Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
v <***
ACf NOW, KIRK AIDE SAYS '- ;r
Timing Crucial In Pollution Baffle Nat Reed

ByNEAL SANDERS
Alligator Assignments Editor
If environmental quality is to
be achieved, the time to act is
now, according to Gov. Claude
Kirks man on conservation.
Nat Reed, special assistant to
Kirk on the area of conservation,
and head of the Florida Air and
Water Pollution Control Board
told an audience of 200
Thursday that timing is the most
essential element in the fight
against pollution.
YOUVE GOT to be able to

KM
AWL Av*mm.

Vol. 62, No. 132

PHIL BANNISTER
A HOSTILE CROWD LISTENED
... to Don Middlebrooks, Steve Uhlfelder and Walter Morgan

Cambodia Force Gets
Enemy Weapons, Supplies

See Related Stories, Page 13
Editorial, Page 8
SAIGON (UPI) U. S. Army
troops pressing into Cambodia
11l Inside
COLLEGE STUDENTS plan
week-long strikes in many
schools to protest Indo-China
war expansion page 13
Campus Crier ... 12
Classifieds 10
Editorials 8
Letters 9
Movies ..; 10
Sports... 14
Whats Happening 3

produce die right argument at
the right time, he said. The
country is ripe for a real fight
against pollution, but the fight
has got to be prepared with
logical arguments, facts and
figures, not just emotion.
If the current push for
conservations fails and Reed
calls it, the largest and most
efficient in history.he expects
serious disasters by the end of
the century.
Something will happen to
man, Reed said. Either
overpopulation will catch up

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

discovered a motor pool and
supply depots for medicine,
munitions, food and fuel
Sunday.
They encountered no
significant resistance to their
campaign to locate and destroy
the Communist command
headquarters for the war in
South Vietnam.
TO THE SOUTH of the
American operation, two
columns of South Vietnamese
troops driving from the north
and the south linked up Sunday
at Ba Thu in the Parrots Beak
area of Cambodia.
The U. S. military command
said neither campaign has met
significant resistance, but
spokesmen said more than 1,300
Communists had been killed in

with us, or youll get natural
resources so depleted man will
cease to be able to live at his
current level.
IN FLORIDA, Reed said,
there has been a move toward
conservation, and the actions of
both the state and federal
governments show this.
The everglades jetport
controversy will always rank as a
major victory for
conservationists, Reed said.
The Cross State Barge Canal is
one of the first Corp of
Engineers projects ever to come
under such a critical eye, and by

University of Florida, Gainesville

UHLFELDER BOOED

Ticket Issue/ Band
Draw Rally Crowd

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
A walkout and rally attracted
about- LOOO people to discuss
the Athletic Associations (AA)
proposal to charge students for
football tickets and hear the
music of the Emergency Exit
Rock group Saturday,
Student Body President-elect
Steve Uhlfelder spoke to the
crowd gathered at Florida Field
to sec the Orange and Blue
football game about the reasons
for his opposition to the AA
proposal.
AFTER ABOUT 15 words,
the cheerleaders began to chant
This is Gator Country and the
band began to play. People in
the stands shouted and booed.
Uhlfelder asked students to
follow him to the rugby field,
where an opposition rally was
being held. Approximately 400
students left the stadium.
In a speech to the 1,000

scattered fighting since the two
frqnts were opened into
Cambodia last week.
American casualties were 13
dead and 32 wounded. The
South Vietnamese have lost 90
dead and 298 wounded.
SINCE FRIDAY, when
American forces rolled out of
South Vietnam into Cambodias
Fishook area, at least 650
Communists have been slain
there, the spokesmen said.
Approximately 10,000 troops
are involved in each operation,
those in the Fishook mostly
Americans of the Ist Air Cavalry
and 25th Infantry Divisions.
Troops in the Parrots Beak
are all South Vietnamese except
for about 40 U. S. Army advisers
with the task force.

the middle of the month, may
have been killed altogether.
Reed said the most important
thing students must learn is to
be aware of the lag between
interest and completion of
action.
MANY STUDENTS who
protested April 22 were there
because they felt not enough
was being done right now to
combat the problems of
pollution.
It doesnt happen
overnight, he said.
Environmental control takes
time, money, and plans.

people at the rally some who
had come to hear the discussion,
others to hear the band
Uhlfelder said students had to
stand up for what they believed.
HE SAID considering the rally
had been scheduled for a
Saturday, and what we had to
compete with, the turnout was
not bad. He was most
disappointed in the disrespect
shown him by the cheerleaders
and the band.
We tried to work through
the proper channels. We got
more cooperation from the
Athletic Association than some
students the cheerleaders and
the band.
Student Government
Secretary of Athletics Lee Green
said he was also disappointed in
the reaction of students and
alumni.
WHEN STUDENT groups
funded through SG wont even
listen when students speak
weve got a real problem at this
university.
Student Body President
Walter Morgan said SG could
re-allocate some of the funds
which have been given to the
athletic department.
Student Body Vice
President-elect Henry Solares
said he was extremely
disappointed in the
cheerleaders and the band.
I HOPE the Student Senate
will cut their budgets to zero.
They are not representing
student interests, SolareS said.
They are just self-interest
groups trying to perpetuate
themselves.
Florida Blue Key President
Don Middlebrooks said he was
disappointed because of the
lack of cooperation from the
cheerleaders and band and the
total lack of respect for
Uhlfelder.
The actions of the alumni
today demonstrate why we want
something a bit different from
our education here,

NAT REED
... Kirk's man on pollution

Monday, May 4, 1970

Middlebrooks said.
* KEN DRIGGS, Sigma Chi
president, said AA doesnt seem
(SEE 'RALLY' PAGE 2)
Rally Harked
By Speeches,
Talk, Frisbee
By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writar
It could have been another
afternoon at the plaza only
transferred to the rugby field.
The sun was hot; kids sat on the
ground listening to the sound of
the Emergency Exit. Some
played frisbee; others talked; a
few danced.
Some fat mamas and bald
daddys carrying orange and blue
stadium cushions walked past
the group. They shook their
heads and made as big a detour
as they could.
THE MUSIC was
accompained by an occasional
burst of cheering nearby. And an
announcer chirped
He-e-e-e-re come the Gators.
Then something happened.
The long hairs were joined by
short hairs as several hundred
kids clad in their Sigma Chi, Phi
Tau, and ATO jerseys left
Florida Field and came to the
rugby field.
Steve Uhlfelder and Flash
joined Andy Kramer on stage
and it looked like a rerun of the
election debates minus
Jimmey Bailey and Alan Howes.
Steve talked awhile and
received scattered applause.
Then Andy talked. Flash talked.
Ken Driggs talked. Everyone
talked. And everyone received
scattered applause.
THEY SAID something about
the Athletic Association
(SEE 'FACES*PAGE 2)



-me fferida 1 AKigWfri May 4> W&

Page 2

UF Students,
Bullwinkle Hit
Aflilefics Side


SYMPOSIUM MAY 16
Womens Group Plans Meet
7 s

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
The Womens Caucus, a
non-militant group, plans to tell
women about their potential
power in a Symposium on
Women May 16 in the Reitz
Union Ballroom.
Catherine East, executive
secretary of the Citizens
Advisory Council on the Status
of Women, is the keynote

Gator Cheerleaders
Listed For VO-7l

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Gator cheerleaders for
1970-71 were announced late
Wednesday night, two days
before the Orange and Blue
Game.
Male cheerleaders are Captain
Bruce Bradbum, 3JM; Pete
Alberti, 3AS; Mike McGrady,
SEG; Steve Powell, 3AS; Randy
Tribble, 2UC, and Neal Young,
lUC.
MALE ALTERNATES are
Ralph Nobo, 3AS; Gordon
Lundquist, 2UC, and John
Middleton, lUC.
Female cheerleaders are girls
coordinator Susan Stratton,
4AS; Janice Biewand, 4PE;
Susan Engelmann, 2UC; Mae
Gray, 2UC; Candy Clift, lUC,
and Joanne Kennedy, lUC.
Alternates are: Janice Karst,
2UC; Donna Ellenson, lUC, and
Gail Hill, lUC.
THERE WERE two different
groups of judges according to
Bradbum.
Last Friday, we had physical
tryouts consisting mostly of

Gainesville Course Beginning Tues., May 5
SELF-HYPNOSIS
CDCC LECTURE AND DEMONSTRATION
rKEE MAY 5 8:00 PJM. HOLIDAY INN AT 1-75
LEARN WHY SELF-HYPNOSIS IS THE MOST POWERFUL
AND EFFECTIVE tOOL AVAILABLE TODAY FOR SELF SELFIMPROVEMENT.
IMPROVEMENT. SELFIMPROVEMENT.
WRITE OR PHONE FOR FREE BROCHURE
INSTITUTE Os APPLIED HYPNOSIS
5046 MARINER STREET, TAMPA, PH. 872-0698
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR R tM official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or tum away copy It considers
~ objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writw f
Student displeasure with university
emphasis on athletics found an
unexpected release Friday in the
Bullwinkle Cartoon Festival during the
Reitz Unions week-long third birthday
celebration.
The occasion for the peaceful dissent
came in the first cartoon.
IN THIS cartoon, a small school,
Wossamotta U., finds itself in financial
difficulty. The administration proposes
taking the Coke machine out of the
faculty lounge as a solution. The football
coach suggests firing a few English

speaker for the May 16
conference. Her topic will be
The Current Status of
Women.
A PANEL of women will give
their reactions to Miss Easts
talk. These women will be a
cross section from legislators to
militants.
Then the conference will split
into workshop action groups of
about IS members.

actual cheering. The judges were
members of the faculty,
Bradbum said.
/
On Wednesday, we had
personal interviews. These were
primarily to see what type of
personalities the participants had
and to see if we would be good
representatives of UF.
WEVE GOT some
humdinger ideas to build spirit.
We dont want to be the
traditional cheerleaders,
Bradbum said. Wed like to use
our ideas and gimmicks for more
entertainment.

Students Faces Showed Disinterest

RAPE QNeJ|
screwing up the students
something about a boycott in
protest of making students pay
for football tickets next year.
But no one seemed to hear.
They stood inline to buy cokes.
They passed bottles in brown
paper bags among themselves.
They played Frisbee or showed

v
teachers (Who needs them? We all speak
English anyhow.)
It is finally decided financial solvency
lies in budding a winning football team.
Bullwinkle Moose, a terrific passer, is
recruited and given special courses in
personal grooming, crocheting and
reading modem classics. A $7 million
football stadium also is built.
In time Bullwinkle leads the team to
ultimate victory and the profits must be
dealt with. Although the deans and
professors say they need the money
desperately (maps still show the earth is
flat and current events textbooks teach
McKinley is still President), the coach
retains all profits for athletic
expenditures.

The resource leaders will
Come from the university staff
add faculty, and the community
and state:
Dr. Marilyn Zweig, the only
woman professor in the UF
Department of Philosophy, sees
How Women are Divided as
one of the most significant
action groups. At the
conference, we hope to find out
what keeps us apart, in order to
bring women together to free
ourselves and our men, she
said.
CAROLINE BIRD will sum
up the action groups resolutions
and suggest projects for Florida
women. Miss Bird is the author
of Bom Female: or The High
Cost of Keeping Women Down.
Womens Caucus is composed
of 40 members connected with
UF either through their jobs or
by their husbands.
The result is an unstructured
coalition of individual women
concerned with the obstacles
which their gender encounters.
The caucus is for those of us
who are not ready for other
feminist groups, said Dr. Betty
Cosby, assistant to the
universitys vice president for
student affairs and former dean
of women.

off on their cycles. Two guys
had their hands full keeping
their dogs from fighting.
One Phi Tau in the crowd said
he came out because he had
nothing else to do. A hippy said
he had come out to hear the
music. Another said he came to
see all the people 1 know
and groove.
AN INDEPENDENT said he
wanted to hear the bands. Only

S 096-fKcr >totjicwohs 9
pieue a&iuer aini
| Orlatlio Syorfe 8
v VI 111 E, colovial. cm. y
| Hlau, 7:3 o I
O fct X
8 ergtunion bopcofficg 8

1 Parked Cars Towed!
$
1 From Sigma Nu Lot (
$ £
* By CHARLES HEEKIN
v Alligator Staff Writer :
? Several students who parked their cars on the empty lot i
vvhere the Sigma Nu fraternity house used to stand were :
surprised last week when they returned to find their cars either :
i ticketed or towed away. ji
: The Sigma Nus asked the Gainesville Police Department
: (GPD) to tow the cars away after posting signs prohibiting j:
:j parking on the lot.
THE SIGNS were ignored.
i; The lot, located at. the northern end of North-South Drive
$ near the College of Journalism and Communications, has been a
:* favorite parking for Journalism students and on-campus >:
$ residents without parking decals for a number of months, a ;j:
Sigma Nu brother said.
He said the situation had gotten so bad there was no longer
room for fraternity cars on the lot. :
A GAINESVILLE city policeman who refused to identify
himself said the GPD had towed away six cars parked on the lot :j
* and ticketed the rest. >

* The towing charge and ticket are $lO each, he said. £
Students 'whose cars were towed away also received tickets. £
Rally Shows Futility Bailey

PAGE ONE^i
to realize students support
athletics in other ways than just
money.
He added that it is time
students start pushing for
education.
We ought to place our
emphasis on education instead

a few seemed interested in what
the boycott was all about. And
most of them were on stage.
Sure, Im in sympathy with
the boycott, one student said,
but what good is it going to
do? 01 Gator Ray and the
Athletic Association are going to
charge us for tickets if they want
to. And there is nothing we can
do about it.

HEAVY APPLAUSE and booing
followed each triumph of athletics over
academics.
It was coincidentally very pointed at
our campus and very amusing in that
sense, Roger Moore, 2UC, commented
afterwards.
I felt it was made to be shown here. It
looked like they made it just.for this
school, Ellen Smith, 2UC, said.
It was pretty relevant as far as
facilities are concerned, Larry Stewart,
3AS, said.
Office of Student officials,
who sponsored the showing, said they
had no prior knowledge of the films
contents.

of jocks, he said.
STUDENT BODY
Treasurer-elect John Dodson
said the low turnout for the rally
was going to make it hard to
force the AA to back down.
I think what happened today
is going to cost us money, he
said.
Jimmey Bailey, unsuccessful
presidential candidate, said he
thought the rally plus the small
number of voters in the recent
election, shows SG should be
abolished due to lack of interest.
THE RALLY is
representative of the futility and
impotence of the entire SG
structure, Bailey said.
Uhlfelder said he is trying to
set up a referendum to give
students a chance to express
their feelings on the different
proposals which student leaders
and the AA have been
discussing.



I HBBli Im ft. jHw
l 1 I 1 |liii | l hi| lr I rl | I I 11 11 A H S^l
''-v-.:-; m < . JHw sHm- M W 3s| :
jj|H l| ? #ii|H
Jf 1
Ms WPIB 11 11 I 1 I II 11 -%^sW>^^:js3c&rf S
Sn § vs
PHIL BANNISTER

Winners of World University Service's Beauty and
Beast contest announced this weekend are Allan
Watson of Sigma Nu fraternity and Dolly Tison of
Alpha Delta Pi sorority for the best costumes, left.
Most money collected was by Tom Kibler of Alpha

Mortar Board Elects New Officers

The UFs Mortar Board
elected Nancy Wolfson, 3ED,
president for 1970-71.
Mortar Board is seeking to
establish a greater self-identity.
MISS WOLFSON is former
president of AEPhi sorority and
head majorette with the Gator
Band.
Miss Wolfson wants to have
Mortar Board bring speakers to
UF, and promote service
projects for the university and
Gainesville community.

I-
i FRATERNITY GATOR I
! ALL-STARS vs GREATS j
4
* Coached by Carlos Alvarez, featuring Steve Spurrier,
4 5
* John Reaves, Jimmy Dunn Richard Trapp, Larry
4 4-
* < Smith, Tom Christian
FLORIDA FIELD
| Thurs 5/7/70 7:00 PM* -|
* _i _. CAi, AVAILABLE AT STADIUM, IFC OFFICE,
: Tickets 50( recordbar ?
jK
*** ********** *** ************ ** ** + ******************* t Oitiot t

BEASTLY BEAUTY

Other officers elected were
vice-president, Nora Childs,
3ED; secretary, Beth Roffelsen,
3AS; treasurer, Dorothy Alfred,
3 AS; and historian, Brenda
Gevertz, 3JM.
NEWLY TAPPED members
include Patricia Collins, Margaret
Dekle, Jennifer Doane, Kathleen
Dolan, Linda Edmunds, Brena
Gibson, Iris Glazner, Rebecca
Hoodwin, Helen Huntley, Susan
Jacobs, Connie Knight, Vicki

ll

**%&&&&
PHIL BANNISTER

Tau Omega fraternity and Marci Ronan of Pi Beta
Phi sorority, who brought in $455, right. Winners
were announced at the contest finals Friday at the
Reitz Union and trophies will be awarded at
Interfratemity Council's Spring Frolics May 29.

Krezdorn, Janey McCrillus,
Cynthia Menne, Lauren Lucas.
ALSO TAPPED were Judith
Nash, Patricia Nichols, Vema
Novak, Emily Retherford,
Melody Roberts, Susan Roman,
Jenny Scrivner, Marion
Southerland, Linda Strauss,
Faith Tulino, Lynn Tyner, Carol
Walwofth, Kerry Werner, Kathy
White, Elizabeth Widman, Laura
Young, and honorary member,
Dean Phyllis Meek.

Housing 'Druthers
To Be Considered

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Housing preference forms
may show that UF students
living in residence halls prefer to
be assigned to sections with
friends and former dorm-mates.
Housing Director Harold
Riker said his office is going to
make an effort to arrange
student group sections, as
indicated by the preference
forms, which students should be
filling out soon.
REQUIREMENTS will be
the same. All beginning students
will be required to live on
campus according to
regulations, Riker said.
Sophomores may request
off-campus housing. We will try
to let students know if their
request can be granted by the
end of the quarter, Riker
added.
Students can give their
preference of rooms, buildings
and roommates. Groups of
students may also request the
same section or floor, according
to Riker.
THROUGH THE preference
forms, there will be an
opportunity for groups of
students to return to the same
*t *.7>
rooms and sections, Riker said.
Students who prefer to live
together may continue to do
99
SO.
We make every effort to
grant the student his
preferences. Each preference is
individually considered, Riker
said.

>* UAI 4 -
wood ay, mVf nrAr) I w j

The new effort to group
students who wish to live
together will eliminate the initial
problem of adjusting to
dormmates, Riker said.
ITS GENERALLY a goo
idea because you wont be stuck
with a bunch of freshmen who
play around and mess up the
floor," Stephen Bryan,
lUC-Simpson Hall, said.
Students have approached
me about this idea, and for them
it would be good. Overall, I
think it could be to a
disadvantage for freshmen who
need sophomores to help them
adjust, Bryan added.
If the kids wanted it, its a
good idea. It should be strictly
voluntary, Carol Reid,
lUC-Broward Hall, said.
According to Riker there
might be some problems with
overcrowding living area§.
WHAT'S
HAPPENING
SPACE OUT: IEEE meets at
7:30 p. m. in room S-310 of the
Electrical Engineering Building.
There will be nomination for
officers, and a NASA film on the
Flight of Apollo 12 will be
shown.
READ: Celebration 7O
presents prof Harry Crews, in
Readings. Today at 8 p. m. in
room 361 of the Reitz Union.
AIESEC: Meets today at 7:30
in room 301 of the Union.

Page 3



Page 4

L Tlmi Florida Alligator, Monday, May 4, 1970

I UNIVERSITY OF FLOftIDA
student accounts
the hub LOAN PAYMENT STATEMENT
OMIVUL HOMOA 32401
STATEMENT DATE 04-15-70
l ix>aw account HUMtit \
cr
' /
r -I
' i H SANDERS MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO:
65 7 SOOTH Dk 1V p uuii/iTft*nA. m
HIApiI SPkMf.S FLA |UNIVEMHTY OF FLOBIPA
DO NOT DETACH
RETURN BOTH COPIES WITH YOUR PAYMENT
CURRENT AMOUNT DUE $ NQaiK
LOAN PAYMENT PAST-DUE DELINQUENT AMOUNT T .01
IF YOUR LOAN IS DELINQUENT REFER TO PAST DUE
STUDENT LOAN POLICY ON REVERSE SIDE.
PAY THIS AMOUNT BEFORE 10th OF hay t ,oi
* PAYMENT HAS KEN MADE PIEASE DOMGARD THIS STATEMENT
PO NOT WRITE MLOW THIS LINK
date Z Z
i
- I.
A PAST-DUE PENNY
Did you ever feel picked on? Red tape gets carried to extremes at
times, and efficiency is lost in the process. A delinquent loan payment
statement for one cent is enough to make a normally-sane student go
mad. But Alligator Assignments Editor Neal Sanders has been caught
in this trap twice in his college career. Anyone care to challenge that?
Celebration Presents
Poet, Photographer

w
Two prominent UF professors
will be featured in separate fine
arts programs for Celebration
7O.
Novelist Harry Crews will read
selections from his recent works
at 8 pjn. today in rooms 361-3
of the Reitz Union.
CREWS, a UF English
professor, gained national
recognition with the publishing
of his book Naked In Garden
Hills. This was followed by
The Gospel Singer. His most
recent offering is This Thing
Dont Lead To Heaven.
On Tuesday evening professor
Didier Graefee will lecture and
exhibit an abstract study of
photography entitled The
Human Biological Form. This
presentation will also be in the
Union in rooms 346-7 at 8 p.m.
THE MULTI-talented
Graefee, who has exhibited his
photography internationally
since 1945, has been working on
this particular showing for nine
months. He will concentrate on
the techniques and esthetic
aspects of the abstract form of
photography. His most recent
exhibit was in St. Petersburg in
January.
Both of the events are free to
the public. I
t
y y-> /y .. £! .
* inrinf
Gainesville twice
" the service...
1802 W. UNIV.AVE.
1430 BJW. 13th ST.

REDBONES
HERE
Page 13

Student Government Productions
and
Celebration
ver y proudly present
L^i^BpF^Bp
iHVI
*-%b *' *-* **7TwpoF
Boston Symphony Chamber Players
In Concert beginning Tuesday,
May 15 at 8:15 pm.
The J. W. Reitz Union Auditorium.
* s w.

'CONCEIVED FOR LEARNING*
College Plan Presented

' By BOofWSE
Alligator Staff Writer
A proposal for a four-year
experimental college within the
UF was presented to the
Curriculum Committee
Wednesday by Frederick W.
Conner, vice president for
Academic Affairs?
CONCEIVED in terms of
learning rather than teaching,
according to Conner, the
institution would be named
Arredondo College.
The proposal was intended for
thought rather than for action
at present, and UF probably
could not afford to begin it this
year, Conner said.

STUDENT SPECIAL
GOOD ALL DAY MONDAY THRU WEDNESDAY^^^^
BUY ONE FISH SANDWICH
AT REGULAR PRICE \ WeE^Bf
GET THE SECOND
FISH SANDWICH FOR !£ JiH&c II
OEFER GOOD ONLY AT 715 N.W. 13th ST.

The Socratic method,
with the student at the
center of discussion and
man and truth as its
end/ is Arredondo
Colleges inten^
The proposal was prepared by
a faculty committee appointed
by Conner on December 2,
1968. A similar proposal by a
committee of students was
included.
ACCORDING TO the
proposal, students and faculty
would live in a common
residential center with all the

* fecifitiesofljving. and learning.
An enrollment of 400 was
suggested, although 600 to 800
could be accommodated at the
same cost per student, the report
said.
While taking comprehensive
courses in five general areas, the
student would have the
opportunity to bring all his
learning to bear in an
Integrative Seminar stressing
mans fallibility, the unity of
knowledge and the interrelation
of nature, man and society.
The seminar would be
conducted by the Socratic
method, with the student at
the center of discussion and man
arid truth as its end.



SEVERAL BOSTON SYMPHONY CHAMBER PLAYERS
... performing, teaching this week
Concert Schedule

TUESDAY Mozart, Quartet in D
Major for Flute and Strings, K. 285;
Poulenc, Trio for Oboe, Bassoon, and
Piano; Colgrass, Variations for Four
Drums and Viola, and the Brahms
Horn Trio, in E-Flat Major for
Piano, Violin, and Horn, Opus 40.
WEDNESDAY Dnazi,
Woodwind Quintet; Koper,
Kammermusik for Oboe, Bassoon,
Percussion, and Piano; Blacher, Trio
for Trumpet, Trombone, and Piano,
Opus 31, and the Alvin Etler
Woodwind Quintet No. 2.
THURSDAY Beethoven, String
Trio in C Minor, Opus 9, No. 3 and
the Piano Trio in E-Flat, Opus 70,
No. 2, and the Schoenberg String
Trio, Opus 45 (1946).
FRIDAY Serenade in D for
Flute, Violin and Viola, Opus 25;
Quintet in E-Flat for Piano and
Winds, Opus 16, and the Septet for
Strings and Winds, Opus 20.
CLINIC SCHEDULE
Joseph Silverstein, Concertmaster,
and Burton Fine, Principal Viola:
Violin Clinic, Walker Auditorium;
Wednesday, May 6; 3:35 p.m. Mr.
Troupin presiding. Master Class,
Walker Auditorium; Thursday, May
7; 3:35 p.m.
Jules Eskin, Principal Cello: Cello
Clinic, AFA Auditorium, Room
105-B Tuesday, May 5; 2:30 p.m.
Mrs. Henderson presiding. Cello
Master Class, Music Bldg. Room 107
Wednesday, May 6; 2:30 p.m.
Henry Portnoi, Principal Bass:
Double Bass Clinic, Music Bldg.
Room 144 Wednesday, May 6, 3:35
p.m. Mrs. Henderson presiding.
Double Bass Master Class, Music
Bldg. Room 107 Thursday, May 7;
3:35 p.m.
Dorio Anthony Dwyer, Principal
Flute: Flute Clinic, AFA
Auditorium, Room 103-B Tuesday,
May 5; 3:35 p.m. Mrs. Fouse
presiding. Flute Master Class,
AFA Auditorium, Room 103-B

Open 7 days
Clip the
Pizza Inn *Ra
Buct Sy3
belou' for a special treat! 1 I /x
S; A I NNPOU GH NOTE
\ lUdoomoblo with tho /4
fri'-r. / n HT;, 1 WC? ) lorf* liia (MHO /
7fc~ T |or 2 modium piiui.
1 Pino l"
rpor family
fforfood \ \( // 3165. W. 16thAva./>YjkT-m\
i.v_-7 I yivjy
r P17.7.A INN BUCK^

Wednesday, May 6; 3:35 p.m.
Ralph Gomberg, Principal Qboe:
Oboe Clinic, University Auditorium
Wednesday, May 6, 3:35 p.m. Mr.
Groth presiding. Oboe Master Class,
University Auditorium (Mr. Groths
Studio) Thursday, May 7; 2:30 p.m.
Gino Cfoffi, Principal Clarinet:
Clarinet Clinic, Little Hall
Auditorium, Room 101 Wednesday,
May 6, 3:35 p.m. Mr. Small
presiding. Clarinet Master Class,
Little Hall, Room 101 Thursday,
May 7; 2:30 p.m.
Sherman Walt, Principal Bassoon:
Bassoon Clinic, AFA Auditorium,
Room 105-B Wednesday, May 6;
3:35 p.m. Mr. Kitts presiding.
Bassoon Master Class, AFA
Auditorium Room 103-B Thursday,
May 7; 3:35 p.m.
James Stagliano, Principal Horn:
French Horn Clinic, Music Bldg.,
Room 212 Tuesday, May 5, 2:30
p.m. Mr. Poole presiding. French
Horn Master Class, Music Bldg.,
Room 212 Thursday, May 7; 2:3o''
p.m.
Armando Ghitalla, Principal
Trumpet: Trumpet Clinic, Music
Bldg., Room 122 Tuesday, May 5;
2:30 p.m. Mr. Foster presiding.
Trumpet Master Class, Music Bldg.,
Room 122 Thursday, May 7; 2:30
p.m.
William Gibson: Trombone Clinic,
Music Bldg. Room 211 Tuesday, May
5; 2:30 p.m. Mr. Bowles presiding.
Trombone Master Class, Music Bldg.,
Room 142 Wednesday, May 8; 3:35
p.m.
Everett Firth: Percussion Clinic,
Music Bldg., Room 144 Tuesday,
May 5: 2:30 p.m. Mr. Hale presiding.
Percussion Master Class, Music Bldg.,
Room 144 Thursday, May 7; 2:30
p.m.
Richard Goode: Piano Clinic,
University Auditorium Tuesday, May
5; 2:30 p.m. Mr. Brask presiding.
Piano Master Class, University
Auditorium Thursday, May 7; 2:30
p.m.

ONE WEEK AT UF

MuSiCIGftS T6GCn

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
Academics at UF will receive
a lift this week with the arrival
of the Boston Symphony
Chamber Players for a series of
concerts and performance
clinics.
The Chamber Players,
consisting of the 12 principals
from the various sections of the
Boston Symphony Orchestra
and pianist Richard Goode, will
be in residence at UF for the
entire week.
THE GROUP will perform a
concert every evening, Tuesday
through Friday, at 8:15 in
University Auditorium. Tickets
for the performances will cost
UF students $1 and the general
public $2. .They are on sale at
the Union box office.
During the day from Tuesday
through Thursday the Chamber
Players will offer two dozen
informal master clinics. All
daytime master clinics will be
free to the public.
The presence of this group

1 1 > S W ISpllS 1111 H| m S 1 I
j
We're with you on water and air pollution

We're against pollutionas much as
you are. After all, we live here, too.
So, what are we doing about it?
On Air Pollution the U.S. Public
Health Service estimated that 60% was
caused by automobiles; 26% by indus industry,
try, industry, space heating and refuse burning;
and about 14% by electric utilities.
We felt 14% was too much and we're
spending millions of dollars to find
ways of lessening it.
In the nuclear plants we're now build building,
ing, building, there will be no combustion what whatever.
ever. whatever.

will be a tremendous boost for
the quality and status of the
universitys academic programs,
Reid Poole, chairman of the
Music Department, said Friday.
POOLE SAID that because
the Chamber Players will be
giving instructional advice as
well as performing, they
constitute a significant benefit
to UF student musicians.
This is the type of thing 5
everybody talks about getting
for universities. It gives all the
students as well as the
townspeople a chance to hear
and talk with these excellent
MM MALONES |
1A 3ook and Supply H
11 1712 W. University
I TEXTBOOKS
S 1 SCHOOL SUPPLIES (It
1 ART SUPPLIES
H I ENGINEERING BE SUPPLIES
I Customer Parking In
SB : j The Rear B
m We Welcome: 8

& Electric
Companies
laxpaying,lnvestor-Owned
Florida Power & Light Company / Tampa Electric Company
Florida Power Corporation / Gulf Power Company

Monday, May 4,1970, Tha Florida AMplor,

We are equally concerned about
water pollution and we're doing some something
thing something about that, too.
Each of Florida's four electric com companies
panies companies is supporting continuing inde independent
pendent independent research to try to find out if
there are any undiscovered effects
on marine life caused by our warm
water return.
It's simply good common sense for
us to help in any way we can to improve
the communities we serve.
We're not only with you we're
doing what we can to help win the
battle against pollution.

Iff** :
musicians, Poole said.
The Chamber Players have
appeared throughout the world,
giving concerts in the Soviet
Union, Germany and England.
Their first album, released in
1966, received a Grammy as the
years best chamber music
performance.
They are sponsored by UF,
Student Government
Productions, and the
Department of Music, in
cooperation with the Fine Arts
Council of Florida, and the
National Foundation for the
Arts and Humanities.
RENT NOW)
FOR THIS SUMMER AND
SEPTEMBER, 1970
FALL LEASES 9 & 12 MONTH
Featuring
2 bedrooms
Upper or Lower
Furnished
Air Conditioned
3 Pools
Reeieation Hall
Study Roem
See today. Move right in
VILLAGE PARK
A
FRENCH QUARTER
APTS.
1001 S.W. 16th St.
378-3771

Page 5



Page 6

* rK "" ngaior, moTKMy.lWly 4,1970

By RAY BANKS
Alligator Correspondent
Why would a Hindu prince be cutting beef in a
UF meat laboratory?
; -TRe main reasdnlm working here is because t
need the money, explained Arun Mehra, 7BA, in
A Hindu Prince
Goes To Work,
Breaks Tradition
* an interview. Its true that Hindus dont believe in
killing animals, but Ive gotten too western. I dont
retain anything of Indian
MEHRAS GRANDFATHER, Raj Harichand, was
a prince in present-day Karachi, Pakistan, who
owned three Rolls-Royces and other luxuries.

FSU STUDY SHOWS
JC Students f Prepared

The idea that Florida junior
colleges dont adequately
prepare able students for senior
university work is incorrect, a
Florida State University (FSU)
study says.
The study compared grade
averages of transfer students
with those of native students
at FSU and found there were no
substantial differences in the
grades earned by students with
equal scores on the

Summer Camp Opens
For Diabetic Children
For the ninth year boys and girls from all over the state between
the ages of eight and fourteen will be packing their bags this summer
for a special camp the Florida Camp for Children with Diabetes.
For two weeks, from August 12 to 22, on the shore of Lake
George, at Micanopy, these children will have all the fun a summer
camp affords with one big difference. This will be the first time for
many that they wont feel different or alone among their
contemporaries.
TO HAVE diabetes makes you different because you have
certain problems and certain rules by which you must live. And to be
different is -to a great many kids somehow shameful and
frightening.
But how can you withdraw, feel sorry for yourself, be frightened,
when all the children abound you have the same problems you do?
And thats part of what this special camp is all about, according to
the new director, Dr. Arlan Rosenbloom, assistant professor of
pediatrics at UFs College of Medicine.
YOUNG PEOPLE at these ages need to develop independence and
a feeling of responsibility for themselves, a concept of their own life,
he said. **Having diabetes makes for special problems, but a child who
is able to overcome negative attitudes toward the disease and accept
its limitations can lead a near normal life.
So along with swimming, horseback riding, archery and all the joys
of camping, the children will be taught by a qualified staff of
physicians, nurses and dieticians the things they need to know about
living with diabetes. They will be taught how to give themselves their
daily insulin injection* and why its so vital; how they should eat and
when; how to take urine tests accurately and consistently. In short,
how to control their condition and thus refuse to allow it to control
them.
J s{t Xerox Copies 4<
1-10 off 11-over off
£ original original
C 50
O HLf~l X
D ITM6 COPYL- J
P / C6NTBR \ 1 e
c Sr
E x
f The Copy Center M
£ Next to M4one't Bookstore
R 1718 W. Uni* Parking in Rear- 376-9334

ability-measuring Florida 12th
Grade Test (FTGT). John
Nickens, FSU assistant registrar,
made the study.
NICKENS WAS critical of the
term, transfer shock, which
explained the drop in grades
which many educators assumed
was experienced by transfer
students supposedly not used to
the high grading standards in
universities.

jr* .. ,** ,av*-** y A f ** '* 'if
His father, Tilak, succeeded to the title, but the
family was forced to flee India in 1947 when
Pakistan became independent.
In India, Tilak Raj Mehra served as a pilot with
the Royal British Air Force. Later he became the
head of a machine parts firm based in Calcutta.
BEFORE COMING to the United States, Mehra
helped his father run the firm. But he said, I don t
believe in that (the princely titles) anymore. I don t
want to be some old prince without any money.
Thered be bad news at home if word got
around that I was cutting meat here. Theyd say,
What! Hes cutting beef? Is he eating beef, too?
It would go all over town that Arun is cutting
meat. When I got back, then Id go up to
somebodys family and ask to take their daughter
out. Then the mother would say, Remember five
years ago when you cut meat in America?.
MEHRA HAS has been working in the meat
laboratory of the UF Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences on Archer Road.
His reaction to the actual cutting of the meat? I
dont think about it. When I get there, I just shut up
my smell, my mind, my thoughts, everything, he
said.
The bearded Mehra was the leader of the Naxalite

Educators accepting the
transfer shock idea expect
first-quarter transfer students to
have lower grades than native
juniors. In the FSU study,
however, the transfer students
came out as well as the natives
who had similar FTGT scores.
Transfer students with
below-average FTGT scores
made below-average grades,
which indicated to Nickens that
FTGT scores are much more
important factors in grades than
whether or not the student
received part of his education at
a junior college, g,
NICKENS STUDIED the
grade records of 926 FSU
students for his survey. The
transfer students came from 20
Florida junior colleges.
MEXICO
Cologio Victorias summer
session, Guadalajara, June 29
Aug. 2. Room, Board, Tuition,
Fees, $250. The greatest
concentration of talent and the
finest campus in Mexico. Courses
from Archeology to glass blowing
and leather work. Excellent Art
dept. Numerous excursions.
Write: Director. Box 1327,
Bellingham, Wash. 98225.

TMHu Qkop
K 420 N.W. Ol3th St.
PH. 378-8045
IS HAVING A SALE ON STEREO SYSTEMS!
\ U Good 3 way 10" speakers!
** So

Nikko 64 watt Amp $1 19.95
10" Goodman Speakers
(EE-4410) 75 ea 150.00
Garrard SLSSB 59.95
Coordinated Bese &
Dustcover 11.00
Shura M9IE etiptical
. .if;
eaife $390.85
9O AO
SPECIAL PRICE *99*5

- SALES AND SERVICE 'r~

Nursing Alumni Meet
The College of Nursing alumni will weigh the historical and current
aspects of clinical nursing practice and its role in health care during
the Fifth Annual Nursing Alumni Clinical Session.
The session, sponsored by the College of Nursing section of the UF
Alumni Association, will be held in the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
Auditorium Friday beginning at 8:30 a. m.
Miss Theresa E. Christy, assistant professor of nursing education at
Teachers College, Columbia University will discuss Historical Aspects
of Nursing Practice.
Oriental Tea-house Atmosphere
Serving Authentic Chinese Dinners at Poputar Prices
FAST SERVICE CONGENIAL ATMOSPHERE NO TIPPING
Dining-room is also available for private luncheon
parties and wedding receptions
10 MINUTE CARRYOUT SERVICE AVAILABLE, OPEN 4-10 P.M.
... in the Village Square on 441 372-6801
r "ijjsT STEAK T SHAKE "1
Student Special
I (With The Coupon) |
I Our Regular 93< Steak burger
I Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
| SI.OB Value Only 90i plus tax |
1 1C n Steak n Shake 1
\J 610 S.M/. 13thS M M m Gainesville i

Nikko 64 watt Amp $11996
Goodman (EE-338) ~
spaakars 4450 99 qq
Garrard SLSSB 5995
Coordinatad Base &
Dustcovar ttjOO
Shura M5§E Cartridge 3B fiQ
SAVE w3o
SPECIAL PRICE wi#

Party at a branch of Calcutta University.
THE NAXALITES are non-Marxists
non-Maoists. They want the country to improve*
but they dont want violence. he said.
I was worried that the day would come when
five million people in Calcutta would pick un
daggers and knives.
I may get involved in the political situation
again when I get back, he said.
IN ANOTHER area, Mehra said that there are no
Indian hippies.
Its very difficult for a student to be a hippie
primarily because if he Jeaves home theres no
way he can make any money. They employ only
family members or older workers, he explained.
Do Indians smoke marijuana? If he wants to
have some pot, its legal. He can go and have the
pot, Mehra said.
ITS UNBELIEVABLE all the kids who are
smoking pot in this country. At home its just lying
about and people dont even want to smoke it. They
try it once or twice, but its no big thing, he added.
Mehra said most Indians take bhang when they
take drugs. Its ground, then its mixed up in very
liquid yogurt, and they drink it. You get a feeling
like you had LSD or something.


Pioneer 40 watt Amp 99.95
*' Goodman (EE*lO)
Speakers 24.95 ea 49.90
Garrard SL4OB 44.50
Coordinated Basa &
Dustcovar 11.00
Shura M 44-7 Cartridga
1225.30
SAVE .4730
SPECIAL PRICE $i78.00



Odds Rurmina 2 To 1 Against Armv

OAKLAND, Calif. (UPI) When a draft board in
northern California orders a young man to report for
induction, the odds are 2 to 1 against his ending up in an
Army uniform.
More than half dont even show up and 11 per cent
of those who do report refuse to serve.
BY THE TIME the Army eliminates its share during
re-examination of the potential draftees, only 35 per cent
of those sent notices actually go into service.
The Oakland Indction Center, which processes draftees
for all of northern California and a portion of Nevada,
reported during the weekend on its operations for the six
months ending March 31.
In that period, 4,463 men were sent notices of
induction; only 2,083 reported when ordered; 219 of
them refused induction; 300 more were rejected by the

Panther Rally
4o
Ends Peacefully

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (UPI)
Youthful demonstrators and
national guard troops both left
town Sunday after two days of
rallies in support of jailed Black
Panthers that did not evoke the
violence officials had expected.
Although city and state
officials were not saying it for
the record, it was apparent they
had harbored strong fears
major outbreaks would follow
two rallies in support of the
nine, including chairman Bobby
G. Seale.
AS IT TURNED out, an
overwhelmingly peaceful and
overwhelmingly white assembly
of 20,000 turned out and
produced nothing more than
sporadic and minor
confrontations with police.
New Havens mayor and
police chief variously described
the city as apprehensive and
uptight as the demonstrators
arrived, and had been ready in
case of trouble.
F 6 ur battalions of
Connecticut National
Guardsmen were brought in,
while 4,000 riot-trained Marines
and Army paratroopers were
flown to nearby bases in
Crash Search
Resumes
ST. CROIX, Virgin Islands
(UPI) Clearing weather
allowed helicopters to resume
the search Sunday for more than
20 persons missing since the
crash landing of an ALM
Antillean Dutch Airways plane
the day before in choppy
Caribbean seas.
The National Transportation
Safety Board announced in
Washington it had sent a six-man
investigating team to the scene
to talk with survivors and try to
determine the cause of the
trouble.

DEROSA
JUT 4 STEAK HOUSB \
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM -7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378*3320

Massachusetts and Rhode Island.
THE FEDERAL troops were
on their way home Sunday
morning and three guard
battalions planned to be gone by
midafternoon, with one
remaining as a precaution.
Hitchhiking was difficult in
the rainy morning as many of
the demonstrators chose that
method to return home. By
noon nearly all the
out-of-towners had left Yale,
where they were housed and fed.
Traces of riot gas hung over
the campus from Saturday
nights melee in which 500 to
1,000 demonstrators were on
the receiving end of clouds of
tear and pepper gases.
THE INCIDENT was sparked
by individuals who had hurlfed
bottles and, in one cask, a
fluorescent light tube at police.
The rallies were balled to
demand release for the nine
who, including Seale, are
charged in connection with the
alleged murder-kidnaping of
Alex Rackley, an alleged Panther
found dead in a swamp last May.
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
BARBER & STYLE SHOP
3 Roff/er Stylists
5 Barbers
Roffler Sculpture
Kut for longer hair
Hair straightening
and relaxing
6 to 8 week guarantee
Capiloscope Free
Analysis of hair and
scalp problems
1620 W. Univanity Ave.
373-1196

IN CAUFORNIA DRAFT CALLS

Army; and 1,554 finally were taken into the service.
NEITHER THE Army nor the Selective Service system
knows how many of the 2,380 men who didnt show up
at all had legitimate reasons and how many were
draft-dodgers.
Officers at the induction center, who said they were
only guessing, estimate from zero to 50 per cent were
delinquents.
State and regional Selective Service officials, who also
had no exact figures, generalized both no great
percentage and many.
U. S. ATTORNEY James L. Browning said that during
1969, 822 of those reporting in Oakland refused
induction the highest number of any center in the
country. He said nationally there were only 2,140 refusals
out of 284,924 men ordered to report.

Pollution Program Planned

V
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Legislation to
finance the biggest pollution control program
ever proposed in Florida, perhaps exceeding 51.5
billion, is being quietly put together in a senate
subcommittee, with the apparent blessings of the
legislative leadership.
It is built around a constitutional amendment
which authorizes bonds, backed by the full credit
i; of the state, but which hopefully would be paid
off from fees charged for use of the facilities
$ built with the funds.

mpr 'tqeKS
Sk BREWING CORPORATION
f THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
present in concert
CELEBRATION 70
SLY & THE
FAMILY STONE
YOUNGBLOODS
JAMES COTTON BLUES BAND
CROW
TEN WHEEL DRIVE
GREAT SPECKLED BIRD WITH IAN & SYLVIA
EWING ST. TIMES
" v 0
MECKI MARK MEN
special guest appearance:
GRAND FUNK RAILROAD
Florida Field Sat. May 16th 4:00P.M.
General Admission: $5.50 Tickets on sale at:
k J. Wayne Reitz Union Box Office & A
|Lk; The Record Bar ~ r J
Falstaff Brewing Corp., St. Louis, Mo.
V Entermedia Futures Corp.. N.Y

. Mondy,My #. WQ,Th* FtorMAlpln.

The Defense Department said 788 men were convicted
of draft-dodging throughout the nation in 1968, the last
year for which figures have been tabulated.
The total compared with 4,609 in 1944 the high year
for World War U and 425 in 1954 which was the high
for the Korean War as convictions lagged about two years
behind violations. Since the expansion of the Vietnam
War, convictions totaled 242 in 1965 373 in 1966 and
748 in 1967.
The draft refusers face up to five years in federal prison
and a SIO,OOO fine.
But the average sentence in California has been 38
months in a penitentiary with the sentences usually
somewhat lighter in the San Francisco Bay area than
elsewhere in the state.

V
THIS IS THE only way we can charge the
polluters, rather than the taxpayers in general, :j:
said Sen. Richard Stone of Miami, sponsor of one
of the proposals being used as a vehicle for the j:*
bond program. >j
The leadership in both houses supports this
principle, Stone said in an interview, referring jij
to the pay as you use concept of bond
financing as opposed to the pay as you go
method of direct appropriation of money. x
W.v.v.%v.v.v.v.v.vA%VWAVWW;w:W}MfIWMWW>>MCOK

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 4,1970

The
Florida

The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

J mi- *. > 3 -- : j

Keep Right

President Richard Nixons
decision to send American
troops into Cambodia was a
correct one.
The howls of outrage are
pouring from the Left but this is
expected. There is nothing
Nixon can do to please them
anyway short of pulling
American support out of South
Vietnam in such a manner as to
assure a victory for Hanoi.
If they did not have this issue
they would use or invent others.
Nixon should ignore them.
What Nixon has done is to
puncture one of the myths that
became a tenet of faith in
Southeast Asia. The myth that
the war in South Vietnam could
be separated from and dealt with
separately from the overall
problem of North Vietnamese
imperialistic aggression in
Indochina.
The Left attempts to portray
the war as American
intervention in a civil war which
would end if only we would now
get out.
Nonsense.
How many Laotians are in
North Vietnam? There are about
40,000 NVA troops in Laos.
How many Cambodians are in
North Vietnam? There are about
60,000 NVA in Cambodia.
How many South Vietnamese
troops are in North Vietnam?
There 200,000 NVA in South
Vietnam.
The United States military has
been at a disadvantage in
Indochina partially because
North Vietnam is conducting the
war as a unified theater, and the
United States was not.

Nasi Sanders
Assignment Editor
Earl Hartman
Features Editor
Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief
. John Sugg

Advertising Manager Business Manager

A Correct Move

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor
Fred VoNrath
Wire Editor
Jeff Brain
Editorial Assistant

News Editors

Kerry Dupree

Nixon tells us the action in
Cambodia is not an expansion of
the war. He is correct if one
defines it as not bringing the war
to area that was not already
there.
But, whether the action in
Cambodia is or is not an
expansion of the war depends on
the definition given to
expansion.
But, whether it is or it is not
is immaterial to die argument
for pushing across the border.
The Cambodian government
made a decision to recognize the
existence of Viet Cong and NVA
forces violating Cambodias
nuetrality.
Even deposed Prince
Sihanouk recognized the danger
they presented and demanded
they leave.
They would not.
Instead they turn towards the
West to depose the government
and substitute it with a puppet
of Hanoi. The Cambodian
governments new stance
represents a threat to the vital
interests of Hanoi.
The North Vietnamese made
their decision to overthrow the
Cambodian government
independent of any action of the
United States or South Vietnam.
To suggest the United States
should sit across the border and
permit the North Vietnamese to
take over Cambodia when we
have the opportunity to catch
them between ourselves and the
ambodians is ridiculous.
The establishment of a Hanoi
puppet in Phnom Penh would
result in prolonging of the war in
Vietnam, not ending it.

Alligator Staff

Karen Eng
Managing Editor
Carolyn Pope

Mike Davis

By Fred Vollrath

' i
Robert Berry
Ellen Dupuy
Phyllis Gallub
Les Gardieff
Charles Heekin
Margo Cox
James Davis

BW> iMftff-
Wk MMBMHfIjHr WJP H
& A -rimP
WA 1
ML&qjjtj* ;P|tfjw^P-
H P

; .y.v.*.v Speaking Out iVtVAViyAViSVtViViNViV/iV.V/Ay/iVi'iViV.V.V.V.ViVAViVAVANV/AViViViVMViV*,
On The Twelfth Day

The American people are hushed, waiting for
someone to tell them if if s really true, if the most
powerful nation in the world has actually expanded
its militaristic role in Southeast Asia.
It seems hard to believe the Nixon administration
would display the audacity to expand a war that
has killed men, minds and morale in the United
States.
Korea, South Vietnam and Cambodia. Will it ever
stop?
Probably not as long as the enemy continues to
retreat into areas around Vietnam or wherever else
American forces are engaged in combat.
The Administration will tell us that the move into
Cambodia is necessary. Communist strongholds are
in existence in this neighboring country which have
been and will continue serving as strongholds for
communist forces in North and South Vietnam.
But lets look ahead into the future, say three
years. The war has expanded into Cambodia and
one day the 1973 administration tells us that
communist strongholds have successfully been
checked in that country.
Ah! a sigh of relief.
Full scale fighting continues to exist. But fear,
not the communist strongholds have been checked!
And then one day an announcement.

Staff Reporters
Charlotte O'Connor
Terry Pitman
Richard Roskowe
Charles Trentelman
Robert Wise
Copy Editors
Carlos J. Licea
Bonnie MacCartney

editorial
Limit The President
Deja vu is an odd sensation most of us experience in our
lifetime. Literally, it means seen again. That is, having the
sensation of seeing some scene, usually not more than a few
seconds in duration, which seems hauntingly familiar, as
though it had happened before.
Our reaction to President Nixons recent decision to
invade Cambodia yes, invade; Cambodia had not been
consulted regarding American entrance into its territory
was one of strange familiarity. We have lived through this
scene before and continue to live through it. Unfortunately,
it has lasted eons, not seconds.
Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson put forth
the same rationale Mr. Nixon is now employing. It is the
Communism must be stomped out because we are good
credo straight from the John Foster Dulles Book of Fairy
Tales for Solid American Diplomacy. >
Whether the Cambodian invasion was warranted or
necessary is practically irrelevant, Mr. Nixon merely
extended a malignant growth. The issue is simple; Mr. Nixon
was elected under the premise he would end the war and,
instead, has broadened its scope. The fact that America
wants nothing of a war in Indochina we hold to be
self-evident. The question is, how does the majority make
its desires into realities? How do we take the bloodletting
abstractions of war; democracy, freedom, the end of war
and the fight against totalitarianism; and turn them into the
reality of peace?
Obviously, the answer does not lie in the ilk of Mr.
Nixon. Obviously, we cannot trust any man, once elected,
to end a war. Obviously, something must be done, for not
all presidents have the courage of a Harry Truman, who
called the generals back from Chinas door.
For a starter, we suggest the Presidents war powers be
limited, soon and sharply. No one man should have the'
power to commit 500,000 men to Southeast Asia. Yet, as
Commander-in-Chief, any President can commit troops of
infinite number without declaring a war. Only Congress can
limit such a war and then by refusing to fund it, a step
requiring a bit too much moral courage. We suggest limiting
the Presidents power to immediate dangers, like an ICBM
attack or troops landing in Miami. Any other commitment
should require the approval of the people by electronic
referendum, now considered possible with a combination of
telephone and computers, preferably after a one-week
cooling off period.
Because unless something is done, the invasion of China
could become another deja vu experience.

The move into Laos is necessary. Communist
strongholds are in existence in this neighboring
country which have been and will continue to be
strongholds for communist forces serving in the
Vietnam and Cambodian wars.
If youre familiar with the song, The Twelve
Days of Christmas , the lyrics may take on an
identical approach.
On the twelfth day were liable to be in Moscow
fighting those communist strongholds and as we
work backwards we pass through Thailand, Peking,
Laos and God knows where.
The point is that as fast as we conquer, the faster
they retreat forming those communist strongholds
all along the way.
Will it ever stop?
As long as men are bom and drafted into their
army and ours the needle reamins stuck in the
groove; fight, fight, fight, fight.
Lets stop now.
Were involved in Vietnam, men, money,
principal and spirit. Were in so lets make the most
of it.
But for Gods sake lets not expand this mass
murder because the communists are on the move.
We cant continue to play this game of tag.
Well never catch than.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686. 87. 88. or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83.
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Morida Alligator are those of
the editors jr of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Ilor id a.



WASfraQTQN 1 will use
the full power of the United
States, including whatever force
may be necessary, to prevent
any obstruction of the law and
to carry out the order of the
federal court. The federal law
and orders of a United States
court implementing that law
cannot be flouted with
impunity.
So spoke Dwight D.
Eisenhower in 1957 when the
state of Arkansas forbade nine
Negroes to enter a public high
school in Little Rock.
THE EISENHOWER
statement was historic. Coming,
as it did, three years after the
original Supreme Court decision
on integration, it demonstrated
the power and the will of the
federal government as clearly
and authoritatively as Andrew
Jacksons famous toast to the
federal union: It must and shall
be preserved.
But great statements do not
determine history, as the young
men of Jacksons day were to
discover before they died, and
the Eisenhower statement, for
12 years the national policy, was
as surely superseded last week
by the action of an assistant

Satire

Our fairy tale is set in the year 1985,
and the United States has just won the
Vietnam War. Hows that for a fairy tale?
President Nixon, who had suspended
the constitution and declared rule by
decree in late 1970 to control crime in
the streets, is in Saigon for the
momentous occasion.
Eveiy nation is Asia has signed an
unconditional surrender. Spiro Agnew is
socializing with some Red Chinese
diplomats at a reception.
Ive never met a gook I didnt like,
he gushes, with typical tact. He breaks up
the crowd with a few ethnic jokes from
his early campaigns.
Nixon retreats to another room to
speak with the press.
Q. Mr. President, to what do you
attribute this historic victory?
A. Actually, it stems from an
inspiration I had in Florida.

Reason In An Opinion

MR. EDITOR:
We think the cheerleaders and the band
should be advised that, in a democratic
society, it should not be just those who
have the louder PA system and the louder
horn who are heard.
When the cheerleaders and the band,
interrupted Steve Uhlfelder and Ken
Driggs at Saturday's Orange & Blue game,
LETTERS POLICY
LittM's must:
Be typed, ripnsd, doubls tpatmi and
not nosed 900 words.
- Wot bs ripwd with a pseudonym.
Nemos wM bs withheld only iff writer
ngni to scut w WuMT tot yy.
vviiims iwy luimvii ionpv
columns or lettws to bs considered ffor use
es Spooking Out" ookimns. Any mdtar
inlsrsited bt udwolttbn e regular eabnun

The Loaded Scales Os Justice

attorney general as was Andrew
Jacksons by the actions of the
doughface Presidents Fillmore,
Pierce and Buchanan.
Assistant Atty. Gen. Jerris
Leonard was asked why the
Justice Department had moved
to delay enforcement of a court
order compelling the integration
of schools in Mississippi. This is
what he said: Even if the
Supreme Court were to order
immediate integration, I lack the
people and bodies to enforce the
law.
IF THAT statement is
permitted to stand if Leonard
is not overruled by the attorney
general, or by the President
then the nation has embarked on
a new course. The integration
which the Supreme Court
ordered and which three
successive -Presidents have
enforced will be an ideal but not
a goal, a prayer but not a creed.
It will be talked about but it will
not be done.
Sixty-five of the 74 attorneys
in Leonards division have
publicly disagreed with their
boss, but it seems unlikely that
their protests will avail. Leonard
is /- like most of the new
appointees in John Mitchells
Justice Department not a

Polk County Possibilities

Q. What was that?
A. I was flying in Air Force One to my
home on Key Biscayne. I just happened
to look out the window as we passed over
part of Central Florida, Polk County I
think you call it. ... .... r
I looked down and there was this big
splotch of grey where everything looked
dead. Thinking it might be some kind of
defoliant testing, and it sure seemed to
work, I assigned one of my aides to
investigate.
Q. What kind of a defoliant was it?
A. That's what is so unusual. It wasnt
a defoliant at all. That was just a
phosphate plant.
Seeing the possibilities our office
sprung into action and under the guise of
economic aide we subsidised phosphate
operations along the DMZ, one in central
Thailand, and three in northern Laos.
Well sir, did we get results! The

they deprived those men of their right to
express opinions on the issue of student
football ticket costs. More important,
they deprived students of their right to
hear, and react to, those opinions.
At football game after football game,
the cheerleaders call upon students to
express blind school spirit without giving
reason for doing so. It was to be expected
then, at Saturday's game, when someone
attempted to express reason in an
opinion, the cheerleaders started a
senseless chant to overpower him.
Apparently, the cheerleaders and band
owe their first allegiance to the athletic
department, and not the students.
It should be pointed out further that
the cheerleaders and band have nothing
to lose in this football ticket controversy.
They never have, Mid never will, have to
pay for their football tickets. It is a
shame their actions may have prevented

lawyers lawyer but a lawyer
turned politician.
Leonard did not bring
spectacular civil rights
credentials to his job, but the
Atlantic Monthly reported
earlier this year that as the head
of Wisconsins State Building
Commission he directed about
$200,000 in legal fees to John
Mitchell, then a New York
municipal bond lawyer.
DEFEATED IN a Senate race
in Wisconsin, he is joined among
Mitchell's associates at the
department by Deputy Atty.
Gen. Richard Kleindienst, who
was defeated for governor of
Arizona, Assistant Atty. Gen.
William Ruckelshaus, defeated in
an Indiana Senate race, legal
counsel William Rehnquist, a
Goldwater speech writer,, and
Assistant Atty. Gen. Will
Wilson, who lost races for
governor and senator in Texas.
Not in recent history have the
top men at Justice been so
politically oriented, and they are
directed by the author of Mr.
Nixons Southern strategy, John
Mitchell himself, whose principal
assistant, Kevin Phillips, has set
forth the strategy in a book

flourides and particulate matter were
picked up in die Eastward winds and
spread a blanket of sickness across the
entire nation of North Vietnam.
Q. Is that what did it?
A. We also had some other things
going our way that we didn't know
about. All our military bases had been
pouring sewage into the ocean. But
nothing really happened. Oh, there was a
plague or two among the natives, but
nothing serious.
Q. So what brought Asia to its knees?,
A. Shut up and listen, dummy.
Q. Yes, Mr. President.
A. Anyway, we had all this sewage
going into the ocean. About that time the
Chinese developed a nuclear power
generation station near Peking. They
went into mass production and set up a
string of nuclear generation plants all

the rest of the students from taking a
course of action, a walkout of the Orange
& Blue game, which would have
strengthened student leaders positions in
arguing against the assessment for student
football tickets.
MARTI COCHRAN, 4JM
BARBARA GRIFFIN, 4JM
the smoll society

WHAT'S WfoNd WiTH A
MENT EH YOU EVERYTH IN<& You WANT? ei&
n EHOUOHTO
/ V ~7 s WTi / T^E /EPv'-
(ftT' /Jlv/ TWiNoVodVe

[Frank Mankiewicz*
_ Tom Braden

which might as well be called
How to Win Elections Without
Black Votes.
As a lawyer, Leonard is wrong
in his refusal to uphold the law,
and his excuse that he hasnt
the manpower is laughable.
The Justice Department undeir
Dwight Eisenhower didnt even
have a Civil Rights Division. But
Gen. Eisenhower enforced the
law, even when, as with the
Supreme Court decision of
1954, he was personally
unsympathetic to it.
AS A POLITICIAN, however,

FORUM: ^
(\ jAitfitt tol ViiAut
hope for the cotnvja^JS^

Monday, May 4,1970, The Florida ARiprtor,

Leonard seems to be on the
popular course. The law is
against him but the polls are not.
The growing view is that middle
America has had enough
integration, and the
well-publicized views of black
militants do not help the cause.
So 15 years of legal precedent
are giving way now to Mr.
Nixons new federalism." The
Supreme Court, Mr. Dooley
told us, follows the illiction
returns. The Justice
Department is doing even more.
It is making therm

By Reg Crowder

along the seashore.
They built so many the ocean
temperature increased over six degrees
from the cooling outflow.
The sewage and the warm water
produced an algae bloom on the top of
the entire South China Sea.
Q. Youre kidding.
A. No, really. Have I ever lied to you?
? Q. Now that you ...
A. Dont answer that. So, as 1 was
saying all the fish in the ocean died and
the water got so foul even Mao wouldn't
swim in it.
In short, they said to us: Well do
anything. Just get your damned factories
out of here.
Q. What form of withdrawal do you
envision?
A. Were going to move the factories
back to Florida and bring the boys home.

e Clean Up
MR. EDITOR:
Those of us who took part in the
Gainesville City Clean-Up would like to
know what happened to all of the
sororities and their relevancy? Out of
all of the sororities, the only one to
participate was Kappa Delta.
NAME WITHHELD
by Brickman

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

a*
%%%y/Xv#v*w#%VAvX%vv*y.v.y#y/*v
FOR SALE
1966 Karman Glha good condition
phono 3 72-2059 ask for Bill
(A-st-131-p)
Typewriter royal electric best offer
372-2900 900 am 5OO pm
weekdays. (A-3t-131-p) <
KLH Model 15 stereo, garrard
changer, walnut base and speaker
enclosures. Perfect condition with
new cartridge and stylus phone
378-1122. (A-st-131-p)
Labrador retrievers, Bweeks, wormed,
shots. AKC papers, SSO ea. tel.
376-3787. (A-5M31-P)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W Unlv.
ave., and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(A-st-131-p)
4 cent Xerox copies OUIK WAY
Copy Center, 3> machines no waiting.
Free collating, 100 copies 1 original 3
% cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Qulkway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (A-llt-126-p)
1965 Corvette conv. stereo tape. All
the extras. Must, see to appreciate.
Will trade for big' cycle + cash. Call:
392-7565 after 4 PM. (A-st-128-p)
DESTROY your roomie with 35
watts/channel. 6 yr. old Heath da2Bl
amp. Tubes less than 1 yr. old. With
assembly manual. SSO. 378-7671.
(A-st-128-p)
Kustom amp. Gibson elec, guitar.
Both excellent condition. Must sell.
Call Mike at 372-7913. (A-st-130-p)
REK O KUT Professional
turntable & tonearm with cartridge
650. Askrfor Bill Hat 372-9405 Chi
Phi Frat. Evenings. (A-3t-130-p)
Enjoy the Florida sun with a cycle
*69 Honda cm9l $235 helmet
include Yamaha 50 $125 automatic
exc. cond. Call 376-0687 or
378-4668 aft 2:30. (A-3t-130-p)
A beautiful Persian rug is a wonderful
gift especialy for Mother's day call
378-8641 after 5:00 pm.
(A-st-130-p)
Mobile Home 1969 Homette 12 x 44,
one bedroom, A/C,* Early amer.,
carpet, good study desk, on nice lot.
378-9661 after 5:00 p.m.
(A-129-st-p)
New Moon *64. 55 x 10 2 bedroom.
Central Air & Heat. Furnished.
Excellent Condition. $3,290. Call
372-3893 after 7 P.M. (A-10t-126-p)
Complete component streo-falr
condition $40.00 phone
904-964-6983 313 Washington
Starke. Fla. (A-129-st-p)
GATOR COURT
375*4667 4170 SW
13th St.
"spend where the
the night... price is right

9BK
l at
I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
I MONDAY
I Baked Meat Sauce and
I Macaroni 791
I All you can eat T
I TUESDAY
I Golden Fried Chicken
I All you can eat
99<
l; GAINESVILLE MALL
[piHilM SIMM

..a***********************


FOR SA LE
vlvXvavX-:^
CLEANINGEST carpet cleaner you
ever used, so easy too. Get Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-c-156)
Headquarters for tennis, golf, guns,
handball, water sports, camping team
sports, fishing, physical fitness B & B
SPORTS CENTER 5320 N.W. 13th
St. 378-1461. (A-st-132-p)
Selective cross-bred female puppy.
Parents AKC Doberman, AKC
Viseler (similar Wiemeraner) Pet,
hunting, watchdog. SSO. 376-4500.
(A-3t-132-p)
17' Thunderbird, 100 HP Evinrude,
Murray Trailer, component winch,
equipped. SI9OO. or best offer call
378-7213 evenings. (A-st-132-p)
Honda 65cc Must Sell $75 or Best
offer Cali Alan 392-7254.
(A-131-3t-pT
Save! 7' antiq crnr hutch $100; 6 mo
Zenith solid st port, stereo, dia ndle,
6 spkrs, orgin, $219 now $100;
maple dbl drsr & mlr $25. Will sell all
3 together for $175. Call 378-8803
anytime. (A-6t-132-p)
Ham radio. National NC-300. Heath
TX-1. Many extras. Excellent
appearance and operation. Bargain at
$250. Interesting hobby. 376-6705.
(A-3t-132-p)
FOR EE NT
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities Included complete!/
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
Male female, now, June Sept two
blocks to campus, large rm ktchen
priv. TV air cond quiet yet liberal
1204 NW 3 ave 378-0286 392-0700.
(B-st-130-p)
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close to
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
376-8990 University Apartments
(B-24t-l 1-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423 r 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372-7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
[ Guns Guns Guns j
[ Inventory over 500. Buy j
[Sell Trade Repair, j
[ Reloading supplies, Layaway j!
i plan. Harry Beckwith, gun )
" t dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. j [

l. The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 4.1970

Page 10

FOR RENT
POOLSIDE 2 bedroom Landmark
apt. no. 110 to sublet for summer qt.
46.25/mo. a person June rent free or
need 2 fern, roomates call 376-2842.
, (B-st-130-p)
Sublet for summer quarter one
bedroom sum. apL Gatortown 115
130/mo. large living room. Call
378-9743 Will consider best offer.
(B-6t-130-p)
1327 NW 7th Ave one bedroom apt
suitable for two person or married
couple call 378-8641 after 5:00 pm.
(B-st-130-p)
Must sublet til mid Sept. 1 bdrm apt
ac across from campus SIOO monthly
immediate occupancy ph 378-7198.
(B-st-131-p)
No lease S7O a month incl. utilities
new 12x60 mobile home your own
room TV A/C and only one other
person phone 376-4138. Ask for Jim.
(B-st-131-p)
Furnished apt. quiet luxury living in
two bedroom central h/air w.w.
carpeting convient location $145
376-6690. (B-2t-131-p)
Sublease now for summer. Summit
House. New building, pool etc. Much
more. Must be 21 and working or
married. $139 per mo. call 376-8514
after 5:00. (B-st-131-p)
SUBLET HAWAIIAN VILLAGE
Townhouse summer quarter.
$l6O/mo. Usually $230 But we will
give you S7O dlf. Call 378-4219 eve.
(B-129-st-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 SW 16th Court. MAKE YOUR
FALL RESERVATIONS NOW. Call
376-9668. (B-126-ts-c)
Furnished, Clean, Single Corner room
Boys and upperclassman only. All
utilties furnished. 30.00 per month
1614 N.W. 3rd place call 372-2946
for appointment. (B-lt-132-p)
I br apt Landmark No. 164.
Available June 15. AC, Dishwasher.
Beautiful & big. Call Cindy,
376-0453. (B-3t-132-p)
Sublet for summer or longer. June
rent paid, 1 bdr, furn, A/C, pool, TV
cable. $l2O/mo Frederick Apts No.
63. Day 372-7555, night 378-5823.
(B-st-132-p) t
WANTED
SUMMIT HOUSE male roommate
needed Immediately and/or for
summer quarter 43.50/mth. apt. G-l
call after spm 376-1006.
(C-3t-130-p)
Female roomate needed immed no
lease own room 2 blocks away from
campus Call 378-3220. (C-lt-132-p)
HELP WANTED
Wanted: 2 attractive girls, 21 or older
to be carhops. Must be willing to
wear bikinis. Job is part-time
evenings, full-time on weekends. Stop
by, don't call. Maryland Fried
Chicken, 516 NW 13th St. (E-ts-c)
Distribute advertising to city homes,
You can eam $2 or more an hour.
Tues. or Wed. time flexible.
Telephone 376-5716 after 2 p.m.
(E-st-132-p)
Co-ed wanted room and board in
exchange for domestic duties call
378-4292 after 7 p.m. (E-4t-132-p)
Listeners Wanted will pay $2.00
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call 392-2049
between 1 and 4 p.m. for
appointment. (E-st-132-p)
/ COLO* SSJ
\nSixr!*Z H,,s Ff K
A*!V BEST SUPPORTING ACTRES j Goldie HawnX
| v\v> j
II Cactus Flower3
Jrjfib now m
Mil jjN SHOWING KS
/^fifi PLAYING
I f < illrj APR X MAY 6 O 0
I k-u* ' A n
I com,t
in v -a
COHIC** fl
I So 2 COLORHits!

HELP wanted
Cocktail Waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary will
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dub's
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-12S-p)
Drivers to transport car to Phlla area
one In May other in June must have
ref prefer over 21 call after 8 in
evening 378-0685. (E-st-130-p)
AUTOS
1965 Corvair. Air conditioned, radio,
automatic. Basically good condition,
needs minor repair. First $425. Steve
373-1085 or 845 SW sth ave.
(G-2t-131-p)
; -
VOLVO 1962 Model PV544 with 5
main bearing B-18 engine, new tires,
very good condition S4OO call
378-6945 after 5 o'clock.
(G-3t-131-p)
64 Falcon, 4 dr., 6 cyl., stand, shift,
radio, heater, good condition. $525.
Call 376-2248 between 5 and 10 P.M.
Only! (G-129-4t-p)
1941 Ford 2 dr. Daluxe sedan VB.
Ideal for restoration excellent
running condition. Never wrecked.
Second owner $250. Call 378-7700
anytime. (G-st-129-p)
Need cheap transport around campus
and city? *63 Falcon radio heat,
standard $175 moves slow but gets
you there. 373-2371 FOR INFO.
Leo. (G-st-128-p)
1969 BMW 1600. Stickshlft and
brandnew engine. $2195 call
372-6474 after 2pm. (G-3t-130-p)
1963 Rambler FULLY EQUIPPED
Runs Perfectly yery Clean Best offer
takes It! Cbll 373-1573 or 373-2747.
(G-129-st-p) -
1967 Flat SSOO. Body and engine in
excellent condition. Foqr brand new
tires. Terrific buy! I'm ready to sell!
376-6166 or
MERCEDES-BENZ 1964 190 Sedan
in immaculate condition with air
conditioning, Becker AM-fM, Radial
tires, $1490 378-5068. (G-3t-130-p)
1960 Ford Galaxle 2 door automatic
power steering, factory air, 8 heater
call 378-9460 afternoons or see at
Westgate trailer park Lot 101. $250.
(Q-131-4t-P)
BEAUTIFUL German Shepherd
puppies. 2 girls left. 5 wks. ACK well
bred! SSO proves you want them,
pays our vet bill. Bob 378-7479 j nlte.
(J-st-128-p)
Co-eds unwanted facial hair removed
forever cost is low fast world
famous kree method. Edmund Dwyer
Electrolog Ist. 372-8039. 102 NW 2nd
St. (J-21t-124-p)
Hwr W.M*
,* TO EXCITE *.
EACH OTHER. . \
THEY IGNITE J
THE WORLD!
Based on he Novel 0 m
tfi "THE ADVENTURERS" bye
YTHBe HAROLD ROBBMS *
wgfw *u_
Last 4
wstifl j ays
I [ml
4 ACADEMY AWARDS
mcMnw
fBEST SONG I
PAUL
eMH
Cc-lor 0
_ Last 4
Days
I W BUWeerelN 4ve. I *,
|
#**

PERSONAL
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W. Univ.
ave., and ask for Bob Zuber, .teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(J-5M31-P)
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent air
carports awnings add-a-rooms
supplies and accesories. Prompt
and dependable -service. TNT sales
and service 373-1446. (J-10t-130-p)
Flying to Miami May Bth $25 & to
Wash. D.C. May 14th or 15th S6O
round trip. Need 2 3 passengers.
Bahamas anytime $25 r.t. 372-2419.
(J-3t-131-p)
Student Representatives from Fla.
Law School will be at the Reitz
Union on Tues. May sth to answer
questions on admissions, etc.
(J-129-st-p)
Its the every-other-week! THE
FLORIDA PROBE is coming to your
door (in Sin City) and to your
college. Find out what's REALLY
happening on campus. Read the
PROBE. (J-2t-132-p)
Wanted Mothers with infants 3 mo/'
or younger needed for infant research
study. Up to $5.00 for participating
Call 392-2914, after 6; 372-1114.
(J-10t-132-c)
Ted, I love you very much. Thank
you for "Just Because, and for
being the one I love. I am yours
forever. Love, your Baby.
(J-lt-132-p)
LOST & FOUND
v.v.v.v.;.v.v.v.v.;.y/.v.;Av.v.v.v.y.v.:
Lost: Ladies silver with black band
Bui ova watch Name v and date
Inscribed on .back of case Gall Gloria
at 378-9743 Reward. (L-3t-130-p)
LOST: Gold Omega Orange Bowl
1967" watch at handball courts great
sentimental value reward Mel Sharpe
392-1311 or 376-9966 after 6pm.
(L-st-131-p)
5
Found: Mens ring. Blue Stone call
& Identify 378-1190. (L-3t-131-p)
BMP I NOW!
| TfksMw Isl MM r I
WHATTA 49
DAMN! Mm :a
MASTERPIECE *r
I* m. tn* %H?7to7nof
TECHNICOLOR* a
FROM WARNER BROB.OP



,'V ' * _ -* /. ...
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

LOST & FOUND
Ivivl'X'Xy^vli.vXv/iylvXvXvXyXv;;;
REWARD for return of bee-shaped
pin tel am only 392*3413.
(L-3t-130-p)
Lost Champion motorcycle helment
between Williamson and AFA
Building April 29 call Paul after 4
p.rn. at 378-5864. (L-2t-132-p)
SE RV ICES
Motorcycle ownersl Custom painting
of cycles and helmets full line of
metalflake and candyapple colors
now available cyclerama ph.
378-2811. (M-st-131-p)
VOLKSWAGEN PARTS AND
SERVICE GAINESVILLE MACH
SHOP 1224 S MAIN 376-0710.
(M-10t-131-p)

'V ;
Photography
Your Bag? jflr
The Florida Alligator
is looking lor a
Fashion Photographer
- <- ; ~
Summer Quarter
' ' *' 9
(or longer)
If you aro intorostod in joining tho staff, bring your portfolio
to the Alligator Business Office as soon as possible.

| the UF Board of Student Publications is accepting applications for J
I Editor, Managing Editor,
Term IV, 1970 Summer Term, Only I
[ Editor, Managing Editor, j
I Florida Alligator
1 ' " g v. '
Terms I & II Fall 1970; Winter 1971
1 '
i (
- General Instructions
Begin picking up applications Tuesday, May 5.
All applications are to be picked up and returned to Room 330, J. Wayne
Reitz Union between 8 am 4 pm.
Each applicant must return an original plus two clean copies of his application.
§ Applications must be returned prior to 4 pm, FRIDAY, MAY 15.
f Board meeting will be held Thursday, May 21 at 2:30 in Room 316, Reitz Union.
A schedule of interviews will be posted on main bulletin board in
Room 330, Wednesday, May 30.
# ...<
|| . .
, -v 1 if* I

Monday, May 4,1970, The Florida Alligator.

SE RV ICES
Alternators Generators Starter?
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent-air
carports awnings add-a-rooms
supplies and accesorles. Prompt
and dependable service. TNT sales
and service 373-1446. (M-10t-130-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass offlca in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPITCIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-c)
Captain Louies Galley delivery
service seafood & chicken phone
372-3547. (M-st-131-p)

Page 11

SERVICES
4 cent Xerox QUICK WAY Copy
Center, 3 machines no waiting. Free
collating. 100 copies 1 original 3 Vi
cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Qulkway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis end dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (M-llt-126-p)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
RECORDS! Oldies! 20,000 in Stock.
Send 35 cents for 2,000 listing
catalog. Mall orders filled. RECORD
CENTER 1895 W. 25th Cleve., Ohio.
Record Tapes (M-4t-122-p)

BONUS£ PHOTO.
FROM ALL COLOR SQUARE NEGATIVE FILMS
Greatest thing
to happen to your ;
color snapshots!
3RD ANN I VERS A R
mlji 1 TO
£ j.
t| c<^^Lr^=
l f
i 1
JHH
HM I 1 M
* (ACTUAL SIZE PRINTS 3V4 SQUARE AND 2W- SQUARE)
REMEMBER, WERE HEADQUARTERS FOR QUALITY PROCESSING BY BONUS PHOTO!
a a PHOTO DEALERS:
A. ALL GRESHAM DRUGS
and PHARMACIES
IllWtr KWIK-STOP
Tlf FLORIDA PHARMACY
- -.1



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 4,1970

1 (CflttiptlSl'KDrttf SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
*r c
1 GET INVOLVED IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT
I r? j -
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT? GET INVOLVED ... Applications are now available for
cabinet and other student government agencies for any interested students. COME ON UP TO THE STUDENT
I GOVERNMENT OFFICES, third floor Reitz Union.
FLORIDA PLAYERS PRESENT:
Tickets for Florida Player's multi-media production of Jean Anouilh's comedy Thieves' Carnival go on sale Tuesday
I May 5, at the Union Box Office, 392-1653. All seats are reserved. Admission for UF students is $.75.
A BRIDGE OVER TROUBLED WATERS
A SERIES OF FRANK DISCUSSIONS ON MARITAL PROBLEMS ...
May 14 Desire, Expectations, and Reality ... deals with the whole process of child bearing. Rm. 347 Union, 7:30
May 21 Two In One Flesh ... deals with sexual and spiritual aspects of marriage. Union Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.
May 28 Babies and Budgets & Alimony to Divorce ... deals with the financial and legal aspects of marriage. Union
Aud. 7:30
ATTENTION PRE-LAW AND OTHER INTERESTED STUDENTS
Student Representatives from the University of Florida College of Law will be in the lobby of the Reitz Union on
Tuesday, May sth, from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. to answer questions concerning admission requirements, financial
assistance programs, curriculum, and related matters..
HONOR COURT FORMS SPEAKERS BUREAU
; - _ t
The Honor Court Bar Association has formed a Speaker's Bureau. The purpose of the Bureau will be to furnish any
interested faculty or Student organization a qualified member of the Honor Court to talk about the Honor System, the
Honor Code, and the Honor Court. Any interested organizations should contact the Honor Court Office at 392*1631-2-3.
HELP FROM THE OMBUDSMAN
Have a problem? Need help? Call the OMBUDSMAN! Room 232 J. Wayne Reitz Union. Phone 392-1650.
STUDENT TUTORS AVAILABLE
-
-/ .. *- \
Physical Science confusing you? German losing you? Whatever course bothers you. Sigma Tau Sigma, the Student Tutor
Society, can help. Applications for tutoring are available in the office for Student Development, room 128, Tigert Hall.
FLORIDA STUDENT CONGRESS NEEDS PERSONNEL
$
4
The Florida Student Congress, a statewide student government association, still needs office personnel and an
Administrative Assistant to the President. Apply at the Student Government Office, 305 J. Wayne Reitz Union.
BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE
Bulletin Board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it. Bring your material, 20 copies of each
sheet, to the Student Government office and you will get free publicity for your organization. No personal material will be
posted.
SUPPORT THE LEGAL AID FUND
The Student Mobilization Committee will sponsor a dance next Friday to raise money for their newly established Legal
Aid Fund. SHOW YOU CARE .. .SUPPORT YOUR FELLOW
Presbyterian Center, 376-7530.376-7539.
FRATERNITY ALL-STARS VS. GATOR GREATS
The Fraternity All-Star Football team coached by Jimmy Dunn, Carlos Alvarez, and John Reaves, will duel the Gator
Greats, featuring Steve Spurrier, Richard Trapp, and Larry Smith, on Thursday May 7, in Florida Field. Tickets $.50.
DON'T MISS THIS GREAT CONTEST ... Sponsored by the IFC.
COME TO THE INAUGURATION
;; A - \ %
All students are invited to attend the Inauguaration Ceremony for the 1970-71 Student Government Officers on
Thursday May 7, at 12 noon in the Plaza of the Americas.
y \ * ; ... jaatl f to
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 5:00 OF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS CRIER. THANKS.
1 > .... .
, \ 808 BERRIN
I|| DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
T STUDENT GOVERNMENT



Students Plan
Cambodia Protest
. 1 . . [' f T
By United Press International
College students around the nation vowed Sunday to step up
their protest against expansion of the war in Southeast Asia A
week long strike was scheduled for today at many schools.
In Cleveland, about 75 students occupied ROTC offices on
the Case Reserve University campus." 1
CASE PRESIDENT Robert Morse told the students that
protesting is not the way to get out of Cambodia.
The students vowed to remain in the ROTC offices until an
emergency meeting of the faculty senate is held Tuesday.
Students from at least 13 colleges many where violence
occurred following President Nixons decision to send troops to
Cambodia called for a weeklong strike.
STUDENTS WHO signed the four-point resolution calling for
the strike were from the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton,
Pennsylvania State, Temple, Bryn Mawr, Villanova, Lycoming!
Bucknell, Rutgers, Goucher, Drexel, West Chester State and the
Philadelphia College of Art.
Columbia President Andrew W. Cordier agreed to a one-day
moratorium on classes Monday to protest the Cambodia
situation.
As Cordier made his announcement, editors from six of eight
Ivy League newspapers were meeting to discuss joint action on
the issue, possibly an editorial calling for a strike at colleges
throughout the country.
MOST STUDENT militants spent Sunday in planning
sessions.
A late Saturday night fire of undetermined origin at Kent
State University destroyed a converted World War II building.
About 500 National Guardsmen stood by but there were no
arrests:
All but 500 of the 1,800 troops dispatched to Ohio State
during a confrontation between police and students last week
went home. Bars were reopened and a midnight curfew was
lifted.
FOUR PRINCETON University students were arrested for
allegedly throwing two Molotov cocktails into Army and Navy
administrative offices.
All were charged with conspiracy and burning buildings other
than dwellings. Damages to the military offices were estimated
at under $15,000.

situation.

AVAILABLE AT RECORDSVILLE, IN THE MALL
1 a >J .

HOLLYWOOD WOULD NEVER APPROVE

There are no stereotype
Saturday-at-the-movies Indians
in this picture.
Youre looking at four hard harddriving
driving harddriving rock musicians from the
West Coast who call themselves
Redbone^
Two of the group, Lolly Vegas
and Pat Vegas, backed Odetta and
John Lee Hooker while still in

SEEKS LIMITS

Congress Debates War

WASHINGTON (UPI) With U. S. troops now
fighting in Cambodia, the House and Senate resume
their rekindled debate on the Indochinese War this
week with resolutions to either halt or limit
American participation.
Such resolutions were due in both chambers, but
most of their sponsors conceded they amounted to
little more than symbolic protests rather than
realistic attempts to sway President Nixons war
policy.
IN THE SENATE, the Foreign Relations
Committee scheduled another meeting today to
discuss various alternatives for displaying its
displeasure over the turn of events in Southeast
Asia, including what to do about what some
members saw as a partial rebuff from Nixon on a
demand to meet with him.
Many committee members were planning to
boycott the meeting Nixon offered, a Tuesday night
White House gathering with their counterparts on
the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
Some of the dissidents said the gathering would
be too large with about 50 congressmen and
senators to be productive.
OTHERS CONSIDERED Nixons response a
direct insult to the Senate, which has a special
constitutional role in the making of foreign policy
that is not shared by the House.
Four senators said they would propose an
amendment to uspecified legislation that would cut
off all funds for the war, but an up or down vote
they are seeking may be postponed for several


free expression
for $1.25?

their teens. And have written
songs recorded by Aretha
Franklin, Bobbie Gentry and
The Righteous Brothers.
Chances are youre not going
to expect what you hear when you
play Redbones new album.
Chances are youve seen too
many movies.
On Epic Records

Monday, May 4,1970, The Florida ANifator,

weeks until defense spending bills begin coming to
the floor.
And a yes or no vote on the war may never come
at all, because of Senate rules that permit softening
substitutes to be offered to amendments.
THE VEHICLE FOR Senate debate on Southeast
Asia this week will be a concurrent resolution to
repeal the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin resolution, which
authorized unlimited action to repel Communist
aggression in Vietnam and elsewhere in Indochina.
Most members believe the actual act of repeal
which does not require the Presidents signature
would be practically meaningless, since the
Nixon administration is not relying on the 1964
legislation as the legal basis for its continued
intervention in Southeast Asia.
In the House, the vehicle will be continued
debate on a $20.2 billion military authorization bill
for major weapons systems and military research in
the 12 months starting July 1.
THREE AMENDMENTS reflecting the
Cambodia situation have been introduced.
One, by Rep. Ogden Reid, R-N. Y., would ban
sending U. S. ground combat troops to Laos,
Thailand or Cambodia, but observers have pointed
out a ban on Cambodian action would be academic
at this point.
Rep. Robert Leggett, D-Calif., offered an
amendment to add the words without the prior
consent of Congress to the ban.
Rep. Paul Findley, R-111., proposed to grant the
President authority to use troops in the other
countries to protect the lives of Americans fighting
in Vietnam.

read
FLORIDA
QUARTERLY

REDBONE 1
I INCLUDING:
NIKI HOKEY/TENNESSEE GWL/UTTLE GNtl
MINOR SEVEN HEAVEN/RED AND BLUE

Page 13



The
Florida
Alligator

PLAYERS AND COACHES
Shiny New Faces Shown

By CRAIG GOLDWYM
Alligator Sports Editor
A generation gap between
newcomers and old-timers
slammed shut Saturday when
new Head Coach Doug Dickeys
adopted Gators got it together
Saturday in a close 23-20 finale
to spring drills. The Blue won,
but it hardly mattered.
Steady veterans like John
Reaves, Tommy Durrance, Jack
PHIL BANNISTER
WILLIE JACKSON
... steps over Sorenson

Auburn Halts Streak

. * - V
The baseball teams 11-game
winning streak finally came to
end Saturday as Coach Dave
Fullers men dropped a close 3-2
decision to the Tigers at Auburn.
The loss, coupled with
Tennessees rain-out at
Kentucky, enabled the
Volunteers to move a half-game
in front of the Gators in the
Southeastern Conference
standings.
THE GATORS had won their
eleventh in a row, 4-0, Friday
behind the six-hit pitching of
Glenn Pickren. Pickren now has
three victories and two defeats.
In Saturdays game the Gators
had built up a two-run lead in
the early innings only to see the
Tigers score two quick unearned
ones in the bottom of the sixth.
Auburn then went on to score
the deciding run in the bottom
of the ninth on clutch hitting.
Wayne Rogers started for the
Gators and went six innings
before giving way to Larry
Sheffield, who was tagged with
his second loss to bring his
record to 2-2 for the season.
The Gators will entertain
Golf Clnb
SIMM! MBMHBHr
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 TAX
SPECIAL RAH
WEEKDAYS $2 ALL DAY
WfEKINQS $3 ALL DAY
For information coil
3 76-0080
gr teowwoop
W IU. JMiAWNU I

GATOR SPORTS

Youngblood, Bob Harrell and
Jack Burns welcomed the
upstarts with a hard-fought
contest of two evenly matched
halves of the squad.
TIGHT END Jim Yancey,
who played just long enough last
season to earn a letter and get
his pants dirty was the ghost of
the football season yet to come
as he enveloped seven passes
with his 6-3 frame from sub
quarterback John Schnebly.
Schnebly fed Yancey one that
gave Blue defenders indigestion
for seventy yards and six points.
Steady blocking from Gene
Conrad, Eric Taggart and center
Richard Kensler protected the
inexperienced Schnebly who
proved his worth to Dickey, a
man who is used to having
strong back-up quarterbacks.
The Schnebly-led Orange
squad came out on the short end
of the scoring stick, but not on
the yardstick as they
out-offensed the Reaves led
Blue 379-284 yards.
ON DEFENSE, Blue
standouts were Richard
Buchanan, a reckless and
exciting linebacker who makes
things happen, Bums, Doug
Sorenson, John Silman, and
Mike Gurkin.
And then there was Willie
Jackson. Jackson gave Orange
defenders the willies as he
jitterbuged from goal to goal
with passes and hand-offs.

Rollins College Wednesday
before leaving for their crucial
three-game series against SEC
Eastern Division leader
Tennessee in Knoxville.
Havt
# Your Generator %
| OVERHAULED Special)
%SJLS 0 |
-
alachOUWty
GENERATOR SERVICE
USEYOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARD.
, Mon.Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm

r WWWWWWVWUVWWVV^^
NORTHWEST AMERICAN
3302 N. W. 13th Street Gainesville, Florida
\ SPECIALIZING IN VOLKSWAGEN REPAIR ;!
i: OVER 5 tears experience at your local authorized Volkswagen dealer :
Hainlenance of SIO.OO or More Provides Tree Oil Change and Lubrication
\ BRAKES MUFFLERS ALL WORK GUARANTEED 1
i REAR END TUNE UPS Fpcc pctim atf<; / f \
S ENGINE WORK FRONT END 1
i FUEL INJECTION AIR CONDITIONERS /) -7- \
i GENERAL REPAIRS ELECTRICAL REPAIRS ij

Incredible.
There may be no super sophs
next year, but some super
surprises are certainly in the
brewing.
Consecutive
Goal Record
DETROIT (UPI) The
Detroit Red Wings hold the
National Hockey League record
for most consecutive goals in
one game, 15, in a 15-0 rout of
the New York Rangers in 1944
at Detroit.
NOW
OPENING
for
Sept. Occupancy
LEASE OFFICE
309 NW 13th St.
Across from
Tigert Hall
.tlf@i
place)

I
HH JWk JH&
jk 'be §hb Jehel smb : bhe ^bb
if r fQmHHi;
p Sr s E §BBBm nt BE P h on
i B B I Sv n\ v Vm^Tffit^M
'
m IWI r *jii i j# B^Hl^Bl^ll^l^^^^B^^fl^flHl^l
:^HI *9 1 j j
Hffl|^H^^^^^^nw|WjVT^RHyl|nHVl^^^^Hnnl
h Sif JsHflHf hEBe' v eh
Bfl jIB

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 14

JIM YANCEY PH,L BANNISTER
... off to the races
GUNS-GUNS-GUNS
-Students only only-10%
-10% only-10% DISCOUNT on
guns and ammo. Bring this
ad and your student I.D.
card
offer expires MAY9
1970
Harry Beckwith Gun Dealer
Micanopy, Fla,. Ph 466-3340

v The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 4,1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor



SAME STORY ALL DAY
... FSU wins 440-yd. dash
Seminoles In Runaway

Track Coach Jimmy Carnes
called it as the favored
Seminoles ran away from his
tracksters Friday for a 85-60
victory, but unhappily so for
.himself and the record 4,000
spectators.
Carnes had figured on paper
before the big dual meet that
FSU would win 76-68 on best
times and distances for this year.
But he had also planned to alter
things a bit by using some of his
runners in two events to help
take points away from the Tribe.
CARNES HAD unpublically
figured that his alterations
would produce a one point
victory margin, but
disappointingly the Seminoles

...And Sailaway Too
The Gator Sail Club held their Gator-bait Regatta Saturday and
wound up getting scalped 77-56 by FSU in a meet that was shortened
by one day at Lake Wauburg.
FSIPs stronger and more established club could only stay one day
and left Sunday after taking all of the division and class firsts except
for Nancy Yoders first in the smaller boats.
Gator John Tack finished second over-all on the strength of several
seconds during the regatta.
The club will have a rematch with the Seminoles May 16 and 17 in
Tallahassee.
TENNIS
Columbus College at Varsity Cts., 2:30 p.m.
GATORTOWN APTS.
Featuring :
3 MONTH LEASES
LARGE CLOSETS
% ALL ELECTRIC KITCHEN
m u master tv antenna
\l 1 ABUNDANT P ARK NG
( 8 JtSi TW LARGE POOLS
barbecue grills
309 SW 16th
the se NOW FOR

were too strong and quickly
proved it.
There were some highlights
for the Gators as All-American
Eamonn OKeeffe led a UF
sweep of the 880-yd. run with
Benny Vaughn and Bob Lang
finishing behind him.
In the field events Ron
Jourdan took the high jump
with a 6-foot-8 leap, Scott
Hurley won the pole vault with a
15-6 effort and John Courtney
aced the discus with a 164-4
throw.
TWO OTHER SUCESSES for
the Gators were Roger Carsons
first in the 220-yd. run and Jim
Dyson, Vaughn, Ron Kingry and
OKeeffes victory in the mile
relay.

Frustrations for the Gators
were injured Ron Colemans two
second places in the long
jump and triple jump, plus John
Parkers second in the mile.
I' SMK..
m ONRH' v
m 1 ig^lPWrl
IB T Js
4 B
5
Bilf r 1 |
PHi m MMiml
RON COLEMAN
... still hobbled

BRASINGTON
Cadillac-Oldsmobile, Inc.
2001 NW

1968 CADILLAC ELDORADO $4895
v
2Dr H.T. Black Vinyl Over White, Front Wheel Drive,
Full Power, Loaded, AM/FM Radio
1969 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD $5495
White with leather Interior, air conditioned, tilt &
teloscoplc steering wheel, power door locks, twilight
sentinel lights, local owner.
1968 CADILLAC $4295
Sedan de Villa. Four door hardtop. Cameo Beige with
matching vinyl top. L-eather interior. Loaded with
accessories Including autronlc eye, twilight sentinel, air
conditioning, tilt-telescopic steering wheel.
1966 BUICK RIVIERA $2295
Turquoise with matching Interior, air conditioned, full
power, very attractive.
1968 BUICK SKYLARK $2095
4 dr. Sedan, radio heater, automatic transmission,
power steering and brakes, air conditioned.
1967 OLDSMOBILE $2495
Toronado. Blue with matching blue Interior. Air
conditioned. Full power. Front wheel drive.

OTHER FINE LATE MODEL USED CARS IN STOCK) fjeaCMsl I

Netters Split Two
The UF's tennis team split a two-day road trip, defeating Atlantic
Christian College 8-1 Saturday in Boca Raton after dropping a 7-2 loss
to the University of Miami Friday.
The Gators, who are now 13-8 for the season, were never in the
match against the top five nationally ranked Hurricanes, dropping all
six singles matches. Buddy Miles and Ralph Hart, however, defeated
Miamis Lee Steele and Tom Hauser.
Saturday turned out to be a better day for the Gators as they
completely out-classed Atlantic Christian. Only 1968 Florida Junior
College Champion Mike Keighly could earn the smaller school a point
by knocking number one Gator Greg Hilley.
ELROD'S AUTO REPAIR
AND SALES
VlfiKc. "CORVAIR SPECIALIST"
GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 3767771

mm

EXPERT SERVICE j
PORSCHE CARE AND PREPARATION
wf*
Speed Equipment Service on All
end Accessories / Foreign Makes
MF/
535 SW 4th Ave. 376-9381

Monday, May 4,1970, The Florida AMgator,

1967 FORD $2195
Thunderblrd. Air conditioned, full power. Black vinyl
top over yellow.
1968 OPEL $1395
Station wagon, with air conditioning, 4 speed, beige.
1966 OLDSMOBILE 98 $1695
Two door hardtop coupe. Black vinyl over white. Air
conditioned. Full power. NICE!
1967 VW 'RED BUO $1295
Radio, Heater. Runs Good.
1968 RAMBLER AMERICAN $1295
2Dr Coupe, Radio, Heat* Automatic Tranemkdon.
Green.
1967 OLDSMOBILE FBS $995
. \
Sedan 6 Cylindqr, 3 Spaed TrammMon Heater, Good
Economical Transportation.
1964 CHEVROLET $895
Impa la station wagon V-8, automatic transadaiLon, air,
PS A PB. New rebuilt engine. vaaatinnSpaefifc

! Student Special >
Any car or color!
I
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
|_ Ph. 373-1665 J

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 4,1970

Trading Rash Over For NFL Teams

REACTING LIKE SOMEONE
with a strange and rare disease
the National Football Leagues
teams broke out with a rash of
trades. Cause for the rash was
the NFLs in ter conference
trading deadline, which was
Friday at mid-night.
With new coach Don Shula
probably wanting to shake
things up at Miami, the Dolphins
sent defensive back Tom Beier
to the San Francisco Forty
Niners for offensive tackle Lance
Olssen.
In another deal the Dolphins
got the Minnesota Vikings to
swap offensive guard Bookie
Bolin for comerback Dick
Westmoreland.
WITHOUT A DOCTOR to
remedy the rash the Denver
Broncos got into the action
picking up running back Israel
Lang from the Los Angles Rams
for linebacker Frank Richter.
The Broncos also got veteran
running back Willis Crenshaw
from the St. Louis Cardinals for
an undisclosed draft choice.
In another outbreak the New
York Giants acquired
quarterback Dich Shiner from
die Washington Redskins in
exchange for defensive end
Henry Davis and running back
John Fuqua.
And before the all safe period
started the Oakland Raiders gave
up unnamed draft choices for
1971 in exchange for offensive
tackle Jerry Jones and
linebacker Ted Davis from the
New Orleans Saints.
* *
HAROLD FOX, one of the
nations top junior college
basketball players, signed a
basketball grant-in-aid Sunday
with Jacksonville University.
Fox, who averaged 25 points
per game for Brevard Junior
College in Cocoa Beach, is
expected to move into the
Dolphins starting lineup next
season replacing 6-5 Rex
Morgan.

kTdatsun
THE NEW LEADER IN SMALL CARS** OPEN j.. 7 p M
2ND AVE AND 2ND ST. S.E. 378 2311 M ON THRU SAT

Morgan was the only starter
lost from the team which
finished second to UCLA in the
recent NCAA championships.
* *
A 15-POINT CREDIT at the
free throw line in the final
period by Fred Lewis enabled
the Indiana Pacers to take a
114-110 victory and a 2-1 edge
over the Kentucky Colonels at
Louisville in the Eastern Division
finals of the American
Basketball Association playoffs
Sunday afternoon.
Lewis hit 17 of 17 attempts at
the charity stripe and collected
31 points.
* *
JOHNNY BUCYK scored the
first hat trick of his career
Sunday at St. Louis in the
playoffs to give the Boston
Bruins a 6-1 win over the St.
Louis Blues in the first game of
the Stanley Cup finals.
Bucyk, a 15-year veteran in
the National Hockey League,
scored one goal against St. Louis
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 14 8
Detroit 8 .619 Vi
Boston 12 9 ..571 IVi
Washington 12 11 .522 2Yi
New York 13 12 .520 2Vi
Cleveland 9 12 .429 4Vi
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 14 7 .667
California 14 8 .636 Vi
Oakland 11 13 .458 4Vi
Chicago 9 13 .409 sii
Kansas City 8 14 .364 6Vi
Milwaukee 5 19 .208 10
SUNDAYS RESULTS
Cleveland 6, Kansas City 3
Detroit 6, Chicago 5
Minnesota 4, Baltimore 3
Oakland 3, Washington 1 (Ist)
Washington 6, Oakland 4 (2nd)
New York 8, Milwaukee 7 (Ist)
New York 4, Milwaukee 2 (2nd)
California at Boston (postponed, rain)
MONDAYS GAMES
(No Games Scheduled)

goalie Jacques Plante, who was
forced to leave the game when he
was hit in the forehead with a
puck, and tWo goals against
Ernie Wakely.
* *
VETERAN BEN HOGAN,
who has not played golf
competitively since the 1967
U. S. Open, said Friday in
Houston he will play in next
weeks $115,000 Houston
Champions Golf Tournament.
Hogan, 57, who has not won a
tournament since the 1959
Colonial in his native Fort
Worth, has been sidelined with a
recurrence of a knee injury
suffered in a 1949 car accident.
* *
HORSEMEN ON THE
BACKSTRETCH at Churchill
Downs willingly conceded
Sunday that Kentucky Derby
2 BEDROOM
FULLY FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME
SET ON LOT OF
YOUR CHOICE
$62.43 per mo.
AFTER SMALL DOWN
PAYMENT
Mustang*^.
MOBILE HOMESkK
4820 N.W. 13th ST.
378-1346
WE WILL HELP YOU LOCATE
A LOT AT NO CHARGE

/ Downtown
on the square
What? You still havent found the
perfect Mothers Day gift? sX\
Relax. Weve got her JIMPi*
'VANITY' FAIR, JjjU j
slumber-number.
l yovrseff. yy\ '*
yjiKwft ; / Jgf j BW Just give us a clue, well find the gown,
/ jjjf |f j Jlp 11 the robe, the set thats going to make her feel
jp .M beautifully appreciated and beautifully
Jp BSliiA feminine on her special day. And shell know
-mm you care a little extra, because you choose
no-fuss Vanity Fair wear, to make her
j \ \ leisure life just that much lovelier!
Set, XS-S-M-L, R. XS-S-M, SS. $25 .....
Gown, XS-S-M-L, R. XS-S-M, SS. $9 SflOp WIIsOHS 9:309

winner Dust Commander was
the best horse in the race
Saturday.
But they are far from ready to
award the 3-year-old
championship to the compact
little colt who streaked to a
five-length victory in the first of
the triple crown classics.
My Dad George, the favorite,
was second and High Echelon
third in a race marred by a spill.
Holy Land fell midway around
the final turn and jockey Hector
Pilar was thrown heavily to the
ground.
* *
CHICAGO CUB MANAGER
Leo Durocher was fined S2OO
and suspended for one day by
National League President Chub
Feeney for making an obscene
gesture at an umpire in Saturday
nights game with the Atlanta
Braves.

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
1 STARKE? FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM -6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

Durocher Mas thrown out of
the game in the sixth inning by
umpire Tony Vincent.
Durocher, angered because he
thought Vincent should have
made a strike call, turned on his
way back to the dugout and
made the gesture.
The message Durocher
received from Feeney said he
was suspended for May 3, but
the game was rained out.
CENTRAL AUTO SHOP
MAJOR TUNE UPS
MINOR TUNE UPS
ENGINE OVERHAULS
RING AND VALVE JOBS
CLUTCH JOBS BRAKE WORK
CARBURETOR REBUILDING
1027 S. MAIN 378-4943