Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
UP Mourns Death Os Kent State Students

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Silence, broken only by deep strains from the UF Brass
- Choir set the mood for the gathering of about an
estimated 3,000 students in the Plaza of the Americas to
mourn the deaths of five Kent State students.
We are here to give some meaning to the lives of five
who can no longer express themselves, Rabbi Michael
Monson of the Hillel Foundation prayed.
FATHER MICHAEL V. Gannon of the Catholic
Student Center opened saying he could not talk of this
matter in eulogy form, but must express the way that
he felt. This crisis called for more than an abstract

H^dJil
All AwJUam

Vol. 62, No. 135

3000 UF Students 'On Strike

xgfrfl +*% Irf 11 1--
W isl
,* jHMorjr hk#~ w
aJt B w*m : 'l * -M r HSJ
RJI Hnp -sf j mi jF
I nIHH v i m § -vifc*
CLAY PHIPPS
* SHUT IT DOWN
... 1,500 rallied at Tigert Tuesday night

AA Unanimously Passes
Football Card Program

See Complete Text of Policy Page 5
By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
After being subjected to months of bargaining
and protesting, the Athletic Association (AA)
Wednesday afternoon unanimously passed a football
card system.
The football card will cost students $5 and will
allow them to pick up tickets prior to each of the
five home games. The card itself does not constitute
a season pass.
SINGLE GAME tickets will be available to
students who do not buy the card at the regular
reserved price for the general audience. The price
has been set at $7 for the 1970 season.
At the insistence of Student Body President
Walter Morgan representing students at the meeting,
a provision was made to give students priority to
purchase guest tickets at the $7 price before sales
are opened to the public.
The resolution passed by the AA also called for
2,000 season spouse cards" to be sold to married
students at sls each. Date tickets have been
eliminated.

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

OCONNELL SIGNS PETITION

comparisons.
A PETITION to be sent to President Richard M. Nixon
was read by Ralph Glatfelter, president of Omicron
Delta Kappa. The petition was circulated throughout the
crowd.
It said the undersigned wished to be heard and that
they mourned the useless deaths of those killed at Kent
State, and in Viet Nam.
We believe in Life not Death, Love not Hate, Peace
not War, and we believe in our country, the petition said.
IT REQUESTS President Nixon to heed the pulse of
life and to stop the war here and abroad.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell signed the petition

THE NEW ARRANGEMENT will not affect bloc
seating. For the 1970 season, students have been
allotted 18,000 seats to be divided up as they wish.
Os these, 2,000 have already been labeled spouse
cards.
In the future the cards price will vary in relation
to the number of students seats sold the previous
season.
The AA set a baseline for this purpose of 18,000
or this seasons attendance, which ever is higher.
THIS MEANS for every additional 500 cards
purchased over the baseline the price of the card
will increase 50 cents. For every drop of 500 cards
purchased the price will decrease 50 cents.
Morgan said the price of the card has been
guaranteed to remain at $5 for at least two years
(until the 1972 season) by an adjustment restriction
clause ir "he policy. After that the price can only go
up commensurate with a great increase in student
attendance to the games," he said.
With what they (the AA) have nowiapproved
based on my examination and report of the three
student accountants, there can be no doubt that
some increase in monies is needed" Morgan said.

University of Florida, Gainesville

CLAY PH

after adding that the United States should do as much as
possible to end the war as soon as it is safe for the troops
already there.
WE SHOULD affirm that violence is not the
way ... It is not in human interest, OConnell said.
By doing this we might know that the deaths of the
five Kent State students were not in vain. OConnell said.
' Student Body President-elect Steve Uhlfelder took the
platform to appeal a moment of silence to express the
deep sorrow of the crisis at hand.
The memorial service was closed with a brief
benediction from Rev. Robert Smith of the Baptist
Student Center.

See Todays Strike Schedule Page 3
By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writar

By the time the anti-war demonstrators reached the ROTC drill
field, dissent among the dissenters had reached the point that few
knew exactly what to do Tuesday.
Students followed first one leader and then another. They marched

first from the drill field to the
ROTC Building itself, then to
Tigert Hall. Confusion grew. By
4 pm., student leaders were
advocating going home and
regrouping this morning to
continue the protest of the war
and the death of five Kent State
students. By 4:30, most of
Tuesdays marchers had gone
home.
AFTER LISTENING to
student debate of the ROTC
program, a vote was taken by
Andy Kramer to march
peacefully on the ROTC
Building. A crowd estimated by
Kramer at 6,000 and the
University Police Department at
3,000 filled the area in front of
the ROTC Building and across
the street in front of Tolbert
Area.
LEADERS PROPOSED
submitting a petition to the
ROTC Department demanding
in part that ROTC courses'be
discredited and moved off
campus because there is nothing
academic about indoctrination
of the art of killing.
Students then voted to
converge on Tigert after speakers
said ROTC is just an instrument
of the military machine and not
(SEE 'STUDENTS' PAGE 2)
lllllHiiliilllll 1
!§jH|ie Gator
PRESIDENT NIXON
orders his staff to
compile report on Kent
State crisis page 2
Classifieds ...14
Editorials 8
Entertainment 22
Letters .9
Movies .i 14
Sports .26
What's Happening 4

Thursday, May 7, 1970

UhHelder's
Statement
r ip*
Wednesday the students
had a day of non-violent
demonstration. We expressed
our feelings about the deaths
at Kent State, and reaffirmed
our desire for an end to the
war in Southeast Asia. The
day was successful because
the people worked together
for a common goal.
The students have the
opportunity to strike and
participate in discussions
Thursday. We should
attempt to have meaningful
change made at this
university and its surrounding
community through
constructive programs and
teach-ins designed to involve
more students and faculty.
As one such positive
approach, the Environmental
Action Group will be working
on projects to clean up Lake
Alice and to collect
aluminum cans along area
highways. We will attempt to
organize similar constructive
projects in Gainesville's
ghettos as well.
We are attempting to reach
the unconcerned as well as
the discontent, but we must
do it in away that will have a
positive effect on our
community.
And we must exercise our
rights while avoiding
infringing on the rights of
others to work or attend
class. We must persuade, not
force. We must educate, not
dictate.



Page 2

i;Yi wafc'Aiiitft.'Vfeaw. wr?

Strike Forces ROTC
ToCancel FSU Drill
TALLAHASSEE ROTC Drills scheduled for this afternoon have
been cancelled due to the tense situation at the campus of Florida
State University.
Pershing Rifle competition, set for Saturday, was also cancelled.
One ROTC commander expressed fears that a confrontation might
lead to violence. ~ n
A DEMONSTRATION against ROTC has been called for 11:30
today by student coordinators of the two-day moratorium on classes.
University President Stanley Marshall has called for a general
meeting of the university faculty this afternoon. Reliable sources
indicate a resolution calling for cessation of classes Friday and a
limitation on the use of light arms weapons on state campuses will be
introduced.
Similar resolutions are expected at a Student Senate meeting
tonight.
IN OTHER activities, a guerilla theatre and war workshops have
been called for this afternoon, as well as a campus service to honor
students killed at Kent State University.
These events will culminate in a mass march on the state capitol at
1 pjn. on Friday.
Tuesday night, 500 students staged an impromptu march on the
presidential mansion here, but Marshall told the Students he would
not cancel classes today and Friday, as was asked by the marchers.
USF: Crosses For Dead
TAMPA Five crosses, symbolizing the five students killed at Kent
State University appeared on the campus of the University of South
Florida Wednesday.
This was anticlimactic compared to the estimated 5,000 students
who turned out to hear speakers eulogize the dead students Tuesday.
Wednesday there was little activity on the predominantly commuter
campus.
Only 1500 students gathered in front of USFs University Center to
hear debates on U. S. involvement in Cambodia.

Students March To ROTC, Tigert

PAGE ONrJ
the machine itself. Rally leaders
said the only way to shut down
the university, was to shut down
Tigert.
Students then marched down
Stadium Road to Tigert chanting
On strike. Shut it down.
ENROUTE TO TIGERT, the
students stopped at the comer
of Buckman Drive and Stadium
Road where the engine of a
Chevy van was on fire.
Students found Tigert Hall

Campuses Around Nation Shut

By United Press International
Hundreds of thousands of
college students stayed out of
classes on campuses throughout
the nation Wednesday in
clamorous protests against the
nations military policies and the
killing of four students at Kent
State University.
THE TEXAS STATE capitol
was evacuated and hundreds of
armed Texas Rangers, state
troopers and Austin police
guarded it against renewal of
attacks by University of Texas
students.
In Illinois, Gov. Richard B.
Ogilvie ordered 5,000 National
Guard troops to the
Champaign-Urbana campus of
the University of Illinois to quell
student disturbances.
THE HASTILY organized

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only time official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida" Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601,
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day ester the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion. ~

locked with University Police
stationed inside. The group, now
estimated at only 700, massed
outside Tigert and listened while
some speakers said they should
mobilize and take over the
building. Others said they should
remain peacefully outside,
arguing that students had no
right to interfere with the work
going on inside Tigert.
By 4 pm. some leaders
advocated going home, saying
students were tired, and nothing
more could be accomplished

National Strike Center at
Brandeis University in Waltham,
Mass., reported strikes were
under way at 240 colleges and
universities. Half of the affected
schools are in New England and
New York State.
Most of the strikes and
demonstrations were peaceful.
At many schools, only scores or
hundreds out of thousands of
students were participating.
Classes went on normally at
hundreds of colleges.
But scores of prestigious
universities had shut down for the
day, for the rest of the week
and in the case of a few -for
the rest of the academic year.
FIREBOMBINGS of ROTC
offices or other buildings shook
some campuses. Buildings were
occupied on a few campuses.
Evacuation of the Texas
capitol was ordered by Gov.

Bn
§§&:: .tsU
: :::

,* . v 1 hBHS
r; -a f 'wmk,, ;
I 9
I
Si
1 M I B 8
NIXON BURNED
... at UF Tuesday night

that night. Others advocated
staying, saying everything the
protest had accomplished would
be lost if everyone went home.
Meanwhile, student leaders
argued among themselves as to
what the group should do.
Andy Kramer, Steve McGuire,
and Steve Uhlfelder, all
advocating calling off the protest
until this morning, finally
gathered enough support. The
dissenters went home, saying
they would return at 7 am. this
morning.

Preston Smith after a bomb
threat was telephoned to
security guards and student
protestors gathered for a campus
rally and threatened a march on
the capitol. Police Tuesday
hurled tear gas bombs into ranks
of screaming, chanting
demonstrators who stormed
around the capitol and marched
downtown.

9 o9e4Ker Fromowons 8
| Ortamio Sporfe M*. 1
S Ckii *"1* X
5 br&atum £*. g
1 may V 7 ; {o m 1
X cl\ Aoor /j X
Suuuuuuuu-r^jT^!^!^ o^ jj

Students Surround
Miami Building
Special to the Alligator
MIAMI 1,000 students surrounded the Ashe Administration
building at the University of Miami Wednesday, demanding the
university be shut down until Sunday.
The march at the 18,000 student campus climaxed two days of
student protests, including bombings and a memorial service to
students killed at Kent State.
TUESDAY, UM President Henry King Stanford called a halt to the
university for a one hour memorial service at the student union, which
drew 4,000 participants.
That evening, students marched to the universitys ROTC building,
and during the night, a molotov cocktail was thrown into the ROTC
motor pool. Light damage was reported as a result of the bombing
attempt.
Members of the campus militant SDS unit Wednesday called for a
one-to-one confrontation with community members as a means of
peacefully explaining the purpose of the strike the group is attempting
to call.
Student Government leaders Pete Yaffee and Marty Winkle joined
with an ad hoc group of concerned faculty members in producing a
call for a student strike without violence.
Nixon Orders Report
On Kent State Crisis
WASHINGTON (UPI) President Nixon Wednesday ordered his
White House staff to compile a thorough report on the Kent State
University violence and to recommend ways to prevent campus
disorders.
After meeting more than an hour with six Kent State students,
Nixon instructed his assistant for domestic affairs, John Ehrlichman,
to determine the cause of the Kent State rioting and to find ways to
improve communications between students and college
administrations and his own administration.
THE WHITE HOUSE is not sitting here, nor is the President, in
total disregard or without concern for the frustrations many young
people feel, Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler told reporters.
Nixon acted as Senate Democratic leader Mike Mansfield was
calling on the President to appoint a high-level commission to
investigate the Kent tragedy and to recommend solutions to campus
problems.
He suggested the panel include former Chief Justice Earl Warren,
John W. Gardner, former secretary of the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, and Sam Brown, a leader of antiwar
demonstrations.
AT THE SAME time, Sen. Stephen M. Young, D-Ohio, introduced
a resolution that would establish a special Senate committee to look
into the four Kent occurred when Ohio National
Guardsmen fired into a crowd of students.
But in the debate that occurred in the Senate, assistant GOP leader
Robert P. Griffin of Michigan blamed student revolutionaries.
Ziegler said Nixon decided to meet with the six Kent State students
after learning from Rep. William Stanton, R-Ohio, that they had come
to Washington to explain the cause of student unrest on their campus.
Churches Fast For Dead
Twenty religious leaders of the University-Gainesville community
have declared Friday a Day of Prayer and Fasting.
All persons, of whatever faith or persuasion, are invited to spend
the day in fasting (no food, only water) as away of identifying with
the dead and the suffering at Kent State and Indochina.
Five churches in the community have been set aside for silent
prayer and meditation during the lunch and dinner hours of
tomorrow, 12 to 1 p.m. and 6 to 7 pan. The centers for prayer in the
immediate vicinity of the university are the Catholic Student Center,
University Lutheran Church, and Hillel Foundation.



VIETNAM BILLS PASSED

Senate Supports Str

Three bills pertaining to U S.
involvement in Vietnam and the
recent events at Kent State
University were passed by the
Student Senate Tuesday night.
Two of these bills were
resolutions supporting the
student strike for as long as it
continues and censoring the
National Guard of Ohio for
their responsibility in the tragic
event that took place on
Monday, May 4,1970.
STUDENT BODY
President-elect Steve Uhlfelder
addressed the senate to thank
them for passing the bills. He
said he was glad Student
Government was supporting the
strike because we can play a
leadership role.
Were fighting against the
violence that occurred in
Vietnam, the violence that
occurred in Cambodia and the
violence that occurred at Kent
State, he said. We dont want
to have a double standard and
have violence here.
I think we can make the
university a little bit better by
facing the important issues of
today, he said.
THE THIRD bill passed was a
referendum to be placed on the
ballot of the May 11 special
election to ask the students if
they want:
The students of UF to call
for an immediate withdrawal of
all U. S. forces in Southeast
Asia.
To support the call for a
nationwide strike May 29.
To express disagreement
with any escalation of the war in
Southeast Asia involving U. S.
troops and bombing of North
Vietnam, but not call for
immediate withdrawal.
The referendum bill was
passed without discussion.
An amendment was added to
the resolution supporting the
student strike directing those
groups conducting it to avoid

8:15 P.M.
University
Auditorium
I
. bm
mik "'
jfllKf; llb.^BjPb^p
If AKhIBb
\ ~ ? ; r ~ ~ - .

violence and not interfere with
any students who wanted to go
to classes.
PROPONENTS of the bill,
including Senators Doug Jewett,
Bill Gilmore and Bob Beron,
denounced this amendment
saying it made the resolution
wishy-washy.

Referendum Includes
Football Ticket Item
By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate Tuesday authorized a referendum on the
various proposals for athletic seating and tickets. The referendum will
be on the ballot for the special election May 11.
The referendum places three choices before the students which
Henry Solares, student body vice president-elect, said the Athletic
Association would accept, he doubted if they would accept anything
else,he said.
THE REFERENDUM asks first if the student favors the system of
seating assignments used last year.
It asks which of the following plans would the student favor:
A $5 season card, making available 2,000 cards for spouses at $3
each.
A $1 per game plan, with the cost of tickets rising fifty cents a
year to a high of $3.50 in 1975.
A no extra charge plan which would do away with bloc seating
(the others do not) and limit student seats to 14,700.
Four public opinion questions are also on the referendum. They ask
if the students favor retaining the present system of athletic tickets if
it means cutting back the UF athletic program.
Also it asks if the students feel they should have significant
representation on the board of the Athletic Association; if the
students would favor limiting the athletic program by cutting out
certain sports, and if the students would boycott the football games if
charged for tickets.
Anti-War Poetry Readings
Scheduled At Union Tonight
An antiwar poetry reading will replace a scheduled student and
faculty poetry reading at 8 tonight in the Reitz Union.
The name of the program is Where Is Indochina? Where Is Kent
State? and it will feature about eight local poets reading their own
work and the antiwar comments of other poets and writers.
The reading is organized by the Florida Quarterly and will be held
in the first floor lounge in the Union, rooms 122 and 123.

If youre going to pass this
bill, pass it, said Gilmore,
speaking against the amendment.
But dont weaken it.
4 Stewert Hershey, who added
the amendment, said it should
be added because those
students who want to go to class
have a right to go to class.

ike

I Strikers 3 Demands I
£: The Student Strike Committee, an ad-hoc group of strike £j
£: leaders, met last night and proposed six demands which must be
£: met before students will end the current strike.
£: The committee is calling on students to meet in the Plaza at 1 £
£: pjn. today to ratify the demands set forth by the committee:
t Disarmament of campus police. £
£ t Hiring of more black professors and enrollment of more £
£ black students in accordance with standards set by the Black £
£ Student Union. V £
£ Immediate non-accreditation of the ROTC program, and
£ eventual removal of ROTC from campus. v
£ Amnesty for UF employes who are union organizers. £
Cessation of chemical-biological' warfare research being £
conducted on campus, and a rechannelling of OF resources to £
£: ecological research. £
£: Total amnesty for strikers. :
A HANDOUT prepared by the committee and distributed last £
: night in dorm areas stated: A strike by University of Florida £
£ and faculty has been called in protest of the Southeast Asian £
£ War and die actions which killed five students at Kent State £
£ University. £
£ Student Body President-elect Steve Uhlfelder told the
£ committee he planned to contact each member of the Board of
£ Regents last night and ask that they call an emergency meeting
£ to suspend classes all day today and tomorrow. He said he £:
£ would even call the governor if necessary to ask his help in £:
£ ending classes. £:
The Strike Committee also proposed five programs for £
£ positive action to be conducted during the strike today. The £
£: programs are as follows: teach-in by faculty and students ;£
£: concerning the above demands; distribution of information £
£: sheets to students and faculty in the classrooms; clean up Lake £
Alice; aluminum can collection; ghetto clean up. $
Black General Speaks
On Vietnam POWs
Brig. General <( Chappie James, the second black ever to rise to the
rank of general, will be at UF Thursday and Friday to kick off POW
Week.
James, deputy assistant secretary of defense, is directly concerned
with the POW situation in North Vietnam. He will appear on
WRUF-TV and WRUF Dialogue. His main concern is to emphasize the
plight of the prisoners in North Vietnam.
AMONG THOSE James is slated to visit are the wives of three
Americans being held by North Vietnam. They are Mrs. Linda Gray, a
UF graduate whose husband is also from UF; Mrs. Carl B. Crumpler;
and Mrs. Randolph Ford. He will also meet with UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
Mrs. Gray is one of the wives who accompanied H. Ross Perot,
Texas billionaire, to Paris to try to obtain information on prisoners
from the North Vietnam peace delegation there.
POW Week is a national effort by the Air Force to get help for the
prisoners in Vietnam. Activities planned include passing out of
petitions to be sent to North Vietnam and letter writing campaigns for
the same purpose.

Thursdav May 7, 1970, The Florida Alligator,
. ASA A A m A* A A A A A* A*A *A A-A* A A*A* A*A*A* A

Page 3



1, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 7,1970

Page 4

| 11
'' m a J v ' !'-., ~..
jfl
v K
WALKING FATHER SUNNY BARLOW
Father Michael Gannon dons his most comfortable tennis shoes in
preparation for his 20 mile walk around Gainesville May 19. Father
Gannon will march with dozens of other UF students in the
VISTA-sponsored "Steps for Development" project. Sponsors will
contribute to VISTA projects for every mile walked by the students.
STREET MUSIC: The Ewing Street Times will be at the Rat
tonight at 9 and 11 p jn.
FLY HY: AIESEC Charter flight meeting is today at 7:30 pjm. in
room C4 of the Union (under the colonade).
CHAMBER MUSIC: SGP presents the Boston Chamber Players
tonight in the University Auditorium at 8:15 pin.
READ THIS: Celebration 7O is sponsoring a poetry reading tonight
at Bin room 122 of the Union!

Teachers Get More $
But Don't Stay
Teacher salaries are going up
in Pennsylvania, but the
instructors don't stay as long.
The state Public Instruction
Department reported all teachers
in the Commonwealth received
an average of 5.9 per cent higher
salaries in 1968, compared with
1967. The average salary for
administrators and teachers last
year was $7,602, compared with
$7,178 the year before.
Almost 2,600 teachers were
added to the states public
school system last year. But the
average length of service for
professional personnel declined
to 13.8 years in 1968.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376*5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

MEXICO
Cologlo Victoria's summer
session, Guadalajara, June 29
Aug. 2. Room, Board, Tuition,
Foes, $250. The greatest
concentration of talent and the
finest campus in Mexico. Courses
from Archeology to glass blowing
and leather work. Exoallant Art
dapt. Numerous excursions.
Write: Director. Box 1327,
Bellingham, Wash. 98225,
NOW
OPENING
for
Sept. Occupancy
LEASE OFFICE
309 NW 13th St.
Across from
"N'igert Hall
.tltei
place)

Allies Hit Cambodia Again

SAIGON (UPI) The United
States and South Vietnam
launched three new offensives
into Cambodia Wednesday in the
biggest Allied operation of the
war.
An armada of U. S. Navy river
patrol boats moved into
Cambodian territory to join the
50,000 Allied troops involved.
THE THREE NEW drives
crossed the border in areas
ranging from 65 miles northwest
to 95 miles north of Saigon and
were preceded by massive aerial
assaults using bombs and napalm
which wiped out the town of
Snuol where some looting by
American troops was reported.
One new offensive Wednesday
was by a 4,500-man task force
of the 25th U.S. Infantry
Division into the Dogs Head
sector 65 miles northwest of
Saigon. At least 43 Communist
troops and four Americans were
killed in the first hours of the
sweep.
Two of the Americans were
killed when U. S. artillery
rounds fell short of their target
in the intitial stages of the
operation. UPI correspondent
Robert Kaylor reported from
the scene.
THIS BROUGHT U. S.

I And Stop Throwing I
r Your Money Down I
A Hole In The Groundll
S _...... v>-.,
I SIZE 16 to A SIZE 14 ]jy Wm I
I Elaine Pewen figure Salons JjJf UN I
I GUARANTIED ~ SR* 'l§ I
IL_ a 081- ,o, Any I Mothers Day I
you fail to receive the v
PI 4 YOU CAN be a size 10 by June 7 ults listed, Elaine ial
|| 16 YOU CAN bee size 12 by June 12 Powers will give you O^JCtlOl
1118 YOU CAN be a size 14 by June 12 I ciV u /u,...
L2O YOU CAN be a size 14 by June 27 SIX MONTHS COMPLETE I
Ip- ^- N J a hj FREE 4 MONTH I
I A for your 2 NOW Ur,llmued Visi,s
1 VIV 1 TO THE FIRST 45 TO CALL NOW
I FREE TRIAL VISIT I
I HOURS: 9 a.m to 9 r, m I
I ELAINE POWERS FIGURE SALONS I
I E.P. Management, Inc. 1240 N.W 21 A MASTERCHARGE OR
BANKAMERICARPj

THREE DRIVES

casualties in the multi-pronged
offensive to 30 killed and 70
wounded.
At least 50 U. S. Navy river
patrol boats, heavily-armed
50-foot vessels, moved into
Cambodia along the Kham
Spean River as part of this
operation, Kaylor reported.
They ran into Communist fire
two miles inside Cambodia but
casualties were not known.
THE SECOND drive crossed
the frontier 95 miles north of
Saigon and the third was about
80 miles north of Saigon near the

Georgia Students March
ATHENS, Ga. (UPI) About 400 to 500 University of Georgia
students marched across the campus Wednesday to confront Vice
President George Parthemos with a demand the school be closed for
the rest of the week.
The students sought the action as a memorial to the four students
killed at Kent State University in Ohio Monday during a clash with
national guardsmen.
PARTHEMOS TOLD the group he sympathized with them but any
decision would be up to President Fred Davison.
' The students, who dispersed after the confrontation with
Parthemos, planned memorial services for 7 last night to express, as
Student Government President Bob Hurley put it, our common
concern and offer our prayers for the students who were killed.
Hurley said he felt the shootings could have been avoided.
The students were probably wrong in carrying the demonstrations
as far as they did, he said, but in my opinion there is no excuse for
the students who were killed in this.

Loc Niiih district town.
Both areas are north of the
Fishhook area where Allied
troops have been searching f or a
Communist central headquarters
for six days.
U. S. military officials said the
offensive, ordered by President
Nixon to wipe out Communist
sanctuaries across the border
have killed 2,800 Communist
troops, captured 6,000 weapons,
seized or destroyed 700 tons of
food and munitions and 64
trucks and destroyed hundreds
of bunkers and base camps.



FOR C ANNEY AND LIBERMAN
Catholic Center Collects

The Parish Council of the Catholic Student
Center will take up a collection Sunday for the legal
defense fund of David M. Liberman, 3 JM, and
Robert B. Canney, education instructor, arrested
April 18 in St. Petersburg.
The arrests stem from an alleged police riot
during a statewide antiwar demonstration,
THREE QUESTIONS were raised by the council
about respect for the rights of those holding
unpopular opinions.
Canney was arrested on a charge of obscenity
after having used the phrase God danti|? during the
course of his address. Since it is difficult to believe
that a speaker at a business luncheon in St.
Petersburg would have been arrested for using
similar language to condemn marchers and
protestors, the council feels that Canney was
arrested more for his political views that for his
language.
Libermans charge was resisting arrest with
violence. The charge has been made that the
violence which subsequently took place was
deliberately provoked by the police, not only in
their arrest of Liberman, but in harassment of

Charges
Dismissed
Six UF students, charged
Monday with contempt of court
during the trial of Izell Booth,
have been admonished and
released.
Booth was on trial for a
disorderly conduct charge.
DURING THE TRIAL Judge
Ira Carter said a group of
spectators appeared to be
present for their own
entertainment instead of any
lawful or useful purpose.
A deputy sheriff admonished
the group one time for makings
too much noise arid obscene
gestures.
At this point Carter did not
charge the students with
contempt because, It may have
interfered or had some bearing
on the defendent, Booth, having
a fair and impartial trial, he
said.
ACCORDING TO CARTER,
just before the Booth verdict
was handed in by the jury, he
warned all the spectators that
when the verdict was read no
outward display of emotion
would be tolerated.
When the verdict was read,
several people jumped up and
showed their pleased emotions
by punching each other and
laughing out loud while court
was still in session, Judge
Carter said.
Judge Carter then told the
deputy sheriffs to arrest all
violators of the warning. They
were taken to the Alachua
County Jail.
UPON RETURNING to his
office, after the Booth trial,
Judge Carter called the sheriffs
office and ordered the students
released and to appear back in
court at 2 pm. Wednesday.
The students returned to
court Wednesday, where Judge
Carter admonished the students
with Treat others who may be
reaping the benefit of our
judicial process with the same
dignity and respect that you
would desire if you were in their
shoes. All charges are hereby
quashed. You may go.
None of the six students
could be reached for comment.
The Gainesville Sun Tuesday
said that the students instead of
causing a disturbance at the trial
breathed a sigh of relief when
the non-guilty verdict was read.

A B HP^; r v
HHH mmLJSL XL >
HH
: '': : ::: : : : £-
i X; m % 4
mw ~
' You own the sun
Child of Aquarius. Sun worshiper...
iti4 Coppertone takes you back to nature with a
: deeper, darker, richer tan... faster.
And there's a Coppertone tan that's just
naturally right for you. Eleven fabulous
blends. Make Coppertone a part of
your bag... beach j§
Wm bag, that is.
V ] W* --r-ywr Blp^gp z
1 Products 01 Plough Inc
S-l F r a totaHy different sitn
*try new Coppertone
Butter (cocoa butter and
-v 1 ! /' 1 r r- 1 J

protestors prior to that arrest, and by placing agent
provocateurs in the crowd to instigate and
encourage violence afterward. If true, these
allegations would lend further credence to the
charge that the bust was essentially political in
nature.
Bonds which were set for those arrested seem
to be exhorbitant, especially in the two cases where
bonds originally were set at SI,OOO each and later
raised to SIO,OOO and $15,000 respectively.
WHERE PUBLIC authority oversteps its
competence and oppresses the people, these people
should nevertheless obey to the extent the common
good demands. Still it is lawful for them to defend
their own rights and those of their fellow citizens
against any abuse of this authority, provided that in
so doing they observe the limits imposed by natural
law and the gospel, the church fathers stated.
The council further stated that while we do not
know whether, in this case, officials did abuse their
authority, we recognize the seriousness of the
charges that have been made. The facts, whatever
they may be, ought to be brought out fully. This
can hardly be assured unless those arrested have
adequate funds with which to defend themselves.

Student Ticket Policy
(EDITORS NOTE: The following is the complete text of the
new policy on student football tickets adopted Wednesday by
the Athletic Association.)
The purchase of season football cards by students for all
home games played at Florida Field at a total price of $5. Order
blanks, mailed out to all students having been admitted as of
August 15th. Deadline for receiving season card orders to be
August 30. Single game tickets to students not exercising the
season ticket card shall be at the regular reserved price which for
the 1970 season will be $7. In order to adjust the season card
prices in subsequent years based on the number of seats lost to
the general public to the student season cards, an increase in the
season cards will be $1 per card per 1,000 seats adjusted in
increments of 500. It is recommended that the baseline of
student seats be 18,000, or sale for this season, whichever is
higher, in computing the additional charge in subsequent years.
This 18,000 for the 1970 season shall include 2,000 season
spouse cards at sls each.
There will be 2,000 student spouse cards available on a
season basis of sls for the home games played at Florida Field.
These cards may be converted to student season cards at a later
date in determining the baseline for student card conversion.
Policy on non-home games played on neutral fields, as
outline in recommendation of March 18, to remain the same.
t Ticket committee will work out student priority for
student guest tickets at $7 each on ah individual game basis of
student season cards sold.

Thu reday, May 7,1970, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 5



Page 6

AWprtPb 7 r JjgTfl T

Cambodian Arms Request Rejected

WASHINGTON (UPI) The White
House said Wednesday President Nixon
rejected a Phnom Penh request to supply
arms for up to 400,000 Cambodian
troops prior to his decision to commit
U. S. troops to combat inside the
Cambodian border.
Nixons press secretary, Ronald L.
Ziegler, made public for the first time the
extent of the urgent aid request of the
regime of Cambodian Premier Lon Nol.
SEN. HUGH SCOTT said the request

j^vK*K*:*::*:*x*K<*: (Brewer Tops Wallace f
* x
}ln Alabama Primary f
5 £
£ BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPI) Gov. Albert P. Brewer surged
£ ahead of George C. Wallace by 17,000 votes Wednesday on the jj:
. > strength of late returns from the populous Birmingham area in £
£ Alabamas gubernatorial primary. £
§ The lead, however, was not sufficient to save Brewer from a £
§ June 2 runoff with Wallace, the former third-party presidential j:
$ candidate who once ruled Alabama politics with an iron hand. £
£ WALLACE HAU nursed a thin lead through the night from £
x Tuesdays voting but when boxes from populous Jefferson £
County (Birmingham) and other north Alabama areas began to £
x flow in during the morning, Brewer, a softspoken moderate, £
* took the lead. ~ £
x With 85 per cent of the vote reported, the count in the
x Democratic primary looked like this: Total Percent £
£ Brewer 370,323 42.21 x
£ Wallace 353,425 40.29 £
:* THE REMAINING 18 percent of the vote, forcing the runoff, £
was split between five candidates, led by millionaire Charles R. J
£ W00d5129,364 or 14.75 per cent. v x
£ The bulk of the early returns had come from rural counties.
:j It appeared certain a new record vote would be recorded. The x
: total for the seven candidates almost equalled the record of £
£ 888,838 set in 1966 with 15 per cent of the boxes still to be if
§ tallied.. §
WALLACES RURAL strength made him the leader in 36
counties while Brewer led in 29, but the incumbent governors £
: total in Jefferson County was approaching 2-1. :
£ Wallace predicted he would win the runoff. He told campaign <
£ workers he believed he did well despite Washington £
£ interference and the bloc vote. We ran very well and we will £
j: certainly win the governors race in the runoff.
IN OHlO,.voters rebuffed their Republican governor, James
£ A. Rhodes, and sent former astronaut John H. Glenn down to i;i
£ upset defeat'"while Alabamans put a crimp into George C.
j: Wallaces bid to regain public office. :ji
The Ohio and Alabama voting highlighted a scattering of x
primary elections Tuesday
Rhodes was beaten by Congressman Robert A. Taft Jr. for £
£ the Republican nomination for the Ohio Senate seat being £
:j vacated by Sen. Stephen M. Young, a Democrat who said he was
£ retiring at age 80 in spite of good health to let a younger person £
£ move in.
£ GLENN, AT FIRST an odds-on favorite to win the £
Democratic nomination to succeed Young, was overhauled by £
Howard W. Metzenbaum, a'millionaire from Cleveland. Glenn, :
:£ the first American to orbit the earth, had intended to run :
:£ against Young in the 1964 Democratic primary but withdrew £
;£ after being injured in a household accident. £
£ In Indiana, all 11 incumbent congressman four Democrats £
£ and seven Republicans won renomination.
£ In Connecticut, where 11 communities had primaries, slates £
£ pledged to incumbent Democratic Sen. Thomas were beaten in
£ nine of 11 races. £:
£ The state partys convention to endorse candidates for the :£
:£ November election is scheduled in June. £
5:
!wK*NWsss%v.vMx:.J'
While Man Refuses To Help
1 Woman Save Drowning Blacks
MACON, Ga. (UPI) A young woman told Wednesday how a
white man watched her unsuccessful efforts to rescue two blacks from
drowning, and came to their aid only after it was too late.
Heide Ridley, 22, of Macon, saw a small boat carrying William
Smith, 47, and Leonard James Walker, about 40, on a fishing trip in
Lake Tobesofkee capsize Tuesday afternoon.
SHE JUMPED INTO the water and swam to the overtimed boat
where she managed to grab one of the men. She yelled for help to a
man standing on the shore but, she said, he told her to use a floating
paint can for a buoy. (
The man finally jumped into the water when Miss Ridleys male
companion, who was several hundred yards away, arrived and also
plunged in to help her out.
Miss Ridley said she was confident she could have held one of
the victims if help had arrived in time.
#

WANTS SUPPLIES FOR 400,QUU men

had been for Up to 400,000 Allied troops.
Scott said Nixon made some
categorical assertions, including:
One, the scheduled withdrawals of
Gls from Vietnam would not be possible
unless the Communist sanctuaries m
Cambodia were cleaned out.
t Two, that the 150,000 additional
men Nixon promised to withdraw during
the next year would be pulled out on
schedule.
THREE, THAT the President told

Texas Capitol Evacuates
After Bomb Threat Call

By United Press International
All occupants of the Texas State Capitol at
Austin were ordered to leave the building
Wednesday because of a bomb threat and plans by
college students to renew disruptive demonstrations.
The evacuation order highlighted fresh campus
outbreaks in protest of American military action in
Cambodia and the killing of four students at Kent
State University.
MOST OF THE nations colleges and universities
were peaceful during the early morning hours, but
there was violence and disorder on some campuses
Tuesday night.
Gov. Preston Smith of Texas ordered the
evacuation of the capitol after he learned that the
Student Mobilization Committee at neighboring
University of Texas planned an afternoon march on
the building and the Federal Building downtown.
The capitol was damaged and 16 persons were
injured in demonstrations Tuesday. v

WEEKEND
Friday,
Members
to be 21

his audience the reason for action in
Cambodia now rather than earlier was
the Sihanouk overthrow and the
Communist military pressure on the new
Phnom Penh regime that followed.
Scott said the attacks by U. S. and
South Vietnamese troops had so
disrupted Communist supply and
headquarters setups that they could not
possible be reestablished before
November.
Ziegler said Scotts comments

indicated he misunderstood the
Cambodian request.
SCOTT HAD SAID earlier that
Cambodia had first asked for 400,000
U. S. troops, and after that was rejected
asked for 200,000, and that also was
rejected.
Ziegier said that the 400,000 and
200,000 figures were correct but they
represented arms aid for Cambodian
troops, not American soldiers.

THE BOMB THREAT was telephoned to capitol
security guards at midmoming and Smith notified
all agencies with employes in the capitol to send
them home.
Hundreds of students wore black armbands and
carried red flags on the Texas campus Wednesday.
Some groups gathered for instructions on how to
protect themselves in a riot and against tear gas.
Elsewhere, a long convoy of National Guard
trucks rolled back to the troubled University of
Wisconsin campus after being pulled back during the
night when sporadic violence subsided. Guardsmen
appeared on the Ohio State University campus
Tuesday and were on standby status in Maryland
and Oklahoma.
A band of University of New Mexico students left
the schools administration building after a
seven-hour takeover.
Gov. David F. Cargo had alerted the National
Guard and said the students would go out of there
with force.



UPI Around
The World
PRAGUE Russia and Czechoslovakia Wednesday signed a
new 20-year friendship treaty that incorporates the Brezhnev
Doctrine justifying Soviet intervention in any of its satellites it
feels is straying from Communist orthodoxy. Leonid I.
Brezhnev, the Soviet Communist party first secretary, and
Czechoslovak party leader Gustav Husak signed the five-page
treaty in a ceremony at the historic Hradcany Castle
overlooking Prague.
Thousands more Allied troops
preMed on three more fronts into Cambodia Wednesday in the
war s biggest offensive and an armada of U. S. Navy river patrol
boats moved into Cambodian territory to join them. Inside
Vietnam, Hanoi troops killed 29 Americans and wounded 31
others in a furious assault against a U. S. artillery base two miles
below the DMZ.
HAMBURG, Germany A group of about 50 German
students staged a sit-in demonstration at the Amerika Haus
cultural center Wednesday, protesting the slaying of four
students at Kent State University in Ohio during a
demonstration there earlier in the week.
. .. The Nation
RALEIGH, N. C. A three judge federal panel ruling which
struck down key portions of North Carolinas anti-busing law
will be appealed to the U. S. Supreme Court, the attorney
generals office said Wednesday. Ralph Moody, assistant
attorney general, said the appeal would be based on most of the
same reasons presented to the three judge panel during a hearing
in Charlotte March 24.
WASHINGTON A federal judge Wednesday handed out jail
terms ranging from six months to six years to nine antiwar
protestors, including four priests and a mm, convicted of
ransacking the Dow Chemical Co. offices here March 22,1969.
All nine were convicted three months ago by a U. S. District
Court jury on charges of unlawful entry and malicious
destruction of property.
PHILADELPHIA Daughtry Long, 28, former associate
dean of student affairs at the University of Pennsylvania, was
held in $3,500 bail Wednesday for court action in three
arson-set blazes at the school.
Three fire bombs were tossed around 12:45 ajn. April 24 and
Long was arrested about 15 minutes later in a small auto, the
license of which was noted by a Penn student who saw three
men running from the fires in college hall.
The fires were among eight arson-set blazes at the university
in a three-day period last month.
Long was hired by Penn last fall and resigned April 16 in a
dispute with school officials over a program for incoming black
students.
' V
... The State
TALLAHASSEE A bill requiring that courses in drug abuse
be taught in Florida elementary schools starting this fall cleared
the Senate Ways and Means Committee Wednesday.
But an appropriation to help the Department of Education
coordinate the new program was eliminated with the
understanding, Sen. Robert Shevin of Miami said, that it will
be included in the general appropriations bill if needed. The bill
also requires that alcohol and tobacco abuse be taught in the
same course.
TALLAHASSEE A bill allowing cities or counties to levy a
special two per cent tax on hotels, motels and trailer camps
cleared the last Senate Committee hurdle with only three
dissenting votes today despite charges it was just a
Disneyworld tax relief bill.
The bill which started out as a resort tax on lodgings, food
and beverages was amended in subcommittee to hit lodgings
only and swept out of the Ways and Means Committee by a
whopping 10-3 vote.
The revenue, estimated statewide at S2O million a year if the
tax is levied by all cities, must be used for civic improvements.
1 BEAUTY AND WIG SALON ]j*
l OUR NEW
* V. <55 SET-LESS-PERM *jP
' To introduce you to this f
' t W beautiful Sls wave, were
offering it, for a limited
V time only,
\ ... 't
*p V for a man $lO *1
J IN GAINESVILLE MALL Telephone 372-8511 ] |

*
*

Egyptians, Israelis
Exchange Hostilities

By United Prmt International
Egyptian artillery shelled
Israeli troops on the northern
sector of the Suez Canal front
Wednesday and Israeli warplanes
went in to silence the Arab gun
positions, a spokesman in Tel
Aviv said.
Jordan reported a clash
between Israeli and Jordanian
troops across their frontlines.
IN ISRAEL, Foreign Minister
Abba Eban came under heavy
attack from hawkish rightwing
members of the Cabinet for
saying Israel was willing to make
some concessions for peace.
Eban did not elaborate on the
statement made to a trades
union council meeting in
Jerusalem Tuesday night.
Across the Suez Canal, an
Egyptian government spokesman
officially denied for the first
time that Soviet pilots were
flying operational missions over
Egypt.

Legal Aid Society Strike
Slows Court Actions
NEW YORK (UPI) The business of the Criminal Courts was
hampered Wednesday by a strike of some attorneys employed by the
Legal Aid Society.
Members of the Association of Legal Aid Lawyers, representing
some 75 per cent of the societys 260 lawyers, voted Tuesday night to
turn down a tentative agreement until there is a firm offer on court
reform, including the hiring of more lawyers.
THE STRIKING attorneys, whose number ranges in estimate from
140 to 170, began their walkout Monday, mainly as a protest to a
work overload.
They demanded the right to turn down cases they felt unable to
handle and the hiring of more lawyers by the society.
The strike apparently had little impact on the societys civil and
family court staff, but it thinned the ranks of lawyers handling
criminal cases and a number of hearings had to be put over.
The society represents persons who cannot afford legal counsel
about 70 per cent of all defendants in Criminal Court cases.
JOB APPLICATION
AND
PASSPORT PHOTOGRAPHS
TAKEN ONE DAY
READY THE NEXT
GUI 376-7657 Kill APPOINTMENT
TOTAL
PHOTOGRAPHY
JiHIUHI w. Univ.
I JI r I 376-7657
I'm mi JL -i. i.! ii .

Dr. Ismat Abdel Meguid told a
news conference in Cairo that
the charges made by Israel last
week are completely
unfounded, but he admitted
Soviet military instructors were
training Egyptians in all
branches of the armed services.
MEGUID SAID the Israeli
allegations were aimed at
pressuring the United States into
supplying more military
assistance and warned that any
additional help from
Washington would be regarded as
directed against the entire Arab
nation and Arabs everywhere.
The Tel Aviv spokesman said
that in Wednesdays raids our
aircraft attacked Egyptian
artillery positions which were
firing on Israeli positions in the
northern sector of the canal. He
said all Israeli planes returned
safely but made no mention of
casualties in the shellings.
Earlier, Israeli spokesman
announced security forces killed

v wi wwy p #f iw^

one Arab guerrilla in a clash in
the northern Jordan Valley and
another in the occupied Gaza
Strip along the Mediterranean.
It raised to 56 the total
number of guerrillas reported
killed by Israel since April 1.
A Jordanian military
spokesman in Amman said one
Jordanian soldier was slightly
wounded in the gun battle across
the Jordan iliver about 18 miles
south of the Sea of Galilee.
What's
your
excuse?
You could have gone water ski skiing
ing skiing or swimming or to a dance
at night. Instead you've spent
the entire day moping around
the house feeling sorry for
yourself. And why? Just be because
cause because it was one of those diffi difficult
cult difficult times? How silly. A lot of
girls are out there enjoying
themselves under the same cir circumstances.
cumstances. circumstances. They use Tampax
tampons.
Tampax tampons are worn
internally so you can swim or
dance or do most anything you
please. There are no bulky pads
or telltale odor to give you
away. Tampax tampons are so
easy to use. Yes, even the first
time. Just follow the instruc instructions
tions instructions inside each package. So
go on out and enjoy yourself.
With Tampax tampons you
have no excuse.
\yy '' :
Z j, ''
tit"
I? iiUl : -t
MOV# tftfff pf mixiOMO Os vomr
TAMPAX* TAMPON* AM MAOI ONLY BY
TAMPAX INCORPORATED, PALMIR, MAM.

Page 7



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 7,1970

Page 8

The Robert Fraser Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
Alii o*£l John Su 99 Carolyn Pope
News Editors W?J
The price of freedom Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
is the exercise of responsibility. Advertising Manager Business Manager

Staff Writings

The strike now going on at UF will long be
remembered. The consequences of an imperialist
war in Indochina have finally hit the great mass of
students.
Why the strike?
Because U. S. troops invaded Cambodia -a
country where a military dictatorship has just taken
power under Pentagon direction. Nixons talk of
just peace, de-escalation, vietnamization
have been proven for what they are lies. Lies to
fool the American people while aggression is spread
through Southeast Asia.
Because at least five students have died as a result
of the massacre at Kent State. They died because
this nations rulers cannot tolerate dissent if they
are to wage and spread their barbaric game in
Indochina. UF students know that the bullets struck
each one of us Monday, a day that was the
anniversary of another attempt to stifle the struggle
of Americas masses, the Haymarket Massacre.
The strikers realize many other things. The
violence perpetrated by the Guard in Ohio occurs in
gigantically multiplied terms every day in the black
community, in Vietnam, in Cambodia, in Laos all
over the world as a result of the ever-expanding
appetites of the U. S. ruling class.
They realize the people of Indochina and the rest
of the colonial world will not give up their struggle
for liberation because of the threat of military
intervention by the U. S. rulers when their empire is
threatened. Today is another anniversary. The fall
of the French imperialists at Dienbienphu. Think
about it.
What will the strike do? All over the country,
more than 300 campuses are ON STRIKE. Never
has there been such a tumultous and spontaneous
demonstration of mass rejection of government
policy.
Our aim is to bring UF and every other campus in
the United States to a standstill. A strike is not a

WASHINGTON When the Columbia
Broadcasting System put a former soldier named
Paul Meadlo before the cameras one evening to say
that he had shot civilians at My Lai, a number of
senators were shocked into public outcry, not so
much at what Meadlo said as at the fact that CBS let
him say it.
Sen. Peter Dominick although also condemning
the massacre, was the most outspoken. In general,
the Hawks annoyance may have betrayed
embarrassment. They cannot have enjoyed the
public presentation of still another horror about the
war they have advocated. And yet, Dominick has a
point that Meadlos public confession and
implication of the superior whose orders he said he
was obeying may jeopardize the ancient American
privilege of fair trial.
What Dominick was asking is simply this: Can Lt.
William Calley and others who may follow him into
the dock be fairly tried after the country has been
shocked into anguish by details of the deed?
It is an important question but to raise it is to
raise another. For if CBS and other news media had
not described what happed at My Lai, the American
people might never have known about it. Which
right is more important? The right of the public to
know? Or the right of an accused to a fair trial? Are
the two antagonistic or irreconcilable?
hi fact, however, there is not so much conflict
between the two rights as Sen. Dominick appears to
believe. Both were imbedded into the first 10
amendments to the Constitution and both were
viewed by the founding fathers as instruments of
justice not as a matter of form. It is relatively
recently, as Vermont Royster, editor of the Wall
Street Journal, has pointed out, that we began to
think of a trial as a presentation of evidence to a
jury totally unfamiliar with the case.
Originally, jurors were chosen from the local
citizenry because they had some knowledge, some
background gossip about the people involved which

Shut It Down!

A Right To Know

festival. It is designed to bring the factory, in this
case the university, to a halt. No more business until
our demands are met.
And no more business with the war machine at
all. No more ROTC. No more defense research. No
more complicity with the madmen in the Pentagon.
The most encouraging thing about the strike is its
broad range of support. Over 2,500 people in the
plaza, in the street, at the ROTC building and back
at Tigert Wednesday. Student Government leaders,
Blue Key, fraternities, football players. And the
people who have been explaining their opposition to
the aggression in Vietnam for years Student
Mobilization Committee, New University
Conference, Young Socialist Alliance and the large
milieu of campus radicals.
And one more group, Veterans for Peace. The
people who deserve so much of the credit. The men
who have been to Vietnam, who know what Nixons
lies are all about. The people who started the strike.
One personal note. It is too bad that the call of
the strike is not editorially supported by the
primary source of communication at UF, the
Alligator. As news editor, I oppose the editorial
policy concerning the strike, until such time as the
strike is supported.
What now? The strike is on today. Wednesday, 15
per cent of the campus was out. Today there will be
more. Those of you who yawn and go to class stop
and think. About five students dead at Kent. About
thousands already dead in Vietnam. Think hard.
Strike
STRIKE until Nixon brings all the troops home
immediately and ends this insane, imperialist war.
STRIKE until UF rids itself of ROTC.
STRIKE until UF ends all complicity with the
death machine.
STRIKE until the police on this campus are
disarmed.

Mankiewicz-Braden I

might be helpful in securing justice. There is,
Royster has said, no antiquity in the modem idea
that a jury should be composed of people who come
to court with minds blank ... left to struggle as best
they may without guidance and dependent solely on
the skill of advocates for the justice of their
verdict.
little anitquity and, he might have added, little
sense. In this world of rapid and total
communication, it is nonsense to believe that a Lee
Oswald or a Sirhan B. Sirhan could be tried by
jurors who had never read anything about them. If
such were found, they would not be 12 good men
and true but 12 ignoramuses.
In Britain, press reporting of crime ends with the
arrest, and does not resume until the trial.
Newspaper and TV reporting about My Lai, of
police comments on the accused murderers of
Sharon Tate, would result in prison sentences for
editors, publishers and printers.
This system has advantages, not so much in
justice as in taste. But those who advocate it must
decide whether the price for keeping the nauseating
details of the Tate killing out of public view is not
too high if it also keeps us from a national
consciousness of for example My Lai.
Americans have always agreed it is.

Alligator Staff
Naal Sanders Craig Goldwyn
Assignment Editor Sports Editor
/
Fred Votlrath
Wire Editor
Dan Vining Jeff Brain
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant

By John Sugg

editorial
A Crucial Day
For Protest
Today is crucial. It will determine whether the three-day
period of involvement called by student leaders continues as
a peaceful demonstration of concern or becomes a senseless
bloodbath. ..
The reaction to the slaying of five Kent State University
students has taken two directions at the UF. Steve
Uhlfelder, student body president-elect, is promoting a
three-day period of involvement. To that end he is
sponsoring a series of activities, ranging from a
voter-registration drive to an environmental clean-up at
Lake Alice.
We endorse Uhlfelders efforts. They are a fitting and
constructive manner in which to dissent against the war and
the recent involvement in Cambodia tliat led to the deaths
of the five Kent State students. As a method of protest, we
fully endorse Uhlfelders period of involvement.
On the other side of the coin, we cannot agree with the
tactics seemingly inherent to the word strike. That is, if
the word strike stands for surrounding Tigert Hall,
disrupting classes or hindering the normal functioning of the
UF, we are opposed to it. Granted, our distinction is a one
of semantics and can be construed in several ways. We feel
the vast majority of students who have decided not to
attend classes do so with a sincere objection to the war and
the slayings. We hope they are steadfast in their rejection of
rash acts called for by the firebrands in our midst.
Surrounding Tigert Hall strikes us as a particularly
senseless move. True, it is a symbol of campus authority but
does not qualify as Floridas version of the Pentagon.
Surrounding Tigert, however, is an excellent tactic if the
aims of the organizers are to force the hand of President
Stephen C. OConnell. President OConnell has shown a
great deal of tolerance in this issue and we hope he is not
forced into an untenable position. The so-called politics of
confrontation have no place with non-violent protest.
In the interest of peace, then, we hope all students have
the maturity to resist extremist calls and decide the nature
of their own protest. Peer pressure is great in these times
but being swept along with the crowd is hardly a viable
excuse for violence.
For those ,who would provoke violence we can only hope
they have the courage to assume responsibility for their
actions. If provocative confrontation leads to bloodshed,
then blood will be on the hands of the organizers.
Remember, today is crucial. To a large degree what
comes of it depends on us.
"Well, Nixon WAS the one"

Published by students of the University of
lorid a under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union,
editorial: p h P ne 392-1686, 87, 88, or 8&.
usmess, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 64. Circulation: 392-1619.
the editorsof C fh t,orida Alligator are those of'
pf *?£££_ S\TZL of ,he ar,,c *



Satire

In the confines of the
PatriotviUe draft board a sweet
old lady, Miss beti Skrewem,
sits and knocks off, as she
calls it, about 50 names a day.
These 50 young men will go
visit their Uncle Sam, she
giggles.
I liked it better when we
didnt have the lottery system,
said Miss Skrewem. It was
much easier to choose the ones
you wanted. Why, I would just
go right through the files,
knocking off the boys named
John I never did like that
name and anyway, the country
can benefit by losing a few.
Miss Skrewem has been
working on the PatriotviUe draft
board for 42 years. She is the
daughter of the late Col. Zowie
Skrewem, who made his claim to
fame in the first World War
when he mistakenly
machine-gunned 23 priests in
France. Dad thought they were
German under-cover agents and
just fired away, said Miss
Skrewem. He didnt go
unpunished, though. The Army
gave him a severe reprimand
and made him take a desk job in
the Pentagon.
Miss Skrewem finds her work
interesting because of aU the
gimmicks the feUas bring in to
get out of the draft. Some are
real beauties, chuckles beti.
Just two days ago a feUa came
in with no legs and tried to get
me to let him go. I knew it was a
trick he probably had the legs
outside with his seeing-eye dog

MR. EDITOR:
Your editorial entitled, State Should
Fund Benefits, in the April 28 Alligator
implied that the University of Florida
provided a board program of fringe
benefits to its faculty and staff.
Furthermore, it was noted that these
benefits included retirement, life
insurance, long term disability
insurance, hospitalization insurance, etc.
With the exception of contributions to
the retirement system, which will be
discussed later, the state provides no paid
fringe benefits to the faculty and staff of
the UF. All premium costs of coverage
for faculty and staff have group life
insurance, disability insurance and
hospitalization insurance are paid for by
faculty and staff. As a large group with a
favorable experience rating, lower rates
are available than if such insurance
coverage were purchased individually.
The only contribution made by the
university is that of providing personnel
to process forms, make payroll
deductions and remit payments to
insurors.
We know of no major university with a
more miserly system of fringe benefits
for its faculty. The initiation of a
program of employer-paid insurance
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, wgned, double-spaced and
not exceed 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have addreaes and telephone
numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer
shows just cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for space.
Writers may submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column
ji asked to contact the editor end be
ryepated to show samples of his work.

Hippy Pinko Degenerates

A Long Way To Go

so I quickly slammed a big
1-A right on his file. He
pretended not to see it and went
right on begging.
She boasts that nobody has
gotton past me during aU her
years with the board. I figure if
they reaUy do have ailments, the
Army can use them for target
practice or something. For the
feUas like the one without legs,
the Army could probably tie
bombs to their waists and wheel
them over the DMZ.
As would be imaginined, Miss
Skrewem is against a voluntary
army. With so many
commie-hippie-pinko commie-hippie-pinkodegenerates
degenerates commie-hippie-pinkodegenerates around, we couldnt
get enough people to fight, even
for this land which God gave us
to expand and preach His
word, she said. Why, with all
our boys being clipped off daily
by them shady gooks, I think we
need a bigger army! I think we
ought to send all men over there
and get this job done right.
Excuse me, she said, as she
popped a tranquilizer.
She feels the President is
being a chicken with this new
move into Cambodia. God
knows its a step in the right
direction, but Dicks being to
slow about it. In every letter I
wrote him I said take Peking,
take Peking.* He just sits there
and lets the Reds build up their
missile system. If we just went in
there and wiped em out, we just
might stand a chance of
perserving civilization!
Miss Skrewem said she gave

programs was in this years budget
request of the Board of Regents but it
was eliminated in the Tallahassee review
process. Agencies of local, state and
national government, industrial and
business firms and other universities have
found that raising the level of fringe
benefits has been one of the most
effective means of attracting and holding
competent and effective trained and
productive personnel.
Now a word about the retirement
system. A faculty member must stay here
ten years in order to benefit from the
matching contribution made by the state
to his retirement. This can only be
received at retirement age. In the event a
faculty member leaves the university
prior to serving here for ten years, he
forfeits the states contributions. He is
entitled only to receiving his own
contributions back, plus accumulated
interest at a nominal rate. Under the
proposed new retirement bill now under
consideration in the legislature, he would
not even receive interest on his
withdrawn contributions.
The major national statistical report on
faculty salaries and fringe benefits
excludes university contributions to
retirement as a fringe benefit unless title
is vested within the faculty member after
five years of service.
The comparison group of 18 public
universities awarding 100 or more earned
doctorates annually contains only two
which do not vest the state's
contribution to faculty retirement within
five years. On the average, these
institutions reported $1,765 in countable
faculty fringe benefits during the current
school year. The UF is listed as having
zero dollars in fringe benefits, Aside from
fringe benefits relating to retirement,
others include university contributions to
insurance programs, faculty childrens

up hope in finding the right
man when Curtis LeMay got

Speaking Out

Kent State Massacre

A blast of gunfire into a mass of students and
four dead bodies lay bleeding. Kent State could
have been the UF. Governor Rhodes chose to send
in armed National Guard troops to pacify Kent
State demonstrators. What if Claude Kirk had made
the decision to call the National Guard into
Gainesville? Maybe one of your friends would be
dead today.
Kent State students were protesting Nixons
decision to expand thfe Indochina War into
Cambodia. On the day of the Kent State massacre
several other colleges were protesting against U. S.
military expansion into Cambodia.
All of these incidents were reactions to Americas
invasion of Cambodia. Probably the Kent State
massacre, witnessed by thousands of students on
national TV, will lead to massive reaction by
university students across the nation.
Hopefully student-reaction will be appropriate to
the reaction called for. Watching National
Guardsmen on TV fire into a crowd of students,
obviously appalled most of us. We were sickened by
this student slaughter. Appropriate reaction to this
wholesale billing is called for and is our
responsibility. The UF might be next, you know.
Reaction to this incident is our duty our
fellow-students were gunned-down at Kent State.
We would grossly fail as responsible students not to
react. But, how should we react?
Should we follow militant leaders who would
have us bum-down, take-over, and avenge the Kent
State slaughter by violence? Such leaders might
think nothing of exploiting the hapless Kent State
victims to advance their cause? They might also
think nothing of exploiting you the angered

tuition and housing allowances.
If it were assumed that Floridas
contributions to retirement were
countable as hinge benefits, the average
faculty member in the 18 comparable
universities still receives some $895 more
in fringe benefits than does his UF
counterpart.
We yet have a long way to go.
CECIL N. SMITH
PROFESSOR OF AGRICULTURAL
ECONOMICS AND CHAIRMAN,
FACULTY COMMITTEE ON
SALARIES AND FRINGE BENEFITS
Communicating
MR. EDITOR:-
Communication is where its at! And
on Sunday May 31, we want this
community of 50,000 to be where its at.
COME-TOGETHER DAY is the name.
But whats in a name? In this name is the
feeling, the understanding, and the
learning that this city desperately needs.
No more up against the wall. Lets tear
dowi the wall!
the small society

7% I HAV/eTO PIZIN6A ^
I HoJ&To'SCHOOL, PAP-
Q \ THEY' WANT
L_J A I / A Written
SMt l
married. An American of his
high caliber is hard to find, she

FORUM;
C Ainu. ml DiiAttt J
> * **£js n n hnr,*, f rr th P c om^ lncen{^,^ /^

Thuraday, May 7,1970, The Florida AHlgator,

By Philip Morgan

By Bob Sistrunk

student seeking an outlet to vent your bitterness.
They might use you, as tools of destruction, to
advance their cause.
Reacting by blindly following emotional leaders
is a dangerous course. This could well lead to gross
overreaction in appropriate to the Kent State
incident. It might also lead to a repeat performance
by the National Guard on the UF campus.
If we, the responsible students of the UF, choose
not to join emotional leaders in order to express our
bitterness, where do we go? How can we effectively
communicate our reaction to this Kent State
massacre?
One way is through a moratorium. Student
Government officials can offer guidelines about how
we, the UF student body, should react to the Kent
State incident. Anyone wishing to speak should be
allowed to do so.
Proposals like the following might be suggested as
appropriate reactions to the massacre:
A collection for flowers could be sent to the
parents of the victims;
A telegram' campaign to President Nixon,
expressing our abhorrence of the use of bullets to
pacify the disturbance could be launched;
A student lobby could be formed to approach
those in power concerning the disgusting way this
incident was handled.
These are just a few ways we, the responsible UF
students, can react appropriately to the massacre.
Not to react is unthinkable. To overreact would
be most unfortunate. We must come together and
responsibly plan the appropriate actions to be
taken. Then we must follow through and act.

Lets get top-name bands, prominent
local and national speakers and one
hell-of-a barbecue for underprivileged
kids. Lets call it Come-Together Day
and lets make it work with your help.
The ideas been initiated and the works
been started. But we only have four
weeks to make it happen.
You can help.
You can make this community a real
community through communication. The
proceeds will go to make up the
Come-Together Fund. The money will be
used for any worthwhile community
organization regardless of race, color or
creed: according to need. But to make
this a reality we need manpower and
money. If youre a concerned individual
or if youre in a concerned organization,
contact us at these numbers: 373-2437
(Neal Lubow) or 373-2900 (David
McGriff). Coordinating headquarters will
be the Pi Lambda Phi House, 15
Fraternity Row.
Its time we stopped talking about
communication and started
communicating. This is only the
beginning.
DAVID McGRIFF, 3AS
NEAL LUBOW,
SANTA FF. J.C.
by Brickman

said, as a tear rolled down her
rigid cheek.

Page 9



Page 10

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 7, 1970

Reagan Orders Campuses Shut Down

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (UPI) Gov. Ronald Reagan
Wednesday announced the University of California and
the states colleges, wracked by widespread student
protests, will close down at midnight.
Reagan said UC President Charles Hitch and State
College Chancellor Glenn Dumke concurred strongly with
his proposal to shut the 18 state colleges and nine
university campuses from Thursday through Sunday.
REAGAN SAID he hoped the period would allow
time for rational reflection away from the emotional
turmoil and encourage all to disavow violence and mob
action in current protests against the war in Cambodia.
Reagan took the action as activists on Southern
California campuses passed out armbands and leaflets
calling for strikes, Police girded for trouble at UCLA and

Compromise Abortion Bill
Designed To Win House Votes

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A compromise abortion
bill, deliberately designed to win votes in the House
which struck down a liberal version last week, was
agreed to Wednesday by senators who would prefer
- that the state let such operations be a personal
matter between a woman and her doctor.
Sens. Robert Shevin and Kenneth Myers, both
Miami Democrats, said they will propose the
compromise when the bill hits the Senate floor for
debate Thursday.
HOUSE SPONSORS, led by Rep. Miley Miers,
D-Tallahassee, think they can get the necessary 13
additional votes to pass the modified version if it
clears the Senate, Myers said.
Its almost identical to the bill that passed the
last year and the same members are back this
year, Myers said. That House-passed bill died in the
Senate committee that this year passed out a bill
that* would legalize abortions without restrictions,
other than requiring that the operation be
performed by a doctor in a licensed hospital on a

Legislator Proposes Bill
For 'Death With Dignity

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
living dead, Rep. Walter
Sackett of Miami said
Wednesday, pose a problem of
emotional and economic
bankruptcy for families and
government.
It can be headed off, he said,
by passage of a bill which
relieves the physician of going to
extraordinary lengths to keep a
hopelessly ill person alive.
Called the death with
dignity bill, it has been rejected
by past sessions. But Sackett, a
physician, is convinced this is
because legislators confuse it
with mercy killing.
There is absolutely no
element of euthanasia mercy
killing either in the bill or in its
basic philosophy** which,

CHERRYS DRESS SHOP
FEATURES JUNIOR AND PETITE SIZES
FROM THESE FAMOUS NAME BRANDS
SALE PRICES 20% OFF
PETITES JUNIORS
PETITE PHILIPPE ~~ M,NX MODES
COUNTRY PETITES MARIE PHILLIPS
LION TREE CAROL KING
JUDY GIBBS COUNTRY JRS.
DOWNTOWN GAINESVILLE
7 WEST UNIVERSITY MALL
*

Sackett contends, is
humaneness.
A public hearing on the
measure is set for Tuesday
before the House General
Legislation Committee.
He said health facilities are
deprived of needed finances for
rehabilitative care while billions
of dollars are spent on the
prolongation of the death
process by herioc and artificial
means.
Sacketts bill would permit a
person to direct his physician, in
writing, not to meaninglessly
prolong his life. In the case of
incompetence, the document
could be excuted by a spouse or
next of kin and if there is no
kin, it could be done with the
consent of three physicians and
a circuit judge.

'FOR RATIONAL REFLECTION

UC Berkeley faced another day of disrupted classes.
The governor, after a series of meetings with top aides,
issued a statement in his office announcing he had asked
Hitch and Dumke to close down the campuses.
IT IS ESSENTIAL for our college and university
faculty, students and administrators to reflect on the
grave sequence of current events and to consider their
responsibilities to themselves and to our society Reagan
saiid. ~ ~
In order to afford them this opportunity, away from
the highly emotional conditions now prevailing on most
campuses, I have today asked President Hitch and
Chancellor Dumke to close the university and State
College campuses for two days and over the weekend.
REAGAN SAID all campus facilities would be closed
during the period.

woman who has lived in the state at least six
months.
MYERS STILL wants this bill, but knows it cant
pass the House and said hed settle for almost any
liberalization of the present 110-year-old law which
permits abortions only to save the life of the
expectant mother.
The Myers-Shevin. compromise permits abortions
where the physical or mental health of the woman is
threatened, the child would be bom physically or
mentally defective, or the pregnancy resulted from
rape or incest.
The operation would have to be approved by the
womans husband or, in the case of a minor, her
parents, and must be done within the first 20 weeks
of pregnancy.
A six-months residency provision is included as
well as requirements that the operation be
performed in a licensed hospital by a licensed
doctor or osteopath and the need certified by two
doctors.

A population explosion in
this county is not to be feared so
much as a living death
explosion, Sackett said.
HWMMC
V DtOOOWMIT
1 L Iffuvroft
I 1 NOMIN W V
bat'd a fylfckd
(That's the trouble.)
A very personal problem...
yet women who are
confident are using
MY
OWN.
Hygienic Deodorant
Spray to be sure..the
deodorant that is made
for women only.
Available also in the
cleansing towelettes.

He said he would go on statewide television Wednesday
night to give all Californians a full report on this
situation.
I hope that this period will allow time for rational
reflection away from the emotional turmoil, and
encourage all to disavow violence and mob action,
Reagan said.
More than 50 persons were arrested at Berkeley
Tuesday in another day and night of violence. A student
strike on the 27,500-student Berkeley campus was
spreading.
Stanford University, a private school not affected by
Reagans order, was at a virtual standstill because of a
widespread, but nonviolent student strike.
Protests were reported on virtually all college campuses
in the state.

{ Permission Denied 1
| WASHINGTON (UPI) -At the administrations request, a £
:j: federal judge Wednesday refused to issue a permit for a big £
£ antiwar protest in front of the White House Saturday, but £
£ demonstration organizers said they would mass there anyway £
£ and invite arrests. £
£ Joseph Rauh Jr., an attorney for the demonstrators, warned, £
Theres going to be some real violence here this weekend £
£ unless a predicted 30,000 protesters are allowed to use £
$ Lafayette Square, just across Pennsylvania Avenue from the :
£; White House. £
£ DONT COME IN here with threats of violence, replied £
U. S. District Judge George L. Hart Jr., Im tired of hearing £
£ threats of violence. There wont be any violence unless they £
£ demonstrators want violence. £:
£ At the Justice Departments request, Hart waived a
£ requirement of 15 days notice for such assemblies be filed with
£ District of Columbia authorities, and approved a permit for a £:
£ rally at the Washington Monument grounds. £:
£ But he said, it is entirely impossible to make provision for :£
: these people at Lafayette Square.
Iji ASSISTANT ATTORNEY General William D. Ruckelshaus £
£ told Hart the government thought it is terribly important that £
£ the demonstrators be given an opportunity to express their £
£ dissent from the President or whatever else they have in mind in £
* full view of the White House. £
£ This, he said, could be accomplished from the monument £
:£ grounds, less than a half a mile south of the White House on the $
:£ other side of the elipse. :£
£ The Secret Service, said Ruckelshaus, did not believe the :£
£ President could be adequately protected if the demonstration ;£
£ was held directly in front of the White House. £
£ BUT THE NEW Mobilization Committee immediately £
£ announced it would proceed with plans to assemble in £
£ LaFayette Square in violation of Harts decision. £
£ We are coming to the White House Saturday at 12 noon, £
£ declared Ron Young, project director of the coalition of antiwar £
groups. We are coming... to the doorstep of Mr. Nixons £
house. £
! 'XvXv:v:.Nv.v.v.\\\\\\v.-.- 1 -.'.'/,v.v. , .v.y.:.:.y.:.y.v.:.;.:.:.v.;.;.v.;.v.v.v.vv;v Iv;';v 1 v;';v
1 500 Northwest 16th. Avenue
Tomorrow's Living Today ..
VILLA RAVINE
A Country Club atmosphere where you can
enjoy apartment living to its fullest ...A
large roof deck for entertaining outside the
rear door of your one bedroom
apartment... A two bedroom Townhouse
with the bedrooms on the lower level instead
of the upper... A view of the tree tops
from the master bedroom window of your
three bedroom apartment. .. Luxurious
shag carpeting in five rich color'
combinations ... An exclusive Northwest
residential location ... And Management
that cares. Mrs. Linda Langford would like
to show you the beautifully decorated
models. Call 378-8521 anytime.
Professional Management By:
| ERNEST TEW & ASSOCIATES, INC.



. \.v / 'it .*
'
-
Start rjow to collect youfget of
6 Fkqtagia Gtyrja
r
)H&-\ V at J|
The dinner plate will start your
translucent china. JUST FOLLOW THIS SCHEDULE
Fantasia China is designed with
\ classic elegance. Traditional rim DATE PIECE-A-WEEK PRICE
HT #1
Ifr. > jt_ TA sublle ,loral accents in red and Moy U 20 FRUIT DISH 39*
p* w,v S' blue will enhance your finest -
r table service. Buy one piece May 21 -27 BREAD & BUTTER PLffTE 39*
with a $3.00 purchase... two-
with a $6.00 purchase, etc. May 28 June 3 cup 39*
mm- No coupon, no limit. o lHir n on*
1 June 4-'lO SAUCER 39*
mihhilH
Ls iyiIIYTYITTYTYT -0 -with a purchase of S3OO or more
, < Open Stock Guaranteed
'B*l ; Thats right! Open stock will "S EXCLUSIVELY AT
a three )| C A V P
k No replacement worries. > \
Clip and use these Coupons .. Start Now To Complete Your Set 1,1 11
fS3 I I
SALT |ji] TWO SOUP Ufl ** VEGETABLE M M I
BpTB B & PEPPER I]|l F PLATES BOWL M|LAM X VIf?WU
fl $2 99 price HH L !2 :i,| f lir J *4.99 m 11 I|\Mm n J
I. W j stop c L u ur ||K Inoosasr s on |] f/ 111B|II W.
tjJXBI *1.99 coupon ||

I nuraiy, Ruy 7, >970, Tvm Floridi Alllfitor,

Page 11



Page 12

t The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 7,1970

Dontmiss this Offer! I #% Alt I all vegetable shortening
Thrftasia Gk ir l a fj im 11%|
VOID AFTER MAY 13
f if ia rajiy\ or w
1
^- C E s'. 49 c |3 N
GOOD MAY 7 THRU AUGUST 19 3 BEECHNUT STRAINED DIXIE DARLING COCONUT OR GEM
i jar~lT 5 Baby Food .. 15 *l Sugar Donuts. 39 HOUSEWARE SPECIALS
|H 0 PFPPFR DIXIE DARUNO PRESTIGE DIXIE FLORAL DESIGN
111 ...I Bread 2-- 59 c Jumbo Pies .. 3 r S I OO TV Tray... 88 £
. H $-i on coupon ? 50' garden
'io M I.UU VALUE { DIXIE DARLING BROWN & SERVE PILLSBURY AU FLAVORS A
Flaky Rolls ...4a s l w Coke Mixes ..3-l Sfe** 1
H Biscuits... 4 s l oo Peaches .. A s i oo l qns 12
CHASE & SANBORN ALL GRINDS
COFFEE u MKESXk,
-jp, limit on* coll** of your choice with $3 00 or mor* purchase I
| FLOUR|
f4| Imkjnnaiseji a
THIIIEY MAID MIXED VEGETABLES O.G.EEN IHEWIY MAH> SLICEDOE CDUSMEO MOMOGEAMIONGGIMN
Lima Beans 6 M OO Piaeapple..... 5Si s l Fancy Rice 3£> 39 e Gold Corn 1 0#
THRIFTY MAID CUT THRIFTY MAID CALIFORNIA TOMATOES OR THRIFTY MAID* CRACKlN'rrtftn
Green Benns ... 7"r *l Apple Sauce .. SSJ s l Corned Beef 2 89 c Fig Bars 39*
Tea Bags ~. 67' oxides Worcestershire ... 33' Comet Rte ..45' Vermicelli 23'
f*wammr*% vl Tea es* 33' ssrshoii. 2/33'
I 1 c "£z *" FREE 1 e ? p||l^l"'^"'"'''*fpiilji'''^"'e TT o'i-ilTPiVr.Ti^'j^e'iil^Tlin Lm_B _l
I Favontes
I MrMr Wrthou, coupon 2 bars 26 c 1-5 y iR# ;Hf JftK i;Hf rrJZlu.
f AMA* I g N ' '.. 1- ; Nc 2 No 3 KESm No N
Thu H*r flood thru May 21 | CfOckfirS 1101 U/ECT I IkIIWCDCITV *T ** **' 1
Good only at Winn-Dlxiw Stores | 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. OPEN ON SUNDAY 130 NW 6THST
St 43 c HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 140 l N MA|N ST



IP '"'
n A|uiVP |%ba| || aaa a* |apa TARNOW COOKED OR BAKED
bob white regular sliced Hum 3 -~-
rn PORK BREAKFAST LINK
BR|l Sausage 69 c
£Er pp r I french frieo heat & serve fish
k ; m Sticks "* 99 c
' S' taste ( Why Not Serve Him Bacon lb. Fillets .. 79*
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND "NATURALLY AGED" (BONELESS Lb. Wc) USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BONEUSS EYE W-D BRAND GROUND (HANOI-PAK)
Chuck Roast 69* Round Roast $ 1 39 Round Steak 99 c
SUNNYLAND PORK SHOULDER USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND FULL CUT BONELESS USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND ROUND BONE
Smoked Picnics ... 48 e Round Steak...... $ 1 19 Shoulder Roost... 99 c
EAMUTE AU MEAT USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND PORTERHOUSE OR USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF CHOICE BONELESS BOTTOM
Sliced Bologna ... 69 c T-Bone Steak $ 1 39 Round Roast..... $ 1 09
TENDER COOKED USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND TOP ROUND OR USDA CHOICE BONELESS
Sliced Ham ......,.. $ 1 39 Sirloin Steak $ 1 29 Rump Roast $ 1 29
Quantity Rights Rmtvtd L Wk. /m* W-D BRAND PURE . 5-lbs. *2** I MB 79
GR .BEEF 3 1
IN SLICED PORK IA Wf PR *j JWUOAL I yXLMprjo FARMS PIMENTO BORDENS
i/lllH *XL SWISS CHEESE Cheese.. 69* Biscuits 10*
IwHwt t * ch se ,9 1
(Kjji
ORANGE JUia .. 5 1 TAJHI NUGGETS 3 1 M - W MOf ".chin, "fc
COFFEE RICH .. 4 1 VEGETABLES .... 5 *l**
tOOLWHIP i 1 %V,v i A
SUPERBRAND "SOFT" SWEET A JUICY JUICY FRESH FIRM
Margarii.e ..... 3 S I OO Oranges 5 49* Sunkist Lemons... 49* Tomatoes 4 s l
Whip Topping .... 49* Margarine 5 '£. s l Potatoes ..... 10 £ 69* Cabbage 2££ 39*
KAL KAN JMEALTIME (2 6 Vi or. 37c A "* GIANT SIZE AJAX LAUNDRY Ortr 'i 01, FAULTLESS GOLDEN BANTAM
Bit of Beef 2/35 c Detergent 89 c Spray Starch 49 c m
Phase 111 Soao ... 2/49 c Liquid Cleaner 39 Fabric Finish 59 c M~M W
-------- r----.Yj ia>rG V H
IH*! 1 I [ijl J
sssr 'mM mBB T%9 MsasHr w w WHW
Sarny Starch Dr... ..* Ro.l J C.tt 9 ch.... Patti.. I
THRU MAY It SSuHB 0000 THMi MAY 1 3 .Hi 0000 TM.U MAY I J BMSSM OOOOIHRU MAY It BS3O OOOC THRU MAY IJ |
; j L N _ l ... *
3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. 11l M
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST. 9

Thursday, May 7,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

**

m
FOR SALE
1966 Karman Giha good condition
phone 3 72-2059 ask for Bill
(A-st-131-p)
KLH Model 15 stereo, garrard
changer, walnut base and speaker
enclosures. Perfect condition with
new cartridge and stylus phone
378-1122. (A-st-131-p)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W Univ.
ave., and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(A-st-131-p)
4 cent Xerox copies QUIK WAY
Copy Center, 3 machines no waiting.
Free collating. 100 copies 1 original 3
V 2 cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Qulkway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (A-llt-126-p)
Bultaco 250 Pursang Scrambler fine
condition engine runs super strong
full knobbles race proven
modifications $550 call Jon
378-3554. (A-st-133-p)
Must sell: HONDA Sport 50 cycle
SBO. Only 4,850 miles. Helmet
included. Engine recently tuned. Call
378-8525. (A-3t-133-p)
35mm camera Yashica Rangefinder
hand held light meter included. Need
money. Low price. Call 378-9367
after 5:00 PM. (A-st-133-p)
New Moon *64. 55 x 10 2 bedroom.
Central Air & Heat. Furnished.
Excellent Condition. $3,290. Call
372-3893 after 7 P.M. (A-10t-126-p)
Headquarters for tennis, golf, guns,
handball, water sports, camping team
sports, fishing, physical fitness B & B
SPORTS CENTER 5320 N.W. 13th
St. 378-1461. (A-st-132-p)
17 Thunderbird, 100 HP Evinrude,
Murray Trailer, component winch,
equipped. SI9OO. or best offer call
378-7213 evenings. (A-st-132-p)
Save! 7 antiq crnr hutch $100; 6 mo
Zenith solid st port, stereo, dia ndle,
6 spkrs, orgin, $219 now $100;
maple dbl drsr & mir $25. Will sell all
3 together for $175. Call 378-8803
anytime. (A-6t-132-p)
Wedding dress. White organza w/ lace
appliques long chapel train size 5.
$50.00 Call 372-2740 Mon, Tues,
Wed, Thurs after 4 PM. (A-3t-134-p)
Fender Bandmaster amplifier S2OO
Gibson classical guitar SSO Kay
electric 3 pickups SSO HOLb weight
set sls or best offer each. 372-8714.
(A-st-134-p)
MUST GO Llv. Rm. Furniture,
Double rocker. Kit and bedrm. set,
etc, also kittens, paintings, prints,
424 SE 7 St. Call 378-3614 after 5.
(A-3t-134-p)
69 Honda 90, excellent shape, 4700
miles, just tuned-up, call 392-7561
after 5 PM, ask for Bruce.
(A-st-134-p)
Honda 1967 Cl 160 Scrambler,
excellent condition, $350 firm. Call
378-5996. (A-3t-134-p)
3 br. IV2 bath 10 x 56 fur. trailer, 1
br. fixed as study washer clothes
line fenced lot cable TV in
park with pool A/C, 376-8517.
(A-st-134-p)
HARLEY Sprint 250 CC $450, GOYA
G-10 classical guitar sllO,
POLAROID 103 SBO or make offer,
call 376-2048. (A-st-135-p)
Honda 250 Scrambler, excellent
condition. Sunburst gold, new trials,
tire, new alloy sprocket 48 tooth,
plus 3 2 tooth sprocket, Call
372-8923 $350. (A-3t-135-p)
8 x 42 2 Bedroom Bath & Shower
$1,200, 8 x 35 5 AME SI,OOO, 8 x
30 SBOO. 376-6831, 372-4595.
Income Trailer Available also.
(A-st-135-p)
New Color Organs, 1-channel, will
drive any light system up to 500
watts. Ideal for stereo or band. S2O
each. 376-2389. E. E. Senior.
(A-st-135-p)
2 large 10 back-deck speakers sls,
12 volt ACOC converter $9., Never
used Electric Ladyland 8-track
tapes 4., 392-8723, (Bill) (A-2t-135-p)
Midland anvfrn stereo rec. Excellent
in all respects. Almost brand new.
$l2O. Call 373-2643 or see at Apt.
94, French Quarter. (A-3t-135-p)
Electric bass guitar nice looking,
solid body, with adjustable pickup,
strap, strings like new. Come by or
call 392-7385, 211 Fletcher O.
(A-st-135-p)
FOR RENT
Sublet for summer quarter one
bedroom sum. apt. Gatortown 115
130/mo. large living room. Call
378-9743 Will consider best offer.
(B-6t-130-p)

Page 14

l, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 7,1970


FOR FI ENT
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities Included completely'
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Must sublet til mid Sept. 1 bdrm apt
ac across from campus SIOO monthly
immediate occupancy ph 378-7198.
(B-st-131-p)
" No lease S7O a month Incl. utilities
new 12x60 mobile home your own
room TV A/C and only one other
person phone 376-4138. Ask for Jim.
(B-st-131-p)
Sublease now for summer. Summit
House. New building, pool etc. Much
more. Must be 21 and working or
married. $139 per mo. call 376-8514
after 5:00. (B-st-131-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 SW 16th Court. MAKE YOUR
FALL RESERVATIONS NOW. Call
376-9668. (B-126-ts-c)
Sublet for summer or longer. June
rent paid, 1 bdr, furn, A/C, pool, TV
cable. $l2O/mo Frederick Apts No.
63. Day 372-7555, night 378-5823.
(B-St-132-p)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372- Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
Sublease for summer poolside French
Quarter n 0.47 near laundry room
rent can be discussed 2 bedroom
A/C. Call Linda or Jackie 372-6768.
(B-3t-133-p)
Immediate Occupancy Sublet Now. 2
bdrm furn AC pool Apt 3 1130 S.W.
16th Ave. 376-8821. (B-st-133-p)
Sublet June 1 Nice Large 1 bdr. Apt
A/C close to campus. 372-5032.
(B-st-133-p)
Must sublet Landmark Apt. for
summer quarter. Pay only 69.25 for
the entire summer. Be cool and Call
376-1769 any time. (B-st-134-p)
Male Roommate Wanted For
Immediate Occupancy. Apt. 167
Landmark 378-7142. (B-4t-134-p)
2 roommates wanted summer
quarter. Air-conditioned, carpet,
other extras, located right on pool,
BBQ pit, no. 60, Landmark Call
373- (B-st-134-p)

lUO NOW} HURRY!
ws Aash
MASTERPIECE!
pUHfpy STARTS FDIHAYI
I "'i 1 'I ri\ll/M I s
..
Castanvif
Irene popee inger elevens
earn levette Harry Mar* Petrakis and lan Hunter Harry Mark Petrakis
(iuiaa*Schrmar Oamet Mann Alex North Technicolor* 1-Rl
LAST DAY THE DAMNED* X

- *7 l *-l
. ' J B ***'

FOR RENT
French Quarter One bedroom
townhouse apartment to sublease
immediately. Call 378-0422 evenings.
(B-st-134-p)
La Mancha townhouse to sublet
summer quarter private bedroom
near campus. Swimming pool S7O
month, Call Dave 378-7314.
(B-2t-135-p)
Sublet starting summer quarter at
Olympia apts, 2 bedrm., 3 or 4
persons, A/C, furn., $l5O per month.
Call 373-2462 anytime. (B-3t-135-p)
2 bedroom French Quarter apt. to
sublease for the summer. slls for
the entire summer. Please call
373-2226 or visit apt. 12 French
Quarter. (B-3t-135-p)
SHACK UPstairs vp apt. 98 for 2
female types S9O ea entire summer
AC topside, poolside 373-1501
Lynne or Celeste after 5.
(B-5M35-P)
Poolside apt. for summer qtr
sublease June rent paid $95 a month
1 bedroom with patio. NW section
of town. Call 373-2442 after 3:30
PM. (B-st-135-p)
1, 2 or 3 female roommates summer
quarter. Landmark Apt. 35 A.C.,
carpeting, poolside, dishwasher. No
deposits. $46.25 mo. 378-3518.
(B-3t-134-p)
WANTED
Need one female roommate for fall
quarter. Landmark apt. Poolside. Call
392-9597. (C-st-133-p)
Female to share 2 bedroom apt. with
3 others for summer. Aid cond. +
pool. Frederick Gardens SIOO or best
offer for summer. Call 373-2480.
(C-3t-133-p)
Male roommate needed in a hurry
43.50 mo. Summit House real nice
air cond. pool TV. Call 378-1901
close to campus. (C-st-133-p)
Male roommate wanted/ Summer qtr.
2-bdr. duplex in quiet wooded area.
Pets welcome. A/C SSO/mo + V 2 util.
Near Mall. Your own room.
372-6598. (C-3t-133-p)
For fall female roommate for
Colonial Manor apt. Your share is
$55. + util. Glenda 392-7593.
(C-st-134-p)
Female rm-mt to share modern 1 br.
apt, TV, patio, $53. + elect 378-3588
or 392-3691 Barbara no lease, Immed
occupancy. (C-4t-134-p)
Female roommate La Mancha oVirn
room $72.50 Includes utilities must
like dogs. Call Jo-Anne 392-3601
Immediate occupancy. (C-4t-134-p)

WANTED
2 med. 1 grad student need 1 male
roommate summer or longer, rent
43/mo. CAMELOT apt. 202
376-0354. (C-3M34-P)
Female roommate. Williamsburg. 1
blk to campus. May rent paid. No
Contract. Needed immed. Call after
4:00 376-0709. Caroline.
(C-st-134-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATES fall quarter,
prefer near-campus apartment. Call
Linda 392-8821 after 7:00 p.m.
(C-3t-134-p)
LOST bright colors ... restore them
with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(C-1 t-ts-c)
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
for summer term at French Quarter.
Call after 5 PM 378-3068.
(C-3t-135-p)
Need 2 female roommates for
Landmark apt. fall quarter. Call after
10:00 p.m. 392-7709. (C-st-135-p)
Female roomate needed immed no
lease own room 2 blocks away from
campus Call 378-3220. (C-lt-135-p)
2 female roommates wanted to share
2 bedroom apt Unlv Gardens
$54 per month secuity dep. free
call Diane at 376-0716 after 4:30.
(C-st-135-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEdT
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Dead fin* -300 pan. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

' I
* r *. A I y.:'^i
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME> DATE
for sale STUDENT t PHONE
for rent 1 dav
q wanted 2 da v $ ADDRESS.
help wanted 3 days (*lO% discount)
autos G 4 days (*lO% discount) QJY STATE 7IP
personal q 5 days and over
lost-found (*20% discount)
" WORDINO
in 11 1 M 1 11 1 1 11 11 11 1 1 n 11 11 1 mi mr
2l I I I I I I I I I I M I I M I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I 1
an I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I
4| ii 1 11 1 1 ii 1 11 m~

(PLUS 2ND FEATURE)

WANTED
Female roommates for summer
quarter at Tanglewood 2 bdr. a/c,
TV. Share $l9O + utll./mo. Call
373-2711 after spm for Info.
(C-st-135-p)
HELP WANTED
Cocktail Waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary will
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dubs
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-125-p)
Distribute advertising to city homes
You can earn $2 or more an hour!
Tues. or Wed. time flexible.
Telephone 376-5716 after 2 d m
(E-st-132-p)
Co-ed wanted room and board in
exchange, for domestic duties call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-4t-132-p)
Listeners Wanted will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call 392-2049
between 1 and 4 p.m. for
appointment. (E-st-132-p)
SPORTS WRITERS for Alligator
staff. No experience necessary. Salary
is flexible. Call 392-1686 in the
afternoon. (E-4t-135-p)



gator classifieds

xws&s&w&ffls xws&s&w&fflshelp
help xws&s&w&fflshelp wanted
Secretary, part tlma or full time, for
law office, 376-3315. (E-2t-134-p)
Like to aall or would you Ilka to try?
How about a Job with good pay plus
a chanca to win Elucatlon Grant. Call
Fuller Brush 378-0121. (E-10t-134-p)
AUTOS
1960 Chevy 4 dr. Sedan 6 cyl stick
shift, runs wall, vary reliable, passed
Inspection, $225, Phone: Steve
McGuire 376-3767. (G-2t-134-p)
1963 Dodge Dart 4 dr. automatic
excellent transportation asking 450,
Call after 5 PM, 378-9925.
(G-3t-134-p)
69 Camera 4sp. 327 Daytona yellow,
12600 378-3588 will bargain.
{G-4t-134-p)
Must sell 11 Banana yellow Maverick,
automatic, VB, tape deck, radio,
"Ford-Power" + "Chequlta" stickers,
372-1324 after 10 PM. R.l.Betts.
(G-3t-134-p)
1962 Ply. CNV, Mach, sound
(300.00 F. GRAUDON Starke,
964-6202. (G-2t-134-p)
*62 Cutlass V-8 Auto trans. R/H, all
cond., power brakes steer good
Shape $450. Ph: 1-964-7616 Starke
after 6 PM. Can be seen on campus
(student). (G-st-134-p)
1963 Corvalr Monza conv. new top,
carpet, and oil seals. Radio heater
excellent condition SSOO or best
offer. Call Sandy 372-1729 or
372- (G-st-134-p)
61 Peugeot Dependable No Rust runs
Good Need Money $lB5 10 Speed
Rallegh Super Course Aluminum
Wheels SBS Call 376-9066.
(G-3t-133-p f
1960 FOrd Galax le 2 door automatic
power steering, factory air, 8 heater
call 378-9460 afternoons or see at
Westgate trailer park Lot 101. $250.
(G-131-4t-P)
'7O Chevelle SS 396 Full Power
Options Galor, less than 2 months
old. showroom condition with first
year's deprlcatlon already paid.
373- after 5:30. (G-4t-133-p)
Falcon *64 4 door, standard shift, 6
cylinder, radio, heater, good tires,
very good condition. $495.
378-4642. (G-st-133-p)
60 Pontiac reliable transportation
good tires fading Tom Wolfe type
baroque American $125 Radio Air
Power-Socko 378-4861 After five.
(G-3t-135-p)
69 CAMARO automatic radio call
Luis 376-7098. (G-lt-135-p)
1967 Flat SSOO. Body and engine In
excellent condition. Four brand new
tires. Terrific buyl l*tn ready to sell!
376-6166 or 378-8211. (G-6t-130-p)
SUNBEAM ALPINE 1964
convertable SSOO call 392-0293
weekdays 8-4. (G-st-135-p)

Silly????

FROM THE MALL J a
JJI Thurs. Fri. Sat.
fli iTiIV tT B morbison s cafeteria^
"I ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<
ffljlilwjwp -I MI wmmm .
LUNCH AND DINNER
I J. .y.-, Fish Almondine and
F l !P* a^oes

AUTOS
-----!*!*!*T*!*?"***e"****"***I*I*I%%*I*I%*I*r*I%" # # ****
Winners of the recent Datsun contest
JACK MCCONNELL and
LINDA AUST. The Datsun with the
automatic transmission Is a winner
too! TRY IT! Godding and Clark 2nd
Ave. and 2nd Street S.E. (G-135-ts-c)
67 Rambler 4 Door 6 Cyl. Rebel
Available Trade Or Cash Or Both
376-6831 372-4595 Seats Make
< Large Double Bed. (G-st-135-p)
1960 Chevrolet Impala. Good
condition. Power steering. $175 call
373-2901.
PERSONAL
Wanted Mothers with infants 3 mo.
or younger needed for Infant research
study. Up to $5.00 for participating
Call 392-2914, after 6; 372-1114.
(J-10t-132-c)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W. Unlv.
ave., and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(J-st-131-p)
Willie, l saw the giant oak today and
It made me wonder how you are.
Best. of luck and above all be
happy! Yours from the USSR.
(J-2t-134-p)
Arles Kittens! 6 wks. old, weaned. 2
all wht., l all blk (born mldnlte) 1
blk & whte. Raised outside but are
tame. Witches/Warlocks Call
376-1489. (J-3t-134-p)
New student owned mobile home
repair, service. Any repairs cant air
carports awnings add-a-rooms
supplies and accesorles. Prompt
and dependable service. TNT sales
and service 373-1446. (J-10t-130-p)
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent
alr-carports-awnlngs-add-a-raoms alr-carports-awnlngs-add-a-raomssupplies
supplies alr-carports-awnlngs-add-a-raomssupplies and accesorles. Prompt and
dependable service. DtM sales and
service 373-1446. (J-10t-130-p)
Sweet Lynn the rear Is nice.
(J-lt-135-p)
Happy 8 month anniversary to Mom
and Dad Elsler. Love and best wishes
always, Tina E Peaches, Cream,
Flippy and Penny. (J-lt-135-p)
Gator gun club monthly pistol match
Sunday, 2pm at police pistol range
ion Kincaid Rd. Rim fire and center
fire matches. For more information,
phone Capt. Roberts at City Police
Station. (J-135-lt-c)
Would the owner of the recent model
Mercedes that picked me up late Sat.
night hitchlklng on radio road please
call me at 392-8317. Urgent!
(J-lt-135-p)
Is your Mom -Cool, far out or even
Square? It doesn't matter, we have
Just the thing for her Mother's Day
gift (May 10). The remainder of our
Ruanas and Capes are reduced 25%
We also have gift Items from India,
South America and Spain. Free gift
wrapping. The Spanish Main 1624 W.
Unlv Ave, open 10-10 Mon-Sat.
(J-lt-135-p)

Thursday, May 7.1970. The Florida Ailtor.

m mrm
PE RSONA L
Israel Independence day will be
celebrated May 10 Sunday night at
7:30 p.m. at the AEPhI sorority
house free food and entertainment.
(J-2t-135-p)
LOST St FOUND
LOST: Gold Omega "Orange Bowl
1967" watch at handball courts great
sentimental value reward Mel Sharpe
392-1311 or 376-9966 after 6pm.
(L-st-131-p)
FOUND: Pair of men's glasses In
vicinity of Reitz Union. Contact
David Pearson at 1204 NW 3rd Ave.
between 57 p.m. (L-3t-134-p)
Lost In recent model mercedes that
picked me up hitch Iking late Sat.
night on Radio Road glasses with
wire frames call 392-8317.
Reward. (L-2t-135-p)
£BBBBBBBBBBBBBBB^^
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent-alr
carports awnings add-a-rooms
supplies and accesorles. Prompt
and dependable service. TNT sales
and service 373-1446. (M-10t-130-p)
Captain Louies Galley delivery
service seafood & chicken phone
372-3547. (M-st-131-p)
Motorcycle owners! Custom painting
of cycles and helmets full line of
metalflake and candyapple colors
now available cyclerama ph.
378-2811. (M-st-131-p)
Alternators Generators ltahsil
Electrical Systems fitljl
repeat ~ Auto Electrical Service,
1111 s; Main. (M-107-ts-c)
: r- i.r ;_tqir- .Ml t r r
VOLKSWAGEN PARTS AND
SERVICE GAINESVILLE MACH
SHOP 1224 S MAIN 376-0710.
(M-10t-131-p)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs-cent-alr- N
car port s-awnlngs-add-a-rooms s-awnlngs-add-a-roomssupplies
supplies s-awnlngs-add-a-roomssupplies and accesorles. Promt and
dependable service. DtM sales and
service 373-1446. (M-10t-130-p)
r 4
Ruby's ALTERATIONS 1958
N.W. 4th St. 376-8506 Mrs.
Ruby Mills. (M-10t-135-p)
BABY CARE: 311 N.W. 15th
Terrace (infants under 1 yr. old);
rates by the hour $.75, dally $4.00,
weekly sls. Experienced, reliable
Christian home. Call 376-2072.
(M-2M35-C)
4 cent Xerox QUICK WAY Copy
Center,'3 machines no waiting. Free
collating. 100 copies 1 original 3 V
cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Qulkway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (M-llt-126-p)

Page 15

mjm wwmwmm rrrrrnrrriinrrir^WrfVWJVWWWWVWftfAW/rf
y^nKnnKTpinir
X 7 iM f i
LAST DAY [ j
I TOMORROW ADVENTURERS J
S FROM THE MAN WHO 6AVE YOU BLOW-UP" J
I COIRES HIS FtRSTjMEATMjroMjANIUT
wmzk LAST DAY IS
. * BUTCH CASSIDY AND
S Starts TOMORROW! SUNDANCE KID J

i ACADEMY AWARD WINNER S
MAGGIE SMITH
iu:l*nmc pjbirl
* igpi
{ rflH^J'j
IBIOxTRAORDINARY... SIMPLY GREAT:
: Maggie Smiths performance is staggering.:
I YOU ASKED FOR mill*l
! LIMITED 7 DAY ENGAGEMENT, j
j ITS MARVELOUS, RELEVANT :
AND UNINTELLIGIBLEIiII :
: NOT TO BE MISSED.
:
[Down Madison Avei
immm
w A
I I PUTNEY I
S SWOPE" i

; The Truth and Soul Movie /



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 7,1970

FBI Wants Rap Brown

WASHINGTON (UPI) For
the third time in 10 years, the
FBI Wednesday its
most wanted list from 10 to 11
adding H. Rap Brown, the
fugitive black power militant.

'Right To WorkBill
Fought By House
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The House jerked the controversial REA
stay put bill out of its last committee Wednesday but fought down a
proposal to revive a Republican right to work bill.
Minority Leader Don Reed, R-Boca Raton, made the motion to
recall the bill from the House Labor and Industry Committee but
failed to muster the needed two-thirds support in a 64-37 vote.
THE COMMITTEE HAD killed the bill 5-3 Monday despite a threat
from Reeds Republican caucus to block the public employe collective
bargaining bill unless the right to work proposal is brought to the
floor.
If we start this, then the committee system is just not any good
any more, said Rep. Harry Westberry, D-Jacksonville, chairman of
the committee.
The bill by Rep. Lewis S. Earle, R-Maitland, prohibits compulsory
union membership.
THE HOTLY CONTESTED Rea bill was in the Appropriations
Committee, after clearing two other committees, when the House
rejected a routine request for more time to study the bill and
demanded that it be reported out to the floor.
The move was led by Rep. Eugene Shaw, D-Starke, who blocked a
routing request by Appropriations Chairman Ralph Turlington,
D-Gainesvifle, for a 14-day extension of time for committee
consideration.
Shaws motion, which Turlington said came as a surprise, carried by
a 52-30 vote. The bill, already approved by two other House
committees, goes to the Rules Committee which must decide whether
it will be placed on the special order calendar.
THE BILL GIVES rural electric co-ops added rights to continue
serving customers who are annexed by municipalities which operate
city power plants. City officials have contended it will cost them as
much as $230 million in revenues over the next 30 years.
Shaw said the bill was being kept in the appropriations committee
to die a quiet death.
Fourteen days from now there will be another extension of time
request, he said. By then it will be too late and the game will be
over.
The vote came a day after House Speaker Fred Schultz said he was
fed up with non-controversial calendars which continually seem to
result in controversy.
Congressman Burke Calls
For Prosecution Os Hoffman

WASHINGTON (UPI) U. S.
Rep. J. Herbert Burke, R-Fla.,
says he cannot understand why
the Justice Department has not
prosecuted Yippie leader Abbie
Hoffman for blowing his nose on
a replica of an American flag.
I am at a loss to understand
why your department has not
taken action against Hoffman,
Burke wrote Atty. Gen. John
Mitchell. Such action would at
least put todays radicals on
notice that the government
means business and that
disrespect of the flag will not be
tolerated.
HOFFMANS ACTION,
2 BEDROOM
FULLY FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME
SET ON LOT OF
YOUR CHOICE
$62.43 per mo.
AFTER SMALL DOWN
PAYMENT
Musiantjd^.
MOHII HOMES 3?
4820 N.W. 13th ST.
378*1346
WE WILL HELP YOU LOCATE
A LOT AT NO CHARGE

Brown failed to appear at his
trial Monday in EUicott City,
Md., to face charges stemming
from a riot in Cambridge, Md.,
in 1967.
THE LAST TIME the FBI

Burke said, violates a federal law
imposing a punishment of up to
SI,OOO fine and a year of
imprisonment for desecrating
the U. S. flag.
Kansas authorities have
already charged Hoffman as a
result of the incident on the
Kansas Wesleyan University
campus.

*
. N mm. i

enlarged the list was in the case
of James Earl Ray, sought for
the 1968 assassination of Martin
Luther King. The other incident
involved Richard Laurence
Marquette, charged with
butchering a woman in Portland,
Ore., in 1961, and throwing her
dismembered body into a river.
Browns SIO,OOO bond was
revoked and a federal fugitive
warrant was issued for his arrest
after he failed to appear for his
trial in Howard County Court.
He is charged with making
speeches that precipitated
rioting and arson at Cambridge.
Brown has not been seeri since
March 7 when he reportedly left
New York City to drive to Bel
Air, Md. The trial had been set
for Bel Air but was later moved
to Ellicott City.
THE FBI SAID that Brown,
26-year-old chairman of the
Student National Coordinating
Committee (SNCC), should be
considered armed and
dangerous.
He is free on bond pending
appeal of a 1968 conviction in
New Orleans for violating the
federal firearms act, for which
he was sentenced to five years in
prison and fined $2,000. He also
has been convicted of carrying a
concealed weapon and of
carrying pistols in an automobile
without a permit.
Brown, whose real name is
Hubert Geroid Brown, is
scheduled to go on trial in New
Orleans June 15 on charges of
assaulting a federal officer in
1968.
Browns attorney, William M.
Kunstler, has said he believes
Brown is alive but has not heard
from him since March 7. Two of
Browns friends were killed in an
automobile explosion just before
Browns trial was to begin in Bel
Air March 9.
FIGHT FIRES

..V/lvlvXv/Xv/i'XVAVAVW/A'AVlv/l'/A^XvX'IWwNyWWiNV-VtV.VtViViV^
Agnew To Speak]
1 At Dedication J
;i $
j: STONE MOUNTAIN, Ga. (UPI) Vice President Spiro T. £
: Agnew will replace President Nixon for the Saturday dedication
j: of the Stone Mountain carvings, it was announced Wednesday.
: Agnews press secretary, Herbert Thompson, said in $
Washington Nixon asked the vice president to take his place at
: the ceremony dedicating carvings on the mountain face of three $
: Confederate heroes Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson and £
S Jefferson Davis.
jo KEEP THE engagement, Agnew, in turn, called on Rogers
C.B. Morton, chairman of the Republican National Committee
to be a substitute speaker for him at the Republican State
: Convention at Cody, Wyoming, Saturday. :j:
: Agnew will be in California Thursday and will appear at a
> Boise, Idaho, fund raising dinner Friday night. He will remain at :j:
J Boise until Saturday morning when he will fly into Atlanta.
President Nixon cancelled his tentative travel plans for this
week, including the visit here, to remain in closer touch with the
Cambodia developments. §
GOV. LESTER Maddox said that will be good that Agnew
will speak in Nixons place. He said he felt Nixon should have $
v kept his commitment but he felt Agnew would be acceptable |:j
:j: to the people.
* Secretary of State Ben Fortson, a member of the Stone :jj
> Mountain Memorial Association, appeared somewhat unhappy £
:j: with the change, however.
I was afraid that if the President sent some underling it
i would throw it (the dedication) into the political arena where it
]: shouldnt be, Fortson said. When asked to elaborate, he said :j:
only I am going to stand on that statement. :j:
THE DEDICATION is set for 2:30 pjn. Saturday but the :j:
festivities will begin in the morning for the expected crowd of
100,000 Georgians and visitors with high school and bands and
choral groups providing music.
More than 2,000 national, regional, state and local officials ;j:
have been invited to the ceremonies. :
* **** ft *<*** + *
t Where Is Indochina? ;
* Where Is Kent State?
* A Poetry Reading Against The Wars
* Featuring Several Local Poets
TONIGHT 122 & 123
4 8:00 PM Lounge
4 J.W. Reitz Union
4
* Sponsored by Celebration and
* florida quarterly
I FOR MOTHER'S DAY, LARGE 8-INCH, 1
jg \ If 1 i/ BUTTERCREAM FILLED, DECORATED
\] 1 I Heart Shaped
Cake I
CAMISHED WITH BUTTER STREUSEL,!
DELICIOUS 8-INCH ROUND
,gwggTWp|i||w Crumb Cake 1
' DANISH I
SB
m BAKERY |
Gainesville Mall
Special Orders Call 372-3885 I



'K'HII.. (tan'nr M| trntmH f '?>'
1 ln ill < lis h 111 11
DINNER^fi

Get Completer Pieces NOW thru Aug.
No Lbnttl No Minimum Purchase!
(A) 8" Luncheon Plate .. 79* (E) 13" Platter $1.99 (J) Cov*red Cawerole $4.95
(B) Cereal Bowl 79 1 (F) Creamer $1.49 (K) Salt Shaker 79*
(Q Vegetable Bowl $1.19 (D) llTPlatter $1.39 (H) Sauceboat $2.29 (M) Covered Butter Dish $2.49
(I) Coffee Server $4.95
Shower Ideas for Brides and Anniversaries!

A COMPLETE SET of elegant "Classic
Green" makes a thrilling shower for a
bride. These completer pieces (beautifully
modelled, aren't they!) may be bought

any week between now and Aug. 19th
and without tie-in purchasesat prices
that make them a terrific buy! A lovely
gift for a bride or your own anniversary!

Banded in an exquisite green (which printers ink cant match), with
double bands of gold, this beautiful dinnerware has the simplicity of
sophisticated good taste. Youll be proud of a table set with
Classic Green. And youll use it with pleasure for years because
this fine dinnerware is remarkably practical. A miracle of modem
technology, Classic Green is ovenproof, detergent-safe, with a
lifetime guarantee against crazing! Yet with purchases at Publix
of sl2 per week, you can collect a service for 1260 pieces for a
marvelous 39c each. Simply because we like to thank you for shopping
at Publix with an especially exciting value we call a Customer Bonus.
We think youll agree that Classic Green is a prize for the
lady who loves nice things.
TO COLLECT YOUR SET!
f Each Place will be available for a weak at three different times.
Clip and save tills time-table:

May 7-13 TO" Dinner Plate 39*
May 14-20 6" Salad Plate 39*
May 21-27 Dessert Dish 39*
May 28-June 3 Coffee Cop 39*
June 4-10 Saucer 39*
June 11-17 10" Dinner Plate 39*
June 18-24 6" Salad Plate 39*

DINNERWARE AVAILABLE AT ALL PUBLIX MARKETS
IN THESE COUNTIES:
Allachua, Marion,
Wi P|||ll IV |l Sumter, Lake, Volusia,
! rPiHiT* *1 Seminole, Orange,
\ Osceola and Brevard

Thursday, May 7,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

June 25-July 1 Dessert Dish 39*
July 2-8 Coffee Cup 39*
July 9-15 Saucer 39*
July 16-22 10" Dinner Plate 39*
July 23-29 6" Salad Plate 39*
July 30-Aug. 5 Dessert Dish 39*
Aug. 6-12 Coffee Cup 39*
Aug. 13-19 Saucer 39*

Page 17



Page 18

l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 7,1970

vAj <*4 |A IV f J
GARDEN (BS3^iife
m f mM M I I S J I I .<; wL * slrelP#
JE #303 $B SAVi 11c Welcltade Delicious
**w h l *,* **" 1 Drape Drink 3~ 11/\/ f\ LJ so \i \S3
Golden Corn 5 ' $ 1 Prune Juice *IT49* NY \ \j)iW^l
SAVE 35c! Del Monte Tender Early Garden 9 l-oi. MAe g U~)
********** B A n.e a #3o3s Salad Dressing 39 e > *
Wivvll r w SAVE 4Scl Del Monte Delicious Cut Grape Jelly 4 *;r M x^r3^HlQ3nsnHHr
Green Beans.. 5 $ I
Tomatoes 4 sl old Milwaukee ;J,\ 98
Chunk Tuna... 3 $ 1 4


Hi-Hat Brand Salad-Perfect |l li \ \ X /fl Ik j§ \
Juicy tl
Tasty
cut** I
Polish RemoverX' 29* ->-'~r V-' \ /Vv I Wv/lV \j/\\ A\ ftife_ "'M
White Rain ... 'X 89* Steaks \r
Tasty Lean Sliced lb. 89* Li'ii.'l.'lJ
Chopped Ham.." 99* |pl|PW|^i^^^^^jr^^!^^P^^^([iTi]cJ*tfGree T nStamps|sl
Cole SICiIMF lb. 39* fra Lfc?f fiM \;.tltf Rath's Honey Cure Smoked |
Delicious Kitchen-Fresh p 4" UTI Boneless Ham <
Potato Salad .. 7" 39* lQk&,l 1 - f
Tasty and Convenient, Submarine || UMeeeeMUWtfttUUUUMIIMMketMeiUUMMUMHMtK
" menu P
( --
j McCormick's Pure
T ry ,Gpt 4 l (an 49c
t ££ c X , deee^^t*uteefteftft r fteeeeftfte.ft^tft^^
argarine | if |T||^^Gf66flSt3lTipS
| Fantastik Cleaner
| 3. (Expires Wed.. May 13. 1970)
Fresh Pork Boston Butt DmAml , P
New Zealand Quick-Frozen 7-0*- 93g^
q||p Armour Star Mira Cure
' ttoo 9
. ; / I Safety-Plus
(plus 100 extra S*H Ornn Stamps with cmpon) 5. (Expire, Wml. May 13, 1*70)
Swift's Skinless Breakfast &a
Tarnow Patties or Link
Kidt Love
,2 *'* cans 70c
IMMK l,, r^ aw fe^se
|y I \/_ /"Ouj jVxA li Seafood Treat, Tasty Fresh Spanish 8.3-oz. can $ 1.19
! Y --. ,
lor I ft \W' \\\# I IV ~ XftftAftftAAftftAAAAAAAA'AAAAAAAAftAAfIAAftAA r~Ni rN< '7XA 1 I
gfrcm Our ffiecdWept. J Whit Shrimp ee e Vb. 99 e |[| St3 IlipS
Singleton's Frozen Stuffed n HIKiM
Flounder Fillet X' 39* --^flf3iPVflV||i Ti 1 ,"*.£!"
10 .oz. <- | HI 4'/2-OZ. size $1.38
Green Peas ft 1 i 1 immniions. mrr when V oub UVo n ||
, J Csnisy rntL Complexion Sirs j
without coupon Zd C j " 'o * '*. !^
> I 1970) I l Sausage & Cheese |
I GoodomyrtPULix markets || 1
v V\j (llkffe, QLejjiut^li^PfemM,
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE MALL
__ Moin Sir**) 2630 I3rt< StrMt K''"""**^B
| Jfwl WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER fIIBIIIYo
'l Wzli I W. University Avenue at 34th Street I, | UDLIA.
THESE PRICES EFFECTIVE IN THE FOLLOWING COUNTIES ONLY 1 a#^jl
V Brevard. Orange. Osceola. Lake, Seminole. Volusia. Marion and Alachua. itOt

Thuraday, May 7,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

The

Florida Gymnasium Renovation To Start

By Alligator Sarvicas
A schedule for renovation and
modification of Florida Gymnasium has
been set cutting construction time to a
minimum.
The new schedule will allow events
connected with basketball, the physical
education instructional program and
special activities to proceed on a normal
pattern.
ACCORDING TO W. Ellis Jones,
associate director of planning, contract

UF Student Find:
. I
.* &
Garbage r Mine
By A. R. GROVER
Alligator Conmpondant
Like bucking broncos, pickup trucks lurch toward the giant funnel
and another Demster Dumpster empies into its mouth.
Poking through the contents dropped into a 60-foot trailer, a young
man hums as he sorts through the debris.
GOT TO BE quick or the fellow upstairs will dump one on you,
Gustavo Villarroel, a 1969 graduate of the university said. They cant
see you, but even if they could, some would try to get you
anyway.
Garbage grubbing, as he calls it, has been a lucrative past time for
Gustavo, or Gus since his junior year. And what originally began as a
search for the record In A Gadda da Vida thrown out with the
trash, turned into a gold mine of garbage.
I never found that record, but when I saw so many books thrown
away 1 picked them out and made a thirty-eight dollar profit on
resale, he said. t( The next tune I brought a box and picked up maybe
thirty more books.
Books are but a few of the valuable objects salvaged. Clothing,
paper, ashtrays, canned goods, and towels, (which Gus had sewn
together to make a bed spread) are among his many finds.
Some coed lost a diamond engagement ring- to the chutes and I
sold it for $1500, hi said. 1 thought about putting an ad in the
newspaper but anyone could have described it, so I said the hell with
it after watching die lost and found for a while.
Wallets and purses alos find their way to Guss garbage mine.
Some have money in them, but most are probably stolen and
discarded, he speculated. I returned several that I found, but now I
dont bother to because a guy threatened me once. He told me I stole
it and wouldn't believe that I found it here, he said.
People would probably throw out their brain if they could take it
out, and from some of the letters and printed matter Ive read, I
wonder if they havent. I cant complain though, these people helped
finance my education in more ways than one, Gus mused.
Several thousand dollars richer, Gustavo has made plans to enter
Graduate School in the fall. A sort of garbage mine of the mind with
its giant funnel too, he said.
Sudha Dances Sunday,
- - v '/ \ :
Shows 'Original Form 1
Exotic dancer Sudha will perform the Dance of India Sunday at 8
p.m. in the University Auditorium as part of the dance series
presented by Celebration 7O.
Mrs. Sudha Chandra Sekhar has spent more than 20 years studying
and researching Indian dance. For this work she was awarded a
two-year scholarship by the government of India.
SHE IS considered the outstanding pupil of an institute for dance
instruction rated among Indias finest. She also studied the Bharata
Natyam dance under the guidance of five successive gurus.
Since bringing her tour to the U. S. and Canada, she has performed
in a number of large cities on this continent.
When not touring, Sudha holds classes for youngsters desiring to
perfect this art form. She backs this up with a refresher course during
file summer months.
SUDHA IS also the creator of original dance forms.
She holds a degree in economics from Bombay University.,
Dance forms featured will be Kathak and Bharata Natyam.
Tickets will be on sale at the door. Admission is 75 cents for UF
students and $1.25 for all others.
;,*V ; i l
llllUffinmrmnnTi
if"' .*
THE QUARTERLY IS HERE

documents will be obtained as soon as
possible to proceed with invitations to
bid on the construction.
Instructions will be given to
prospective bidders so they may start
work on the project outside the budding
and order necessary air-conditioning
equipment at their discretion. The
instructions will include the provision
that the interior of the building will be
made available to the contractor at the
conclusion of basketball season in March
1971, Jones said.
If no serious barriers are encountered,

AFTER BASKETBALL SEASON

FOOD
600 D service
w w w w PRICES
ONLY CHOICE MEATS USED
Try Our
DAILY LUMCHEOII SPECIALS
Meat, 2Veg, Cole Slaw, 3*
2 Rolls and Butter
1225 W. Univ. Ave.
U* 372-6666
Percival Bordes x
1 alking g
Drums 1
|\jl A Program Os o
And West <5
Dance o
University jj
Auditorium |
jCELEBZCATION 70§
x A Festival of the Arts 8
B u An Omicron Ddte Kappa Sttident Government Production Q

the project should be completed and the
building occupied by mid summer 1971.
THE GYM IS the only multi-purpose
facility on the campus capable of seating
more than 1,000. It has been operating
under a restriction limiting capacity to
5,100 since September in order to
comply with tightened fire code
requirements concerning exits.
According to Jones, the new
procedure, although resulting in a slight
postponement of an air-conditioned
facility, would have the following
advantages:

0 Basketball practice and the
basketball playing season could proceed
on a normal pattern.
0 The facility would be available for
physical education classes during the fall
and winter quarters and for the special
events which are normally the most
heavily scheduled. /
0 It would permit the successful
bidder adequate time to place
air-conditioning equipment on order and
the prefabrication of duct work and other
items off the site, resulting in better
bidding at a lower cost.



II p-"Super-Right" % Pork Loin Sliced Special! I
I j__AfeV_MONgf nrni PORK CHOPS LB 79c
1 'Super-Right" Boneless Beef Special!
m i w rJ 3 *'wmpypmm swiss steaks 99c
I k fl § w All good Byand Sugar Cured
* m 5 bacon m 69c
S' J§
j&CH FILLETS !: 49c I
PEACH PIES r 39c
WHEAT BREAD
IMIVJ I
DETERGENT 3z189c
10 cents off Label Condensed (Limit w/ssor more order) iBP*
I Golden Corn Blended Peas I I
I French Beans Stewed Tomatoes I I
I Sliced Beets Seasoned Beans I I
I Whole Beets Whole Peeled Tomatoes I I
A A SWEET CORN 10 s 69c /. Si
I *. I FRESH CUCUMBERS 3 19c I Something I
I Monte Fruit Prints 3J APPLES 19 19( I S P eCial I
|5 save Bc* I Plniri
| l Wirt. this Coupon when you buy MsHowmood Mj. S Wirt, this Coupon wtnn you buy 2 bottle, of H I** *W I
I PANTY HOSE | I HEINZ KETCHUP 1 I StttttiP
I cS. each $1,29 S 5 |lcE 2 .SC'soc H" I Gttte
I|L Coupon Good Through May 10 a. your A&P If jL Coupon Good Through Msy 10 st yaur AtP J| L^ f / W ll

Thursday

Page 21



Page 22

1 < .rraift i-. fcbhV Over \ y>Ai ,\nv.tf r
!, TH FtorM* Afflgvtor, Thvradtoy, May 7, WTO

The
Florida
Alligator

Here Comes Kinetic Art
With More Fine Short Films

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
The second series of short
films in the second Kinetic Art
program is coming here Sunday.
I had a chance to see it early this
week and its very much worth
seeing.
The people who do the
Kinetic Art series place a heavy
stress upon technical skill. That
demand for professionalism
from the filmmakers forces some
filmmakers out perhaps those
who are doing some of the
lighter films and the result is a
program that really doesnt have
the camp effect that the Genesis
films do.
SO, AS IN in the first
program of this second series
shown April 26, the movies are
heavy for the most part. Very

*********
j
Here's something about each:
The program opens with a picture called Re-Entry. It's the kind
of thing that college newspaper entertainment editors usually call
dazzling or an eyeful. I don't mean to be contrary, fellows, but I ;
didnt like it much. I wasnt dazzled. Its one of those color freak j
things that is cool for a few minutes as we all sit there and say, I ;
wonder how he did that? until we don't really care how he did it
anymore. About that time the filmmaker makes the thing a different
color and it's riot much more interesting. My bottom always gets tired
during those type of movies.
The second film is marvelously strange and original. It's named
Unknown Reasons and utilizes a combination of animation and live
action. It is centered around a changing deck of Tarot cards. The
picture is made by Fred Mogubgub, a New Yorker whos name is
known from the work he's done in pop art.
VAUCHERIN IS the third film in the program. It's about a
young man and his life of senselessness in a mental ward. He picks up
objects and puts them down. He never gets anything done, only
begins, t it's really utterly sad, a bit boring and slow-paced, but
generally powerful. It is incredibly well-made. Pascal Aubier is
responsible.
Ive forgotten the exact order of the things, so 111 talk from here on
out about the films. They are in some meaningless order that God put
in my head.
See Saw Seems. This is, to me, the best picture in the group. It is
mostly animated with some still photography. It puts still pictures on
the screen, zooms in on one section, studies the lines and curves of
that section and lines and shapes are added until a new picture is
there. It's much easier to understand on the screen than here. The
effect is very nice and very nearly completely original. The maker of
the it is Stan Vanderbeek.
A FILM THAT takes much the same stance as Re-Entry and does
much more with the technique is Leap, a thing done by Tom
DeWitt of Berkeley. Television systems are used to interpose
rectangles over the main action on the screen. Many other exciting
things happen in the film. It never will let you down or make your
bottom hurt.
The most poetic film is one called Birthday that's about a young
girl whos having a baby. She narrates it aU with a long poem that is
quite good in many places and puts us into some good rooms. The
thing is actually quite complex though it isnt very long.
A young boy who plays a violin goes to a circus in Cirkusz (I just
now figured out what the name means in Hungarian), and he learns
about art there. The film has some beautifully surreal moments, fine
color photography and a good script (in subtitles). It ends a little
expectedly but it's good all in all.
The last film shown on the program is called Au Fou and is
about ways to kill yourself. It is black humor very near the top of the
heap. Made by a Tokyo animator, it is structured in episodes that
reveal different deaths. It's really good and a nice end to the series
itself. J .
>.'* V, V J V >-
I JLM I
V~ t g

HI EEBB IE nKfiFlE -, jE^BiBI> ..bi
WM WK . mvJK 1 .'.. 'gi': S SflRBV9;% % -
- :M/iiai; 1 :%W ( - S -BllMrM.lg '- 11:m JeH
''''pj^piji''*^jjp '*jjjf**'mi^ K jjpjjpgHpi^jpjjjpjjp^

good, but heavy nonetheless.
They require a bit more of an
involvement than do the flashy
light-show color things that
appear frequently in the Genesis
series, but theres more to be
gained too, something beyond
the thrill of color splashes.
I really dont want to make it
sound as if this is a dull and
boring night of entertainment. It
isnt. Its fresh and exciting
much more exciting to me than
was the first program of this
second series from the Kinetic
folks. Theres variety in this
program, a couple of real
standout films, and the lesser
ones aren't as small as the lesser
ones were, in my eyes, in the
other program.
BEFORE I give some of my
ideas about the individual films,

let me say where you can see
them and for how much. In the
Reitz Union theater at 2:30, 5,
7:30 and 10 pjn. Sunday, sl.

********************-*** *************** ***** *4
: THE BUSH JACKET // \W==a Cf
*. AN ALL PURPOSE f J j J
; UNUSUAL STYLE. -A\ \
* A DRIP DRY FABRIC
l OF 65% DACRON I Vw\ \
* AND 35% COnON. KM T |* \ \\J
* COMPLETELY WASHABLE. ||Mm | f TIT*
* Available in Oyster, Vl fjf j\ jBF
* Navy, Tan and Gold. Jmr
S. M. L. and XL. 14.00 MHBHMhIHIBI W
*************** *************** ********** *******
I MOTHER'S DAY SPECIAL
GIVE HER A
|f£FO/?AMjVC£ GUARANTEED. OUR I""'" 9 ... .....
OHW ZENITH MASTER TECHNICIANS Fr "**' Lock Clrcult
WWE DO NOT FARM OUT OUR OBLIGATIONS .. j.
WTO YOU Front Mountw 5 x Speaker
I OPEN TO 9P.M. FRIDAY L RUY-6-WAYS
couchs r,:.rr
| COMPLETE ZENITH DEALER**

Ewing St. Times Opens
Tonite At Rathskeller

The Ewing St. Times, a soft
rock group from Coconut Grove,
opens at The Rathskeller tonight
for two shows a night for the
next three days.
The group has appeared on
campus several other times in
the past year and has been
received well on all occasions.
Their sound is akin to that of
the long-gone Lovin Spoonful,

featuring much the same
vocalizations and
instrume ntalizations.
The bill for the upcoming
Super Show also will include the
Ewing St. Times.
There are two shows a night
at 9 and 11 pjn. tonight,
and Friday and Saturday nights.
Admission for nonmembers is
$1.50. Members will be admitted
for $1.25.

same
and



Borde Takes Audience On Musical Trip

By LESLIE PERRY
Alligator Correspondent
Percival Borde. and his Talking Drums have taken
audiences and critics throughout the nation on a musical
journey through Africa and the Carribean in an evening of
ethnic dance, legend and song.
Borde will present his Talking Drums program on
Saturday, May 9th, at 8 pun. in the University
Auditorium. He will be assisted by Amandina Libamba,
dancer, and Alphonse Cimber, musician and drummer.
THE PROGRAM will include: Hign Life,
Engagement Dance, Village Scene, The Talking
Drums, Drum Talk, Impinyuza and a finale. Tickets
are SI.OO for students and $1.50 for the general public.
Bom in Trinidad, Borde came to the United States in
1953. Until that time he had been performing throughout
the Caribbean and had become one of the leading male
dancers and expert in dances of the Carribean.

ALA Head
To Speak
u
Bill Genoese, executive
director of Alliance for Labor
Action (ALA), will speak to a
business administration class
Friday, 10:10 aun. in room 120,
Bryan Hall.
Genoese is deputy to Frank E.
Fitzsimmons, top official of the
International Teamsters Union,
and also international trustee for
one of the largest airline union
locals.
THE PURPOSE of his speech
will be for students to
understand the union side in
organizing situations better,
particularly in the South.
ALA has been called the first
labor organization to take the
South seriously, according to
press agent Ed Bridges, and
reportedly has over four million
members.
Infirmary
Giving Shots
Full-time students who are
planning to travel in a foreign
country during the summer may
get immunization injections at
the Student Health Service
Center.
Health Center personnel are
requesting such students to
make arrangements for
injections during the week,
Tuesday through Friday,
between 8 11:30 a.m. and 1-
4:15 pan.
Immunizations will not be
given during the noon hour or
on weekends, Dr. Wilmer J.
Coggins, director, stressed.
All countries require a current
smallpox vaccination for entry,
and some require a series of
injections, so students should
make arrangements to have the
shots as soon as they know they
will be traveling in a foreign
country.
RENT NOW!
FOR THIS SUMMER AND
SEPTEMBER, 1970
FALL LEASES ,9 &12 MONTH
Featuring
I I tiiiiowi
Upper or Lenar
Furnished
Air Conditioned
9 3 Poole
Recreation Hall
' Study Room
Sea today. Move right in
VILLAGE PARK
> A
FRENCH QUARTER
APTS.
1001 S.W. 16th St.
11 W&7l

SATURDAY AT UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM

I 1 1 1 | ii II If II II MW II I! I
mml mat mmm bmH mmm
£
W I
k Mm. .;,. :>; ,y ; a^^MWO^?V^^m<^ro g:^;^M^^Ml
f 9? z>f\ 1B! Miii
L 1
, jt a i 11 11 : -3lai£L
w J '.'lJ
L JBl : j
F9HII v: ..'
'>y:-.'':r : JJ:-- : \
Sk I
lllf
I 111 ijg|M Ik,
1 P A Ik H
I if I 4
':' "'S'Vv s Hv f ; 11 ii ti4^MjHWijwi^Mg^^^^ffll^gl^glj^:-
I ?4 ||l
r Jl
I jSgj!§ 'life;* :OMfi :^' \-,, - I
PK|| 3Sll|l|g;
ipfSfe V
(J I | I |
11, j .%k I
- '"""
sfif?$ f if? f \3Mtr*, 1 & ->- r j, - ?

J IIIL. WW HL m
i 11
\ JB> < s*- * * * th *, <* v f (
W :*y *~ --' .1
< L e^^^?sleSt?'%^^i-r^^w*^j'> i' i gnH| j^p:.
' .V, '
S- B Wm v W Imi^j?^?S I
II
:-| 7
lH " "-'
|& i..,.i ' 44ii''444tlMM'44 W>4''' 4 1 4' h Yy*¥ ], 'j'4'' *i*~r>i4w* : | *43*4?' 4f ,^?^4^%*MSfe?' !ir " \j§'
I X
v
-'. 'it.-- v .

The program has been expanded to include the dances
of the African continent. Borde and his wife, Pearl
Primus, an ethnic dancer and anthropologist, have made
several trips to Africa to perform and study.
THEIR LONGEST trip, which began in 1959 and
ended in 19,63, was under the joint sponsorship of the
Rebekah Harkness Foundation and the U. S. Department
of StateT
About it Borde said: Our aim was to introduce theater
to preserve the folk arts. They were rich in folk art, but as
the countries open up and commerce comes in, much of
the dance, which served a specific cultural purpose, would
disappear.
The results of the study done in Africa are easily visible
in Bordes programs, which portray the black cultural
heritage through dance, songs and village scenes of Africa
and the Caribbean.
Borde said that so little is known of the true Africa.

Thursday, May 7 f 1970, The Florida Alligator,

There is the old stereotype of African dance with a bare
body, exotic paint and gyrations. If there is a vigorous
dance with a meaning to it, the meaning has not been
told.
I FINEI breaking down the myths very rewarding,
Borde said. The folk art is explained through his
performances, of the songs, dances and stories of that
continent.
In addition to his performances throughout the
country, Borde is a moving force in education. His
program for children has been hailed by educational
groups and is in continual demand, having been
recognized as an important factor in increasing the
understanding of the black heritage.
As a teacher, Borde is on the dance faculty of the
Harkness Houm for Ballet Arts and is a director of the
Primus-Borde School of the Dance. His tours have taken
him to Europe, Africa, South America and the U. S.

Page 23



4i
i r
*4,
4

Page 24

;The Florida Alligator/ Thursday. May 7,-1970

'*'?;* : i'>,l < AV } : c4?i- Vj VnCi \ \ ;
'v*v*r**. .'*- Y&tEk' Ii '- e-. f -x gi >'<''*,? % -'fSif CsrirSr,
f|F. 'ji^\ / \-j >1- >,./ ...f lu jji 9 -y
.**, ... *-. J ,.>, B'fH bJSBSB £4fcMM!L*.J m
..... v l V- 0., *,:*** g
r^^'"" > ** < :*- ~,... >. aw
sr *' ,j '.%4 <* wxjSp v 1
Bp **&&#
Wr~FyjPp4 a.- \jfTC^&r|!flHP'^^£iH^^HHHttflE£ ; TmStHEt'''
'
"' EARL HARTMAN
UP AND OUT

Workman operating the crane and dumper" on
the edge of Lake Alice are clearing up to 130 truck
loads a day of hyacinths from the once-clogged
surface. Other workmen, including contractor W. G.
Buck" Johnson, use an air boat and other

I REBEL DISCOUNT I
I SAVES YOU UP TO 50% EVERYDAY I
I HEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS FILM & PROCESSING COSMETICS I
I RECORDS CARDS SCHOOL SUPPLIES SUNDRIES I
I SIMPER SPECIALS 1 EXaUSIVE I SAVE 50% SAVE Vo 50% I
I HEA F?MfIY^z?VuM ERS REBEL DISCOUNT KODACOLOR professional I
I 1.75 QQA ALL FILM PROCESSING HAIR CARE I
VALUE OOy REVLON-MAX FACTOR . PRODUCTS FROM
I [SIZE CLAIROL-LOVE-BONNIE BELL COLOR PRINTS REVLON-WELLA I
I LISTERINE DISCOUNTED 30 cent IC/ I CLAIROL-REDKIN I
I LUltint EVERYDAY VALUE pantene I
I" s value oyc t(-l or E c X a P rt S r, R d E ge OLL andmanyothers |
I WILKINSON |wonder L LASH I,7 ATREBEL SUPER DISCOUNTS l
SWORD BLADES $2 8 records I
I ,so'" Gio, cOA IOVt VA ue 1,29 SUDE PROCESSING -> A7 I
I value QyC 20EXP 1.64 I 9BVALUES J.O/I
GIANT 1.3 LBS. 1.50 A CT
I TD/Sl VALUE ... 5.98 VALUES H.D/ I
I IKUL qqi factor makeup 10% all film c I
IshavecreamOOCi OFF 1 discounted I I 6.98 VALUES J. 4/ I
I SPECIALS GOOD thru Sunday I THE STORE WITH THE STUDENT IN MIND I
BY STUDENTS I

equipment to bring the hyacinths within reach of
the specially modified clam bucket, which is full of
the weeds in this photo. The cleanup has been
underway for about two weeks, weather permitting.

Language Experts
NeededUF Dean
The dean of the UF Graduate School, testifying before Sen. Warren
G. Magnusons subcommittee on Labor, Health, Education and
Welfare in Washington, said the United States today is in great need of
language specialists for business, government and education.
Dr. Harold P. Hanson was one of six witnesses representing
educational institutions over the country to testify before the unit of
the U. S. Senate Appropriations Committee.
THE EDUCATORS presented their views with regard to the
appropriation for the Office of Education. They were particularly
concerned with the fellowship program of the National Defense
Education Act which was sharply curtailed by the House of
Representitives.
Dean Hansons testimony dealt primarily with the Title VI program
for language development which involves languages and area
development centers.
It is urgent that provisions be made to continue federal support
for international studies. Until new legislation becomes available, Title
VI seems to present the only viable vehicle, and I urge that it not be
curtailed as planned, he said.
SHOULD IT be allowed to lapse and nothing be set up to take its
place, we will no longer be able to look to international education
programs as the basic building blocks to lasting peace a solid
concept espoused by various presidents since the inception of the
program, he said.
Dean Hanson illustrated the significance of federal support for
international education at UF.
Since Florida is the extended hand of friendship to the Latin
American countries, it is easy to understand our interest and
commitment to this area, he said.
When the university was selected as a Title VI Latin American
Language and Area Center in 1962, the U. S. Office of Education was
building on strength, Dean Hanson said.
THE UNIVERSITY has offered courses in this area since the 1980 s.
From that time to the present, the International Division of the Office
of Education has made available to the university up to 32 fellowships
and some $70,000 of supporting funds a year.
The faculty, with Latin American research experience and
commitment, numbers more than 100 and research has produced
important insights in Latin American demography, tropical ecology,
linguistics, human migration, urbanization, population control and the
history of economic development.
Dean Hanson frankly believes that Florida has been remarkably
generous in its funding of international studies to date. On the other
hand, he noted, I believe that it will be increasingly difficult to
convince state legislators of the need for such funding if the federal
government withdraws.



I
A lot of people who
are now saying Schlitz
Malt Liquor served on the
rocks with a lemon twist is
a spectacular, refreshing
neat, great, wonderful idea,
used to say it was a lousy
stupid, bad, dumb idea
jjjjjp I
..*=* Ilf
i iS
m a
mill
i I
WBb£b& .;*** ; ; >:ii
IS: #:> ,:... :ViM
. Tsyfcjfc.* I
H m.j 1970 Jos. Co.. Milwaukee and other great cities.
/-; V.. v / .'/,- I
- I

Thursday, May 1, t 970, ThafMortda Alligator, 1

Page 25



The
Florida
Alligator

All-Stars Vs. Greats

By STEVE ROHAN
Alligator Correspondent
BULLETIN
The Fraternity All-Stars versus the former
Gator Greats game has been officially postponed
until May 14 at 7:30 pjn. at Florida Field,
according to game coordinator Gene Newman
and IFC game coordinator Elliot Borkson. The
IFC is sponsoring the games.
Borkson said the IFCs Executive Council
decided late Wednesday night that it would be in
the better interest of the students to postpone
the game one week because of the present
conditions on campus.
All tickets that had been previously purchased
for tonights game will be honored on May 14.
The game is being played as a charity contest
with the 50 cent admission being given to the
student recreational fund, which finances such
activities as Lake Wauburg.
The game is sort of a rematch of last years
TEP-Gator game won by the Gators 33-14. If
nothing else, the game is guaranteed to be an
unbelievable exhibition of the talents of such Gator
superstars as Steve Spurrier, Richard Trapp, Larry
Smith, Larry Rentz, Steve Tannen and many more.
The fraternity stars will be sporting the
outstanding players from both the Orange and Blue
Leagues. Theyve been practicing extremely hard in
an attempt to gain the cohesive affect they will need
to win. The frat stars have been practicing now for
three weeks while the former Gators just started to
practice Monday.

Netters Way-Underdogs

By DAVE SPAHR
Alligator Writer
Coach Bill Potters netters will
have to use a new form of
Gatorade, s p elled
F-R-E-S-H-M-A-N, if the UF
hopes to return with its third
straight SEC Tennis
championship from Miss. State
this weekend.
The UF will face its stiffest
test of its last three years of SEC
competition, with the loss of
All-Americans Armi Neely and
Jamie Pressly and. All-SEC Steve
Beeland and Steve Owens.
THE GATORS lost their top
four singles players and virtually
all the doubles teams. The only
players returning from last year's
team are Greg Hilley and Paul
Lunetta, the number five and six
singles players from last year.
Night Golf
For a rare and unique
experience in golfing
Gainesvilles new par-60 lighted
West End Gold Course and
driving range is now open 3VI
miles west of 1-75 on S.R. 26.
The course management
offers a free bucket of balls for
the driving range with each green
fee. The course and driving range
is open from 7:30 a.m. to
midnight seven days a week.

GATOR SPORTS

To stay in contention for the
championship, the Gators will be
depending on the freshman trio
of powerful Kenn Terry, Buddy
Miles, and Ralph Hart. All three
were outstanding high, school
prospects and Buddy Miles was
the number 17 ranked prep
school player in the nation.
The veteran play of captain
Will Sherwood, Hilley and

Golf Practice In Georgia
Golf Coach Buster Bishop takes his linksmen to Calloway Gardens,
Ga., Saturday for a practice round at the site of this years
Southeastern Conference Golf Championships that will be held May
14,15 and 16.
Tennessee, FSU, Auburn and little Columbus College will also
participate Saturday and give the Gators a chance to see what the
Volunteers and the Tigers will bring to the SEC.
COACH BISHOP said he is taking David Barnes, Wendell Coffee,
Joel Eastman, Mike Killian, Tony Kindred, Ron Mahood, Andy North
and Stacy Russell. Os these eight only six will be able to start in the
three-day 54-hole SEC Championships.
The golfers, who finished a disappointing second last year in the
SEC, have played only in demanding tournaments this year in Coach
Bishops effort to give them more tournament experience.
The Gators won the Miami Invitational in late March over a large
field of collegiate teams for their only tournament victory this year
out of five efforts.
TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
1 FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM -6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

Spectators at the Gator practice said that no
passes were dropped and that Spurrier was firing the
ball like a cannon. With no 300 lb. linemen coming
in on him its easy to see why Spurrier would be at
his best. v
The frat men hope to score touchdown for
touchdown with the Gators. There is not much
hope of stopping Spurrier.
The frat men will be starting Mike Rollyson
(SAE), Chris Hall (BTP), Don Perrin (BTP), Mike
Smith (SPE), Herby Appel (PLP), Rick Kirby
(SAE), and Hank Salzler (BTP) on offense.
On defense, Mike Zem (SX), Arthur Alvarez
(PKA), Mike Reeder (ATO), Paul Mittman (TEP),
Phil Petozella (PKA), Dan Olmetti (DTD), and John
Geiger (SPE) will start for the frat men.
The Gators sport a super impressive lineup.
Spurrier will be starting at quarterback with Tom
Christian at halfback, Richard Trapp and Paul
Maliska at wideouts, Larry Smith and Steve Tannen
at flankers and Randy Jackson at center.
The defense will be equally strong with Tannen
at deep back with Larry Rantz; Mark Ely, Skip
Albury and Mike Palahach in the middle and last
years most valuable player, Boyd Welsch, with
Brian Jetter up front.
Game coordinator Gene Newman predicts the
game will be an offensive battle with the score
running high and only a touchdown separating the
teams. Newman, who has been at the fraternity
practices, feels the frat men could upset the cocky
Gator greats.
In any case, a super exciting show is guaranteed
and a crowd of 4,000 is expected to top last years
3,000 plus attendance.

Lunetta will greatly aid the
freshman trio in their first SEC
Championship match.
The Gators stand 13-8 for the
season but have lost three out of
four of the regular season SEC
matches. The netters will be out
for revenge for the losses to
Georgia, LSU, and Tennessee.
The fourth game with Georgia
was cancelled because of rain.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 26

.. y, V.V .
:
9 B
ET 1
WfTM Ml. i

mmm ' ,w*
p|p.
<&9 8.ii218
r~xl i ** || BHHK|BBk v |
TOM KENNEDY
IT'S MINE!
... TEP's Pollack and Gator's downs
*

TENNIS
SEC Championships in Starkville, Miss.
..
- .* ; ;

Iroiwood
Golf Club
STUDWT MEMKRSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 + TAX
SPECIAL RAT!
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
-
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
i '. \
For information tall
p 3 76-0080
gs tZONWOOP
<; cm*
W t itth AVtMUt

Yl PRICE SALE
! on Mens Belts.
| -value* up lo $6.00
\ Adidas Shoes new shipment |
| just in! |
JB
f Across the Mp 1 |
\ Street from hBII 1710 W. ?
S Murphree A roe University 0
1 GATOR SHOP j

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 7,1970

0
CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Student Special ~I
Any car or color!
i $ j
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
{ 2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
j Ph. 373-1665 J



Domed Stadium To Be Built For LSU

THE LOUISIANA Domed
Stadium Commission sold the
firtt $16.5 million worth of
bonds Tuesday for construction
of the $93 million sports and
convention complex in New
Orleans.
A group of Louisiana banks
from throughout the state
bought the bonds at the top
legal rate of 6 per cent set by
state law.
This is a great day for
Louisiana, said Gov. John J.
McKeithen, who heads the
commission.
The sale of the first bonds for
the controversial stadium came
just after two of a series of
lawsuits against the commission
were rejected by the Louisiana
Supreme Court and the state
fourth circuit court of appeal.
The dome opponents contend
the dome was advertised to
voters as costing $35 million
back in 1965, then the cost
steadily rose after voter approval
was given.
The first $16.5 million is to
be used for clearing the
downtown site for the stadium
and buying the lane from two
railroad companies.
* *
FORMER OLYMPIC
heavyweight champion George
Foreman of Hayward, Calif.,
unbeaten in 19 professional
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore IS 8 .652
Detroit 13 9 .591 lVx
Boston 13 9 .591 1%
Washington 13 11 .542 Vh
New York 13 13 .500 Vh
Cleveland 9 13 .409 5%
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 15 7 .682
California 14 9 .609 1 h
Oakland 12 13 .480 4%
Chicago 10 13 .435 5%
Kansas City 8 15 .348 7 h
Milwaukee 5 20 .200 UYi
WEDNESDAYS RESULTS
New York at Oakland, night
Washington at California, night
Boston at Milwaukee, night
Cleveland at Chicago, night
Minnesota at Detroit, night
Kansas City at Baltimore, night
THURSDAYS GAMES
New York at Oakland
Washington at California
Boston at Milwaukee
Minnesota at Detroit
Kansas City at Baltimore
(Only Games Scheduled)
NATIONAL LEAGE STANDINGS
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 13 9 .591
New York 12 12 .500 2
Philadelphia 12 12 .500 2
Pittsburgh 11 13 .458 3
St. Louis 10 12 .455 3
Montreal 616 .273 7
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 21 6 .778
Atlanta 14 11 .560 6
Los Angeles 13 11 .542 6%
San Francisco 13 14 .481 8
Houston 12 15 .444-9
San Diego 10 16 .385 10%
WEDNESDAYS RESULTS
San Franchco at Montreal, night
Los Angeles at New York, night
San Diego at Philadelphia, night
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, night
(Only Games Scheduled)
THURSDAYS GAMES
San Francisco at Montreal
Los Angeles at New York
Diego at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Chicago
Pittsburgh at Houston
(Only Games Scheduled)

bouts, has signed to meet Robert
Russell of Philadelphia in the
windup of a boxing tripleheader
at the Spectrum May 25, it was
announced Tuesday.
Foreman, 22, has won 16 of
his bouts by kayoes. Russell
holds a decision over Leotis
Martin and fought Zora FoUey
to a draw.
* *
THE INDIANAPOLIS
SPEEDWAYS racing elite is
slowly working its way up to the
170 miles per hour level in
preparation for next weeks
500-mile time trials.
Although defending champion
Mario Andretti has yet to make
his season debut, there has been
no lack of activity at the famed
Vh mile oval.
Veteran Lloyd Ruby, Witchita
Falls, Tex., had the unofficial

X;X;X
You only go around once in life.
Even in the beer you drink.
youre out of beer.
HK mm,. - m# , 'Mmm
: "" :
Wjm& wmKlA\Hsmm &
Hi zMwU&mw mmZ.: 1 yr -mM
mSflr w iIHI
\yj£/&Sj&sju6dtft
' 's?f r f, Ip
H V pi v; IB
'///// 4v / !- V/;:
-* jaflMflwyw>?XvlvXyv^^^^^^^^^^^^^^BMK
7fi9ffftft^fflwjj^xoxXKSX>XXOgv^-Xyyvxxx-^-- - >' %:.::
1 A V mSm j f
ff I |
'

/ n spouts shorts

top speed so far at just a shade
under 167 MJP.H. Joe Leonard,
San Jose, Calif., was caught at
165.654 MP.H. and 1969
rookie of the year Mark
Donohue, Media, Pa., made his
first practice ride and quickly
worked his way up to 165.4
M.P.H. in his new Ford-powered
machine.
1
Other drivers out on the track
for the first time were Mel
Kenyon of Lebanon, Ind.;
Leeroy Yarbrough of Columbia,
S.C.; rookie Kevin Bartlett of
Sydney, Australia, and popular
Jim Hurtubis of North
Tonawacda, N. Y., in his
roadster.
* *
HANK STRAM, coach of the
world champion Kansas City

Chiefs, will be honored by the
New York chapter of the
Football Writers Association of
America at its third annual
dinner on May 25.
Stram, who has coached the
Chiefs through their entire
10-year existence, was the
winningest coach in the
American Football League, the
only one to win three league
titles and the first to represent
the AFL in two world
championship games.
* *
MAJOR LEAGUE, baseball
players will be receiving in the
next few days a condensed
version of the latest offer made
to them by club owners in an
effort to avert a possible players
strike.
Marvin Miller, executive

, Thuraday, May 7,1970, Tha Florida Alligator, I

director of the Major League
Baseball Players Association,
said Tuesday he hoped to mail
out the proposal by late
Wednesday. In its original form,
the proposal covered 34 pages
but Miller has condensed it to
three or four.
Among the benefits, the
owners are willing to raise the
minimum salary from SIO,OOO
to $12,000 immediately, with an
eventual rise to $13,500 in
1972, and meal money also
would be increased. However,
the owners are rejecting the
players proposal that the major
league schedule be reduced from
162 to 154 games.
The possibility exists that if
the players reject the latest
contract they eventually may
decide to stage a one-day strike
to press their demands.

Page 27



k
!%

SI

Page 28

. Ttw Florida Alligator. Thuraday, May 7.1970

w w r w
_ ___ . r
,i, 1,, I^Hl JsChJo! i iRf : l^M^jPlilHli^^^B^^HHH^^B^^H^BHHHHit
v MRv :fy3|
_ I .*1
1 I ff : ffe%|lf
mm ' HH| #> J&* H
AS w*r > ,a >

THE CROWD OF MARCHERS WALK FROM DORM TO DORM
... collecting students for Tuesday's sleep-in at Tigert Hall
'
America America
America .-,'
' ;
" i' '
I .-
" nmiii'i^^'rrr'in'i"nfMMMmiii" niiiiifiiw ~ ""~iif [finemwbbbbi iMammiiiiH immammn
4MBKWP
m 9
HP : H
j '''' £afc^y>
s ilfffii 1 # I
i | ;, *&£ IM
|T j|& | ,;/4 v . ia.afe lb 'i 3
I \ ; / "K^^^^lHH
UF PRESIDENT STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL MOURNS
... at requiem for Kent State University dead

jjjk
m } i'V- -l
a?.(
s w 1ML ;; m mir
ir 3 I M 1
m* 7 spPPn> I! Iwie^gKll
H|vjK !
If n |
JHK Wv |/M||jiij t
SHF /.,'; ;:'*
la
P JAj .: ts / J|^
jV |i ,7 /B; M
ii I /
ft 1/vJpH
iAI
;: ;^m|
v :;l
TWO STUDENTS SIT, DREAM AND THINK
... nr an American flag

What Have You Done?
- *
Photos By Tom Konnody,
Cloy Phipps
I K* j|fe*jm
' / **>sMMM|&' SRpSTS ''
1 ? t -yaar4 aWPr*.x <.
Bwl^rHreliaMifcCffisw
jy 'w'Aa, j flp.). WMrS TSf n x*., X a. Jr S|
V s ". ,a 'S t " : Mojtam|P2pKJgKMwr > j& *-
.% jfrif 'IF
# Jr*Mi s^^gsjWp
4 d£^l
ANDY KRAMER PLEADS WITH CROWDS
... for peaceful demonstration

\ ; W" '*
-" % T Hr
:^Mahm|iMiHMWpiP;ix:
' : 'b^A.v:*.
-\%g .li^HttH^
HW 1 b^^HHPPS?^^B^bLJN : _Jy tH : r mStlef^ J v4.
JF
Jp m# ..^^H : SJC llla
>l m. i H
*|^^n.
P / fIH p£.
HP Hr a#
n jp
H|i/| ? i if
.jHJP Hp JB :>y! V
** .# Ji^HiijK^Rs
m : mmf&mMr^ jg
r w
A STUDENT EXPRESSES HIS AGREEMENT
... at Wednesday's strike on the Plaza of the Americas