Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
OConnell Listens To StudentsGripes

By CHARLES HEEKIN
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Steven C. O'Connell
participated in an informal discussion
with Broward Hall residents Wednesday
evening at the invitation of two residents
of the hall, Barbara Boyt and Carlene
Wood.
The topics were racism, athletics,
ticket prices, counselling in University
College (UC) and recruitment of minority
group teachers.
WE WANTED to get some issues out <
into the open, Miss Boyt said, and to
see if the students really do have as much

PRESS
1?oto[
Adi Awi/um

Vol 62, No. 132

HEW REPORTS

UF Desegregation
'Not Fast Enough'

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
UF is not moving fast enough
in providing equal opportunity
employment, according to a
report from the U. S.
Department of Health Education
and Welfare (HEW) Civil Rights
Office in Atlanta.
In a compliance review
submitted April 8, HEW officials
cited 12 problems that would
have to be solved in order for
UF to comply with the law:
UF has been
concentrating its efforts on
white applicants in hiring and
staffing, with the faculty using
"recruitment and referral
sources... which have tended

Rally Saturday
Against AA Card
See Related Story Page 2 and Complete Text of Financial
Report of Athletic Association Page 3.
By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writar
Student leaders are urging students to attend the rally Saturday to
discuss possible alternatives to the proposed ticket charge.
The rally will be on the rugby field across from Florida Field,
starting at 2:30 pjn.
I v* THE ANNUAL Orange and
Blue football game starts at 2
pm. on Florida Field.
Student Body President-elect
.Steve Uhlfelder said the rally
will give students an opportunity
to discuss what action they
think should be taken.
For too long, at this
university, we have had decisions
made for us that directly affect
students interest, before student
interest is considered. The raUy
is an opportunity for students to
show where their interests lie.
NO LONGER can we just
give lip service to what we want
STEVE UHLFELDER d ne We h ff s ff ak *
take action. Uhlfelder said.
...have Andy Kramer said he has
scheduled bands for the event, the music will start at 1 pm.
We want everybody to come together to show that a unified
(SEE'RALLY'PAGE 2}

Objections were raised to the coming football charge for
student seats. When asked what students could do about
this charge, OConnell said, Don't go.

influence on the administration as we've
been led to believe.
ALSO DISCUSSED was the fact that
UF students pay $262,000 per year for
athletics through their tuition, and
objections were raised to the coming
football charge for student seats.
When asked what students could do
about this charge, O'Connell said, Don't
9J
go.

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

to refer primarily white
applicants.
Although 21 per cent of
non-instructional employes are
black, the proportion drops to
eight per cent when the laboring
and service categories are
removed. Os this eight per cent
group, only 13 per cent of
those promoted were black.
Only nine blacks were
included in 922 new academic
employes hired in 1969. No
blacks were promoted.
No blacks have authority to
initiate personnel actions; 151
whites have this authority. All
but one of nine black
professionals hired raised
questions concerning the type of
employment they received.

University of Florida, Gainesville

Selection criteria for
non-academic employes vary
from department to department,
and some administrators do not
trust the Central Personnel
Centers criteria.
Secretaries are required to
have shorthand ability even
though their jobs do not require
it.
Some black employes said
they did not know of any
promotion policy or plan, in
spite of a number of programs
designed to inform them on this.
THEY KNOW nothing of job
openings and little or nothing of
how to apply for a job at a
higher level, according to the
report.
Training programs for non
academic employes are not
reaching the ones who need
them most.
Minorities are still referred
to in traditional and inhuman
terms in some quarters of the
UF.
Several departments have
no blade employes, and blacks
tend to cluster in service, semi
skilled and labor jobs.
There were not enough
Equal Opportunity Employment
posters up to communicate the
posture of the university.
i Some purchase orders were
not stamped with a reference to
Executive Order 11246.
Some contracts with UF
did not contain the Equal
Opportunity Employment
(SEE 'FAULTS' PAGE 2)
iiiliiliiiliil
SPORTS EDITOR, Craig
Goldwyn writes about his
day with the varsity
football team ..... page 20
Classifieds 16
Editorials.... 8
Entertainment 18
Letters 9
Movies 16
Orange and Blue 14
Sports 20
What's Happening .7

WHEN HE ASKED the mixed group,
Would you like us to use that (money
from tuition) for scholarships? the
answer was a strong yes!
Members of the Black Student Union
(BSU) asked ooConneU why there
werent more blacks at the UF.
He replied there was a recruitment plan
for black students, just like one for the
athletes, and that there are blacks

- 1 . imMUMm
Pv
'9
TOUCHi
Florida fencers will participate this weekend at the North Central
Florida Championships on the UF campus to qualify for the
nationally rated U.S. Sectionals and the Nationals later this summer.
In this picture, Caroline Horae, former Florida intercollegiate
champion, is seen inflicting grave injury to an opponent.
*
Elections Upheld
By Honor Court
* By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
: i
The entire upper slate of the April 22 Student Government (SG)
election was upheld by the Honor Court Wednesday night. Sections of
the lower date were declared invalid, however.
The seats overturned were: lUC and 2UC Honor Court; Arts and
Science senate seats, and the Education senate seats. The lUC and
2UC senate seats were also challenged, but SG representatives
conceded there had been violations and would hold another election
for them. j-
THE CASE was decided by a jury of six Honor Court justices,
(SEE 'SG SLATE' PAGE 2)

included in the program for
underprivileged students which is begun
every summer.
ERNEST JOHNSON and Tomasina
Seymour of BSU asked why there were
no black professors or graduate students
teaching class at UF, to which OConnell
replied that, although there are 250 jobs
almost -constantly open at the UF, no
blacks had applied.
He called on each black student to sell
the UF to their friends who are thinking
of going to college in order to increase
(SEE 'BLACK' PAGE 21

/** GUI

Friday, May 1,1970



!, sh. Florid, AMgMor.'

Page 2

FOR FOOTBALL SEATS

$5 Card System Offered

By LES GARDIEFF
Alligator Staff Writer
A football card system
acceptable to both student and
Athletic Association (AA)
representatives was hammered
out Tuesday in a two and one
half-hour meeting of the Ticket
Committee attended by Student
Body President Walter Morgan
and Head Football Coach Doug
Dickey.
The proposed football card
would be purchased for $5
before the football season and
allow its owner to pick up a free
ticket prior to each game. The
card would not constitute a
season pass.
THE MAIN opposition to the
card system had centered around
control of the cards price.
Student leaders have insisted
students should have full control
of the price.
Under the compromise
reached Tuesday, the price of
the card is initially fixed at $5.
This price will increase or
decrease in relation to the
number of students purchasing
cards each year.
The committee unanimously
agreed to set a baseline of
18,000 or this seasons
attendance, whichever is higher.
THIS MEANS for every
additional 1,000 cards purchased
by students over the baseline,
the price of the ticket will rise
sl. For every drop of 1,000

Rally...'A Chance
PAGE OW^I
student body can do constructive and positive things for this
campus.
Kramer said money will be collected for charities, to help the
community too.
STUDENT BODY President Walter Morgan said the rally will give
students a chance to get together and talk about how they really feel.
So far only the leaders and a few interested students have been
mvolved. This will give all students who are dissatisfied a chance
to-talk about the problem.
Student Body Vice President-elect Henry Solares said he thinks
students are going to support the rally.
ITS TIME the administration realized that everytime there is a
financial crisis they simply cannot just turn to students as bottomless
financial pits, to meet their every whim and fancy. This rally has been
called to give tangible demonstration that students will no longer bear
the burden. I think students are going to show once and for all that
they will no longer be trodden under foot by a repressive and
unresponsive administration, Solares said.
Student government Secretary of Athletics Lee Greene said he
thinks the rally will be helpful.
IT WILL give students a chance to show concern and hear possile
alternatives.
Sigma Chi President Ken Driggs said the rally is to force the
Athletic Association to justify charging students for football tickets.
They havent justified it so far. Its time UF realized that a Gator
Bowl champion football team doesnt make us better educated.
Court Jury Duty Postponed
All students called for jury duty for the trial to be held at the
Honor Court on May 3 are advised that the trial has been cancelled.
They are to report, however, for jury duty on Sunday May 10 at 1
p. m. to room 364 of the Union. This includes any student previously
excused for jury duty on May 3.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate Is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for

cards purchased, the price will
drop sl.
The proposition passed by the
Ticket Committee is not
binding. It only forms a
recommendation to be sent to
the AA Board of Directors
which will make the final
decision.
' The effect of this system will
be to give every Florida Student
today and in the future a seat at
Florida Field, Lee Greene,
student representative on the
committee said.
PLANS ARE being made to
send applications for football
cards to all present students and
advance registering students,
according to Ticket Manager
Ray Dorman.

Black Recruitment On

Krom page okJ
black enrollment, and said it was
the responsibility of each
student, as well as the
administration, to encourage
minority attendance at UF.
BSU replied that more active
recruiting by the administration
was needed.
THEY ALSO said there was a
need for more positions like that
of Director of Minority Affairs
Roy Mitchell.

There will be an August 30
deadline on the return of the
forms. Students who do not
receive a form in the mail will be
able to obtain a form on
campus.
Under the new system student
leaders can divide their 18,000
baseline in any manner they
choose. Present plans are to
eliminate date tickets, leaving
only 2,000 spouse tickets for
married students.
ONLY ONE card will be
issued to a student and will not
be replacable if lost or
destroyed. The cards will not be
limited to use by their owner,
however. Any card or validated
student ID will be sufficient to
obtain a football ticket.

OConnell said that in order
to obtain a new administrative
position such as Mitchells,
approval was needed at a very
high level.
Johnson said that although
Mitchell is a step
forward ... he shouldnt be our
only step forward.
Id be happy to see ten
positions like Roy
he said.
Students mentioned that the
quality of Counselling in the UC
is not up to par, and were
advised to know what they want
by reading the catalog, before
they go to a counselor.
Faults Found,
'Steps Taken
clause. Contractors had not been
required to submit Plans for
Affirmative Action or
Certificates of Nonsegregated
Facilities.
HEW ADMITTED that UF
had taken meaningful steps
toward equal opportunity and
that there was an atmosphere
of genuine concern on the
campus.
The report was based on a
visit to UF by HEW officials
during March 10-13.
UF will have to submit a plan
including -a timetable for
promoting and hiring minority
employes to fill categories where
few or none are now working.

BURGER CHEFS
BIG SHEF

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UPI PHOTO
MICHIGAN VIOLENCE
This shop was one hit by looters Tuesday in River Rouge, Mich.,
after violence spilled out on the streets following fighting between
black and white students at River Rouge High School. Additional
police were brought from other communities and a curfew was
imposed.
SG Upper Slate Elections OK
|^OWMGEO^|
chosen before the trial began. The jurors were picked at random from
16 justices of the court, choosing from the most senior group of
senators first.
Both sides the representatives from SG and each of the persons
contesting the election were allowed to question the jurors and
throw out or challenge any they thought held prejudices about the
election.
The election cannot be certified until the required time for filing of
appeals has elapsed. Honor Court Chancellor Richard Lazzara ruled
Thursday anyone wishing to appeal would have until noon Monday,
May 4, to file an appeal with the honor court clerk.
LAZZARA SAID he would certify the election at 12:01, Monday
afternoon if there was no appeal.
The jurors were: Robin Hendel, Donna Linder, Wayne Nullums,
Dennis Watson, Helen Zisler, Ed Morris and Robert Clarke (alternate).
Before the trial began Lazzara told the jury a simple majority
would be necessary to invalidate. In case of a tie, he said, the vote
will go for the affirmative or to uphold the election.
JIMMEY BAILEY, presidential candidate who was appealing the
entire election, listed four main contentions:
There were no instructions in the voting machines as to the
method of voting. He said this caused many people to vote
improperly and described it as one of the prime determinents as to
the legality, freedom and unfetteredness of an election.
Several machines were mechanically inoperable.
t On many machines, the slips of paper showing vertical column
wa.; for which office were shifted. Bailey said he was told this
condition existed in several machines by friends.
t In Journalism, Business Administration and Arts and Science,
Bailey said, people were allowed to discuss the election within 100
feet of the polling places and possibly solidte votes. This could have
influenced the outcome of the election if it was done enough, he
said.



Complete Text Os Athletic Financial Status

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the complete text of a
financial report on the status of the Athletic Association.
The repent was prepared by Steve Gertzman, John
Lacouture and Larry Levine. Gertzman and Levine me
freshman law students who are Certified Public
Accountants. Lacouture is in the accounting doctoral
program and an accounting instructor.)
SCOPE OF INVESTIGATION
We were given free reign to examine all records of the
Athletic Association (AA) and to address questions to
Raymond Daniel, the business manager of the AA. During
the course of our examination we received full
cooperation from all personnel with whom we came into
contact.
In conducting this examination we followed the
assumption that UFs AA will continue to maintain its
present level of activity and not curtail any of the
intercollegiate sports in which it currently participates.
The purpose of this examination is not to debate the
question of the propriety of the existence of the athletic
program, nor to make recommendations regarding the
expansion or curtailment of its activities. This study is
directed at an assessment of the alleged financial needs of
the AA, given its objective of maintaining the status of the
program at its present level.
BACKGROUND
IN ORDER TO provide a background for this
examination it is necessary to state several pertinent facts
which relate to the funding of the athletic program at the
UF.
Each UF student contributes $32.50 per quarter for an
activity fee. Os this $32.50, $3.75 goes toward the
funding of the athletic program, with the remainder being
used to provide other services, such as the infirmary.
This figure compares favorably with the $7 share for
Florida A&M and the $4.50 assessed by Florida Atlantic
University. However, the UF is the only state university
with an intercollegiate program in all sports.
THE RECEIPTS from the football games are
subsidizing all the other sports, as all other intercollegiate
events are free, with several exceptions such as track

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... during the Chamber of Commerce 20th Annual
April 30 May Ist and 2nd
Btmmmsnamiamti .MPiiLLiil fTn f~ ~ l iiaTiiirura id Your dollars will be well spent, and
liwhsSel' i ll HMIS will stretch further, when you see all
EMliMitt4Sc.fli.leJi4S tU E OHJfrMiMSa.n.tiMS a| J E m.m. t#3:4S 2fl| |Bg Qmmdltmm ft4S m.m. w)s4S Sfl| 9
ic-SWKSfi 1 fitt&fpCCS 1 m&VJZZSSi 1 the bargains the Gainesville mer mermissSSASJA
missSSASJA mermissSSASJA chants have put out for your selec selec___________
___________ selec___________ tion Yes, all roads lead to Gaine GaineliT
liT GaineliT i miiiisSS W i llrawsSj l W "wfiauswo* 1 a| sville, the hub of Northcentral Florida
111 . 1.1,41 Ml US Odir 'E tnm <4l .i.>li4s SM B diridi4S.w.f i 4 88l \WS dirii4t.m. li4l #
|E __ A.HI Mth *M* 9l IB M-M Mlk ( lh( If. 9 E ~n. *,rll Mlk t tay 111. 3i E f-- ** * lrt 9| H MIM t May Irt. B. chnnni nn Tflltf* (InVCntCfle rtf fHIS
*E VrSSVIZIIZm- m'l IS M.N 4my fcrt.rd.,. T W iH d mU day Saf wrday, May if E snoppmg. IUKC UUVUMIUyC Ul IHIS
briig| j* 4 ||K|| *' wl aM ? n "J|| opportunity to get special savings
SMBpaMav! limmmmmimiuinngl!limmmmmimiuinngl! i 1 i - tremendous 3-Doy May
Sponsored by The Merchants Division of the Sale.
GAINESVILLE CHAMBER of COMMERCE

PREPARED AT MORGAN S REQUEST

wnwiiwwiimiiiiiwiwmiwwiwimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnin
It is a reasonable proposition that if the
total expenditures of the Athletic
Association are increasing, the students
should continue to aid in supporting this
increase on a consistent basis with that of
previous years. ~
iiiiittHtiiiuiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiimiiiiimHiiimiiiim
meets and basketball, which charges for non-students. The
surplus from ticket sales to football games must cover
virtually all of the expenses relating to other sports in
order for the AA to meet its budget.
The annual percentage which students have contributed
to the total funding of the athletic program has remained
fairly stable for the past decade, fluctuating within the
range of 9-13 per cent of the total funding of the AA.
FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
The proposed increases in the 1970-1971 fiscal year
budget are reasonable and necessary if an athletic program
of the present caliber is to be maintained.
It is a reasonable proposition that if the total
expenditures of the AA are increasing, the students should
continue to aid in supporting this increase on a consistent
basis with that of the previous years. (Although we are
categorically opposed to any increase in the students
proportional support.)
IN VIEW OF the above statements, a plan calling for a
pre-season purchase of a $5 season ticket by the students
seems equitable. In addition to the direct contribution
received by the receipts from the students, this plan
would also facilitate the more efficient use of the
stadium's seating facilities.
Under this proposal, it would be known in advance how
many tickets would be set aside for students, and the
remainder of the seats could be offered to the public or
students not holding season tickets at full price.
This proposal would eliminate one problem which was
caused by the procedure of setting aside a number of
tickets commensurate to the total enrollment of the UF.

Friday, May 1,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

When this procedure was employed it was not known NS NSuntil
until NSuntil the day of the game how many tickets would not be
picked up by students.
BASED ON LAST years average student attendance of
approximately 15,000, the revenues to be generated from
the above plan would be as follows: .
t From season tickets to students: 15,000 x $5 =
$75,000
From increased efficiency:
Based on the figures furnished by Mr. Daniel as to
salable seats as a result of student failing to pick up
tickets, there were 2,000-3,000 seats available per game
last year.
2,000 x $7 x 5 games = $70,000
3,000 x $7 x 5 games = $150,000
Thus, the total increase would be between $145,000
and SIBO,OOO, which is within a tolerable range of the
AAs $174,000 target figure. As $150,000 of the amount
of the proposed increased needs of the association is for
an increase in working capital, this increment would not
be required annually. Thus, the above plan appears to
provide an adequate sum to cover the short-run needs for
the funding of die AA.
The increase in funds provided by the students should
be earmarked to meet current operating expenditures and
not to fund capital improvements.
In relation to the funding of future capital
improvements, the AA should advance or support a
proposal to double the rate scale for the Gator Boosters in
the first year feasible.
COROLLARY TO the above financial arrangement we
propose the following qualitative steps for the mutual
benefit of the AA and the student body:
A representative of the AA should make himself
available to the Student Senate or some other suitable
forum for the purpose of explaining the general operation
of the AA, its future plans, etc., in an effort to open a line
of communication between the AA and the student body.
The president of the student body should become an ex
officio member of the Board of Directors of the AA.
Both the AA and the Student Body should continue ?
and intensify their efforts to secure some funding* from
the State of Florida.

Page 3



Page 4

I a 1 M iliefcr <
r/PVwnpMtMlf I# lli/U

New VP Os SFEA
Elected From UF Chapter

By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
\ MIBnOr SOT Vwfftf
A UF coed took the vice
presidency of the Student
Florida Education Association
(SFEA) at a convention held last
week, April 23-25 in Miami.
Judy Cohen, 4ED, was elected
by the delegates from 20
different colleges in Florida. She
is currently secretary of the UF
SFEA.
THE UF SFEA is an
organization of future teachers
who want to make teaching
more of a profession.
We would like to get
teachers involved in the
problems that they will face in
the future, such as academic
freedom, certification,
professional negotiations, and
Poet Skellings
At Union
This Sunday
Poet Edmund Skellings will
present excerpts from his
current book, Live Concert,
Sunday at 8 p. m., in room 349
of the Reitz Union as a part of
Celebration 70.
Hailed by author Norman
Mailer as, a terrific poet...
formidably breezy. Put my oar
in the water for Ed Skellings, a
fine and exciting poet.
LIVE CONCERT is a
performance of poems with an
accent on performance. The
intermixed dialogue relates the
poetic material to contemporary
popular music.
live Concert is a blend of
blues, rock and country lyrics,
and ballad forms with the more
traditional. It incorporates the
electronic sounds of the newest
music and the ancient rhythms
of ideas.
Currently a professor at
Florida Atlantic University in
Boca Raton, Skellings is the
author to two books of serious
verse and a collection for
children.
NOW
OPENING
for
w
i
Sept. Occupancy
. .. ... V -- 4?
LEASE OFFICE
309 NW 13th St.
Across from
Tlgert Hall
.

|

.tligi
ripiL

social problems, Miss Cohen
said.
The SFEA convention was
part of the Florida Education
Associations (FEA) annual
convention held in Miami Beach.
TWO OTHER UF coeds,
Vicki Hall and Sharon Gudridge,
also attended. Miss Gudridge is
the incoming secretary of the
UF SFEA.
The SFEA members met with

No Miss UF Contest
' / ' ,
Unless sponsors of the Miss UF contest are able to find a new
method of funding, the contest will not be held this year.
Student Body President-Elect Steve Uhlfelder said he only* has so
much money in the special presidential fund from which the money
has been taken in the past. -;V.
THERE ARE more relevant uses for the money, Uhlfelder said.
I think beauty contests in general are irrelevant, but this is the only
one I can control.
Uhlfelder said he is not really opposed to the contest, and hopes
other money will be found for it.
Marsha Madorsky, chairman of the Student Senate Budget and
Finance Committee, said the question will go before the senate.
The Budget and Finance Committee will hear the special request
Monday and then it will go before the senate Tuesday night, she said.
Miss Madorsky said the contest will cost SSOO and there is only
S6OO allocated for special requests for third quarter.

HK||| C
Biff Rose will be at the Rathskeller 1
wf tonight and Saturday at 8:30 p.m. and at
I* 1 p.m.. Admission is $2.00. Come over and I
hear Biff sing. H
P us Nate & John 9
Don i forget T.G.I.F. Special ISC glass
2:30-6:30 PM SI.OO a pitcher |

the FEA board members to
discuss the possibility of having
a voice in FEA voting.
They proposed having one
vote in the general voting of
offices and decision making for
the coming year. The matter is
still being discussed by the FEA.
The SFEA is the future of
FEA and we should be heard,
Miss Cohen stressed.

Ghinesville Course Beginning Tues. r May 5 ~
SELF-HYPNOSIS
rnrr LECTURE AND DEMONSTRATION
rKtt MAY 5 8:00 P.M. HOLIDAY INN AT 1-75
learn why self-hypnosis is the most powerful
AND EFFECTIVE TOOL AVAILABLE TODAY FOR SELF SELFIMPROVEMENT.
IMPROVEMENT. SELFIMPROVEMENT.
WRITE OR PHONE FOR FREE BROCHURE
INSTITUTE OF APPLIED HYPNOSIS
5445 MARINER STREET, TAMPA, PH. 872-0698

The Mausoleum J£ %
Jtt fonnaVm
Hop I
. I J. WojfKt fiutz I
With j
Spiff
You are solemnly invited to come
and dance upon this sterile plot on
Friday, April 1 from 101a.m.
Sponsored by us to celebrate our
third birthday.
SPONSORED BY JWRU



Development March Raises Funds

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Gainesville and UF residents are being asked to join a 20-mile
march around the city the 1970 Steps for Development
Saturday, May 16.
The parade is dedicated to involving the community in the further
development of Gainesville and Alachua County. The funds raised will
be donated on a one-third-each basis to three community-minded
service organizations.
THE PARADE is sponsored by the Progressive Community Fund
Inc., a non profit organization involved in bettering economic, legal
and educational conditions in the community.
The volunteers will walk as far as possible up to 20 miles on a pre
arranged route. Each participant will carry a mileage check card to be
validated at each two-mile rest stop.
Volunteers are responsible for getting their own sponsors, who are
expected to donate on a per-mile basis. Participants are expected to
get as many sponsors as possible.

Overseas
Jobs Are
Available
By ELLEN OUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Jobs overseas are available to
UF students through the
International Association of
Business and Economic Students
(AIESEC).
AIESEC at UF is one of 48
member countries throughout
the world.
ITS PURPOSE is a job
exchange program with
participating countries. Nations
in the program with AIESEC
members are allowed to travel
abroad and earn money in a
working capacity.
Students are not required to
have language abilities or to be
economic or business students.
AIESEC WAS organized in
1948 in France. The United
States joined the program in
1956 and has participated
actively since that time, said
Richard Hubbell, president of
the UF AIESEC.
The only restrictive
requirements for students
interested in going abroad under
this program are that the student
must be a sophomore and a
member of AIESEC
Three UF students have been
given jobs in foreign countries
for the summer. They are
Hubbell to Finland, Dennis
Young to the Netherlands and
Jim Geiger to Yugoslavia.
NONE OF THESE students
know their visiting countries
languages.
The types of jobs are many,
Hubbell said, usually jobs in
white collar capacities.
A MEMBERSHIP meeting will
be held Monday at 7:30 p. m. in
the Student Activities Center,
3rd floor of the J. Wayne Reitz
Union.
To qualify for the overseas
trip with work, students should
join and become active now in
AIESEC so they will have a
better priority rating, Hubbell
said.
I I 1712 W. University
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1 I SCHOOL SUPPLIES I
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two buildings in search
of absolutes
These two buildings rose
From the same dream.
From the same architect, in fact.
Expressing in glass
and concrete the words of
Carl Sandburg ...
"The skyscrapers stand proud.
They seem to say they have
sought the absolute
and made it their own.
Yet they are blameless, innocent
as dumb steel and the dumber
concrete of their bastions.
Man made us,' they murmur. We are
proud only as man is proud and we
have no more found the absolute
than has man.'"
If the ideals these buildings stand for
In political affairs and in commerce
Are to survive,
Your generation must search for and find
Absolutes.
You are their life insurance.
. t
/k
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PARTICIPANTS will gather at the Plaza of the Americas at 9 a. m.
The parade route circles through Gainesville and will end at the plaza.
The three beneficiaries are the Sunshine School for the Mefttally
Retarded, the Northwest Community Volunteer Health Clinic, and
Operation Outreach from UF.
The Sunshine School teaches children ages 2-16 who, because
of mental retardation, are ineligible for admission to public schools.
The school is enlarging its enrollment and planning more facilities.
THE COMMUNITY Volunteer Health Clinic of Northeast
Gainesville has recently opened on a twice-a-week basis for the
servicing of the area. : ~ ~~
Monetary support is needed to maintain the clinics livelihood as
well as to enable the clinic to expand its facilities in the community.
Operation Outreach is a program at UF originating from the Office
of Minority Affairs .Its goals include providing jobs for needy students
and improving university-community relations.
If there are any questions concerning the parade, call 376-7539 or
378-3481.

Friday, May 1,1970, Tha Florida Alligator, I

MEXICO
Cologlo Victorias summer
session, Guadalajara, June 29
Aug. 2. Room, Board, Tuition,
Fees, $250. The greatest
concentration of talent and the
finest campus in Mexico. Courses
from Archeology to glass blowing
and leather work. Excellent Art
dept. Numerous .excursions.
Write: Director. Box 1327,
Bellingham, Wash. 98225.
HERE NOW!
florida
quarterly
i

Page 5



i. Tlm Florida AlU>nr, Friday, May 1,1970

Page 6

Reds Vow United Front Against U.S.

PARIS (UPI) Chinese
Communist Premier Chou en-Lai
flew to last weekends summit
meeting of Indochinese
Communist and leftist leaders
and pledged Pekings full
support for their anti-American
front, Communist officials in
Pans disclosed Thursday.
The officials made the
disclosure at the 65th session of
the Vietnam peace conference
after a Hanoi negotiator charged
die new Cambodian regime, with
U. S. support, was carrying out
massacres of Chinese residents
in Cambodia.
A NORTH Vietnamese news
agency dispatch, released by
Communist officials in Paris,
revealed for the first time that
Chou had attended the summit
meeting held over the weekend
at a still secret place in southern

USF Students Support
Liberalized Abortion
TAMPA (UPI) Some 250 University of South Florida students of
both sexes rallied Wednesday in support if an abortion reform bill in
the state Senate.
Campus support for liberalized abortion laws began building
Tuesday after defeat in the House of a reform bill. A more restrictive
bill is still alive in the Senate. 1
WE FEEL women should have control over their reproductive
lives, with appropriate medical advice/ said a petition circulated by
the universitys dean of women, Margaret Fisher.
Students paid five cents to and their names to a telegram
petitioning senators to vote for the bill.
Miss Fisher emphasized that although her staff had drawn up the
petition, and that it had been signed by other faculty members, the
statement should not be takeii up as an administrative position of
the university. /

it H I I
I I 1 B II I BBiu^^^^W^M£Bl^BfllEL <^ F I 111 1
m B> 1 I 8 H I H 111 B1
| m 1 i^v I 1 B I |
f§ B I B fl
K S B > h X B ;# S| B M

HOME OF THE WHOPPER
8 N.W. 16TH AVE.
§ss **l.'' jWv %*v' .* 1 V^' iv tVS* < *,"' ' '' *V - . ~* >wi


PE KING PROMISES FULL SUPPORT

China.
Hanoi and Viet Cong officials
hailed Chous presence at the
final banquet of the conference
as a major step in their effort to
build up a common united front
against the United States in
Southeast Asia.
The summit session was
attended by the deposed
Cambodian chief of state, Prince
Norodom Sihanouk, along with
leaders of the Viet Cong, the
Pathet Lao of Laos and North
Vietnamese Premier Pham Van
Dong.
CHOU TOLD the assembled
officials, according to the Hanoi
dispatch, that the three
fraternal Indochinese peoples
can be sure that in the common
struggle against American
imperialism, the Chinese people
will be forever on their side, and
will win the victory with them.

North Vietnamese delegation
spokesman Nguyen Tnanh Le
and Viet Cong spokesman Ly
Van Sau hailed the pledge of
support given by China to the
Indochinese summit.
But the two officials made it
clear their governments also
were grateful for support they
are getting from the Soviet
Union although Moscow
apparently sent no one to the
meeting.
IN THURSDAYS session of
the Paris talks, North Vietnam
charged the United States was
sending arms to the new
Cambodian regime to help
... giving
Gainesville twice
the service...
1802 W. UNIV.AVE.
1430 S.W. 13th ST.

massacre not only Vietnamese
and Cambodians, but Chinese
residents as well.
Philip C. Habib, chief U. S.
negotiator at the Vietnam talks,
promptly rebutted the

I I J I F \ I
ft V J

M^^^^^^^^^^lTnT7>y^miiiir?fTTiMTTTr?TiM
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Hkf DATSUN
"THE NEW LEADER IN SMALL CARS" OPEN 'TIL 7 PM
2ND AVE AND 2ND ST. S.E. 378-2311 M a N tmdh
Communist blast against
President Nixon's policies as a
rare example of duplicity,
since Hanoi made no mention of
its own troops fighting in
Cambodia.



RA Appointments
Not 'Finalized
Appointments to positions as Resident Advisors (RA) for next year
are bemg finalized, according to Miss Phyllis Mable, assistant director
of housing.
.7 have no s completed all the appointments yet, Miss Mable
said, but we will probably complete them and send out the notices
nex t week. We arent certain as to the exact day
LETTERS WILL be sent out at the same time to those appointed
to RA positions and to those turned down, according to Miss Mable.
M We re having to turn down an awful lot of good people, she said.
It isn t because they arent qualified. Its just that we dont have
sufficient openings for everyone.
Miss Mable did not know the number of RA applicants nor the
number of RA openings. We wont know the number of positions we
fill until next week, she said. But we try to have a ratio of one RA
to every 100 students.
APPLICATIONS to prospective RAs were sent out last November
and returned in January. Applicants had to fill out a form stating their
activities, interests and standing at the UF.
Each RA hopeful also wrote a letter to Director of Housing H. C.
Riker indicating the priorities and methods he would use as an RA;
list three references; and participate in an interview with the housing
staff. H-
Resident Adviser positions provide financial assistance of SIOO cash
per month and S3O rent allowance. RAs cannot hold fellowships,
assistantships, grants or other employment during their time of
service.
/
jt
PLAY SOCCER: The UF Soccer Club meets the Jacksonville
Spyders Sunday 2 pjn. in Fleming Field, north of Florida Field.
SANGEET BHARATI: Music of India is Sunday at 1 pjn. on
WRUF. Youll love it.
NOVUS ORBE: Aquarius is gathering tonight at midnight in the
Comer Drug Store. 1823 NW 2nd Ave.
VET MEET: The monthly business meeting of the UF Veterans
Club is tonight at 7 in room 150-D of the J. Wayne Reitz Union.
COLLEGE LIFE: Meets this Sunday at 9:13 pjn. in the Hume Hall
recreation room. Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ.
The Sixth Hour folk group will perform.
AND MORE ROSES: Biff Rose is at the Rat tonight and tomorrow
night. 9 and 11 p.m.
WEEKEND MOVIES:
TONIGHT: 1000 Clowns, 5:30,8, and 10:30 pjn.
SATURDAY: Same deal.
SUNDAY: On the Waterfront, 7 and 9:3opjn.
All in the Union Auditorium.
VESPER MELODY: The Music Department presents Twilight
Concert in the Union Terrace Sunday at 6:45 pjn.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY: The Union has a Birthday Special outdoor
barbeque. 75 cents. North lawn.
3 pjn. Cake cutting in the cafeteria.
1:30 to 5 p.m. FREE, Bullwinkle cartoon show in the Union
Auditorium.
6:30 to 8 pjn. A bunch of contests on the Union Terrace yoyo,
hulahoop, jump-rope etc. etc. etc...
10 pjn. to 1 ajn. Union dance, the Mausoleum Hop.
SMASH THE WANDERERS: All students are invited to watch a
Cricket match between UF's A and B teams Sunday at 2 pjn. in the
Alice Field, south of Fraternity Row. This is in preparation to meet
the Commonwealth Wanderers, from Nassau, Bahamas. Anyone
interested in playing sould call 372-2224 or 392-8196.
BIG THING: The Gator Sailing Club has a big regatta against FSU
at Wauburg.
Saturday: 11 aju. to 5 pjn.
Sunday: 10 ajn. to 5 pjn.
For more infor call Rick Edmonds at 372-4627.
Oriental Tea-house Atmosphere
Serving Authentic Chinese Dinners at Popular Prices
FAST SERVICE CONGENIAL ATMOSPHERE *NO TIPPING
Dining-room is also available for private luncheon
parties and wedding receptions
10 MINUTE CARRYOUT SERVICE AVAILABLE. OPEN 4-10 P.M../
... In the Village Square on 441 372-6801
- -^l.
I I

MALL, 2546 N.W. 13th Street
I THE IN-FASHION STORE^
BACK TO NATURE I
In a bikini from
Lemer Shops swim suit
collection. B|
Sun or swim in a
2 or 3 pc. set.
Prints, prints, & more
prints to choose from (even
a few solid colors.)
Also for the shy ones,
several cage styles are
available \
2pc BIKINI SHOWNII. 99 I

Friday, May 1,1970, Ttaa Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

i, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, May i. 1976

The Robert Fraser Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
AllicyQtnr John Sugg Carolyn Pope [|g IlMa
/VlllgdlUl News Editors
77ie price / freedom Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
is the exercise of responsibility. Advertising Manager Business Manager

Inflation And Nixon

WASHINGTON The Treasury Departments
elation over the rising rate of unemployment comes
close to that line between comedy and tragedy for
which great novelists strive.
The tragedy lies in the statements of such
responsible figures as Treasuiy Secretary David
Kennedy and his principal aide both of whom are
on record that an increase in joblessness proves the
success of the Nixon Administrations effort to
control inflation by monetary and fiscal means.
Their statements are tragic not merely because on
the evidence so far they are wrong, but because they
reveal all the understanding and sympathy about
people out of work which might have been
displayed by Marie Antoinette transformed to the
20th century.
The comedy lies in the puppet show aspect of the
scenario the strings pulled by the President and
the actors uttering hopeful 19th-centmy banalities.
The trouble with the whole plot is that the
tragedy outweighs the comedy and as Victor
Hugo once said, The best tragedy ends in farce.
In fact, what is proved by the rising
unemployment figures is that economist John
Galbraith a much despised symbol in Washington
and his fellow economists are right: You can
have both unemployment and inflation if you rely
on monetary and fiscal policies to get there. That
is what Mr. Nixon and Secretary Kennedy are doing.
Galbraith has been calling loudly for wage and
price controls in those areas where wages and prices
are skyrocketing. In a recent letter to the Wall
Street Journal, Galbraith asked particularly for price
controls in housing, steel, automobiles and other
basics, and for wage controls in those same areas,
particularly in housing. There, the building trade
unions have recently won wage demands which if
they continue any further will make it impossible
for the ordinary housewife to call a plumber
without first running to the bank.
But to ask for price and wage controls would
force Mr. Nixon out of his chosen middle of the
road position one which he has defined as
bounded by the two extremes of jawboning and
letting inflation take its course.
The reason it will be possible to have both
runaway inflation and increasing unemployment, so

' Staff Reporters
Neal Sanders Craig Goldwyn Robert Berry ChaHotte O'Connor
Assignment Editor Sports Editor Ellen Dupuy Terry Pitman
Phyllis Gallub Richard Roskowe
Earl Hartman Fred Vollrath Les Gardieff Charles Trentelman
eatures Editor Wire Editor Charles Heekin Robert Wise
DniVMy jm Brain- .... Copy Editors
1

Frank Monkinwicz Monkinwiczeconomists
economists argue, is that unemployment must be
extreme must reach a point Americans may not
be willing to bear before it hits the highly paid,
organized worker who can pay the higher prices
inflation demands:
The marginally employed mainly the young
and black who largely constitute the 4 per cent
unemployed figure of which Treasury Secretary
Kennedy is so proud never were able to afford the
cars, the houses and appliances, even when they
were working.
One of the reasons why the Administration can
afford to approach the tragicomic line on this
question is that the people now being thrown out of
work by its monetary-fiscal anti-inflation policy are
people who never voted for Richard Nixon and
never would.
But if Galbraith is right and both inflation and
unemployment continue to rise Mr. Nixon will
shortly be biting into that segment of the
population which did vote for him, or might vote
for him. It is at that point that we may expect a
reassessment of the notion that tight money and a
surtax will do the job.
Meantime, the country has a bill to pay for the
new 4 per cent unemployment rate. Those new
unemployed will eventually become a part of the
poor.
In 1950, a poor man with a wife and two children
was a man earning less than $2,600 per year. In
1964, the figure was $3,300. Today, it is $3,600.

Alligator Staff

EDITORIAL
Support The
Leadership
A representative can be no more than the voice of his
constituency.
For that reason we urge all UF students to observe the
boycott of Saturdays Orange and Blue game. Student Body
President-elect Steve Uhlfelder and a host of student groups
are attempting to represent the wishes of the student body
in the football ticket controversy. But anyone trying to
represent such an amorphous group is at a disadvantage
when he says, This is what the student body wants.
That statement is generally received with skepticism.
Even though a student body president is elected, those in
command doubt the validity of his statements. They doubt
the strength of student opposition.
Even if Athletic Association members believe the truth of
his remarks as they reflect student wishes, they question his
ability to marshall enough support to back up his
contention that students are unwilling and unable to pay for
football tickets.
The importance of a student boycott, therefore, is to
show the Athletic Association that students are unwilling
and unable to fund sports by two means, the student
activity fee and football tickets.
If the boycott is successful, perhaps the Athletic
Association will realize the effects of its actions. They are
pricing football beyond the means of the average student
with the $3 or $4 per game ticket. And, believe it or not,
the athletic program needs student support.
Without student support the athletic program will suffer
on a number of counts. Students devote a considerable
amount of time and work to homecoming, for one example,
and Florida Blue Key (FBK) is ready to withdraw its
support. Without FBKs efforts, Homecoming could become
a memory rather than a tradition.
Uhlfelder isn't asking for much more than the time to
determine exactly what is needed from the student body
and the best way we can provide it. The variable activity
fee, now being considered by the legislature, complicates
the picture. If it passes will it be used for athletics? Will this
affect the price picture? We feel these questions Should be
answered before a tax is levied on students for them to
watch their team.
Uhlfelder has been bargaining in the students interests
but is in i.ecu of a stronger position. Only the power from
student support will give him that position.
So, attend Saturdays rally and support your
representatives.
Or, if you wish to pay for football tickets next season,
attend Saturday's Orange and Blue game.
"\y
Tin Last Hoorah

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89
Business, Advertising: phone 3924681,-82, 83.
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
ofthe aftiQln not those
Os the U-jjwsUy oi



Speaking Out

I would like to comment on
the lead editorial of the April 17
Alligator, entitled Remove
Children From the Ranks, and
a letter in that same edition of
the paper written by Jerry
Pendry and titled Where Our
Parents Failed.
The editorial says, we were
dismayed to see the march (the
April 15 anti-war march) go
through Tigert Hall. Using Tigert
Hall as a center for frustration
against the war is convenient,
but hardly logical.
I THOROUGHLY
DISAGREE with this analysis,
and I would like to explain, as
an SMC member and a
participant in the march, why
we went through Tigert.
We marched through the
administration building because
we wanted to symbolize our
opposition to our universitys
complicity with the military
industrial complex and the
Vietnam war.
Our university helps the war
effort by having ROTC on
campus, by allowing military
recruiting on campus, by
conducting war and military
related research and by allowing
companies that profit by the wjar
to recruit employes in the Reitz
Union placement center.
IN ALL OF the above ways
the university supports the war
effort, it is easy to see that it
does not in any way take a
neutral position on the war. The
university actively supports and
aids this idiotic and tragic war
against a people fighting for
national liberation and the end
of American imperialism in their
country.
Because we are opposed to
the war, we are also opposed to
our university helping this
country in its war, and that is

St. Petersburg Campaign

MR. EDITOR:
The events around the statewide
antiwar mobilization of April 18 are
varied and have many implications. The
first statewide antiwar mobilization saw
participation from Black, Chicano and
Womens* groups as well as veterans,
retired military officers, senior citizens,
teachers and students. This represents the
deepening and all-pervasive antiwar
sentiment in the state and the growing
determination of the people of Florida to
bring all the troops home now.
The desperation of those connected
directly or indirectly with active support
of the Vietnam war is evidenced by the
calculated, deliberate brutality with
which the police and government of St.
Petersburg conspired to deny rights of
assembly, free speech and petition for
redress of grievances to peacefully
assembled demonstrators.
The specific incidents leading to the
break-up of the peaceful rally were the
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
§ Be typ'd, sign'd, doublt spac'd and
not emaed 300 words.
Noth'sign'd with a pmudonym.
H an mUnmu and telephone
numbers of writers.
Nam'S will be withheld only if writsr
,hows Just "US'. Tho editor reserves the
right to adit all letters for *>aee.
Writs n may submit longsr essays,
columns or letters to be sontldard for uas
as "Spssking Out" columns. Any writsr
hitarastad in submitting a rsgulw column
it adrttff to contact tha adhar and ba
vaparad to show samplaaodMbWofic.

Symbolize The Opposition

why we felt compelled to show
the administration that we feel
this way. It is completely logical
for all of us opposed to the war
to also oppose complicity with
the war machine, and that is the
real reason we went through
Tigert.
Our efforts were emphatically
not a blind attack on authority
as the Alligator charges in its
editorial. Os course many of the
marchers, including myself,
dont like President OConnell
and the present administration,
but that was not the point of
April 15. We were demonstrating
for an immediate end to the
Vietnam war, bringing all the
troops home now. To try to
misrepresent our activities is a
display of ignorance of the facts.
IN MR. PENDRYS letter he
makes the unbelievable
statement that pulling out of
Southeast Asia immediately is as
impossible as traveling back in
time.
Mr. Pendry, do you know
anything at all about the
logistical capacity of this great
country? If you did you would
realize that with all the planes
and ships we have we could
withdraw all American soldiers
ffdm Vietnam within 24 hours.
So lets realize that were not
talking about capabilities, but
rather about policy decisions.
And we believe that the best
policy decision would be to pull
out immediately, thereby aiding
both the Vietnamese people and
our own country.
To save thousands of lives on
both sides, and to end the
immoral American involvement
in Vietnam that has already cost
us over 40,000 lives and over
SIOO billion, we should get out
now.

accosting and arrest of a speaker by at
least five police, the provacative actions
of police agents in the crowd (bottle
throwing, shouting, etc.), the nearly
immediate surrounding of the people by
riot police and subsequent random
attacks on demonstrators by
club-swinging police.
A full confrontation was avoided
because Florida Antiwar Coalition
officers and marshalls quickly moved to
insulate the demonstrators from police
and police agents and steer the people
into a column leaving the park for a
defense rally in the black colony.
The indignation and outrage which
demonstrators felt during the police
attacks has been transformed into a
determination to expose the
police-government conspiracy and to
protect victimized brothers and sisters
from further violence inflicted by the
legal system.
The only requirement for participating
in the defense is willingness to devote
time and financial assistance to defend
basic democratic rights. The benefit of
participating in the defense of the victims
of the St. Petersburg attack is the
knowledge that you are joining in the
struggle to maintain and extend rights
wrenched from demagogues and autocrats
in past years and centuries that you are
helping to establish and maintain the
basis for a truly just society.
DAVID ROSSI
GAINESVILLE DEFENSE FUND
1 BOX 15107 UNIVERSITY STATION

OUR PRESIDENTS Vietnam
policy, called Vietnamization,
merely means that we will
slowly pull out small numbers of
troops while planning to
maintain the present
unrepresentative ~ regime in
Saigon and continuing to murder
thousands of Vietnamese.
It is not a plan to end the war,
rather it is_a.phm to keep troop
levels and casualties at a level

\V.VM Staff Writings >>>s UF Gets An Apathetisizer
| |
WMFSWWMVW/.WKW.WSWWiWV.V.VAV.V.V.V.V.W.SvWv.v.vW By Philip Morgan

A friend of mine claims to be the discoverer of
the silent god of the campus (as he calls it). He
expressed concern over its potential danger to
civilization and said it might be the cause of the
present mediocrity plague destroying the state.
From what he said, several years ago a few noble
defenders of the majority values, men of such
magnificent caliber as Tom The Blade Slade and
Claude The Emancipator Kirk, realized the
danger of a growing subversive element in our
society. A frightening number of poeple were
questioning the values of this SUN and FUN state
and even those of the whole contemporary
American system. They were denouncing the basis
of our free country individual life dedicated
solely to the accumulation of money!
Well, Hell! The overtones of such denunciation
is downright treasonous, said the noble defenders.
What would happen to this promised land if
people decided to stop striving only for money?
People might even stop defending our GLORIOUS
CAUSE AGAINST COMMUNIST DEVILS! There
wouldnt be anything to preserve outside of the
AMERICAN WAY, and thats meaningless without
lots of money!
The noble defenders got to work. They figured
the reason so many people were beginning to
deviate from the supreme American goal is that the
university professors have been teaching them

A Memorial
MR. EDITOR:
The Florida Statutes provides for an
ex-confederate soldiers' and sailors
home endowment trust fund, the
proceeds of which shall be used for the
endowment of scholarships in the state
university system for lineal descendants
of confederate soldiers and sailors. This
statute .provides further that when it
appears that no one can qualify for said
scholarship that the endowment trust
fund be used to ... erect a permanent
memorial to the confederate soldiers and
sailors in the form of a building upon the
campus of the University of Florida ...
and suitably mark said building as a
memorial to the confederate soldiers and
sailors.
I suggest that the Board of Regents
hs smoll society

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acceptable to the public. That is
why we, in the anti-war
movement, must keep up the
pressure with demonstrations
and rallies, to let Nixon know
were not buying his phony
jdan to end the war, and that
we want immediate withdrawal.
By demonstrating we show we
care about morality and needless
killing, and show that this
generation gives a damn. We are

FORUM:^^
(Aim mL VliAut J
,^J hope for Tr -^f ,rp

Friday, May 1,1970. Tha Florida AWfator, I

By Mike Hittlemi&i*.

radical things like how to think and evaluate
instead of telling them how to make money like
they should be doing. They only blamed a few
schools subversive schools like English, or
political science, or philosophy. The noble
defenders were, still proud of business
administration, though.
Ahyway, they needed to stop this subversive
element, cleverly and effectively. They needed to
make people forget the minor side effects of the
system and concentrate on their individual
accomplishment. They hired a patriotic engineer
(who owned stock in At & T) to do something
about it. After a few months of grueling
computation the engineer came up with a device he
called the APATHETISIZER, which looked like a
regular air conditioning unit.
So, out there on the terrace in front of Little Hall
is the silent god of the campus. Well protected. It
has a brick wall built around it and can only be seen
from above. It probably doesnt work for free. It
probably requires a sacrifice or something. Perhaps
some old IBM cards. Perhaps a barrel of Blue Key
pins. Maybe even a young virgin, or if there are
none, someone who says shes a virgin, Nevertheless,
die noble defenders have once again protected our
values. They disguised it as an air-conditioning unit.
Obviously a CAPITALIST PLOT to cool things
down.

declare that it appears no one can qualify
for these scholarships and that a
memorial in the form of the one specified
in the statutes be constructed on the
Plaza of Americas and that said memorial
shall have erected at the center of its
entrance, a flag pole upon which shall fly
the confederate flag. This flag shall be
raised daily by the directors of the
departments housed in said buildings.
I further suggest that the Department
of Minority Affairs and the Department
of Black Studies occupy said building
along with other organizations which may
want to take advantage of this generous,
sympathetic gesture of southern
hospitality, provided, of course, that the
officers of the organizations participate in
the daily flag ceremonies.
NAME WITHHELD
by Brickmon

serving America in tneoest way
possible, by demanding that she
follow a just and honest path for
peace and freedom from
imperilism. I believe we are the
greatest generation of youth this
country has ever seen, arid we
must keep demonstrating we
care about this world we will
soon run, or there wont be a
world left when our turn comes
to run the show.

Page 9



Page 10

K Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, May 1,1970

Federal Fund Cut Affects Latin Center

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the last of a two-part series
about the UF Center for Latin
American Studies.)
By CAR LOS J. LICE A
Alligator Writer
There is a possibility that by
1972 federal funds for the UF
Center of Latin American
Studies (CLAS) might be cut
off.
According to CLAS Asst.
Director, Raymond J. Toner, the
CLAS has been partially funded
by the Office of Education of
the U. S. Department of Health
Education and Welfare, and
Congress has reduced the funds
destined for this type of
program.
CLAS DIRECTOR, Dr.
William E. Carter, said the
phasing out of the funds might
eliminate a smaller center, but
the UF center will not be
eliminated.
We have enough support
from the state to keep the (UF)
center open.
One effect of this, is that
some of the research will be
hampered, and that student
research might be cut down
considerably.
CARTER SAID the student
research will have to come more
from requests and grants,
allowing only for independent
research.
There is, however, one bright
point in the CLAS future, in
December the center will move
to the third floor of the new
graduate and International
Studies Building, now being
constructed north of the Plaza
of the Americas.
Some of the funding for
CLAS might come from other
sources, mainly foundations.
THE ROCKEFELLER
Foundation grant given to CLAS
was extended until August of
this year.
i This grant is for a cooperative
teaching and research program
with the Universidad del Valle in
Cali, Colombia.
Another part of CLAS is the
Latin American Data Bank
(LADB).
ACCORDING TO Thomas L.
Page, assistant professor of

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RAYMOND J. TONER
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... funds reduced
political science, who is in
charge of the LADB, it contains
a collection of census and
electoral data from the Latin
, American nations.
This information about 12
million card images has been
made available to all UF
students and faculty who have a
need for this information.
The LADB works closely with
the Center for Latin American
Demographic Studies
(CELADE), which, is
headquartered in Santiago,
Chile. CELADE is part of the
United Nations Educational,
Scientific and Cultural
Organization (UNESCO).
THE INFORMATION
collected by the LADB is then
made available to all the Latin
American Nations.
Another project in which the
CLAS is actively involved is
research on the Aymara
language.
According to Carter, HEWs
Office of Education asked the
UF to do this research, and gs r e
Dr. Martha Hardman-dt-
Bautista, associate professor of
anthropology a $29,000 grant
for research of the Aymara
language.
TWO NATIVE speakers of
Aymara are now residing at the
UF, Juan de Dios Yapita, and
Miss Juana Vasquez.
Yapita is currently editor of a
news bulletin in Aymara.
The UF is the first university
in the United States to offer
Aymara as a regular course.
AMONG THE projects-

initiated by the CLAS which
benefit the UF and Latin
America are:
Research in the Lake Isabal
region in Guatemala.
With the Rockefeller
Foundation, a program of
development in Cali, Colombia
(Universidad del Valle).
f Publishing books about
research done in Latin America,
the monograph series. (Carter
has published a book on the
Bolivian agrarian reform in the
monograph series.)
Dr. Alfred Hower, professor
of romance languages, and Dr.
Richard Preto-Rodas, assistant
professor of romance languages,
are preparing a reader in
Portuguese, Cronicas
Brasileiras.
Miss Irene Zimmerman,
associate librarian, and librarian
for the Latin American
collection located in the
College Library will publish a
book in Latin American
bibliography.
DR. JOHN V. D. Saunders,
professor of sociology, has
prepared a population study
about Peru; professor of
sociology Irving L. Webber, who
was also with the Universidad
del Valle, a study of population
trends in the Cauca Valley
region of Colombia.
Presently, psychology Prof.
James C. Dixon and Dr. Comelis
Goslinga, interim professor of
Latin American Art, are with the
Universidad del Valle.
Among other projects, the
CLAS publishes the
Latinamericanist, a magazine
published five times a year,
which is edited by Toner, who
also teaches history.
THE LATINAMERICANIST
has world-wide distribution to
people who are interested in
Latin America, Toner said,
inclusive behind the Iron
curtain.
Issues of the Latinamericanist
are sent to Poland, East
Germany and the USSR.
Another feature of the CLAS
is the Colloquium Series.
According to Carter, the
colloquiums are at least
monthly.
THE COLLOQUIUMS are
series of conferences on Latin

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sponsored by CLAS.
Another project which CLAS
has undertaken is the Latin
American Conference.
According to Carter, these

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Men's Dorms Get New Commons Building

Brown Construction Co. of
Gainesville was apparent low
bidder Tuesday on a commons
building at the UF to serve as a
community center for
approximately 1,200 men
students living in the five oldest
residence halls on campus.
Browns base bid of $ 112,720
was slightly above the $112,500
available for the construction
project being financed by funds
maintained by the UFs Division
of Housing.
C. L. KLONIS, zone director
for the Board of Regents, said
Brown s bid along with higher
figures submitted by three other
construction companies
Holton of Gainesville, Triest of
Keystone Heights and Wesley of
Jacksonville would be studied
by affected administrative
agencies with formal notification
expected within a few days.
Bent Card
Future Called
Uncertain
People involved with the Bent
Card, a coffee house sponsored
by the Lutheran Student Center,
disagreed Wednesday whether it
will soon be closing.
In actuality the building
itself is being closed, probably in
June, to build a new one, Bob
Zuber, manager of the Bent
Card, said.
WERE LOOKING for
alternative possibilities so that
we can keep the Bent Card
open, Zuber said.
If the Card closes, it will
suffer. We operate effectively on
the momentum we have built up
in the last five years, and closing
for any length of time would
probably mean we would lose
support, Zuber said.
As far as this building is
concerned, the Card is closing.
But were striving to keep it
open somewhere else, possibly in
a new permanent location,
Lillian Brown of the Bent Card
said.
PLANS ARE underway for a
fifth anniversary celebration,
according to Miss Brown.
Tentatively, Sunday, June 7,
will be the celebration. We are
contacting all those who have
played at the Card in the past
five years, Miss Brown said.
It will be a big family
reunion-type thing. Everyone
will get together to sing and
talk, she said.
IN THE MALL-IN THE MALL
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The one-story brick building
will be located in a courtyard
between Fletcher and Thomaas
Halls. It will serve as a meeting
and social facility for occupants
of those buildings and students

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living in Buckman, Sledd and
Murphree Halls. Lemon and
Megginson of Titusville are
architects for the project.
According to Dr. Harold
Riker, director of housing, the

lack of meeting and social rooms
for these buildings has prevented
the development of a sense of
unity and responsibility in this
large living area. He feels the
building will fill a pressing need

Friday, May 1,1970, Tha Florida ANifator,

to correct this situation and to
make the area more attractive
for group living.
The facility would include
an area office, food vending
equipment and an outside patio.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 1,1970

Sweden Attacks Vietnamization Policy

STOCKHOLM (UPI)
Sweden attacked the United
States' policy of Vietnamization
of the war in Southeast Asia
Wednesday and at the same time
condemned recent Swedish
demonstrations against the new
U. S. ambassador here, Jerome
H. Holland.
Both points were included in
a policy declaration presented to
the Swedish Parliament by
Premier Olof Palme and Foreign

RunawaySexLife
Worth $50,000
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) A jury Wednesday awarded
$50,000 damages to Gloria Sykes, the 29-year-old former
Sunday School teacher whose attorney claimed a runaway cable
car gave her a runaway sex life.
The eight women and four male jurors deliberated for eight
hours, during which two held out for $300,000 award in the
lawsuit against the city and its transit system.
MARVIN LEWIS, Miss Sykes' attorney, said he might appeal
the award one tenth of the $500,000 he was asking.
But he hailed the verdict as a legal breakthrough" which
established the principle of psychic damages."
Miss Sykes was on a Hyde Street cable car in 1964 when it
broke loose, plunged down a hill and smashed into a power
pole. .../ w
AS A RESULT, Lewis contended in the trial, she suffered
from uncontrollable sex drives which drove her into the arms Os
more than 100 men. / /
Miss Sykes, who testified for 2Vi days during the trial, said
she was a former Sunday School teacher and choir singer whose
college friends used to kid her about being the worlds only
21 -year-old virgin."

Black Globs Befoul
Panhandles Beaches

PENSACOLA (UPI) A
pollution control engineer said
Thursday an oil-like substance
no one knows what it is or
where it came from is
befouling a large stretch of the
Florida panhandle's white
beaches.
It's not really an oil slick,
said Ted Ripberger. We know
it's a petroleum product, but we
dont know if it's crude oil.
RIPBERGER, assistant
regional engineer for the
Department of Air and Water
Pollution Control, said samples
of the slimey black substance
have been sent to the federal
water pollution testing
laboratory for testing.
He said the samples will be
compared to oil and asphalt
from previous slicks in an effort
to determine the source.
He said air and ground patrols
have been dispatched along the
beaches to determine the extent
of the pollution, which began
washing up Monday afternoon.
Ripberger said air observers
spotted a mass of black
petroleum lying under shallow
water between a sandbar and the
beaches, with small pieces
from the size of a dime to
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Minister Torsten Nilsson. It was
the Social Democratic
government's first outspoken
criticism of j! President
Nixon's Vietnamization program.
WE DON'T CRITICIZE the
United States for pulling back
troops from Vietnam but for
building up South Vietnam into
a military power when every
indication is that a political
solution must be sought," said

about the size of a plate
breaking off and washing ashore.
GLOBS OF IT started
coming up Monday, then held
off until Wednesday and started
coming up again, he said.
What's coming up on the
beaches is not an oil slick,
theyre globs.

SpringookSale
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kNeed gift ideas for Mothers Day and
perhaps Fathers Day? The Campus Shop
and Bookstore is having their semi semiannual,
annual, semiannual, sidewalk book and record sale
the week of May 4. Plan to take advantage
of this opportunity to select a
book or record at fantastic savings
that will be a welcomed change from
the ordinary.
Mother's Day
May lO
El Campus Shop& Bookstore
I! 11 tL -- - located in the Hub
PVNJIII

Palme, reading the statement
before Parliament.
There is risk that this policy,
which has been given the name
of Vietnamization, will prolong
the war," he said.
In reference to
demonstrations against Holland,
the statement referred to the
protesters as scoundrels" and
said they damage Swedens
reputation.
HOLLAND, a blade educator,
has been the object of racial as
well as political taunts since
arriving here.
In Washington Rep. L.
Mendel Rivers, D-S. C., irked by
demonstrations in Sweden
against U. S. Ambassador
Jerome H. Holland, said
President Nixon should call
home the new U. S. envoy and
consider reducing the American
embassy in Stockholm to a
consulate.
It bums me up, Rivers said
of the heckling Holland received
at the hands of antiwar
demonstrators. Id teach these
buzzards how the horse ate the
cabbage as we say back home.
HOLLAND HAS been
heckled repeatedly by
anti-American demonstrators
since his arrival in Stockholm
last February. The latest
inddent occurred Monday when
demonstrators hurled eggs and
verbal abuse at the ambassador
during the opening of the new
U. S. cultural center in
Stockholm.
Rivers also made clear Sweden
angered him for reasons besides
the disrespect that he said was
shown this great America.
They have decoyed our
servicemen from their posts of
duty and caused them to be
traitors to their country, he
said, referring to American
servicemen who have deserted
and been granted sanctuary in
Sweden.
T THINK Jerome Holland
should be called home by the
President and he Nixon should

consider reducing the embassy
to consulate status, Rivers
declared.
Sweden, said Rivers, must
learn that they are not our
friends.
The South Carolina
Democrat, chairman of the
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Police, Guard, Clash With Students

COLUMBUS, Ohio (UPI) A force of 1,200 National
Guardsmen and police clashed Thursday with militant
students throwing homemade tear gas bombs, bricks and
bottles in the second day of violence on the Ohio State
University campus.
The guardsmen and police, wearing gas masks and
carrying clubs and rifles with fixed bayonets, hurled tear
gas canisters to break up a rally by 1,500 students on the
center of the huge campus.
AT LEAST 92 persons were arrested during the

,#
....
AMliiiWci
IgggNAM?.
MEMPHIS, Mich. A man
angered over ah arrest for a
traffic violation killed one police
chief and critically wounded a
second Wednesday before dying
himself ihside a house where he
held police off for more than
two hours.
Police Chief William Lewis of
Capac, a small east Michigan
community, was felled by a
single bullet through the heart as
he and other officers sought to
flush Leland Dulaney, about 45,
from his house.
BATON ROUGE, La. A
bomb rigged with 14 sticks of
dynamite and a clock was found
Wednesday in a clump of stubby
palm trees outside a country
club rocked three days before by
another bomb believed exploded
in revenge for the killing of three
blacks by law officers.
WICHITA, Kan. A Wichita
State University Student was
arrested and jailed Wednesday
on charges he had an American
flag sewn across the seat of his
pants. Leroy J. Peters, 20, of
Garden City, Kan., was jailed in
lieu of $250 bond on a charge of
defacing the flag.
WASHINGTON Rep. L.
Mendel Rivers. D-S.C., said
Wednesday U.S. prisoners of
war would rather be killed in an
American attack on North
Vietnam than be left to die in
confinement.
ATLANTA A delegation of
Long County businessmen went
home to Ludowici Wednesday
with a promise from Gov. Lester
Maddox that he would remove
or cover up speed trap billboards
in exchange for promises in
writing that such rackets have
ceased. There was no immediate
promise and Maddox told the
businessmen to go bade home
and try to get the commitments.
HAMPSTEAD, N.Y. About
100 students Wednesday seized
Hofstra Colleges University
Club, which has been off limits
to them, in an effort to liberate
this symbol of segregation.**
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disturbance, which started after the predominantly white
group of students, many of them dressed in dangling shirts
and jeans, refused to disperse.
The rally was to protest law enforcement tactics during
a six-hour battle with students Wednesday in which seven
persons were shot and wounded, 73 injured and about
350 arrested.
After the students refused to break up the rally,
guardsmen and police threw several canisters of tear gas
into the crowd.

Friday, May 1,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

STUDENTS* WEARING makeshift masks and chanting
stop the pigs and pigs off campus, threw bade the
canisters and hurled homemade tear gas bombs, bricks and
bottles.
Many students were clubbed to the ground with rifle
butts as the guard, backed by armored personnel carriers,
moved through the campus area, dispersing students.
Despite the violence, classes at the university, which has
an enrollment of 45,000 continued. An 8 pm. to 6 am.
curfew was in effect for a two-square-mile area around the
campus.

Page 13



Page 14

.'.f. r v*r.
I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 1,1970

Orange

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAM will be given Saturday,
May 2 f at 8:30 a.m. in room 207
Leigh Hall, in French, German,
Russian and Spanish.
'
ALL STUDENTS who are
expected to take these tests
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use his
social security number.
%
CMS 171 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
MS 102 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. in Little 101, 109,
113,121, and 125.

Library Schedule
Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
College Library* Bamll pm Bam-11 pm 2pm ll pm
Research Library Bam ll pm Bamll pm 2pmll pm
PKY Lib. of Florida History 8:30 am spm 8:30 am l2 N
Special Collections 8:30 am spm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Architecture & Fine Arts Library Bam spm l
Arch. & Fine Arts Building 7pm -10 pm Bam -12 N 6pm-10 pm
Chemistry Library Bam spm 9am l2 Npm spm
216 Leigh Hall 7pm -10 pm Ipm 4pm 7pm-10 pm
Education Library "" rT
341 Norman Hall Bam -10:30 pm** 9am- spm 2pm 10:30 pm
Engineering & Physics Library Bam- 5 pm 9am -12 N 2pm- 5 pm
410 Engineering Building 7pm -10 pm Ipm -4 pm 7pm-10 pm
Health & Phys. Ed. R. R. Bam spm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6pm- 10 pm*** Bam -12 N 7pm-10 pm
Health Center Library
L 102 Med. Science Bldg. 8:30 am -12 M 8:30 am -5 pm 2pm -12 M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall Bam ll pm Bam -spm 7pm-11 pm
Journalism & Communications R.R. Bam spm ~
337 Stadium 7pm -10 pm*** Bam -12 N Closed
Law Library
Holland Law Center Bam ll pm Bam-11 pm 8:30 am -11 pm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School)
Yongeldg. F. 8 am-4 pm Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Office Bam spm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam -12 N Closed 2pm- 5 pm
6pm lO pm 6pm-10 pm
lpm spm
The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday nightsfrom 11 p.m. l2 M.
** The Education Library closes at 6:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
*** The Reading Rooms dose at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.

, for your next car 10an... jg fssM&mvrnk-M
Try our lovv cost auto f' nanc n 9 ~ Interest M 3b
* == 7 balance and do vou ever save when you
I 01/ trade or pay ahead 1 Call 392-0393 for cost .2
before signing papers anywhere else.
HM Payroll deduction available for share and ~
foan payments.
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION H A
_ j st|^vnue_oMhe^come^on2th^Stfcet^_^_Hoim^ooqjw ; : _3^3og ; m£Mogjgyjhrou g h V2 t 1^

MS 204 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. in Little 201, 203,
205, 207, 213, 215, 217, and
219.
CBS 261 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 5, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Little 101, 109, 113, 121, or
125; M-Z to Little 201, 203,
205,207,213,215,217, or 219.
CBS 262 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 5, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M-Z
report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 111, 113, 115, 116, 117,
118, or 119.

BLUE BULLETIN

CBS 263 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 5, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Walker Auditorium; M-Z report
to Peabody 1,2, 4,7,10, or 11.
PLACEMENT
NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
June and August graduates
unless indicated otherwise.
May 4 : Regional
Administrator of National
Banks; Procter & Gamble
Engineering Div.
May 5: John Deere Co.
May 6: First Union National
Bank of North Carolina
CANCELLATIONS:
May 5: AC Electronics
Division of GMC

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES
A ...'**>

Friday
Friday, May 1
Circle K Annual Law Day Rally,
Plaza of the Americas, 11:00
a.m.
Indpendent Student Association
Meeting, 122 Union; 5:00
p.m.
Union Movie, "1000 Clowns,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Veterans Club
Business Meeting, 150 C & D
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movies, 9:00: "PT
- 109," 11:30: "Mysterious
Island," Southhall Rec.
Room
Union Dance, "Mausoleum
Hop," Union Stairway, 10:00
p.m.
Rathskeller, Biff Rose, 9:00 &
11:00 p.m.
Saturday
Saturday, May 2
Union Movie, "1000 Clowns,"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 8t
10:30 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movies, 9:00: "PT
- 109," 11:30: "Mysterious
Island," Southhall Rec.
Room.
Rathskeller, Biff Rose, 9:00 &
11:00 pjn.
Sunday
Sunday, May 3
Music Dept: Twilight Concert,
Variety Bands, Union
Terrace, 6:45 p.m.
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:00 pjn.
Union Classic Film Series, "On
the Waterfront," Union Aud.,
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Celebration 70, Poetry Reading,
122 Union, 8:00 pjn.
Campus Crusade for Christ
Meeting, Hume Hall Rec.
Room, 9:13 pjn. Folk
Group, "Sixth Hour."

Campus
Calendar

Monday
Monday, May 4
Block & Bridle Meeting, 349
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Brazilian Portuguese Club
Meeting, Evening of
Portuguese Music, 347 Union,
8:00 p.m. v
Celebration 70 Lecture, Prof.
Harry Crews, 361 Union,
8:00 p.m.
Science Fiction Book Exchange
& Fan Club Meeting, 356
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday
Tuesday, May 5
John Marshall Bar Association,
Admission, Financial
Assistance Programs &
Curriculum Information,
Union Colonnade, 9:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m.
India Club Movie, "Anupama,"
Union Aud., 2:00 pjn.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
362 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Modern Jazz Dance Lessons, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:30 pjn.
Dept, of Romance Languages,
French Film, "Le Bourgeois
Gentilhomme," Union Aud.,
8:00 p.m.
Celebration 70, Dr. Didier
Graeffee, 346 Union, 8:00
PJT).
SGP: Boston Chamber Players,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: Biff
Rose, $2.00. Poston Chamber
Players, U. of F. Students,
SI.OO, Gen. Pub. $2.00.



Gov. Dempsey Wants Troops

NEW HAVEN, CONN. (UPI)
Gov. John N. Dempsey,
fearing possible violence at the
scheduled giant Black Panther
rally here on May Day, Thursday
requested an adequate number
of federal troops be placed on
standby.
Dempsey asked for the federal
troops as the vanguard of an
expected 35,000 demonstrators
began to pour into the city in
support of Black Panther leader
Bobby G. Seale and eight other
panthers charged with murder.
IN AN EXECUTIVE order
issued from his office in
Hartford, Dempsey said: In my
opinion potential violence is and
remains high in New Haven.
He asked Attorney General
John N. Mitchell to place the
federal troops on standby so
that they could respond within
a minimum of four hours.
Dempsey had already placed
an undisclosed number of
National Guard troops on alert
and said he believed that local
and state forces could contain
any violence that might occur
during the rally Friday and
Saturday.
HOWEVER, THERE
remains a strong possibility that
the violence could escalate
beyond our capacity to contain
it, and that additional forces
would be necessary.
In Baltimore At least 10
suspected Black Panthers,
including two women, were
arrested Thursday in a ghetto
roundup involving 150
heavily-armed policemen. >
Police Commissioner Donald
Pomerleau said some of the
arrested men and five others still
being sought were wanted for
the torture murder of a member
of the black militant group last
summer.
HE IDENTIFIED the victim
as Eugene Leroy Anderson.
Andersons mutilated body was
found in a West Baltimore park
last July 12. Pomerleau said
Anderson was tortured at Black
Panther headquarters in East
Baltimore.
One of those arrested
Thursday as an accessory before
the fact in the Anderson killing,
2 BEDROOM
FULLY FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME
SET ON LOT OF
YOUR CHOICE
$62.43 per mo.
AFTER SMALL DOWN
PAYMENT
Mustang*^.
MONU HOMES MOV
4820 N.W. 13th ST.
378-1346
WE WILL HELP YOU LOCATE
A LOT AT NO CHARGE
your
mail-order
magazine
club
You probably didnt know it,
but you can order your Florida
Quarterly by mail.
Just send $1.25 to Room 330,
J. Wayne Reitz Union.
And well mail you a Quarterly.

FEARS PANTHER VIOLENCE

Marshall Conway, was being held
without bail for the ambush
murder of Patrolman Donald
Sager last Friday.
Four others arrested were not
named in connection with the

I v cfIPTN mm
I IfOUiE 8 m
KLLEY mm
SEAFOOD & CHICKEN BBi I
I SAVE THIS MENU!! I
I TELEPHONE AND YOUR ORDER VWLL BE READY WWQ/ YOU ARRIVE I
1 FRIED SEAFOOD CHESTS FRIED CHICKEN CHESTS I
ft shrimp regular 1.75 Capt'n Chest (half chicken, 4 pieces) 1.45 ft
ft small 1.35 Mate's Chest (3 pieces) 1.20 ft
I select oysters regular 1.75 Mate's Chest (3pieces white meat) 1.30 ft
M smalt 1.3 5 Mate's Chest (3pieces dark meat) 1.20 W
§ deep sea scallops (when in season) 1.90 ... 1
mullet ~~t~~ .1.15 chicken gizzards regular .85 ft
all the above chests served withfrencn mes,
ft fillet Os flounder 1.65 cole slaw, hush puppies, and honey
red snapper 1.90 ft
1 PARTY AND PICNIC SUGGESTIONS 1
m
Pirate s Platter 9 nieces of chicken only 2.20 v
I shrimp, oysters, scallops, fillet of flounder 5 ... 1.85 with onto of ftJeh flies, 4 hush I
1 shrimp, oysters, scal/ops, filiet of snapper 2.10 puppies cup of colt slaw 2.60 1
shriipp, oysteis, scaliops, filiet of J 5 pieces of chicken only 3.45 1
ft snapper & deviled crabs with pint of cole slaw and 6 hush ft
ft puppies: 3.85 ft
ft deviled crabs two to a Chest 1.40 21 pieces chicken only .. 4.70 m
ft extra crab .50 with pint of cole slaw and dozen ft
ft hush puppies 5.30 ft
all the above chests snrved with french Mes, hush puppies, ft
ft cole daw, ketchup and our own delicious tartar sauce ft
8 BEVERAGES I
1 YOU CAN BUY ANY OF THE ABOVE ITEMS 1
1 WITHOUT FRENCH FRIES, HUSH PUPPIES, AND selection of Coffee milk V
V COLE SLAW IF SO DESIRED.. JUST ASK US!!!'> drinks Tea chocolate milk ft
I SPECIALTIES AND SALADS DESSERT ft
W FISH-N-CHIPS I -- M
ft (Ash, french Mes, 1 hush puppy) .79 ASSORTED PIES CHEESE CAKE 1
V CHIC-N-CHIPS ft
ft (2 pieces, french fries, 1 hush puppy) .79 ft
9 SHRIMP-N-CHIPS ft
ft (3 shrimp, french fries, 1 hush puppy) 79 I
ft frog legs 1-75 I
ft veal cutlets (3 pieces) 1.35 f/VTftl!T 7 S R I
ft hush puppies... 3 for. 10 dozen 40 V -AAXWAAaKA M 9
9 french fries order .25 f
I onion rings 35 1
ft macaroni 5a1ad......... cup .15 16 pint .25 pint .45 ft
potato salad ...cup .15 16 pint .25 pint .45
ft coleslaw cup .15 16pint .25 pint .45
I 309 N.W. 13th STREET 231 N.W. 10th AVENUE ft
| TAKE-OUT SERVICE j
{ FOR FREE DELIVERY |

Anderson case but were seized in
a car loaded with eight guns,
including rifles and shotguns.
One of this group was
identified by police as John
Clark, captain of the local

Panther chapter.
Among the premises raided
were Panther headquarters and a
school where the group conducts
a breakfast program for ghetto
children.

Friday, May 1,1870. Tha Florida Animator,

"w* J ftaVpM
CENTRAL AUTO SHOP
MAJOR TUNE UPS
MINOR TUNE UPS
ENGINE OVERHAULS
RING AND VALVE JOBS
CLUTCH JOBS BRAKE WORK
CARBURETOR REBUILDING
1027 S. MAIN 378-4843

Page 15



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

*

FOR SALE
CLEAN rugs, like new, so easy to do
with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-155-c)
1966 Karman Giha good condition
phone 372-2059 ask for BUI
(A-st-131-p)
Typewriter royal electric best offer
372-2900 900 am 5OO pm
weekdays. (A-3t-131-p)
KLH Model 15 stereo, garrard
changer, walnut base and speaker
enclosures. Perfect condition with
new cartridge and stylus phone
378-1122. (A-st-131-p)
Labrador retrievers, Sweeks, wormed,
shots. AKC papers, SSO ea. tel.
376-3787. (A-st-131-p)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W Unlv.
ave., and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(A-st-131-p)
1967 BSA 500 Royal Star Very good
condition. $725. Call 378-2965.
(A-129-3t-p)
4 cent Xerox copies QUIK WAY
Copy Center, 3 machines no waiting.
Free collating. 100 copies 1 original 3
*/z cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Quikway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (A-llt-126-p)
1965 Corvette conv. stereo tape. All
the extras. Must see to appreciate.
Will trade for big cycle + cash. Call:
392-7565 after 4 PM. (A-st-128-p)
DESTROY your roomie with 35
watts/channel. 6 yr. old Heath da2Bl
amp. Tubes less than 1 yr. old. With
assembly manual. SSO. 378-7671.
(A-st-128-p)
Yorkshire terrier puppies, 7 months,
must sell, AKC registered, shots,
small adorable dogs, SIOO.OO, call
376-0289 after 5:00 on weekdays.
(A-st-127-p)
Must sell 1967 Honda SSO for SSO.
Runs good. Going into military.
Phone 378-0081 between 4 and 9pm.
(A-st-130-p)
Kustom amp. Gibson elec, guitar.
Both excellent condition. Must sell.
Call Mike at 372-7913. REK O KUT Professional
turntable & tonearm with cartridge
SSO. Ask for Bill Hat 372-9405 Chi
Phi Frat. Evenings. (A-3t-130-p)
Enjoy the Florida sun with a cycle
69 Honda cm9l $235 helmet
include Yamaha 50 $125 automatic
exc. cond. Call 376-0687 or
378-4668 aft 2:30. (A-3t-130-p)
A beautiful Persian rug is a wonderful
gift especialy for Mother's day call
378-8641 after 5:00 pm.
(A-st-130-p)
Mobile Home 1969 Homette 12 x 44,
one bedroom, A/C,' Early amer.,
carpet, good study desk, on nice lot.
378-9661 after 5:00 p.m.
(A-129-st-p)
New Ityoon *64. 55 x 10 2 bedroom.
Central' Air & Heat. Furnished.
Excellent Condition. $3,290. Call
372- after 7 P.M. (A-10t-126-p)
Complete component streo-fair
condition $40.00 phone
904-964-6983 313 Washington
Starke, Fla. (A-i29-st-p)
DONT miss this one, the best yet
AUCTION, new-used-antique,
Saturday, May 2nd, 7:30 p.m. C & J
Auction House, Archer. (A-129-2t-p)
Stereo Ampex tape recorder model
760 and miracord turntable with
pre-amp. Like new. Call Pablo at
373- anytime. (A-st-127-p)
HARLEY Sprint 1967 250 CC $450,
GOYA g-10 classical guitar sllO,
POLAROID 103 SBO, or best offer.
Call 376-2048 anytime. (A-st-127-p)
FOR RENT
/.y.VAVASV.V.y..V.V.'.ViVA^AWiSw

Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 SW 16th Court. MAKE YOUR
FALL RESERVATIONS NOW. Call
376-9668. (B-126-ts-c)
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/'c, pool, some carpeted, close to
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
376-8990 University Apartments
iB-24t-11-p)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)

FOR RENT
Male female, now, June Sept two
blocks to campus, large rm ktchen
priv. TV air cond quiet yet liberal
1204 NW 3 ave 378-0286 392-0700.
(B-st-130-p)
New 2 bedroom townhouse CH/A
w.w. carpeting luxury living Stephen
Foster Apts. 1020 N.W. 38 ave.
$135.00 376-6690. (B-2t-130-p)
POOLSIDE 2 bedroom Landmark
apt. no. 110 to sublet for summer qt.
46.25/mo. a person June rent free or
need 2 fern, roomates call 376-2842.
(B-st-130-p)
Sublet for summer quarter one
bedroom sum. apt. Gatortown 115
130/mo. large living room. Call
378-9743 Will consider best offer.
(B-6t-130-p)
1327 NW 7th Ave one bedroom apt
suitable for two person or married
couple call 378-8641 after 5:00 pm.
(B-st-130-p)
Must sublet til mid Sept. 1 bdrm apt
ac across from campus SIOO monthly
immediate occupancy ph 378-7198.
(B-st-131-p)
No lease S7O a monch Incl. utilities
new 12x60 mobile home your own
room TV A/C and only one other
person phone 376-4138. Ask for Jim.
(B-st-131-p)
Furnished apt. quiet luxury living in
two bedroom central h/alr w.w.
carpeting convient location $145
376-6690. (B-2t-131-p)
Sublease now for summer. Summit
House. New building, pool etc. Much
more. Must be 21 and working or
married. $139 per mo. call 376-8514
after 5:00. (B-st-131-p)
SUBLET HAWAIIAN VILLAGE
T ownhouse summer quarter.
$l6O/mo. Usually $230 But we will
give you S7O dis. Call 378-4219 eve.
(B-129-st-p)

HELD ||H|j|C||2nd
OVER I WEEK! I
MASH 1
IS WHATTHE NEW
FREEDOM OF THE
SCREEN IS ALL
ABOUT!
Richard 7*40
Joseph Morgenstern. mHmk....
Newsweek hL
American war
sound came in!
Pauline Kael.
New Yorker
Time Magazine mstmctio
Udt 17 reguvtt
B9
Fa*nt Qt AdWt
Gws'o K; :
jM I
2om cmtury fop*en!s An Ingo Preminger Production
Starring, v' I
DONALD SUTHERLAND ELLIOTT GOULD TOM SKERRITTI
mmmmmmmm l

Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 1,1970

FOR RENT
v Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372-7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
WANTED
Female to share 2 bedroom
apartment with 2 others. Air-cond.,
$46.00 mo. plus utilities. Immediate
occupancy 219A NW 3 Ave. Phone:
372-2393. (C-st-127-p)
SUMMIT H(|USE male roommate
needed immediately and/or for
summer quarter 43.50/mth. apt. G-l
call after spm 376-1006.
(C-3t-130-p)
A coke for a book! Bring your used
paperbacks to the union browsing
library on Friday May 1 only and get
a free coke for each one. (C-Bt-128-p)
Need S4O-SSO? I need a 10-speed
bicycle call 372-4989, evenings.
(C-2t-130-p)
HEI.P WANTED
Wanted: 2 attractive girls, 21 or older
to be carhops. Must be willing to
wear bikinis. Job is part-time
evenings, full-time on weekends. Stop
by, dont call. Maryland Fried
Chicken, 516 NW 13th St. (E-ts-c)
Cocktail Waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary will
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dubs
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-125-p)
Drivers to transport car to Phila area
one in May other in June must have
ref prefer over 21 call after 8 in
evening 378-0685. (E-st-130-p)

J£W.WAV.VATAff.V.VAV.V.VAV.V.V.V
REEF WANTED
.V.V.V.%V/.V/*V.VfV*VV*V*V#V*V.V.Vt%V
wXvXvaw.w3wwSw>X*X*X*X*X*X #
Piano Player Fri. Sat. nights Shakeys
Pizza Parlor. Call: 372-3384 evenings.
(E-129-3t-p)
Growing firm needs part time
electro-mechanical draftsman. Call:
378-7970. (E-5M27-P)
Counselor positions available at
CAMP PINEWOOD this summer.
(Hendersonville, N. C.) Male or
Female Ski boat
operation-experienced-160 to 220
h.p.; Male only Go Kart Specialist
mechanically inclined.; Male only
Big and strong Trips and Hikes
(operate truck); Male or Female
Tennis instructor (high school or
college experience); Male or Female
Archery Specialist good archer;
Male only Cabin Counselors,
activity escorts and leaders. Write to:
T. R. Robertson, 1414 Felch Ave.,
Jax., Fla., 32207. (E-st-127-p)
AUTOS
*:*:*:::*%^
1965 Corvair. Air conditioned, radio,
automatic. Basically good condition,
needs minor repair. First $425. Steve
373-1085 or 845 SW sth ave.
(G-2t-131-p)
Pick up on this magical 59 Ford.
Runs good. New tires. This car has
plenty of good karma. Very cheap.
Must sell quickly. 376-0482.
(G-lt-131-p)
VOLVO 1962 Model PV544 with 5
main bearing B-18 engine, new tires,
very good condition S4OO call
378-6945 after 5 o'clock.
(G-3t-131-p)
1966 Plymouth Satellite 2 door
white. Blue interior, 30000 miles 4
speed, 383 engine, new tires $1295
phone: 392-7116. (G-lt-131-p)

I STARTS AT
I BAAIIII 3.58
I TODAY! L-^^i* 434 * l l|fi-an 9:25
I TECHNICOLOR*
r AN ALFRED LEW- EVER HAGGIAG PRODUCTION
I
nuMhinia hums,
"> NICOLA BADALUCCO -ENRICO MEOIOLI LUCHINO VISCONTI
I -SSSSSB, MAURICE.JARRE-"^ALFRED LEVY*EVER.HAGGIAG

AUTOS
62 Austln-Healy 3000 New Paint,
New Interior, New Tires, Top
Condition, $1,050. Will Negotiate.
See at 1235 NW 39th Avenue, after
6:00 P.M. A beauty! (G-7t-125-p)
64 Falcon, 4 dr., 6 cyl., stand, shift,
radio, heater, good condition. $525.
Call 376-2248 between 5 and 10 P.M.
Only! (G-129-4t-p)
1941 Ford 2 dr. Deluxe sedan VB.
Ideal for restoration excellent
running condition. Never wrecked.
Second owner $250. Call 378-7700
anytime. (G-st-229-p)
Need cheap transport around campus
and city? *63 Falcon radio heat,
standard $175 moves slow but gets
you there. 373-2371 FOR INFO.
Leo. (G-st-128-p)
1969 BMW 1600. Stickshlft and
brandnew engine. $2195 call
372-6474 after 2pm. (G-3t-130-p)
GATOR COURT
376-4667 4170 SW
f Wpi **
spend where the
the night... price is right
[ Guns Guns Guns j
( Inventory over 500. Buy j
| Sell Trade Repair. J
t Reloading supplies, Layaway j!
j plan. Harry Beckwith, gun )
l dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. ]



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

:-x-x-x-x-x*x*x-x-x-XvXxXvXvx-x.x.
AUTOS
dodge DART : 1966 radio and
heater, standard transmission. Good
running condition, recently replaced
brakes and tires; S7OO. Call
378-7060. (G-st-127-p)
Porsche 912 sand beige, perfect
mechanical condition. New engine
many accessories. Must be seen,
378-3844 after 5:30 all day
weekends. (G-st-127-p)
Porsche 1961. Very strong engine.
Mechanically excellent. Radials,
Konls, luggage rack, radio, Bursch
many extras. SI6OO. Call 378-8342.
(G-2M30-P) c/
1963 Rambler FULLY EQUIPPED
Runs Perfectly Very Clean Best offer
takes It! Call 373-1573 or 373-2747.
(G-129-st-p)
1967 Fiat SSOO. Body and engine in
excellent condition. Four brand new
tires. Terrific buy! Im ready to sell!
376-6166 or 37§?5211. (G-6t-130-p)
Roomy 1968 Cortina white with
delux red interior, new tires, radio
heater, 4 on floor, bucket seats, good
mileage call Pablo 373-2303.
(G-st-127-p)
PERSONA L
Flying to Miami May Bth $25 & to
Wash. D.C. May 14th or 15th S6O
round trip. Need 2 3 passengers.
Bahamas anytime $25 r.t. 372-2419.
(J-3t-131-p)

I MORRISON'S CAFETERIA*
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
I FRIDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
I Fish Almondine
I and French-Fried Potatoes

Ir-fV) 89<

11| | H
b mmmm, m- s
4 W LI .' 3
I p __ __ :aiF 'lal^llV 1 : ABV jgfe,. .S.._.y .- %,
* wti Pra I Vlilb 4f r^H
111 I' |M I |fS|l|ll | > l 3IM

PERSONAL
If you didnt do anything In 1969 do
something in 1970. "Confront the
Issue Join Circle K Meetings Wed.
7:30 p.m. Reitz Union, Room 361.
(J-st-127-p)
BEAUTIFUL German Shepherd
puppies. 2 girls left. 5 wks. ACK well
bred! SSO proves you want them,
pays our vet bill. Bob 378-7479, nite.
(J-st-128-p)
WOULD LIKE TO FIND COED AS
PARTNER TO STUDY CBS 262
WITH CALL BRUCE 378-6691
today. (J-lt-131-p) j
Co-eds unwanted facial hair removed
forever cost is low fast world
famous kree method. Edmund Dwyer
Electrologist. 372-8039. 102 NW 2nd
St. (J-21t-124-p)
A FREE GUITAR LESSON phone
372-3225 or come by 1826 W. Univ.
ave., and ask for Bob Zuber, teacher
and performer here 3 years.
(J-st-131-p)
Tabu & Kiku, black-mix cockers 7wk
This could be love at first sight! All
you do is come by Broward 59 or call
392-9866 after 5 Let us give you a
little love. (J-2t-130-p)
Student Representatives from Fla.
Law School will be at the Reitz
Union on Tues. May sth to answer
questions on admissions, etc.
(J-129-st-p)

Friday, May 1,1970, The Florida Alligator,

PE FI SONA L
e e e
.x.x-x*x*x*x-x*x-x-xx-x*xx-x*x*xx-t
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent air
carports awnings ad d-a-rooms
supplies and accesories. Prompt
and dependable service. TNT sales
and service 373-1446. (J-10t-130-p)
Richard, Its been one year-no longer
a rookie. So lets keep the ball rolling!
Clyde. (J-lt-131-p)
LOST St FOUND
Lost: Ladles silver with black band
Bui ova watch Name and date
inscribed on back of case Call Gloria
at 378-9743 Reward. (L-3M30-P)
Lost or stolen: Dog at carnigras,
brown male Boxer, 2 yrs. old. Short
tail, long ears, $50.00 REWARD
FOR RETURN, 376-4671, or
376-7397. (L4t-128-p)
Found: Mother cat and 5 kittens on
French Quarter 109 Doorstep. I*f
owner-casesMother cat may be
claimed at Animal Shelter.
(L-129-3t-nc)
LOST: Gold Omega "Orange Bowl
1967" watch at Handball courts great
sentimental value reward Mel Sharpe
392-1311 or 376-9966 after 6pm.
(L-st-131-p)
Found: Mens ring. Blue Stone call
& Identify 378-1190. (L-3M31-P)
REWARD for return of bee-shaped
pin tel am only 392-3413.
(L-3t-130-p)
:x:x:^^
SERVICES
New student owned mobile home
repair service. Any repairs cent-air
carports awnings add-a-rooms
supplies and accesories. Prompt
and dependable service. TNT sales
and service 373-1446. (M-10t-130-p)
4 cent Xerox QUICK WAY Copy
Center, 3 machines no waiting. Free
collating. 100 copies 1 original 3 Vz
cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Quikway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (M-llt-126-p)
Free Inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
VOLKSWAGEN PARTS AND
SERVICE GAINESVILLE MACH
SHOP 1224 S MAIN 376-0710.
(M-10t-131-p)

Page 17

SE RV ICES
rXyXw:*^^
Motorcycle owners! Custom painting
of cycles and helmets full line of
metalflake and candyapple colors
now available cyclerama ph.
378-2811. (M-st-131-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office In
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPITCIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-ts-107-c)
Captain Louies Galley delivery
service seafood & chicken phone
372-3547. (M-st-131-p)

igeaegr/^,,^]
I 1 "?. A Htlp ovhS
THE ADVENTURERS
j To excite each other they ignite the world!
Iv
Sfe* fflf A
Everything that excited 50 million readers
l is now on the screen...and morel §
= HEID over. ? 85 |
PURE ENTERTAINMENT!)
mi United Pres? International
fsl/f
IBBM S
BUTCH V 1
the
IsUNOfINCE KID |
Mil I
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mftLLS OFAMGER |

BIRTHDAY
SPECIAL!
OUTDOOR BARBEQUE
75< Platter
great sandwich of
pork or beef,
cole slaw, and
baked beans
1:00 pm the Beasts from the
Beauty & Beast Contest
will tie judged
TODAY 11 -2:00
HAPPY BIRTHDAY UNION!



Tlw Florida Alligator, Friday, May 1, *970

Page 18

!****^%*^Hv!^^v?**^9?* # ****^*# #^^??r# r*^^^^^*%** # **t # ******* # **i r* # ********* ## ** ~#* ****, *, ** * ~#* ****************************'
Florida Folk Festival:
A Chance To Be Mellow

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
One of the nicest things about
this time of the year and maybe
the only nice thing about spring
quarter is the annual Florida
Folk Festival at White Springs.
WELL IT'S here, this
weekend, beginning sometime
tonight up on the Suwannee.
And it promises to be all its
been for us in the past.
In case you dont know about
it, the Florida Folk Festival is
three days of folk, country and
bluegrass music hooked up with
country food, some Seminole
Indians cracking whips and old
folks telling old stories. And
there are always millions of dirty
little kids running around, full of
joy absolutely.
Theres a beautiful woman
named Aunt Thelma who is in
charge of the whole show, filling
in with meaningful words in
between acts. Shes as much a
part of the. scene as are the oaks
and the river and the moss.
Almost anything can happen
musically. There usually are a
number of young people in
pop-style folk groups, loads of
bluegrass and country quartets

WRUF Presents
New Soul Show
WRUF will feature soul music from 10 p. m. to midnight
beginning tomorrow night
The host of the show will be Bill Ransom, 4JM, who is the
disk jockey for a half-hour soul show Soul OTempora heard
on WRUF-FM Friday nights at 7 p. m.
THE NEW program is a result of the success of our original
half-hour show, and a successful pilot program two weeks ago
which lasted for two and a half hours, Ransom said. The
response was just great. I got so many phone calls I hardly had
time to play the records.
The new show will differ from Soul Tempora by being
somewhat less formal. He plans tp play a total spectrum of soul
music.

AT 11AM A
MON-SAT
Si
Every Tuesday Nite Everyday H
|** A Free Keg of Beer 1 *?*<" ftl J
iA To the Guy Who \ V\l
VVf Bring* the Mott Girls l I
Famous ALANS
CUB ANA sandwicKot 1611 SW 13th St.

and groups, many single
performers both instrumental
and vocal and
ultra-traditional folk performers.
The variety makes the whole
thing exactly right for a lot of
different tastes and the audience
is filled with all sorts of folk.
THERE HAVE been some
name entertainers at past
Florida Folk Festivals including
the famous Carter family of
singers. Many top popular
bluegrass acts from around the
South have come in the past. A
number of excellent fiddlers
have come in years past in
addition to some really fine
banjo players.
Theres a structure to the
whole show -a structure thats
probably more inside Aunt
Thelma than anyone else but
the i organization isnt rigid
enough to say exactly whos
going to appear and who isnt.
All I can do is say that I have
faith the show will be a good
one.
And heres the really nice
part. It doesnt cost much. If I
remember correctly and if ithasnt
changed in the last year, the
only charge is to get into the
White Springs Suwannee River

park and thats only a quarter a
person or a dollar a car or some
ridiculously low figure such as
that. And once you go in, it
doesnt cost to leave and come
back.
To get there drive up
Interstate 75 and turn when the
signs tell you too. Actually its a
nicer drive to go byway of
Alachua. Its slower but cooler
and you dont have to put up
with all the Honest Charley
Speed Shop freaks in their
Chevelles. Either way, its about
40 or 50 miles.

COUCH'S MAYPOLE sale
FRIDAY SATURDAYTHIS WEEK
33 1/3 % DISCOUNT ALL SCOTCH 3M co
RECORDING TAPE REEL OR CASSETTE
ROBERTS STEREO TAPI RECORDERS
for the home...
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- sill h jgfl Headphone jack Full size yet light weight
only 26 lbs. 2 speeds w.th 15 IPS optional
BjH extra Two separate detachable speakers
Separate Tone and Volume controls, each
j) channel Automatic Shut-Off
MAYPOLE PRICE *I 9
FREE 6 ROLLS SCOTCH 7-201 $24.60 VALUE
DYNARANGE TAPE WITH ANY- 1 onti TO I
ROBERTS TAPE RECORDER SOLD to pm
DURING MAYPOLE SALE I Friday |
UP TO 50% DISCOUNT ON
ALL AIWA TAPE RECORDERS.
TPR-101
CASSETTE
. r RECORDER
j /SBCW
l eg AM-FM
I RADIO
BATTERY
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COUCHS

ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
Tggi/ AMI SALES
' "CORVAIR SPECIALIST"'
- GENERAL REPAIR ON ALL CARS
5 Skilled Mechanics With Over
80 Years Experience
10% DISCOUNT TO STUDENTS
Free Estimates and Guaranteed Work
1031 S. Main Phone 3767771

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
STARKE, FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER gs
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
..SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT



i WEEKEND |
i MOVIE FARE j
THE DAMNED This is a story about a family of strange people
in Hitler s Germany. The tale involves a brother and sister who are
respectively -a transvestite and a lesbian. Its directed by Luchino
Visconti and is supposed to be handled well. Dirk Bogarde, Ingrid
Thulin, Helmut Berger and Helmut Grien star. Visconti co-authored
the screenplay. Its the fare at the Plaza Two.
* *
HALL OF ANGER This is the only other new picture here in
town this weekend. I dont have the slightest idea what its about
except to say a black man and a white woman are involved but then
that happens all the time anymore. Its at the Florida.
* *
M*A*S*H* I was just sitting here trying to decide if I wanted to
see this for the third time this weekend. Its about war the Korean
one and funny inspite of excessive gore. There are a multitude of
top lines. Eliott Gould is beautiful. The supporting cast is brilliant. I
just decided to see it for the third time. Its at the Plaza One.
* *
BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID Robert
Redgrave and Paul Newman and Katherine Ross star in this good story
of bank robbers, love and Bolivia. There are many fine moments in it,
particularly several shootout scenes handled with real skill and
imagination. Its playing at the Center Two.
* *
THE ADVENTURERS This is an adaptation of Harold Robbins
bestselling novel of the same name. Its about South American
matters. Robbins is the guy who wrote The Carpetbaggers so this one
has some promise of being worth the time. Its at the Center One.
* *
# FLESH FEAST Yuk. This blood-quickener is with Blood
Suckers at the Gainesville Drivein. Also on the same weird bill is
Dracula Has Risen from the Grave, a tender 19th Century
adaptation of the age-old Easter epic.
* *
I, A WOMAN This is the picture that all the other films compare
themselves to. It was pretty much of a breakthrough in what was
allowed on screen, skin wise. Its also a good film, beyond the
advertising nonsense. Its with Carmen Baby, another fair one, and
something about a knight at the Dragon Drivein.
* *
A THOUSAND CLOWNS This one stars Jason Robards and
Barbara Harris and, It too, is a good picture. Its full of warmth. Tliis
weekend offering at the Reitz Union Theater.
*
ON THE WATERFRONT This is such a beautiful picture. As you
must know, it stars Marlon Brando, Eva Marie Saint, Lee J. Cobb, Rod
Steiger and others. Produced and directed by Eli Kazan, its the story
of the waterfront unions in New York and a man trapped. Its got to
be one of Brandos finest performances. Its on Sunday at the Reitz
Union as a part of the things that come to us thanks to the Film
Classics Committee.
Give Mom a BigH% early.
And make Mothers Day last longer.
Call or visit an FTD florist today. And
order a Big Hug Bouquet to arrive
early. Hell send it across the street.
Or country. A special arrangement.
For very special mother. Yours.
Usually available SIQ CLfl
at less than
i
*A* an Independent busincKman, each FTD Member Fkri*t *et* his own prices.
WP

Biff Rose
Appearing
At Rat
Biff Rose fans have two more
nights to see the popular singer
and conversationalist at The
Rathskeller tonight and
Saturday.
There will be two shows each
night, one at 8:30 and the other
at 11. Admission cost is $2 per
person.
Rose opened his third campus
engagement here Thursday night
with two shows.
Rose has appeared on most of
the major television late night
talk shows and hed probably
say on several of the minor
ones. Hes also recorded albums
of his material.
On his last visit here, Biff
Rose went to The Millhopper.
He probably will, local sources
say, return.
Mucho Mountains
Forty per cent of the total
area of Puerto Rico is
mountainous.
Iroswood
Golf Club
STUDENT MHRKRSHr
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 + TAX
SPECIAL RATI
WEEKDAYS $2 AU DAY
WEEKENDS $3 ALL DAY
For information coll
r 376 0080
gr izonwoop
coir civa
N i. AVOW

Nj RANCHO rooa # j
P 5 P 52559 R|
gj TACO RANCHO M
M BUSTS BEER BARRIER... Eti
M Low-Low Prices ki
W DRAFT CAN 6PK 24 CASEM
Wold Milwaukee .20 1.00 4.00 pS
M BUSCH .15 .20 1.10 4.40 Q
Uj %L SCHUTZ .25 1.25 5.00 0
QyC BUD .20 .25 1.30 5.20 W

! 4SS& STCfIK $Hf)K
1 Student Special
| (With The Coupon) |
. VALLLURf Our Regular 93< Steak burger
Luncheon And Any 15< Drink
I SI.OB Value Only 90< plus tax |
Steak n Shake 1
1610SJN.
REITZ UNION AUPITORUM^
SUNDAY, MAY 3 WTf
7:00 & 9:30
/OMISSION .50
WF
One of the greatest films of IJk y/V
all times. With Marlon i
Brando, Karl Malden, Eva
Marie Saint, and Lee J. Cobb
ON THE WATERFRONT
Drive a car
without an engine
in front or back. <
* j
*V.-' I .
The mid-engine Porsche t
PINNA PERFORMANCE MOTORS INC
615 MAIN ST.
378-1668

Friday, May 1,1970, The FI pride AWtar.

Page 19



Page 20

>. Th* Florid* Alligator, Friday, May 1,1970

By CR AIG GOLDWYN
Alligator Sports Editor
Cmon, Ill show you where to go.
So I hiked up my hip pads and followed him.
Hes a mountain of a man, Jack Youngblood, and
I felt like I was well protected as long as I was
following him.
WE MUST HAVE looked like quite a pair, Jack
and me. Me with my moustache and long hair, a
towering 5-foot-6, 146 pounds, and Jack 6-foot-4
and pushing 238 pounds. Like Mutt and Jeff.
We both had on white jerseys. That meant we
were defensive players. I knew better than to try to
be offensive to any of these guys.
We strolled from the varsity locker room under
the south stands. On Graham Field, behind the
stands, my ROTC class was crawling 40 yards,
jumping imaginary ditches, throwing dummy
grenades, and running the mile in preparation for
training camp this summer. Boy, I thought, am I
getting away with murder.
YESSIR, I WAS getting away from the frying pan
and into the fire. It had been less than a week since
I first discussed the idea of padding up with the
Gators for spring practice. I fully expected coach
Dickey to laugh in my face and then call in a few of
his cronies and share the joke. But all he did was
turn up the comers of his mouth and nod his head.
Sure, sounds like a good idea.
Too easy. Theres got to be a catch.
Why do you want to come out, Craig?
SO I TRIED TO explain. I told him how its
mighty easy for some objective sports writer to sit
on his press box and peer through his binoculars and
write how the Gators blew it.
I also wanted to see what it would be like to meet
Tommy Durrance coming through the line, read
John Reaves eyes and cover Carlos Alvarez. I
wanted to see first hand what its like to be down
there with pads popping, necks snapping, and two
teams of animals trying to devour each other. Now
his lips curled further up and he chuckled.
So here I was. It had been three years ago almost
to the day that I'd hung up my pads after the spring
game at Merritt Island High School. I never thought
Id ever wear them again. Sure there was this small
college in the Appalachians, but ever since I was a
little maggot Id wanted to be a Gator, even if I
could only be a grandstand Gator.
Jumbo Jack strode into a small projection room
in the west side of the stadium. Defense director
Doug Knotts saw us and snapped around from the
blackboard on which he was diagramming some
plays to the other line men in the room.
WHERE WERE you this morning? The
question hit Jack right between the eyes.
I was in class, he mumbled.
Then whatd you do?

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CLAY PHIPPS
HERE COME THE BACKS
in fnnxo,him

PAPER GATOR

I ate lunch. Why? I do something wrong?
YEA, YOU graded out at 22 per cent
yesterday. That one hit him below the belt.
Obviously stunned, and with about 10 pairs of
eyes burning down his neck, all he could manage
was a feeble how?
Get by in the morning and watch the films was
the answer and the conversation was over.
IN ANOTHER room a crowd of about 30 had
gathered to hear critiques of the offense. The lights
went out and the projector rattled away. Linemen
danced back and forth in forward and reverse. In
the back row there was a giggle and a whisper.
Someone shrank down in his chair. From the front
someone roared lookit that pitiful block! Leonard
is that you? And the whole room roared with
laughter.
The lights flashed on and when my eyes adjusted
I could see all the living legends around me. Garry
Walker, an old classmate of mine from several years
ago walked me out to the practice field. I was glad
he was there. I had a rough time getting my jersey
over my shoulder pads. He yanked the tangled cloth
out and almost pulled me over with him.
I decided to go with the defensive backs, usually
the smallest men on the field. Obviously I wasnt
going to play linebacker like I had in high school.
The whole squad ran through some quickness
exercises first, nothing too strenuous. Someone
explained that the players were expected to keep
themselves in good shape and not waste valuable
practice time with calisthenics.
THEN COACH Dickey called everyone together
to issue the order of the day, and then, he shouted
for his Paper Gator.
Huh? Someone jabbed me.
I jogged around to the front of the group, trying
hard not to trip. Coach rested his hand on my head
and shook it for me while he introduced me.
Already I was sick.
AFTERWARDS WE segregated into groups to
practice our specialties. I felt like I should pull
out a camera or a typewriter or something.
Coach Brown told me to fall in at the end of the
line and do what the other guys do. We chased balls
shouting Oskee when we happened to find one in
our hands. Oskee is the universal cry of defensive
backs. Its sort of a mixture of a karate yell designed
to make one vicious, a shout of joy because you've
done your job right and you want everybody to
look, and, closer to the truih, a cry for help because
there are eleven raving idiots on the other team who
don't appreciate the wrong people catching the ball.
My oskee sounded more like obschkee. My damn
mouthpiece got in the way.
Finally we split into two groups. I could smell the
blood in the air! This was it, a contact drill! We
(SEE TAPER' PAGE 21)

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MASH
... eating pigskin

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PAPER 6ATOR
|Trom page 2qj
were going to practice form-tackling each other. I
was last in my line and Doug Sorenson lined up
opposite me. I could tell when we started moving
towards each other his heart wasnt in it. Even after
all this time I could remember..'. watch his waist
so he doesnt head fake me ... keep low. Place my
helmet in his numbers, grab and drive, drive, drive. I
got in a good lick and the bystanders congratulated
me, but I didnt hear them, my helmet had twisted
over my ears, there was dirt in my mouth, and my
hip pads had come loose.
COACH DICKEY wandered by later, but I don't
think he had a chance to see me do my stuff. Maybe
he felt that he was responsible if anything happened
to me. Maybe he didnt want to see it happen.
Then we jogged to Florida Field for a controlled
filmed scrimmage. After a Gatorade break along the
way I took my position, on the bench.
Finally Coach Brown flagged me onto the field.
This time I didn't jogg. Youre Mike linebacker.
That meant I lined up opposite the offensive
strong-side tackle. This was no defensive back
position, and I began to fear for my life. Only about
the first two years flashed before my eyes before
the ball was snapped. I was with the first team
defense, which meant I was facing the second team
offense. It was an off-tackle dive with the tackle
blocking down on the defensive end leaving the
linebacker isolated against the full back who is
instructed to move him one way or the other leaving

REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM
BULLWINKLE CARTOONS
Jr TODAY AT 1:30 + 3:30
Free!
sponsored by JWRU
REITZ UNION AUPTOMUMI
JHnS' g
FRIDAY & SATURDAY May 1.2
5:30, 8:00/ 10:30 PM__Adnnssion__s(K_

* NITE GOLF
| PAR 60 LIGHTED COURSE
Driving Range
< \
\\ 7:30 A.M. to Midnight A
A .WtitSJ&dCmnA
B to ( 3 i/j m iles West of 1-75 on S.R. 26)
|

TOM KENNEDY
REAVES IN SHADES
... I wanted to read his eyes
a hole for the back. But I didnt know that. If I had
I might not have stuck around.
A LINEBACKER is trained to step into any holes
he sees opening, and when the tackle blocked down
I stuck my foot in. Here come the backs. Duane
Doel, a sophomore fullback was leading Leonard
George, a freshman running back right at me. Doel
hit me and while trying to parry him I sort of fell
into the way of George who was right behind him. I
closed my eyes and fell to my knees and reached
out. I grabbed him around the thighs at about the
line of scrimmage and held on for my dear life.
George fell over me for about two yards, but I had
made a tackle on my first play!

Then all of a sudden there was
a warm hand on my rump
moving me towards the sideline,
and a voice that sounded like
Coach Dickey was saying good
job son. Now you're
one-for-one, quit while you're
ahead. I headed for the sidelines
and the bench was up and
cheering. So were the fans in the
stands.
I felt good. The guys were
great and heaped on their praise.
That meant a lot. These guys
who had been playing the sport
since they could walk.
IT WAS good to be able to
talk to them from a different
level than the always-suspected
reporter. After that they began
to open up. It would be hard to
find as dedicated a group of men
anywhere. They've been given
their scholarships already. They
don't have to take the physical
and verbal abuse on and off the
field. They've got a free ride.
Most of them will never play pro
ball.
UNIVERSITY PLAZA
BARBER % STYLE SHOP
3 Ro filer Stylists
5 Barbers
Roffler Sculpture
Kut for longer hair
Hair straightening
and relaxing
6 to 8 week guarantee
Capiloscope Free
Analysis of hair and
scalp problems
1820 W. University Ave.
373-1195

REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM
ON THE WATERFRONT
Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Eva Mario Saint,
Loo J. Cobb
Classic Films Series
Sunday at 7:00 and 9:30

m'wmm*mm\uw
I
I NO. IgISIIRCESTED FOR GENERAL AUDIENCES |l
I NOTHING UKETH.S.N ALL I
| DRACULA |
I HAS RISEN FROM THE I

I 2 x n
/ COLOR (fclj) Vn
[ HITS ff B§S
| J| %m[
I Goldie Hawng|
{ Cactus Floweri|
> .. " < '

Friday, May 1,1970, Tha Florida Alligator;
/ . -

Page 21



The
Florida
Alligator

JV.V.WiV.V.V.V.V.V.*.
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GATOR SPORTS

Track Coach Jimmy Carnes
has been playing make believe
with UF-FSU time and distance
comparisons in anticipation of
todays 4 p.m. dual track meet.
Carnes claims that the way
things are right now, the Gators
will lose 76-68 but thats not
what Carnes is telling his track
team.
They hear a different story
that says they will win 73-72
over the favored Seminoles. How
Carnes comes to that winning
conclusion is a combination of
strategy and mysterious
performance factors.
But hes not letting out just
exactly how he plans to knock
the Seminoles off, who havent
been able to beat the Gators in a

dual meet for the last four years.
If multi-team matches mean
anything, the boys from FSU
topped the Gators in Tampas
Jesuit Relays, but the Gators got
even by stopping the Seminoles
in the UFs own Gulf-Coast Meet
recently.
Seminole Coach Mike Long
said that either team might win
it by a sizable point spread in
the end, but that would not
indicate the closeness.
By scoring a hypothetical
meet on a 5-3-1 basis, heres how
Carnes figures the meet might
end:
440 Relays: Florida State 41.1,
Florida 42.4
Mile Run: 1, Ken Misner (FSU)
4:06.0. 2, John Parker (UF) 4:06.7.
3, Frank Betts (UF) 4:07.3.
120 High Hurdles: 1, Roger
Peterson (FSU) 14.3. 2, John Fuss
(FSU) 14.5. 3, Jim Devenny (UF)
440: 1, Greg Stowe (FSU) 47.9. 2,
Mike Link (FSU) 48.1. 3, Jerry
Faltnin (UF) 48.6.
100: 1, Roger Carson (UF) 9.7. 2,
Doug Brown (FSU) 9.8. 3, sddie
McMillan (FSU) 9.8.
880: 1, Eamonn OKeeffe (UF)
1:50.4. 2, Benny Vaughn (UF)
1:51.3. 3, Steve Oulman (FSU)
1:51.8.
440 Hurdles: 1, Jerry Fannin (UF)
52.0. 2, John Fuss (FSU) 53.7. 3,
Sandy Garland (FSU) 54.2.
220: 1, Roger Carson (UF) 21.7.
2, Eddie McMillan (FSU) 21.8. 3,
Doug Brown (FSU) 21.9.
3 Mile: 1, Ken Misner (FSU)
14:24.2. 2, Mark Bir (UF) 14:33.5.
3, Johnny Brown (UF) 14:59.5.
Mile Relay: UF 3:14.2, FSU FSU-3:14.7.
-3:14.7. FSU-3:14.7.
Pole Vault: 1, Scott Hurley (UF)
15-8. 2, Bill Jackson (FSU) 15-2. 3,
Joel Sarrett 15.
High Junp: Ron Jourdan (UF)
7-2. 2, Jim Sauers (FSU) 6-6. 3,
Chuck Duff (UF) 6-6.
Shot Put: 1, John Snyder (FSU)
54-1. 2, Chuck Crowder (FSU)
51-11. 3; Jim Nelson (UF) 51-3%.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 22

Javelin: 1, Glenn Perry (UF)
210-10. 2, Alan Landis (FSU) 196-0.
3, Roy Dunn (FSU) 195-6.
Long Jump: 1, Charlie Galloway
(FSU) 23-7. 2, Ron Coleman (UF)
23-3%. 3, Don Wagner (FSU) 23-3.
Discuss: -1, John Courtney (UF)

# total
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!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 1,1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

158-1. 2, George Frank (FSU) 151-4.
3, John Snyder (FSU) 150-1.
Triple Jump: 1, Charles Galloway
(FSU) 49-4. 2, Ron Coleman (UF)
48-7%. 3, Grover Howard (UF)
47-6%.



I // SPORTS SHORTS

18 Run For Roses

A FIELD OF 18, the largest
in 19 years, was entered today
for Saturdays running of the
Kentucky Derby in Louisville
and for the first time in the
history of the classic a woman
was listed as one of the jockeys.
Late Wednesday evening,
W. P. Lyons Brown decided he
would start Fathom to give
Diane Crump a chance to tide in
Americas most coveted horse
race.
George Lewis drew post no. 1
in the largest field since Count
Turf ran against 19 rivals in
1951. The others entered in the
mile and a quarter race, in post
position order, were Dust
Commander, Dr. Behrman, Holy
Land, Rancho Lejos, Silent
Screen, Robins Bug, Protanto,
Native Royalty, Action Getter,
Fathom, High Echelon, My Dad
George, Terlago, Naskra,

Major League Baseball

AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L PCT GB
Detroit 12 5 .706
Baltimore 13 6 .684
Boston 11 8 .579 2
Washington 10 8 .5 56 2Vi
New York 8 12 .400 5Vi
Cleveland 71 1 .389 s/i
WEST W L PCT GB
California 13 6 .684
Minnesota 12 6 .667 Vi
Oakland 8 12 .400 SVz
Chicago 7 12 .368 6
Kansas City 6 12 .333 6Vi
Milwaukee 5 14 .263 8
THURSDAYS RESULTS
Minnesota 4, Cleveland 1
Boston 8, Oakland 7
Chicago 6, Baltimore 3
Milwaukee at Washington (night)
Detroit at Kansas City (night)
California at New York (night)
FRIDAYS GAMES
Cleveland at Kansas City
Detroit at Chicago
Minnesota at Baltimore
Oakland at Washington
Milwaukee at New York
California at Boston

THIS SATURDAY NIGHT
MAY 2
FULL DRAG RACING
Program
wheel to wheel, fire smoking #
super action
Drive'your own car for E. T. Eliminator you
choose your own dial in time win a trophy
and go for the CASHH __
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As a spectator or participant include
Gainesville Dragway in your Sat. night action.
Special Student Prices
$l3O with IJ).
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GATES OPEN S:PM Time trials til BPM Eliminations 8:30
Gan. Adm. $2.00 children under 12 25 4 with adult
3Vi Miles North of Municipal Airport

Admirals Shield, Personality
and Com Off The Cob.
* *
DICK BASS, the National
Football Leagues no. 8 all-time
msher with 5,417 yards, will not
return to the Los Angeles Rams
next season.
Bass, *33, Wednesday
announced his retirement after
10 years with the Rams. He
carried the ball only once for
one yard last season, spending
most of the year on the disabled
list with a knee injury.
* *
JERRY WEST, the keystone
of the Los Angeles Laker
offense, has a severely
jammed thumb and it is
doubtful if he can play in
tonights fourth game against the
New York Knicks.

NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Night Games Not Included)
EAST W L tCT GB
Chicago 13 4 .765
Pittsburgh 11 8 .579 3
St. Louis 9 7 .563 3 Vi
Philadelphia 10 9 .526 4
New York 10 9 .526 4
Montreal 5 12 .294 8
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 16 6 .727
Los Angeles 9 10 .474 5Vi
San Francisco 10 12 .455 6
Atlanta 9 11 .450 6
Houston 7 14 .333 BVi
San Diego 7 14 .333 BVi
D i !
THURSDAYS RESULTS
New York 4, San Francisco 1
Houston at St. Louis (night)
Chicago at Atlanta (night)
Montreal at Los Angeles (night)
(Only Games Scheduled)
FRIDAYS GAMES
Houston at St. Louis
Chicago at Atlanta
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
Montreal at Los Angeles
New York at San Diego
Philadelphia at San Francisco

*
THE ATLANTA Braves
signed veteran relief pitcher Ron
Kline Thursday to brace their
mdund staff and cut loose
another veteran hurler, Dick
Ferrell, to make room for him.
* *
GEORGE FORMAN and Ted
Gullick, two young hard-hitting
undefeated heavyweights, scored
knockout victories Wednesday
night.

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Friday, May 1,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 23



Page 24

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 1,1970

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