Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
And 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writers
More than 2,500 people
thronged the Plaza of the
Americas Sunday morning for
a folk mass on the grass with
Father Michael G. Gannon
and members of the Catholic
Student Center.
The theme of the mass was
the celebration of life,
according to Father Gannon
in the words of Psalm 150,
read at the service, Praise
God with loud voices.
AS FATHER Gannon
opened the mass with the

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Vol 62, No. 127

Rumors Fly About

Real Estates Fate

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writer
Speculation that the real
estate department is to be
it
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DOUG CASE
MILITARY QUEEN
Elly Kuypers was crowned
queen of the Military Ball
Saturday night in the Reitz
Union Ball Room. Elly, 2UC, is
a member of Kappa Delta
sorority.

Students Join in 'Celebration of Life

University of Florida, Gainesville

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song Here Comes the Sun,
a ray of sunlight broke
through the scattered clouds
overhead.
Many in the crowd held

dissolved has been denied by
College of Business
Administration Dean Robert F.
Lanzillotti.
The rumor that plans are
underway to merge the finance
real estate, and insurance
programs is not valid,
according to Lanzillotti.
The entire College of
Business Administration has
been undergoing, since last fall, a
complete re-examination of its
curriculum objectives,
department by department,
said Lanzillotti, not just the
real estate department.
Lanzillotti said no plans are
lihderway to dissolve or combine
any department in the college.
He said he had no authority to
do so anyway.
Any change in the structure
of a department in any college
of the university has to go
through channels before it can
be approved according to the UF
constitution, he said.

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body President Walter Morgan has less than one
week of his four-week administration left if last Wednesdays
election is not overturned.
What does he think about the presidency as he leaves office?
IN ANSWERING, Morgan drew on-a year of experience in
the Student Government executive branch.
In the past year, he has served as administrative assistant to
former Student Body President Charles Shepherd, student body
vice president under Shepherd since Charles Harris left and now
as student body president.
Morgan said he thinks more vertical communication is
necessary for SG to function the way he believes it can.
SHEPHERD RESIGNED at the end of last quarter, leaving
Morgan to fill out the term which ends Thursday.
I admit my term as president has not exactly been under
normal conditions, but I think communication is the key to
better Student Government.

'FOLK MASS IN THE GRASS

Morgans Short Term Ends

balloons distributed by Sigma
Chi fraternity. A number of
songs were composed for the
occasion by members of the
center.

Monday, April 27, 1970

The steps include formal
recommendation by the dean of
the particular college, approval
by the University Senate, and
approval by the" Board 'of
Regents.
Lanzillotti said he __ has
appointed a committee to
evaluate the college and make
recommendations to him about
changes in the college. This may
include realigning departments.
Tom Infantino, president of
the Society of Real Estate and
Urban Affairs and spokesman
for students concerned about
the fate of the Real Estate
Department, said that even if
there are no plans to dissolve
the department at this time,
students are concerned about
de facto de-emphasis of the
department.
Infantino feared that the
department will be
de-emphasized so that by the
time it is dissolved, the students
will have nothing to say about it.

CAREER BRIEF BUT METEORIC

Singing alternated with
biblical readings and a sermon
by Father Gannon. Among
the readings were the
Beatitudes.

BAILEY CHALLENGES
Top Slate
Contested
By RICK ROSKOWE
And CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writers
The results of the student body election have been challenged by
11 students, including presidential candidates Jimmey Bailey and
Andy Kramer.
Bailey has asked the entire election be overturned.
THE UF HONOR COURT will decide the fate of the April 22
spring quarter elections on Wednesday, 6 pun., in room 283 of the UF
Spessard Holland Law Center.
In a letter to Richard Lazzara, Honor Court chancellor, Bailey said
he contested the election because no voting instructions were in the
voting machines.
He also said persons who had already voted in three precincts
Journalism, Business Administration and Arts and Sciences
congregated around the polls and discussed the election and
candidates. Bailey claims this is a violation of the election laws.
ANDY KRAMER, student body presidential candidate on the
Student Freedom party ticket, contested segments of the lower slate.
Bailey said he wouldnt comment on his challenge, except to say he hecontested
contested hecontested the election because of various technical and illegal acts
performed during the election. He said they had been serious enough
to effect the outcome of the election.
BAILEY REFUSED further comment until after an Honor Court
ruling. I dont want it tried in the newspapers, he added.
The UF student body constitution provides for an election hearing
at the request of any student who feels the elections were unfair.
Six jurors will be selected from the 18 Honor Court justices. They
will decide whether the whole election should be overthrown or only
a particular section.
The Honor Court chancellor may rule on each appeal separately or
lump similar appeals together. The hearing is open to the public.

Morgan said the student representative has a responsibility to
other students to inform them of policy changes that are in the
making before they have been decided.
MANY OF THE problems that have come out in the open in
the last three or four weeks are not entirely the fault of the
administration. Their responsibility was met by including
student representatives on their committees.
It is the responsibility of these students to pass the
information along to the rest of the student body, Morgan
said.
During Morgan's administration, at least three important
issues came to the attention of the student which had been in
the works for quite a while.
AT LEAST one or two students had been involved in each
decision, but the student body was not made aware of the
decisions until they had been finalized, Morgan said.
The issues Morgan referred to were:
The charging of $3 to $4 per ticket for football games.
The ban on amplified instruments on the Plaza of the
(SEE 'FROM' PAGE 2)

HAPPY ARE the pure in
heart, for they shall see
God, someone read, as
hundreds of smiling children
with balloons in hand listened
in silence.
Happy are the
peacemakers, for they shall
be called sons of God.
Bearded peace freaks in the
crowd listened intently.
Blessed are you when
men revile you and curse you,
and utter all manner of
falsehoods agains y0u...
FATHER GANNONS
sermon dealt with the joy of
living for the moment, which
he said was a positive
approach to religion.



Page 2

!, Tho Florida Alligator, Monday, April 27,1970

Population Group
To Plan Action
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
A new student Zero Population Growth (ZPG) group will hold its
first organizational meeting tonight in room 331 of the J.Wayne Reitz
Union at 8 pjn.
The group is being organized by Norma Reddish, 4AS, and Hal
Barcey, 3AS, to solicit more university support through a student
groUp.
THE MAIN POINTS to be discussed according to Barcey are:
t whether to apply for on-campus organization status.
how much money to ask the Student Government for.
how radical to be in policy.
methods of distributing information to the public.
ways to coordinate ZPG and the Environmental Action Group.
setting up lab sessions.
plan to set up state-wide organizations.
Barcey said an example of his radicalism is the selling for bumper
stickers saying, Make Love, Not Babies.
Barcey is hoping to have the Gainesville Family Planning Centers
reopened and also hopes to establish a cabinet post for environment in
Student Government.
WE WANT this to be a positive-action type group. We will do this
by such means as petitioning for rather than against actions, Barcey
said.
Barcey is hopeful the meeting will provide the structure for a
semi-organization for next year.
He emphasized that the group will conduct rap sessions as well as
being an action group.
The public is invited to this meeting.
~ v.v.v.?*v.v.v.v.v.v.w.v.w.v.v.w.v.%v.v.w.v.;.y
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Americas and elsewhere on campus.
j f The announcement of a joint anti-drug program with the ij:
:*. City of Gainesville, Alachua County and UF. ij:
I think much of the lack of communication could be ij:
:j: eliminated through standard report forms used by all student jj:
>: representatives, Morgan said. The forms would list what was
discussed and done during every meeting. j:j
When asked if he would do anything to change the duties or j;j
|:j responsibilities of the vice president, Morgan said: :j
>j Nothing. Id give the next guy a break and leave it like it is. ij
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Shell, Tickets, Drugs
Discussed In Conference

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Amplified on-campus music
headed discussion topics at the
second Sunday conference of
students and UF leadership.
New sites for the former
happenings on the Plaza of
the Americas are being sought,
according to Public Functions
Committee Chairman David
Wilmot.
A SCHEDULE is being made
for future happenings, and plans
are being drawn up for an
accoustical shell at a permanent
location.
Our basic concern is to find
a place that doesnt interfere
with academic activities at the
university, Wilmot said.
If we get too organized, we
will lose some of what the
happenings' are all about,
Andy Kramer said in protest to
the idea of constructing a shell.
IN OTHER action, football
ticket policy was discussed at
length with statements from
Athletic Director Ray Graves
and Student Body President

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June. July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator. Reitz
Union Building. University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator Is entered as second class matter at the United States Rost Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of aH advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous Insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

Walter Morgan.
Weve met with students
who presented an alternate
student ticket plan ... there is a
good chance that the Athletic
Association will change its
decision, Graves said.
The alternate student
proposal is that students be
allowed to purchase a $5
football card, $1 per home
game, to be allowed a ticket at
home games. There would be no
assigned seating and 3,500
guaranteed date tickets per
game, Morgan said.
DRUG USE on campus
during activities should be
curbed by the students
themselves rather than bringing
in the police. We should be
allowed to clean up our own
house first, Jerry Siegel of the
Comer Drug Store said.
My concern in the enacting
of the new narcotics polictv was
to alert UF students before it
was enacted... It is the policy
of UF to correct problems
without arrest if possible, UF
President Stephen O'Connell
said.

START EARLY PH,L BAN ,STER

He may be smiling now but wait until he finch
out the current of Itchetucknee River, a favorite
tubing spot of UF students has slowed. Swollen by
recent rains, it now takes six hours to drift down

OConnell Asks $7 Million More
For University Budget Allocation

See Editorial Page 8
By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
President Stephen C.
O'Connell will ask legislators
today to increase the UFs
budget allocation by $7 million.
OConnell is attending a
meeting of leaders of the Florida
Senate and state university
presidents in Tallahassee.
He will also make a
presentation of the deficiencies
and needs of the university
system in the area of physical
SUMMER JOBS
with the YMCA
DAY CAMP
Rroforenoo given to those who
qualify as work-study students.
June IS-July 2$
SWIM CLASS INSTRUCTORS
Rod cross W.S.I. and/or YMCA
Leader-Kxaminer certificate
required. Dates open. GOOD
RAY. Call John Liles 372-ss2l,
376-0117

plants. Physical plant includes
grounds, maintain ance and
buildings.
Florida State University
President Stanley Marshall will
talk about the problems which
involve the libraries.
University of West Florida

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the river. It usually takes three. Students caught
unaware of the current change have found it cold
and dark at their journey's end. Keep smiling,
fellow.

President Crosby will cover the
problems of the administration
and its needs.
OConnell will then present to
the Senate leaders his bare bones
budget request, which shows a
need of $7 million over that
recommended by the governor.



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CLEAN-UP DAY
Over 300 UF Greeks turned out Saturday morning to clean up 150
city blocks of litter, pick up litter along three miles of highway, plant
flowers along State Road 26, dean up the grounds of an elementary
school and paint four houses.
AEPI's Kevin Clark, Barry Shimler, and Wayne Heiber prepare for
painting the house their fraternity was assigned.
Astrologer, Attorney Featured
At Union Birthday Party

Astrologer Barry Patch and
draft attorney Steven Butter will
highlight the Reitz Unions
six-day-long third birthday party
Sunday through Thursday.
The Union Program Office,
which has arranged to have a
large tent erected on the north
field (behing the Hub) and will
provide entertainment and
exhibits there and in the Union
each of the six days.
The party began Sunday
with two events scheduled in the
tent. First, the College of
Architecture erected an
environmental structure from tin
cans at Ipm This was followed
from 2 to 6 p.m. by a musical
happening with at least four
bands.
Patch is scheduled to appear
Wednesday night and Butter
Thursday night.
Other events include a Maas
NOW
OPENING
for
Sept. Occupancy
LEASE OFFICE
309 NW 13th St.
Across froi i
Tigert Hall'
,riio
place)

Brothers fashion show, Flash
Gordon series, flea market and
yoyo, hula hoop, ball-bat and
jump rope contests.
Fraternity Moves
To UF Campus
National headquarters of
Sigma Lambda Chi, a scholastic
fraternity for students majoring
in construction, has voted to
move to the UF.
James O. Stakely Sr.,
professor in the department of
building construction and
national president of Sigma
Lambda Chi, reports the UF will
be its permanent national
headquarters.

Open 7 days
t
Clip the
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University Senate Drops
Faculty Fringe Benefits

By RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff Writer
Discounts on educational materials, free
education and reduced UF football ticket prices
have been dropped as fringe faculty benefits by the
University Senate.
Thomas Biggs, UF attorney, pointed out that the
State Department of Administration has the power
to prohibit state agency employes from receiving
discounts on materials or services purchased from
state agencies.
THE CONTROVERSIAL subject was the first
action item handled by University Senate members

Fate Os Financially Troubled
/
Baby Gator Nursery Uncertain

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writer
The Baby Gator Nursery is in
trouble financially, and its fate is
uncertain.
According to director of the
nursery, Mrs. Peg Pritchett, the
nursery has enough funds to
operate until June 30. If more
fimds cannot by found by then,
the nursery may not be able to
remain in existence.
OUR BOARD of directors is
actively seeking some alternative
means of continuing support for
the nursery, Mrs. Pritchett said.
I am confident they will find
away to keep it open.
The nursery is presently being
supported by the Institute for
Developing Human Resources
from the College of Education.
The institute has been doing
research work at the nursery
concerning early learning.
THE INSTITUTE will no
longer fund the nursery after
June 30. Dr. Ira Gordon, head of
the institute, has been seeking to
find a new means of support for
the school, according to Mrs.
Pritchett.

One program that may be
used, if support cannot be found
for next year, is raising the
tuition of the nursery students.
Tuition is currently S3O per
month, a price "Mrs. Pritchett;
said all students can afford.
Many of us feel that raising
the tuition would defeat the
purpose of the program, Mrs.
Pritchett said.
ONE MEANS of support not
in danger of being withdrawn is
from the University Methodist
Church, which donates its
facilities free to the nursery.
The Baby Gator Nursery has
a very fine program, said Mrs.
Pritchett. I am very proud of

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Monday, April 27,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Thursday at a meeting in McCarty Auditorium. UF
President Stephen C. OConnell presided over
the senate.
Senate members said they receive professional
discounts from local bookstores even though denied
a similar discount at a UF bookstore.
Some members complained that by denying state
agency employes, including UF faculty members,
discounts on educational materials, football tickets
and the right to take six hours of education each*
quarter free of charge, some instructors may look
away from UF as a potential employer.
OConnell said he disagreed with the policy, but
he is working with the Board of Regents to find
alternate solutions to the problem.

the program we offer.
The program consists of 30
students the maximum
number allowed by the schools
health department license. There
are at least 30 more on a waiting
list to get in, according to
Pritchett, who is the only
full-time teacher. Nine part-time
teachers aides from the institute
also help out.
The Baby Gator Nursery is
controlled by a board of
directors consisting of three
students of the UF, two
representatives from the church,
one representative from the
College of Education, and one
member from the community.

Page 3



Page 4

l,Ttw Florida Alligator, Monday, April 27,1970

Course Shows Importance Os Women

CSS 194 looks ordinary,
tucked away in the UF sociology
offerings for spring quarter.
Check it out and you find,
Female America: the Minority
Majority.
THE PURPOSE of the study
of woman in North American
society is to acquaint the
student with the body of
knowledge pertaining to the
biological, psychological and
social equipment with which the
woman chooses among
alternative roles.
The instructor and originator
is Mrs. Candy Monsees,
instructor in social sciences. She
planned the course for 20
freshmen women. There are now
30 in her class, including three
men. She turned away another
20 students.
Students sign up for Female
America for reasons as varied as
their hair styles.
MARY JENKINS, 18, Tampa,
said, I wanted to see how white
people feel about a womans
situation. Black woman has a
special case. She must gain
recognition as a person before
she goes for recognition as a
woman.
Ken Jacobson, 18, of Miami,
said, Like Im already planning
to get married. I want to know
more about my girl, how she is
now and what shes going to be
like.
Joe Ahrens, 18, of Tampa,
wants to know more about equal
roles so I can be more
accustomed to it.
A QUESTION from Ahrens
was a catalyst for the new
course. In an institutions class he
asked Mrs. Monsees, Why dont
women want to be soft and
feminine anymore?
Arleen French, 18, West Palm
Beach, a feminine member of
Womens Liberation, said of her
reasons for taking Female
America, Ive always been
interested in women and their
role. I think every woman
should know what her role has

WHAT'S HAPPENING
LEARNING POLITICS: Dr. Eugene Todd, chairman of the
department of secondary education and candidate for the Alachua
County School Board, will talk to the UF Young Democrats today in
room 361 of the Reitz Union. Topic of the talk will be The Politics
of Education.
UNION BIRTHDAY: As part of its birthday, the Union is
sponsoring a student art show in the tent from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
UNION MOVIES: At 4 pjn., Flash Gordon and The
Roadrunner.
Showing at 7 and 9:30 pjn. The Flim Flam Man.
Both in the Union Auditorium.
BOMB FILM: Interhall Council is sponsoring the film Hiroshima
and Nagasaki tonight in lounges 122 and 123 of the Reitz Union.
This once secret film was recently released by the U. S. government
and shows the dangers of nuclear warfare.

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111 ART SUPPLIES
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111 Customs r Parking In
JK The Rear
HI we Welcome: B

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ALL ABOUT WOMEN
Class draws reactions from (left to right) Bobbie Jo Hunter, Cheryl Brown, Cleasie M. Hickson, Arleen French, Mary L. Jenkins and Ken Jacobson.

been, what it could be what
her possibilities are, what shes
not, what isnt open to her and
how she could make these
open.
Mrs. Monsees designed the
seminar because, Women across
the country are demanding their
rights in an upsurge of the
womens liberation movement.
IT IS MY contention that a
scientific study of the question
of womens characteristics and
capabilities is a necessary
prerequisite to any discussion of
this movement.
Her students will conduct
research into womens
capabilities and
characteristics.
She also contends that
although women comprise more
than 50 per cent of the
American population, they
function as a minority.
MRS. MONSEES suggests that
minority group theory could be

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THE MINORITY MAJORITY

applied for better understanding
of the behavior patterns of
women.
She adds, Further, both men
and women are virtually
ignorant of the anatomy and
physiology of women, to say
nothing of the history of
women.
Since most of the writers of
all ages have been men, a
systematic bias has been
introduced in the description of
women. A new literature is
emerging, written by and about
women, to which little serious
attention has been paid yet.
FINALLY, SHE says,
there are many questions about
women that social science has
not answered and, indeed, not
often raised. For example, why
are women less susceptible to all
kinds of disease than are men?
Why do measures of need for
achievement predict educational
and vocational success for men,
but not for women? What are
the effects of womens shifting
hormonal levels?
A rich variety of subjects are
covered in the course. They
in dude:
The physiological makeup
of the human female organism as
compared to that of the male,
and as it limits the roles available
to women;
The phenomenon of the
woman on the pedestal and the
woman as socio-emotional leader
and keeper of morality;
The woman as mother and
housewife, as a worker, as
consumer spending to
compensate for powerlessness in
a money-oriented culture- and
as a sexpot.

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PRECAUTION FOR SOVIET ATTACK
China Disperses Industry

VIENNA (UPI) Communist
China has dispersed its key
nuclear installations over a wide
area as a precaution against any
possible attack by the Soviet
Union, according to diplomatic
reports here Sunday.
At the same time, the reports
said Peking has been pushing
ahead with its rocket
development program.
THE PLACING into orbit of a
satellite Saturday testified to the
progress which Peking has been
making in developing powerful
rockets which could be used to

Vast Oil Slick Floats Ashore

NEW ORLEANS (UPI)
Heavy pollution from an oil
slick washed ashore in the
marshy area southeast of New
Orleans, the Coast Guard said
Sunday.
A Coast Guard helicopter
surveyed two oil spills in the
Gulf of Mexico that originated
about 14 miles offshore.
THE PILOT REPORTED the
pollution had taken the form of
a broken silver sheen and was
breaking up well. The pilot
'id the source of one slick was
ill leaking Sunday morning.
Coast Guard and state wildlife
ficials checked the extent of
ollution l in the area, which
'ounds oyster beds lining the
joast of Breton Sound, and for
any damage to game and
seafood.
FISHERMEN REPORTED
pollution in the area Saturday
and a Coast Guard helicopter
found the two slicks. Lt. Dan
Bridges said one was 13 miles
long by 1,000 feet wide and the
other six miles long by 600 feet
wide.
Bridges said the larger slick
came from a floating
barge-platform owned by the
Barnwell Drilling Co. of
Shreveport, La., and the smaller
slick appeared to come from two
offshore oil platforms, still
oozing oil.
ONE IS OPERATED by
Chevron Oil Co. and the other
by Shell Oil Co. The larger slick
had reached the Louisiana coast
Sunday.
Barnwell acknowledged that
the barge had sprung a leak but
said it was stopped Saturday
night after leaking 12 or 15*
barrels of oil. Shell and

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deliver nuclear warheads, the
reports said.
Diplomatic sources said the
dispersal by China of its nuclear
installations had apparently been
earned out on a wide scale.
THEY SAID PEKING
apparently considered its
previous high concentration in
Singkiang province, bordering on
the Soviet Union, too risky in
view of the festering Sino-Soviet
dispute.
The sources said that while
exact details were hard to come
by, available reconnaissance has

Chevron spokesmen said
Saturday they had no knowledge
of any leaks in their Breton
Sound operations.
BRIDGES SAID it was the
largest oil spill off the Louisiana
coast since Chevrons Charlie
platform 75 miles southeast of
New Orleans was shut 25 days
before.
The platform spewed 20,000
barrels of oil into the gulf for
three weeks after a huge fire was
extinguished.
The Coast Guard said
Saturday a few birds had been
soaked with oil.
Shrimp and oyster fishermen
have filed more than SIOO
million worth of lawsuits against
Chevron, claiming its Charlie
platform spill had damaged their
fishing grounds.
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confirmed that large and
important sections have been
shifted to remote areas,
including the mountains of
Tibet.
THE SOURCES said that with
the dispersal at least partially
completed, Peking now appears
to be going all out for rocket
development and the harnessing
of nuclear power in smaller,
more manageable warheads.
They said that while Red
China is expected to have
effective medium range missiles
in operation in the next two to
three years, intercontinental
ballistic rockets may not be
ready for deployment until the
late 19705, at least.
BUT BY 1980, the Chinese
are exacted to have sufficient
landbased long range nuclear
weapons to pose a threat to both
the United States and the Soviet
Union.
According to the sources, the
possibility is being taken into
account at the Strategic Arms
Limitations Talks (SALT) now
underway in Vienna between the
United States and the Soviet
Union.

GBve your
contact lenses

a bath
tonight

| Pollution Problems ]
{Concern Soviets Too l
| MOSGOW (UPI) Silent Spring menaces the Soviet Union,
v a prize-winning Russian nature writer warned Sunday. $
The rare bustard and droves of other wild fowl are being §
$ decimated by pesticides, Vasily Peskov wrote in the youth
|:j newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravada. IS
IN A DOCUMENTED echo of Rachel Carsons nightmare
:j: prediction of the death of nature, Peskov asked, Where have all
$ the birds gone. Our forests, fields and gardens are growing :!
quieter and quieter.
Peskovs article was accompanied by a photograph of a >:
collective farmer standing in a field with dead geese and cranes $
>: piled around him. >:
The birds, migrating northward up the Don Valley, died of
:j: zinc phosphate poison dusted on grain fields to kill gophers. jjj
>; WE DONT KNOW what happened to the gophers. They jjj
:* probably survived without significant loss, Peskov wrote. But c
! the toll of birds included 50 cranes and 11 grey geese, and :
probably more because in nature animals usually die quietly and $
jij alone. J
|:j In the southern steppes near Grozny, Peskov reported, zinc j;
phosphate spread to exterminate field mice killed several score $
foxes and 200 great bustards, a rare bird protected by a total >
hunting bah.
- Such cases happen everywhere, Peskov wrote. Official :
regulations permit dusting of poison by aircraft or farm :j
machines and allowing it to lie on the surface. :?
>: PESKOV, WHO was awarded the 1964 Lenin prize for his
x travel books, said that when questioned the Agriculture
Ministrys plant protection office expresses regrets but v
inevitably concludes with the phrase, we are fighting for the
| harvest.
'.OXWWWK'WMK'X'M'X'W'XWOKWKOXWXWX'XWKWWXvKCWKK'I'

Monday, April 27,1970, Tha Florida AMpator,

!H
In order to keep your contact lenses as
comfortable and convenient as they were
meant to be, you have to take care of
them. But until now you needed two or
more separate solutions to properly
prepare and maintain your contacts. Not
with Lensine. Lensine is the one lens
solution for complete contact lens care.
Cleaning your contacts with Lensine
retards the buildup of foreign deposits on
the lenses. And soaking your contacts in
Lensine overnight assures you of proper
lens hygiene. You get a free soaking case
on the bottom of every bottle of Lensine.
It has been demonstrated that improper
storage between wearings may result in
the growth of bacteria on the lenses.
This is a sure cause of eye irritation and
in some cases can endanger your vision.
Bacteria cannot grow in Lensine which is
sterile, self-sanitizing, and antiseptic.
Just a drop or two of Lensine, before you
insert your lens, coats and lubricates it
allowing the lens to float more freely in
A the eye's fluids. That's because
Lensine is an ''isotonic'' solution,
which means that it blends with
the natural fluids of the eye.
Let your contacts be the
convenience they were
meant to be. Get
some Lensine, from the
WW Murine Company, Inc.

Page 5



i, Th# Florida Alligator, Monday, April 27,1970

Page 6

Fire Destrovs A Lifetimes Work

By United Rrm international rampaging through the campus and
smashing windows valued at between
Firebombs tossed into an advanced $30,000 and $40,000.
studies center at Stanford University At Pennsylvania State University,
Friday destroyed the life-time notes and student leaders called for a protest strike
woiks of a group of visiting scholars, by the more than 48,000 students in the
including Indian anthropologist, M. N. state university system.
Srinivas. It was the first action by student
The fire came after 125 sit-in government leaders since sporadic
demonstrators protesting ROTC were incidents of violence broke out April 15.
moved out of another building and 23 THE STUDENTS said their actions
were arrested. were triggered by university trustees
OTHERS IN THE group fled, statement that there would be no

Abortion Bill Will Pass Houses

TALLAHASSEE, (UPI)
The presiding officers of the
legislature predicted Friday that
liberalized abortion legislation
would pass both houses
possibly next week but in
widely varying forms.
Senate President John
Mathews, D-Jacksonville, a
proponent, said the bill will
come up for floor debate next
Tuesday and said he expected it
to pass in a very close vote.
BUT HOUSE Speaker Fred

, >XvXv>l Xv>>X'>l >X lv>X%v,
{Fall Os Castroegimef
Goal Os Exile Forces!
>: NEW YORK (UPI) A free-lance photographer who said he >
accompanied recent Cuban exile guerrilla landings in Cuba
declared Friday that their purpose is to harass the Castro regime
and seek its downfall through internal revolt.
S Edward Guayo Hernandez brought back what he described :!
$ as still and newsreel pictures of recentlyTanded expeditions in :-j
;|i eastern Cuba. g
HE SAID THE groups were small but their effectiveness
:j: could not be disputed.
:|j Castro knows how destructive the guerrilla actions are and
;! that is why he runs loose his militia and his oratory against what
! he knows to be his biggest danger, Hernandez said.
Hernandez said the small-scale invasion groups were not
jjj seeking to immediately overthrow Castro but to set the stage for J:j
his inevitable collapse. Castro knows how corrosive and
effective the guerrilla action is, Hernandez said.
ij: THE MISSION OF the guerrillas is to find and organize
people opposed to Castro and Communism, Hernandez said.
:j: The idea is to help such people into the fight, he said. To
give them the opportunity to fight; perhaps to throw the first >:
iji rock. |
*: If the people could, they would be out fighting tomorrow,
$ Hernandez said. Even in militia ranks there are plenty of :*
people opposed to Castro.
i; The peasants are hoarding arms, too.
!<
'.v.y.v.y.y.j.y.y^y.yvV.y.y.v.y.y.y.v.y.y.v.y.y.y.yo.y.y/.y.y.y.yiV.;/.;.;.;/.;^
th!
QUARTERLY
IS HEREI
The Quarterly is here and our best wishes and our
the waiting is over. greatest efforts.
. The Quarterly is here
The Quarterly is here with stacked on a |jtt|e tab|e
fiction and poetry that are j n tbe pj aza tbe Americas
alive today, written by and Ljtt | e Wa | ker P | aza
peop e that are alive today. from 10 to 4 p m
People you might know. Tuesday through Friday of
_ ... this week.
The Quarterly is here with a
portfolio of photographic ftQtUlfl
art (that really is art). 'flUflftCTiy
The Quarterly is here with We only did it for you.
*Pi£** i-itu* * tfru- p * r v t % > -4 * * .*'

SET BY RADICALS AT STANFORD
"-- a I a M M

Schultz, D-Jacksonville, an
opponent of any change in the
abortion laws, said he expected
the House to pass only a very
limited liberalization similar
to what it passed last year.
The House bill last year was
killed by a Senate committee.
Much more sweeping bills
making abortion a matter
between a woman and her
doctor and imposing only a
six-month residency requirement
passed committees in both

houses Thursday and were sent
to the calendar.
SCHULTZ SAID he is
committed to giving the bill
absolutely fair treatment
despite his personal opposition.
I think an abortion bill will
pass the House in what form, I
cant tell, said Schultz. I
suspect the bill that passed the
House will be very similar to the
bill that passed the House the

last rime.
I havent seen any significant
changes in the approach on the
part of the membership.
THE 1969 HOUSE bill
permitted abortions only when
the life or physical health of the
mother or child were endangered
or when the pregnancy resulted
from rape or incest.
Both legislative leaders
predicted the session will
conclude within the allotted 60
Tobacco, No
Marijuana, Yes
LONDON (UPI) Actor
Tony Curtis, who often appears
on television crusading against
smoking cigarettes, was arrested
Sunday at Londons Heathrow
Airport and charged with
possession of marijuana.
A spokesman for Scotland
Yard said customs officials
discovered the drug when Curtis
arrived Sunday afternoon. The
44-year old actor was released
on bail and scheduled to appear
in court Monday morning.
The Scotland Yard spokesman
declined to say how much
marijuana was confiscated or
where it was allegedly hidden.
Curtis, who was president of
an I Quit Smoking Club in the
United States, spoke in London
last year on the perils of the
weed.
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amnesty for 37 students and former
students arrested during camp
disturbances. ,
Earlier Penn State student leaders had
declared the entire university an
educational disaster area and vowed to
seek federal aid.
Kansas Gov. Robert B. Docking said
Friday the worst was over at the
University of Kansas at Lawrence and
withdrew most of the restrictions
imposed on the university community.
IT WAS THE first night since Monday

days, with Mathews sticking to
his goal of a 50-day maximum,
although they conceded that a
revised revenue outlook could
delay the appropriations process.

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that Lawrence had been released from a
dusk-to-dawn curfew, following a rash of
fires including a $2 million blaze at the
Student Union.
Restrictions on the sale of firearms and
gasoline were extended to Monday.
A Stanford colleague of Srinivas asked
newsmen: Please dont disturb him. His
mother just died this week and now his
entire life work has been destroyed.
What is lost is the irreplaceable
product of a great scientist from India
where his science is sorely needed.

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Some Vietnamese Are 'Fifth Column

PARIS (UPI) The chief of staff of the Cambodian
army said Friday some Vietnamese residents of Cambodia
are acting as a Fifth Column for invading Viet Cong and
North Vietnamese troops.
How can anyone be astonished that, in the extreme
peril that our nations face, certain among them have been
killed? asked Gen. Srey Saman.
SAMAN CALLED a news conference at the Cambodian
embassy Friday to comment on reports of massacres
and charges of genocide that have been leveled against
the new Cambodian leadership.
Reading calmly from a prepared statement, the
Cambodian general said the estimated 400,000
Vietnamese residents of Cambodia are not the object of
persecutions.
He said, however, that among the Vietnamese
residents there exists a pro-Viet Cong minority which has
received orders to transform itself into a Fifth Column.
SOME OF THESE Vietnamese have aided the invaders
in their push through the provinces, informing them about

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CHARGES CAMBODIAN GENERAL

our military dispositions, feeding them, pointed out loyal
functionaries and inhabitants to be killed, serving also as
the leaders of a handful of Cambodian Communist
guerrillas ... he said.
In Vietnam U.S. planes pounded Communist
positions around the besieged Dak Seang Special Forces
camp for the second consecutive day Sunday, military
spokesmen said.
One U. S. fighter was shot down during one of the 92
air strikes Saturday, but the pilot was rescued.
ALMOST HALF of the 195 Air Force missions flown
in South Vietnam Saturday were in support of Dak Seang,
located 290 miles northeast of Saigon.
The camp came under Viet Cong and North Vietnamese
attack during the beginning of the Communist spring
offensive on April 1.
Sunday morning four missions of 852 bombers hit
suspected Communist positions in jungles only three miles
to the northeast and northwest of the outpost in the
Central Highlands.

Monday, April 27,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

THE SHOCKS OF the bomb explosions were felt in the
camp, defended by mercenaries, South Vietnamese troops
and a handful of U. S. Green Berets.
A propeller-driven A1 Sky raider was hit by Communist
groundfire Saturday two miles northeast of Dak Seang,
U. S. spokesmen said. The pilot was rescued unhurt.
It was the 12th American aircraft lost around Dak
Seang since the start of the Communist drive. Eight of the
aircraft were helicopters and three were C7 Caribou
transports hit while parachuting supplies to the defenders
seven miles east of Laos.
Nine miles to the north of the camp, government
infantrymen supported by planes and artillery reported
turning back an attack and killing 17 North Vietnamese
without taking a casualty.
The U. S. command reported 35 shelling attacks across
the country in the 24-hour period ending at 8 ajn.
Sunday. Only six were directed against U. S. units or
installations, but left five Americans dead and 28
wounded, spokesmen said.

Page 7



, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, April 27,1970

Page 8

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Northern Strategy

Washington One year and a half after the 1968
campaign in which he first emerged as a political
force, the middle American has yet to find a major
political party which takes him seriously. George
Wallace continues to speak to him and to command
some of his allegiance, and the Republican party
thinking Wallaces appeal to be only racial woos
with the vision of an all-white school. It is not
enough.
The middle American is worse off today than he
was when the journalists looking at the Wallace
stickers in the factory parking lots discovered him
in 1968. He is the same fellow, to be sure.
He has children in primary and secondary school.
He is between 35 and 45 years old. He owns a home
in a close-in suburb -for the first time and much
of his annual earnings of $7,000-$ 12,000 go to
retire a substantial debt, including a mortgage. He
did not because he could not afford to go to
college, and that fact limits his status and his
income to its present level.
But in the past three years the value of his savings
whether in the bank, a union pension plan or a
retirement fund has declined more than 20 per
cent. If he was saving to buy a new home, it has
eroded even more, as interest rates go out of sight.
And inflation day-to-day price increases rob his
salary in a highly visible manner.
He is told -regularly that his affluence is
unmatched in history, but he hears it with
resentment. A prolonged layoff or a serious illness
or accident in his family would bankrupt him. The
Department of Labor tells us that $9,977 is a
income for a family of four in New
York City; $9,624 in Buffalo. But in only one
industry in either city contract construction are
wages up to this standard.
He does not care much about an issue called the
environment, but he does care that the beaches
and lakes are polluted. Most of all, he cares that his
schools are bad and getting worse, and he is at least
partly right to blame it on the influx of
underprivileged blacks and on the liberal whites who
seem to believe in integration for him.
The Democrats have helped bring him to this pass
and have added a war which is the major dislocation

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Carolyn Pope
Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
Earl Hartman Fred Vollrath Craig Goldwyn
Features Editor Wire Editor Sports Editor
Dan Vining Jeff Brein
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief

John Sugg
News Editor

Kerry Dupree

Advertising Manager Business Manager

Karen Eng
Managing Editor

Mike Davis

Frank Mankiawicz-
Tom Bradon
in the economy. But the Republicans are doing
nothing for him except to offer Spiro Agnew and
the all-white school. Some Democrats are banking
on the possibility that an all-white school is not
what he wants so much as a good one.
Sen. Edmund Muskie seems to have found new
value in the 1972 nomination. Sen. George
McGovern, despite a recently garbled newspaper
account that he was quitting the field, is actively
seeking top staff for the long haul.
And these Democrats are aiming at the middle
American as the chief element of a new coalition.
Their strategy has been outlined in New York state
where Eugene Nickerson and Adam Walinsky,
seeking the office of governor and attorney-general,
are ready to jettison the traditional liberal slogans
and issues.
Walinsky points out that no possible hourly wage
rise or union militancy can outrun inflation and
taxes fast enough to make a real change in the
middle Americans treadmill. Walinsky believes the
best the Democratic party could offer, he says is a
program for a real second chance: to permit those
who missed out on education 10 to 15 years ago to
go to study courses in their neighborhoods run by
their local universities and make the jump into the
educated white-collar class.
Walinsky and Nickerson are saying not racism but
his own advancement up the economic ladder will
rekindle the middle Americans political enthusiasm.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Morida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Honda.

EDITORIAL
OConnell, A
Handy Target
Mr. Stephen C. OConnell is a man with responsibilities,
with authority, with problems.
As students, we tend to be critical of President
OConnell. We tend to hold him responsible for all facets of
the university. As president, he is a handy target for our
criticism. Unfortunately, student criticism is not always
accurate.
His biggest responsibility, for example, is providing us
with high-quality education. Unfortunately, the state in
which he serves as a university president is unwilling to fund
higher education. Underfunding has been an acute problem
in Florida for the past five years.
Since this is an election year, the logical tax base needed
to fund higher education will not be forthcoming. Hence,
UF students are forced to pay S2O more in tuition each year
than is the national average. Unless the fiscal situation
changes, UF students can look forward to more tuition
increases in the disturbingly near future.
The governors budget proposal wholly consistent with
his no-new taxes campaign approach pared sl7 million
from the budget proposal submitted through the Board of
Regents by the UF. President OConnell, however, did not
passively accept the cut. Instead, his staff prepared what he
calls a bare bones budget which restores $7 million of the
governors cut. Hopefully, the legislature will choose the
presidents alternative over that of the governor. We urge
Alachua Countys delegations, particularly Sen. Robert
Saunders, to champion the bare bones request.
But the question is, should a university president be
forced to act as a lobbyist in the interest of his university?
By OConnells estimate, he spends 90 per cent of his time
trying to find funding for the UF. We can believe that. His
efforts hark back to before this quarter began, when he and
other educators toured the state in an attempt to drum up
budgetary support. He spent the first half of last week in
Tallahassee doing likewise. In fact, he is in Tallahassee today
for the same purpose.
Although we think OConnells efforts are entirely
laudable, we believe he has enough problems at the
university to keep him busy without trying to run the show
from Tallahassee.
So when the issue turns to quality education, dont be
too quick to criticize OConnell, speak to the wind blowing
toward Tallahassee.
ikfl
ip
Moynihan Memos



MR. EDITOR:
The editorial of April 17,
Remove Children From the
Ranks, misses the point about
the war in Vietnam, which is
quite more than the absurd
situation referred to. In fact,
the war is a rationally conceived
product of a militaristic
government which has spent
5108 billion to murder
three-quarters of a million
Vietnamese, destroy Vietnams
countryside and sacrifice the
lives of 40,000 Americans to do
it.
Every day the government
continues to let its war machine
go berserk, people die. Any
concern for well-mannered
protest must be deemed
irrelevant in the face of so much
death. In the name of the
preservation of humanity, any
means necessary must be used to
stop the mass killings now. This
can mean people respecting laws.
It can mean ignoring the laws,
because the government of the
United States is acting so
viciously in disregard for
constitutional law, international
law and most importantly, any
semblance of humanity or
freedom, that respect for that
government is difficult to
justify. Finally, it can mean
bringing the war home to the
streets of America, where a
movement of committed people
is willing to struggle against the
murder of its brothers and
sisters.
The editorial claimed the
march of April 15 went well
despite obscene words and
offbeat flags. On the contrary,
the march went well because
students perceived the obscenity
of the war, and expressed it. Our
government is committing mass

Speaking O

On Marchs editorial page Michel
Parkinson revealed that the massacre of
South Vietnamese civilians in Hue by
Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army
regulars was not all its been made up to
be.
Only a few South Vietnamese civilian
policemen were executed by the invading
Communists, he tells us, while the real
death dealer was the overkill
bombardment by American artillery.
Furthermore, Hues bloody shirt that
Americans wave to justify My Lai is in
reality blood shed by our own troops not
by the North Vietnamese.
This does not even begin to answer the
charges of Communist genocide in Hue.
Civilians killed in the siege of Hue is not
what has made this city a Viet Cong
atrocity; rather, it is the remains of
citizens of Hue that have been
periodically unearthed in mass graves
outside Hues city limits upon what the
uproar is all about.
In the sand dunes northeast of Hue a
mass grave containing over 800 South
LETTERS POLICY
Lattars mutt:
Bt typed, signed, double-spaced and
not axoaad 300 words.
Not ba signad with pseudonym.
Hava sdrirsw n and telephone
numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer
draws just cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for space.
Writers may submit longer essays,
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
interested in submitting a regular column
h asked to contact the editor and be
prapwad to show samples of his work.

Offended By Dirty Words

murder, and the Alligator gets
offended by dirty words. Well,
so-called dirty words are
appropriate in reference to a
very dirty war. As for offbeat
flags provoking an ugly
situation, the American flag was
the only one represented which,
while flying under the guise of
patriotism, serves, in reality, to
blind a nation to the insanity of
a racist war.
The march through Tigert was
justified because of the very real
role the administration of this
university plays in support of
the American military.
Recruiters from the armed
services are always here. ROTC
gives academic credit for
instruction in organized murder.
University defense contracts
totaled nearly $2 million in
1968. Private businesses which
obtain huge profits from war
production are welcome to
recruit here. Tigert Hall is
therefore guilty of complicity
with the war.
Remember, people are dying,
so theres no more time to be
nice. The Alligator claims that
SMC lays itself bare to charges
of disruption by a march
through Tigert. If there has to be
disruption, then right on! If
there have to be dirty words,
right on! If there have to be
offbeat flags, right on again!
If there has to be much more,
then lets do it, because while
the Alligator and Spiro are
rapping about the responsibility
of dissent, the obscene,
irresponsible and offbeat war
machine is not very civil.
4*. DENNIS ROCKWAY
STEERING COMMITTEE, SMC,

They Just Live There

Vietnamese civilians, thgir hands wired
behind their backs, AK bullets through
their heads, was uncovered shortly after
the fighting had stopped in the city.
Since that first grisly evidence of
liberation was uncovered in April
1968 other mass graves have been found,
their occupants all liberated by a
similar, methodical, bullet-through-the bullet-through-thehead
head bullet-through-thehead technique.
All in all over 2,000 civilians have been
liberated by last count. A discovery in
August 1969, of a new ditch full of the
results of those glorious Viet Cong
letting off steam topped the list.
These civilian casualties are not due
to the siege of Hue. They were found
murdered in graves outside Hue. The
victims were relatives of ARVN soldiers,
merchants and every level of city official.
By the nature of just who was
murdered, subsequent testimony of the
survivors, and broadcasts of Radio Hanoi
which admit these executions of these
enemies of the people, it has been
thoroughly established that this massacre
was a Communist atrocity.
Either Mr. Parkinson is in ignorance of
these mass graves, or he must know of a
new artillery projectile used by American
troops that transports its victims out of
town, wires their hands behind their
backs, and then buries them death
caused by a single piece of shrapnel
through the head.
Apart from the mass graves question,
civilian casualites incuned in the fighting
for Hue proper cannot be attributed to
American exuberance with the fieldpiece.
Heavy artillery was not used to support

A Trend
MR. EDITOR:
Mr. Vollraths silly little pout
about the census questionnaire
should probably be dismissed as
too trivial to be worth
answering, but even so, I would
like to say a couple of things
about the topic.
It is, first of all, entirely
untrue that the Census Bureau is
asking more and more questions
of an increasingly personal
nature. The 1970 Census
represents a continuation of a
trend underway for several
decades a trend using sampling
to spare most individuals the
necessity of coping with the long
form and toward avoiding, even
on that form, questions which
may seem personally offensive
to many people.
My major point is that it is
very much the the damn
business of us all to possess
information which is derived
from the census. How in the
world are we to know, on any
basis other than impressionistic
guessing, the dimensions of
poverty in our society if we are
forbidden such survey
information? How are we to
know the inadequacy of
housing, the changing pattern of
reproduction, the prevalence of
broken homes with small
children, the number of elderly
persons living alone, if we do not
seek such* information in the
enumeration?
If Mr. Vollrath subscribes to a
doctrine which denies any
collective or governmental
responsibility for any human
problems, then he may have
something of a point in
objecting to the information
sought by the census. If he can

house-to-house fighting untih,
after the American
Marines sustained of heavy
casualties.
Conservative artillery support was used
in the fighting for the citadel on the
north bank of the Perfume River, where
breaches in the walls were blown by
American artillery but the interior
temples were not heavily damaged.
When I was in Hue in August last year,
I found the temples incredibly scarred by
small arms fire but with no major
structural damage, evidencing the
decision of the allied command to forego
artillery support to preserve South
Vietnamese cultural heritage in the
citadel a decision that cost many extra
American lives.
The American command sacrificed the
lives of its soldiers to preserve the tombs
and temples of the citadel, much to the
disappointment of the invading NVA who
the small society

JjL &UOULPTIZY
IffffTlTTr / WUVMT \c
With
> mn sm> i,wii m 4-27

imagine that ameliorative goals
may be desirable, then obviously
we need to know something of
the geography of poverty, the
educational levels of different
segmbnts of the community, the
need for nursery programs in the
inner city, the areas of most
demanded medical specialization
in county health programs and
on and on and on.
Each person who interferes
with or who withholds full
cooperation with the efforts to
make the 1970 census the most
complete and accurate ever
conducted is showing an ostrich
reaction, wishing to hide his
head in the sand of ignorance
rather than contributing to the
acquisition of urgently needed
information.
NAME WITHHELD
Academics
MR. EDITOR:
Your editorial of April 16
concerning the sad football
ticket situation and its
consequences interested me.
Specifically, the tremendous
influence of non-student
interests on college football has
distorted its purpose and
objectives.
We must reverse this
dangerous trend away from
student athletic endeavor and
return to a more sensible stage
where friends watch the boys
run, jump and throw and the
campus main concern is
academics. The members of our
organization realize this, and we
welcome all those who have a
desire to get out of the stands
and back onto the field!
RICHARD EDWARDS, 7BA
UF RUGBY CLUB

Monday, April 27.1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

FORUM:
Aitki 04 uL V'mt
hnpt> f or the comn 1 I^*^000^

a Speaks Well
MR. EDITOR:
T.
I would like'to take this
opportunity to draw to your
attention the outstanding
support and spirit of
cooperation that has been
extended to the Gainesville City
Plan Board and the Alachua
County Planning and Zoning
Commission during their efforts
to present to the citizens of the
Gainesville Urban Area a guide
plan for the future growth and
development of this area. The
administration of the university
most generously offered the use
of the McCarty Auditorium last
Tuesday, April 14, for the
official presentation of the Land
Use Plan by the staff of the
Department of Community
Development, at which time an
official welcome was extended
by Mr. Walter Matherly, Director
of Physical Planning for the
university.
It should be pointed out that
the student body was well
represented at the hearing,
which speaks well for the
interest that the students have in
the community in which they
currently reside. It is only
through such expression of
interest, as well as the example
of cooperation, that the entire
community will benefit and
progress in an outstanding
fashion. It is only through such
expression of interest, as well as
the example of cooperation, that
the entire community will
benefit and progress in an
outstanding fashion.
NORMAN J. BOWMAN
DIRECTOR, DEPARTMENT OF
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

By Mark Johnson -I

£
banked on the destruction of these
treasures in the fighting.
In Hue the North Vietnamese were the
invaders. They were the aggressors. All
was peaceful before they and their Viet
Cong allies came armed with political
dossiers of Hues citizens, butchering
those who didnt pass their intolerant
tests yet Mr. Parkinson blames the
American military for the inevitable
deaths of innocent civilians in Hue. This
is a responsibility that should be placed
on the NVA invaders, the instigators of
this bloody month.
I was told a funny thing when I was in
Hue last August. Hue is one of the few
pro-Saigon and pro-American cities in all
of South Vietnam. Sorta weird, isnt it,
Mr. Parkinson, for a people to be
pro-American and anticommunist in Hue
after what you told us? However, they
probably dont know what you know.
After all, all they do is live there.
by Brickmah

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

**
FOR SALE
For sale: Short wave rec. 3 speaker,
Mel. SX llO, SIOO.OO F. Gravdon
964-6202 Starka. (A-2t-126-p)
Sllvertone electric, speaker in case
dual pickup, tremolo. $75. Sale or
consider trade for accoustic. Call lan
378-2298. 4 8 evenings.
(A-2t-126-p)
New Moon 64. 55 x 10 2 bedroom.
Central Air & Heat. Furnished.
Excellent Condition. $3,290. Call
372-3893 after 7 P.M. (A-10t-126-p)
EKO l2-string guitar acoustic with
electric pickup, hard shell case. Call
372-9167 Ask for Parke. PEACE.
(A-4t-123-p)

DIALOGUE WITH A THEOLOGUE
Dr. Seymour Block
of Zero Population
on
Sex Without Children &
Children Without Sex
Union Lounges 122,123
April 28,4:00 pm
Refreshments
sponsored by the J.W. R. Union
eir
... .* ; ;; ,F
' : .. \
UNION TENT
THIS WEEK
SPONSORED BY
THE COLLEGE OF
ARCHITECTURE
&
THE UNION
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA I
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES I
LUNCH AND DINNER
MONDAY I
Baked Meat Sauce and I
Macaroni TO A I
All you con eot I
TUESDAY I
Golden Fried Chicken I
can eat I
y > S
I i
I fl|L
v v. .-.. ' m '"rt vW > V*''VT;

FOR SALE
Air Conditioner quiet kool emerson
8000 BTU cools 3 rooms perfect
condition, used 2 mo. warranty
SIOO. Call 378-8168 mornings or late
evenings. (A-2t-126-p)
4 cent Xerox copies QUIK WAY
Copy Center, 3 machines no waiting.
Free collating. 100 copies 1 original 3
*/2 cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Quikway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. (A-llt-126-p)
Fender Palomino 6-string acoustic
guitar. Excellent condition. Hard
shell case. $l5O. Call Anita at
392-9126. (A-5M24-P)

Page 10

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 27,1970

FOR SALE
125 cc Ducat I, 1,900 ml, $175. Like
new. 63 Corvair, 60,000 ml., naw
tires, body and engine good
condition. Must Sell!!!! 914 S.W. Bth
Ave, Apt. no. 29, "LA MANCHA"
(A-3t-126-p)
Camera Petri flex 735 mm sir speeds
b-1000. 55mm fl. 8 sto. lens + 135
mm f 2 8 tele. Leather case like new
cond. Only $135. Must sell, Call B.
O. Parker at 378-5836 anytime.
(A-4t-124-p)
!- +
12 x 52 mobile home two bedrooms,
raised front kitchen. Early Amer.
$3200. Plus' added extras,
dishwasher, AC, 16 x 18 awning.
Phone: 485-2531. (A-st-124-p)
Irish -Setter puppies, 4 weeks old,
AKC top championship stock.
Wormed, shots. Excellent pets,
hunters or show material. SIOO
372- (A-13t-124-p)
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES 6 weeks old.
S3O. Call 372-2135. (A-st-124-p)
Matched bedroom set 2 twin beds,
dresser, bureau, bedside table. $65
Good condition. 372-7925 after 5.
(A-3t-125-p)
Portable stereo brand new, garrard
turntable, need money must sell call
378-3593 after 7:00 pm.
(A-3t-125-p)
196 9 Triumph 6 50, excellent
condition call Mike at 378-3587 after
7:00 pm need money must sell.
(A-3t-125-p)
Yorkshire terrier puppies, 7 months,
must sell, AKC registered, shots,
small adorable dogs, SIOO.OO, call
376-0289 after 5:00 on weekdays.
(A-st-127-p)
FROM wall to wall, no soil at all, on
carpets cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-159-c)
Stereo Ampex tape recorder model
760 and miracord turntable with
pre-amp. Like new. Call Pablo at
373- anytime. (A-st-127-p)
HARLEY Sprint 1967 250 CC $450,
GOYA g-10 classical guitar sllO,
POLAROID 103 SBO, or best offer.
Call 376-2048 anytime. (A-st-127-p)
FOR RENT
SUBLET JUNE IST -1 bdr. AC,
turn 115/mo, village 34 apts. no. 11.
Call or come by. Phone 373-1797.
328 SW 34th Street. (B-st-126-p)
Room In private home for mature
male student. Air-conditioned, linens
and maid service. Private entrance off
street parking. Call 376-5360.
(B-3t-126-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE APARTMENTS:
1700 SW 16th Court. MAKE YOUR
FALL RESERVATIONS NOW. Call
376-9668. (B-126-ts-C)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
LjmmmmmmmmimmumiiiwiwmrmimiiMMMiw
mmmmmwmm .. M
EH* TORIZ r 4*
t % *£
| > r.*. now showing
PENTHOUSE 2 N. ft. 13th 8L PH: S
T|ir:r^
N. ft. 13th ST. PH: 372-9623
A man went looking for America.
And couldnt find it anywhere...
NOW
PLAYING fIP
THUN THRU WfO Bin*
23ri THRU
OUR BIG WEEK BBIH
co Hijrl
N IM> ACHOm > *<>M The
mom ms a Swimmer Swimmer-1
-1 Swimmer-1 CANNES** FE^l^^lNNEn|t i^ >
r*" ."] SesSf :-r 3> a.*^ Pfctor' r
ADM. 1.25 THURSDAY
FWA/HOPPERiicJtusbN
mi wiii finll in i mi | i

FOR FI EBIT
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Apt. for rent: Summit House, new
building, furnished, must be married
or 21 and working. Call 376-8514
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-124-p)
Sublet May 1 thru Aug. 1 br. furn.
Univ. Gardens Apt. Pool, central air,
carpet, $l2O. Jane Peterson
392-0352. After 5, 378-0327.
(B-st-124-p)
Sublet 2-br. apt. summer quarter, ww
carpet, central AC, pool, $145/mo.
Call 392-2111, 11-12a.m. & 8-9p.m.
weekdays. (B-3t-125-p)
Need to sublet 2 bedroom, poolside,
AC Village Park Apt. Nice neighbors
good management. Call 372-9904
anytime. (B-3t-124-p)
Several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372-7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
Sublet starting summer quarter La
Bonne Vie, 1 bdrm., 2 or 3 persons
A/C, 1 pool, w/w carpet, dishwasher,
furn., $l5O/mo. Call 378-2158.
(B-st-124-p)
SUBLET for summer &/or after
Landmark no. 87, 2 bdr, furn, A/C, 2
pools $lB5/mo. June rent paid
available for occupancy June 15 call
378-0727. (B-st-125-p)
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close to
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
3 76-8990 University Apartments
(B-24t-11-p)
Clean large downstairs furnished apt.
Electrically hot and cold water. SBO
per month. Student upperclassmen
only. No pets. 1614 N.W. 3rd Place.
Call 372-2946 for appointment.
(B-lt-127-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom furnished apt.,
A/C, & H, pool, quiet nbhd., parking
5 min. drive to campus, lots of
closets, only sllO/mo. Ph:
378-7834. (B-lt-127-p)
2 br. Landmark apt. Sublet for
summer quarter. AC, pool, gym,
suana, 95.00 for mid June to Sept.
30. Call 378-2298 no. 144, 4 8
evenings. (B-3t-126-p)
w*
WANTED
Female to share 2 bedroom
apartment with 2 others. Air-cond.,
$46.00 mo. plus utilities. Immediate
occupancy 219A NW 3 Ave. Phone:
372-2393. (C-st-127-p)
Female roommate wanted French
Quarter Apt. 97 Poolside
Please call after IPM Phone:
371-7833. (C-st-124-p)
a
KflP-#,
ire-iaM |
wow!
DAMN! Wjm
ELLIOTM3OULD
A COCKEYED
MASTERPIECE !
Joseph Morgenstern, Newsweek
sHShilFi
over
| AWARD

WANTED
Male roommate/summer qtr. Your
own room In 2-bdr. duplex In quiet
wooded area near mall. Alr-cond.
Pets. welcome. SSO/mo. + Ve util.
372-6598. (C-4t-127-p)
Male roommate to share 2 BR. V.
Park. apt. Tenants furn. (incl. console
color TV SSO/mo.), + 1/3 utils.
Available June Aug. 378-0503.
(C-lt-127-p)
HELP wanted
Cocktail Waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary will
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dubs
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-125-p)
Counselor positions available at
CAMP PINEWOOD this summer.
(Hendersonville, N. C.) Male or
Female Ski boat
operation-experienced-160 to 220
h.p.; Male only Go Kart Specialist
mechanically inclined.; Male only
Big and strong Trips and Hikes
(operate truck); Male or Female
Tennis instructor (high school or
college experience); Male or Female
Archery Specialist good archer;
Male only Cabin Counselors,
activity escorts and leaders. Write to:
T. R. Robertson, 1414 Felch Ave.,
Jax., Fla., 32207. (E-st-127-p)
Wanted: 2 attractive girls, 21 or older
to be carhops, Must be willing to
wear bikinis. Job is part-time
evenings, full-time on weekends. Stop
by, dont call. Maryland Fried
Chicken, 516 NW 13th St. (E-ts-c)
Growing firm needs part time
electro-mechanical draftsman. Call:
378-7970. (E-st-127-p)
AUTOS
62 Austin-Healy 3000 New Paint,
New Interior, New Tires, Top
Condition, $1,050. Will Negotiate.
See at 1235 NW 39th Avenue, after.
6:00 P.M. A beauty! (G-7t-125-p)
1962 Triumph TR-3, New Paint, New
Carpets, Rebuilt transmission, new
clutch, good top and side curtains,
excellent cond., $675, Call:
378-9952. (G-st-126-p)
* [ Guns Guns Guns j'
-1 Inventory over 500. Buy j.
' | Sell Trade Repair. J
. ( Reloading supplies. Layaway j!
* plan. Harry Beckwith, gun J
1 j dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340. j \
TO EXCITE
" SflNjF each other
wF. they ignite
THE WORLD!
Based onto Novel
THE ADVENTURERS" by pEfl
HAROLD RQBBNS =
4 ACADEMY AWARDS WINNER
JL Including JfegW||
A 3 ACADEMY AWARDS WINNER
W INCLUDINGrBEST PICTURE



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

k*:*:*s£S

autos
..ft*
-
63 Porsche S Complete engine
overhaul, new paint, Mlchelln X tires,
interior completely redone,
AM-FM-SW radio. Call 392-8891.
(G-St-125-p)
1968 TRIUMPH GTO wire wheels,
luggage rack, british racing green,
17.000 miles, take over payments.
Call 372-2135. (G-st-124-p)
1968 Pontiac FlreM'd 400 four speed
transmission almost new condition
$1650 or best .offer 372-1393.
(G-5M25-P)
Roomy 1968 Cortina white with
delux red Interior, new tires, radio
heater, 4 on floor, bucket seats, good
mileage call Pablo 373-2303.
(G-5M27-P)
69" Volkswagen Air-conditioned,
blue, radio, floor mats, 8-track
stereo. $2,000.00. Call Rick
376 1155. (G-2t-127-p)
VOLVO, 1961, PV544, Runs great,
body is solid. New battery, exhaust
system. Radio, heater, many other
exciting extras. Only $450.
376-1024. (G-2t-127-p)
PICKUP, Chevy 1/2 ton, 1952. New
battery, brakes, 4 speed trans.
Inspection sticker, tag, recently
overhauled. Only $285 3 76-5962.
(G-3M27-P)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refutkls.
Deadline -3too pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

ij *- *.
i 9
CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
for sa.e (contour.,,) STUDENTL# PHONE
torrent day
wanted 2 days ADDRESS
Q help wanted O 3 days (*lO% discount)
autos 4.days (*lO% discount) Qjy STATE TIP
Q personal q 5 days and over
lost-found r 20% discouM)
services
U WORDING
fin 11 11 11 11 1 11 1 11 11 11 11 1 11 11 1 11 11 11
2i 1 1 1 11 11 1 mi 1 11 ii 11 11 11 1 ii hi 11 1 11
am I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II 1 1
4i 1 11 11 1 11 ii 11 11 1 11 iti 11 11 1 11 1 1 rmr

AUTOS
56 Chevy, 283, Rebuilt Lest
Summer, 4BBL, Hurst Shifter, Radio,
power steering, new seat covers.
Ray a,ter 5 PM PM-372-6524.
-372-6524. PM-372-6524. (G-4t-127-p)
Porsche 912 sand beige, perfect
mechanical condition. New engine
many accessories. Must be seen
3 78-3 844 after 5:30 all day
weekends. (G-st-127-p)
DODGE DART: 1966 radio and
heater, standard transmission. Good
running condition, recently replaced
brakes and tires; S7OO. Call
378-7060. (G-st-127-p)
PERSONA L
Wanted: Mothers with Infants 3 mo.
or younger needed for Infant research
study. Up to $5.00 for participating.
Call: 392-2914; after 6; 372-1114.
(J-st-126-p)
Co-eds unwanted facial hair removed
forever cost is low fast world
famous kree method. Edmund Dwyer
Electrologist. 372-8039. 102 NW 2nd
St. (J-21t-124-p)
FREE One adorable 3 mo. old gray
kitten, litter trained, must move, will
provide litter box and food. Please
call 372-5891. (J-3t-127-p)

Monday. April 27,1970, The Florida Alligator,

ttxXtXrXxXw^
>x-x-x-:-x-x-XyX-x-x-x-x:wx>>x:-
Refunds for Sympathy for the
Devil" will be issued from the
Constans Theatre Box Office during
Its regular hours of operation (Noon
to 4:30 p.m.) Monday April 2Q
through Friday. April 24. NO
REFUNDS WILL BE ISSUED
after 4:30 p.m. on Friday, April
24. (J-5M24-P)
SPRING is the time when a young
man's fancy turns to LOVE. Two
young men desire liberal female
companions over 18, Contact JF. at
1642 W. Univ. Ave. (above Spanish
Main) PEACE. (J-st-124-p)
GIRLS Distinctive CUSTOM
MADE Personal Dress, WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Bikinis sl4, Phone 378-0320.
(ALTERATIONS TOO).
(J-10t-124-p)
Wanted: Two girls to accompany two
guys for weekend to Sunny Sands
Nudist Resort. Good fun, good sun,
good company. Sincere Applicants
only. Call Tom or Jim at 378-2294.
(J-2t-127-p)
Been 6 mo. since Oct. I miss your
sweet smile an unmeasurable lot and
wish you much success and happiness
In all you do. STILL Miss
HAPPINESS. (J-lt-127-p)
UNION AUDITORIUM
with George C. Scott
TONIGHT
7:00 & 9:30 Showirigs
Admission 50 cents
Sponsored by JWRU

. FLASH GORDON &
ROADRUNNER
every afternoon (M Th)
week
4:00 5:00 \
UNION AUD. 11 * kr J
£ n?
Admission 25 cents
Sponsored by JWRU
Mil WIN A BANQUET ABOARD M
ifflf A JAPANESE SHIP! 188
||H (In Jacksonville May 4th) fn|jp
SinW In 25 words or less, finish these statements: WEBB
HIR 1. | expect an auto dealer ... (say what fIUBI
you expect of him) XflH:
H| 2. I like the Datsun automatic sedan S9U
ilB because ... (or the Datsun automatic RH
! |E| wagon because ...)
P|B There will be two winners. Selection will be by Bill HH|
f.IH Deckel man. President Godding and Clark Motors, and
; by Roy Loveday, General Manager, based on what K|||h
|lm these judges consider helpful insight into consumer
limm Contest limited to students at the University of
MSB Florida. Names of winners will be published in this 9n|
mm Bring your entries to the showroom at 2nd Avenue
!§§§*! and 2nd Street S.E. and drop them into the box. |||j||||
mgm Contest doses April 30. Hh
H| GODDING 2ND AVE. AND^H|

Page 11

>XxXx:x:x:
gONA y.
If you didn't do anything In 1969 do
something in 1970. Confront the
Issue Join Circle K Meetings Wed.'
7:30 p.m. Reitz Union, Room 361.
(J-st-127-p)
PTL for God's Squadl Mika Joa
Bobby Lance Tommy Dave B. Hank
Hawk Buster Dave W. Terry and
Dwight Brothers, you are really on
the ball. BOBBIEJO. (J 2t-127-p)
LOST <& FOUND

LOSTI One bracelet with fraternity
crest. Sentimental value Desperate,
will pay REWARDI. Call Eileen
anytime 373-2742. (L-2t-126-p)
LOST: DIAMOND NECKLACE.
Diamond Is In sliver setting on a silver
chain. If found, PLEASE call
378-8795. REWARDI. (L-3t-127-p)
LOST: Boy's high school senior ring.
Littleton Colorado '6B Initials EMK.
Os much sentimental value. Please
call 392-7818. Reward. (L-3t-127-p)
FOUND ON CAMPUS: Exposed roll
of Kodak Trl-X 120 film. Call
378-4676. (L-3t-127-nc)
SERVICES
Horses to rent: Hay rides, parties,
cowboys, riding stables. Open seven
days a week. 372-8460. (M-st-124-p)
The Copy Center Xerox copies 1
to 10 copies of each origin*! 5 cents;
aver ten 4 cents. 1718 West Univ.
Now open next to Gold Coast
Restaurant. Free Collating. Try us
First for Quality 8> Service. Tel
376-9334. (M-17M14-p)
GATOR COURT
376-4667 jP 41705 W
y 13th St.
spend where the
the night... price is right'

SERVICES
Del-ray typing service: manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, tight steno, etc.
Prompt, pickup-delivery, 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-115-p)
Aitemetoi* Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
4 cent Xerox QUICK WAY Copy
Center, 3 machines no waiting. Free
collating. 100 copies 1 original 3
cents, 10 or more 4 cents, less than
10, 5 cents: Quikway Copy 1620 W.
University. Free Parking offset
printing thesis and dissertation
specialists. 376-2533. CM-llt-126-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480.
(M-ts-107-c)
Free inspections. Automotive electric
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Standard Service Station, 2109 S.W.
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several credit cards honored, phone
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Sill
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imm* 1
h. 4.. ; J



J

!, Th. Florida Alligator, Monday, April 27,1970

Page 12

Caroptig Crier s BYSTUDmT
DR. TODD TO SPEAK ON 'POLITICS OF EDUCATION
Dr. Eugene Todd, chairman of the department of secondary education and a candidate for the school board of Alachua
County, will speak to the Young Democrats, Monday, April 27th at 8 pm in room 361 of the JWRU. Dr. Todd's speach,
"The Politics of Education," will be concerned with political decisions' effects on education and education's effects on
politics. Dr. Todd will touch on topics such as the local effects of school integration.
HONOR COURT FORMS SPEAKERS BUREAU
The Honor Court Bar Association has formed a Speaker's Bureau. The purpose of the Bureau will be to furnish any
interested faculty or Student organization a qualified member of the Honor Court to talk about the Honor System, the
Honor Code, and the Honor Court. Any interested organizations should contact the Honor Court Office at 392-1631-2-3.
FLORIDA BLUE KEY APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE
Florida Blue Key men's honorary fraternity is now accepting applications for membership. Application forms may be
picked up at your Dean's office, the information Desk of the Reitz Union, or in the Florida Blue Key Office (312 JWRU).
The deadline for turning in applications is Monday, April 27.
STUDENT TUTORS AVAILABLE
Physical Science confusing you? German losing you? Whatever course bothers you, Sigma Tau Sigma, the Student Tutor
Society, can help. Applications for tutoring are available in the office for Student Development, room 128, Tigert Hall.
FLORIDA STUDENT CONGRESS NEEDS PERSONNEL
The Florida Student Congress, a statewide student government association, still needs office personnel and an
Administrative Assistant to the President. Apply at the Student Government Office, 305 J. Wayne Reitz Union.
MAYBE YOULL BE THE NEXT MISS FLORIDA
Applications for the coming Miss Florida contest are available at the Student Activities Desk, J. Wayne Reitz Union.
BULLETIN BOARD SPACE AVAILABLE
Bulletin Board space is available to any campus organization wishing to use it. Bring your material, 20 copies of each
sheet, to the Student Government office and you will get free publicity for your organization. No personal material will be
posted.
DYNAMITE WEEK AT THE UNION
The Union is celebrating its third birthday this week. Something different happening every day, through Friday:
Monday Splash Bash ... Bathing Suit Fashion Show and Beauty and the Beast Contest.
Tuesday- Flea Market in the Union Tent
Wednesday Dawning of the Aquarian Age with Barry Patch, eloquent prophet in Union Tent.
Thursday Rap ... Steven Butter Nationally noted Draft lawyer will shed some light on the draft.
Friday Compete ... What's your sport? yoyo, hula hoop, frisbee. Prizes.
| CONGRATULATIONS f VT
I TO OUR NEW | jMA
im :
I ( jfS
! EMPEROR I
4§
ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER MUST HAVE
THEIR INFORMATION IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICE BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, 5:00 OF EACH
WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT TO APPEAR IN MONDAYS CAMPUS CRIER. THANKS.
BOBBERRIN
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
STUDENT GOVERNMENT



The
Florida
Alligator

Mad Gator
Bites Dog
The Georgia Bulldogs invaded
Perry Field Friday and Saturday
and lost the war 3-0 and 10-0.
The wins put the Gators into a
tie with Tennessee for the lead
of the Eastern Division of the
Southeastern Conference. Both
teams are 9-2.
Wayne Rogers was the winning
pitcher Friday in a game that the
Gators won with three unearned
runs. Leon Bloodworth made a
key catch to end the game with
three Bulldogs left on base.
SATURDAYS GAME was
won by pitcher Glen Pickren
who whitewashed the Bulldogs
despite suffering from a virus
condition.
Freshman Nick DeVirgilis
exploded with a triple in the
third inning that moved Laurie
Seminoles Drop
Favored Netters
At Cape Coral
The Gator netters were
bridesmaids to FSU in the Cape
Coral Intercollegiate Tennis
Tournament Saturday.
Coach Bill Potters squad,
which won last year and were
favored again this year, found
themselves tied 16-16 with FSU
after Fridays play.
IN SATURDAYS deciding
play the Seminoles took the lead
for sure when Herb Rapp beat
Greg Hilley 64, 64 to take the
singles honors. Rapp then
teamed with John deZeeus to
beat Hilley and Ken Terry by
the same 64, 64 margin for the
doubles title.
The Gator netters gained only
one point Saturday when Hilley
and Terry defeated FSLPs Dave
Bristol and Eddie Procipio
earlier in the day.
THE GATORS scored 17
points finishing second to FSU
with 19. University of South
Florida was third with six points
and Jacksonville and Harding
College of Georgia tied with two
each.
The Gators next match is
Friday at Florida Atlantic
University in Boca Raton. The
next home match will be against
Columbus College May 4.
.. .giving
Gainesville twice
the service...
1802 W. UNIV.AVE.
H3OSJV. 13th ST.

GATOR SPORTS

BUM W %
Jlillllll
;
HBb mm
BBHPM ''
BACHELOR
... wins two
Vidal home for a score, which
started a string of hits that put
the Gators far out ahead for the
win.
The Gators play a
non-conference game today
against 13th ranked Miami at
Perry Field with Larry Sheffield
scheduled to pitch.


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FINISH HAND-IN-HAND
Grad Runners Lead World

UFs Olypmic standout Jack Bacheler and
recently acquired graduate-student-runner Frank
Shorter teamed up this weekend in a two-man
power show to put the Florida Track club on the
map.
Friday Bacheler won the three mile at the Drake
Relays in a record time of 13:13.4 with Shorter a
scant two seconds behind.
IN THE six-mile Saturday they teamed up to
crush some of the finest distance junners in the
country as they broke the tape hand in hand for the
finest two day double in the world this season.
Their three mile times also lead the world at this
point of the season.
It was really a great feeling, said Yale graduate
Shorter, there we were just blazing the pace and
runners dropping out right and left. Gerry Lindgren
looked over at me at one point and said jogger. He
must not have been serious because he dropped out
a few seconds later. Then Jack caught up to me in
the last straight and we held hands the last 100
yards.
Also at Drake was freshman Mark Bir running his
first marathon. For the first 15 miles the valiant
little mnner was in second place, but he couldnt

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Monday, April 27,1970, The Florida Alligator,

hold the pace and Finally finished the 26 mile ordeal
23rd.
MEANWHILE at the Penn Relays, another group
was busy collecting medals to bring back to
Gatorland.
In the distance Medley of Eamonn OKeefe, Jerry
Fannin, Frank Betts, and John Parker UF finished
fifth with a new school record.
Parker and Betts teamed with milers Steve
Atkinson and Roy Benjamin to place fifth in the
four mile relay with another school record of 17:02.
THE TWO MILE relay team, bolstered by Benny
Vaughns 1:513 and Eamonn OKeefes 1:50.8 ran
third to Villanova and Texas of El Paso. Bob Lang
and Jack Steward ran the first two legs in I:s4s.
Scott Hurley, still trying to break the 16 foot
barrier in the pole vault, placed fourth with 15 foot
six inches. The muscular athlete has gone 16-2 in
practice but has yet to make it in competition.
The thinclads run again Friday in a dual meet
with Florida State that promises to be a cliff-hanger.
FSU has beaten UF once already this season, but
the Gators evened the score in the Gulf Coast meet
a week ago by a scant 10 points.

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Page 13



I. Th Florida Alligator. Monday. April 27,1970

Page 14

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PHIL BANNISTER
LEAPIN' LIZARD
... sophomore Tim Good pounces on Schnebley (14) fumble

Defense Shines Aqain

By 808 THOMAS
Alligator Staff Writer
The Gator defenses looked stronger than ever
Saturday as they stopped the running and passing
attack of the offenses in the annual Lettermans
Day game at Florida Field.
In the first half the number one offense scored
twice against the second team defense, both on
John Reaves passes. The first was a 10-yard play to
Willie Jackson and the second was a 22-yarder to
Jim Yancey.
COACH DOUG Dickey matched the number one
offense against the number one defense in the
second half and the big 0 failed to score.
Meanwhile, John Schnebly led the second team
offense to two touchdowns and three field goals.
Richard Franco kicked all the field goals, one a
40-yarder, and four out of four extra points.
Sophomore Willie Jackson, who was moved from
running back to wide-out earlier in the spring, had a
good day and was praised by Dickey. Jackson made
a few catches that drew ahs from the 4,000 fans,
but the big sophomore missed a couple of close
ones, too.
Dickey attributed the weak passing exhibition to
injuries. Carlos Alvarez, who played in the
scrimmage last Saturday, is out again with a knee

Beard Bags Champions

RANCHO LA COSTA,
CALIF. (UPI) Frank Beard, a
skillful iron player and a sure
putter, won the $150,000
Tournament of Champions by
seven strokes Sunday when he
shot a final 71 for a 72-hole
total of 273,15 under par.
Billy Casper, playing in the
last twosome with Beard, sank a
birdie putt of about 15 feet on
the last green to tie for second
with defending champion Gary
Player and British Open
Champion Tony Jacklin at 280,
seven under.
BEARD, 30, pro golfs leading
money winner with $175,000
last year, took his first title of
1970 here. Up to this
tournament, which he also won
in 1967 at Las Vegas, Nev., he
11
Student Special
Any car or color!
I
I Joy's Paint & Body Shop
I 2017 N.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373-1665

had won only $23,000 so the
$30,000 first prize here was
more than his previous earnings
for the year by $7,000.
Despite a sometimes brisk
wind gusting up to 25 miles an
hour Beard never lost his cool
during the final round. He led at
the halfway mark by three
strokes and by two strokes over
Jacklin going into the last round.
His earlier rounds were
70-64-68.
Casper, the Masters Champion

rVAuimm
EXPERT SERVICE ]
INTERN
PORSCHE CARE AND PREPARATION
SpeedT Equipment JL_ Service on All
and Accessories / Foreign Makes
535 SW 4th Ave. 376-9381

infection, this time for the rest of the spring. With
Andy Cheney and Terry Ash both out for the spring
a lack of receivers has become a problem.
LEONARD GEORGE, who had been playing
wide receiver was moved to .running back and
picked up 87 yards in eight attempts for the second
team George scampered for 51 yards with a
pitch-out in the third period.
Sophomore Duane Doel, also playing on the
second team ran a total of 93 yards on eight carries
including a 67-yard touchdown run in the half.
Dickey called the run a great individual effort.
The defense was led to their moral victory by the
strong effort from linebackers Rich Bucanan, Fred
Abbott and Mike Kelley. Three interceptions, two
by Doug Sorenson and one by Jack Burns were the
deciding factor for the defense in the second half.
Offensive tackle Mike Fields was added to the list
of injured with a torn knee ligament. He underwent
surgery Saturday night. Garry Walker injured his
knee and offensive tackle Tom Condon hurt an
elbow. Eric Taggart, playing at offensive guard
sprained his knee and will be in a cast for several
weeks.
Tuesday begins the Gators last week of spring
practice which will be climaxed next Saturday with
the annual Orange and Blue game. The entire team
will be split, including the coaches, for the game and
Dickey will watch from the press box.

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CLAY PHIPPS
JACK BURNS
... intercepts Reaves

who has never won this one,
shot 71-69-68-72 for his 280
total. Jacklin had 69-68-67-76
280 and Player, who won last
year by two strokes over Lee
Trevino, had 68-72-69-71 280.
They each won $ 11,633.

I BASEBALL
Gators take on Miami at Perry Field, 3 p.m.

Ironwood
Golf Club
STUDENT MEMBERSHP
THREE MONTHS FOR $25 + TAX
SPECIAL RATE
WEEKDAYS $2 AU DAY
WEEKENDS $3 All DAY
For information call
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ENGINE OVERHAULS
RING AND VALVE JOBS
CLUTCH JOBS BRAKE WORK
CARBURETOR REBUILDING
1027 S. MAIN 378-4943



Bruins Top Hawks; Reichardt Traded To Nats

VETERAN WINGER John
McKenzie beat goalie Tony
Esposito with just under two
minutes remaining Sunday to
give the Boston Bruins a 54
victory and a shocking
four-game playoff sweep over
the Chicago Blade Hawks.
McKenzies goal touched off a
wild demonstration in crammed
Boston Garden as he scored for
the fourth time in the Eastern
playoff finals and put Boston
into the Stanley Cup showdown
with the winner of the St.
Louis-Pittsburgh series.
The Boston sweep victory
exactly reversed Chicagos
four-game elimination of Detroit
in the Stanley Cup playoff
preliminaries and gave the Bruins
revenge for finishing second to
the Hawks by a technical margin
during the regular season.
* *
BILLIE JEAN KING of Long

1
Major League Baseball

AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Baltimore 11 5 .688
Detroit 10 5 .667 Vi
Washington 7 8 .467 3Vi
Boston 7 8 .467 3Vi
New York 7 11 .389 5
Cleveland 5 9 .357 5
WEST W L PCT GB
Minnesota 10 4 .714
California 12 5 .706
Oakland 8 8 .500 3
Kansas City 6 10 .375 5
Chicago 610 .375 5
Milwaukee 5 11 .313 6
SUNDAYS RESULTS
Chicago 2, Cleveland 0
Baltimore 10, Kansas City 9
Minnesota 6, Detroit 0
California 3, Washington 2
New York 8, Oakland 3
Milwaukee 5, Boston 3
MONDAYS GAMES
Cleveland at Minnesota
Milwaukee at Washington, night
Oakland at Boston
(Only Games Scheduled)

1505 r N l 2310
N.W. 13th St. V A y S.W. 13th St.
GAINESVILLE GAINESVILLE
dm
ITALIAN CRUISE
SPAGHETTI NIGHT
990
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TONIGHT t WHY MONDAY 5-9 PM
: , '

Beach, Calif., broke every service
but one of defending champion
Julie Heldman of New York to
win her first Italian Tennis
Championship Sunday 6-1, 6-3,
then teamed with Rosemary
Casals of San Francisco to win
the womens doubles title.
The Mens singles final, which
was postponed until today will
pit Jan Kodes of Czechoslovakia
against Hie Nastase of Romania
in a match for the $3,500 top
prize money and the first Italian
mens title an East European has
ever won.
Mrs. King, who said she would
not play again in Rome unless
more money was offered, won
S6OO for the womens singles
championship.
*
THE CALIFORNIA ANGELS
traded their one-time bonus boy
outfielder Rick Reichardt and
infielder Aurelio Rodriquez to

NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 11 3 .786
St. Louis 9 5 .643 2
Pittsburgh 10 6 .625 2
New York 8 8 .500 4
Philadelphia 8 8 .500 4
Montreal 3 11 .214 8
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 14 6 .700
Los Angeles 8 8 .500 4
San Francisco 910 .474 4 Vi
Houston 7 12 .368 6 Vi
San Diego 612 .333 7
SUNDAYS RESULTS
Chicago 6, Houston 3
New York 3, Los Angeles 1
Philadelphia 3, San Diego 2
San Francisco 11, Montreal 1 (Ist)
Montreal 3, San Francisco 2 (2nd)
Atlanta 2, Pittsburgh 0
St. Louis s,Cincinnati 1
(Only Games Scheduled)
MONDAYS GAMES
Chicago at Pittsburgh
Philadelphia at Los Angeles
Montreal at San Diego

i n shorts siiorts

the Washington Senators Sunday
for third baseman Ken
McMullen.
The trade was announced in a
joint news conference in
Washington by the two club
managers, Lefty Phillips of the
Angels and Ted Williams of the
Senators immediately after
California Washington 3-2.
* *
JERRY WEST, having the
best season of his 10-year career
with the Los Angeles Lakers,
was the only unanimous choice
Friday to the 1969-70 National
Basketball Association All-Star
team.
Two New York
Knickerbockers center Willis
Reed, who was named the
leagues most valuable player,
and guard Walt Frazier also
made the team along with Billy
Cunningham of the Philadelphia
76ers and Connie Hawkins of
the Phoenix Suns.
The second team of the
All-Star squad, which was
chosen by a panel of
sportswriters and broadcasters in
the 14 NBA cities, included
Bostons John Havlicek, Gus
Johnson of Baltimore, Lew
Alcindor of Milwaukee, Lou
Hudson of Atlanta and
Cincinnatis Oscar Robertson,
who has since been traded to
Milwaukee.
* *
CHRIS AMON of New
Zealand drove his Works March
701 to overall victory in the
International Trophy Race for
formula one cars Sunday at
Silverstone, England.
Jackie Stewart, Who won the
second 26-lap heat of the

2QOI NW 13th Street 378-5301

1969 CADILLAC ELDORADO $5895
Full power, air conditioned, beautiful silver finish with
dark blue Interior. Front wheel drive. Sold and
serviced by Brasington.
1969 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD $5495
White with leather Interior, air conditioned, tilt &
teioscoplc steering wheel, power door locks, twilight
sentinel lights, local owner.
1968 CADILLAC $4295
Sedan de villa. Four door hardtop. Cameo Beige with
matching vinyl top. Leather interior. Loaded with
accessories including autronlc eye, twilight sentinel, air
conditioning, tilt-telescopic steering wheel.
1968 BUICK SKYLARK $2095
4 dr. Sedan, radio & heater, automatic transmission,
power steering and brakes, air conditioned.
1966 BUICK RIVIERA $2295
Turquoise with matching Interior, air conditioned, full
power, very attractive.
1968 FORD LTD $2195
Four door hardtop, air conditioned, low mileage.
Black vinyl over gold.

^n^ipigmw
I OTHER FINE LATE MODEL USED CAR BUYSI gpPCMIJ I
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two-heat race, finished second
overall in a similar March
entered by Ken Tyrrell.
* *
ALLSTAR FORWARD Billy
Cunningham is on the verge of
signing a one-year contract to
remain with the Philadelphia
76ers next year, owner Irv
Kosloff said Friday night.
The signing would end
speculation Cunningham might
play for the Carolina Cougars of
the American Basketball
Association one year ahead of
schedule. Cunningham has
signed a three-year contract with
the Cougars beginning with the
1971-72 season.
*
THE CLEVELAND
CAVALIERS, one of three
expansion teams to begin play in
the National Basketball
Association next season, Friday
announced the signing of their
second draft choice, 6-foot-8
Dave Sorenson of Ohio State.
Sorenson led the Buckeyes in
scoring the past two seasons and
was twice an All-Big-Ten
performer.
THE NATIONAL
BASKETBALL Association has
approved a realignment plan,
dividing the leagues 17 teams
into four divisions for the
1970-71 season.
The teams will be divided as
follows: Atlantic Boston,
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SASO |
INC LABOR
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
USE YOUR MASTER CHARGE
OR BANKAMERICARD.
Mon.Frl. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm

Monday, April 27,1970, Tho Florida AMpator,

1967 OLDSMOBILE $2495
Toronado. Blue with matching blue Interior. Air
conditioned. Full power. Front wheel drive.
1967 FORD $2195
Thunderblrd. Air conditioned, full power. Black vinyl
top over yellow.
1968 OPEL $1395
Station wagon, with air conditioning, 4 speed, beige.
1964 CHEVROLET $895
Impala station wagon V-8, automatic transmission, air,
PS & PB. New rebuilt engine.
1966 OLDSMOBILE 98 $1695
Two door hardtop coupe. Black vinyl over white. Air
conditioned. Full power. NICEI
1966 CHEVROLET $1495
Two door hardtop. VB, Automatic transmission, air
conditioned, posl-tractlon rear end. Ntee red and
READY!
1968 CADILLAC $4895
Eldorado. White with black vinyl roof, leather interior,
air conditioned, AM, FM radio, front wheal drive.

Buffalo, New York and
Philadelphia; Central Atlanta,
Baltimore, Cincinnati and
Cleveland; Midwest Chicago,
Detroit, Milwaukee and Phoenix;
Pacific Los Angeles, Portland,
San Diego, San Francisco and
Seattle.
* *
THE WORLD CHAMPION
New York Mets will pay respect
to the man who led them
through their comical and
difficult years when they honor
Casey Stengel at the teams
annual Oldtimers Game July
11th.
Stengel, who will celebrate his
80th birthday on July 30, will
have a star-studded supporting
cast at the three-inning contest,
that will proceed the regular
game between the Montreal
Expos and the Mets.
Rube Marquard, Frank Frisch,
Dave Bancroft, George High
Pockets Kelly, A1 Lopez, Tony
Cuccinello and Van Mungo have
all been extended invitations to
join the Ole Professor.
Others who have been invited
include: Roy Campanella, Carl
Erskine, Eddie Stanley, Robby
Thompson, Carl Furillo, Don
Drysdale, Sandy Koufax, Gil
Hodges, Richie Ashburn, A1
Jackson, Jay Hook and Frank
Thomas.
Hall of Famers Lou Boudreau,
Earl Combs, Jess Haines and
Ford Frick are also expected to
be in attendance.

Page 15



i, Th# Florida Alligator, Monday, April 27,1970

Page 16

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