needs for
CAR AND DRIVER MAGAZINE classroom use or campus
_ II activities always check before
BEST SPORT SEDAN IN RQIDm HQ ft you buy at the ...
THE WORLD. THIS r
IS THE 3RD CONSECUTIVE <
YEAR BMW WAS JW
chosen best in its CLASS! This week's Player of the Week award goes AMI tell # S llftb
READERS VOTE BMW to nottr Ra,pH Hart f f hi winnln 8 W#ll|rW# W
iww^Nfi^MODFls performance in the Southeastern Conference
1600 AND 2002 MODELS Tennis Championship*. A
Ralph was the only Gator to win his JL H QAIfCfAfA
bracket and bring home a first place trophy.
Ralph conquered the field in the number six
ft rs I\\ singles bracket
Ralph is a freshman from St Louis, Mo., located in the HUB
and just beat out righthander Wayne Rogers,
who pitched a three-hit 7-0 win over
Tennessee and a 3-1 victory over the nation's BR Braw^TTrf. E fh7p^wr. C and* r,
nunber one team FSU's Seminoles. Rogers ** Un| "
has already won the Player of the Week award
once this quarter. ~
are the most enthusiastic l/J
endorsers of BMW performance. You'll understand t/m(
why five minutes after you're behind a BMW
wheel. Come in for a test drive today. Jjjl
>Road and Track Magazine says: "YOUR ON-CAMPUS STORE"
"The BMW 1600 and 2002 MONDA £ 8 FRIDAY gj
are the best sedan buys in SAT I R 1 2 AY J
. the world."
SEE WHY AT..
Mitu4MiyAA MM MMMftS \ H
Wien Y iii A
Imwdiot* d.livry 10 Now in Stock AMI CaWfrUS SllOp & BOOkttOH