Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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MIKE HENSON
UNION CELEBRATION
Everybody is celebrating the Reit* Union's third birthday, either
with an art show, or just by playing guitars and singing. The week-long
birthday will continue through Friday.

Conference Discusses Site
For Future 'Happenings

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Fifty UF administrators,
faculty members and students
met Sunday afternoon at the
second leadership conference to
discuss progress in dealing with
problems facing the university
community.
Minority concerns was first on
the agenda, but neither Dr. Roy
Mitchell, director for
disadvantaged students, nor
Mitchell Dasher Jr., of Black
Student Union, were present for
comment. They were invited
according to Dr. Frank Adams
Jr., dean for Student
development.
PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
Committee action included
seeking new sites for
happenings formerly held on
the Plaza of the Americas,
according to Chairman David
Wilmot.
A schedule is being made for
future happenings and plans are
being discussed for an acoustical
shell at a permanent location.
UF priorities were the major
concern throughout Sundays
leadership conference.
The summer enrichment
program, presently awaiting
funding, will enable 125-230
disadvantaged freshmen unable
to meet minimum entrance

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

requirements to enter the
university after a summer
development program, according
to Vice President Harry H.
Sisler.
When there injuch a struggle
for funding for summer
program, how can we make
plans for a band shell that will
cost several thousand dollars?
Greg Jones, of Florida Blue Key,
asked.
IF A STUDENT has missed
out for twelve years, how can he
be expected to tackle it in one
summer? Wayne Hieber,
SAMSON area coordinator for
Waldo, questioned.
Why couldnt the university
help to correct the problem in
its early stages by having certain
colleges give credit for tutoring
of younger students through
SAMSON? Hieber added.
The largest priority question
was raised in reference to
athletics and academics.
STUDENTS ARE tired of
paying for things they dont
consider important. They are
tired of poor faculty and
facilities. Wed rather pay for
better professors than for better
football, Jerry Siegel, of the
Comer Drug Store, said.
Our main purpose here is to
get an education, Siegel said.
The activity fee is not in
conflict with academic funds.

University of Florida, Gainesville

'OUT OF BALLFIELD

State May Deny
O'Connell's Request

By RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell went to Tallahassee
Monday to save $7 million from
an executive budget cut, but
according to at least one
legislator, his efforts may not be
completely successful.
OConnell met with other
university representatives, state
legislators and the Board of
Regents staff to discuss
alternatives to the governors
educational appropriation
recommendation.
REP. RALPH TURLINGTON
of Gainesville said the entire
state University System is
affected by the educational
appropriations. He said each
university was asked for
adjustments. Each university is
expected to re-evaluate and
resubmit their individual budget
proposals.
Turlington said, Quite
frankly we dont know what is
available from future legislative
appropriations to the university
system.
Turlington was quoted on a
local radio station earlier in the
day as saying the UFs requested

The reason athletics is a part of
the activity fee is to avoid
conflict between athletics and
academics, UF President
Stephen C. OConnell said.
l wouldnt under any
circumstance ask legislture to
take funds from academics for
athletics, OConnell said.
One problem in getting
alumni to give to the academic
needs of the university is that
they see no reason to give when
they cant even get football
tickets.
Unfortunately, too often
academic support comes as a
result of athletics, OConnell
said.
What I would like to see is
for the University of Florida to be
(SEE 'UF' PAGE 2)
jiff Inside fjg
A SHOW of hands in
the Florida House
declared today Spiro T.
Agnew Day page 4
Classifieds 9
Editorials 6
Letters : 7
Movies 9
' Orange and Blue 8
Sports 10
Whats Happening 3

$7 million was out of the
ballfield.
OConnell, who will return
from his Tallahassee meeting
Wednesday, has proposed a
bare bones budget reflecting
the UFs Five budgetary units
financial needs. The units are
general education, Institute of
Food and Agricultural Science,
Health Center, Graduate
Engineering Education System

Bikeways Petition
Asks SIO,OOO Plan

By PHIL MORGAN
Alligator Staff Writer
A petition requesting SIO,OOO
for the planning and
construction of bikeways at the
UF is being distributed but has
had only two to three pages
of signers, Dr. Seymour Block,
initiator of the petition, said.
It is a petition probably
everybody would sign, nobody
would be against it. We just

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BEASTLY DISPOSITION
Marci Ronan and Tom Kibler show their eagerness to win the titles
of beauty and beast in the contest that highlights World University
Service Week. Fifteen fraternities and fourteen sororities are
participating in the contest. The winners of the contest will be the
fraternity-sorority team that collects the most money. The winners
will be announced Friday.

I **
\ /

Tuesday, April 28, 1970

and Educational Engineering
Institute Station.
RAE 0. WEIMER, special
assistant to OConnell, said, We
wouldnt have turned in a
budget unless we needed it.
Turlington said it was not
unusual asking for Floridas
universities to re-evaluate their
budgets and No different than
any other fiscal year.
(SEE 'BUDGET' PAGE 2)

havent distributed it much,
Block, a chemical engineering
professor, said.
THE PETITION asks for
planning to start this summer.
Reasons for the bikeways
listed on the petition were:
Bicycles provide healthful
exercise
They do not pollute
Bicycles decrease traffic
congestion
(SEE'BIKE'PAGE 2)



!. The Florid* AMfttor, Tuaaday, April 2ft, 1970

Page 2

A new federally subsidized food stamp
program is being prepared for operation
in Gainesville and may be a helping hand
for eligible UF students.
The federal food stamp program
affords individuals or households an
opportunity to purchase food at reduced
cost.
QUALIFYING for the bonus food
stamps is a two-step procedure Mrs.
Marcia Tyler, Supervisor of the
Orientation and Volunteer Program,
'Conservation 70

Environment Bill
Faces Legislature
A bill to prohibit the sale of one-way bottles and cans for malt
liquor and carbonated soft drinks is being proposed in the Florida
Legislature.
The bill is the result of lobbying by a group called Conservation
70, which is also proposing 54 other bills dealing with environmental
problems.
SENATOR JERRY THOMAS, D-West Palm Beach, and
Representative John Middlemas, D-Panama City, are to introduce the
bill into the House and Senate simultaneously in a week or two.
The bill is supported by the UF Environmental Action Group
according to EAG Informations Chairman Brad Raffle.
Right now, the bill is in limbo, said Raffle. Theres a great deal
of opposition to the bill. We will have to generate a massive state-wide
movement in order to overcome the opposition, and make the bill
law.
EAG IS soliciting students to write letters to the legislature stating
their support of the bill. EAG is collecting letters at its regular
meeting Wednesday at 7:30 in McCarty Auditorium, Room 186.
Letters can also be brought to the EAG office, 323 in the Union,
according to Raffle.
EAG is registering its support of the bill banning one-way bottles
and cans because they are a source of litter and an eye sore. Also,
EAG advocates recycling resources and not wasting them like one-way
bottles and cans do, said Raffle.
WITHOUT THE help and cooperation of the students in writing
letters, said Raffle, we wont have much of a voice when we go
before the legislative committees. Without them, we cant win. This is
a perfect example of how we need their help.

UF Priorities, Programs
Studied In Conference

PAGE oN^|
excellent at every point as soon
as possible, Dr. Delton
Scudder, chairman of religion
department, said.
WE HAVE an excellent
opportunity with athletics. We
should work gradually to build
up every point," Scudder said.
Objections to the methods
used by local enforcement
agencies in dealing with drug
problems were voiced by Siegel.
He referred to policemen
promising to clear the records of
a person caught violating drug
laws if they could lead to the
arrest and/or conviction of
others involved.
THIS IS a fairly common
practice of police officers in
dealing with drugs. They use
everything at their disposal,
including UF students.
Lets not turn this into a
Fascist institution where you

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is th official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, Jply pnd August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exant periods. Editorials represent only the official pplnions
of thejr authors. Address correspondence to Florida- Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville,. Florida 32*01. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter atvthe United States Pott Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601. ... ...I *
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and IMOedjaii^r.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of pH .Advertisements and to revise or turn away copy It considers
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice k given to the advertising manager within (1) one day ester the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one Incorrect insertion of an advartisamant schodulad to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

Food Stamp Program To Start

division of Family Services, Alachua
County, said.
To qualify, the program distributors
must know how many live in a
household. This does not require family
ties in any way, only that the people live
under the same roof and eat together,
Mrs. Tyler said.
The second step to qualify is to
determine the total net income of all
members of the household. The number

have to fear your neighbor,
Siegel said.
It is the policy of UF to
correct problems without arrest
if possible... If there is any
validity to these rumors, we
should find out about it,
OConnell said.
TWO PROGRESSIVE
measures were presented by Dr.
Wilmer Coggins, director of
student health services.
The Florida Legislature has
designated $16,500 for the
continued operation of the
Comer Drug Store with no
strings attached to its
administration.
Initial laws directed at youth
are being modified to a mote
reasonable measure. There are
presently bills modifying
existing laws in the Florida
Legislature.
Im encouraged about where
we are now and where well get
in the next year, Coggins said.

MAY BENEFIT UF STUDENTS

mr
BOOKING IT?
Linda Tyndall lUC finds that precalculus does studying by a new method called radiant osmosis.
have a practical use after all. Or perhaps she's

Bike Backers Present Demands,
Present Conditions r Dangerous f

Ffrom page oneJ
t They reduce need for
parking lot acres
They furnish efficient
campus transportation
Bicycles must have separate
road facilities for the safety of
their riders
Block is interested in the same
type of plan the City of
Gainesville has for bicycle riders.
Gainesville has paths designated
for bicycles according to a
design by Herrick Smith, a UF
landscape architecture professor.
BLOCK SAID the UF plan
calls for ramps, roadways and
signs designating areas for riders,
$o they can have their own
place.
He said present conditions are
dangerous for riders and

GOOD TUESDAY ONLY
1.... fotodcii Fried tfkickeK I
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114 S.W. 34tti St.
M Agatov A 372-3649 M
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of household members and their incomes
will determine the benefits available.
UNDER THE program, a household is
eligible for both reduced stamp purchases
and free stamps.
For example, one person households
who receive slls or less a month will be
eligible to receive S2B worth of stamps
for SB.
A two person household receiving
$l6O or less can receive $56 worth of
stamps for $23. j

pedestrians. He spoke to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
and said OConnell seemed
interested.
Block said the petition is to
urge fast action on the part of
the administration.
The SIO,OOO will get us
started, Block said. He is also
interested in building bicycle
garages where students may keep
their bikes during the night and
pick them up in the morning
after they have parked their cars.
CORRECTION
The discounts on educational
materials, free education and
reduced football ticket prices
were not dropped by the
University Senate, as reported in
Mondays Alligator, but by the
State Department of
Administration.

THE GAINESVILLE program, is
scheduled to start on June 1,1970.
Eligibility for the stamp program can
be determined in late May. Applications
for the food stamps can be obtained
when the date is set at the Alachua
County Department of Social Services.
There is no age limit for elegibility for
food stamps.
The amount of income required
necessary for each state is determined by
the U. S. Department of Agriculture.

Block is also proposing that
SG sell bicycles to students and
buy them back after the
students leave, or wish to sell
them back.
Budget Cut
May Remain
Weimer said of the UFs
original sll2 million request,
which he said conformed to a
Regents approved budget
formula, was cut back sl7
million in the governors budget
recommendation to the
legislature.
The UF bare bones budget
cites reasons why $7 million of
the proposed sl7 million to be
cut are needed.



GATOR
GIRL
Catching the rays is today's
Gator Girl, Carla Moesly, 3JM,
majoring in advertising. Carla is a
native of Miami and was a
Gatorette with the Gator Band
for two years.

'HARDLY WORTH INTEGRATING
Senate Told American Schools Are Bad

WASHINGTON (UPI) A Senate
committee studying school segregation
problems was told Monday that American
schools are so bad theyre hardly worth
integrating.
Charles E. Brown, a former junior high
school teacher who served eight years as
school superintendent in Newton, Mass.,
said grades are idiotic, and that schools
rule most children by fear and stifle their
minds.
THE ENTIRE system must be
changed, Brown told the Senates new
Select Committee on Equal Educational
Opportunity. Rather than seeking
equality in terms of ... expenditures,
class size, college placement, etc.
We must learn to seek equality in new

MORE TIP TOE: The Childrens Ballet Recital will be today at the
Union tent at 3 p jn.
WITH OR WITHOUT SEX: Dialogue with a Theologue will have
Dr. Seymour Block today in room 122 of the Union. The subject is
Sex Without Children, and Children Without Sex.
CELEBRATE: Celebration 7O presents Paul Winter Consort, at the
Florida Gym tonight at 8.
ROSES...: People interested in helping with the project to
develop the Rose Concert Hall and Community Center are invited to a
meeting today at 8 p.m. in room 355 of the Union. For more info
call Bruce Nearon at 376-3626.
UNION MOVIE: The Committee, Union Auditorium 7 and 9:30
p.m.
CHERRYS DRESS SHOP
FEATURES JUNIOR AND PETITE SIZES
FROM THESE FAMOUS NAME BRANDS
4 >
SALE PRICES 20% OFF
PETITES JUNIORS
PETITE PHILIPPE MARIE^LLIPS
COUNTRY PETITES
LION TREE CAROL KING
JUDY GIBBS COUNTRY JRS.
DOWNTOWN GAINESVILLE
7 WEST UNIVERSITY MALL
V f' I
t- mYi I fTtelM nil* g

.iSspss^SaTHte' < . 1 m m
MMmf 41&. *sS?* : .. \ w w
ig .gfelfe***; sjjjiMlML

terms, in human terms, such as respect,
dignity, trust, humanity, freedom,
responsibility, integrity, joy, authenticity,
compassion, empathy, tenderness and
love.
We might be going aground here,
Sen. Edward W. Brooke, R-Mass., said, a
strong proponent of school integration.
He suggested that Brown perhaps picked
the wrong committee. Brown is now a
program officer for the Ford Foundation.
I AM intrigued, disturbed and
appalled a bit by the statements of the
witness, Sen. John L. McClellan, D-Ark.,
said, an opponent of compulsory
integration. He shook his head at Brown.
You go off in such long tangents,

CELEBRATION 70
An Omicron Delta Kappa Student Government Production. f
' llo> fe | i 9fif -lavi.- *>?j :imti nonpr !-, tqi ?9;)HqH r7
HT

McClellan said. I wont get a concrete
answer from you.
I anticipated I was going to get in
trouble with this testimony, replied
Brown, nervously puffing a cigarette. He
acknowledged his ideas sounded like
soft words and loose concepts.
But we are not going to approach
equal educational opportunity until we
face these problems, he said.
Sen. Mark O. Hatfield, R-Ore., said his
experience as a father of three made him
doubt that teachers, administrators or
the system make students live in fear.
THE GREATEST fear my children
bring home is not from the teachers or

Tinwljy, April 2t, H7O, T> HwilAjplpr, l

the administrators but from their fellow
students, demanding conformity in styles
and fads, in dress and hairdos a cruel
conformity, Hatfield said.
Hiroshima
Film Shown
The Interhall Council sponsored film
Hiroshima and Nagasaki will be shown
tonight in the Graham Recreation Room
continuously from 7 to 9 pjn. It is a
sixteen minute film that was recently
released by the U. S. government showing
the dangers of nuclear warfare.

Page 3



. Tlftor&*lli*to,. t4#rf*7o

Page 4

FOR AID IN POLLUTION FIGHT
South Carolinians Thank Sec. Hickel

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Capt Dave a
white-painted shrimp trawler which carried a group of
South Carolinians on a 600 mile voyage, docked in the
Washington channel Monday and was greeted by Interior
Secretary Walter J. Hickel.
The conservationist group, led by Orion D. Hack,
delivered 45,000 thank you messages to Hickel for
holding up construction of a S2OO million West German
petrochemical complex on Hilton Head Island, S.C.,
which they claimed would pollute the air and water and
destroy one of the last unspoiled estuary systems on the
southeast coast.
I THINK YOUR cause is just and will prevail, Hickel
told the group as he accepted the bundle of messages.
Hickel, on March 26, had notified the Frankfurt-based
firm, Badische Analin and Soda Fabrik BASF he would
strenuously oppose its plant unless it could give firm

War Issue At IBM Meeting

ATLANTA (UPI) The
board chairman of International
Business Machines refused
Monday to put the corporation
on record as opposed to the
Vietnam war.
Thomas J. Watson Jr. told
stockholder critics of IBM selling
equipment to the government
for use in Vietnam a corporation
had no other choice than to

McCormack Rejects Nixons
Plan For Lower Voting Age
WASHINGTON (UPI) Speaker John W. McCormack, D-Mass.,
Monday rejected in advance a plan by President Nixon to ask the
House to abandon Senate-passed legislation to lower the voting age to
18 by law rather than a constitutional amendment.
With all due respect to the President, McCormack told newsmen,
the voting rights bill should be passed and sent to the White House.
THE WHITE HOUSE said Sunday that Nixon plans to tell House
leaders this week they should scrap the 18-year-old provision that the
Senate added to a House-approved voting rights bill. The President, it
was said, favors the idea but thinks that it should be done through a
constituional amendent.
Nixon has adopted the position that reaching the goal through
legislation might be declared unconstitutional by the courts and
jeopardize the 1972 elections.
McCORMACK disputed that contention.
From my study I think theres a good chance that the Supreme
Court will find it constitutional, he remarked.
McCormack said a special provision in the bill calls for quick legal
review, so the Supreme Court could settle the issue before the 1972
election.
The administration view is that if the courts threw out the law the
1972 presidential race might have to be rerun to eliminate ineligible
voters, namely those under 21.

Georgia Profs Die On Trips

ATHENS, Ga. (UPI) Two
University of Georgia professors
died of sudden illnesses during
the weekend while on separate
Hips away from the campus, the
school reported Monday.
Claude Callison, 40, a
professor in the journalism
Florida House
Declares Today
Spiro Agnew Day
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
Democrat-controlled House
1 adopted a resolution lauding
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew.
THE AGNEW resolution
sponsored by House Republican
leader Don Reed of Boca Raton
was adopted by a voice vote
so close that Speaker Pro Tern
Terrel Sessums, D-Tampa,
declared that it barely passes
by a slim one-vote margin.
Sessums ignored a show of
hands for a roll call vote on the
resolution which declares
n
Tuesday as Spiro T. Agnew
Day* because of the Republican
Vice Presidents appearance at a
fund-raising dinner in
Hollywood.

respond to its government as
long as it believes the
government is democratic.
WATSON, WHO received loud
applause at IBMs first Southern
stockholders meeting as he
outlined the corporate policy on
the war, came under fire from
three stockholders on the issue.
Businessman A. R. Appleby
of Los Angeles, Professor David

department, died of a heart
attack on his way from St.
Simons to Athens. He became ill
while driving and died in the
Washington County Hospital in
Sandersville.
Stephen B. Homic, an
professor of
accounting, died in Johnson
City, Tenn., while en route to a
conference in Blacksburg, Va.
For MCI Copy of
'mat Is Race?"
Write: 716-311 S.W. 16th Are.
Pit. 373-1614 or 376-5073
SUMMER JOBS
with the YMCA
DAY CAMP
Preference given to those who
qualify as work-study students.
June 15 July 23
SWIM CLASS INSTRUCTORS
Red cross WJU. and/or YMCA
Leader-Examiner certificate
required. Oates open. QOOD
PAY. Call John Liles S/t-Mai.^

assurance the environment would be safeguarded.
BASF suspended construction April 7 pending a
meeting with federal officials, still to be held, to discuss
federal pollution requirements.
THE ACTION culminated a six-month fight by Hack,
president of South Carolina Environmental Action Inc.,
and other conservation leaders.
The fight began after South Carolina Gov. Robert E.
McNair went to Germany last October to win BASFs
agreement to build the plant.
Hickel said he could not give assurances the plant will
not be built. But if it is built, it must not destroy
industry that is already there. We are not being obstinate,
but we are trying to set wise guidelines for the use of
public resources.
THE WATER from a bay is public water. All we are
saying to them is, return it like they got it. The South

Novak of Vassar College and
Robert A. Mazelow, who said he
was a former GI, called on IBM
to stop doing business with the
U. S. as long as it is involved in
Vietnam.
They also urged the
corporation and its directors to
go on record as opposing the
war.
WATSON SAID there seemed
to bo a tendency to get
corporations into politics as
corporations. He said such
actions by the board would be
taking the voting power away
from the individuals and placing
it in the hands of a few
corporate officials.
He said that would be
contrary to the basic principles
of our democratic government.
He said he felt it would be
anarchy if IBM told the
government it would not do
business with the U. S.
WHEN ASKED BY Mazelow
if he didnt feel the corporation
was in a similar position to that
of the Krupp family which
helped build the Nazi war
machine before World War 11,
Watson replied the charge was
profoundly insulting.
He said IBM was in the
position of turning out
computers and not in the
position to make political
judgements.
Watson said individuals were
free to do as they liked and the
company encouraged local
political participation.
He suggested the critics take
up the Vietnam issue with their
elected officials.
~~ HOW
OPENING
for
Sept. Occupancy
LEASE OFFICE
309 NW 13th St.
Across from
Tlgert Hall
place)

Carolinians applauded and passed out packages of frozen
shrimp to all those gathered on the dock.
Hack said the Hilton Head islanders oppose the
petrochemical plant because it would. discharge a lot of
heavy metallic salts into the sea.
They are all poisonous, especially to shellfish, he
said. They wont kill the shellfish but they will make
people sick who eat them.
HE SAID THERE were 3,000 fishermen and 3,000
resort workers on Hilton Head Island whose livelihood
would be threatened by the plant.
The resort business is the third largest business in
South Carolina, and the governor wants to run a risk with
that, he said. All weve gotten from the state has been
evasion, and if they havent been evasive theyve been
arrogant.
He said South Carolinas pollution laws are pathetic
and enforcement is worse than that.

I Abortion Laws Face
X >

v ;.
I Constitutional Test 1
v
:j WASHINGTON (UPI) The Supreme Court announced :j
x Monday it will rule next term on the constitutionality of a
>: District of Columbia law against abortions which may have :
ij: impact on restrictive statutes in a number of states. :
>: Arguments on the issue will be heard next fall or winter with :
: the court later handing down a decision which may prove a
: landmark in recent moves to liberalize the nations abortion
: laws. iji
THE CASE IN question involved the Nov. 10 action of U. S. j:
District Judge Gerhard A. Gesell striking down the District of >:
Columbias 69-year-old law barring abortions except when :j:
necessary for the preservation of the mothers life or health. :
Gesell held this language was so vague that an accused person ij
j: could not properly defend himself against the criminal charge. $
: He dismissed an indictment of Dr. Milan Vuitch, a Yugoslav <
: immigrant who has been crusading for more liberal abortion
: policies. :j:
THE JUSTICE Department appealed Gesells action to the
Supreme Court, arguing the judge should not have dismissed the
: indictment without a jury trial.
x The American Civil Liberties Union and other groups have x
urged an easing of criminal abortion laws on grounds the
: operation is a matter solely between a woman and her
: physician.
> They also claim that the laws discriminate against the poor, v
: EARLIER THIS term, the Supreme Court declined to review
>: a state court decision which struck down Californias abortion v
:j: law. :jj
On March 6, a special three-judge federal court in Milwaukee
ruled part of Wisconsins law unconstitutional. $
X Other test cases are in the courts in New York and New X
v Jersey. x
V
i < *.
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/McGovern Commission:
Demos Must Reform

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Democratic Party commission
said Monday the party must
reform itself to survive and to
keep the disenchanted from
turning to third and fourth
party politics or the anti-politics
of the street.
The warning was issued by the
Commission on Party Structure

Cambodian Troops
Build Up Border
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (UPI) Military sources said Monday
several thousand Cambodian troops were being rushed into two
Cambodian provinces along the South Vietnamese border to stem a
Viet Cong advance toward Phnom Penh.
Three national highways were reported cut.
MILITARY SOURCES said the reinforcements were being sent to
Yaket and Kampeo provinces south and southwest of Phnom and Viet
Cong troops have launched widespread attacks in the past week.
The reinforcements were reported under orders to conduct
cleanup operations along Highway 3. It runs through vital
crossroads at the village of Angtassom which has been under Viet
Cong pressures since last Thursday.
Saboteurs early Monday blew a bridge on Highway 3 near
Angtassom.
A U. S. MILITARY transport plane landed at Phnom Penh Airport
with several tons of communications equipment for the U. S.
Embassy. But there was no official word from Washington on Premier
Lon Nols appeal for American weapons to repulse 40,000 invading
North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops.
In Washington, the White House issued a statement Monday saying
the United States has an overriding interest in preserving the
neutrality of Cambodia because of the effects a Communist takeover
would have on the war in Vietnam.
The attack on the bridge on National Highway 3 five miles from
Angtassom was reported to have blown a hole the width of the 60-foot
span.
ANGTASSOM, 40 miles south of Phnom Penh, was the scene of
heavy fighting last week between Viet Cong troops and Cambodian
infantrymen.
A Cambodian military spokesman said in Phnom Penh Monday
Cambodian forces had taken control of Angtassom but that some
Viet Cong were hiding in homes and pagodas in the town.
He said other Viet Cong were in positions along Highway 3 about
10 miles north of Angtassom and sniping at cars using the road.
HE SAID THE Communists sabotaged two bridges in the area.
Military sources said Highway 1, which runs eastward to the South
Vietnamese border, has been cut beyond the town of Prasaut about
20 miles from the frontier for about a month.
But apart from an occasional Viet Cong roadblock traffic was
reported moving in both directions as far as Svay Rieng 55 miles east
of Phnom Penh in the area known as The Parrots Beak.
Highways 2 and 3 have been cut south of Phnom Penh but military
sources said travel to the important province capital of Takeo would
be possible if repairs were made to a bridge blown up on Highway 2.
Soviet's New Rocket
Launches 8 With One Shot
MOSCOW (UPI) The Soviets announced Monday they had
successfully placed eight unmanned satellites into orbit around the
earth with a single rocket booster on Saturday. All were reported
functioning normally.
The total weight of the satellites in the first Soviet multiple space
shot since 1965, was not disclosed. Neither was their precise mission.
IT WAS THE first time the Soviets put as many as eight satellites
into orbit with one rocket.
U. S. space officials at Cape Kennedy said the United States
launched a cluster of eight satellites three times in the past on June
16,1966, Jan. 18,1967 and July 13,1968.
The official Tass news agency said the cluster of sputniks was
circling the earth every 115 minutes with orbits ranging from 870 to
931 miles at an angle of 74 degrees. __
DIALOGUE WITH A THEOLOGUE
Dr. Seymour Block
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and Delegate Selection, headed
by Sen. George S. McGovern of
South Dakota.
THE McGOVERN com commission
mission commission was one of two created
to avert strife like that which
disrupted the 1968 Democratic
National convention. The other
deals with convention
procedure.

In a report to the Democratic
National Committee,
McGoverns 28-member
commission proposed guidelines
for state party organizations it
said were intended to open the
party i to all Democrats who
wanted a voice in the choice of a
presidential nominee.
WE BELIEVE that popular
control of the Democratic Party
is necessary for its survival, the
commission said. We do not
believe this is an idle threat.
When we view our past
history and present politics
alongside that of the Republican
Party, we are struck by one
unavoidable fact: our party is
the only major vehicle for
peaceful progressive change in
the United States.
If we are not an open party,
if we do not represent the
demands of change, then the
danger is not that people will go
to the Republican Party; it is
that there will no longer be a
way for people committed to
orderly change to fulfill their
needs and desires within our
traditional political system.
IT IS THAT they will turn to
third and fourth party politics or
the anti-politics of the street.
As a basis for its guidelines,.
the commissions findings
included:
Party organizations in at least
20 states had no rules or
inadequate rules and a handful
of party leaders controlled the
convention delegates selection
process.
MUCH STRESS WAS caused
by unrestrained use and
application of majority rule
through such devices as binding
instructions on delegates and
favorite son candidates.
The cost of participation in
delegate selection was too high
in many states.
Representation of blacks,
women and youth at the
convention was substantially
below the proportion of each
group in the population ... the
delegates to the 1968
Democratic Natipnal
Convention, in short, were
predominantly white, male,
middle-aged and at least middle
class.
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Tobacco Critic Busted
For Possession Os Pot
LONDON (UPI) Actor Tony Curtis, a prominent
anti-smoking campaigner in United States, was fined 50 pounds,
$l2O, Monday for illegally possessing marijuana.
Curtis pleaded guilty but through his British attorney denied
using the drug. The $l2O fine was the lightest usually assessed
for marijuana possession, an offense against the Dangerous
Drugs Act.
THE 44-YEAR-OLD film star was arrested Sunday when he
arrived at Heathrow Airport from New York. Customs
inspectors and Scotland Yard drugs squad detectives found less
than one ounce of marijuana in a pouch in his luggage.
Curtis appeared before three magistrates at Uxbridge, near
Heathrow, Monday and told them: I plead guilty.
Geoffrey Leach, his British lawyer, says Curtis is not a man
who smokes cannibis marijuana. He was given it by a friend to
take if the need arose.
THE ARRESTING detective, Alex Lawrence, said Curtis
was completely cooperative and frank throughout with myself
and customs officials.
He said Curtis admitted possession of the drug for his own
use -a legal point that distinguishes against selling the drug and
does not imply that actual use took place.
Leach said that just before the actor left New York, Curtis
was told by a friend that he looked pale and strange. The
friend, not identified, gave Curtis the marijuana, Leach said.
LEACH TOLD THE court Curtis would be in London for a
year to 15 months to make a television series.
Curtis licked his lips nervously as he entered the prisoners
dock in the packed courtroom. Elderly women and teen-aged
girls made up at least half the spectators.
Curtiss third wife, British-born former model Leslie Allen,
25, arrived with him Sunday but was not in court.
They both appear in the United States on a nationally televised
public service advertisement sponsored by the American Cancer
Society in which they speak about the dangers of smoking.
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Tueaday, April 28,1970, The Florida Alligator,

You probably didnt know it* B
but you can order your Florida!
Quarterly by mail.
Just send SI.2S to Room 330, I
J. Wayne Reitz Union. I
And well mail you a Quarterly.!

Page 5



Page 6

, Tha Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, April 28,1970

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

/y/ y^y^yy^y,s%,. v y'
'cy i vfr 4 l
tss\ M y / %.
jJ
y^^pp&ar
/ Cambodia we know what to do with American weapons
- ,*>
In Search Os Leaders
m

WASHINGTON Committees will soon be
formed throughout the nation pledged to the
candidacy of Sen. George McGovern for the
Presidency in 1972. Whether he likes it or not and
he will say he doesnt McGovern is now being
pushed into the greatest leadership void the
Democratic Party has experienced since Woodrow
Wilson left the White House.
McGoverns backers Washington lawyers with
past and present influence, labor leaders, black
spokesmen, students and young faculty and antiwar
congressmen are convinced that someone has to
fill the leadership void. They are equally convinced
that three years before election the little-known
McGovern is the only potential leader around.
Hubert Humphrey, they argue, suffers from the
deep fissures in the party opened up by President
Johnson, the Chicago convention and the war.
Edward Kennedy has not been available since
Chappaquiddick. Eugene McCarthy has withdrawn
into the mists, lit only fitfully by occasional caustic
flashes. Sen. Edmund Muskie who must run for
re-election this year, is busy worrying about the size
of his plurality in Maine.
The result is that there is nobody to speak and
when President Nixon finished his first televised
address to the nation on Vietnam, it was Averell
Harriman, in Vice President Agnews elegant phrase,
who was trotted out. Agnew was lucky. In a
previous era it might have been Adlai Stevenson.
Since 1932, Democrats have either held the
Presidency or in the sos had in Stevenson and
congressional leaders Lyndon Johnson and Sam
Rayburn spokesmen around whom the majority could
rally, whatever the issue. Today, even had the
networks offered equal time to the Democratic
Party after President Nixons speech on Vietnam or
Vice President Agnews on tjhe press, Democrats
would have fallen upon eachf other savagely rather
than settle on a single spokesman.
They may well fall upon McGovern which is
one reason he is reluctant to be pushed. But those
of his own party who will attack him will be forced
to offer alternative leadership, and so the necessary
sorting out of men and issues will begin. On the
issues, McGovern will be difficult to criticize.
He has better credentials as a foe of the

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Carolyn Pope
Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
Earl Hartman Fred Vollrath Craig Goldwyn
Features Editor Wire Editor Sports Editor
Dan Vining Jeff Brein
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg
News Editor

Kerry Dupree

Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

. Mike Davis

Frank Mankiawicz-
Tom Bradan
BUB*
Vietnamese war than any other senator he first
spoke out against U. S. involvement in 1963, while
John Kennedy was President and he is taking
leading positions on other issues as well.
For example, the convening last Dec. of the
White House Conference on Hunger and Nutrition
was largely the result of McGoverns public needling
of the Administration on the hunger issue. He spoke
at length on tax reform, trying to rekindle the
national indignation of six months ago which
sparked the present legislation. And he has in the
works major analyses of such issues as threats to the
environment and crime and law enforcement.
6.
These are, after all, issues that have involved
other senators and other party leaders. The fact that
there isnt anyone else to offer a rallying point
affords an example of how political vacuums are
filled.
The final test, of course, will not come on issues
alone. In an electronic age, politicians looking for
leadership rather than argument do not ask What
else? but Who else? Democratic politicians,
confronted with the stark possibility of the loss of
federal patronage for a generation, ask that question
most urgently. They can no longer rely on Mr.
Dooleys prediction The Democratic Party is
never so good as when its broke, when respectable
people speak of it in whispers and when it has no
leaders and only one principle to go in and take it
away from the other fellows.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.

V..

EDITORIAL
State Should
Fund Benefits
Fringe benefits have become away of life. They serve to
keep employes happy without forcing employers to pay
large salaries.
The UF is no exception. It too provides fringe benefits to
its faculty and staff. Such benefits include retirement plans,
life insurance, long-term disability insurance, hospitalization
insurance, survivors benefits for teachers and nine paid
holidays.
Until last quarter, the university also allowed faculty
members and their spouses to take six free credit hours.
When the legislature discontinued this practice, it set an
action-reaction process in motion that, if allowed to
continue escalating, could have disasterous effects on the
state university system.
The problem is stated simply. The UF, with its
comparatively low salaries, must offer what it has to
compensate for money. Thus, the free courses were used as
an incentive. When this practice was discontinued, a furor
arose from the faculty. President Stephen C. OConnell,
ever-mindful of the need for a happy faculty, then lent his
support to a legislative bill that would allow UF employes
to continue their education. We think the idea was a fine
one. UF employes could continue their education and
OConnell could utilize a resource at his command, available
<3
classroom space, to placate them.
But now the legislature has escalated the matter,
probably in the hope of discouraging the practice. The bill,
now in committee, probably will be amended to include all
state employes.
The legislature, however, will not fund the free hours.
The hours, then, will be a burden on this, and other state
universities. We are of the opinion that if a classroom seat is
occupied, someone must pay for it. The idea that One
more student wont hurt has led to overcrowded
classrooms and far from the best instruction. A PCL 201
class we know of exemplifies this problem. It meets five
days a weekduring fifth period with more than 200 students
in the Norman Hall auditorium. The instructor is excellent
but with more than 200 students can hardly be expected to
give the best possible instruction. A free give-and-take is not
possible.
Therefore, gentlemen of the legislature, we urge you to
either fund the six free hours for all state employes or not
extend the privilege beyond the UF faculty and staff.
Fringe benefits are fine, but they cost and the costs must
be met.
*" A V v y > J t j V



Faces Os The Middle East
>:

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the first in
a series of articles by Joe Torchia, a
former Alligator staffer now serving his
second year with the Peace Corps in
Ankara Turkey.)
I couldnt quite believe the letter when
I received it.
It was from Nofal, my former
roommate (a Syrian), and he said I was
invited to spend a week with his family in
the city of Homs.
At first I was excited, then I was a
little afraid. I looked at the map and saw
that Syria bordered on Turkey (where I
am now working as a Peace Corps
Volunteer) so close, I thought, yet so
far. A million things ran through my
mind: machine guns, war, commandos,
stares, hatred. What would they do to an
American there, I wondered. They
probably hate Americans.
I wrote my parents and my mother was
frantic. Go to Europe for your
vacation, she said. Well send you as
much money as you need, but dont go to
the Arab countries.
I went to the Syrian Embassy in
Ankara where I was told the borders have
been recently opened to Americans.
You can get a visa at the border, I was

Satire

Students for Dynamic Apathy
SDA provided Robert Flash
Matte with a resounding 60 per
cent non-vote in his race to
become the first emperor of this
campus.
He also received almost 600
votes in the contest, mis-named
by some, as the Presidential race
oftheUF.
Os course I am somewhat
disappointed to see almost 600
people turn out and vote for
me, Flash said. I was hoping
for a higher non turnout of the
voters. Its depressing to think
that many of my followers

The Purpose And Intent

MR. EDITOR:
In rely to Fred Vollraths attack on
the census questionnaire, I am compelled
to examine his motives and his
motivations.
In defense of this questionnaire, it is
the only method that the government has
of compiling a pervasive study on the
state of the economy. With this
information the economic stance of the
nation can be diagnosed, extrapolated,
pronosticated, interpolated and possibly
even expurgated. In other words it is one
of the main avenues of economic and
social monitoring for the sake of national
viability. Regardless of its original
constitutional purpose the census has
undergone a metamorphosis concomitant
LETTERS POLICY
Lottore must:
Ba typad, signad, doubtoapacad and
not axoaad 300 words.
Not ba signad with a psaudonym.
Hava addiasaai and taiaphone
numbars of writers.
Namas wMI ba withhold only if wrttar
hows Just oauso. Tha editor reserves the
right to adit all letters for spaoe.
Writers may submit longsr assays,
columns or letters to ba considored for use
"Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column
i* asked to contact die editor and ba
prepared to show limplas of Ms work.

An Arab Household

told. You are welcome to visit our
country.
After much thought I decided to make
a three-week tour through Lebanon, Syria
and Jordan, spending a week with Nofals
family. I wrote to Nofal in the States and
he wrote back: My family has been
waiting for you a long time. They always
ask me about you.
To help me get acquainted with his
family, Nofal wrote the following brief
summary:
FATHER: Shamoun: a poor working
mason; thin and bald but good heart.
MOTHER: Mari: fat, talks a lot but
has enough bone for all of us; her
children are her world.
BROTHER: Majed: witty,
intellectual, sincere, with bad luck.
SISTER: Raaggda: unique girl; our
flower.
Raaggda opened the door on the third
knock.
I stood there, knapsack on back,
clutching my camera in one hand and my
Pan-American travel bag in the other. I
must have looked ridiculous as I tried to
smile in the mid-afternoon sun.
Raaggda looked rather confused for a
moment and then a sudden smile broke
out across her face.
Nofal? she asked, and before I could

The Majority Was Silent

would break ranks and vote.
However, due to the mass
confusion surrounding the
election it is possible they did
not really mean to vote for me
at all, which is some
consolation.
This writer suggested perhaps
the 60 per cent who didnt vote
might not have all been for him.
Nonsense, he replied. I
think it was very evident from
the type of campaign that I ran
that it was aimed at the Great
Silent Minority. I dont see how
you can argue the point. After

with the needs of the society.
So Mr. Vollrath, I fail to see any
rationality in your attack except on the
grounds of personal-inconvenience. On this,
let me say that you will have to fill out
this form five or six times at the most.
Call this a social burden if you like but
look also at its purpose and intent.
I hesitate to grovel on common
ground, but I find it irresistable that you
refer to the flush toilet no less than four
times. In fact, the question of privacy on
this subject has flared your martyr
complex; let me continue this Freudian
analysis by asserting that possibly
improper toilet training has led the libido
to warp your death wish. This is
speculation of course but I fail to see any
other way to explicate your article.
ROBERT HODGIN,7BA
Mediocre
MR. EDITOR:
Judge G. Harrold Carswell who has
now become a candidate for the U. S.
Senate, was defeated for the Supreme
Court because he was alleged to be
mediocre.
What people around this country dont
seem to understand is that mediocre is
considered an excellent rating for a

all they were in the majority and
they were silent.
Flash attributed the size of his
Silent Majority to the efforts of
the UF Mickey Mouse Club.
If it hadnt been for the
Mouseketeers working through
student government, I fear a
larger number would have
turned out and cut into my
margin of victory, said Flash.
Flash was concerned that he
did not finish last in the race.
Out of five candidates running
he finished a disappointing
fourth instead of fifth.

reply she grabbed my hand, pulled me
inside and started shouting in a language I
couldnt understand.
Suddently Mama Mari came running
out shouting the same magic word:
Nofal? Nofal? All I could say was
Yes, yes, Nofal, as Mama Mari
embraced me and kissed me on both
cheeks. Before I had time to blush Mama
Mari was embracing me again and there
were even tears in her eyes.
I was ushered inside where Majed sat
with a book. Welcome, he said. Weve
been waiting for you for three days.
My first impression was: English!
Thank God he speaks English! My trip
from Beirut to Damascus to Homs had
been a predominately speechless one
since few people I met spoke English or
Turkish, and I spoke only two words of
Arabic hello and goodbye).
In a matter of minutes Mama Mari (as I
called her) had a 12-course meal spread
out and Papa Shamoun had come home
from work to welcome me. Papa spoke
about 10 words of English but they were
enough to ask about his two sons in the
States. Suddenly he disappeared and
about 10 minutes later returned with
French bread, canned tunafish and other
American-type products.
Hes afraid youre not used to Arabic

Florida politician.
But why doesnt the judge come clean?
Why doesnt he level with us and tell us
what the G. stands for?
Is it Gregory, Guiseppe or Geronimo?
S.S. BLOCK
A Nod
MR. EDITOR:
£>
I urge all students who sweat (sorry
perspire) through a bug-filled classroom
(sorry no screens ) with the pounding
noise of progress close by (Walker Hall)
to continue their noble sacrifice, along
the small society

I VJoUOb&bD
MIXoN WAS <-oinUs N£>Wl
To BNP THE WA(2-
y WNV I
w... iw 4-2# dtnArrO

In the presidential race I had
been saying all along that I felt
the man who came in last should
win. I had naturally hoped it
would be me.
I dont know where I went
wrong. My precinct workers the
day of the election canvassed
every voter asking them to stay
home.
But, I guess I will have to
accept the decision as the wishes
of the students on this campus.
However, if the charges
about election irregularities
prove to be true I have been in

FORUM:-^^
C AiLia iud ViiAut J
no hope for the r' xW '[ lacer^^ol^

Tuday, April 28, 1970, Th* Florida Alligator,

By Joe Torchia

food, Majed said.
I looked at the flat, unleavened Arabic
bread, and an assortment of foods I had
never seen before. This looks great, I
said, and put the tunafish aside.
When I asked Majed how to say the
food is delicious in Arabic, he taught me
my third Arabic word: quais.
When anything pleases you, just say
quais, Majed said. So I said it and,
unexpectedly, everyone laughed.
Good, Majed said. Well teach you
Arabic.
Three days later I knew 24 words of
Arabic (most of which I couldnt
pronounce correctly), and I had at least
that many new friends.
Youre the only American in Homs,
Majed told me, maybe even in Syria.
Everyone wants to meet you.
' Indeed, my entire 10 days there was
filled with a huge list of names and faces
which I still cant match. Everyone was
overwhelmingly friendly and my fear of
admitting I was American soon
vanished. I was surprised by the number
of people who spoke English; before my
stay was over I had entered into a number
of political discussions and had begun to
understand the Arab side of the
Palestinian problem, a side which I hope
to report in this series of articles.

By Fred Vollrath

touch with the R.O.T.C.
department and they have
assured me they would stage a
military coup, seize the Union,
set up a junta, and install me as
provisional president.
I would then rule until I
decided to call a democratic
election or hell freezes over,
which ever comes first.
The preceeding article is based
upon an interview conducted by
transcendental meditiation
between this writer and the
newly crowned Emperor Flash I
of Gator Gulch.

with their noble professors, in order that
funds may be raised for our noble
Athletic Department who, I am sure, will
bring us all hours of fun-filled
entertainment so that we may forget our
minor discomforts in the classrooms.
After all, education is only a minor
reason for our being here. If we continue
this struggle with no complaints it is quite
possible that John or Carlos may nod
towards our ticket-purchased area with a
sign of appreciation during the fall
quarter games. Imagine how exciting that
would be boys and girls. Rah! rah! rah!
siss! boom! ... ga-thud!
WILLIAM MUSSMAN, 4ED
by Brickman

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 28, T 970

Orange ana

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAM will be given Saturday,
May 2, at 8:30 a.m. in room 207
Leigh Hall, in French, German,
Russian and Spanish.
ALL STUDENTS who are
expected to take these tests
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use his
social security number.
CHN 251 MID TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, April
29, at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CPS 123 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, April 30,
at 7 pjn. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109;C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,

at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
TUESDAY
Golden Fried Chicken
All you can eat 99<
WEDNESDAY
&
Jumbo Baked Chopped
Steak and Yellow Rice 79<

DRIVE LIKE A KIIMG
mm \\ Add to the trade-in value and at the
9 vT /r\ /\\ same time en iY a'r conditioned com com\yrv
\yrv com\yrv \\ fort...arrive refreshed and wrinkle free!
VI TThattMwhrt T U R
v \\ sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street
*l\ GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

113,115,116,117,118, or 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102,110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 111 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, April 28,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to;
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101, 102,112,
or 114.
CSS 113 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, April 28,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8. 9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117,118, or 119;
N-O to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R

BLUE BULLETIN

to Flint 101,102,110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CMS 171 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
MS 102 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. in Little 101, 109,
113,121, and 125.
MS 204 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. in Little 201, 203,
205, 207, 213, 215, 217, and
219.
CBS 261 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 5, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Little 101, 109, 113, 121, or
125; M-Z to Little 201, 203,
205,207,213,215,217, or 219.
CBS 262 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 5, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M-Z
report to Matherly 102, 105,
108, 111, 113, 115, 116, 117,
118, or 119.
CBS 263 MID TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 5, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Walker Auditorium; M-Z report
to Peabody 1,2, 4,7,10, or 11.
PLACEMENT
NOTICES
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
June and August graduates
unless indicated otherwise.
May 4 : Regional
Administrator of National
Banks; Procter & Gamble
Engineering Div.
May 5: John Deere Co.
May 6: First Union National
Bank of North Carolina
CANCELLATIONS:
May 5: AC Electronics
Division of GMC

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Tuesday
April 28
Children's Ballet Recitals, Union
Tent, 3:00 p.m.
Unnion Afternoon Film, "Flash
G o rdon" & "The
Roadrunner," Union Aud.,
4:00 p.m.
Dialogue with a Theologue, "Sex
Without Children and
Children Without Sex," Dr.
Seymour Block, 122 Union,
4:00 p.m.
Chess Club Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Union Film "The Committee,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30
p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4, Union, 7:00
p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
362 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Modem Jazz Dance Lessons 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Bridge Club 150 C & D Union,
7:30 p.m.
Air Force Dames Meeting, Air
Force ROTC Bldg., 7:30 p.m.
Celebration 70, Paul Winter
Consort, Florida Gym, 8:00
p.m.
Young Americans for Freedom,
Speaker, Jacques Marcuse,
French Journalist who
covered Red China, 346>
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Wednesday
April 29
Florida Players in Concert,
Union Tent, 2:30 p.m.
Union Afternoon Film, "Flash
Gordon" & "The
Roadrunner," Union Aud.,
4;00 p.m.
Music Dept: Twilight Concert,
Concert Band, University
Aud. Lawn, 6:45 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 362 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Union Film "A Big Hand for a
Little Lady," Union Aud.,
7:00 8t 9:30 pjn.
Environmental Action Group,
186 McCarty, 7:30 p.m.
Union Speaker, Barry Patch,
"Dawning of Aquarius,"
Union Tent, 7:30 p.m.

Campus
Calendar

Circle K Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Yoga Lessons, 243 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Young Republicans Meeting,
346 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Mensa Meeting, Winnjamer, 8:30
p.m.
Thursday
April 30
Union Open Forum, Union
Tent, 2:00 p.m.
Union Afternoon Film, "Flash
Gordon" & "The
Roadrunner," Union Aud.,
4:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organizations
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
College of Education Play, "In
White America," Norman
Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Union Film, "Hot Millions,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:30
p.m.
Union Speaker, Steven Butter,
"Selective Service System,"
Union Tent, 7:30 p.m.
Celebration '7O, Poetry
Readings, 349 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Rathskeller "Biff Rose," 9:00 &
11:00 p.m.
Friday
May 1
Union Barbeque, North Lawn,
11:00 a.m. 2:00 a.m.
Union Aftertoon Film,
"Bullwinkle Cartoons,"
Union Aud., 1:30 5:00
p.m.
Union Film, "1000 Clowns"
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 pjn.
Union Dance "Mausoleum
Hop," Union, 10:00 pjn.
Rathskeller, "Biff Rose," 9:00 8t
11:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: Paul
Winter Consort, $1.50, $2.00



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

for sale
SORRY SAL is now a merry gal. She
used Blue Lustre rug and upholstery
cleaner. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-161-c)
DESTROY your roomie with 35
watts/channel. 6 yr. old Heath da2Bl
amp. Tubes less than 1 yr. old. With
assembly manual. SSO. 378-7671.
(A-st-128-p)
Cute Little Critter Wants Home.
Kinkajou & Cage. Best offer
accepted. Call Pam after 6:00.
378-3518. (A-3t-128-p)
Need money fast! Must sell cassette
tape recorder and 35 cassette tapes
with carrier: all for $75 or will sell
separately. Call Wm. 392-8903.
(A-3t-l 28-p)
1965 Corvette conv. stereo tape. All
the extras. Must see to appreciate.
Will trade for big cycle + cash. Call:
392-7565 after 4 PM. (A-st-128-p)
New Moon '64. 55 x 10 2 bedroom.
Central Air & Heat. Furnished.
Excellent Condition. $3,290. Call
372- after 7 P.M. (A-10t-126-p) ~
4 cent Xerox copies QUIK WAY
Copy Center, 3 machines no waiting.
Free collating. 100 copies 1 original 3
1/2 cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Quikway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (A-llt-126-p)
125 cc Ducati, 1,900 mi, $175. Like
new. '63 Corvair, 60,000 ml., new
tires, body and engine good
condition. Must Sell!!!! 914 S.W. Bth
Ave, Apt. no. 29, "LA MANCHA"
(A-3t-126-p)
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES 6 weeks old.
S3O. Call 372-2135. (A-st-124-p)
Yorkshire terrier puppies, 7 months,
must sell, AKC registered, shots,
small adorable dogs, SIOO.OO, call
376-0289 after 5:00 on weekdays.
(A-st-127-p)
Stereo Ampex tape recorder model
760 and miracord turntable with
pre-amp. Like new. Call Pablo at
373- anytime. (A-st-127-p)
HARLEY Sprint 1967 250 cc $450,
GOYA g-10 classical guitar sllO,
POLAROID 103 SBO, or best offer.
Cali 376-2048 anytime. (A-st-127-p)
FOR FI ENT
Across Street from campus Studio
. Apts, lor both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities Included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phoni 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
TO EXCITE
dgjp EACH OTHER
THEY IGNITE
THE WORLD!
Based on the Novel
'THE ADVENTURERS" by (W1
HAROLD BO6BINS
4 ACADEMY AWARDS WINNER
JL Including
W BEST SONG J
f PAUL
A 3 ACADEMY AWARDS WINNER
g- UDiw best p,cTu f
V IB dUSTIN HOFFMAN|
Hjon VOIGHT
munani
COWBOY"
AUCE S RESTAURANT^

FOR FI ENT
Room for rent, private home within
walking distance of law college. Meals
also if desired. Call 378-4952 after 6
PM. (B-2t-l 28-p)
Need one roommate for summer.
Have your own bdr. in a two bdr.,
fully furn. air-cond. apt. Free hot
water. One block from campus. SSO a
month. 376-1523. (B-3t-128-p)
Need to sublet, for the summer, 2
bedroom, poolside, AC Village Park
Apt. Nice neighbors, good
management. Call 372-9904 anytime.
(B-6t-128-p)
Fall Quarter available fall only. One
bedroom apt. in Landmark. Call
MIKE 372-9317 evenings.
(B-3t-128-p)
SUBLET JUNE IST -1 bdr. AC~
furn 115/mo, village 34 apts. no. 11.
Call or come by. Phone 373-1797.
328 SW 34th Street. (B-st-126-p)
Room in private home for mature
male student. Air-conditioned, linens
and maid service. Private entrance off
street parking. Call 376-5360.
(B-3t-126-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 SW 16th Court. MAKE YOUR
FALL RESERVATIONS NOW. Call
376-9668. (B-126-ts-C)
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, l-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Apt. for rent: Summit House, new
building, furnished, must be married
or 21 and working. Call 376-8514
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-124-p)
Sublet May 1 thru Aug. 1 br. furn.
Univ. Gardens Apt. Pool, central air,
carpet, $l2O. Jane Peterson
392-0352. After 5, 378-0327.
(B-st-124-p)
SUBLET for summer &/or after
Landmark no. 87, 2 bdr, furn, A/C, 2
pools $lB5/mo. June rent paid
available for occupancy June 15 call
378-0727. (B-st-125-p)
2 br. Landmark apt. Sublet for
summer quarter. AC, pool, gym,
suana, 95.00 for mid June to Sept.
30. Call 378-2298 no. 144, 4B
evenings. (B-3t-126-p)
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close to.
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
3 76-8990 University Apartments
(B-24t-l 1-p)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372-7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
WANTED
Male roommate for summer in 1 br.
FQ apt. June Rent free. Call
378-7080. (C-3t-128-p)
A coke for a book! Bring your used
paperbacks to the union browsing
library on Friday May 1 only and get
a free coke for each one. (C-Bt-128-p)
Female to share 2 bedroom
apartment with 2 others. Air-cond.,
$46.00 mo. plus utilities, Immediate
occupancy 219A NW 3 Ave. Phone:
372-2393. (C-st-127-p)
Female roommate wanted French
Quarter Apt. 97 Poolside
Please call after IPM Phone:
371- (C-st-124-p)
!
Male roommate/summer qtr. Your
own room in 2-bdr. duplex In quiet
wooded area near mall. Air-cond.
Pets. welcome. SSO/mo. + Vz util.
372- (C-4t-127-p)
1
;
*1

;

TONIGHT-6 to 11
Union Ton!
Come buy A Sell!

Tuesday, April 28, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

'XyXvXvX'X'XwXwX'Xv.vx*.-.
HELP WANTED
x-r*x-;*x-x-x.X"!*x-x*x*!*!*S!;;*-*!*x*!"T*xv*'
Cocktail Waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary will
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dubs
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-125-p)
Counselor positions available at
CAMP PINEWOOD this summer.
(Hendersonville, N. C.) Male or
Female Ski boat
operation-experienced-160 to 220
h.p.; Male only Go Kart Specialist
mechanically inclined.; Male only
Big and strong Trips and Hikes
(operate truck); Male or Female
Tennis instructor (high school or
college experience); Male or Female
Archery Specialist good archer;
Male only Cabin Counselors,
activity escorts and leaders. Write to:
T. R. Robertson, 1414 Felch Ave.,
Jax., Fla., 32207. (E-st-127-p)
Wanted: 2 attractive girls, 21 or older
to be carhops, Must be willing to
wear bikinis. Job is part-time
evenings, full-time on weekends. Stop
by, dont call. Maryland Fried
Chicken, 516 NW 13th St. (E-ts-c)
Growing firm needs part time
electro-mechanical draftsman. Call:
378-7970. (E-st-127-p)
x-x-x-x-x-xvxyxtx^xxXxXx^xXx::*
AUTOS
62 Austin-Healy 3000 New Paint,
New Interior, New Tires, Top
Condition, $1,050. Will Negotiate.
See at 1235 NW 39th Avenue, after
6:00 P.M. A beauty! (G-7t-125-p)
1962 Triumph TR-3, New Paint, New
Carpets, Rebuilt transmission, new
clutch, good top and side curtains,
excellent cond., $675, Call:
378-9952. (G-st-126-p)
Need cheap transport around campus
and city? '63 Falcon radio heat,
standard $175 moves slow but gets
you there. 373-2371 FOR INFO.
Leo. (G-st-128-p)
1965 Datsun Sedan Looks Good and
Runs great. Asking $625. 30 miles
per gal. Call Frank at 373-1523
evenings. (G-3t-128-p)
1968 Pontiac Firebi J 400 four speed
transmission almost new condition
$1650 or best offer 372-1393.
(G-st-125-p)
Roomy 1968 Cortina white with
delux red interior, new tires, radio
heater, 4 on floor, bucket seats, good
mileage call Pablo 373-2303.
(G-st-127-p)
69 Volkswagen Air-conditioned,
blue, radio, floor mats, 8-track
stereo. $2,000.00. Call Rick
376-1155. (G-2t-127-p)
VOLVO, 1961, PV544, Runs great,
body is solid. New battery, exhaust
system. Radio, heater, many other
exciting extras. Only $450.
376-1024. (G-2t-127-p)
PICKUP, Chevy 1/2 ton, 1952. New
battery, brakes, 4 speed trans.
Inspection sticker, tag, recently
overhauled. Only $285 376-5962.
(G-3t-127-p)
56 Chevy, 283, Rebuilt Last
Summer, 4BBL, Hurst Shifter, Radio,
power steering, new seat covers.
$3 25. Call Ray, after 5 PM.
372-6524. (G-4t-127-p)
Porsche 912 sand beige, perfect
mechanical condition. New engine
many accessories. Must be seen,
378-3844 after 5:30 all day
weekends. (G-st-127-p)
DODGE DART: 1966 radio and
heater, standard transmission. Good
running condition, recently replaced
brakes and tires; S7OO. Call
378-7060. (G-st-127-p)
wrm
KBUKI
Imm UN. u jh 1 I
I ~ J7B /* 1
A COCKEYED
MASTERPIECE
Joseph Morgenstern, Newsweek
WOW! HOT DAMN
I If! 1M Ir J
AWARD WINNER
GIG YOUNG
gp
ZSB

Page 9

PE R SONA L
BEAUTIFUL German Shepherd
puppies. 2 girls left. 5 wks. ACK well
bred! SSO proves you want them,
pays our vet bill. Bob 378-7479, nite.
(J-st-128-p)
Congradulations Pikes for winning
tennis! Were behind you all the way.
Good luck in track and baseball,
Love, Your little sisters. (J-lt-128-p)
Attn: No. 5 SPE Now that weve
discussed color what are plans for
decor? Lets not strain our
relationship the beard gets the
axe! . Eunome . .cont next week.
(J-lt-128-p)
Wanted: Mothers with infants 3 mo.
or younger needed for infant research
study. Up to $5.00 for participating.
Call: 392-2914; after 6; 372-1114.
(J-st-126-p)
Co-eds unwanted facial hair removed
forever cost is low fast world
famous kree method. Edmund Dwyer
Electrologist. 372-8039. 102 NW 2nd
St. (J-21t-124-p)
FREE One adorable 3 mo. old gray
kitten, litter trained, must move, will
provide litter box and food. Please
call 372-5891. (J-3t-127-p)
SPRING is the time when a young
mans fancy turns to LOVE. Two
young men desire liberal female
companions over 18. Contact JF at
1642 W. Univ. Ave. (above Spanish
Main) PEACE. (J-st-124-p)
GIRLS Distinctive CUSTOM
MADE Personal Dress, WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Bikinis sl4, Phone 378-0320.
(ALTERATIONS TOO).
(J-10t-124-p)
Wanted: Two girls to accompany two
guys for weekend to Sunny Sands
Nudist Resort. Good fun, good sun,
good company. Sincere Applicants
only. Call Tom or Jim at 378-2294.
(J-2t-127-p)
PTL for Gods Squad! Mike Joe
Bobby Lance Tommy Dave B. Hank
Hawk Buster Dave W. Terry and
Dwight Brothers, you are really on
the ball. BOBBIEJO. (J 2t-127-p)
If you didnt do anything in 1969 do
something in 1970. "Confront the
Issue Join Circle K Meetings Wed.
7:30 p.m. Reitz Union, Room 361.
(J-5M27-P)
Lost or stolen: Dog at carnigras,
brown male Boxer, 2 yrs. old. Short
tail, long ears, $50.00 REWARD
FOR RETURN, 376-4671, or
376-7397. (L-4t-128-p)
vXveXX*XX # XX # XX*X # X*X*X # X*XX # X*!
LOST <& FOUND
XXXXX*X-X-X-X-X-X*X*!*X-X*X*X*X-X*X
LOST: DIAMOND NECKLACE.
Diamond is in silver setting on a silver
chain. If found, PLEASE call
378-8795. REWARD!. (L-3t-127-p)
LOST: Boys high school senior ring.
Littleton Colorado '6B initials EMK.
Os much sentimental value. Please
call 392-7818. Reward. (L-3t-127-p)
FOUND ON CAMPUS: Exposed roll
of Kodak Tri-X 120 film. Call
378-4676. (L-3t-127-nc)
SERVICES
Horses to rent: Hay rides, parties,
cowboys, riding stables. Open seven
days a week. 372-8460. (M-st-124-p)
The Copy Center Xerox copies 1
to 10 copies of each original 5 cents;
over ten 4 cents. 1718 West Univ.
Now open next to Gold Coast
Restaurant. Free Collating. Try us
First for Quality & Service. Tel
376-9334. (M-17t-114-p)
Del-ray typing service: manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
Prompt, pickup-delivery, 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-115-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)

REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM
I U 111 IUU I I if
***. ...
FLASH GORDON+ROADRUNNER 4:00-5:00
An insanely comical film! TONIGHT
7:00 & 9:30 showings, Admission 50 cents
Sponsored by JWRU

SERVICES
4 cent Xerox QUICK WAY Copy
Center, 3 machines no waiting. Free
collating. 100 copies 1 original 3 V 2
cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Quikway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (M-llt-126-p)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480.
(M-ts-107-C)
Free inspections. Automotive electric
and brakes. All work guaranteed.
Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
13th St, next to BAMBI motel,
several credit cards honored, phone
372-5804. (M-32-127-P)
l mmrnmmuim mrmconx jl §
iPSfCEEDra 1
5 I3PM.IM 6f M J NOW SHOWING i
E I*-* w4B 2
: PENTHOUSE 2 n.i.usi. -072n E
EinyWHHH .iMiy|||HIMMC
\ jML PENTHOUSE 3 JH o J
Z N *V I 3, ST. PH: 372 962]
£ J| 1 pm. 6
I,2MRi MiMlllUMMimMfMlm mfrmSmXn J
A man went looking for America.
And couldnt find it anywhere...
ea&fjSStK
plus
N. W. 13th St. ACROSS FROM MALIB m rhc
STr | CANNES FI^^FEST^^VINNER I |t^'
| Best Film By a Nev Director' P PSTARTS
STARTS PSTARTS
ADM. 1.25 THURSDAY
a APRIL 30th
imci niden cactus
reeewen flower
starring
PETER (DENNIS l, rK
FONDA/ HOPPERlnicholson
I alright folks,l
I this isl
I the one!
I youve beenl
I waiting fori
I FLORIDA I
I QUARTERLY I
I HERE I
I NOW! I



The
Florida
Alligator

We were third in the
AA U national meet last
year ... Can you imagine
what we could do with a
really well-organized crew
like we have now?
... Florida Track Club
Coach Jimmy Carnes

Favreau Grunts To Title

By BO BERRY
Alligator Sports Writer
Bob Favreau finally won the
state weightlifting championship
for the 148-pound class after
trying for three years.
The crowd was tense in Miami
at the Florida State Weightlifting
Championship over the weekend
when Favreau prepared to make
his last lift of the night. It was
an all or nothing effort to clean
and jerk 290 pounds.
PHIL HUNTER the state
champion the previous four
years had lifted a total weight of
70S pounds in the three lifting
events: press snatch, and the
clean and jerk.
Favreau stepped Up to the
weights and strained. He brought
it up to his chest and then with a

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gator sports

By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Correspondent
A new giant has appeared on the Florida track
horizon jogging right beside Jack Bacheler, holding
hands with him in fact. However, the newcomer is
shorter in size and in name that his towering
side-kick. <
FRANK SHORTER, a graduate of Yale
University and last years NCAA six-mile champ and
indoor two-mile runnerup has joined the Florida
Track Club and has already made his presence felt in
the countrys distance running circles.
Proving that Bachelers 6-7 height is not the
secret to distance running success, the 5-10 runner
teamed up with him at the Drake relays last
weekend to demolish all comers. The two runners
finished one-two in the three-mile event, both below
the old record and then held hands crossing the line
ih the six-mile the next day.
I really like training down here, said Shorter,
The atmosphere is very conducive to' hard
running. Also I like running with Jack and (UF
miler) John Parker. Im just enjoying myself here.
SHORTER FINDS training companion Bacheler
an enigma.
Hes an extremely likeable guy. Very gentle,
thoughtful. But on the track, hes just plain vicious.
But thats the way you have to be to run against the
best in the country. Otherwise they would eat you
alive.
Shorter was an honor student majoring in
psychology as an undergraduate. He began medical
school at New Mexico University in his home

heave held it above his head. The
lift gave him a total of 715
pounds and a gold medal for the
championship.
Training is nothing to take
lightly before a weightlifting
contest and Favreau doesnt.
Besides lifting weights to stay in

Frat Track Today
The fraternity track meet begins today at 5 p.m. Latest news is that
Larry Smith will be running for the ATOs in the 100 dash. Smith won
the event two years ago with a clocking of 9.9. He was injured last
year. The return of Smith gives new hopes to the ATOs in the meet.
An exciting meet is expected as five fraternities are in contention
for the Orange League Presidents Cup for overall intramurals.
Pre-meet favorites are ATO, Pike, Phi Delt and FIJI.
The final day to sign up for dorm softball is Wed., April 19 at 5
pm. Independents are currently in the process of signing up for
handball. All signups are made in the Intramural Office, 229 Fla.
Gym.

Shorter Stands Tall

condition the last 10 days before
a meet he goes on a special
carbohydrate-free diet. He says
this drains his body of a lot of
strength. Then the last four days
he stuffs himself with
carbohydrates that make him
burst with energy for the meet.

state,but dropped out to make a trip to Japan last
fall. He came to Florida at head coach Jimmy
Carnes urging before the Florida Relays and
decided to begin graduate studies here.
WE ARE LUCKY to get a runner of Franks
ability here, said Carnes, he is in the same class as
Bacheler and really adds a lot to our over-all
program. To see those two coming across the line
together in the biggest meets in the country is about
the best thing that could happen to a coach.
Shorter began thinking about coming to Florida
last year during the Florida Relays when he struck
up a friendship with UF miler John Parker.
Shorter had just beaten the devil out of me in
the mile and then gone out and run 8:52 in the two
mile and I thought maybe Id go over and find out
what his secret was, said Parker. We became
friends and I began urging him to come down and
run with us.
HAVING SHORTER, Bacheler, Parker, and Carl
Hatfield, another All-American runner addition to
the track club, has given Carnes some thoughts
about a national cross country title next fall. We
were third in the AAU national meet last year with
Misner from FSU, Bacheler and Parker, plus a few
other runners we picked up. Can you imagine what
we could do with a really well-organized crew like
we have now?
Whether you can imagine or not, you can bet
there are some wiry runners jogging around campus
thinking about winning an AAU title next year.
And one of them is a quiet young man named
Frank Shorter.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 10

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A JAPANESE SHIP!
(In Jacksonville May 4th)
> In 25 words or less, finish these statements: flM||
1. I expect an auto dealer ... (say what
you expect of him)
2. I like the Datsun automatic sedan flflls
I because ... (or the Datsun automatic SJjl
wagon because..,)
There will be two winners. Selection will be by Bill MB'
Deckel man. President Godding and Clark Motors, and
by Roy Lowed ay. General Manager, based on what KB
these judges consider helpful insight into consumer |HH
Stifssrle
anmioes.
Contest limited to students at the University of
Florida. Names of winners will be published in this Mf|i
paper. iMSt
Bring your entries to the showroom at 2nd Avenue BK
and 2nd Street S.E. and drop them into the box.
Contest closes April 30. HI
j GODDING 2nd ave. and]
M

l. The Florida Alligator, Tueaday, April 28,1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

FRANK SHORTER
... teams with Bacheler

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| On Wheels |
Worlds Longest Race
You would have to be over 85 years old, and have a good memory,
to remember the first motor race.
In 1895 the first race was run from Paris to Bordeaux and back to
Paris. A distance of 732 miles over dust, pot-holed, stone-strewn roads
no better than farm tracks.
EMILE LEVASSOR, a now forgotten Frenchman, won that first
race at a blinding speed of 15 m.pii. driving a French Panhard.
City-to-city racing boomed until the holocaust of the Madrid to Paris
event in 1903 which caused every European nation to ban long
distance open road motor racing from city to city. But today the
special thrill of these marathons are with us again. The London Daily
Minor World Cup Rally is reviving the tradition.
April 19 the worlds longest and toughest car rally started in
London with 96 crews and cars from 22 countries participating. May
9 will find the winner in Mexico City after 16,000 miles of
unbelievable roads.
The first section of the rally was from England to Bulgaria through
France, Germany, Austria and Yugoslavia. Wembley Stadium was the
starting area, and 50,000 enthusiasts cheered the drivers on.
THE VERY FIRST car off the starting ramp, a 2.5 liter Triumph,
had gone only 150 yards when it stopped for repairs on its
fuel-injection system. Underway again 30 minutes later, it attracted
the attention of Londons famous Bobbies, and was given a ticket for
speeding. The rally already showed signs of living up to the tradition
of the old city-to-city races.
Porsche took the lead to Germany, but a Daimler-Benz overtook it
before Sofia, Bulgaria. Sofia was the first rest for the tired teams since
they left Boulogne, France 37 hours earlier.
The fog and rain of Yugoslavia had a number of surprises for the
surviving 93 teams. Several drivers, including Prince Michael of Kent,
had to turn bridge builders to repair a collapsed bridge on part of the
route. After passing this obstacle the police set up another by giving
on the spot fines for speeding. And then children added to the
troubles by greeting the teams with a hail of stones. A decided
change from the enthusiastic welcome given in Budapest and Sofia.
THE FRENCH WORKS CITROEN team went flat-out to Monza,
Italy and took over the top two places. At Monza, 83 competitors
took off across the French Alps for Lisbon, Spain.
In the Alps Australian Jack Murray escaped unhurt when his
Triumph left the road and rolled down a hill. Not to be done-in,
Muny had the car pulled up, hammered out the fenders and drove on.
That is the spirit of the worlds longest rally as the Citroen team drove
into Lisbon in the lead. The surviving 80 cars will be shipped to Rio
de Janeiro for the start of the second stage of the rally May 9.
So what has it proved? For the competitors its been great fun
taking on the challenge of city-to-city races. For the manufacturers
its a test of their product and ingenuity. For the rest of us car nuts it
shows we arent the only ones who like to travel from one city to
another as quickly as possible.

In other racing around the world Porsche won the fourth race of
the Manufacturing Championship at Monza, Italy over the weekend.
Pedro Rodriguez and Leo Kinnunen outdistanced the second and
third place Ferraris.
Loyd Ruby of Wichita Falls, Tex. won the ninth annual Trenton
, 200-mile United States Auto Club race Sunday in the final tune-up for
the drivers and cars before the Indianapolis 500.
Ruby drove a Turbo-charged Offenhauser Mongoose and finished
three seconds ahead of Mario Andrettis STP Special Turbo Ford.
These are the same cars they will take to Indy May 1.

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SKIERS UNDEFEATED

Stevens Upsets Kempton

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Awistant Sports Editor
The Gator Ski Team remained
undefeated as they won the 24th
Annual Southern Invitational
Skiing Tournament this weekend
at Tampa.
Host Tampa finished behind
the depth-charged Gators, who
took all three mens events and
one womens event.
TWO UNKNOWNS in the
water skiing world, Win Stevens
and Ronny McQueen, sparked
the Gators to their victory over
nine other teams.
By a strange quirk of fate
Stevens upset such master-class
skiers as Tampas Alan
Kempton, Florida Atlantic
Universitys Jimmy Jackson and
the UFs own John Bedingfield
to win the mens slalom event.
Stevens, who was competing
in his first intercollegiate
tournament, seemed to be the
only skier who could master the
extremely rough water that
suddenly blew up.
Suckers Topple
Ranked Cades
Unlucky 13 turned out to be
lucky for the Gators Monday as
Rod Wright knocked in the
winning run in the 13 th inning
to beat nationally 13th ranked
Miami 7-6. The win kept the
Gators nine game winning
streak going.
With one out and Tony
Dobies on second Wright
smashed a double into
centerfield to bring Dobies home
to break the 6-6 tie.
In the fourth Wright had hit
an inside the park home run
with two men on to give the
Gators a short-lived 3-2 lead.
The Hurricanes tied it up in the
fifth and went ahead 5-3 in the
sixth inning. But the Gators then
rallied to send the game into
extra innings eventually setting
thy stage for Wrights clutch
stick performance.
The hard-hitting Hurricanes
were held hitless from the
seventh on as Rod Macon picked
up his second win against one
defeat in relief. Five of Miamis
runs were unearned.
The Gators, now 20-12 will
risk their nine game winning
streak when they face the
ranked Hurricanes again today at
3 p.m. on Perry Field.

McQUEEN was also aided by
the rough waters in the jumping
competition as he soared 88 feet
for his victory. Tampas
Kempton was second with a
jump of 85 feet.
UFs Bedingfield, however,
was not completely stymied by
the weather as he placed second
in tricks, sixth in jumping, and
seventh in .slalom.
Strengthening the mens
showing in all three events were
Sonny Craddock, who placed
sixth in tricks and seventh in
jumping, and Bill Cox, who
finished with a sixth in slamon
and a seventh in tricks.
LEADING THE WAY for the
women was Pat Boutchyard,
who had seconds in slamon and
jumping an eighth in tricks. Dale
Rogers and Diania Kanoy added
fourth and sixth places
respectively in slamon and
tricks.
Womens world champion and
intercollegiate record holder Liz
Allen won all three of her events
despite the weather for Seminole
Junior College.
N.Y. Never Wins
No Miss New York State
entry has ever won the Miss
America Pageant, says the World
Almanac.

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Tuesday, April 28,1970, The Florida Alligator,

The next time the Gator Ski
Team will put their unbeaten
record on the line is May 8 and 9
in Boca Raton at Florida
Atlantic University.
C|j§pi
m Wu
; '' '' Kjgv
B m
TOM KENNEDY
PAT BOUTCHYARD
... two seconds

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 28,1970

/ ri STOUTS SHOUTS

Yale Walkouts Get Attention

WHILE VILLANOVA
trackmen were quickly running
away from the field in the recent
Penn Relays, Yales trackmen
calmly Walked away from
everything including the Penn
Relays in support of a student
strike.
But Yales cindermen were
not alone in their efforts as
other Yale athletes refused to
participate in support of the
strike, which was called to bring
attention to the trial of Black
Panthers in New Haven, Conn.,
on charges of kidnap and murder
and to conditions in the local
black community.
Twelve members of the Yale
track team, including five black
athletes, withdrew last Thursday
prior to the Penn Relays. Seven
other members, however, said
they would run for the school.
Golf matches were also
cancelled last week with Brown
and Holy Cross, and a baseball
game and tennis match with
Weseyan were cancelled when
athletes supported the strike.
Certainly no action will be
taken against the athletes, said
Yales Athletic Director Delaney
Kiphuth. This is a matter of
deep conviction and conscience
on their part. Perhaps we might
question where their conscience
leads them, but no one would be
punished for following his
convictions.
No end to the strike is in
sight, but Kiphuth said he hoped
to get the athletic program
functioning again shortly.
* *
NICOLA PILIC of Yugoslavia
and Mark Cox of England both
got involved in heated disputes
with officials Monday to mar the
experimental use of young
linesmen on the opening day of
the $36,000 Rothmans British
Hard Court Tennis
Championships in
Boumesmouth, England.
Tournament organizers, in an
effort to inject young blood into
line-calling, were using players
eliminated in Sundays
qualifying round. The players
were being paid $7.20 a day, in
addition to free lunch and tea,
but the experiment appeared to
have failed.
* *
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Night Gaines Not Included)
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 11 5 .688
Detroit 10 5 .667 Vt
Boston 8 8 .500 3
Washington 7 8 .467 3Vx
Cleveland 6 9 .400 4y 2
New York 7 11 .389 5
WEST W L PCT GB
California 12 5 .706
Minnesota 10 5 .667 1
Oakland 8 9 .471 4
Kansas City 6 10 .375 5Vi
Chicago 6 10 .375 5Vi
Milwaukee 5 11 .313 6Vi
MONDAYS RESULTS
Boston 4, Oakland 3
Cleveland 5, Minnesota 1
Milwaukee at Washington (night)
(Only Games Scheduled)
TUESDAYS GAMES
Detroit at Kansas City
Cleveland at Minnesota
Baltimore at Chicago
Milwaukee at Washington
California at New York
Oakland at Boston

HAROLD HENNING, the
lanky South African who won
the $50,000 Tallahassee Open,
figured he was second best until
he saw the scoreboard.
I was thinking of second
place until I got to the 16th
tee, said Henning after beating
Rives Mcee by one stroke.
Then I saw a leaders board with
Rives bogey on it and decided I
had a chance for at least a tie.
Henning had been four
strokes back Sunday, but
whacked out a victory with an
eagle and a birdie on the final
two holes.
Three strokes behind Mcee
at 281 were Homero Blancas,
Fred Marti and Joe Porter.
Finishing at 282 were Bert
Greene, Larry Mowry, John
Miller and Sam Carmichael.
* *
THE PHILADELPHIA 76ERS
announced Monday that all star
forward Billy Cunningham
would play with the 76ers
during the 1970-1971 season.
No terms were announced.
* *
THE MONTREAL
ALOUETTES of the Canadian
Football League Monday
announced the signing of three
players from the University of
Wyoming.
Jim Barrows, Denis Devlin
and Tommy Tucker were signed
by general manager Red
OQuinn.
Barrows, a 21-year-old
defensive back and wide
receiver, was an All-Western
Ironwood
Golf Club
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Athletic Conference selection as
a defensive back. He is from Ft.
Lauderdale.
* *
RAY ANDERSON, winner of
18 of his last 19 fights, risks his
impressive record against
hard-hitting Charlie Green
tonight in a light heavyweight
bout headlining a five bout card
at Madison Square Garden.
The Anderson-Green contest,
delayed four days by the
National Basketball Association
playoffs, is the final of the April
series of bouts staged in the
Forum.
The 25-year-old Anderson, a
New Yorker, carries a 31-3
record into the bout while
Green, a former Golden Gloves
champion, has won 12 of 18
bouts.
The semi-main event pits
Ruben Melendez of New York
against Hector Ortiz of
Secaucus, N.J., in a six-round
welterweight bout.
* *
TWO FLORIDA STATE
University football players,
offensive tackle Jeff Curchin and
safety Phil Abraira, have signed
1970 contracts with the Chicago
Bears.
Curchin was the Bears sixth
draft choice and Abraira the
15th. Curchin, 22, from Ocala,
weighs 255 pounds. Abraira, also
22, is 186 pounds. Abraira was a
wide receiver his first two
college seasons.
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VV*N!VV*V*V*V-V.V*V.*i".%V.ViV;v.V'.*. .V?VV.VV.V*V*VV" .*.VVV*.ViVVVjj
j Derby Entries Up J
j For Saturdays Runl
: Eleven 3-year-olds, all of them eligible for Saturdays ;
: Kentucky Derby but only two certain starters, were entered for
: todays running of the $15,000 added Derby Trial Stakes at j:
i; Churchill Downs. :
: John Jacobs entered High Echelon, which he plans to run j;
j: coupled with Personality in the Kentucky Derby. Trainer John :
: Davis named Native Royalty for the mile event, the final prep :
: race prior to the first of the triple crown classics.
j: BOTH WERE EXPECTED to start in the Kentucky Derby, g
: but the others in the Derby Trial field will have to prove they
j: deserve to start in Americas premier horse race.
:f. Among these were George Lewis, the unbeaten Supreme
|j: Quality and Admirals Shield, all possible derby starters. :
Fathom, Fish Market, Tort-Feazor, Panicum Repens, Frank |
Jessee and Air Song complete the field. 5
Larry Adams will ride High Echelon while Chuck Baltazar :
J will handle Native Royality, winner of the Gotham Stakes at
: Aqueduct. :
: BILL HARTACK RIDES George Lewis and trainer Buster j:
:* Millerick will have to wait and see how the horse races before :
deciding his Kentucky Derby status. :
Supreme Quality has won his three races but trainer Loyd :j:
Gentry said the colt would have to win the Trial by seven :
j lengths in 1:34 and change before I would want to start him in $
v the Kentucky Derby. ijj
BASEBALL
Gators play Miami at Perry Field, 3 p. m.
FOOTBALL
Spring Drills on practice field
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