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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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MIKE HENSON
S/NK OR SWIM
Sharon Strickland is no fish, but she can swim or at least she tries
Sharon is one of the Swim Fins of the UF Syncronized Swim Team
which will present the show "Let Us Entertain You/' The show will
be presented today and tomorrow night at 8 in the UF pool.
Admission is free, and all UF students, faculty and staff, as well as
Gainer*ilie residents, are invited... and the Fins will either
swim ... or they will sink.
'Minimum'Demands
Issued By BSU
The UF Black Student Union issued a list of ten demands
Wednesday they want met by the administration.
The demands are the result of the inequality of black students on
this campus, and also a comparitive study of the conditions of blacks
on other major universities, according to BSU Minister of Information
Steve Baker.
( THE DEMANDS that are stated, are the minimum demands of the
BSU, Baker said. They arent meant as a threat, but if they arent
met, there will be certain pressure from black students on this campus
on the administration.
The study conducted by the BSU revealed that Yale University has
a black enrollment of eight per cent while the UF black enrollment is
six tenths of one per cent.
The BSU listed their demands as follows:
The office of minority affairs shall recruit, admit, and obtain
financial aid for all students gaining entrance solely at the discretion
of its director Mr. Roy Mitchell.
Confer upon Mr. Mitchell the salary of $20,000 recognizing his
importance as an administrator at UF. -
Hire a black administrator in Academic Affairs to coordinate the
recruitment of black faculty.
9 The development of a

SG Mails
{Crisis Issue
£ Wednesdays Alligator
£ contained a special four page
mailaway on the crisis facing
ij: Floridas educational system.
| This section was prepared in
: the hopes that students
:j would want their parents,
: other relatives and friends to
£ know the situation.
£ Student Government has
| volunteered to provide
£ manpower and postage to
£ mail the edition.
Please (Mint die address to
jvwhich youd like it sent and
x your return address on die
space provided, fold the
and give it to one of
ijiyour instructors this morning.
|He will hand it into his
I: department office, where it
|wol be picked up by SG
j volunteers and mailed for

relevant Black Studies Program
leading ultimately to a degree.
Also, the staff shall consist of
black scholars.
More black events on
campus including a yearly Black
Week celebration.
The elimination of racists
hiring and promotional practices
as indicated by the Department
of Health, Education and
Welfare in its March 19, 1970
report.
The hiring of a black
assistant manager in personnel.
This proposal was agreed upon
by the members of the
Super-Committee.
The naming of buildings
and campus facilities after black
men and women beginning with
new structures.
The immediate withdrawal
of campus recognition from all
sororities and fraternities that
have racist policies.
A stepped-up program for
the recruitment of black
athletes. The hiring of blacks as
coaches in the Athletic
Department.

of ten demands

UF LEADERS EXPLAIN

Why Do Students Strike?

By PHYLLI9 GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Two weeks after the announcement of
U. S. troops in Cambodia, V/i weeks after
four Kent State students were slain in a
campus disturbance and the big question
still remains unanswered.
Why were UF demonstrations, based on
these events, able to involve more students
than ever before?
Why did thousands of students

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 62, No. 140

PROTEST WAR, UF

48 On Hunger Strike
Want Demands Met

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writar
Forty-eight UF students are
on a hunger strike in front of
Tigert Hall. They are eating no
food and drinking only fruit
juices to protest the war in S. E.
Asia and demand certain changes
at UF.
The strike began Monday at 8
pan. and will continue until the
demands of the strikers are met.
WE FEEL IT is necessary to
take this drastic step (strike) in
order to emphasize the
legitimacy and reason of our
suggestions, Judy Ross,
spokesman for the strikers said
at Tigert when the strike began.
The demands of the hunger
strikers are essentially the same
as those of the Student Strike
Committee last week:
9 Removal of firearms from
the campus police.
9 Having a meeting of the
University Senate to consider
the function of ROTC at UF.
9 Consideration of the
suggestions of the Black Student
Union concerning methods of
eradicating racism from the UF
campus.
9 Amnesty for students
involved in last weeks strike.
The strikers also want all
firearms removed from not only
police, but on-campus residents
as well, They want no
non-university law enforcement
officers allowed on campus
without the approval of the
University Senate.

FSU Acts To End
Freshman Curfews
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Claiming that women students are
entitled to the same freedom as men, Florida State University joined
the University of Florida Wednesday in a move to abolish curfew
hours for freshman coeds.
AftM University probably will follow along too, a spokesman said.
University of South Florida in Tampa took the restrictions off women
last year.
FLORIDA TECH requires freshman women under age 21 to be in
at 11:30 pjn. weekdays and 1:30 ajn. weekends, and a spokesman
said there is no known move there to change it.
The Student Honor Court at FSU ruled unanimously that curfew
(SEE 'FSU' PAGE 2)

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

SOME OF THE strikers are
not eating to protest the war in
S. E. Asia.
I wouldnt be out here (at
the hunger strike) if guns off
campus was the only issue,
striker Andi McDonough said.
Its necessary that the student
body keeps thinking about
Cambodia and Kent State. They
came out and showed their
support last week, but it wasnt
just a three day thing.
Were here so people dont

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CLAY PHIPPS
HUNGER STRIKE
... Andi McDonough protests war, guns

longhairs, shorthairs, blacks, whites, hippie
types and fraternity types pour from
the classrooms and support a strike?
WHY DID THOUSANDS march? What
caused these students to interrupt their daily
routines?
Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder
said he thinks many of the students were
upset by President Nixons decision to enter
Cambodia, but the thing that made people
(SEE 'STUDENTS' PAGE 2)

Thursday, May 14, 1970

forget what happened last
week, striker Wayne Heiber
said.
A WRITTEN statement from
the hunger strikers Wednesday
said:
We are here to remind you,
the university community, that
although the mass
demonstrations and marches of
the past week have ended, the
issues still remain.
The hunger strikers say they
(SEE 'DISARMING' PAGE 2)

BHflMfli
BBMBBBI
ONE-FIFTH of Florida
college students are regular
marijuana users, reports
Faircloth survey .page 6
Classifieds 12
Editorials S
Entertainment 18
Letters 9
Movies 13
fe Sports. 19
!J



Page 2

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 14,1970

SENATOR GETS SMASHED

Tossed Pie Shows Dissent

1
WASHINGTON (UPI) A youthful
representative of the underground press smashed a
pie into the face of a member of the U.S.
Commission on Obscenity and Pornography
Wednesday to express his opposition to this
unconstitutional, illegitimate, unlawful, prehistoric,
obscene, absurd keystone committee.
Commissioner Otto N. Larsen, a professor of
sociology at the University of Washington in Seattle,
cream pie sliding down the right side of his face and
onto his shirt and tie, didnt raise his hand or
voice in protest.
THE HMNCH pie was thrown at him, from a
distance of about one foot, by Thomas Forcade,
projects coordinator sos the Underground Press
Syndicate, an organization of street-peddled
newspapers which have sprung up in almost every
city in the country.

Strike Involvement Explained

PA6E ONE^
the most aware was the Kent
State incident.
It happened at a college
campus, which made it not so
distant as the war. Four students
just like us were shot
Uhlfelder said.
UHLFELDER SAID students
were involved through the
programs in the Plaza of the
Americas and the teach-ins, and,
for the first time, Student
Government was involved.
John Sugg, SMC
representative, said the fact that
100,000 gathered in Washington
D.C. within three days,
demonstrated the strong antiwar
feeling in the country.
Maybe Nixon should be
charged with inciting a riot for
the speech on Cambodia. Even
people who had never thought
about the war before, think
about it now, Sugg said.
THEY JUST HAD to wonder,
Can you end a war by
escalating that war? And then,
the Kent State massacre, he
said.
The cause of the strike,
Sugg said, is primarily the
unwillingness of the American
people to support or pay for the
imperialist adventures of the
U. S. ruling class.
Sugg also said that there will
be another strike May 29, called
by SMC and already supported
by Vets for Peace. The strike
will take the form of a day-long
series of teach-ins and the
organizers hope to have a
national speaker such as William

Disarming Os UPD Demanded By Strikers

PAGE ON^
realize striking against the war is
futile. So they are continuing to
insist last weeks demands be
met. At least one demand has
been partially met. Prof. Vynce
Hines, head of the University
Senate Steering Committee has
promised the University Senate
will consider @ the strikers
demands at its next regular

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June. July and August when Its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601;
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or tum away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement Involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect Insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

Kuntsler, Conspiracy Eight
attorney.
THE STRIKE was supported
in Mondays referendum by a
235 vote majority.
Secretary of Health,
Education and Welfare Robert
Finch said campus unrest has
reached the proportions of a
national crisis.
He attributed it to the assaults
in Cambodia, which he described
as the straw that broke the
camels back.
GROUPS SEPARATED four
weeks ago students, faculty
and school administrators are
now united, Finch said.
This is not a case of a few
militants as it was a year ago.
You have a much greater
constituency now, he
continued.
Florida Blue Key (FBK)
President Don Middlebrooks said
this greater constituency is
because the events at Kent
State had an emotional tenure
greater than anything
experienced in other campus
issues.
IT HIT HOME to each
student, because college students
were shot, Middlebrooks said.
Associate Sociology Professor
-Richard Larson said the killings
at Kent State were part of the
reason for the large involvement
in the demonstrations.
Students realized it could
happen here, Larson said.
HE SAID WHAT appeared
to be the escalation of the war,
also probably helped to involve a
large number of students.
Greg Jones, a member of

meeting, May 28.
HUNGER STRIKERS report
help has been coming in from
many people. Several people
have donated either cans of fruit
juice or money to buy juice.
Others have loaned camping
tents, and sleeping bags. A
number of students not striking
have joined the strikers by
sleeping-in at Tigert with them.
The strikers encourage this type

Two policemen at the hearing room in a Senate
office building looked aghast, but made no move
against Forcade.
Accompanied by about six officers, he was
permitted to leave with his entourage of young
people, including the 3-year-old daughter of one of
them who called out foff! after Forcade had
finished his presentation.
IN EARLIER testimony, the American Civil
Liberties Union (ACLU) urged the government to
abandon all attempts to regulate pornography,
contending that no one can prove that pornography
harms anyone.
But a spokesman for the nations mailmen asked
for stiff new anti-smut laws, saying letter carriers
were heartsick when they had to deliver filth to
Americas homes.

FBK, said the fact that
students were fired on
affected all the students.
Everyone realized it could
happen to them, Jones said.
FOR TWO YEARS, radicals
have just been talking to
themselves. Last week, the
whole spectrum of groups were
covered. The day to day leaders
were able to channel the
demonstrations at UF along lines
that most students could
accept.
More people were involved
because there was a different
kind of atmosphere. SG, FBK,
Omicron Delta Kappa and other
groups were involved, he said.
Caron Balkany, who was
active during the strike, said SG
as an established organization
helped to assuage some of the
needless fears that
demonstrations are all Radical
and dangerous.
THE FACT that it is SG made
it more acceptable to some of
the people who are new to this
type of thing, she said.
Sigma Chi President Ken
Driggs said the thing at Kent
State was personal. It was
students.
Lance Stalnaker, 4JM, said he
felt the large number of
demonstrators was due to the
emotionally charged
atmosphere created by the Kent
State shootings.
The facts werent all in, but
the students felt like they had to
do something. The facts might
prove it wasnt all one-sided, he
said.

of support.
The reason we are striking,
Miss Ross said, is that we are
concerned. Weve tried
marching, weve made demands,
but were always brushed off
because no one thinks were
serious or really concerned. This
way were showing were
concerned. In this way we are
giving of ourselves personally to
show our support of the causes
we believe in.
MODERN SHOE
REMIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

i GroupTo Coordinate
! War Protest Activity!
By RON SACHS A
Alligator Staff Writer
X
v # : : :
j:j a new antiwar group the Gainesville Indochina Crisis A:
| Committee held its first meeting Tuesdarevening at the Hillel A
Foundation. §
xhe group, headed by biochemistry Professor Abraham Stein,
v is attempting to coordinate the efforts of much of the war
:j: protest now being held, according to spokesman Dr. Barry §
$ Guinagh.
: THE CRISIS Committee aims to enlist the efforts of all £
: concerned faculty members, students and residents of the A
: Gainesville community. \ A
j: As university faculty, students and Gainesville residents, we A
: hope to channel our communitys idealism and peace movement $
£ away from the depression resulting from Kent State into
j: constructive political channels, said a statement released by Dr. A
:j Stein. A
§ The groups initial aim is to influence Congressman Don A
Fuqua to help pass a bill now in the House of Representatives. ;j
% The bill would cease funds to the American military :
: involvement in Southeast Asia by June 1. j:
£ THE COMMITTEES steering organization will meet Sunday :
i; to discuss concrete plans. Gainesville City Commissioner Neil :
| Butler will attend that meeting. |
i- We are hoping to centralize the majority of residents and. j
$ direct them in a reputable way, Guinagh said. £
An open meeting will be held Tuesday at 8 pm. at Hillel to ;A
A recruit interested persons. A
UF Prof In Brazil
Against Asian War
RECIFE, Brazil (UPI) A UF professor in Brazil on a Fulbright
scholarship asked Brazilian authorities Wednesday for permission to
hold a demonstration to protest the Indochina War.
Prof. Roberto Ibarguen, working on a paper called Colonial
Pernambuco, said 20 U. S. residents of this northeastern Brazilian
city would participate in the demonstration if permission is granted.
Lobby Drive Begins
A collection drive for United Student Action, UFs student lobby,
begins today at Little Hall and the Graduate Library.
USA has set up booths to collect money to send its seven-member
lobbying steering committee to Tallahassee Thursday.
THE GROUP WILL register as lobbyists and begin their campaign
for the UF communitys needs and desires, Henry Solares, USA
chairman said.
The recently-formed organization developed from last weeks
student interest on campus, Solares said.
Its purpose is to inform and educate local, state and national
government officials of the UF staff, student and faculty needs and
desires, he said.
FSU Acts To End Curfews
pFROM PAGE OHE^
hours for coeds are discriminatory and an unconstitutional violation
of the Board of Regents policy against discrimination in the university
system, based on sex.
It claims it is also an abridgement of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
ACTING DEAN of Student Affairs Bill Kimmell said he has the
Honor Court opinion under consideration and will make a
recommendation to President Stanley Marshall within a few days.
Final decision at this level is up to the president.
At Gainesville, the committee on student housing has
recommended elimination of curfews which for freshmen women
under 21 is midnight on weekdays and 2 am. on weekends, except
during final examinations when it is waived.
the 1 >res^ Lwtw Hale has it under study.
HE FSU curfew of 11 pm. on weekdays and 1 am. on weekends
can be waived with parental consent after the first quarter.
oe s are required to sign out of campus dormitories or sorority
ouses. For security reasons womens dorms at South Florida are
but a guard open for y student who
!*, ole matter wUI ultimately wind up in the lap of the regents,
frnm .hi Cor P orate Secretary Hendrix Chandler, a ruling
probably be sought.
P v I
I JH|: DEPT. HEADS I
look WHATS COMING! I
of thei Future. 11 modete lO-Bp.m. I
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CRUNCH

To help promote a "Get Together Dey" on May
31, Pi Lambda Phi fraternity is sponsoring a v

IFAS Supports OConnell

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS) gave unanimous support to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell on Monday for his recent
efforts to prevent disruption of normal university
operations.
A resolution from 400 faculty members and the
40-member IFAS Administrative Council backed
O'Connell in urging students not to resort to
violent activities which can destroy property,
interrupt the educational process, and cause possible
injury or loss of life for innocent people.
Strong opposition to violence was also expressed
by the Student Agricultural Council, which
represents 11 student agricultural organizations.
Keeping UF open and functioning was cited in
the faculty resolution as the most important single
issue at this time.
Interruption of the educational process and

Crisis Service Seeks
*Creative Listeners 9
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Wrftar
Students having problems with sex, drugs or parents may find help
in Operation Safety Valve.
Peer group assistance will be available this summer for the
college-age population with the help of Mount Sinai Hospital of
Greater Miami. The program will be designed as a telephone crisis
intervention service.
DR. MILTON GROSSMAN, director of adolescent medicine at
Mount Sinai, will be at UF May 18 to talk to Dade and Broward
county students interested in undergoing training as creative
listeners.*'
Job application forms may be obtained at the Student Placement
Office or from Mark Tyson, 378-6431, and at the meeting in the Reitz
Union, rooms 361-362.
Students accepted will undergo a 40-hour training program
beginning mid-June. Salary will be $2 per hour during training, S2.SO
after that
FOLLOWING TRAINING, creative listeners may sign up to
work at their discretion during operative hours which will be 7
p jn.-12 midnight Sunday through Thursday, 7 pjn.-2 am. Friday and
Saturday.
Listener responsibility may varv from simply providing the caller a
friendly ear to talking down tdniguser on a bad trip, Grossman said.
The listener also will have access to other agencies and services to
which the caller may be referred if necessary, many of which can be
patched in with a caller by telephone.
Although the Mount Sinai program will be the first of its kind in
the South, Grossman said he hopes many of the students who are
trained as listeners this summer will later install similar programs on
their respective campuses.
Operation Saftey Valve is patterned after an emergency telephone
service begun in April, 1968, by the Childrens Hospital of Los
Angeles. x
What Is Blackness?
What is Blackness AH About? will be the topic of Rev. Rogers P.
Fair's lecture tonight at 730 in the Norman Hall auditorium.
The lecture and following discussion will be the last in a series of
the Studies program sponsored by the college of Education.
Rev. Fair is chaplain of Bemime Cookman College in Daytona
Beach:

car-smash this week. Here a Pi Lam brother is seen
taking the hood off of the donated wreck.

violation of the rights of individuals by those
exercising a privilege of protest are inconsistent with
the purposes of an educational institution, the
resolution stated.
The Council expressed its deep abiding faith
that the students of this university are striving not
only for their own educational improvement but for
the welfare and improvement of all people.
If we are opposed to what is going on in
Vietnam, Agriculture Provost E. T. York, Jr. said,
the way to register this opposition and concern is
to let our views be known to those in authority who
have responsibility for guiding our foreign and
military affairs.
York said a university, supposedly a community
of reason, is the last place where disruptive violence
should occur.
Many of the activist groups, preaching freedom of
speech, were actually denying it to other elements
of the university community, York said. N

A
BRIDGE
OVER
TROUBLED WATERS
Frank discussions about marriage
mijuLi Dr. Carl Clarke, Assistant Professor of Psychology
lomgni at the University of Florida and Director of the
# _ Marriage and College Life series will discuss role
UniOfl 3 £L 7 expectations and how they differ with each
** partner. These differences will be approached as
7 indicators of resources which can compliment the )
3 n marital relationship.
# Miss Jennet Wilson, Assistant Professor in Maternal
and Infant Health in the College of Nursing at the
University of Florida will discuss childbearing as a
significant experience for both the husband and
wife. Her piesentation will emphasize how this
shared experience tends to strengthen the marital
relationship.
'Desires, Expectations,
And Reality
sponsored by the university religious association

Uhlfelder Needs
New Cabinet
Student Government needs workers especially people who wfll be
in school for the summer, Student Body President Steve Uhlfelder
said Wednesday.
There are three new cabinet positions, Uhlfelder said. They are
secretary for environmental affairs, secretary for community affairs
and secretary for legal affairs,
OTHER CABINET positions are secretary for academic affairs,
athletics, consumer affairs, finance, health and insurance, interior,
legislative affairs, married student affairs, minority group affairs,
public functions, student affairs, student organizations, student
services and transportation.
Uhlfelder said he is trying to get people involved, but it is difficult
to find people who are staying for the summer quarter.
Interested students should apply at SG offices on Reitz Union third
floor.
1 WHATS
HAPPENING I
FRANK DISCUSSION: Whether married, engaged or just interested
in that sort of thing cross the Bridge Over Your Troubled Waters
and join the group discussion on marriage tonight at 7:30 in room 347
of the Reitz Union. Roll recognition and childbearing are the topics to
be discussed.
GREEK LETTER GOINGS ON: Tonight in room 362 of the Reitz
Union, Gamma Beta Phi will talk things over beginning at 730.
FUN AND GAMES* And prizes too, at the Tolbert Area Council
Carnival Saturday, 10 am.-6 pm. located between North and East
Halls in Tolbert Area*
THEOLOGUE*S DIALOGUE: Dr. James Cone will speak to all
interested in the Black Theologue and Black Liberation tonight at 8
in the Reitz Union Ballroom, second floor..
MORE MUSIC: Tonight at 8:15 in the University Auditorium, the
Music Department presents The Music of Khachaturian in a
lecture-recital program.
UF CRICKETS: The UF international cricket team meets the
Commonwealth Wanderers of Nassau, Bahamas Saturday and Sunday
10 am. and 430 pm. at the Alice Field south of Fraternity Row.

Thursday, May 14,1970, Tha Florida Alliyator,

Page 3



Page 4

1. Ttm Aijflar, Tlwwday.May 14,1970

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SATURDAYS THE DAY
Weather check for Saturday's Super Show is still dear and beautiful
with no chance of rain according to the U. S. Weather Bureau in
Lakeland. The Crow is one of the ten groups which will appear under
the sun and stars at Florida Field. Show starts at 4. Tickets at $5.50
are on sale at the Reitz Union Box Office and the Record Bar. Owing
to the large volumn of sales, will be sold at gate three of the
stadium starting noon Friday. Tickets will go on sale neon Saturday,
and the gates will be open at 2.
Programs A 'Bridge
Over Troubled Water 1

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Three programs on marriage,
called A Bridge Over Troubled
Waters, have been scheduled by
the University Religious
Association.
The first program will be
today at 730 p jn. in room 347
of the Reitz Union.
THE FIRST discussion will be
on Desires, Expectations, and
Reality. It will center around
role recognition and
understanding in the marital
relationship and childbearing as
a significant experience for both
husband and wife, Jacob
Stuart, program director, said.
Psychologist Carl Clarke and
Jennet Wilson of the Nursing
College will speak at the first
meeting.
The second program, to be
presented May 21, is entitled
Two in one flesh ... Sexual
and Spiritual. The third
program, May 28, is entitled
Babies and Budgets and
Alimony to Abortions.
Stuart said the idea for the
programs materialized largely
through the efforts of Rev.
Thaxton Springfield, who
recognized an unfortunate
situation in the university
community too many
students are entering into
marriage uninformed and
ignorant of its basic problems.
June, the month for
marriages, will soon be here.
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And as divorce rates indicate,
too many of these marriages will
be taking the big step* totally
ignorant of marriages basic
problems, Stuart said.

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BROTHERS SAY YES

Will Kappa Sig Survive?

1 i 1 i | %
By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
Kappa Sigma alumni hope
their chapter will be cleared of
charges of racial discrimination
by the UF Committee on
Student Organizations, but say u
will survive with or without UF
recognition.
I think they (the committee)
will be milch more objective and
factual, more interested in the
facts, than the IFC was, said
KS Comptroller Chris Tompkins.
IFC SUSPENDED recognition
of Kappa Sigma Monday,
charging that they denied bids to
two blacks because of their race
during fall rush.
The Committee on Student
Organizations will consider the
case next. It is empowered to
recommend that the fraternity
be denied recognition as a
campus organization.
Tompkins said the charges
were unfounded because the
fraternity could not prevent
individual members from
blackballing a pledge for any
reason.
I DONT see how we are
going to proscribe their feelings
and beliefs, he said.
Furthermore, Tompkins said,
the decision was made in an
informal meeting of active
members, at which a straw vote
was taken.

Hie fraternity 1U& ndt acted
officially, & "as far I*m
concerned the charge has no
merit, Thompkins said.
CENTRAL TO the
controversy is a national
fraternity rule allowing alumni
to attend any meeting at which
bids or memberships are voted
on and to blackball any
potential member.
Active members claim this
rule gives alumni a veto and
allows 'them to influence
elections, though none have
actually used their blackball.
The rule can be revoked only
by national action, and local
Kappa Sigmas have been
pressing for this for years,
according to Tompkins.
SINCE THE Kappa Sigma
house is located off campus,
nonrecognition would have
limited effect, and the fraternity
would continue to operate,
according to Tompkins.
Its like United Nations
recognition a country doesnt
wither away because it isnt
recognized, he said.

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||t#| Recognition was
withdrawn, the fraternity might
still provide grounds for HEW
charges of racial discrimination
against UF.
UNDER TITLE 6 of the 1964
Civil Rights Act, federal funds
may not be paid to any
university where
universityconnected groups
practice racial discrimination. t
An organization could be
considered university-connected
even though if. operated
off-campus.
If the organization depends
for its life on, the university, for
instance, if one has to be a
university student to join, then
the relationship is dear,** said
Horace A. Bohannon, acting
director of the HEW Civil Rights
Office in Atlanta.
In a telephone conversation
last month, Bohannon stressed
he could not comment oq
specific cases and was not anj
attorney. He could not predict
whether nonrecognition of such
an organization would satisfy
HEW requirements, he said.



(IVAVAViViWWKWXOJ'K'JKVAViViViVtViViSViVrtiVWViW.ViVtVtV.ViVAVi.JI
| UPI Around |
I ... The World |
j MATSUYAMA, Japan A young gunman fleeing with a >;
I stolen -arsenal hijacked a Japanese ferryboat Tuesday and held £
43 persons aboard hostage for nearly 10 hours. He then freed 36 $
of the hostages and sailed for an unknown destination early |
Wednesday. £
SAIGON Teen-age North Vietnamese soldiers launched the j* :
£ first counterattack of the Cambodian campaign against a U.S. £
artillery position today but were thrown back with heavy losses. £
| On Highway 1, a South Vietnamese relief force was carving £
* out a land route to Phnom Penh. x
: Communist gunfire in South Vietnam shot down four U.S.
£ helicopters Tuesday, killing 13 Americans including Maj. Gen. i£
£ John A. B. Dillard, 50, commander of U.S. Army Engineers in £
Vietnam and the sixth U.S. general to die in action. Another £
| five servicemen were wounded/ £
| MONTREAL When a Montreal policeman called his |
j: supervisor to report a stolen banana Tuesday he was told flatly £
j; to return to the station. $
v The supervisor was finally convinced after an advertising :£
£ agency spokesman said the missing banana was a handmade :£
£ rubber imitation with a skin that peels off. It was used in £
commercials. *:
£ ST. GEORGE'S, Grenada, W.I. A government proposal to :£
£ reintroduce cat-o-nine tails flogging punishment in a crackdown :£
£ on increasing black power militancy touched off a storm of £
: controversy Wednesday. :£
: The Grenada Christian Council said Premier Eric Gairys
:j proposal to reintroduce the whip as official punishment clearly
j: violated the universal declaration of human rights and would £
: only breed further violence. £
| ... The Nation I
: WASHINGTON About 25 members of the National £
Welfare Rights Organization took over HEW Secretary Robert £
H. Finchs office Wednesday to demand higher welfare benefits j£
and an end to U.S. involvement in Southeast Asia. :
Finch met with the protesters for nearly an hour, then left £
jj; after apparently failing to reach any agreement with the group. £
WASHINGTON Six Duke University Law School students £
£ said Wednesday Attorney General John N. Mitchell £
£ characterized Saturdays mass antiwar demonstration in £
$ Washington as lethargic and led in part by speakers directed
£ by Hanoi. £
£ WASHINGTON Republican leader Hugh Scott and Sens. :£
Daniel K. Inouye, D-Hawaii, and Strom Thurmond, R-S.C., were :£
£ among the busiest senators on the lecture circuit in 1969, but £
Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy, D-Minn, commanded a higher price. £
£ ATLANTA While a small band of state troopers stood £
£ guard at the doors, about 35 college students picketed the state £
£ capitol Wednesday protesting Gov. Lester Maddoxs shoot to
£ kill orders against rioters in Augusta. :£
( ... The State |
£ TALLAHASSEE The latest compromise on the 18-year-old
£ voting issue statute lowering the minimum age for assumption :£
of adult rights and responsibilities passed the House today :£
and was sent to an uncertain fate in the Senate. £
: The vote was 6047 after one proponent said approval of the ;£
£ compromise would call the bluff of senators who might want £
£ to see the issue of lowering the voting age from 21 to 18 kept X
£ off the November general election ballot. £
£ MIAMI Premier Fidel Castro angrily rejected a proposed £
£ prisoner of war exchange with the Alpha 66 exile £
£ organization Wednesday and said Cuba holds the United States £
responsible for the lives of 11 fishermen captured by the
j: Miami-based group. £
: In ruling out any possible swap for nine Alpha 66 guerrillas :£
: previously reported captured alive in Cuba last month, Castro J
: gave no clues as to whether they may already have been £
executed. i£
:j: His response to the prisoner swap, proposed Tuesday, was j£
£ contained in a 1,000-word communique broadcast by Havana :
j: radio. :
£ JACKSONVILLE A runaway bull was finally killed here £
£ early Wednesday following a four-hour chase in which he roared £
£ down Interstate 95, caused at least one traffic accident, rammed £
£ several police cars and trampled one policeman. £
!: Patrolman L. B. Strayer escaped injury after being butted and
x stepped on by the black angus as officers tried to rope the :£
£ animal.
Rogers P. Fair
Bethune Cookman College f
What Is BLACKNESS All About
Thursday, May 14 7 :30 P.M.
Norman Auditorium

Nader Accuses Industry
Os Perpetuating Pollution

WASHINGTON (UPI) A team of investigators
working with consumer advocate Ralph Nader has
accused American industry of perpetuating air
pollution through corporate deceit and collusion,
with help from ineffective laws and timid
government officiate:
The latest hand of Naders Raiders, in a
519-page report, blamed industry, government,
Republicans and Democrats alike for pollution
problems.
THEY SINGLED OUT Sen. Edmund S. Muskie,
D-Maine, accusing him of tailoring the 1967 Air
Quality Act to meet industry needs, while trying to
build a political image as a champion of the
environment.
Muskie said the report distorts the story of air
pollution control and my role in drafting if.
President Nixon was accused of having paid his
fare and jumped aboard... the environmental
bandwagon with a proposed antipollution law
termed ineffective.
SMOGGING A CITY or town has taken on the
proportions of a massive crime wave, yet federal and
state statistical compilation of crime pay attention

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Thursday, May 14,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

to muggers and ignore smoggers, Nader said in an
introduction to the report.
Air pollution and its fallout on soil and water is
a form of domestic chemical and biological
warfare.
The report was particularly critical of General
Motors and other automakers. It alleged they
conspired to retard development of antipollution
devices and later made only token efforts to find a
practical alternative to the internal combustion
engine..
IN A DISTURBINGLY real sense, air pollution
is a new way of looking at an old American
problem: Concentrated and irresponsible corporate
power, it said.
Government antitrust actions or even the threat
of them could prod industries that contribute to air
pollution to move toward new and healthier ways of
doing business, the student investigators said.
The 10-member task force included students
specializing in science, engineering, law and
medicine.
It was directed by a Harvard Law School
graduate, John C. Esposito, 30, and was financed by
Naders Center for the Study of Responsive Law.

Page 5



I, Th* Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 14,1970

Page 6

Infantrymen Throw Back Human Wave

SAIGON (UPI) U. S. infantrymen
firing artillery at ground level hurled back
a North Vietnamese human wave assault
on an outpost inside Cambodia
Wednesday, killing at least 58 of the
attackers.
It was the biggest ground battle fought
by U. S. forces since they thrust across
the Cambodian border 13 days ago.
THE FIGHTING flared as South
Vietnamese armored and ground forces
drove westward from the provincial
capital of Svay Rieng in a push to open
Highway One which leads directly to
Phnom Penh, and thus open a land supply
route straight to the Cambodian capital.

GOP Seeks Nixon Support

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Senate Republicans searched
Wednesday for away to cope
with a snowballing effort o to shut
off funds for continuing U. S.
military operations in Cambodia.
With a vote tentatively
scheduled for early next week,
the GOP leadership called a
meeting for today to find a
party position on the legislation
designed to hold President
Nixon to his promise of a quick

One-Fifth Os Florida
Students Pot Users

TALAHASSEE (UPI) One
out of every five college students
in Florida is a regular user of
marijuana, according to a
shocking report released
Wednesday by Atty. Gen. Earl
Faircloth.
But Faircloth, who ordered
the $15,000 study of the use of
narcotics on Florida college
campuses, said the preliminary
results of the survey disclosed
that almost 90 per cent of the
students had absolutely no
intention of experimenting with
such hard drugs as heroin and 80
per cent were solidly against any
use of LSD.
THE PRELIMINARY results
of this exhaustive survey --
Thousands Pay
Last Respects
To Reuther
DETROIT (UPI) An
estimated 1,000 persons, some
weeping, filed past the caskets of
United Auto Workers President
Walter P. Reuther and his wife as
they lay in state in Detroits
Veterans Memorial Building
Wednesday.
Thousands more, from cities
across the United States and
Canada, were expected to pay
their respects by Thursday night.
The closed oak caskets were
brought to the building in two
blue hearses early today to await
the funeral services Friday. The
flags of the United States,
Canada, the United Nations and
the Peace Flag stood at the four
corners of the coffin area.
BURGER CHEFS
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The South Vietnamese were
accompanied by U. S. advisers.
Allied spokesmen said South
Vietnamese marines had easily occupied
Kanfpong Trabek, the Cambodian town
on Highway One midway between Svay
Rieng and Neak Luong, the Mekong River
ferry crossing seized by government
troops last weekend.
In Saigon, the U. S. Command
announced that Maj. Gen. John A. B.
Dillard, 50, of Los Angeles, commander
of U. S. Army Engineers in Vietnam, had
been killed Tuesday when Communist
groundfire shot down his helicopter in

end to U. S. attacks on border
sanctuaries in Cambodia.
GOP LEADER Hugh Scott
predicted a three way split with
some members supporting the
antiwar measure, another bloc
preferring no amendment at all
and the other third favoring a
compromise approach that
would affirm the Presidents
powers as commander-in-chief.
The Cambodia measure,
sponsored by Sens. John

underway for almost a year
are shocking to me.and deserve
the careful attention of all
citizens of Florida, Faircloth
told a news conference.
Drugs may very well be
eroding the very foundations of
our states next generation.
He said virtually all students
who have tried or want to try
marijuana do so out of curiosity.
He added the finding could
provide justification for reducing
the penalties for the first
conviction of possession of
marijuana.
1 frankly dont know how
you legislate curiosity out of the
psyche of the young people of
Florida, he said.

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Sherman Cooper, R-Ky., and
Frank Church, D-Idaho, was
attached to a foreign military
sales bill that was cleared by the
Foreign Relations Committee
last week.
Senate Democratic leader
Mike Mansfield said a showdown
probably will be postponed until
next week, but there was still a
possibility the Senate would
vote Friday.
THE COOPER-CHURCH
measure would prohibit the use
of congressional appropriations
for retaining American troops
in Cambodia, bar U. S. payments
to mercenaries or military
advisers to the Cambodian
government and cut off funds
for U. S. air strikes in support of
Cambodia.
Some constitutional lawyers
say even if passed, the
amendment is of doubtful
effectiveness, in strict legal
terms, because the constitution
implicitly permits the President
to take almost any reasonable
step to protect American troops.
Scott has proposed an
amendment to the
Cooper-Church measure that
would seal this implicit power
into the bill by authorizing the
President to take steps as may
be required to protect the armed
forces of the United
States.

the central highlands. Nine other
Americans also were killed in the crash.
DILLARD WAS the sixth American
general to be killed in action in Vietnam.
Other helicopter crashes in Vietnam
action Tuesday killed three Americans
and wounded four.
In Saigon Wednesday, Communist
terrorists struck at Allied military
personnel in two attacks, killing one
person and wounding nine.
THE 818 BATTLE in Cambodia Taged
early Wednesday around Artillery Base
Brown which units of the U. S. 199th
Light Infantry Brigade had set up only
Tuesday about two miles inside the

I v.s%v;;.w-:*x*x<*: :*:*:*>>i*i*i iv*"***** * v **********%
| Lindsays Foes j
Demonstrate
V
>
NEW YORK (UPI) About 1,00 persons including £
businessmen and women, construction workers and £
:j longshoremen demonstrated at City Hall foKa second day £
Tuesday against the liberalism of Mayor John V. Lindsay. £
j Several hundred mounted and foot patrolmen ringed the £
£ historic structure during the midday march which was partly a £
£ protest of the mayors criticism of police. £
£ LINDSAY HAD charged that police failed to crack down on j;
£ helmeted construction workers who attempted to storm City :
£ Hall last Friday when he lowered the flag in mourning for four £
j slain Kent State University students. £
£ All the way with the PBA, chanted the demonstrators, £
> voicing their support of the Patrolmens Benevolent Association. £
> Lindsay is a bum. Impeach the Red Mayor.
Lindsay was not in his office at the time, having left City Hall £
£ to attend the Police Academy graduation exercises. £
£ HUNDREDS OF police toting nightsticks and some on £
£ horseback kept 50 construction workers from getting at 1,000 £
£ graduate students from six Eastern business schools who £
£ demonstrated against the Vietnam War in Wall Street. £
£ The two groups were kept behind barricades on the opposite £
:£ sides of Broad Street near the New York Stock Exchange.
£ The construction workers, wearing their yellow hard hats
£ carried small American flags and jeered each speaker who
: addressed the students. £
£ RICHARD BOSSE, chairman of the Student Coalition, said
£ the purpose of the rally was to make known the views of the £
students to the business community. j|:
The students were from Dartmouth, Harvard, New York and £
Columbia universities, the Massachusetts Institute of £
Technology, and the Wharton School of Business. £
:> Lindsay was greeted with perfunctory applause during a brief %
speech at the police commencement in which he praised
patrolment for keeping Financial District demonstrations :£
:£ peaceful since the incidents last Friday when some 70 persons £
$ were injured. >
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border and 90 miles north of Saigon.
Filed reports said North Vietnamese
troops, most of them teenagers but
equipped with new automatic rifles,
attacked the U. S. base under a barrage of
mortar fire and rocket-propelled
grenades.
Some of the attackers broke through
the outposts barbed wire perimeter. But
the Americans lowered their artillery
pieces to ground level and hurled
fragmentation grenades into the charging
Communists, killing at least 42 around
the bailed wire ,and 16 others along a
nearbytreeline.



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Thwtay, May 14,1970, Th Florida Affigtor,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 14,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

bv "W
AH OUR BOVS WILL BE AND OUR BOVS Vltt-L BE
OUT Or NIE-ET NAM BY OUT OF CAMBODIA BY
otc'mus END w "£
Seafarers Lobbyist

WASHINGTON Dark, dapper Rep. Jacob
Gilbert, the Bronx Baritone, collected $9,121 from
the Seafarers Union during his 1968 campaign but
reported only SSOO of it to the Clerk of the House.
This was an apparent violation of the Federal
Corrupt Practices Act.
The Seafarers, in return for their political
investment, got a golden dividend. Their lobbyist,
Philip Carlip, operates out of Gilberts office as if he
were paid by the taxpayers instead of hired by a
union to influence legislation. He deals and dickers
from a convenient desk provided by Gilbert and
uses Gilberts government-paid secretaries to take
messages.
Presumably out of gratitude, Carlip has paid some
of the Congressmans restaurant bills at the nearby
Democratic Club. If Carlip isnt around to pick up
the tab, Gilbert sometimes signs the lobbyists name
to the restaurant checks.
Jack Gilbert, sucking nervously on a huge cigar
which he kept re-lighting, tried to explain.
There have been occasions when he (Carlip) left
the table and said, Sign my name, Jack, mumbled
the Congressman, his mellifluous voice trailing off.
He told of a 15-year friendship, which began
when he was a lowly state legislator and Carlip was a
small-fry lobbyist in Albany, N. Y. Having a
lobbyist in his outer office, in view of their long
friendship, seemed to Gilbert mere hospitality.
He (Carlip) spends a good deal of time here. He
receives phone calls. He may sit around and read
newspapers. He just needs a place to hang his hat,
said Gilbert.
He was aware that the Justice Department is
investigating the Seafarers campaign contributions
but said federal agents hadnt questioned him about
the $9,121 he received.
Theres nothing improper about our relation
with the Seafarers, said the Bronx Baritone. 1
have a high regard respect for the Seafarers.
He lapsed into confusion, however, when he was
asked about the difference between what the
Seafarers gave to his campaign and what lie reported
under the Corrupt Practices Act. T -Vs"
This column painstakingly traced the $9,121
through a maze of committees. Some money was
funneled by the Seafarers Committee on Political
Education and the Seafarers Political Activity
Donation Committee directly into Gilberts various
campaign committees.

Alligator Staff

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor
Earl Hartman
Features Editor
t Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg Carolyn Pope
News Editors
i
Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
Advertising Manager Business Manager

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor
Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor
- l
Jeff 3rein
Editorial Assistant

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Merry-Go-Round
by Jack Anderson
The second Seafarers committee, for instance,
delivered $4,500 to the Gilbert for Congress
Committee. Yet not one penny of this was listed on
the official reports that the law required Gilbert to
file.
The Seafarers shelled out still more money to Log
Press, Inc. and Prospect Photographic Corp. to pay
printing costs.
Most of Gilberts campaign funds were handled
by his law partner, John Foley, who was treasurer
of at least three campaign committees.
Gilbert still earns a modest side income,
incidentally, from his law Firm. Up until two years
ago, the taxpayers also helped to pay the salary of
his legal secretary, who worked in his Wall Street
firm, not in his Bronx congressional office. He
claimed she did congressional clerical work for him.
Gilbert faces a showdown battle with Rep. Jim
Sheuer in the Democratic primary to determine who
will represent their consolidated Bronx district. The
campaign will cost money. Commenting wistfully
on the $9,121 he got from the Seafarers, Gilbert
said: I wish it were more.
This columns search for the tobacco chewers,
whom Vice President Spiro Agnews office claims
abound in the senate, has produced another
devotee.
He is Senator William Saxbe, R-Ohio, who has
had the habit since he first tried the stuff at age 7
behind the bam of his familys homestead in
Mechanicsburg, Ohio.
The discovery of Saxbe makes a total of two
senators who chew. The other is Herman Talmadge,
D-Ga., whose spitting in the Capitol corners caused
the great controversy over tobacco chewing in the
senate.
Agnews office, defending Talmadges tidiness
and denying, anyway, that he was the only
offender, issued the flat statement: Presently,
there are several senators who chew tobacco.
This column conducted a thorough search but
could find none of Agnews chewers other than
Talmadge. The reason we missed Saxbe, apparently,
is that he leaves no trail of tobacco stains in his
wake.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83.
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the I lurid;i Alligator arc those of
'.lie editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the l Diversity of I lorida.

EDITORIAL
Tell Them
Five United States Senators went on nationwide
television Tuesday night and, in an unprecedented move,
asked the people of this nation for support in their move to
end the war in Vietnam.
Their specific action is a proposed amendment which
would cut off all money for military operations in
Southeast Asia after December 31.
For the first time there are two pieces of legislation
aimed directly at cutting off our involvement in Indochina.
The first is an amendment passed by the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee on Monday. It comes as a part of the
Military Procurement Bill, and is scheduled to be voted on
by the end of this week.
If passed, it would cut off all funds for the Cambodian
portion of the Indochina war effective July 1.
The second amendment, sponsored by Sens. Mark
Hatfield, R-Ore., and George McGovern, D-S.D., has more
far reaching implications. It would cut off all funds for
military operations in Southeast Asia after December 31.
That amendment, introduced April 30, has not yet been
tied to any specific bill, but has since gained 18 co-sponsors,
and backers feel they can gamer a majority of the Senate, if
there is sufficient response from their program to sway the
minds of those who are uncertain of the countrys mood.
If 6,000 UF students felt strongly enough about our
involvement in Southeast Asia to join in a candlelight
procession around the university, then these persons, and
thousands more, certainly feel strongly enough to express
their opinion on paper.
, The demonstrations on this campus and others were an
indication of the mood of at least one segment of the
country, and enough to prompt five senators to appear
nationwide to ask for further support.
Below you will find a form which can aid in reaching
those in the best position to do something about our
involvement. Fill out the form below and drop it in a
campus mailbox, or in an envelope and mail it to us. Well
do the rest.
| The Florida Alligator i
330 Reitz Union
I Campus I
Check one.
I support the move to end the war in Southeast Asia as |
proposed in the amendment sponsored by Senators.
1 McGovern and Hatfield
| I support the amendment passed by the Senate Foreign |
. Relations Committee
My reasons are I
My name is
in
/ don t know what the Government will do next. He
never tells us.
./ r* v ... 4
* m-jurw r ***** *.*



A Discouraging Note

MR. EDITOR:
As a recent graduate from the
UF, I feel compelled to write
this letter so that you may be
aware of the misconceptions of
the college degree.
The way for the college
student is bright, bright at least
until he leaves the sanctuary of
the American university. When
he leaves, however, he is thrown
back into the common market
to look for employment. The
market may formally be called
the American zoo.
Technically, the college
graduate is no better off than
the next man. If he has a science
background, he may rise to the
top with rapid speed. If he goes
into business or something to do
with humanities, he may be
faced with having to put up with
a lot of crap.
The business or humanities
major will find in many cases
that the guy above him, his
employer, has never been to
college and lacks the background
of the college student. An
employer who has never been to
college is likely to look down his
nose at the college graduate
perhaps because he has been told
the myth that the college
student is better than he is. As a
result, an employer may take
care to assign the graduate to the
least desirable tasks he has to
perform. An employer may, in
fact, try to ease the graduate out
of a job through low pay,
excessive demands, long hours
and limited chance for
advancement.
All this may strike a
discouraging note, but let me
remind you that four years of
college have not entirely been in
vain. The college graduate has at
least had something to think
about for the last four years.
Personally, however, if this
writer had it to do over again, he
probably wouldnt go to college,

Speaking Out*

During all the excitement and turmoil
last week, 1 kept hearing people say,
What can 1 do? This came as a surprise
to me, but many of the students on this
campus dont know what to do. Also, I
feel that the strategy of STRIKE and
the SMC definitely has limitations. Mass
demonstrations and rallies have been so
overdone in the United States, in the last
decade, that they are always close to
violence, whether caused by over-anxious
police or radicals looking for publicity,
martyrs and polization of the society,
they are not gaining widespread support
with the masses, but just the opposite,
they are alienating the colleges from the
rest of society and they are finally being
asked for the political demogogues of this
country to get them votes. What I would
like to suggest is a change in strategy and
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed, double-spaced and
not exceed 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
g Have addresses and telephone numbers
of writers. -
Names will be withheld only if writer
shows just cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for spaoe.
Writers may submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column is
asked to contact the editor and be prepared
to show samples of his work.

although when I look back on it,
college represented some of the ; ;
best years of my life. But at the *'
same time, college experiences
were those which as a member
of society, I could probably have
done without.
The assumption made by the
college graduate is that he is
better than the non-graduate
because he has spent four years
in an academic institution. Such
persons have been sadly
misinformed. The sad truth is
that if the graduate cannot adapt
to the wants of the
non-graduate, he may not make
it at all.
The dilemma of the college
student may be compared with
the problems of war, or perhaps
democracy. Wars wont cease
because the human being is by
nature a thinking and curious
animal, dominating where he is
stong and yielding where he is
weak. If the pollution problem is
ever solved, people will find
somewhere else to throw their
trash. And if we all become
democrats, someone will have to
come up with another form of
government just to keep from
getting bored. And so the world
wont be ready for college
degrees until everyone has one,
and then people will have found
something else to take their
place.
TIM STERLING,
CLASS OF 69
Moratorium
MR. EDITOR:
In a philosophy class, I once
made the mistake of telling my
professor what I thought of
Kants theory of Universality.
He said, dont tell me what you
think son, youre only a
sophomore.
Later, my English teacher
returned an essay in which I had
solved the problems of the

away to peaceful revolution which at the
same time answers the question, What
can I do?
There are several things I am going to
suggest. The first is register to vote. This
is normally done in the county court
house. You have to be 21 years old, must
have lived in the county for six months
and in the state for one year. Most young
people dont vote or even register to vote.
This means that normally politicians
dont pay much attention to the youth of
the country. With older people just the
apposite is true. They both register and
vote and as a result, the politicians stand
at their beck and call. So, if you are old
enough to vote, register and vote.
Remember, only a few Americans vote
and they are the ones who rule.
My next suggestion is to take your case
to the people. Either one of your friends
or you, yourself, should run for office.
Remember, even if all the college
students in the country revolted, they
would be so out-numbered that success
would be impossible. But, if these same
students convinced enough people they
were right and they should vote for the
students candidates, violent revolution
would be unnecessary. Also, the
campaigns are going to be during the
summer, when the students are going to
be home. This means you can forget the
mass demonstrations, during the summer,
which you know our leaders have
already thought of. So, what better

world, with the brief notation
that this was only sophomoric
groping.
My teachers then were
mature, well-educated men,
deeply intelligent and
knowledgeable.
Unfortunately, our colleges
now are filling up with
pip-squeaks who have spent their
lives in ivory towers. Since they
are themselves still groping
sophomorically, they accept the
sophomoric groping of then thenstudents
students thenstudents as pure gospel truth and
a blueprint for the future.
In the current college
vernacular, its a hell of away to
run a college. Or as a cartoonist
recently put it, those who had
much to leam, took over from
those who had much to teach.
As a result, students and
faculty alike suffer bellyaches,
headaches and nagging backache,
because they live in a world
governed by emotion rather than
reason where each individual
is tied up in knots of tension,
hatred, anger.
Lets all shut up and have a
two-day moratorium on
talk ... so our ears can stop
ringing ... and we can approach
the problem quietly, reasonably,
logically as befits a
community of scholars.
DON GROOMS,
ASST PROFESSOR
JOURNALISM
Ban Games
MR. EDITOR:
I am a strong supporter of
student rights. I also believe that
vigorous student involvement is
necessary for a great university
to exist. However, I am
disappointed in some of the
recent events concerning the
proposal to charge students for
football tickets. I agree that the
students have a right to protest

What Can I Do?

tactics than to use the summers for
campaigning. In Florida there are 12
congressional districts which are all
having elections this year. There is a U. S.
Senate seat up for grabs. Most of the state
elected officials are up for re-election. So,
why not run for office? They cant call
out the National Guard to. put down an
election.
Finally, what if age stands in your
way? You are not 21 years old yet. Well,
dont let this stop you. A good campaign
worker can be enough to change the
outcome of an election. A good example
of this is how Goldwater beat Rockefeller
in the California primary and won the
Republican nomination. Goldwater had
dedicated campaign workers who on
election day made the difference and
Goldwater upset Rockefeller. Also, the

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about having to shoulder the
cost of football. But the planned
walkout at the Orange and Blue
game would seem to be a poorly
conceived way to complain.
If the students dont care
about football and dont want to
support the football team, then
the solution is simple. Dont go
to the games.
Ironically, the intensity of the
protest over the cost of football
tickets would suggest that the
students care very much about
football. Perhaps their actions
are motivated by the realization
that they will go to the games no
matter what is charged.
To strike against the football
team they seem to care so much
about is somewhat hypocritical.
This is why the protest failed. I
suggest that the student leaders
who planned the walkout accept
the responsibility for a bad idea
and quit letting their immaturity
show by using the cheerleaders
as a scapegoat.
WALTER A. BUSBY
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
PSYCHOLOGICAL
FOUNDATIONS
OF EDUCATION
Hunger
MR. EDITOR:
I fail to see how many of my
fellow students evade the major
implications of the significance
of the strike when other
universities are unified by the
thousands behind a solid cause,
while we are not. Perhaps they
know something we dont. It
would appear that many of us
are unaware of the facts.
The war in Vietnam and the
move into Cambodia is formost.
According to every poll taken a
clear majority of the American
people disagreed with any

Thursday, May 14,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

further escalation. The war
is doing more than killing
Americans overseas, its
destroying our country from
within and from without. We
channel funds to this war at the
sacrifice of letting millions of
our own starve, letting rural
problems become horrendous,
city living dirty and crowded,
conservation and ecology
moving in a disastrous direction
and racial maladjustments which
make some more equal than
others. In the long run we may
win in Vietnam (?) but will loose
America.
Those students, only a
handful of us on a hunger strike,
understand more than petty
issues. The broader implication
of the strike is to sit down, talk,
listen, read and learn. We are not
hard-core radicals. I am more
conservative than any. Yet I am
firm in my conviction that some
communication must begin now.
We can not sit back and let our
country fail at the wake. The
public must be made to realize
the issues. Through education
and education alone can this be
accomplished. To create
measures to improve courses on
a more meaningful basis; toward
the ends of understanding the
practical aspects of these issues,
to avoid further holocaust with
guns killing that is no more
legitimate than Vietnam itself
and to stop supplying man
power to aid a war that may
continue for the next century
(or until something else gives
way).
This is what the students
strike was about, and still is in
many parts of the country and
similarly as the hunger strike
further implies now.
ARNOLD LEIBOUIT 3JM

By Ed Murphy.

state legislature has a constitutional
amendment before it which, if put on the
November ballot, will reduce the voting
age to 18. Even if you dont campaign for
a candidate, you could campaign for this
amendment. And, if you are old enough
to vote, you can vote for it.
What I have tried to do here is to
explain what you can do. Also, I have
tried to outline the plans for a peaceful
revolution. But, dont make the mistake
of thinking what I am saying is easy. It is
inconvenient to go register and then go
vote. It is hard work with normally no
obvious results to campaign. It takes
courage to run for public office.
If you believe in what you are saying,
come join the revolution!

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, May 14,1970

Page 10

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Instant Folger's
Orange Thins... ~49 W % >JB ; s|63
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Hydrox Cookies - 49- W*|>||PilM \1
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49 c
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V t Cooked Shrimp T. 85*
Fan. Out Gtoceiu Pept.
Fenny-Sever liquid
BHIr £oSr\ Detergent 3r $ l
Paradis* Strawberry
\Sw\ Preserves .... 59*
Ketchup 29*
Out Monte Light Meat
14# Fruit Drinks.. 3 -.:: M
Dole Drinks 4 $ l
extra P P!! ~ fxtra 8^ ?!?!!, a ilxtra y-"'^Ff T l Extra mnsmvw
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Bar-B-QFryers ...r 6* c \tgL% ..J!!!?.,. "...
Tasty, Coavaaioat Cuban i jfijfc *** "** *""" "*'*
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London Broil lb $ 1 39 a4pn^^ME (f^SSTCIS^))
Swift's Premium Proton Orillia' Good, i
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Pot Roast 79* 11
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Shortibs 59* I|>^gjlj/\
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Swift's Franks £ 59* jffiygpgqs .*~ OT
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Thuraday, May 14,1970, Th# Florida AMpaiar,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
xXrXvIrXvX-XXvXW
"AKC German Shepherds, 8 weeks
old, superb pedigree llnebred Odin A
Pfeffer, excellent temperament &
conformation for breeding. Show and
Pets. Females, Black w /cream,
SIOO.OO Mrs. Scott, 2246 N.W.
Magnolia Road. Ocala. 629-4177.
(A-136-10t-p)
Big sale Chest sls; Zenith TV S4O;
rugs; lamps; linens; appliances; ladles
clothes (9-10); picture frames; movie
camera 372-7240; 306 N.E. 3rd
Avenue. (A-st-137-p)

GOT BIG SCHOOL
_ SYNDROME?
Come get some personal attention
from Rod Taylor, a young California
ft A poet who is on a Stanford Creative j
IF Fellowship and will be a member of
I \ he sta ff at Stanford in the fall
' I JHe will be in the lounges at thef /
Union from 3-5:30 p.m. today to tnikv SI
L t 0 y u to b sten to y u an< i to rea d
J SPONSORED BY AWBU 4. A
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
DoacMm -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
o
| I | ir l £
Hi ll Hill
8 ? I ~ i & sio
& I 5
1 5
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D DODO q
' >
Ca) ISJ
g- g- g- g- O
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I If z
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[" -DO
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FOR SALE
Pennsylvania Centre Court Tennis
balls 2.30 a can. Handball gloves,
padded 3.50; unpadded 3.00.
Shoes for all sports. B & B SPORTS
CENTER, 5320 N.W. 13th ST.
(A-136-st-p)
For sale: 1968 Kawasaki 650 twin If
Interested call 378-0491 after 54)0
p.m. and ask for Kevin. (A-139-st-p)
PHOTOGRAPHERS! Nikon
Equipment 2 months old, Need Cash
Fast. Call 392-7387. (A-st-137-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 14,1970

0 m
a

FOR SALE
xX-x*X!X-x-x*x%x-x*:vx-XvX-x-:-x*x-:-:
Pellex f 1.4 complete w/accessory
lens & cases. 200mm and 35mm
S4OO or best offer. Call 372-5516.
(A-10t-138-p)
Need bread badly, stereo good sound
new diamond needle S7O also stereo
tape recorder Arvln + parts also
double bed best offers 373-1979 Bill.
(A-st-137-p)
Dual Showman amp. top clean towe
$175, 1932 Ozark Guitar S4O, 62
Peugot Sedan $175 Also records and
other things. Call 2 76-9066.
(A-139-st-p)
Trailer 30 x 8 new furniture, rugs and
water heater. Must see to believe.
3301 SW Rocky Point Road Lot 27
B 378-6443 for information. $725.00
(A-139-3t-p)
8 x 34 Aluminum trailer on shaded
lot in student park. Has large
screened porch and 8 x 10 cabana.
Air-conditioned, clean, $1,150.
376-8082. (A-139-3t-p)
SURFBOARD 7 ft 6 in. Daytona
Pintail waveset fin PERFECT
condition. Call 378-9208 anytime,
but keep calling sllO (racks too)
(A-136-st-p)
'69 CA 160 Honda electric tools,
helmet, manuals drafted must sell
weight set also 373-2173.
(A-st-139-p)
Early Amer. sofa & matching chair,
both in great shape. SIOO or best
offer. Call Frank, 373-2118.
(A-136-st-p)

VBBSMMMMBM, iB, l M I BMBM|Mnm nITTT,,rTT^I
Playing /j
| May 14 Thru /|fg| wKk
20
:
"T I 2 COLOR HITS |
l^^| n | NOW SHOWING |
N.W. 13th ST. ACROSS FROM MALL
PH 372-9523
M\ I# PLUS CO-HIT
I A ICO i
I M UIW Wrecking Crew:
>Ul l UIIUUIUIHIIIIII l |IMIIIHIIIIIH|||||,H, m j

11 under is ONLY MOVIE
| Mjd_ required YOU'VE BEEN x d i Dll UK THE NEWLY- FOUND
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11 YEAIB T 0 SFF

.;.;.x-x-X*X*x-x*x-x*XX:X:X'X:X:X:XxX::
FOR SALE
Mesh side play pen, 3 bookcases,stone
coctall/end table, washing machine,
TV stand, TV antenna, S 30 Mast,
Polaroid J 33, Yashlca Mat Reflex
378-1109. (A-4t-139-p)
Suzuki *67 200cc transfer Insurance 2
helmets, asking $285 or best offer.
Call anytime 392-8101 ask for Dave.
Must sell need the scratch.
(A-3t-137-p)
Refrigerator, 12 cu. ft., 2 dr, 1% yr.
old, Gibson auto-defrost, $165. Grad.
June and moving Into sum. apt. Call
372-0311. (A-5M38-P)
LOFTY pile, free from soil is the
carpet cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-163-lt-c)
Distinctive 1968 AMX. 390, 4-speed,
air, stereo tape, other extras. Must
sell, going camping $2,30d. Call
376-1853 evenings. (A-st-140-p)
KAWASAKI 500 7O. I want to sell
or trade for VW bus. Cycle in good
shape Light but powerful. Call J.
M. after 7:00 pm at 392-8821.
(A-3t-140-p)
Lady Yamaha 50cc Like new, only
750 mi. Elec, start Auto, clutch. See
at 304 SE 3rd St. North apt. 5 9
pm $lB5. Easy and fun to drive.
(A-st-140-p)
Honda CB 160, just tuned up, High
and low bars, other extras, S3OO. Call
Pat, 372-7789 or 3 9 2-9842.
(A-2t-140-p)

FOIRS A LE
1969 Triumph 650 excellent
condition SBSO call Mike at
378-3587. (A-2t-140-p)
1969 Triumph 500 cc Twin cylinder,
4,800 miles, $850,378-8884 student.
(A-4t-140-p)
REALLY. These fuzzy puppies are
lovely I Ma and Pa are both handsome
collie-shepherd mixtures. Call
378-0118, then come and seel
(A-st-140-p)
For sale: Surfboard: Petrillo Pintail
only S4O. Honda 250 Scrambler
S3OO. Call 373-1249. (A-2t-140-p)
~ /
FOR RENT
Sublet Sum. Qtr. 2 bed. apt. can
easily fit 4 Air-con. roomy, close to
campus, really nice $125/mo + ut
Call 372-2137 or come by 804 SW
Depot Ave, eves. (B-3t-138-p)
WALK TO CLASS! 3 bedroom
house, AC, TV, 10 minutes to
Matherty. For summer term, liberal
neighborhood, Furnished fully. Call
378-8946 now. (B-136-st-p)
Sublease at 1716 NW 3 Ave. apt
Move In June 13th. Only $96/month
one bedroom air/heat. Perfect
for young marrleds dose to
campus 372-2257. (B-st-137-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Sublet for summer, 1 bdrm. apt. WW
carpet, central A/C, completely furn.,
2 pools, free bus to campus Unlv.
Gardens Trace sllO/mo. 372-1065.
(B-136-st-p)
Groovy no. 69 2 bedroom
Williamsburg apt. for summer,
furnished, AC, pool, dishwasher,
carpeted, near Med Center really
sharp, Call 373-2352. (B-136-6t-p)
Sublet: 1 bdrm. furnished apt. June
through August. French Quarter. AC,
pool, Call 376-4165 after 5:00,
392-0510 weekdays. (B-st-137-p)
Sublet 1-bedroom apartment next to
campus for summer quarter;
Alr-condltoned, furnished, parking,
SBS per month. 378-8548 after 4:00
(B-3t-138-p)
Modern 1 br. apt. beautifully
furnished AC, dishwasher, pool.
Available June 12 $l4O/mo Just off
campus Mt. Vernon Apt. Call after
6:30 p.m. 378-0260 (B-st-138-p)
-Across Street from campus Studio
Apt*, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included complete!*
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1228
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR
summer qtr. Share house 2 blocks
from campus with 2 coeds pvt. room,
A/C, Call 378-6548. (B-st-137-p)
Room MALE FEMALE carpets TV
Air kitchen liberal yet quiet. Summer
or fall see 5 to 6 PM or Call 392-0700
or 378-0286 1204 NW 3 Ave.
(B-st-138-p)
Alr-condltloned, 2 bedroom, quiet,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6.
Avail. June l. (B-7t-138-p)
2 br. furnished AC apt. SBS mo.
Sublet Jane Ist. 372-4179 anytime.
(B-3t-139-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT
Several 1 br. apts. l bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372*7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
2 br. furn. apt. for summer fun, AC,
pool, rsvd. pkg; quiet, upstairs, beaut,
view, spacious, Avail. June 1, vili.
Park. 86; 372*1114. (B-5t*139-p)
Sublet for summer or longer 1
bdrm. A/C, pvt. patio, furbished,
$ 115/mo Village 34, no. 27, Call
378-7000. (B-139-st-p)
House in the country, sublease, 3
bedrooms, AC 3Vi acres of forest, 5
min. from school, $125 per month
378-2809 1560 NW 29 Rd.
(B-139-st-p)
Need to Sublease 3 bedroom house
Alr-cond., 160 a month; for summer
quarter only 1319 NW 3rd Ave.
(B-139-st-p)
Sublease for summer, one bedroom
Village 34 apt, $220 for June 16 thru
Aug. 31. Ideal for couple. Call
378*0117 after 4:30 p.m.
(B-139-3t-p)
DRAFTED!!IiIt MUST sublet for
summer qtr. A 2 bdr. apt. reg.
$l9O/mo. BUT for you $l6O/mo.H
S9O off, just for you. Tanglewood.
378-7212. We only did It for you!!!!!
(B-lt-140-p)
Sublease for summer 2 room apt.
furnished lVi blocks from campus
call between 8 AM noon
S4O/month 378-9627. (B-st-140-p)
YOU can live at CLO all summer and
pay only $195 for your room AND
BOARD Call sec 376-9473 for
more information. COED.
(B-10t-140-p) )
1 BR furnished AC apt. 2 blocks
from campus. Sublet summer
quarter. $95/mo. Includes utilities.
Call 376-1331. (B-st-140-p)
Live it up this summer. Sublet 1
bdrm. French Qtr. apt. no. 38 choice
location, right on pool. Call
378-8980 after 5 PM. (B-3t-140-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 S.W. 16 Court. Make Your Fall
Reservations Now. Summer Rates on
a Few Apts. Available CALL
376-9668 (B-ts-C)
Need male roommate for summer
University Gardens alr-cond., carpet,
pool, etc. Only $45/month + V 2
utilities Call 378-6743. (B-3t-140-p)
WANTED
Need two coed roommates for 2
bedroom Tanglewood townhouse.
Move In Immediately. Call 372-0360
In afternoons or evenings.
(C-136-st-p)
Like a Bridge Over Toubled waters
7:30 May 14,21, 28, at the Union.
Please come .. Interesting,
Informative and free. Married or un.
(C-136-lt-p)
Two Together Keep It that way
A BRIDGE OVER TOUBLED
WATERS. FREE May 14, 21, 28
In the Union at 7:30 (C-136-st-p)
Fall qtr. engineering senior needs
three male roommates French Qtr.
$45 per month plus V utilities each,
call 373-2525 after 7 PM.
(C-2t-140-p)

, .mfif] 1
e Qtrei
<

WANTED
WfftWSSS
1 Female needed to sublet Landmark
apt. for summer qtr. (June rent free
546.25/mo.) Close to the laundry
and pool. Call Maddy at 373-2393 or
373-1192. (C-st-137-p)
Poolside! Williamsburg Apt., 2 bd.
furnished townhouse. Wish to sublet
for summer. Call 373-2358 now! All
the conveniences! (C-st-139-p)
Female wanted for summer $42.00
plus utilities for own bedroom In
house one block from campus. Move
In anytime after June 11. Call
378-2828. (C-st-139-p)
Want to sell your BIKE before
summer? Alice wants one now. Call
376-1391. (C-136-st-p)
Needed one female roommate for fall
quarter. Colonial Manor apts. one
block from campus. Call 378-9597.
ask for Debbie. (C-3t-140-p)
Two coeds need apartment,
preferably close to campus, for fall
quarter only. Call Mara 392-9724,
Gail 376-0738. (C-2t-140-p)
HELP WANTED
Cocktail Waitress part-time or
full-time no experience neceesary win
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dub*
Lounge 376-9175. (Elt-12S-p)
Like to sell or would you like to try?
How about a job with good pay plus
a chance to win Elucatlon Grant. Call
Fuller Brush 378-0121. (E-10t-134-p)
NYSE listed firm engaged In air
pollution study at Key West needs
analytical chemist & technlclal for. 4
mo. project. Starting in July. Call Dr.
J. Craig, 378-8090 for information.
(E-136-st-p)
Need a job? All routes student
operated. Charles Chips Home
Delivery service potato chips,
pretzels, cookies, 376-6943.
(E-10t-137-p)
Co-ed wanted Room and board In
exchange for domestic duties. Call
378-4292 after 7 PM. (E-st-138-p)
Student with truck or van to help
move Spinet piano, some furniture
May 30. 372-4179 anytime.
(E-139-2t-p)
TUTOR wanted for bright but easily
distracted second grader; reading and
writing. Call 372-4385 after 6 PM to
discuss salary, etc. (E-st-140-p)
2 Experienced smart painters,
gardeners tools furnished also
girl for House Cleaning Beautiful
Lake estate near
Gainesville-permanent. Hours to
suit-prevailing wages. Telephone
533-2381 or write Rt. no. 1, Box 361
Hiway 16 A Starke, Fla. (E-2t-140-p)
AUTOS
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission is a winner
tool TRY ITI Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)
Everyday transportation specials: We
Also buy clean used cars: Guaranty
Motors 1109 S. Main 378-7330.
(Q-ts-c) __
65 Austin Healy 3000 SI,OOO 220 SE
7th Street. 378-3831. (G-st-138-p)

Thursday, May 14,1970, The Florida Alligator,

ADM. 53.00 n 'S A
feature fipKvv ... J
M is
m MAIIiI #3-7:00
phsne \n|A sun. f. t SHOW
3724623 Persons under 18 now showing
no passes wof aamitfa playboy
Vflgot Sjo mans complete and uncut I Am Curtom (Ytow) is a PINT HO USE
remarkable film (which) has been playing for a long time to droves of THRiTIK
Swedes, and to several million people almost everywhere. It is the story of 1
a young gill who is, or was, curious about politics, nonviolence, Zen, iocatio atth*
commitment, socialism, other Swedes and, to be sure, sex. It is a serious susutSlA mhvk in
film with a noble theme, and, in dramatic terms, it is original. says Look thcatm
magazine. N.W. 13th ST.-PH. 373-952$
ADMISSION RESTRICTED TO ADULTS _Acsossr>OM thimau
UaiwiSy /
mw. IMversttvAve. I .-
pMSBHBBBBaaaH LAST DAY
"PUTNEY SWOPE"
heh m... iipiwirt]nr
£ji**ii**ii m 1 MimitiMlmtMiiaimWV'ii imUTn' i flgpiirlffi^^FtMi'Jl
I

-* HB&U, I LAST DAY I \

Page 13

pPP2F=r
ua war 4
Maggie Smith \\
Jr
g the^rimc
qf 6 Miss
Jfewnflrodie
Moggie Smith
I"*> #ilMp:



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

X*X-X-X*X'X*X*X*X*XvX*X*XvX*X X X*
AUTOS
xrrXvXtXvXx^Xxivl^y^XstXrXvlvX:;:,
1964 VW, good condition, "bug,"
new whitewall tires, new naugahide
interior, newly rebuilt engine, radio.
$550. After 5:30 call 378-4674.
(G-4t-137-p)
Mercedes Benz 220 S Sunroof
Bucket-seats, British racing green
Fog-lights FM-short wave radio must
sell! 1959. $550. Call 392-8729.
(G-st-137-p)
1966 Corvette 427 Air FMAM
radio, Immaculate, 34,000 miles. Call
Bill Baxter 372-9363 PIKE House.
(G-st-137-p)
64 Corvair, clean 4 speed, radio,
heater, $300; '65 Honda 90 good
condition, Call 378-6017.
(G-139-st-p)
1969 V W Squ are back
air-conditioned, Fine shape $2,200.
1966 Simca sedan good car. *550.
No reasonable Offer refused on either
car. 372-1039. (Q-st-T39-p)
*64 Falcoln 4 door, stand, shift, 6
cylind., radio, heater, good tires, very
good condition. Clean, cheap, fun.
$4 75. 378-4642 or 376-2248.
(G-3t-139-p)
69 VW bug white w/red interior
white sldewals like new 12,000 ml. 1
yr. warranty left $2064 new now
SI7OO. Must sell! Calf after 5:
373-1654. (G-3t-140-p)
Ford, 1962, Air, R & H, 4 dr, six
white, S4OO, VW Bug, 1968, Air, R &
H, Sunroof, Extras, Excellent car,
$1590, Call 372-2303. (G-3t-140-p)
1963 Rambler FULLY EQUIPPED
RUNS PERFECTLY $399. Call Tom
at 373-1573 or 373-2747.
(G-st-140-p)
PERSONAL
A program designed to answer honest
questions about the marital
relationship. A Bridge Over Troubled
Waters good program good time
(j-136-St-p)
At last! A real delicatessen in
Gainesville the NEW DELHI 706 W.
Unlv. or call 378-8656 for free
delivery. Good food for good peoplel
(J-136-st-p)
CO-EDS, Facial Hair removed forever
fast low cost gentle hale removal.
Edmund Dwyer Electrofogist 102
NW 2nd Ave Call 372-8039 for appt.
(J-23t-137-p)
COMING: A BRIDGE OVER
TROUBLED WATERS May 14, 21,
28. Frank Discussions about
Marriage. (J-136-lt-p)
"Desire, expectations & reality" May
14 Union room no. 347 free, a
frank discussion about marriage
roll expectations and child bearing.
(J-136-st-p)
STATISTICS tutor needed for St
340, Call Janice at 373-2994 after 6.
Will pay. (J-139-2t-p)
Ride desperately needed to Naples or
vicinity Friday, May 15. Call Anne at
392-7744. (J-139-3t-p)

MORBISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
THURSDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<
FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
Fish Almondine and
French-Fried Potatoes
9<
GAINESVILLE MALL

PERSONAL
Union, room no. 347 A BRIDGE
OVER TROUBLED WATERS The
first in 8 series of frank discussions
about marriage. Designed for you.
FREE. J[J-136-st-p)
Charlotte, you're the prettiest peace
marcher I've ever seen. Call 378-0529
and we can rap some more about
school, politics, etc, Jack.
(J-139-2t-p)
Thinking about getting married? Find
out what Its all about. Come to A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters, May
14, 7:30 Union no. 347.
(J-136-st-p)
A frank discussion about marriage.
Married, thinking about it or just
interested. May 14 A Bridge Over
Troubled Waters. (J-136-st-p)
New student owned mobile heme
repair service. Any repairs cent, air
carports awnings > add-a-rooms
supplies and accessories. Prompt
and dependable service. D & M Sales
and service 373-1446. (J-10t-130-p)
FLYING to Miami. Leave May 15
return Sunday night. Round trip $25.
Need one passenger. Call 392-8875
anytime. U*lt-140-p)
REWARD for return of contents of
missing suitcase. Lost at corner of 15
St. and 2nd PI. No questions asked.
Call 378-8546. (J-3t-140-p)
Transcendental Meditation lecture
has been rescheduled for Sunday,
May 17, at 7:30 p.m. Meet at lecture
Hall across from University (Ellery.
(J-2t-140-p)
ATTENTION! American Woman!
Your Vehicle has arrived! Fondly
Pat (J-lt-140-p)
Jeng Congradulations BUT there are
407 steps from Yulee to Rawlings
YLS. (J-2t-140-p)
To my favorite Scorpio (EAM 17):
Always may the sun shine bright for
you and the stars guide you, for you
are the reason they shine. Youll
always be the one and only *N* man
gray hairs included. "Mt P"
(J-st-140-p)
Big Strong Boy, What can I say? Even
though everything didnt go perfectly
last weekend, the good things that
happened were the best that could
have happened. All I can say Is
thanks for everything! Youve made
me much happier than you know.
Love, Your Kitten. (J-lt-140-p)
LOST <& FOUND
at *
Lost: Pair of glasses Sunday 3 PM at
Front of McCartney Hail. Reward
Call Don: 378-8666. (L-139-lt-p)
Lost: Black wallet near Gym. Need
IDs badly. Please call Chuck
392-8158. (L-139-3t-p)
SERVICES
;*X XX X*XvX*X*X"X*X X*X*XX'X'X'X
Rubys ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th St. 376-8506 Mrs.
Ruby Mills. (M-10t-135-p)

Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 14,1970

SERVICES
XsrX?X£SS:S3£X ; X*X*X*X*X*r*X ; X ; X ; X ; X\
A Million Dollars worth of free
advice... FREE at A BRIDGE
OVER TROUBLED WATERS. May
14, 21, 28 ... 7:30, in the Union.
(M-i36-it-p) j:.v
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
Mayes Designer's furrier, stoles made
from coats dress designer, alterations,
teach 102 N.W. 2nd St. 372-0160.
(M-4t-137-p)
Alternators Generators Starters'
Electrical Systems tested and!
repairs Auto Electrical Service,,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
- - V*
AT THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 cent and 4 cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)
X;XvX;X;X;X;Xx.'"xX\vX\*XvX"&\"XX"X -XvXv
X-X-X-X-XvXvXvXvX-X-X-X-X-X-.'.vXvX -XvXv
XvXvX\vXvX X*X X X* v .'.*""*.*.'"XvXv XvX*X
I Hat** j
J£j:

JVROOOM!\
m SUNDAY--MAY 17--1 P.M. lllflf fl P Pfl Q Q I
(practice at 11a m.) l|f|e|U Races I
NEWLY EXCAVATED TRACK LOCATED
A i DIRECTLY BEHIND THE DRAGON ART
THEATRE. ENTER AT THEATRE FRONT! iffllfiP*
I -Wl
I < THE BIG BIKES, ROAR £ fte /
p UNBELIE\ EABLE HEIGHTS!
I FIERCE MOTO-CROSS I

;X:X;::XxX;X\;X;X::x:x:x:X : x : X ; x : X : X
SERVICES
Grad student Needs Bread.
Experienced Accurate Typist. .45 per
page Cal! Lorrie ,372-7973.
(M-Bt-140-p)
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent, air
carports awnings add-a-rooms
supplies and accesories. Prompt
and dependable service. D & M sales
and service 373-1446. (M-10t-130-p)
********* *** Volkswagen **-
********** ******** Parts and
Service********* ***** Gainesville
Mach. Shop ****** ******** 1224
S. Main 376-0710*****
(M-10t-131-p)

imiE 11 .. :
FRIDAY
WITH THE \
UNINHIBITED SEVENTIEsX
A different hunk of youth. When he
speaks, you listen. You wonder about
the freaky things you'hear and the
people he raps with.
YOUR EYES
WONT BELIEVE
ALL YOU HEAR
,M Tii LAWYI.
mNEWMAN
mam muMULDAUR h(M£Y fcCOURT
Written trj SKINCY J. FUWE and HAROLD BUCHUAN Produced t*BMO OEXTER greeted by SXWEY J FUME h COLOR
LAST "A DREAM
DAY OF KIN^S"
T^SUMMERMO^ECLUBTICKEfsoir il |
| SALE NOW 12 SHOWS $1.50 |

SERVICES
It's all there: SEX, BABIES,
MONEY, DIVORCE, at the Union on
May 14, 21, 28. FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE. (M-136-lt-p)
New Speed Queen Coin Op
Laundry In Sin City. S. W. 16th Ave.
Studnet special. Wash one load, get
second wash free. Offer good Tues.
through Sat. from 3 PM lO PM.
Air-Conditioned. Also Do It yourself
Dry-Cleaning. (M-139-3t-p)
Del-Ray typing service: Manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.,
prompt, pick-up delivery,
373-1984, 9-5, (M-st-115-p)



BIRDSEYE AND CREAMY
FOX DELUXE
PIZZA CHUNKIES.... $ 1
CHEESE OR SAUSAGE
frozen french fried
CA, POTATOES.. 5 69 c
OCOMA
DINNERS. .59- DINNERS ... 3 s l
ESK|MO HAWAIIAN
raon .us ; FRUIT PUNCH 5 s l
FISH STICKS
THOMAS
^ s ; / ENGLISH MUFFINS 4 ~ s l ##
g~7* J >3 mmmums BAR-B-QUE SANDWICH ~ 99'
y ( 'Jr '""qQc DESSERT TOPPING 39'
~~~~ TER nuggets......3~i 00
(l \ / jfTIIIV TOP VAUJC nlum il [III/TW VALUE iMllTiT
T "*** w iwoTmnn "** j
| I / / STAMM ;BilllT W VALUE STAMM j:| [ill JYC*> VALUE jjSft |
m M | .... . WH ww | N(.VFM (OMR*. ! FVMMW Wlf < MkWtfM (M HWOHH W
I \ § m ISKiaO ICE CREAM FANNrsnHNtRS iHKmEs ujlmm JAJKtJIfA
I I # !K# SaadwEch., Spaghetti K&3& Caka it-'lii K'W Saalaad Plattar
L| M iSM* t OOO0 0 6 00 ,H,U, '^, KV OOOOTHIUM. Jl, BBmBF N 8 0000 IHRU *

Thursday, May 14,1970, Tha Florida AMfator,

Page 15



Page 16

1, Tho Florida AKIfMor, Thunday, May 14,1970

PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON, MAY 20
miss this Offer!
voidAftiimay2o \
- FRUIT DISH |
y v V \ V Mori Pvfchote Excluding Cigorettos kB
0000 MAY 14 THRU AUGUST l Era \ /' IR^^Hk ;
H 77)/s coupon worth *7.00 PR&& El BAG
§ TWO SALAD H
1 Fw~ M I Bartlett Pears... 3 s S I OO Liquid Deteraent4 i S I OO
B Ji H Tomato Juice ...4 S I OO Paper Towels ...3 S I OO
THRIFTY MAID All Flavors (Bean, Tomato, Vegetable, Chicken, Vegetable Beef) DEL MONTE
wsaiL'.y.lu'i.jiuj.-iiSLaM Soups 10 s l Green Peas 5" s l
i l Cnili Crackers .. 4 ~ S I OO Green Beans.. .10 S I OO
j|| 12" PJ
| A| SANDWJOffTp^
1 r~ m yKmo^ fiT i M 2 8-oz. lfl\MUk A| Vw
1 t-t^JMoo 1 m NRBs I I pnfcefcr pj
l JHB OIXIC OARUNG BROWNjL SEIVE
protoutp 2 9 A
WCATSUP TOOTH^WSH
M|| writ $3.00 o' mor. pinch...
ho.oM 000 SANBORN
Food ... 7 '-s' s l Corn ... 4 s l Jwlii rAEELE .. pa<-
Italian Pressing 3^ $ I Wrrtt J #
mi-9*. HEINZ HOT 000 RELISH & 15-ox. SWITCH REGULAR SIZE 14-ox. KEEBLER DANISH
Sweet Relish .... 31* Cat Food ... 10 Lifebuoy Soap... 3/45 c Wedding Cookies 53*
6-ox. DOG TREATS 15-ox. SUNSHINE 14-ox. HEINZ
i Liv-A-Snaps 33* Hydrox Cookies ... 49* B-B-Q Sauce 49
j 5 Mp^gST*S 3lb. 101. [|ffpei| "inrii T-yW' ; ;
Tde ze 60 c i iiunjsgm w3*hamk;
i s niEPBPMRMRMHPHRaMiaaaHnpRBPMRMMMM* J Paper Plates | Instant Coffee i Fleer Shine | Bag Bernb
I i COUPON - S .IE.IMIHIHIIM | m,, ~
i 2 GOOD ONLY AT | J ,,l> i iB ....Jkli.A
; I winn-dkie | 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST.
! OFFIR EXPIRES MAY 20
' UMITI COUPON m PURCHASE HI WAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST.
M A
. .-*... I* *'*
?s



PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON, MAY 20 sunnyland pure rone link breakfast
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE BOTTOM kl Sausage .... $ 1
DAIlAin IUI,
|b I VI I IAI I W I Drumsticks
* WWr WjOjM WHWHC Cocktail 3is 89 e
B-- liMMttiH Ik I iongacre country style fried
S, jj Cll*ol^ StamP w^Coupon
k TARNOW SMOKED
r Sausage....
0 P LB. Franks
USDA CHOICE MM) BRAND BEEF USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF TRIMMED NEW YORK USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF TOP ROUND or SIRLOIN
Chuck Roast 69 c Strip Steaks..... $ 1 59 Tip Roast * $ 1 29
W-D BRAND FRESH HANDI-PAK (5-lb- $2.89).. (10-lb*. $5.69) USDA CHOI W-D BRAND BEEF BONELESS EYE USDA OtOICE W-D BRAND BEEF
Ground Beef... 3 $ 1 79 Round Roast..... $ 1 39 Chuck Steak 79 c
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF BONELESS USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF FULL CUT BONELESS W-D BRAND GROUND HANDI-PAK
Rump Roast $ 1 29 Round Steak .... s l l9 Round Steak 99 c
USOA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF TOP ROUND OR USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF PORTERHOUSE OR FRESH
Sirloin Steak $ 1 29 T-bone Steak... .. $ 1 39 Pork Ham 69 c
*4SSa T S=i-Hm +]kjkm FRESH QUARTER LOIN SLICED MjjfeL
f PORK CHOPS.... /y
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Thuraday, May 14,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 14,1970

rBOOKS =j
David O. Selznick:
A New Biography
Selznick?by Bob Thomas.
(Doubleday, $7.95)
At 37, David O. Selznick had completed Gone with the Wind,
without argument one of the finest movies ever made. As he received
the Academy Awards, the huzzahs of his fellow movie men, the
pudgy, confident producer didnt realize that, in effect, his career was
over.
Selznick never came near equalling the triumph of that one picture,
though he tried sometimes a bit pitfully and pathetically. The
GWTW story also is the high point of his biography of all the
Selznicks, father and sons David and Myron, which is one of its
troubles.
But practiced film chronicler Bob Thomas, as in his previous tales
of Hollywood rajahs, dutifully collected anecdotes that will enthrall
any follower of film making in the 1930 s and 19405. The Selznicks
might not come off as the worlds most commendable people, but
they were individuals who grabbed more than their share of life and,
occasionally, enjoyed it.
Joan Hanauer (UPI)
* *
Push Comes to Shove, by Steven Kelman.
(Houghton Mifflin, $5.95)
Like the rest of the country, Harvard University has been tom by a
kind of warfare during the last four years.
In the fall of 1967, when the war in Vietnam seemed out of
control, students at Harvard suddenly turned against the war in a
Cotton Matherhood of burning frenzy. As a longtime socialist
familiar with politics on the left, Steven Kelman, then a sophomore,
was unimpressed by the passionate anti-war rhetoric of SDS,but few
other Harvard students were as sophisticated.
The result, at Harvard and dozens of other colleges and universities,
was a fierce commitment to political change by any means
necessary.
Kelmens uneven but fascinating book describes the slow building
of political passions, culminating in the bitter and chaotic strike in the
spring of 1969.
While many Harvard students found the strike inspiring, Kelman
saw it as tragic. Acquainted with the narrowness, intolerance and
brutality of Stalinism, especially during the 19305, he saw the violence
of those weeks at Harvard as the first step toward the self-destruction,
and the perversion, of the New Left.
Thomas Powers (UPI)
Poet Around To Talk
To You In Union Today

People interested in talking
about anything with a young
California poet will have their
chance today when Rod Taylor,
who fits that description, will be
listening in the Reitz Union.
Taylor was brought to campus
from Stanford University by the
Union Programs Office and The
Florida Quarterly for a reading
Wednesday night. The thing
today also is sponsored by the
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Union.
Mr. Taylor will be in the first
floor lounges, rooms 122 and
123, from 3 until 530 pjn.
today to discuss his own poetry
or the work of others or
anything else of mutual interest.
His interests include the making
of rock music, films, oriental
cooking, and masonry.
Its all free.

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The
Florida
Alligator

'Sympathy Is Back
For Union Showings

Sympathy for the Devil, a
film by Jean-Luc Godard
starring The Rolling Stones will
be shown here next Monday and
Tuesday night.
It was going to be shown one
other weekend, was one time,
and then was stolen from the
Union Theater booth. Its back,
the same film. Hopefully it
wont be stolen this time.
THE FILM is Godards first to
be made in English and is also
the first full length dramatic
picture to be made about or
with The Stones. Though the
movie is centered around a
recording session with Jagger
and The Stones, it also comes to
be about black power, rape,
murder, fascism, acid,
pornography, sex, gore, and
brutality according to
information from the
distributors.
There will be three showings a
night Monday and Tuesday at
530, 8, and 10:30 pjn. in the
Reitz Union Theater. Admission
price is $1.50. Except for the
couple of showings the night
Production
Continues
At Constans
There are three more nights to
catch the latest offering from
The Florida Players, a comedy
by Jean Anouilh, Thieves
Carnival.
There is one show at 8 pjn.
tonight and Friday and Saturday
nights in the Constans Theatre in
the Union complex.
There is a special emphasis by
the Players in this production to
involve the audience as much as
possible and there are many nice
surprises in the play. It is
mixed-media production and
makes use of a musical score
written by a student, Fernando
Fonseca.
The production of Thieves
Carnival opened Monday night.

''^^^^s^S'^v^^^p^^^S'>is'^flV|9'9|^B'9G|K'^u''9|^B'''B''''

- before it was stolen, this will be
the premier showing of the film
in the South.
There is approximately 50
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minutes of footage of The
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The
Florida
Alligator

Gators Wright On, Sweep FSU!

808 TEBOW
Alligator Writer
Victory couldnt have been sweeter Wednesday as the Gators
downed the number-one ranked Seminoles 54 for the second straight
day at Perry Field.
FSU was leading 4-2 in the bottom of the ninth when Rod Wright
ended the game with his two-out, bases-loaded double. The Gators
came up with three runs on four walks and Wrights double. It was the
third time the Gators had the bases loaded, but this time they
capitalized on the situation as Wright hit a 2-2 pitch over the third
basemans head which eluded the leftfielder.
THE GATORS opened up the scoring in the first inning on a single

w r
: .->>e^y^^>>^g>cjacj&frqj^gi^c^fife&^a^ $: v
. -./. ... .
- -.. - -ff
TOM KENNEDY
WILL HARMAN
... dives under pick-off

Golf Hopes High For SEC

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
Weve got a good chance to
win the SEC, said Golf Coach
Buster Bishop in a phone call
from Calloway Gardens, Ga.
' Weve practiced on the
Calloway Gardens course and
the boys and I feel we are ready
for a top performance.
Bishop must know what hes
talking about as he brought the
UF its first NCAA team
championship back in 1968, the
same year Steve Melnyk & Co.,
captured the Southeastern
Conference golf championship.
THIS YEARS GOLF edition,
although not as strong as the
NCAA and SEC title holding
squads, has won the Senior Bowl
and Miami Invitational
tournaments and will be
shooting for their fourth team

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GATOR SPORTS

title since the SEC golf tourney
began in 1^37.
The 54-hole tournament will
get underway today at the 7,100
yard Calloway Garden course,
which is known for its long,
narrow fairways and small
greens. The 10 SEC schools will
play 18 holes each day through
Saturday over the tough par 72
course. Team standings will be
determined by the schools top
five players after 54 holes of
play.
Coach Bishops lineup for the
SEC crown event will mix two
seniors with three shophomores
and a freshman. Senior Ron
Mahood won the individual title
at the Miami Invitational
tourney this year and senior
Wendell Coffee was a member of
that 6B NCAA title winning
team.
ANDY NORTH, David Barnes
and Mike Killian are all strong

by Will Harmon and Tony Dobies double over the centerfielders
head. FSU came back in the second to score three runs on four hits
and two Gator errors. Harmon scored his second run of the day on a
walk to Dobies and Lauri Vidals single to right, and" came home on
four straight balls to Tommy Blankenship. FSU added a run in the
sixth to set the score at 4-2.
The winning pitcher was Larry Sheffield who came in for Tom
Seybold in the ninth. Losing pitcher was Mack Scarce who came in
the game in the seventh. Glen Pickren started for the Gators and went
six innings. FSUs Amman started and went 6 1/3 innings.
The Gators have three remaining games with Florida State at
Tallahassee May 22,23.

sophomores, with North
appearing to be the strongest for
the SEC. North shot a
one-under-par 71 over the
Calloway Garden course last
weekend in a practice session.
Freshman Stacy Russell
rounds out coach Bishops squad
of hopeful contenders for the
coveted SEC title crown.
A high finish in the SEC
Championships will assure the
Gators of a spot in the
prestigious NCAA
Championships on June 23-26 in
Columbus, Ohio.
_ a
MEXICO
Cologio Victorias summer
session, Guadalajara, June 29
Aug. 2. Room, Board, Tuition,
Fees, $250. The greatest
concentration of talent and the
finest campus in Mexico, bourses
from Archeology to glass blowing
and leather work. Excellent Art
dept. Numerous excursions.
Write: Director. Box 1327,
Bellingham, Wash. 98225.

mm&immMi'Mm*'* Maeaem *" --- v ~
m... > I .Ea&Jlifii jKm
m> RMHftjfl
fc mmg VW
? JM L" W
jm
GLEN PICKREN TOM KENNEDY
... started win

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Thuraday, May 14,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Ironwood
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMBERSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 4 TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
for information tall
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Assistant Sports Editor

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Page 19



Page 20

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 14,1970

Steen Turns Chargers Down

By DOUG KEITH
Alligator Writer
i
Former Gator football co-captain Mac Steen has turned down an
offer to play professional football with the American Football
Leagues Diego Chargers.
Cited by Gator coaches as one of Floridas greatest team leaders
ever, the All-SEC tackle has decided a career in dentistry is a more
comfortable way to make a living than head-knocking in the pro
ranks.
Steen has been, accepted to Emory Universitys School of Dentistry
for the fall term. He will graduate from UF in August.
1 just decided that Id been playing football for nine years and its
done a lot for me, but theres a time when you have to give it up and
think about what you want to do for the rest of your life. Emory has
all new facilities and its an honor to get accepted.
The decision was not an easy one. Although picked in the 10th
round of the pro draft, the Chargers made a pretty fair offer.
Most Florida fans will remember Mac as the man most responsible
for bringing attention to the often overlooked offensive lineman. As
the ring-leader of Haynes Hornets, Steen and his cohorts did much to
insure the reliability of the vaunted Gator passing attack this fall, the
most successful year in Gator history.

Owens Named
Not only did Andy Owens
lead the basketball team in
scoring on the court, but he led
them off the court in scoring
too. Andy was named Tuesday
to the 1970 Academic
All-American Basketball Second
Team, which is chosen by the
nations sports information
directors.
Dan Issel and Mike Pratt, a
, pair of Kentucky standouts for
Coach Adolph Rupps Wildcats
were named to the first team.
Issel, who led the Wildcats to the
Southeastern Conference
championship, was the leading
vote-getter on the il -man squad
composed of players with at
least a B average.
Others named to the first team
include Dennis Awtrey of Santa
Clara, Charlie Scott of North
Carolina, John Roche of South
Carolina, Rich Yunkus of
Georgia Tech, Ralph Simpson of
Michigan State, Bill Zopf of
Duquesne, Mike Newlin of Utah,
Ron Becker of New Mexico and
Jim Cooper of Air Force.
NOW
OPENING
for
Sept. Occupancy
LEASE OFFICE
309 NW 13th St.
Across from
Tigert Half
Jliei
place)

CHOOSES DENTAL SCHOOL

; a y v intiniiii' Ji Jr & IkmP
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MAC STEEN
... guard takes on Houston pair

NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST / W L PCT GB
Chicago < 16 13 .552
New York ; 16 16 .500 1%
St. Louis 1 13 14 .481 2%
Pittsburgh 14 17 .452 3%
Philadelphia 13 *$ ,419 4% '"
' Montreal 9 20 3 w ?**
WEST \W L PCT GB
ancinnati 24,, 9 .727
Atlanta 18 13 .581 5
Los Angeles 17 13 .567 5%
San Francisco 16 17 .485 8
Houston 15 17 .469 8%
San Diego 15 19 .441 9%
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 22 4 ,733 '*'
New York 17 15 .531 6
Detroit 15 14 .517 6%
Boston 14 15 .483 7%
Washington 13 17 .433 9
Cleveland 10 16 .385 10
WEST W L PCT GB
California 20 10 .667
Minnesota 18 10 .643 1
Oakland 15 16 .484 SV2
Chicago 13 17 .433 7
Kansas City 10 18 .357 9
Milwaukee 10 21 .323 10%