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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
IPitkL
All Awmm.

Vol G 2, No. 136

UHLFELDER CALLS MEETING OF STUDENT BODY
Strike Closes UF; No Classes Today

OConneff
Dismisses
All Classes
(See OConnells
Statement, Page 2)
By TERRY PITMAN
And RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff VWiters
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell dismissed all classes
today and Saturday with the
support of the State Board of
Regents.
OConnell met student
demands Thursday at 5:30 pjn.
in Walker Auditorium. The
strikers had occupied the
building since 1:30 pjn.
Thursday.
THE PRESIDENT warned
demonstrators to leave the
auditorium by 7 pjn. After a
discussion moderated by Rev.
Michael Gannon, the students
agreed to leave at the deadline
and voted to return to Tigert.
you dont do it, were
inviting the same kind of thing
that happened at Kent State,
OConnell said.
I will not discuss demands
under these conditions,
OConnell said at Walker
Auditorium. He said there can
be reasonable discussion of
the demands at a future date.
HE SAID he had no
intention to call the National
Guard here.
The 800 students left Walker
at 7 pjn. and joined another
group of about 400 students.
University police wore riot
helmets, but did not carry clubs
or sticks. The students left
(SEE 'DEMONSTRATORS'
PAGE 2)

TWO SWORN IN
SG Oathtaking Provision Questioned

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The new student body treasurer and Honor Court chancellor were
sworn in Thursday or were they?
The constitution and statutes of UFs Student Body, article VII,
section 3 states:
TIME OF ASSUMING OFFICE. The officers of the Student Body
shall assume the duties of their offices ten (10) days after canvassing
of elections by the Student Senate .
Sen. Stewert Hershey, majority whip, said the election was
canvassed at 12:45 am. Wednesday morning. This means the new
officers cannot be sworn in until a week from Friday, he said.
The question was raised because Student Body President-elect Steve
Uhlfelder called a special senate meeting for Thursday night, Hershey
said.
NOT ONLY WAS the supposed senate meeting improperly called,
but it appears from the constitution that the president has another
week before he takes office. There just can be no meeting without at
least 24 hour notice, Hershey said. N

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

V |f j _:
WALKER OCCUPIED TOM KENNEDY
... strikers liberate" auditorium, hold teach-in
Shutdowns Hit Campuses
As Demonstrations Mount

By United Press International
College shutdowns, student strikes and
tumultuous demonstrations mounted across the
nation Thursday.
A wave of arson and vandalism hit many
campuses^
NATIONAL GUARD troops kept the peace in
many university communities.
Some campuses were all but deserted, schools
closed by administrative order or classes abandoned
by students protestlhg the gunfire deaths of four
Kent State University students and the U. S. move
into Cambodia.
Most of the protests were orderly and classes
went on normally at hundreds of schools but
violence marked demonstrations in some cities.
SIXTY CARLETON and St. Olaf College
students were arrested in Minneapolis, Minn., when
they blocked all entrances to the federal building.
Some 100 state troopers broke up an all-night
vigil by protesters on the University of Alabama
campus at Tuscaloosa after a fire of undetermined

University of Florida, Gainesville

Senate Majority Floor .Leader Sam Poole said any action taken at
the meeting would be illegal because f the meeting had not been called
according to proper procedure.
Hershey said if the new officers assume their duties they do in the
interim would be unconstitutional.
RICK LAZZARA, former chancellor of the Honor Court, swore in
Dan Stephens as the new chancellor Thursday afternoon.
Stephens then swore John Dodson in as student body treasurer.
Lazzara said based on precedent and his interpretation of the
statute, new officers should assume thieir duties within 10 days,
rather than only on the tenth day.
STEPHENS SAID he feels a reasonable interpretation would be
within 10 days. 4'--'*" '.
I think 10 days was intended to be a maximum rather than an
absolute.
Uhlfelder could not be reached for comment.
Student Body President Walter Morgan said he agrees with the
interpretation which allows new officers to be sworn within 10 days,
but will continue in office until the next administration comes in.

origin erupted in a gymnasium.
Fire ruined an administration building on the
Valparaiso (Ind.) University campus.
FLAMES OF suspicious origin gutted a student
center on Fordham Universitys Rose Hill campus ih
New York City.
Student vandals caused heavy damage to two
buildings on the Southern Illinois University campus
at Carbondale.
Fire destroyed a two-story bookstore at Marietta
(Ohio) College.
ARMORIES AND ROTC offices caught the brunt
of the firebombings and other vandalism across the
nation.
A $5,000 fire swept the ROTC headquarters at
Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.
Two firebombs were tossed into an ROTC room
at Ohio University at Athens, Ohio.
Three firebombs were thrown at the ROTC
building at the University of Nevada, and a bottle
Filled with gasoline was thrown at an armory in
Mankato, Minn. In both cases, little or no damage
was done.

Friday, May 8, 1970

Meeting
To VoteOn
Demands
See Today s Program Page 3
By RICK ROSKOWE
And 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writers
UF Student Body
President-elect Steve Uhlfelder
has called for a meeting of the
entire student body on the Plaza
of the Americas today at noon.
The announcement came
during a day of unrest in which
students occupied Walker
Auditorium and UF President
Stephen C. OConnell cancelled
classes for today.
THE TIME has come to
speak up for morality not just
what is safe. We will continue to
strike and continue to fight until
we win, Uhlfelder told an
audience of 500 at the plaza
Thursday afternoon.
Uhlfelder called on all
students to come to the plaza
for an hour of meditation and a
1 p.m. vote on the Student
Strike Committee demand to
disarm campus police.
(SEE'STRIKERS'PAGE 2)
BULLETIN
An estimated 3,500
students marched in silent
procession last night in
mourning for the dead at
Kent State and in S.E. Asia.
Student Body
President-elect Steve
Uhlfelder and Karen Balkany
led the march from Tigert to
Tolbert and Graham areas
and back again. The march
stretched seven blocks long,
with marchers eight abreast.
Most of the students
carried candles and remained
silent until the end of the
march when they began
singing Give Peace A
Chance.
Karen Balkany described
the march as the largest peace
march in the history of the
university.
Inside |H
llliliiiliipiiiill
INDOCHINA: U. S.
forces invading
Cambodia Find Communist
Supply Base ........page 4
Classifieds 12
Editorials 8
Entertainment 16
Letters .9
Movies 12
Orange and Blue 14
Sports 18
What's Happening .....7



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday. May 8.1970

Thursdays Strike Actions Varied

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KEN MEGILL
.. addresses strikers at Tigert after leaving Walker
Strikers Debate, Debate

pace oneJ
An emergency meeting of the
Student Senate would be called,
and he would ask OConnell for
an emergency meeting of the
Faculty Senate, Uhlfelder said.
TAKE A STAND, for a
change if you believe in
something, you have to speak
for it, Uhlfelder said.
Disarmament of campus
police was one of seven demands
posed by the Student Strike
Committee. The others are:
Hiring of more black
professors and enrollment of
more black students in
accordance with standards set by
the Black Student Union.
Immediate nonaccreditation
of the ROTC program, and
eventual removal of ROTC from
campus.
Amnesty for UF employes
who are union organizers.
i Cessation of
chemical-biological warfare
research being conducted on
campus, and a rechannelling of
UF resources to ecological
research.
Total amnesty for strikers.
Four hundred radical students
took over Walker Auditorium
Thursday afternoon after
becoming dissatisfied with the
rally on the plaza.
THERE WAS NO violence
during the student takeover,
although UF police in riot
helmets waited outside the
building.
A scheduled zoology class was
turned over to radicals by
Clifford Johnston, assistant
professor of zoology, for a
discussion on the Indochina war.
Class members were allowed
to enter the building after Frieda
Brown, associate professor of
French, warned students that
the situation would be out of

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601..
Subscription rate is SIO.OO pfeiCyear and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

PLAZA, DORMS, WALKER, TIGERT

the universitys hands if the
class was not allowed to go on.
IF THIS IS done, the state
will bring in troopers. If you
want violence, go out into the
streets, she said.
Police apparently left after
Johnston spoke, and a crowd
that had grown to
approximately 600 listened to a
succession of speakers debate
why they had liberated
Walker Auditorium and what
they were going to do.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell cancelled three
progress tests scheduled to be
held in the auditorium Thursday
night.
IF THEY TRY to remove us
from this building, theyre going
to have to pick us up and carry
us. And were not moving, one
speaker said.
At 2:10 pm., a speaker asked
how many were willing to spend
the night. Only a few hands were
raised. Two hours later, about
one-third of the group indicated
they would stay.
I guess that settles it were
gonna be here tonight, a
student in an American flag vest
announced.
A COLLECTION was taken
up to buy food. Bottles of wine
were passed around among the
crowd and students later
appeared with polyethylene
trash baskets full of Koolaid.
Oranges and bread were
distributed.
Volunteers were called for to
act as marshals -a vote was
taken as to whether news
coverage of the event would be
allowed.
Before the vote, newsmen
were told to come to the
podium and identify themselves.
IF YOU SEE some of these
guys with their cameras and tape
recorders, ask them to identify
themselves. If they dont, then

you take their cameras or their
notebooks away, because some
of them may be police
informers, said an unidentified
speaker.
A student who refused to
identify himself, told students it
was too late to worry about
issues such as Vietnam, race
relations and the shootings at
Kent State.
WEVE GOT to declare war
on the United States government
right now, he declared.
The remark drew a chorus of
boos and No war with
anybody from the crowd.
Mitchell Dasher of the Black
Student Union told students
that they could not affect the
war in Vietnam or other national
issues.
The only issue here is
student power, Dasher said.
Another said there was only
one way to prevent another
Kent State was to stop
demonstrating altogether.
Earlier in the afternoon, one
speaker called on the students to
stop using the word pigs to
refer to the UF police.
Those police out there arent
pigs. The police in Chicago are
pigs, but these guys outside are
people.
The word continued to be
used.

Beethoven ....
Several of Beethovens works will be presented tonight by
The Boston Symphony Chamber Players. Tonight, their final
night on the University of Florida campus, will be dedicated
to compositions of the master. Performances begin at 8:15
tonight in the University Auditorium. Tickets are SI.OO for
students, $2.00 for non-students. Presented by Student
Government Productions and Celebration

By STEVE STRAPS
And RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff Writer*
Striking students ringed Tigert Hall Thursday morning trying to
prevent employes from getting to work at the UF administration
building.
With cries of open up, let us m, the crbwd milled around the
steps. Workers edged their way into the building. They were admitted
into the building only with police approval.
A TEAR GAS bomb was hurled into the crowd by an unidentified
person, which sent the students scurrying from the steps.
Steve Uhlfelder, Student Body President-elect, talked to the
crowd and directed them to the Plaza of the Americas.
At the plaza, philosophy professor Kenneth Megill read a statement
from the Ad Hoc Committee of Concerned Faculty supporting the
strike.
THE STATEMENT read by Megill said:
The faculty should give no exams or assign termpapers until the
strike is ended.
A list of faculty members interested in helping with teach-ins
concerning the strike and marshaling duties will be made public.
The faculty would meet behind the Hub to discuss our actions
relative to the war and violence at home, and to consider the demands
of the student strikers.
SIX BOMB SCARES did not materialize in the campus, according
to James King of the University Police Department.
One of the demands of the demonstrators is that campus police be
disarmed.
tomb scares occurred at Matherly Hall, the Research Library, and
in the Centrex Building.
JOHN SUGG of the Student Mobilization Committee and the
Young Socialist Alliance, read a statement by organizations supporting
the strike.
He said the bomb threats have to be considered the works of
provocateurs to discredit the strike.
Demonstrators Leave Walker

PAGE oNE*j|
peacefully and marched to
Tigert Hall. A candle .light rally
was held later in the evening.
D. BURKE KIBLER,
chairman of the State Board of
Regents, said Thursday
afternoon that any decisions to
dismiss classes would have to be
made by the university
president.
Kibier said he was in constant
communication with OConnell
and said he felt the president
would make the correct decision

This is
where
its at.

on any situation that might
arise.
He has my complete and
entire confidence, and I speak
for the entire Board of
Regents, Kibler said.
KIBLER SAID ending campus
unrest would ultimately lie with
the students themselves.
The order we must have on
campus will come when the vast
majority of responsible students
become aware they are being
used, Kibler said.
He said a fringe few are
using the emotions of the rest to
make their demands known.

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MARSHALL JONES HERE
' Todays Strike Schedule

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
A meeting of the student body has been set for this afternoon by
the newly-formed Strike Committee to involve interested
students and inform uninterested students why they should be
involved, according to John Bogert, a member of the committee.
The comniittee was formed at Thursdays rally outside Tigert Hall
following the clearing of Walker Auditorium. A teach-in was also
agreed upon at that time.
ACCORDING TO Bogert, the committee passed the following
resolution: 0
We the students at the University of Florida, urge you to attend
the May 8 Teach-In at the Plaza of the Americas. The following topics
will be discussed beginning at 1 p jn.:

StudentsTo Protest Near White House

WASHINGTON (UPI) Organizers of Saturdays war protest
vowed Thursday they would instigate no violence, but they insisted
they would demonstrate across the street from the White House
although a federal judge ruled it off-limits to them.
We want to be nonviolent because we are about something far
more serious than fun and games with the police in the streets ... far
more serious than side show violence, said David Dellinger of the
Chicago Seven and one of the organizers.
NEVERTHELESS, the New Mobilization Committee (New Mobe),
coordinator of the protest, said it would go ahead with plans to
assemble thousands of persons in LaFayette Square, a tree-lined park
directly across Pennsylvania Avenue from the front of the White
House.
If there is any violence, spokesmen claimed, it would be initiated
by police, and they warned it would endanger members of Congress
who would be in the forefront of the demonstration.
U. S. District Judge George L. Hart Jr. granted a Justice
Department request Wednesday permitting the demonstrators to use
the Washington Monument grounds, which is almost a half-mile south,
on the other side of the White House.
BUT HART specifically ruled out LaFayette Square. The Secret
Service had said President Nixon would not be adequately protected
with a major demonstration so near.
Hart said the park was not big enough to hold the crowd, supposed
to number as many as 30,000 persons.
Police plans to enforce the courts decision and to cordon off the

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9 Reasons for the strike.
The relevancy of the strike to individuals in the student body.
Six demands of the strikers.
Discussion of by the students of the six demands.
BOGERT SAID the discussion would then move to other campus
problems and finally national issues, such as poverty, pollution and
the war in Indochina.
Guest speakers scheduled to discuss the national issues include
Marshall Jones, a professor whose denial of tenure was a controversial
issue two years ago, former maj. Russell Ramsey, a former ROTC
instructor, Prof. Kenneth McGill, Prof. Irving Goffman and Father
Michael Gannon.
After the speeches the crowd will break up into smaller discussion
groups, Bogert said.

White House have not been announced.
But all police leaves have been cancelled and the entire 4,200-man
District of Columbia police force will be ready for duty.
BULLETIN
SG Marches On D.C.
Six student senators were chosen in a special student senate
meeting Thursday night to travel to Washington D.C. to take part in
the peace march there Saturday.
The senators, nominated from the senate body and appointed
officially by the rules and calendar committee, will leave for
Washington sometime Friday.
THE TRIP will be financed by the senators themselves. Those who
cannot afford the trip will receive backing from a person in Miami,
who requested to remain anonymous. The donor is underwriting the
trip up to SI,OOO.
His only stipulation was that those who go be elected by the senate.
Tom Tworoger, who transmitted the offer to the senate, said the
person wanted the UF to be represented in a national peace march.
The senators, six who will actually make the trip and two alternates
are: Carol Sanger, Doug Jewett, Sam Poole, Rick Horder, Jack
Voughn (president of the senate), Tom Tworoger, Cindi Lavely
(alternate) and Vaughn Bomberger (alternate).

Friday. Miy . 1970. Thm Florida Alligator. I

O'Connell's
Comments
By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
The postponement of a
progress test last night in
Walker Auditorium and the
dismissal of classes today
were for the safety of *he
students, UF President
Stephen C. OConnell said
Thursday night.
It is not for mourning (of
the four students killed at
Kent State University),
OConnell told newsmen after
announcing his decision to
students occupying the
auditorium.
IT IS called to alleviate a
situation of danger I believe
to exist on this campus. We
dont want anyone to have a
confrontation, he said.
OConnell said he thought
it was unfortunate in the wake
of the injuries at Kent State
that the students occupying
Walker Auditorium would
bring about a situation that
would present a danger to the
students on this campus.
OConnells decision to
dismiss classes followed a
lengthy conference in his
office with administration
officials and students
representing various factions.
Asked if the decision to
dismiss classes came at the
request of the students,
OConnell said: The
students tell me there is just a
small group of students who
want to cause a
confrontation. We want to
avoid that.

Page 3



Page 4

, Th Florida AHlptor, Friday, May 8,1970

Gls Hit New Communist Supply Base-

SMGON (UPp U.S. ThuiSday ferried M
more Airiericait ihlfantrynteii into ah itfea' of 10
Cambodian farmlands laced with bunkers described as
a supply base for 10,000 Communist troops.
One of the helicopters crashed and nine Gls were
killed.
THE CRASH brought to 26 the number of
Americans killed in five helicopter losses in Cambodia
and four in South Vietnam since Monday, and military
sources said die Cambodian offensive and Communist
counterattacks have raised the U. S. casualty rate to its
highest point in a year.
Last week, U.S. headquarters reported Thursday,
123 Americans were killed in Vietnam action 29
more than the previous week and the third highest toll
for any seven-day period this year.
The week included the first stages of the drive into
Cambodia which moved into a second week Thursday.
ALLIED commiques, claiming great success in the
Cambodian thrusts, reported more than 3,300 North

r
Poll Says 51 Senators
Oppose Nixons Move

WASHINGTON (UPI) In
less than one week, President
Nixons decision to send U.S.
troops into Cambodia has drawn
the criticism of a majority of the
Senate in the most concerted
opposition since the war began
in Southeast Asia.
A United Press International
survey shows at least SI senators
have voiced their opposition in
speeches, statements and
comments to newsmen since the
action to knock out Communist

Senate Breakdown

Republicans against: 13
Aiken, Brooke, Case, Cooper,
Cotton, Dole, Goodell,
Hatfield, Javits, Mathias,
Percy, Saxbe and Schweiker.
Democrats against: 38
Anderson, Bayh, Burdick,
Byrd of Va., Church,
Cranston, Eagleton, Ellender,
Fulbright, Gore, Harris, Hart,
Hartke, Hughes, Inouye,
Kennedy, Magnuson,
Mansfield, McCarthy,
McGovern, Mclntyre,
Metcalf, Mondale, Montoya,
Moss, Muskie, Nelson,

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sanctuaries began. Only 21
senators have expressed
approval.
Many senators still feel Nixon
has not adequately explained
why the United States went into
Cambodia. They are suspicious
his real purpose might have been
to take advantage of what U. S.
commanders said was a fleeting
but promising opportunity to
gain a military advantage by
wiping out Communist
sanctuaries.

Pastore, Pell, Proxmire,
Ribicoff, Spong, Symington,
Talmadge, Tydings, Williams
of NJ., Yarborough and
Young of Ohio.
Republicans for: 18
B ennett, Boggs, Cook, Curtis,
Dominick, Fannin,
Goldwater, Griffin, Gumey,
Hruska, Jordan of Idaho,
Miller, Murphy, Scott Smith
of 111., Thurmond, Tower and
Young of N.D.
Democrats for: 3 Long,
Russell and Stennis.

INDOCHINA ROUNDUP
Vietnamese and Viet Cong killed in the six-front
campaign by an estimated 50,000 U. S. and South
Vietnamese troops. Hundreds of tons of munitions and
food for Communist forces were reported destroyed or
captured.
The cost to the allies was described as comparatively
light- Field reports listed 75 Americans killed and 300
wounded and 180 South Vietnamese killed and 840
wounded.
Cambodian commanders, fighting their own war
against the Communists, sent tanks along the Mekong
River south of the capital of Phnom Penh Thursday
and reported recapture of the village of Koki Thom
after a four-hour battle.
BUT OTHER Phnom Penh dispatches said the
provincial capitals of Kratie and Sermonrom in
east-central Cambodia fell to the Communists.

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i. UPI correspondent Robert ICJ Sullivan, reporting
'-Bfbift a border region 230 mlles>Northeast of Saigon,
radioed 5 that at least battalions of Gls from the 4th
Infantry Division had been flown across the frontier
into Cambodia by late afternoon in an assualt on
farmland laced with North Vietnamese bunkers.
A battalion usually numbers about 800 men. The
operation also includes elements of the U. S. 101st
Airborne Division and units of the 22nd Division of the
South Vietnamese Army.
THE HELICOPTER which Thursday
suddenly lost power, correspondent Sullivan reported,
and was apparently not hit by groundfire.
Lt. Gen. Lu Mong Lan, the South Vietnamese
commander in overall charge of the push, said the
mission was designed to crush a supply base for 10,000
North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops.
If it is successful in finding and destroying enemy
caches, the effort could hamper or cripple the 10,000
troops for two years, Lan said in an interview.

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Abortion Bill Wins First Round Test

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Advocates of a liberalized
abortion law won the first round
in the Senate today, voting
down 22-19 an effort to avoid
floor action by shoving the
controversial measure back to
committee.
Before launching into what
may be long debate of the highly
emotional abortion controversy,
the senators digressed briefly to
pass a vital conservation measure
to prevent destruction of Florida
beaches and seas from oil
drilling.
WITHOUT A dissenting vote,
the Senate passed to the House a

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bill prohibiting the granting of
permits to drill oil, wells within
12 miles seaward of the high tide
line or on submerged lands
within 12 miles inland of the
line.
Before the vote, the Senate
accepted an amendment that
would have prohibited drilling
on dry land 12 miles from the
shore.
Sen. Warren Henderson,
R-Venice, said it would give the
state a tool to keep oil wells
from appearing just off shore
under leases granted on the west
coast from Apalachicola to
Naples 20 years ago in a zeal to

develop Florida.
Sen. Ken Myers, D-Miami,
fought Sen. Jerry Thomas move
to return the abortion bill to
committee, calling it a terrible
tragedy to sidestep a vote on
this vital issue. One senator said
it would be a cop-out.
IT WOULD be a terrible
tragedy to avoid squarely facing
this issue, said Sen. Ken Myers,
D-Miami, the bill sponsor.
Sen. Harold Wilson,
R-Clearwater, put the cop-out
label on the motion, which was
made by Sen. Jerry Thomas,
D-Riviera Beach. Thomas said it

was an affront for senators to be
called upon to vote on a bill to
legalize the capital crime of
child murder.
The newest senator, David
McClain of Tampa, who was
seated only moments before,
cast his first vote against the
motion.
THOMAS* MOTION to return
it to committee was obviously
designed to let some senators
duck a direct floor vote on the
bill which was killed in the
House in a form that virtually
allowed abortions on demand.
But Senator Myers and

Friday, May 8,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

co-sponsor Robert Shevin,
D-Miami, offered amendments
to almost rewrite the bill,
putting in restrictions that
would make it much more than
a decision between a woman and
her doctor.
r
This is one of the most vital
issues facing us ..this session,*
Myers said. We are faced with a
desperate dilemma ... because
if we dont act in some way, the
U. S. Supreme Court, come fall,
is going in all probability to
strike down our present law and
well be left with no law at
all.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 8, 1970

Business Leaders Doubt Nixon Economic Moves

H# SPRINGS, Va. Nixon
administrations campaign restore f|ith in the
economy is running into new skepticism from the
top executives who make up the prestigious
Business Council.
Three-quarters of the national business leaders
who responded to a UPI poll predicted either
continued inflation, a recession or both while only
two Os the 50 members included in the sample rated
President Nixons inflation control efforts as
effective.
IN AN effort to regain the support of the
powerful industrialists, corporate executives and
bankers, the administration is sending five cabinet
officers to attend council meetings beginning Friday
at this fashionable spa in the Allegheny Mountains.

Carswell Enters Hospital For Operation

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Former
federal Judge G. Harrold Carswell
announced Thursday he will interrupt
his U. S. Senate campaign this weekend
to enter a Tallahassee hospital for
prostate surgery.
Carswell, who announced as a
Republican candidate for the Senate
after his nomination to the U. S.
Supreme Court was rejected by a 5145

100 Blacks Disrupt Classes
At Miami-Palmetto Hiqh

MIAMI (UPI) About 100
black students went on a
rampage at the Miami-Palmetto
High School today, injuring a
security guard smd a student.
Classes Halted
At 27Colleges
In Georgia
ATLANTA (UPI) All 27
colleges and universities in the
University System of Georgia
were notified Thursday to
suspend classes for the rest of
the week, affecting some 83,000
students, in the wake of a
demonstration at the University
of Georgia.
Chancellor George L. Simpson
Jr. directed presidents to close
their institutions Friday and
Saturday on authorization of the
Board of Regents.

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Senate vote a month ago, confirmed
reports of the planned surgery at a news
conference.
I DONT anticipate any problem
with it at all, he said. Im going to be
sidelined a little while and I wanted
everybody to know about it.
He said he, will enter Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital Saturday and the
surgery is planned for Monday morning.

Officials say the security
guard was struck on the face
with a fist and the student was
cut on his arm with a pair of
scissors.
The trouble apparently
started when about 100 blacks
congregated on an upper floor
wing and began brawling with
white students and throwing
furniture around a classroom.
Security officers and sheriffs
deputies restored order and the
100 black students left the
campus.
There were no immediate
reports of any arrests.
About 10 per cent of
Palmettos 3300 students are
black. The school was
desegragated several years ago
and officials say this was the
first serious racial incident at the
school in Miamis southern
suburbs.

1 Wall Street Protest j
: NEW YORK (UPI) Several thousand :j
: anti-establishment students confronted financial £
: district workers on Wall Street Wednesday. The £
: incident was a standoff, noisy but not disorderly. £
: There were boos from the ranks of financial £
j: workers who were on their lunch hour. £
: The students, most of them from high schools £
: but some from colleges and medical schools, j;|
: marched to Wall Street from City Hall Plaza. x
V.v.v.-.v.v.v.
A key question in the UPI poll, conducted by
mail, How do you rate the Nixon administrations
efforts to control inflation?

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His doctor, whom he declined to
identify, says he will be hospitalized
about 10 days to two weeks after the
surgery, Carswell said.
Carswell had been expected to
announce some of his campaign
organization at the news conference but
said that would be delayed for about
two weeks.

i ;i TRjUd e*fe<3ll failure, 30 said
|l#S%i one added, just barely,
and three indicated less than satisfactory but not
quite failure.
ASKED TO forecast the economic future, 11
predicted a return to stability, 17 predicted
continued inflation, ninfe predicted a recession and
eight predicted both inflation and recession with
business sluggish but the cost of living continuing to
soar.
The 150-member council, established in 1933 to
advise the government, is officially nonpartisan but
its membership is overwhelmingly Republican.
Earlier UPI polls showed general support for the
policies of the Nixon administration.
The council members expressed support for
Nixons performance so far in the Vietnam war with
17 rating it as execellent, 23 as good, seven as
fair and only one poor.
BUT THE responses on economic issues were far
less enthusiastic.
Our inflation is due to excessively high cost of
labor and lack of productivity, one member said.
The administration has done nothing in this area.
Another said Nixon is Not taking proper steps
to control inflation; he is getting bad advice.
Thirty-nine of the members said they believe the
administration has begun to ease its anti-inflation
policies. Only seven said they think it has not.



Faculty Segment
Meets At Hub
By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
A special faculty committee will discuss the present UF crisis today
at 10 aun. behind the Hub.
About 100 faculty members decided Wednesday night to make a/
more publicized forum to discuss current problems on campus and
across the nation.
THE COMMITTEE, named the Ad Hoc Committee of Concerned
Faculty, will host speakers from various UF colleges in the first
general meeting of faculty to address the public.
The general aim of the meeting is to display the concern of the
faculty over the escalation of the war in Indochina.
THEY WILL also discuss what the faculty can do to make the
student strike more effective.
At least one speaker will talk about disarming the campus of
firearms.^
Speakers in the committee are Edwin Ochester, assistant professor
of English; G. T. Diller, assistant professor of romance languages and
literature; Jean Casagrande, assistant professor of romance languages,
and Robert J. Scholes, assistant professor of communication sciences.
Also speaking will be Norman N. Markel, associate professor of
communication sciences; Arthur Newman, assistant professor of
foundations of education; Judith Phillis, instructor in speech; and
Hunt Davis Jr., assistant professor of history.
WHAT'S HAPPENING
EAT YOUR..: The Heart is a Lonely Hunter is the Union
movie for today. At the Union Auditorium 530, 8, and 10:30 pm.
Tomorrow, same times.
RAT BAG: The Ewing Street Times will be at the Rat tonight 9
and 11 pm. Tomorrow, same thing.
CHAMBER MUSIC: The Boston Chamber Players will be at the
University Auditorium tonight at 8:15. One buck.
BEAT IT: Talking Drums of Africa will be at the University
Auditorium Saturday at 8:15.
PUSH H: Union Film Classic Series will present Sunday the film
Kinetic Art II at the Union Auditorium.
Times: 230,5,7:30, and 10 pm.
DANCE WITH: Sudha, Indian dancer will be at the University
Auditorium this Sunday,at 8:15. A presentation of Celebration 7O
and the India Club.
WATER, WATER: The Gator Sail Club will have a training and
checkout session for all members this Sunday at 12 noon and
Saturday at 10 a.m.
Meet at the foot of the main staircase at the Union. For more info
call Rick Edmonds at 3724627.
WANDERING? In preparation to meet the Commonwealth
Wonderers from Nassau, Bahamas, (May 16-17) the UF International
Cricket Team will practice this Saturday at 2 pm. on the Lake Alice
field across from the Sigma Phi Epsilon house, south of Fraternity
Row lnterested parties should call 372-2224. NOW.
INDEPENDENCE: Israel Independence Day will be celebrated
Sunday at the A E Phi hiouse. Free Israeli food and entertainment.
The Mezuman Trio, a Philadelphia folk group will entertain at 730
pm. Public invited free of charge.
Poll Workers Needed By SG
Student Government is looking for Honor Court officials and poll
workers, preferably with experience, to work on the Student
Government runoff elections Monday.
Workers will be paid $135 an hour and should be prepared to work
the whole day from 7 am. to 6 pm.
Interested people should call 392-1665 before 5 pm. today.
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Friday, May 8,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 8,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
s3uf
77ie price o/ freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Days Os Decision

The last installment of this column ended on a
soft note of hope. Hope that President Nixons
decision to deal a death blow to the communist
war making capability in the South via Cambodia
might provide him with enough political cover to
speed withdrawal of American troops under a guise
of victory. It was a false hope bom of caution in
the face of events too young to take conclusions
from.
THE EVENTS UNWIND
A recent dispatch from AP correspondent Peter
Arnett, who is with the American task force in
Cambodia, related that American troop
commanders are already faced with two major
problems. One is military, the other political.
Militarily, planners had been hoping for at least six
weeks of cloudless skies. Sunday brought 2 inches
of premature monsoon rains. This is one of the
unforeseen risks which 1 alluded to in Tuesdays
column. An important forward airstrip has been
washed out and some of the hundreds of armored
vehichles have begun bogging down in the thick red
mud. American armored columns have already
transited the sparsely populated Fishhook
without detecting the communist headquarters
which Nixon wants so much to destroy. Now the
Americans have crossed Route Seven and are among
the rubber plantation hamlets and farms.
THE PATTERN REPEATS
Here says Arnett, the pattern of Vietnam is being
repeated. American troops are putting the torch to
homes and shooting livestock. I had orders to bum
everything said one young tank commander whose
force had just driven through two hamlets and
burned both of them. The rationale for this
scorched earth policy is a familiar one. Everything
that might be of use to the communists must be
destroyed. One can only surmise what the old
farmer was thinking as he watched the guardians of
the free world destory his livelihood. He might
have recalled his own disbelief when communist
propogandists told the people of his hamlet about
the barbarous round-eyes. Next time around the

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Craig Goldwyn
Assignment Editor Sports Editor
Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor

" Dan Vining Jeff 3rein
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief
*

vS . .News Editors..

Kerry Dupree

Advertising Manager Business Manager

Peace won Y work unless humans have basic rights!
- MITCH DASHER

Back On The Hill

Karen Eng
Managing Editor
Ctirdfyri

Mike Davis

By Russ Taylor

propogandists will be replaced by a recruiting team
assuming the hamlets people are not locked in a
refugee camp to insure their freedom but real
work will have already been done for them gratis,
by Americans. On up the road, the sprawling
Cambodian town of Mimot is being pounded by
U.S. air strikes. North Vietnamese troops had been
reported inside. Like the Vietnamese city of Hue it
may be necessary to destroy it in order to save it.
And also as in Hc, any civilian deaths resulting
from these air strikes can be ascribed to
communist terrorism.
As for the failure to locate the communist
headquarters, one supply officer offered this as a
partial explanation, some of these tank
commanders are still fighting World War 11. They are
so busy reaching their objectives, they must be
passing everything by. So, militarily the effort is
quite literally bogging down while politically we are
likely creating more communists than we are killing.
MEANWHILE, BACK ON THE HILL
The scene was an ominous one as Norris Cotton,
the conservative from New Hampshire and
heretofore staunch backer of, the Presidents
Vietnam policy, approached Senate Foreign
Relations Committee Chairman J. W. Fulbright with
the following words, bring that repealer of the
Tonking Gulf Resolution out Bill, and I will vote for
it. Cotton is one of the many senators who have
supported Nixon thus far but are fighting mad
about the way in which he has ignored them. Two
days before the move into Cambodia Secretary of
State William Rogers sat before Fulbrights
committee. He made no mention of the coming
events. The senators caiyonly infer that he either
withheld the information or did not know himself.
Either way, Rogers credibility is about shot.
Regardless of what happens in Cambodia, Nixon
may soon go the way of Wlson and LBJ. They were
the last two presidents to challenge the senate and
itand its constitutional perogatives in foreign
relations. It appears that the gauntlet has been cast
down.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89..
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in* the I lorida Alligator are those of
.he editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the 1/Diversity of I lorida.

: ,tr \
\ /

EDITORIAL
"WRITE ON!
The point has been made. Student dissenters have voiced
enough opposition to the war to close the UF. In so doing,
they have dramatized their position and forced the UF to
join other colleges closing across the nation.
Whether the university should have closed is no longer
important. The only question before us is whether such
protest methods effectively end the war.
At this point it is fitting to note that not all students
demonstrated against the war. If 4,000 students attended a
rally, then almost 16,000 students did not. This does not
mean necessarily that the other 16,000 support the war.
Nor does it mean the other 16,000 are apathetic. It simply
indicates that not everyone cares to carry their grievances to
the streets and become a part of a great mass.
Fortunately, other means exist for expressing our
grievances or support. In these emotional times the idea of a
letter or telegram to a congressman may seem inadequate.
Who is to say, however, that such a tactic would be at least
if not more effective than taking the issue to the streets?
For that reason, names and addresses of all the senators
and representatives from Florida are listed below. Since
Congress is in session, the letters or telegrams would be
delivered fastest to Washington, D.C., 20515.
For those who dislike letter-writing, Western Union will
send a personal opinion message to the president or any
member of Congress for a mere $.90. Such a message
including the name and address cannot exceed 15 words.
The town following the congressmans name indicates his
district.
Write on!
The Honorable Richard M. Nixon 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
Senators Edward Gurney and Spessard Holland Senate Office
Building
The Honorable:
I Charles E. Bennett Jacksonville House Office Building
i J. Herbert Burke Hollywood House Office Building
Bill Chappell, Jr. Ocala Room 1131 Longworth Building
I William C. Cramer St. Petersburg Room 2458, Rayburn
Building
Dante B. Fascell Miami House Office Building
I Louis Frey, Jr. Winter Park 1315 Longworth Budding
Don Fuqua Altha Room 434, House Office Building
i Sam Gibbons Tampa House Office Building
t Janies A. Haley Sarasota Room 1236, House Office Building
Claude Pepper Miami House Office Building
I Paul G. Rogers West Palm Beach House Office Budding
.Robert L. F. Sikes Crestview Room 2269 Rayburn Budding
NoKm"\
Jbr>Aw
American Forces Attacked On Three Fronts Today"



Speaking Out

We Most Stand Together
By Bruce

Those who march today on
the campus and in the streets
and employ violence and mob
action are the real enemies of
the freedom to dissent. Those
who threaten and attack others
who support the president, who
believe in America and in
peaceful change are not really
dissenting from the Vietnam or
Cambodian policies or from
social injustice.
Those who claim their right to
dissent is threatened and under
attack by Vice-President Agnew,
the police and others, are
out-right liars. The tables are
now turned and the wheel has
come full circle and now all
all, should be capable of seeing
the truth starkly glaring down
upon them.
I WAS INFORMED on
Tuesday, May 5, in Matherly
Hall at 2:50 p.m. by a group
using Hitlerite tactics of terror
and mob action that I, indeed,
no man, can support the
president or attend classes or do
anything not approved by such
extremists.
One leader of the mob
decreed, we are ordering this
classroom emptied and closed.

The Desire Is Real

MR. EDITOR:
I am upset. Today while in my
humanities class students protesting the
death of four students came screaming
down the hall, get out of the classrooms,
this is a strike. They pounded on the
door and told us to get out. THEY TOLD
US TO GET OUT!.
Those students were protesting the
shooting death of four Kent State
students who were supposedly innocent
of any wrong, but after an investigation
of what had happened prior to their
deaths, new facts came to light.
Two days before that tragic scene an
ROTC building was burned to the ground
and the day after that an ROTC colonels
family home was fire bombed. Luckily
there were no deaths as a result of these
two insane actions. With these thoughts
in the head of every National Guardsman
is it any wonder that when they began to
retreat under a barrage of rocks they blew
what cool they had left, tragically as it
turned out. Would it be possible to
develop troops specifically for this kind
of action who were the possessors of steel
nerve and steady fingers? Maybe.
Those four may have not thrown a
rock, or even had any strong opinion
against the National Guard and if not it is
indeed a tragedy. But if they were
throwing rocks rocks that could injure,
they were in the wrong as much as the
guardsmen. If I had been a guardsman on
the scene being pelted with rocks I cant
say what I would have done.
All these happenings leads me to my
current opinion on strikes and students
dissent. Although it is questionable
whether this strike will.do any good, the
right and desire to do sods real and I am
all for it, but I could not feel right about
participating. The strike in my opinion is
condoning something I dont believe in.
As long as dissent is sane and peaceful
great. Once that first rock is thrown, that
first bit of damage done, the beginning of
damage of some student and his idea is
initiated.
I am shocked to hear of the deaths of
fellow students and could not possibly
condone it but neither can I agree with
violent dissent.
RONNIE CLARK, 2UC

Hitler too, emptied and closed
the stores of the Jewish people
for they too faced violent
intimidation and mob action.
Each extremist of the left has
the makings of another Hitler, of
another Stalin, of another
murderer. Each man who
cherishes his freedom and liberty
is a target of the extremists oF
the left, for they cannot allow us
to disagree nor to go about our
business as we may choose. Thus
they declare our rightyour right
and mine to dissent from
violence and views of a
treacherous group of hooligans is
now ended. They demand
unwavering devotion to their
decree of the truth and personal
subordination to their terrorist
leadership.
WE MUST REALIZE that
dissent is threatened but not the
dissent of those against the
Vietnam war or the recent
action on Cambodia, but the
dissent of those who support the
president and who refuse to
condemn America for they
know it is a nation of justice,
virtue, and honor.
We must stand together and
oppose the left and its fascist
tactics. When men march

Minority
MR. EDITOR:
People who do not respect the rights of
others, people who attempt to upset our
society, people who constantly oppose
the actions of the government of our
United States, are in a minority.
There is no reason why the American
people should allow this small minority
to ruin the greatness of our nation. This
small group has no right to do whatever it
pleases, simply because it feels like doing
so.
Many of the people who attend protest
marches do not even know what or why
they are protesting. If you ask them why
they are marching, they will give you one
of two of the many stereotyped answers.
Theyre playing it cool, following then
crowd. One of the gang.
This small minority cannot run our
nation, as it is not representative of our
people. The opponents to our society
present a bad image of the American
nation and people, and the youth in
particular.
BILL GOLLNICK, 2UC
Lesson
MR. EDITOR:
On this day of mourning declared by
President OConnell for the tragedy at
Kent State, I was totally shocked by the
actions of my second period professor. At
the beginning of class he wrote
following on the board, lesson for
today, he who stands in front of loaded
rifles should not throw stones.
Ha! Ha! Ha! I could hardly stop
laughing through the sickness I felt.
Could not have one Professor Courtland
A. Collier, who also happens to be a
Gainesville City Commissioner, a man in a
highly responsible position, even show a
little respect on this day of mourning for
the poor victims who died and their
sympathizers?
MICHAEL D. FRIED, 4EG

screaming bum it down, shut it
dofcm we are threatened with
more than a conflagration of
buildings. We are threatened
with an inquisition against those
who have faith in their country,
who still trust our president and
who will not be the willing tools
of our enemies abroad.
A smaller inner core of
experienced anarchists are
playing upon the fears, the
discontent, the unhappiness of
others and using such persons
for their own ends.
THOSE WHO TRULY and
deeply disagree with American
involvement in Asia on moral
grounds are doing themselves a
disservice by associating and
participating in violent
demonstrations. By using
violence they negate their own
personal abhorrence of violence
and thus violence becomes
glorified as good and just if it
achieves their aims. But all along
it is the inner core of anarchists
and traitors who are wielding
their unsuspecting followers to
achieve their own selfish dreams
and illusions of greatness.
Make no mistake about it the
right to dissent of those who

OPEN FORUM:
C Ainia aml Vititot J)
Classic Fool hope for the complaS^j^^
so and I respect that right. In like

MR. EDITOR:
1 ask the group of inflamed students
who marched into Matherly Hall Tuesday
afternoon during 7th period classes
who the hell do you think you are? Do
you fancy yourselves a righteous
vigilante party which may invade the
rights of others just because you have
some newly acquired convictions about
what the world should be like? How
many of you really believe that you acted
out of wisdom and not youthful emotion
and impatience?
Wisdom is knowledge tempered and
refined with experience and wisdom for
rational action can hardly be acquired
during four or five years in a college
classroom atmosphere. You are gaining
knowledge at the UF yes, but can you
honestly say that you have refined this
fresh knowledge into real wisdom? To
think that you can act rationally from
emotion and limited knowledge is to
prostitute yourselves as the classic fool.
No matter how distasteful the truth may
be, anyone who claims to be intelligent
must realize that human maturity
(wisdom) is a lengthy, painful process and
chants and slogans shouted from a mature
body, prompted by an immature mind
will not suddently transform that entity
into a wise person who is capable of
dealing with the worlds problems.
If you want to strike, demonstrate or
protest lawfully, you have the right to do
the small society

I LteZPToiyiUK r
THAT Ffcv'BfnY WAS
ACOtiPITIoH- \t tWMIIIIHH* HO M ~0

disagree with American policy is
not threatened. It is the right of
those who dissent from violence
and who dissent from an
unreasoning comdemnation of
this nation whose rights are
threatened and being called into
question.
Those men who use violence
and burn ROTC buildings, thus
interfering with the rights of
others to serve their country as
they wish it is they who are
traitors and criminals. They are
traitors for they reject the
nation and criminals because
they want only and maliciously
to destroy the property and
rights of others.
TO REFUSE TO accept the
views of the left and of others
who disagree with the direction
America is moving in is just as
sacred and inalienable a right as
is that to be a member of the
left. But this freedom is scorned
by the violent left.
The violent, the extremists
and the anarchists are on notice
that students will not be forced
from a classroom if they desire
to pursue their education. The
violent can attempt to
intimidate us, to frighten and
threaten but we must never

Friday, May 8,1970, Tha Florida AMfrtor,

kow-tow to them. Not
cowardice nor compliance is
called for. What we who love
this nation and abhor violence
must do is to stand our ground
and condemn the extremists. 7~7
Should it come to a clash of
physical violence when we
whose rights are being attacked
have not only the legal right of
self defense but the duty to fight
this aggression against our
freedom as Americans.
ONLY ONE PERSON out of
my entire class elected to leave
and perhaps join the mob on
Tuesday. Those who remained,
perhaps unaware of it at that
moment, took a stand for
freedom, for the right to dissent
for justice and for America. As
long as men will be steadfast in
their dedication to uphold our
liberty then our nation need not
fear.
The enemies of freedom are
now on notice that those
Americans who cherish their
liberty will not be intimidated or
bullied by fascist mobs and
extremists of the left. Rather,
freedom will be preserved. The
nation will not be forsaken by
true patriots.

manner, if I choose to attend classes at
UF I have the right to do so without
willful and unlawful impediment. You
should respect that right if you have but
an elementary sense of values. If you
want to befree, there is but one way, it is
to guarantee an equally full measure of
liberty to all your neighbors. There is no
other. Carl Schurz.
JOHN L. SNOW JR., 4BA
a Economic Boycott
MR. EDITOR:
For seven years the students of this
country have been protesting the war in
Vietnam, and the administration has not
listened to us. As students, we do not
have the political power we need.
One-day demonstrations have not
worked. The only way we can reach the
government is to boycott nationwide a
product which is primarily bought by
students, and has a lobby in Congress.
We are asking interested students,
especially those with knowledge in these
areas, to meet at the Rathskeller at 11
a.m. Friday, to do research immediately
on this subject and begin a nationwide
boycott that can bring political and
economic pressure on the government.
BILL MOSSMAN, 4ED
GRANT CARRINGTON, 7AS
JOHN JOHNSON, 2UC
by Brickmon

Page 9



Page 10

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 8,1970

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
25-year-old liaison man between
the Nixon administration and
the nations students quit
Thursday to* protest what he
called high officials implied
approval of even the most
vicious tactics against
legitimate dissent.
Anthony J. Toby Moffett,
appointed last September to
head a new Office of Students
and Youth by Education
Commission James E. Allen, said
his resignation was prompted by
what I fear is a very dangerous
attitude in our country.
THE RECENT remarks by
the President concerning student
protestors were most
instrumental in my decision,
Moffett said.
For they confirmed what
thousands of students have
believed or suspected for some
time: namely, that the President
and his most trusted advisors do
not view themselves as leaders of
all the American people; that
they do not have the best
interests of youth in mind. And,
most tragically, that they will
sanction even the most vicious
tactics against young people and
other legitimate political
dissenters.
MOFFETT SAID the
increasingly repressive
character of this administration
continually undercut his efforts
to convince young people to
work for change through
existing channels.
When Allen appointed him,

the UF Board of Student Publications is accepting applications for j
Editor, Managing Editor, j
Term IV, 1970 Summer Term, Only i
Editor, Managing Editor,
Florida Alligator
Terms I& 11 Fall 1970; Winter 1971 j
- General Instructions
\ ... J -l '.'A;, *' '
, ' .v y,
All applications are to be picked up and returned to Room 330, J. Wayne
Reitz Union between Bam 4 pm.
Each applicant must return an original plus two clean copies of his application.
Applications must be returned prior to 4 pm, FRIDAY, MAY 15.
t Board meeting will be held Thursday, May 21 at 2:30 in Room 316, Reitz Union.
A schedule of interviews will be posted on main bulletin board in
Room 330, Wednesday, May 20.

Nixons Student Liaison Official Resigns

the commissioner described his
job as that of an advocate for
youth within the Office of
Education.
But Ni off e 1t said
high-ranking officials of the

U.S. Troops Move Into 'Fishhook
Discover Enemy Base Operations

WASHINGTON (UPI) The White House confirmed Thursday that
U. S. troops moving into the Fishhook area of Cambodia had
uncovered a major sophisticated enemy base complex.
Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler said the complex was larger than any
discovered so far in the area where Communist forces operating in
South Vietnam had set up their top military headquarters.
THE TOP headquarters is known as the Central Office of South
Vietnam COSVN to Americans.
Ziegler said the complex, uncovered by U. S. troops ordered into
the area last Thursday by President Nixon, could be one of the base
areas used by COSVN.
He emphasized however that the Communist headquarters group
had several such base areas which they used from time-to-time,
moving from one to the other to keep their whereabouts secret.
ZIEGLER, commenting on a Reuters news service report from
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
Yg AND SALES
'/SSSt. "CORVAIR SPECIALIST"
GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 376-7771

CITES VICIOUS TACTICS

Department of Health,
Education and Welfare were
often more concerned with
protecting what they perceived
to be the political interests of
the President and other

administration officials than
with problems of the young.
HE DID NOT name the
officials, but made it clear he did
not refer to either Allen or HEW
Secretary Robert H. Finch. He

'
Cambodia, said the headquarters contained larger and more
permanent structures and some communications equipment.
He said the Allied operations into the North Vietnamese sanctuaries
in Cambodia were generally going extremely well.
Israeli Ceremony Cancelled
Israeli independence day ceremonies Sunday have been cancelled
out of respect to the students killed at Kent State, Rabbi Michael
A. Monson of the Hillel Student Center announced Thursday.
The students decided, due to the tragedy, the event should be
postponed and attention devoted to the crisis at hand, Monson said.
Monson said he polled students by telephone to get their views on
whether the celebration should be held.
An announcement will be made later of the time and place for the
event, Monson said.
r STCfIK SlfflKC !
1 &X, Student Special >
| (With The Coupon) |
I Our Regular 93< Steakburger
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value y 90$ lus tax |
i Steak n Shake 1
\J6IO SM/. 13th St. __ __ __ Gainesville j

said that in a conversation with
Finch Thursday morning, I
sensed ... as I had sensed before
that he is very, very troubled
indeed about what he is going to
do.



UF Professor Died Wednesday

Professor William J.
Engineering, died Alachua General
Hospital after an extended illness; He was 54.
Mr. Fagan joined the faculty in 1947 as associate
professor, and in 1957 was made a full professor. He
received his B.S. from Louisiana State University in
1937 and his M.S. from LSU in 1939.
THE PROFESSOR was the author of numerous
books and papers on induction heating, industrial

@}£Limtey
SOAIOJPTHE SDN JjP
cs. "
a
s jfil Youll feel & look the most in CATALINAS II \ \
L f DIAMOND LACE. A play of texture-on-texture I n \
\ fed & White that takes a new approach to see-through. I I
A 5600 Sheathy, 14.00 Coverup, 32.00 .? JLr I
Belk Lindsey In The Gainesville Shopping Center
'i mmmmmmmmmmmm mmmmmmm mmm is*-mmi mmrnmmmmmmmmmmmmmm mmm -mmmmmmmmmmm

pg J ij §1 ijf 4k *S! 3? j
electricity and nuclear t
He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Maxine E.; one
son, William J., Gainesville; three daughters, his
mother, two brothers and two sisters.
Funeral services will be conducted by the
Reverend U. S. Gordon, Friday, May 8 at 3:30 pjn.
at the Williams-Thomas Funeral Home Chapel.
The family requests no flowers. Contributions
may be made to the William F. Fagen Student Loan
Fund.

Miss UF Contest On
I j|; | .4*l jf %1 Nr I I |
j: SufvivaHrf the Miss 1# Contest is assured, durirfhatn #ete Caterina j
|:of the Miss UF Pageant said Thursday. $
: Today at 5 p.m. is the deadline to turn in entry forms to the>;
Student Government Productions Office, third floor Reitz Union. :
i; The pageant is scheduled for May 18 and 20. Forms are still:-
at the Student Activities Desk on the Union third floor. :j
: Entry fee is sls. j|
Girls are judged on poise, beauty, and talent, according to Caterina.ij
: Its not so much a beauty contest, like some others, Caterina :j
jsaid. The winner goes on the Miss America Pageant, and they judge;:
iheavily on talent, too. :
: :
. .....

Friday, May 8,1970, Tha Florida AHigator,

Page 11



REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM
INGMAR BERGMAN'S CLASSIC
Tile Seventh Seal
EXTRA HURRY
DAYS! bii.w. li
UMTOI § T*tepHw 378-2434 |l |
MASH
ITS SUCH A SMASH
WE ARE
Joseph Morgenstern.
Newsweek '^Hnip
American war t^HjElra#'
sound came in! f
New Yorker
Time Magazine BP
STARTS : AT... 1:50 3:45
TODAY v 15:39 7:35 9:35
wu rTTTTga i
IP Jl
*" ,f -;'."//V.._ .-; v
- y , /> r^', *_);--**' *-*.>J. T| ' *; ?, > |
BmKv.' <99M
frfc.
wttwfcwx^wrSsabaaaaew-ttKwssetfe-wwweeeeaweiimewepnwsiwwwpeees^eeeweeew
Irons papas inger stevona
ii iinim it momm ini SMB VSmMI norvy MvR iwsus ana win rfunvar nvry mstk iwwui rj^r
Menn-Atex North Tsohalealsr*
pni-n ) p., 1J ,... JII
Pk Ski *y S Nji¥|T*|j||iAn^
IsilTllilE-lf' jjQID
I Com TiSnOur Regular Show And TIS MillMll
I Sneak Preview, Too, At Mo Extra Cost! |Sg?j^SKj|

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SAL.JE
vXyXv^XvW-:^
1966 Karman Glha good condition
phone 372-2059 ask for Bill
(A-5M31-P)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372*3225 or come by 1826 W Unlv.
ave. t and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(A-5M31-P)
4 cent Xerox copies QUIK WAY
Copy Center, 3 machines no waiting.
Free collating. 100 copies 1 original 3
V 2 cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Qulkway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (A-llt-126-p)
Bultaco 250 Pursang Scrambler fine
condition engine runs super strong
full knobbles race proven
modifications $550 call Jon
378-3554. (A-st-133-p)
New Moon 64. 55 x 10 2 bedroom.
Central Air & Heat. Furnished.
Excellent Condition. $3,290. Call
372-3893 after 7 P.M. (A-10t-126-p)
17 Thunderbird, 100 HP Evinrude,
Murray Trailer, component'winch,
equipped. SI9OO. or best offer call
378-7213 evenings. (A-st-132-p)
Headquarters for tennis, golf, guns,
handball, water sports, camping team
sports, fishing, physical fitness B & B
SPORTS CENTER 5320 N.W. 13th
St. 378-1461. (A-st-132-p)
Save! 7 antiq crnr hutch $100; 6 mo
Zenith solid st port, stereo, dia ndle,
6 spkrs, orgin, $219 now $100;
maple dbl drsr & mir $25. Will sell all
3 together for $175. Call 378-8803
anytime. (A-6t-132-p)
Honda 250 Scrambler, excellent
condition. Sunburst gold, new trials,
tire, new alloy sprocket 48 tooth,
plus 32 tooth sprocket. Call
372-8923 $350. (A-3t-135-p)
8 x 42 2 Bedroom Bath & Shower
$1,200, 8 X 35 5 AME SI,OOO, 8 X
30 SBOO. 376-6831, 372-4595.
Income Trailer Available also.
(A-st-135-p)
New Color Organs, 1-channel, will
drive any light system up to 500
watts. Ideal for stereo or band. S2O
each. 376-2389. E. E. Senior.
(A-st-135-p)
2 large 10 back-deck speakers sls,
12 volt ACDC converter $9., Never
used Electric Lady land 8-track
tape $4., 392-8723, (Bill) (A-2t-135-p)
Midland am-fm stereo rec. Excellent
In all respects. Almost brand new.
$l2O. Call 373-2643 or see at Apt.
94, French Quarter. (A-3t-135-p)
MUST GO Uv! Rttl Furniture,
Double rocker, Kit and bedrm. set,
etc, also kittens, paintings, prints,
424 SE 7 St. Call 378-3614 after 5.
(A-3t-134-p)
Fender Bandmaster amplifier S2OO
Gibson classical guitar SSO Kay
electric 3 pickups SSO llOLb weight
set sls or best offer each. 372-8714.
(A-st-134-p)
3 br. IV2 bath 10 x 56 fur. trailer, 1
br. fixed as study washer clothes
line fenced lot cable TV ln
park with pool A/C, 376-8517.
(A-st-134-p)
Wedding dress. White organza w/ lace
appliques long chapel train size 5.
$50.00 Call 372-2740 Mon, Tues,
Wed, Thurs after 4 PM. (A-3t-134-p)
Electric bass guitar nice looking,
solid body, with adjustable pickup,
strap, strings like new. Come by or
call 392-7385, 211 Fletcher O.
(A-st-135-p)
HARLEY Sprint 250 CC $450, GOYA
G-10 classical guitar sllO,
POLAROID 103 SBO or make offer,
call 376-2048. (A-st-135-p)
IF carpets look dull and drear,
remove the spots as they appear with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-165-lt-c)
Honda 1967 CII6O Scrambler,
excellent condition, $350 firm. Call
378-5996. (A-3t-134-p)
69 Honda 90, excellent shape, 4700
miles. Just tuned-up, call 392-7561.
after 5 PM, ask for Bruce.
(A-st-134-p)
I ' "" I
65 MG MIDGET, Excellent condition
WW tires, wire wheels, like new top.
Call 376-0681 anytime. (A-136-}t-p)
AKC German Shepherds. 8 weeks
old, superb pedigree llnebred Odin &
Pfeffer, excellent temperament &
conformation for breeding. Show and
Pets. Females, Black w /cream,
SIOO.OO Mrs. Scott, 2246 N.W.
Magnolia Road, Ocala. 629-4177.
(A-136-10t-p)
THE BENT CARD LIVES come and
share the 9 PM movie, the Free
coffee and snack and all the warm
music from the friendly folkles!
(A-136-lt-p)
SURFBOARD 7 ft 6 In. Daytona
Pintail waveset fin PERFECT
condition. Call 378-9208 anytime,
but keep calling sllO (racks too)
(A-136-st-p)

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 8,1970

FOR SAl_
Pennsylvania Centre Court Tennis
balls 2.30 a can. Handball gloves,
padded 3.50; unpadded 3.00.
Shoes for ail sports. B & B SPORTS
CENTER, 5320 N.W. 13th ST.
(A-136-st-p)
Air-cond. Sears Coldspot, 6,000 BTU
used 1 mon. $95 or exchange for one
larger. Make me an offer. Perfect
bedroom companion. 373-2390.
(A-136-3t-p)
SAVE MONEY! Inventory sale of
stereo components Fisher, ADC,
Pickering, University Sound, Sony,
Astrocom/Marlux Buy a Fisher
160 T or 210 T receiver and any
speaker In stock and get the other
speaker free, saving up to $199.95
$189.95 cassette recording and
playback system only $129. $695
Fisher console, Mediterranean In
pecan, only $525. Many magnetic
phono cartridges at less than V 2 price.
$13.95 headsets only $7 until gone.
Two automobile 8-track tape units,
one Lear Jet and one Toshiba price
includes speakers and Installation.
Lear $65, Toshiba sBs.
ALTMAN STEREO SYSTEMS is
student owned and operated and Is
Interested in giving you the best
possible sound for your money.
Come in and see the equipment we
are franchised for Dual, Fisher,
Sansul, Revox, Astrocom/Marlux,
Sony, ADC, University Sound, and
many other lines. We service
everything we sell. Sale begins at
3:30 p.m. today. Open Saturday
from 10:00 to 6:00. Inside the
record store at 1638 W. University.
376-9583. (A-136-3t-p)
Early Amer. sofa & matching chair,
both In great shape. SIOO or best
offer. Call Frank, 373-2118.
(A-136-st-p)
1969 Yamaha 250 Enduro, excellent
includes 2 helmets, passenger seat
and pegs, $725. Call 378-9630.
(A-136-3t-p)
Labrador retrievers, 8 weeks,
wormed, shots. AKC papers, SSO ea.
Tel. 376-3787. (A-st-131-p)
Want to trade 63 chev. Belalr for
cycle anything over lOOcc consider
Gordon Moore 9085 S.W. 7 Ave. Apt.
1 (A-136-3t-p)
FOR RENT
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, l-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
.* vi:.' _Jr-""g.v.'jg.Lr.jg^iii l
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV -
utilities Included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
STIWf l 11 J
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 SW 16th Court. MAKE YOUR
FALL RESERVATIONS NOW. Call
376-9668. (B-126-ts-C)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372-7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)

4
1
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< i HHMSIS£.
m^bwbh^-
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IB^KBuP|HS^^^^^^^^^^^^Bfl
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Three programs of 22 short films by the world's
leading filmmakers This Sunday Program 2 will be
shown at 2:30, 5:00, 7:30 and 10:00 p.m. at the Reitz
Union Auditorium. Tickets are SI.OO at the door.
Sponsored by J. Wayne Reitz Union, selected by the
Classic Film Committee.

FOR RENT
Sublease for summer poolside French
Quarter n 0.47 near laundry room
rent can be discussed 2 bedroom
A/C. Call Unda or Jackie 372-6768.
(B-3t-133-p)
Immediate Occupancy Sublet Now. 2
bdrm furn AC pool Apt 3 1130 S.W.
16th Ave. 376-8821. (B-st-133-p)
La Mancha townhouse to sublet
summer quarter private bedroom
near campus. Swimming pool S7O
month, Call Dave 378-7314.
(B-2t-135-p)
Sublet starting summer quarter at
Olympia apts, 2 bedrm., 3 or 4
persons, A/C, 'turn., $l5O per month.
Call 373-2462 anytime. (B-3t-135-p)
2 bedroom French Quarter apt. to
sublease for the summer. slls for
the entire summer. Please call
373-2226 or visit apt. 12 French
Quarter. (B-3t-135-p)
SHACK UPstairs vp apt., 98 for 2
female types S9O ea entire summer
AC topside, poolside 373-1501
Lynne or Celeste after 5.
(B-st-135-p)
Poolside apt. for summer qtr
subtease June rent paid $95 a month
1 bedroom with patio. NW section
of town. Call 373-2442 after 3:30
PM. (B-st-135-p)
Male Roommate Wanted For
Immediate Occupancy. Apt. 167
Landmark 378-7142. (B-4t-134-p)
2 roommates wanted summer
quarter. Air-conditioned, carpet,
other extras, located right on pool,
BBQ pit, no. SO, Landmark Call
373-2207. (B-st-134-p)
Sublet June 1 Nice Large 1 bdr. Apt
A/C close to campus. 372-5032.
(B-st-133p)
Sublet for summer or longer. June
rent paid, 1 bdr, furn, A/C, pool, TV
cable. $l2O/mo Frederick Apts No.
63. Day 372-7555, night 378-5823.
(B-st-132-p)
French Quarter One bedroom
townhouse apartment to sublease
Immediately. Call 378-0422 evenings.
(B-st-134-p)
1, 2 or 3 female roommates summer
quarter. Landmark Apt. 35 A.C.,
carpeting, poolside, dishwasher. No
deposits. $46.25 mo. 378-3518.
(B-3t-134-p)
Must sublet Landmark Apt. for
summer quarter. Pay only 69.25 for
the entire summer. Be cool and Call
376-1769 any time. (B-st-134-p)
Groovy no. 69 2 bedroom
Williamsburg apt. for summer,
furnished, AC, pool, dishwasher,
carpeted, near Med Center really
Sharp, Call 373-2352. (B-136-6t-p)
Sublet for summer, 1 bdrm. apt. WW
carpet, central A/C, completely furn.,
2 pools, free bus to campus Unlv.
Gardens Trace sllO/mo. 372-1065.
(B-136-st-p)
Available June 12, 10 x 48 Mobile
Home, furnished, 1 bedroom, study,
carpet, A/C, washer, pool, awning, 1
mile from campus. SBO/mo.
372-0949 after 5:30, 3536 14 S.W.
24th Ave. (B-136-St-nl
WALK TO CLASS! 3 bedroom
house, AC, TV, 10 minutes to
Matherly. For summer term, liberal
neighborhood, Furnished fully. Call
378-8946 now. (B-136-st-p)



GATOR CLASSIRIRRS

for rent
LANDMARK apt. no. 128 3 female
roomates for summer qt.
90.00/person, phase 2. No parking
problems. Call 372*0929.
(B-136-3t-p)
WANTED
X'X-XX-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-SfX-X-X-X-X-X*
Female rnrvmt to share modern 1 br.
apt, TV, patio, $53. + elect 378*3588
or 392*3691 Barbara no lease, Immed
occupancy. (C-4t-134-p)
Female roommate La Mancha own
room $72.50 includes utilities must
like dogs. Call Jo-Anne 392-3601
immediate occupancy. (C-4t-134-p)
Need one female roommate for fall
quarter. Landmark apt. Poolside. Call
392*9597. (C-St-133-p)
Female roommate. Williamsburg. 1
blk to campus. May rent paid. No
Contract. Needed Immed. Call after
4:00 376*0709. Caroline.
(C-st-134-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATES fall quarter,
prefer near-campus apartment. Call
Linda 392*8821 after 7:00 p.m.
(C*3t-134-p)
Male roommate needed in a hurry
43.50 mo. Summit House real nice
air cond. pool TV. Call 378-1901
dose to campus. (C-5t*133-p)
Need 2 female roommates for
Landmark apt. fall quarter. Call after
10:00 p.m. 392-7709. (C-st-135-p)
LOST bright colors... restore them
with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(C-lt-tf-c)
Need two coed roommates for 2
bedroom Tangle wood townhouse.
Move In Immediately. Call 372*0360
In afternoons or evenings.
(C-136-St*p)
Want to sell your BIKE before
summer? Alice wants one now. Call
376-1391. (C-136-st-p)
For fall female roommate for
Colonial Manor apt. Your share Is
$55. -i- util. Glenda 392-7593.
rc-st-134-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
for summer term at French Quarter.
Call after 5 PM 378*3068.
(C-3t-13S-p)
2 female roommates wanted to share
2 bedroom apt Unlv Gardens
$54 per month seculty dep. free
can Diane at 376-0716 after 4:30.
(C-st-13 S-p)
Female roommates for summer
quarter at Tangiewood 2 bdr. a/c,
TV. Share $l9O + utll./mo. Call
373-2711 after spm for Info.
(C-st-13 S-p)
Like a Bridge Over Toubled waters
7:30 May 14,21, 28, at the union.
Please come .. Interesting,
Informative and free. Married or un.
(C-136-lt-p)
2 med. l grad student need 1 male
roommate summer or longer, rent
43/mo. CAMELOT apt. 202
376-0354. (C-3M34-P)
Two together Keep It that way
A BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED
WATERS. Free May 14, 21, 28 in
the Union at 7:30. (C-136-st-p)
HELP WANTED
asm
cocktail Waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary wilt
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dubs
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-125-p)
Listeners Wanted will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call 392-2049
between 1 and 4 p.m. for
appointment. (E-st-132-p)
SPORTS WRITERS for Alligator
staff. No experience necessary. Salary
Is flexible. Call 392-1686 In the
afternoon. (E-4t-135-p)
Distribute advertising to city homes.
You can earn $2 or more an hour.
Tues. or Wed. time flexible.
Telephone 376-5716 after 2 p.m.
(E-st-132-p)
Secretary, part time or full time, for
law office, 376-3315. (E-2t-134-p)
Uke to sell or would you like to try?
How about a job with good pay plus
a chance to win Eiucation Grant. Call
Fuller Brush 378-0121. (E-lOt-134-p)
NYSE listed firm engaged In air
pollution study at Key West needs
analytical chemist & technic lal for 4
mo. project Starting In July. Call Dr.
J. Craig, 378-8090 for information.
(E-136-st-p)
AUTOS
winners of the recent Datsun contest
were JACK McCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission Is a winner
tool TRY ITI Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (Q-135-ts-c)
w * m.m *.*;*& / a*..*, a-' .4ft., W-vV-yeV*. MPvJW

. rW#Y. May 8 1970. The Florida Alligator,
...V. -soJsfniiA'sbhoH

:-x ; x-x*x-x-x-XvX^
AUTOS
xWvirXritXtXtXsXxXrXrX.x-:::::-:-:-:^-:-^
1963 Dodge Dart 4 dr. automatic
excellent transportation asking 450,
Call after 5 PM, 378-9925.
(G-3t-134-p)
Falcon 64 4 door, standard shift, 6
cylinder, radio, heater, good tires,
very good condition. $495.
378-4642. (G-st-133-p)
67 Rambler 4 Door 6 Cyl. Rebel
Available Trade Or Cash Or Both
376-6831 372-4595 Seats Make
Large Double Bed. (G-st-135-p)
1960 Chevrolet Impala. Good
373 2901* P Wer stMr,n 9- $175 call
*62 Cutlass V-8 Auto trans. R/H, all
cond., power brakes steer good
shape $450. Ph: 1-964-7616 Starke
after 6 PM. Can be seen on campus
(student). (G-st-134-p)
1963 Corvalr Monza conv. new top,'
carpet, and oil seals. Radio heater
excellent condition SSOO or best
offer. Call Sandy 372-1729 or
372- (G-st-134-p)
*7O Chevelle SS 396 Full Power
Options Galor, less than 2 months
old. showroom condition with first
years deprication already paid.
373- after 5:30. (G-4t-133-p)
69 Camero 4sp. 327 Daytona yellow,
$2600 378-3588 will bargain.
(G-4t-134-p)
60 Pontiac reliable transportation
good tires fading Tom Wolfe type
baroque American $125 Radio Air
Power-Socko 378-4861 After five.
(G-3t-135-p)
1967 Flat SSOO. Body and engine In
excellent condition. Four brand new
tires. Terrific buy I Im ready to sell!
376-6166 or 378-8211. (G-6t-130-p)
SUNBEAM ALPINE 1964
convertable SSOO call 392-0293
weekdays 8-4. (G-st-135-p)
403 PEUGEOT BLACK WAGON.
Excellent mechanical shape. S3OO.
100000 cheap, reliable miles to go.
This vegetable wagon Is for YOU.
378-0329 after 5 PM. (G-136-lt-p)
XrXiX::*^
PERSONA L
8 May 70 Year one Chucky my
chucky, its our first anniversary I
Wont It be ducky when we have
our first nursery?! (J-136-lt-p)
Israel Independence day will be
celebrated May 10 Sunday night at
7:30 p.m. at the AEPhi sorority
house free food and entertainment.
(J-2t-135-p)
Aries Kittens! 6 wks. old, weaned. 2.
all whL, 1 all blk (born mldnlte) 1
blk & whte. Raised outside but are
tame. Witches/Warlocks Call
376-1483. (J-3M34-P)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W. Unlv.
ave., and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(J-st-131-p)
Wanted Mothers with infants 3 mo.
or younger needed for infant research
study. Up to $5.00 for participating
Call 392-2914, after 6; 372-1114.
(J-10t-132-c)
To that wonderful photog (N.A.) c
the P B Post: May 4-5 marks the day.
I LOVE YOU!!! Glad you said yes.
Shump. The Living Loving Maid V.
* R. also. (J-136-lt-p)
A program designed to answer honest
questions about the marital
relationship. A Bridge Over Troubled
Waters good program good time
(J-136-st-p)
At last! A real delicatessen In
Gainesville the NEW DELHI 706 W.
Unlv. or call 378-8656 for free
delivery. Good food for good people!
(j-136-St-p)
Desire, expectations & reality May
14 Union room no. 347 free, a
frank discussion about marriage
roll expectations and child bearing.
(J-136-st-p)
A frank discussion about marriage.
Married, thinking about It or Just
Interested. May 14 A Bridge Over
Troubled Waters. (J-136-st-p)
Union, room no. 347 A BRIDGE
OVER TROUBLED WATERS The
first In a series of frank discussions
about marriage. Designed for you.
FREE. (J-136-st-p)
Thinking about getting married? Find
out what Its all about. Come to A
Bridge Over Troubled Waters, May
14, 7:30 Union no. 347.
(J-136-st-p)
To My Tampa Pear-Body, These Four
short months could last a lifetime.
Your Guatemalan Princess.
(j-136-lt-p)
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent
a I r-car ports-a wn I n gs-add-a-rooms gs-add-a-roomssupplles
supplles gs-add-a-roomssupplles and accesories. Prompt and
dependable service. DtM sales and
service 373-1446. (J-10t-130-p)

Page 13

PERSONAL
St. Martin, our Intentions were
honest. Wb came to see and learn so
that someday we could help others.
Alice. (J-136-lt-p)
SOVIET UNION. Driving end
Camping 10 weeks, $1,350. Includes
air and all expenses. A. Lipson, 2
Garden Terr., Cambridge, Mass
02138 or call (collect) 617-547-1127.
(J-136-4t-p)
To My Arcadia Porker. Thanks for
the past seven months. They've been
the best. Your Llmona Lover.
(J-136-lt-p)
Voluptuous VI, Have a Happy 19th
Birthday on Sunday. The section
wouldn't be the same without You!
Love, Ellen, Steph, and Maureen.
(J-136-lt-p)
Mom, Only when looking back and
looking at what we have become will
we see the full worth of your love
and the miracle that Is you. SMLJJ.
(J-136-lt-p)
THE BENT CARD LIVES come and
share the 9 PM movie, the Free
coffee and snack and all the warm
music from the friendly folkles!
(J-136-lt-p)
This Is not a recording. To The
Sundance Kids twin (WEP III): My
teeth look and feel great with their
new tan. My* two fingers and that
special one are doing fine. How are
your toes doing? ... This Is not a
recording. To The Sundance.
(J-136-lt-p) S
COMING: A BRIDGE OVER
TROUBLED WATERS May 14, 21,
28. Frank Discussions about
Marriage. (J-136-lt-p)
MEMO: Ah yes, my little Chickadee
(that's so old but recently familiar)
we wouldn't leave out the 2nd floor
office help HAPPY MOMS DAY
Mag, Wade, Roberta (your golden
girl forever.) (J-136-lt-p)
LOST <& FOUND
FOUND: Pair of men's glasses In
vicinity of Reitz Union. Contact
David Pearson at 1204 NW 3rd Ave.
between 57 p.m. (L-3t-134-p)
Lost In recent model mercedes that
picked me up hltchiklng late Sat.
night on Radio Road glasses with
wire frames call 392-8317.
Reward. (L-2t-135-p)
SERVICES
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
Ruby'S ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th SL 376-8506 Mrs.
Ruby Mills. (M-10t-13S-p)
BABY CARE: 311 N.W. 15th
Terrace (Infants under 1 yr. old);
rates by the hour $.75, daily $4.00,
weekly sls. Experienced, reliable
Christian home. Call 376-2072.
(M-2t-135-c)
4 cent Xerox QUICK WAY Copy
Center,'3 machines no waiting. Free
collating. 100 copies 1 original 3 %
cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Qulkway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (M-llt-126-p)
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent-air
carports awnings add-e-rooms
supplies and accesories. Prompt
and dependable service. TNT sales
and service 373-1446. (M-10t-130-p)
Motorcycle owners! Custom painting
of cycles and helmets full line of
metalflake and candyapple colors
now available cyclerama ph.
378-2811. (M-st-131-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical 'Systems -tested aw*
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
VOLKSWAGEN PARTS AND
SERVICE GAINESVILLE MACH
SHOP 1224 S MAIN 376-0710.
(M-10t-131-p)
A Million Dollars worth of free
advice... FREE at A BRIDGE
OVER TROUBLED WATERS. May
14, 21, 28... 7:30, In the Union.
(M-136-lt-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-c)
AT THE COPY CENTER
XEROGRAPHY 5 cent and 4 cent
and lower, open until 9 PM. Thesis
Dissertations Books Notes
Singles 1718 W. Unlv. 376-9334.
(M-136-16t-p)
Its all there: SEX, BABIES,
MONEY, DIVORCE, at the Union on
May 14, 21, 28. FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE. (M-136-lt-p)

Teachers Wanted
Southwest, Entire West
and Alaska for 24 yean
Southwest Teachers Agency T
j 1303 CiptglAve., N.E.
| Wi|w Mexico
I 'ree RigUtmtiamh Goad Salaries
aaIBBBHMBSUaBa^MHaaHHaaaaIBIMMBIISWHHHMfIHCHnMmaHBBBBiia

£j|S?l!M^Bre : : : : : : : : : :£: : £ : x£ ::::: ::££ : : ::::: £ : : : ::^
FRIDAY A SATURDAY MAY 8,9
5:30, 8:00, 10:30PM ADMISSION So<
L~*j"L*^twis3
\ FROM THE MAN' JA f
\ WHO GAVE YOU /
\ 'BLOW-UP" COMES f
\ HIS FIRST GREAT f
\ ANTONIONI'S*" /
\ lAffil /
1 amd f
\ mlmi;; /
1 wk /ftv w turn §
\ PwIIMT /
I^^^BEI^JhEARRODMcKUEN^JEAnT
1 theffiimeqf
Missfjeanflfrodie
WMmt!
LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
| PI w. IMwwSf Am I
1 YOU ASKED FOR IT-DON'T MISS ITII M
\ FUNNIEST PICTURE "YEAR I
Down Madison Ave
1 pi's TIMELY* J| y
\ IMPORTANT WL* t
"PUTNEY SWOPE"
'i . y ,. V V '-HR ' ;;. f
% The Truth and Soul Movie M

GATOR COURT
376-4667 jB 4170 SW
-, 13 th St.



Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 8,1970

**'* *-*nfltfrfi f!ng-A ..* i'.\ .*. *^

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

NOMINATIONS TO
UNIVERSITY PRESIDENTIAL
AND UNIVERSITY SENATE
committees can be sent to Dr.
Cecil Smith, Room 1117
McCarty Hall, until May 15.
FLORIDA BANKERS
ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP
LOAN applications may be
obtained in the Dept, of Finance
and Insurance, Room 204,
Matherly Hall. The Scholarship
Loan will be for the academic
year 1970-71.
U NIVERSITY RELIGIOUS
ASSOCIATION: All persons
interested in applying for an
elected position in the
association should go to the
religion office in the Reitz
Union and fill out an
application. Elections will be
held Thursday, May 14.
ALL STUDENTS who are
expected to take these tests
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use his
social security number.
CLC 141 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 12,
at 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
CLC 142 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 12,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-F report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
G-L to Peabody 101,102,112,
or 114; M-Z to Peabody 201,
202,205, or 208.

I
I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA 1
I ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES I
H '-j >
I FRIDAY I
I LUNCH AND DINNER I
I Fish Almondine I
I and French-Fried Potatoes I
89<
1 W h! I Tt^

DRIVE LIKE A KING
sy' \\ Add to the trade in value and at the
11 yf 7f\ /\\ same time en iY 9*r conditioned com comft
ft comft J \VjC\ \\ fort,..arrive refreshed and wrinkle free!
IIS 3b TV \\ Well make 3,1 of the arrangements!
JP U YOUR CAMPUS CREDIT
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

CLC 143 and CLC 146
MID-TERM TEST will be given
Tuesday, May 12, at 7 p.m.
Students whose last names begin
with A report to Floyd 104 or
106; B to Little 101 or 109; C to
Leigh 207; D-E to Little 113,
121, or 125; F to Little 201,
203, 205, or 207; G to Little
213, 215, 217, or 219; H to
Little 221, 223, 225, 227, 233,
or 239; l-L to Matherly 2,3, 4,
5,6, 7,8, 9,10,11, 12,13,14,
or 16; M to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 111, 113, 115, 116, 117,
118,119; N-0 to Anderson 104,
110, or 112; P-Q to Floyd 108
or 109; R to Flint 101, 102,
110, 112; S to Walker
Auditorium; T-V to Anderson 2,
4,5, 7,18, or 20; W-Z to Walker
Auditorium.
i ... .A. '
PLACEMENT
NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
June and August graduates
unless indicated otherwise.
May 12: The Equitable Life
Assurance Society of U. S.; Boy
Scouts of America

BLUB BULLETIN

UNION BOX OFFICE: Florida
Players, 'Thieves Carnival,"
$.75, SI.OO, $1.50, 3oston
Chamber Players, SI.OO,
$2.00, Talking Drums of
- Africa, SI.OO ,$1.50, Mrs.
Sudha Chandrasekhar, $.75,
$1.25, Sly and The Family
Stone, $5.50
Friday, May 8
Union Movie, 'The Heart is a
Lonely Hunter," Union Aud.,
5:30, 8:00 & 1030 pm
SGP: Boston Symphony
Chamber Players, University
Aud., 8:15 pm
Rathskeller Ewing St. Times,
930 & 1130 pm
Saturday, May 9
Gator Sail Club Training &
Checkout Session, Union
Stairway, 1030 am
Union Movie, "The Heart is a
Lonely Hunter," Union Aud.,
530,830 8t 1030 pm
Celebration TO, Talking Drums
of Africa, University Aud.,
8:15 pm
Rathskeller, Ewing St. Times,
930 & 1130 pm
fijmwjri!
Wk
IK If
. ;'y' M
I WSk TadyhT I
TflL GOODBYE COLUMBUS

Campus

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES
| ijr 3 I* W ?

Sunday, May 10
Gator Sail Club Training &
Checkout Session, Union
Stairway, 1230 noon
Union Classic Film Series,
"Kinetic Art II," Union Aud.,
730 & 9:30 pm
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
730 pm
SMC Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
pm
Celebration of Israel
I independence Day, Alpha
Epsilon Phi Sorority House,
730 pm
India Club & Celebration TO,
Mrs. Sudha Chandrasekhar,
University Aud., 8:15 pm
Campus Crusade for Christ
Meeting, Sigma Phi Epsilon
House, 7:00 pm
Monday, May 11
Union Movie, "7th Seal," Union
Aud., 630,830 & 1030 pm
Sigma Xi Lectures, Dr. Alvin F.
Moreland & Dr. G. Paul
Moore, McCarty Aud., 730
pm
Unitarian Student Forum, Ric
Masten Concert, P. K. Yonge
Aud., 830 pm
Florida Players, "Thieves
Carnival," Constans Theatre,
830 pm
Gator Amateur Radio Cldb
Meeting, 525 E & I Bldg.,
830 pm
Science Fiction Book Exchange
Meeting, 356 Union, 8:00 pm
Young Democrats Meeting, 361
Union, 8:00 pm
Tuesday, May 12
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 330 pm
PBint for Fun, C-4 Union,
730 pm
Chess Club Meeting, 361 Union,
7300 pm
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
362 Union, 730 pm
Union Movie, 'Tth Seal," Union
Aud., 6:00,830 & 1030 pm
Air Force Dames Meeting, Air
Force ROTC Library, 730
pm
Modem Jazz Dance Lessons, 118
Union, 730 pm
Union Lecture, Sri Chinmoy,
122 Union, 730 pm
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
730 pm
Florida Players, "Thieves
Carnival," Constans Theatre,
830 pm
Law Dames Meeting, Law
School Aud., 830 pm
Music Dept., Music for Bassons,
University Aud., 8:15 pm

Calendar

HPT ]
"PLUS 2ND HIT" J
WHEN YOU ENTER THE 1
GATES 0F... 1
(YOU WILL WITNESS...
.. ji-..f-.x '" Mafe&vXy''
INHUMAN EXPERIMENTS..
' \ N '. >' '* f .5 ...
TOTAL DEGRADATION.'.*
y*^n
V
A PLACE
ALL THE YOUTHFUL
BEAUTY OF EUROPE ENSLAVED
FOR THE PLEASURE OF
THE 3RD REICH
IN EASTMAN COLOR



'Thieves Carnival
Here Monday

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
The next production of The
Florida Players, Thieves
Carnival should prove to be
quite interesting. Its going to be
a multi-media production with
some special things happening in
several areas.
The play opens in the
Constans Theatre in the Reitz
Union complex next Monday
and plays through Saturday,
May 16. The play begins at 8
pjn. each night. Tickets are
available at the Reitz Union box
office.
THE PLAY was written by
Jean Anouilh and centers, as you
might imagine, around thieves in
several forms. The theft of
objects as well as the theft of
love is the subject matter.
Members of the audience can
expect the unexpected according
to Florida Players officials who
say that this production could
rank as the most experimental to
be done by the group. Were
going to really try to involve the
audience as much as we can,
one spokesman for the Players
said.
A HIGHLIGHT of the
production should be the music,
an original score written by a
student. There also will be some
popular music edited together as

i ft ?:'
*?m I 1 IliilliK
I
W 3f parental pressure forces you into action jp
this summer ... let Western Girl help you!!
B There are assignments waiting for you
if you can type or take shorthand or file
MM or have other office or marketing skills. |H
INIfRKAriONAI
B| Offices across the nation. For more information call 1111
Wm JACKSONVILLE 359-6902 H
dry your eyes
. §Ss
If you haven't bought you. Quarterly So if Jr favuiteboo* shop run.
yet, all you've lost is time. * m * reordw
Well be around all quarter. We ll see you get yours.
FLORIDA
QUARTERLY

a part of the productions
background.
Among those included in the
leading roles are Gene Touchet,
Johnny Stephens, Kandi
McNett, Debbie Kondelik and
Fernando Fonseca.
Kinetic Arts
Films At
Union Sunday
The second series of the
popular Kinetic Art Program of
short films made by independent
filmmakers will be shown
Sunday afternoon and night in
the Reitz Union theater.
There are seven short films in
the program, gathered from
around the World.
THERE WILL be four shows
Sunday, at 2:30, 5, 7:30 and 10
p.m. Admission price is $1 for
the two hour program.
There are several animated
films in the series in addition to
regular live action films. There is
one film that uses a combination
of live action and animation.
This program is the second of
three nights of films included in
Series Two of the Kinetic Art
programs. Series One of the
program was shown on campus
last year. The third night of
Series Two will be shown May
24 in the Union.

The
Florida
Animate*

L *** MMfti !3HI
THE DUEL
... Gene Touchet and Johnny Stephens battle in a scene from Thieves' Carnival o

| RED PIN qAI
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM M
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

jPik'
Huge Clearance
Mn
HAH SUCKS & JEANS HR RH
800 PAIR TO CHOOSE hhS
The pick of the soasonl Your favorite
famous brand fashion slacks A jeans 1
in swinging flare styles. ?
As Seen on T.V.
Available At All Belk Lindsey Stores of Florida

, A')iiiVi(!lt! a !Viivj|P!*! > !Vi|*'!'iVnV!'MP!v!^R !ill'!w!'W!^^^^^W/!'!^R^X'^^*!v

Oriental Tea-house Atmosphere
Serving Authentic Chinese Dinners at Popular Prices
FAST SERVICE CONGENIAL ATMOSPHERE NO TIPPING
Dining-room is also available for private luncheon
parties and wedding receptions
10 MINUTE CARRYOUT SERVICE AVAILABLE. OPEN 4-10 P.M.
.'. in the Village Square on 441 372-6801


Friday, May 8,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 15



Page 16

i, Th* Florida AMoator. Friday, May 8,1970

r=WEEKEND=^
3 g H a&Sg-jf T iLM s | §
wpP'w " Wtiitr'-mkim''M I < stg& b a
*
MOVIE FARE
- >?-k ?
PUTNEY SWOPE This is billed as the truth and soul movie. Its
good, according to nearly everyone. It takes a look at Madison Avenue
and blacks and does so with an incredible sharp and original wit
according to folks whove seen it. Bob Downey is the maker of the
film. Several mock commercials appear to be one of the highpoints of
the thing. It is showing at the downtown Florida.
*
A DREAM OF KINGS This is another new one to town and
another thats gotten fine reviews across the country. It stars Anthony
Quinn in a role similar to his role in Zorba the Greek. Irene Papas
co-stars and both are supposed to be good. The story is set in Chicago.
It's showing at the Plaza Two.
* *
M*A*S*H It isnt known for sure if this picture will continue at
the Plaza One or if a replacement will be screened. The movie is good.
If you havent seen it yet, you should. Its about war, a funny lodk at
it. Maybe there is something in the humor of it that will help us all
through these troubled times. Elliott Gould and a top cast star. Ring
Lardner Jr. wrote the screenplay.
* *
THE HEART IS A LONELY HUNTER This is a beautifully
tender story of growing up written by Carson McCullers, one of the
country's best and least recognized writers. Alan Arkin stars. He lives
and those who live around him are changed. Its incredibly soft and
warm. The picture is at the Reitz Union tonight and Saturday night.
* *
THEY SHOOT HORSES, DONT THEY? This is pure power in a
huge metaphor. Its about marathon dancing in The Thirties. People
were sad and danced their hearts out and the reason they did has a lot
to do with why any of us do anything. It reappears in town, showing
now at the Gainesville Drivein with some Bob Hope thing.
* *
KINETIC ART SERIES TWO All the information about this is
on the preceding page. It should be seen.

NOW
OPENING
for
Spt. Occupancy
LEASE OFFICE
309 NW 13th St.
Across from
Tigert Hall
.tlic
place)
I floruia |
I quarterly I
I We only did it for you. I
ImmJ

Tonight
. V,
w
£ o
in H 0
K| v lf^
jmk JM F* J A F ; yB
V fm £WL
Chamber Players
5 Performances at 8:1 S p.m.
in the University Auditorium.
Tickets: SI.OO students
$2.00 non-students
. v . v ... .j,

Ewing St. Times To Give
X#*6r?rS -Jam* -Vyiihc ...
Perforhnarices Nightly

A popular soft rock group, the Ewing St. Times,
will be giving two shows tonight and Saturday night
at The Rathskeller as their third engagement at the
club continues.
There will be two shows tonight and tomorrow
night, at 9 and 11 p jn. Admission price is $1.25 for
members of the club and $1.50 for nonmembers.
THE GROUP, which lives now in Coconut Grove
in South Florida, offers a sound similar in many
ways to that of the Lovin Spoonful, featuring much

Iroawood
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMBERSHP
THRU MONTHS FOR $25 4 TAX
SPECIAL KATE
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For information cols
p 376-0080
gr reofvweop
h i Avwm

RADIAL
WIDER AND STRONGER
Thaw tires are classified as "blemish" tires because of an appearance
blemish. THEY ARE GUARANTEED. Compare them with standard
nnv TLicaa aiau/ bias ply tires. Compare them with belted tires. Sihrertown Radials
BUT InfcfW NUW are tops every time.
I RADIAL I REG.
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the same kinds of vocal harmonies and tone and a
similar instrumental sound.
They will be performing their own material in
addition to songs written by others.
The Ewing St. Times has appeared at The
Rathskeller twice before to good-sized audiences.
They also are scheduled to be on the bill for the
upcoming Student Government Productions Super
Show in the stadium the weekend after next.
The Rathskeller is open to everyone. There is no
minimum age requirement.

7
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Mon.Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm



Committees Attract Small Attendance

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Managing Editor
Lack of student participation
in university committees has
been subject to criticism in the
past, but this year few chairmen
have complained, according to
Mel Sharpe, coordinator for the
committees.
Approximately 60 students
are appointed to serve on the
university-wide committees
which report to the
administration. Through the
committees, students can take
advantage of one of their few
chances to aid in UF
policy-making.
STUDENTS ARE nominated
Girl Raped
In Museum
Witch Ritual
NEW ORLEANS (UPI) A
tattooed teen-ager, who said she
is a witch, and three hippie
drifters were arrested Thursday
for the cat-o-nine-tails flogging
and rape of an 18-year-old girl
beside a guillotine in a Hall of
Horrors was museum on
Bourbon Street.-
Patricia Hall, 18, known by
the witchcraft name of Inca
Angelique, threatened to turn
arresting officers into frogs.
POLICE SAID the rape
victim, described as a hippie
type with tattooes, was walking
in front of the museum just
before dawn Thursday with her
boyfriend.
She said Miss Hall and the
men forced her inside at the
point of a knife.
The victim told police she was
stripped of her clothes, raped by
one of the men and then flogged
for three or four minutes by
Miss Hall.
ALSO ARRESTED were
William Rhodes, 24; Richard
King, 29; and Peter Valenzuela,
18.
The wax museum, catering to
the heavy tourist traffic along
Bourbon Street, contains figures
of ghouls and simulated torture
devices, including the guillotine.
When we arrested the Hall
girl, she claimed to be a witch
a member of a Satan cult, one
patrolman said.
She threatened to turn the
arresting officers into frogs if
they didnt leave her alone.

BURGER CHETS
BIG SHEF

to the committees by the
student body president and
appointments are made by UF
President Stephen C. oConnell.
Many students dont attend,
committee meetings because
chairmen fail to take into
account the fact that students
have classes and cant attend at
certain times of the day, Miss
Gail Merein, student coordinator
for the committees, said.
It comes down to a question
of whether you cut classes or
miss committee meetings, she
said, and students cant be
expected to cut classes.
ANOTHER PART of the
problem is that chairmen havent
been notifying Student
Government when student
members arent attending
meetings. If we dont know
about the problem theres not
much we can do about it, she
said.
Another complaint has been
that students do attend the
meetings, but contribute little or
nothing to the discussion.
Dr. John P. OConnell,
chairman of the teaching
evaluation committee said that
although student attendance at
the meetings has been good, y
participation has been limited to
one or two of the four
members.

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AT 11AM A
MON-SAT __
Every Tuesday Nite 1 Everyday 1
I A Free Keg of Beer \
To the Guy Who \ th #w VV
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Famous ALANS
CUBANA

FEW CHAIRMEN COMPLAIN

BUT HE ADDED that this is
to be expected and the same
ratio exists for faculty members.
The student affairs
committee, chaired by Dr.
Ernest R. Bartley, has been
working on a revised Student
Code of Conduct for over a year.
The delay is partly due to the
fact that students have no tenure
on the committees; appointment
is for one year.
Nothing is accomplished,
Bartley said, because new
student members must be
indoctrinated each quarter.
SHARPE ADMITTED that it
is hard to find an hour when all
members can attend meetings,
and its a chore with student
members continually changing,
especially with committees that
meet often.
But as a whole, student
participation has been excellent
and I've been very pleased with
the way it's working, he said.
Many students feel there is no
sense in participating in
committee meetings because
they feel the administration
doesnt care what their opinions
are, Miss Merein said.
OCONNELL SAID his
committee had been very
successful in dealing with the
students. I like to think its
because students feel they have
an impact on what happens, he
said.

Weve run the committee in
such away as to give them a
voice in what is done.
At least two committees,
admissions and student
petitions, have the bulk of their
duties during quarter breaks.
Problems have arisen here when
students attend well during the
term, but lose a chance to really
participate because they leave
town during the break,
admissions committee chairman
and Registrar Richard H.
Whitehead said.
THE STUDENT members
have been faithful during the
term, but you just can't expect
them to stay during the break
when activity is heaviest, he
said.
SG has tried to keep student
attendance high by forbidding
students to serve on more than
one committee, as far as
possible, Miss Merein said.
The president and treasurer of

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Friday, May 8,1970, Tha Florida AMgator,

the student body serve on
several committees, but these are
ex officio appointments, she
said.
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
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Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida AlHgator, Friday, May 8, H7O

I ,~/ s r >. *"" '' l 4 r '% i V 1 ,__ v '7 I I *-> * * T v. ** 1 * j, _- -" t >
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MHHHHIHHHFI. Bill < **
KELLEY AND ALVAREZ TOM KENNEDY
... speak at rally on plaza
Jocks Support Protest

When people hear the name of Carlos Alvarez
they usually think of his prowess on the gridiron.
But Wednesday Alvarez and UFs highly touted
linebacker Mike Kelley spoke in support of the
student strike.
The two gridders told students gathered in the
Plaza of the Americas they fully supported the
strike and would do whatever they could to help
them.
ALVAREZ SAID he was against any killing, by
either American troops or the Viet Cong. Im not
saying America is right, said Alvarez, but neither
are the Viet Cong right.

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TOM KENNEDY

Bartlett Signs Another
UF had a close call in a recruiting shootout with Kent State for
one of Ohios top college basketball prospects.
Coach Tommy Bartlett announced today the signing of Don Close,
a 6*7 wing player from Stow, Ohio, a suburb of Akron. Close was
named the Akron-Beacon Journal Player of the Year.
BARTLETT SAID he came highly recommended to us. We
couldnt be more pleased than to get a player of his calibre.
Gose averaged 20 points and 16 rebounds a game. He also blocked
52 shots during the season and lead Stow to a 15-3 regular season
record.
Don can play wing or post, which is a real plus for our program.
He certainly fits into our future plans, said Bartlett.
Close narrowed his choices to Florida and Kent State before the
Gators won out. He was recruited by most every university in the
Mid-America Conference.
.
Close follows two former Akron players of the year, Bruce
Moorehead and all SEC guard Skip Highley, who played for Florida in
the mid-60s.
BASEBALL
Gators vs. Tennessee at Knoxville, Tenn. Friday and Saturday
TENNIS
SEC Championships at Starkville, Miss. Friday and Saturday
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PROS LARRY RENTZ AND LARRY SMITH
... attend takeover of Walker

All killing is wrong. Love should be the word
to live by.
Alvarez said he had to leave Cuba because it was
so bad there.
AMERICA IS a beautiful place, but could be a
lot more beautiful, said Alvarez. Our generation
has to make it that way, and our generation only.
After his short talk Alvarez said he and Kelley
were speaking as concerned students and that they
were not speaking on behalf of the football team.
Many of the players agree with what Mike and I
said today, but were not going to say that all of the
team agrees with us.

I ALL
WEEKEND
Tonight and
B Saturday,
For Members
For Non-Members
tgif special
a glass
I SI.OO a
j \ < 1/ you dont have to be 21

Hilley Upsets, UF Second
Unseeded Greg Hilley bumped off no. 2 seed Norm Holmes of
Georgia yesterday in the first round of the SE Tennis championships
inStarfcvilfe, Mis 6. pM wM 1 § 1 I
The Gators have moved into second place in the contest on the
strength of Hilleys 6-3, 8-6 upset, and wins by four other Gators in
the first round.
TENNESSEE IS in first place with 12 points followed by the UF
with 10; Mississippi State, 9; Georgia, 8; and Vanderbilt, 6.
The only Gator to lose in the first round was no. 3 netter Ashley
Sherwood.
Other Gator winners were Buddy Miles, 6-0, 6-1 over Dooley of
Auburn; Paul Lunetta, 64, 3-6, 7-5 over Tennelbaum for Vanderbilt;
Kenn Terry, 6-0, 6-0 over Hartzog of Mississippi; and Ralph Hart over
Barr of Mississippi by 6-0,6-1.
Hilley next meets Steve Faulk of LSU, a man he has lost to once
already during regular season play.

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Chamberlain Overwhelms Kniel
WILT CHAMBERLAIN, who
had the reputation of being a
loser when Bill Russell was
around, may be on the verge of
changing his image.
The man who missed all but
12 regular season games with a
severe knee injury Wednesday
night muscled the Los Angeles
Lakers into a National
Basketball Associations last
game of the 1969-70 season.
With Willis Reed on the bench

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IV / K XAVS/C *t I VS' V / ? I
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UNiysnSiV/ /W£ olC'JcCs
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with a hip injury, the powerful
Chamberlain bulled his way for
45 points and 27 rebounds in a
135-113 romp over, the New
York Knicks.
That knotted the Lakers and
Knicks at three victories apiece
in the best-of-seven game playoff
finals with the championship
decider set at New Yorks
Madison Square Garden tonight.
The game will be nationally

a i>i snoi< r> >iioi{ is I

televised by ABC-TV tonight at
7:30 p.m. EDT.
* *
DEFENDING INDIAN INDIANAPOLIS
APOLIS INDIANAPOLIS 500 champ Mario
Andretti of Nazareth, Pa., has
yet to make his debut on the
famed oval. The arrival
of Andrettis new German-built
racer has been delayed until
Saturday because of a trucking
strike, car owner Andy
Granatelli said Wednesday. The
cars first appearance on the
track will probably be Monday.
Top speed of practice was
turned in by Dennis Hulme of
New Zealand in one of three cars
entered by Bruce McLaren.
MEXICO
Cologio Victoria's summer
session, Guadalajara, June 29
Aug. 2. Room, Board, Tuition,
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finest campus in Mexico. Courses
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and leather work. Excellent Art
dept. Numerous excursions.
Write: Director. Box 1327,
Bellingham, Wash. 98225.

FALSTAFF
BREWING CORPORATION Hggjji
F THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 1
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
present in concert
CELEBRATION 70
SLY & THE
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. YOUNGBLOODS
JAMES COTTON BLUES BAND
CROW
TEN WHEEL DRIVE
GREAT SPECKLED BIRD WITH IAN & SYLVIA
EWING ST. TIMES
MECKI MARK MEN
special guest appearance:
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Florida Field- Sat. May 16th4:ooP.M.
General Admission: $5.50 Tickets on sale at:
L J. Wayne Reitz Union Box Office & J
gt The Record Bar J|
Falstaff Brewing Corp., St. Louis. Mo.
uX/fSk Entermedia Futures Corp., N.Y. i/mw/
a.f; - t

Hulme toured the oval course at
a speed just under 168 M.P.H.
*
IT TAKES more than frigid
weather to cool off Tom Seaver.
The 2 5-year-old righthander of
.the New York Mets has been red
hot since early August of last
season, and he shows no signs of
slowing down, not even in the
wake of bone-chilling
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Friday, May 8,1870, Tha Florida Alligator,

temperatures.
A sudden cold spell gripped
the Northeast section of the
country Wednesday, yet 18,027
fans, most of them clad in heavy
blankets, braved their way to
Shea Stadium in 46 degree
weather to watch Seaver beat
the Los Angeles Dodgers, 5-4,
for his 16th consecutive
triumph.
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378-3771

Page 19



Page 20

I. Th Florida Alligator. Friday, May 8,1970

BONANZA SIRLOIN FIT
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