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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
'RdUI

AM A*wwm

V'ol. 62, No. 125

HONOR COURT DECISION POSSIBLE
Election Validity In Doubt

The Rat-
Questioning
And Smoke
The Rathskeller at 10 pjm.
An air of questioning hangs as
thick as the pall of smoke under
the massive beams of the german
beer house.
THE CROWD of over 100
contains the full spectrum of
students the political
candidate, the campaign
manager, the political protege,
the hanger-on, the student lured
by the excitement, and the
Murphree freshman lured by the
free popcorn.
It has been four hours since
the closing of the polls, and not
a single figure has flashed across
the projection screen.
Somewhere, poll workers count
ballots, and somewhere, a
candidate reaches for'the one
beer too many which will dull
his senses, win or lose.
The crowd feels the air of
uncertainty, and with each
passing minute squints in the
direction of the rats stage to
catch a glimpse of the figures
seated before the microphones.
ABOVE THE din, and yet not
quite audible to the people at
the tables two, three, and
sometimes four figures discuss
the state of the elections.
Somewhere an expensive
camera becomes a collection of
expensive glass fragments as a
photographer too hastily sets up
his equipment.
And then a hush falls over the
room.
THE PROJECTION screen,
silent and dark until now
appears as the sun, and then, a
first set of meaningful figures.
Somewhere in the massive hall
a candidate smiles, and
somewhere, one frowns in
disbelief. Within moments, new
figures correct the old ones.
And somewhere, a candidate
buries his face in his hands, so
noone will see the tears.
EARTH DAY and SG
election day activities
made April 2 2 a
picturesque day ... pages 2,3
. Jf '_ ;
Editorids
Entertainment 19
Letters 9
Sports... 22
WhatS Happening 4

The
f
Florida Alligator

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STEVE UHLFELDER TOM KENNEDY
... received majority votes

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Nixon Endorses Carswell

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen. Edward Gurney,
R-Fla., Wednesday said President Nixons political
adviser Harry Dent and Republican Chairman
Rogers C. B. Morton concurred in Judge G. Harrold
Carswells Senate race.
Gurney, sponsor of Carswells aborted Supreme
Court nomination, said Dent and Morton agreed a
Carswell race would be a good chance to avert a
badly split Republican party in Florida.
GURNEY CALLED Carswell dream candidate
and publicly called on Rep. William C. Cramer,
R-Fla., an announced candidate, to withdraw from
the race.
Cramer announced Tuesday he will not withdraw.
Gurney said Dent agreed in two telephone
conversations with Florida GOP leaders that the
Carswell candidacy would be an ideal solution to
a divisive situation in Florida.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

CRAMER AND Lt. Gov. Ray C. Osborne, backed
by Florida Republican Gov. Claude Kirk, were
locked in a neck and neck race that might lead to a
General Election loss for the party, Gurney said.
Osborne withdrew in favor of Carswell but Cramer
has refused.
Gurney made no attempt to reconcile his version
of the Dent calls with White House denials that it
had anything to do with Carswells candidacy.
Asked at a news conference if Dent and Morton
knew Cramer had refused to withdraw at the time
they approved of the Carswell race, Gurney said he
did not know.
Gurney also said he knew of no assurances given
Carswell that Cramer would withdraw before
Carswell decided to resign his $42,500 a year federal
judgeship and enter politics.

Thursday, April 23, 1970

Unofficial Final
Howes 2172
Bailey 217
Flash 568
Kramer 1478
Uhlfelder 3160
By RICK ROSKOWE
Alligator Staff Writer
Pending possible complaints
to the Honor Court,
Wednesdays Student
Government elections may be
invalidated due to voting
machine irregularities.
At 10:30 p.m., all five
presidential candidates voiced
unofficial willingness to hold the
election again. At that time,
Focus party candidates Steve
Uhlfelder and Henry Solares led
unofficially with 1,031 votes.
Do-It party candidates Alan
Howes and Don Tucker followed
with 672 votes. Student
Freedom party candidates Andy
Kramer and Joe Magyer
followed with 580 votes.
INDEPENDENT
CANDIDATES Flash Matte and
Jimmey Bailey had 325 and 123
votes, respectively.
When the Alligator went to
press, eight of twenty precincts
had reported their returns to
voting headquarters.
The night was filled with
accusations that the election
should be invalidated because of
alleged election rule violations.
BEFORE ANY returns came
in at the election headquarters
Howes objected to the votes
being counted in a back room.
The first official precinct
reports came at 10:10 pjn.
Howes, 6ED, said a
Shepherd-Uhlfelder coalition
should not be allowed to play
with the votes. He named file
coalition as being made up of
Student Body President Walter
Morgan, SG Secretary of the
Interior Kevin Davey, former SG
secretary of the interior Bill
Modlin, and Louis Kalivoda,
director of SG elections.
Kramer said, I would like to
see all the candidates work
together to bring about a new
election.
Kramer listed what he termed
several Honor Court election
violations. He said some
machines were opened during
the elections, some were not
working, levers were not lined
up with candidates* names,
levers were not locked when
they should have been and he
objected that no voting
instructions were in each voting
machine.
Mrs. Alma Bethea, Alachua
County supervisor of elections,
said People who are not expert
in the field of elections were
(SEE *MRS. f PAGE 2)



Page 2

!. THa Florida Alligator. Thursday AnrU 23. 1970

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BUT I'M NOT 211
She voted anyway in SG elections Wednesday. All students had to
show picture ID and fee card to vote.

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WITH A LITTLE HELP ...
Election officials assisted in voting by checking student IDs and watching the polls.
Photos By Tom Konnody

T *"IE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and Is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when it's published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville. Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida AHigator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

Voters Find Polls Awry

Several irregularities were
reported in voting machines for
the SG presidential election
yesterday.
Hume Hall residents found
the voting machines there would
not register a split vote. Students
wanting to register a split vote
were told to vote in another
area.
ROY SHOAFF, an election
official at Hume Hall, said
students had trouble voting
because there were only five
lines of names, but six levers on
the machines. He said some
votes may not have registered
because of this discrepency.
4
Several other machines were
reported out of order but were
repaired within 15 minutes. One
machine in Murphree Area,
however, was out of order for
five hours.
All 16 University College
machines had to be
re-programmed for split voting.
Kevin Davey, manager of SG
elections, said his office
discovered the county officials
error 8:30 Wednesday morning.
He reported machines were
repaired by 1:30 that afternoon.
BEFORE RETURNS had
been counted Wednesday

toytime
Toys Hobbies
Juvenile Furniture
A complete line of swim
goods and playground
equipment.
1315 N.W. 16th Ave.
376-4576 Phone 376-4577

evening, SG presidential
candidate Andy Kramer said,
The students arent getting a
fair shake because of voting
machine irregularities.
He said he would file a report
to the Honor Court petitioning

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Students closed the curtains at the booths and cast a vote for their
candidate.
Mrs. Bethea
Denies Fault

running these elections. I did my
part.
IM UTTERLY amazed at
some of the statements proving
that students who dont know
what theyre talking about dont
like to listen to someone who
does.
Betheas job was to set up the
ballot on the voting machines.
Kalivoda said the reason the
ballots were incorrectly set up
was Mrs. Betheas fault.

CHERRYS DRESS SHOP
features junior and petite sizes
FROM THESE FAMOUS NAME BRANDS
SALE PRICES 20% OFF
pet,tes juniors
COUNTD v ,E PPE MINX MODES
110n N TREF PET,TES MARIE PHILLIPS
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downtown
GAINESVILLE
7 WEST UNIVERSITY MALL

election invalidation because of
machine incongruencies.
Davey said violations reported
to his office would also be
turned in to the Honor Court.
He said parties have 48 hours to
file a protest.

BAILEY SAID, I think that
a lot of the accusations are going
to be substantiated, referring to
the suggested election violations.
He said the election would
probably be thrown out,
adding that it should be thrown
out.
Morgan explained the Student
Body Constitutions statement
on election procedures. He said
the only body who can
invalidate the election is a jury
of Honor Court justices. Any
candidate has two days within
which to contest the election.



Teach-In Successful,
But Problems Remain

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
The Environmental Teach-In
ended Wednesday with a rally on
the Plaza of the Americas at
3:30 pjn., with a smattering of
loose papers and cans Mid with
scattered groups of students
taking advantage of the sun and
Frisbees.
Around polling booths at the
Graduate Library were tables
and people from various
Gainesville and UF groups. They
sponsored petitions ranging from
the worth of zero population to
the benefits of bike riding.
OUR MAlN.purpose of the
teach-in was accomplished, said
Brad Raffle, information
chairman of the Environmental
Action Group (EAG). What we
wanted to do was stir up interest
in people and put this interest to
work.
Raffle felt a main purpose was
successful through the many
classes that participated in
environmental discussions.
We want to make this
teach-in a springboard for action
action that the students and
concerned citizens will continue
to support and be involved in,
Raffle said.
EAG Seeks
Pledges For
1000 Letters
By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Write*
Pledges to become actively
involved in environmental
problems are being sought by
the Young Democrats in
coordination with
Environmental Action Group
(EAG).
We want to form a
committee of 1,000 to write
letters to specific people on
specific environmental
problems, said Hal Barcey, who
designed the environmental
balance button.
I PLEDGE to write one
letter a week, each week, for one
year to a public official or
businessman concerning a
current population or
environmental issue, the pledge
reads.
It will cost 25 cents per
pledge. Each member of the
committee will receive an
exclusive button saying, A
common goal for this
millenium.
Young Democrats will have
booths set up on campus for the
next two weeks to distribute
pledge cards. The cards are also
available from Barcey,
392-8839, or Kathy Theele,
392-9088.
INFORMATION will be
published weekly through the
Alligator telling students persons
to write and the topic of
concern for that week. Reasons
will be given for the emphasis.
The first assignment was
concerned with using the
environmental balance symbol
on the eight-cent postage
stamp, Barcey said.
This is away that students
can get involved. The silent
majority are subjected to the
decisions of the vocal majority,
he said.

FOLLOWING THE teach-in
will be letter-writing campaigns
and petitions to keep the issue
before the public.
Raffle said the large
conservation groups in Florida
have already proposed 55 bills
for the next legislative meeting.
UFs teach-in was as big a
success as we could expect. But
its now April 23, and what are
the people going to do about
environment problems now?
Raffle asked.
Accent V 0
Essay Winners
Winners of the Accent 7O
essay contest were announced
Wednesday afternoon.
They are Muriel Launa Keith,
lUC, and Linda Miklowitz, 3AS.
They will receive S4O each at the
present, but this is subject to
change according to Joe Baron,
Accent 7O chairman of the
essay contest.
ESSAYS were on topics
concerning Tomorrow in
Perspective.

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Complex To Cure City Ills

Walt Disney Productions is joining in the
effort to improve urban environments, building a
prototype community at Disney World.
Disney World, south of Orlando, is a complex
designed not only as a place to play, but as a
place to live and work.
PRIOR TO his death, Walt Disney expressed
concern over the condition of our cities and the
need to reclaim our environment.
I dont believe theres a challenge anywhere
thats more important than finding solutions to
the problem of our cities. But where do we
begin?
Were convinced we must start with the
public need, Disney continued, and the need is
not just for curing the old ills of old cities.
WE THINK the need is for starting from
scratch on virgin land and building a community
that will become a prototype for the future.
Anticipation of a new life style for cities is the
driving force behind plans for the Experimental
Prototype Community of Tommorrow (EPCOT)
planned at Disney World, according to Disney
officials.
IT IS DESIGNED to be a total environment of
the future and is dedicated to showing how many
of the problems of our cities can be solved
through proper master planning.
Designed for an initial population of 20,000, it
is faced with the task of depicting urban life 24
years from now.

'COMMUNITY OF TOMORROW

Thursday/April 23,19*0/The Florida Alligator,

EPCOT will never be completed. It will always
be introducing, testing and demonstrating new
ideas and new technologies, Disney officials said.
AT EPCOT, the commercial area and its
central hotel will be the hub of the
community. Surrounding this downtown center
will be the citys four primary spheres of activity.
These activity spheres include high density
apartments, a wide green belt including schools,
churches and recreational areas; low-density
residential areas; and, far away from the
residential community, an industrial complex.
The commercial and international shopping
area, 50 acres of city streets and buildings in the
core area, will be enclosed completely for climate
control protecting the pedestrian from rain,
heat, cold or humidity, day or night.
THE CONGESTION we now associate with
cities will be absent from EPCOT, according to
current plans.
Signal lights will not be used, so there should
be a constant flow of traffic. Transportation will
be channeled into nonconflicting traffic flows.
Vehicles will use different levels of a multilevel
roadway.
A monorail and electric cars, called people
movers, will be used for short distances.
These plans will result in Disneys goal of
EPCOT as the first accident-free, noise-free and
pollution-free city in America, officials say.

Page 3



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 23, 1970

Page 4

For The Love Os Life

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PHIL BANNISTER

WHAT'S
UAPPFNINf.
nMrr he Wm hi nil ii
BIG TALK: Dialogue presents William Rion, director of the
Reitz Union, and John Englehardt, president of the Union tonight at
11:05 on WRUF. Presented by FBK.
BOOK WORMS: Dr. John Andes reviews The Peter Principle
tonight in room 122 of the Union at 7:30.
BLOW YOUR WOOD: The Florida Woodwind Quintet will be at
the University Auditorium at 8:12 pjn.
STRONG CELLS: Dr. Daniel Mazia will speak today at 8 pjn. in
the Medical School Auditorium of the Shands Teaching Hospital. The
topic is Proteins in Cell Structure.
BIG VETS: There is a meeting tonight at 7:30 for the
pre-veterinarian students in room 118 of the Union. Members of
Omega Tau Sigma from Auburn will speak.
CRICKET TO YOU: The UF Cricket Club will have a practice
match on Sunday May 3 in preparation for the two-day tour against
the Commonwealth Wanderers (May 16 and 17).
In order to play in this practice match all players and interested
persons should attend practice this Saturday in the ROTC drill field.
For more info call 372-2224 or 392-8186.
ODDS AND ENDS: The Comer Drug Store needs furniture.
Anything that can be spared, the Drug Store can use. Bring furniture
to 1823 NW 2nd Ave.
>nu t* H
| Level ( Wnfetenee
THE
PETER
principle
Rivliwad by
I Dr. John Andes
I Ant. Professor of Sduestion
I'V I Thursdsy, April S 3 ( 7I 30 p.m.
K I Lounges ISS ft IS3 Rslta Union
Free
Sponsored by J.W.R.U.

EARTH DAY

Take a look if you can see through the
pollution. Displays on the plaza for Earth
Day pointed at people guilty of first degree
pollution. One display was a booth showing
a rare breed of animal that persists in
contaminating his surroundings. A visitor at
the display who observes the creature sees
the image of himself in a mirror. The
message of the world on a string suggests
that if we dont start cleaning up our planet,
we might as well can it.

Senate Votes For Temporary
Opening Os Wauburg Facilities

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
In a drawn-out election eve meeting, the Student
Senate Tuesday night voted to reopen temporarily
the north side of Lake Wauburg with a minimum of
facilities.
The senate also okayed an audit of Rathskeller
finances and heard a proposal for funding the
campus buses by charging only those students who
ride them.
THE DECISION to reopen the north side of
Wauburg will cost about S4OO, said Robert Benin, a
member of the Budget and Finance Committee. It
will consist of preparing the grounds and providing
portable sanitary facilities, swimming safety
equipment and two canoes.
A lifeguard will be hired, but his salary and other
maintenance costs, about $4,000 a month, will be
paid by money already allocated in the activities
fee.
The plan does not include facilities for changing
clothes, taking showers or other activities.

Modern, Minstrels
Or Easy Riders,
Brewer & Shipley
Put it Together
AT THE Rat
ALSO: Country Mood Music Featuring DUCKBUTTER
Friday&Saturday 8:30&11:00pm
$1.50 per person
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PHIL BANNISTER

SAM POOLE, senate minority leader, tried to
amend the bill to open the south side of the lake,
saying it was foolish to put money into something
that would not be used when the south side is
finally opened.
University Business Manager Tom Wells gave the
senate the recommendations of the Parking and
Transportation Committee on funding the campus
buses next year. The plan calls for charging students
$4 for a six-month bus pass. Students who
purchased parking decals would receive a bus pass
free for as long as the decal lasted.
THESE COSTS include printing the passes,
bookkeeping, hiring personnel to handle
distribution, and other administrative affairs.
Wells said the price of $4 for six months means it
would cost each student about four cents a day to
ride the bus as often as he wished. It would also
mean the bus routes could be expanded and
improved, and larger buses leased to handle more
students during rush hours.



Country Unites Behind 'Earth Day

By United Press International
Hundreds of thousands of Americans took part
Wednesday in demonstrations for a cause affecting the
lives of every one of them keeping the earth livable.
It was Earth Day, an occasion for Americans of all
shades of belief to unite in a determination to stop the
spreading pollution of the earth, waters and atmosphere
which, some scientists have warned, threatens the very
existence of life on this planet.
CONGRESS WAS closed down while senators and
representatives spread across the country to address mass
rallies.
Thousands of colleges, universities and high schools
took an active part, with the gas-burning automobile a
major target of attack on many campuses.
Students blocked the four main gates of Syracuse
University and manned barricades at lowa State
University to keep cars out.
NEW YORK LED the nations cities in demonstrating
mounting concern over the threat of pollution. The citys
Union Square was made spotless by about 300 persons,
aged 8 to 80, who showed up at dawn.
Then an estimated 250,000 persons converged on the
square to listen to speeches, watch a stage show, and stroll
on nearby 14th Street, which was closed to traffic.

Swift Scoring
NEW YORK (UPI) On
March 19, 1938, Torontos
Maple Leafs scored five goals
and New Yorks Americans
scored three goals in a span of
four minutes 52 seconds in the
third period. The Leafs won the
National Hockey League game,
8-5.
n
3 Dialogue \
CONTEMPORARY
CONTROVERSIAL
CONSTRUCTIVE
OPEN PHONE FORUM
WRUF-AM
1105 P- m.
Tues. and Thurs.
IS
FLORIDA BLUE KEY
WRUF-AM
PRESENTATION

HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS MARCH

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Black is beautiful.
Red is beautiful.
White is beautiful.
Yellow is beautiful.
l eop,ebu ,dd^ /
o Tha Equitable Ufa Assurance Society o the United States. New York. N.Y. 1970 An Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F THE EQUITABLE
For a free 18" x 24" poster of this advertisement, write: The Equitable, Dept. C, G.P.O. Box 1170, New York, N.Y. 10001

GAS MASKS WERE sold out in Omaha, Neb., because
students throughout the city chose to observe the day by
wearing them.
High school students around Cape Girardeau, Mo., and
other communities went on litter-collecting expeditions
along the highways.
THERE WAS a dead orange parade in Miami, a
survival march in California, a festival of death in
Boston, and, at Southeast Missouri State University, a
mock funeral to symbolically bury the earth under a pile
of trash.
The inspiration for Earth Day came originally from
Sen. Gaylord Nelson, D-Wis., a longtime battler for
conservation, Rep. Paul N. McCloskey, Jr., R-Calif., and
the student-oriented, Washington-based Environmental
Teachin Inc.
BY THE TIME THE day arrived, these sources were
almost forgotten as Earth Day received warm
endorsements from President Nixon on down.
Although the President took no personal role in the
observances, the White House sent word that he feels the
activities show the concern of people of all walks of life
over the dangers to our environment.
Nixon seemed almost the only public figure in the
country not making a speech.
THE AIR OVER the cities was thick with oratory,
McCloskey said, Everyone Ive talked to is making a

Thursday, April 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

speech somewhere.
The appeal of Earth Day was such that even
representatives of firms accused of being major polluters,
such as Chicagos Commonwealth Edison Co., took an
enthusiastic part in the teach-ins and rallies.
BUSINESSES across the country have seized the
occasion to announce anti-pollution programs, such as a
$36 million Scott Paper Co. project and pledges by the
Texas Gulf Sulphur Co. and Sun Oil Co. to embark on
expensive research developments.
States joined in. The Michigan House overwhelmingly
approved a bill to give private citizens the right to take
legal action against polluters.
NEW YORK GOV. Nelson A. Rockefeller signed into
law a new Department of Environmental Conservation
and dedicated a bicycle rack under the capitol steps in the
bargain.
There were some participants who were less than
enthusiastic about the vent. For example, Michael Grosso,
executive vice president of the Fifth Avenue Association
in New York, went along with the idea by closing the
street for two hours, but said all this circus type activity
will accomplish nothing.
And in Earth, Tex., Earth Day was a any other
day. It just slipped up on us, Chamber of Commerce
President Terry Martin said. We just failed to do
anything special about it.

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 23,1970

Page 6

I South Viets Hit
i Hard At NVA
a*
jj SAIGON (UPI) South Vietnamese troops have wiped out
jj the equivalent of a North Vietnamese army battalion and
jij captured enough supplies to equip two more battalions in five
jij strikes across the border into Cambodia, military sources said
jij Wednesday.
K The sources said at least 671 Communists were killed and 75
| captured since April 13 in thrusts into Communist sanctuaries in
jjj the Parrot's Beak area, 55 miles west of Saigon and the rich
delta riceland southwest of the beak,
ij: IN OTHER WAR action reported Wednesday, Communist
ij: anti-aircraft shot down four U. S. helicopters in South Vietnam
jjj and four warplanes over Laos, heaviest one day toll of the war.
jjj One American airman was reported killed, four wounded and
jij three others missing.
jij 852 BOMBERS also had their busiest day in 10 days,
jij dropping 30-ton loads in 10 air strikes that loosed at least 900
jjj tons of bombs on Communist base camps, bunkers, storage and
ij: staging areas.
ij: The South Vietnamese forays smashed Communist base
ij: camps, supply depots, staging areas and arms plants inside
iji Cambodia, the sources said.
jji THEY SAID the raiders had captured an arms plant, 264
jj barracks and storage buildings, 1,242 weapons and 82 tons of
jij rice. In addition 1,000 gallons of kerosene were destroyed the
£: sources said.
:j South Vietnamese Rangers and armored cavalarymen on
j Tuesday killed 45 Communists and captured one in the second
J day of an operation inside Cambodia opposite Tuyen Binh in
: the beak area.
j: Another 32 Communists were killed in the sweep by the
ji Saigon 6th Armored Cavalry Regiment across the border at
j; Hong Ngu.
| TO THE NORTH, along the Laotian border, two battalions
j: of South Vietnamese infantrymen, backed by artillery and air
[j strikes, killed 40 Communists in a pair of clashes Tuesday night
§ just north of the besieged Dak Sang Special Forces camp,
ij Cambodian army troops surrounded and pressed to within
ij 150 yards of this strategic Bassac River city Wednesday but
| were unable to dislodge a force of Vietnamese Communists
£j holding it against artillery, aerial and ground assaults,
jj BRIG. GEN. SUSTHENE Fernandez, field commander of the
ji 4,000-man Cambodian army force in the region, said at least 50
ji of his troops had been killed or wounded in the three-day-old
ij battle to recapture Saang, 20 miles southeast of the capital of
ij Phnom Penh.
jj Despite the fact that the town was surrounded, Communist
jj snipers got within range of Fernandez' command post one mile
ij from Saang Wednesday and fired on it.
ij The general, his aides and news correspondents were forced
ij: to take cover when the sniper fire began.
:j: There were no casualties.
FERNANDEZ' STAFF estimated that the Vietnamese
:jj Communist strength in Saang was about 100 men.
jj Cambodian air force T2B and MIGI7 planes strafed and
jj rocketed Saang Wednesday afternoon following a morning-long
jj bombardment of the town by 105 mm howitzers, mortars and
ij recoilless rifle fire.
ij Despite the bombardment that left a heavy cloud of black
ij smoke over the town, the Communists holding it held back
jj Cambodian troops with heavy small arms and machine gun fire.
VIETNAMESE COMMUNISTS captured Saang Sunday
j: afternoon, their furthest penetration westward into Cambodia
j; from the border area near South Vietnam they have long used as
: sanctuary from the war in Vietnam.

Prolific Pair
One pair of robins could leave
3 million descendants in 16
years.
NOW
OPENING
for
Sept. Occupancy
LEASE OFFICE
309 NW 13th St.
Across from
Tlgert Hall
.tllC;
place)

CENTER of MAN
invites you to hear
Dr. Fred King
speaking about
THE BRAIN
AND BEHAVIOR
8:00 pm
April 23
Presbyterian Student Center
preceded by music & poetry

LARGEST EVER HELP

Soviet Navy Maneuvers

LONDON (UPI) Nearly 200
Soviet ships and submarines
were spread around the world
Wednesday in an unprecedented
naval exercise timed to coincide
with the 100th anniversary of
Lenins birth, U. S. and NATO
sources said.
The sources said the
operation, dubbed Ocean by
Moscow, was 10 times bigger
than anything of this nature the
Soviets have ever done before.
A U. S. NAVY source in
London said the Russian vessels,
which included the aircraft
carrier Moskva in the
Mediterranean and the
helicopter carrier Leningrad off
the coast of Scotland, were
being tracked around the clock.
The sources said the global
Russian fleet included 95 to 100
ships and submarines in the
Atlantic, 45 to 50 in the
Mediterranean, 15 in the Indian
Ocean off the east coast of
Africa and 20 to 25 in the
Pacific, around the Philippines
Sea.
THEY ALSO said Operation
Ocean was supported by
Russian aircraft. At least one
flight of four-engine TU9S
Scott Paper
Promises End
Os Pollution
LOS ANGELES (UPI)
Scott Paper Co. says it will
spend an estimated SBS million
in the next eight years to curb
air and water pollution from its
mills.
Harrison F. Dunning,
president of the company, told
the annual meeting of
stockholders Tuesday that the
company plans to spend $36
million on an antipollution
project at its mill in Everett,
Wash.
Another $lB million to S2O
million will be spent for a similar
purpose at its mill in Winslow,
Maine.
Similar pollution abatement
programs will be carried out at
Scott paper mills in Georgia,
Pennsylvania, Michigan, New
York and Alabama.

Bear aircraft was tracked on a
nonstop flight from northern
Russia to Cuba last week and a
return nonstop via the same
route earlier this week.
American and NATO sources
said they expected the Russian
fleet to remain on station at
least throughout May partly
to help observe Wednesdays
100th anniversary of the birth of
Vladimir I. Lenin, and partly as

Kirk Names Osborne
As His Running Mate
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Gov. Claude Kirk tapped Lt. Gov. Ray
Osborne as his running-mate Wednesday and predicted that Senatorial
candidate G. Harrold Carswell will be a rallying point for
conservatives across the country in the 1970 elections.
It will be a battle of the ultra-liberal against the conservative and
the battleground will be here in the eighth largest state of the nation,
the Republican governor declared.
KIRK DODGED a direct reply to the question of whether Carswell,
whose nomination to the Supreme Court was recently rejected by the
U. S. Senate, had a presidential go-ahead for the Senate race.
But, Kirk said, Its obvious he would not step into something
offensive to the man who had nominated him for this high position.
OSBORNE HAD stepped out of the Senate race to let Carswell run.
Flanked by Osborne, Kirk said its like Christmas in April and
called Osborne my leader of all men. He said he wasnt going to let
unfriendly newsmen make him angry.
As reporters flooded him with questions about Carswell, who
dropped from sight after announcing his surprise decision to run for a
seat in the body that rejected him as a judge, Kirk grinned and said:
Erik, his 13-day-old son, slept all through the night because he
knew Judge Carswell was going to be a U. S. Senator.

I CHRIST
IN THE
concrete
r mf erv^ e< Baptist Student Center
Thursday, April 23 7:00 p.m.
I I o s u i';j,T:oX k,hopruns
1 We>ll be around all quarter
I M arier. We ll see you get yours.


a training exercise.
The Soviet vessels were
reported to include, in addition
to the carriers, six cruisers, four
of them armed with missiles; 20
destroyer-type vessels, eight of
them missile carriers; and 25
submarines, 10 of them nuclear
powered and more than one
carrying submarine launched
ballistic missiles similar to
Americas Polaris.



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Thursday, April 23,1970, Tlw Florida Alligator, J

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 23, 1970

The Robert Fraser Karen Eng
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
a. 11 a John Sugg
Alligator News Editor
The price of freedom Kerry Dupree Mike Davis
is the exercise of responsibility. Advertising Manager Business Manager
Socialism In The Pentagon

WASHINGTON The spectacle of
Undersecretary of Defense David Packard agonizing
over how to give Lockheed Aircraft $650 million of
the taxpayers money in order to keep it in business
is a scandal made more so because it is so
revealing of the military-industrial complex.
Daniel Patrick Moynihans recent definition of
the military-industrial as a figment of the
imagination (as Stone Age men imagined evil gods
to explain a poor rainfall) is a better description of a
tendency in high places to intellectualize than it is
of economic fact.
The economic fact is that the government already
owns nearly all of Lockheed except the stock and
the profits. We own the Marietta, Ga., plant at
which the C-5A was built, and we own the plant at
Sunnyvale, Calif., where the Poseidon-Polaris
nissiles are fashioned.
Now it is baldly proposed by Lockheed
management that it be rewarded for stunning
mismanagement by a gift of cash in order, we are
told, to keep the team together and avoid the risk
that several other weapons systems will go by the
boards. And the government treats the event as a
commonplace. Alas, for what remains of free
enterprise in really big business, it is.
What is unstated, in the Lockheed proposal, is
that the companys cash flow is tied up not in
Pentagon contracts alone, but in construction of the
commercial L-1011 Jumbo Jet. Lockheed has been
out of commercial aircraft construction for some
time, existing almost entirely on government work.
But the new plane is at least a year away from the
runway, costs are high and commercial airlines do
not have the cozy arrangements with their suppliers
which the taxpayers do. The result is a hard-pressed
company, and die proposed solution is a bail-out
which would be denounced as a failure of
socialism if it happened, say, in England.
Lockheed is in trouble on the C-5A a giant
plane whose cost overruns, concealed in the
Pentagon last year to protect the companys stock
position, were finally revealed to be enormous. As a
result of congressional outcry, the reorder was
reduced and the game was up.
The game, in this case, is Pentagon procurement
practices which would cause the instant dismissal of
anyone in business. It is a world of will cost

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Carolyn Pope
Assignment Editor Assistant News Editor
Earl Hartman Fred Vollrati! Craig Goldwyn
Features Editor Wire Editor Sports Editor
Dan Vining Jeff Brain
Entertainment Editor Editorial Assistant
.ip...

contracts, rather than should cost, of contract
nourishment rather than contract policing, of
get-well money under the guise of change orders.
It is a game of which former Pentagon official A.
Ernest Fitzgerald has said The more you spend the
more you earn.
A Pentagon weapon is originally priced not on
the basis of what it should cost but on the basis of
what it cost last time, and any overages are
Frank Mankiowicz-
Tom Braden
II
J 111 1
promptly made up in the reorder, since the inflated
cost is now the historical cost. In the case of the
C-sA*s famous golden handshake contract, the
procedure was put to the absurd length of folding
back into the first order the now-inflated
historic cost of the reorder, so as to make even
the first blunder a profitable one.
Fitzgerald and others think there is another
solution. For once, let capitalism work; let the
inefficient producer be driven from the market. A
Lockheed bankruptcy, after all, would mean the
government could look for another tenant for its
factories another manufacturer who would hire
the present work force and finish the job. Perhaps a
score of Lockheed executives would lose their jobs
-for they would have gambled, as American
businessmen used to do, and lost.
Instead, inefficiency will have been rewarded, the
club will not be required to post the names of
delinquent members and we will have moved a step
closer to the interesting prospect of socialism for
the rich and free enterprise for the poor.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.

editorial
County Should
Finance Airport
The Gainesville Municipal Airport is misnamed.
Its more than just a municipal airport. It does not exist
solely for the residents of Gainesville, it provides service to
the entire Alachua County, including the students of the
UF. It is the only airport in the county that provides
commuter service by Executive Airlines, Shawnee Airlines
and Florida Airlines. It also provides the nationwide services
of Eastern Airlines.
But the reasoning behind the label ot Gainesville
Municipal Airport isnt all that foolish. Just as a company
bears the name of its financial support, so does the airport.
It is financed by the city and by federal funds. Not only
does the city bear this financial burden, but the
administration of the airport is also left in its hands.
An inequitable tax basis, one of the main arguments for
consolidation of city and county services, is the issue.
Gainesville residents, UF faculty, staff and students
included, are paying taxes to support an airport that
provides services to the entire county.
The problem hasnt been overlooked by the local
Government Study Committee. Task Force I has submitted
a report recommending that the airport be financially
supported by Alachua County. The administration would
continue to be left to the city.
Alan Sutherland, chairman of the committee, says the
report will most likely be accepted by the committee,
although there may be some changes in minor details.
Howard Weston, Alachua County administrative assistant,
says there is sympathy for the argument among members
of the county commission.
Should the city ask the county for financial assistance,
it would be seriously considered, Weston said.
Great strides have been made by Alachua County in the
area of consolidation in the last 10 years. The spirit of
cooperation and intermixing of administrators has become
obvious as meaningful lines of authority and functional
cost-sharing methods have been worked out in many areas
of service.
County Commissioner Ed Turlington showed this spirit
of cooperation when he claimed that, since the airport
serves the entire county, certainly some financial
assistance is necessary from the county.
Eastern Airlines is planning on expanding service to
Gainesville by consolidating passenger business from Ocala
and surrounding areas.
The Government Study Committee has admitted the
need, and Turlington concurs. Now its in the hands of the
County Commission.
We feel Ed Turlington is the man to take the initial steps
toward correcting the existing tax inequities.
Then we can rename the Gainesville Municipal Airport
what it has been all along the Alachua County Airport.
----- 1 | \
Jgj
"*.., * *



- Speaking Out--

(EDITORS NOTE: J.P.
OConnell is an associate
professor in the College of
Engineering.)
A recent article Purpose and
Function of the University in
Science magazine written by the
Interdisciplinary Studies
Committee on the Future of
Man at the University of
Wisconsin at Madison was
particularly meaningful to me
and might be to others. Here are
several quotes:
The Interdisciplinary Studies
Committee on the Future of
Man, together with other groups
on the University of Wisconsin
Madison campus, was asked to
comment on four questions
raised by the Board of Regents
about the purpose and goads of
higher education: (1) What are
the purposes of higher
education? (2) What should be
the goals for the university as an
entity? (3) What should be the
goals for each segment of the
university? (4) To what extent
should students and student
organizations be involved in
university government?
In answer to the Regents*
question: What are the purposes
of higher education, this
committee responded that:
The primary purpose of the
university Is to provide an
environment In which
faculty and students Can
discover, examine critically,
Preserve, and transmit The

Satire

For a remarkable contribution to
national defense, Dr. Gene 0. Sydde will
be awarded the coveted FABULOUS
WEAPON MEDAL in a White House
ceremony next month.
While working for Pow Chemical
Corporation under a government defense
grant, Sydde developed a new germ
warfare weapon so incredibly powerful
that it can totally destroy a population
the size of New York City in three
minutes.
There is no question as to its value as a
defensive weapon for our country. An
administrative aide has called this
another step toward world peace. Dr.
Sydde has worked strenuously and
diligently and should be commended for
his patriotism.
The weapon, called GOTCHA
(Because when it hits cha, you know
its got cha, smiles Sydde), is composed
of leprosy, plague, small pox, yellow
fever, tuberculosis, anthrax, German
measle, syphilis and cholera germs ten
times more powerful than naturally
occuring strains, with a little pinch of
influenza for spice, Sydde said.
At this time no antidote is available.
In tests on cocker spaniel puppies we
found this weapon extremely potent,
LETTERS POLICY
Lvttara must:
Be typed, rigmd, and
not axaaad 300 words.
Not be signed with a pseudonym.
Have add re and tatophona
numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if writer
shows just cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for space.
Writers may submit longer aawys.
columns or letters to be considered for use
as "Speaking Out" columns. Any writer
Interested in submitting a regular column
is ariced to contact the editor and be
prepared to riiow samples of his work.

University Purpose And Function

Knowledge, wisdom, and
values That will help ensure
the survival Os the present
and future generations With
improvement in the quality
of life.
We seek a wide acceptance of
this restatement of purpose. In
so doing, we acknowledge the
legitimacy of other purposes of
the university and do not wish
to interfere with them ...
A previous report took the
position that the benefits can be
achieved only if the search for
truth is accepted as the ultimate
purpose of an institution of
higher learning because the
modem institution of higher
education is the only one in our
society in which this search,
untrammelled by the need for
specific solutions, can possibly
take place.
We believe that only by a
radical departure from the
abstract statement to search for
truth will it be possible to
educate students, faculty and
government as to what the
university really
represents ... Government and
industry can and will be
primarily responsible for
solutions to problems of the
present, though they will in
many instances draw upon
university resources. On the
other hand, the university by its
very nature must be
future-oriented because it is
responsible for the joint effort
by which faculty and students
provide knowledge, skills, and
social values for much of the

No Antidote

By Philip Morgan

Sydde said. Why, you should have seen
those little critters squirming and
whinning while the germs were attacking
their innards. I cant wait to see
GOTCHAs effect on human beings.
The animals experimented upon were
from the litter of Syddes family dog,
Floppy. Well, we didnt have any
clean laboratory animals at hand and
since we couldnt sell the pups 1 just
figured what the hell, you know...
laughed Sydde.
Sydde became interested in germ
warfare indirectly as a child. When I was
about 12-years-old I used to be interested
in the reactions of moths after I had
pulled their wings off. Then I sort of
started pouring hydrochloric add on
them and timing how long it took for
them to disintegrate. From there I moved
up to injecting different flu virus strains
into stray dogs and here I am.
Outside of the lab Sydde is considered
to be an upstanding dtizen in the
community. Neighbors report him to be
a kind man, somewhat shy, but deeply
moral and a real leader in the church.
Although he left this country during
the war to join in on sdentific
breakthroughs in Germany, he admits
that his true loyalty was always to the
United States.
During vacations, Sydde goes up to
Alaska to join the hunt for baby seal
skins. Its quite a sport, he said. You
cant shoot them because it will mess up
the skin, which is valuable, so we just
have to dub them to death. It's an ideal
way of relaxing.
Sydde is concerned about the youth of
this country and leaves them this
message: Just keep working hard and
stay away from drugs. All they do is let
you escape for a short while from reality,
v and reality can be a wonderful thing. T

leadership for the next
generation.
When it is admitted that no
individual knows that most
appropriate criteria for judging
actions that are future-oriented,
it must be recognized that
pluralistic approaches and
solutions need to be developed
and maintained on the basis of
all the knowledge that can be
brought to bear on the issues
following all of the principles.
There must be complete
intellectual freedom for faculty
and students, satisfactory
solutions to problems can be
achieved through rational
inquiry and discussion,
implementation of needed
changes in the university must
be through legal means, each
individual has the right to his
opinion and to be heard, but no
individual has the right to
prevent those of differing views
from equal opportunity to be
heard.
Once these principles are
unreservedly accepted by
Regents, faculty and students,
together with an acceptance of
the primary purpose as future
-oriented in terms of survival and
improvement, we believe that
this university could proceed to
the detailed discussion of the
operation problems: how to
improve the teaching function,
how to achieve a proper balance
between teaching and research,
how to facilitate the
organization of vital
interdisciplinary programs, how
to evaluate the values of the past

MR. EDITOR:
Election day is here and Fd like to
make a few comments about the students
of this institution, not the candidates, for
I feel that all of them are equally
qualified (or is that unqualified), to try
and do a half decent job of doing
something.
The power or capabilities to get
anything done on campus with regards to
students needs, lies with the students,
not with who they elect.
The UF students are among the most
apathetic anywhere. They write to the
the small society

A HoW'te Yatl Qo\w&
:: ji ! ALLIVb
JH S iT( y slTl /E
v *** - 4-25

in relation to the future, and
how to achieve a sense of
community among students
faculty and citizenry.
References and Notes
A statement on university
purposes and principles was
adopted by the University of
Wisconsin Faculty Assembly, 26
February 1969. This statement
included the following: The
purposes of a University are: (1)
to provide students with
optimum opportunity for
learning from the heritage of the
past, for gaining experience in
the use of their intellectual and
creative capacities, and for
developing themselves as
concerned, responsible, humane
citizens; (2) to extend the
frontiers of knowledge through

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"' *>. \ \ |buH|^b
Whew!"
OPEN FORUM:-^.
(\ W VliAUlt ")
hopp fnr fL r
All Talk No Do

Thursday, April 23, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

* By J.P. O'Connell

research; (3) to provide society
with objective information and
with imaginative approaches to
the solutions of problems which
can serve as a basis for sound
decision-making in all areas.
This statement is relevant to
us for several reasons: 1) Earth
Day, 2) there is no statement in
any of the U. E. catalogues
about our purpose and function,
and 3) too many of the things
people here get upset about
(football tickets, for example)
are totally inane compared to
the problems of implementing
the universitys real purposes
and goals in the face of political
interference, economic
depravation, bureaucratic
strangulation and general
apathy.

Alligator and complain and act as if the
Alligator will solve their woes. If you
want something done, go out and get it
done yourself, as a whole.
Great power lies in the masses. I dont
mean student revolts or takeovers. That
never accomplishes anything but hate and
distrust.
As an instructor of mine once said,
there are two extremes, the students at
Berkeley and the students here.
Apathy makes harmony for the
administration. You want? You work!
ERIC KURITZKY, 2UC
by Brickmqn

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator. Thursday, April 23, 1970

LI Ml fi D J. I*l .fl SAVI 43c, Stokely Joan Os Arc Red
flam & \>wty Mi bpetm Shellie Beans. .51? $ 1 Kidney Beans 51. os l
Jv.t W.Rd.rlwl ft... .r Hard-To-Held ftftVl 10, wl.k C.p~ I. M >VI 10<. C.l~
Hair Spray 7.:* 49* Ajax Cleanser..*. 10 c Kosher Dills.. ".r 39*
Colgate Reg., Mint, or Lime SAVI 19c with Coupon in Ad Heins SAVI 10c, Kloonox Boutique
Instant Shave 39* Ketchup .... 2 '7; 39* Bath Tissue ... X l 3s*
rr- T
__ | Klmm.m B.uti.we (3t-olf label)
m7fK\Gold Medal jj towels '%?,* 29 c
Iw!|p "S.* i wm?/>y 10&9 Si"!** ,k - w
| ft* 1 3 4 " *1
s A ,, JL ;i"ltill*!a(Epie WJ., April 29, 1970) tU f yf |K... Mussolmonn's Low Col
gpusirxcoopojra felMyfc sg*iKt.. u -~-to*
m Hein* i! Mayonnaise .. T"49*
im o?£ P I Rocket Pies 3 :,?. *1 IWfWU
[j |j Lemon Juice bet. 39 c JLsDCfll*CiCius mib> 59 c
VLIZ jHtfUJlLtE.pir.. Wed.. April 29, 1970)1*::. SAVI lAc, O'Sage Freestone Q .. WW P* l *'
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Right Guard If Lavori. Mouthwash || Swift Premium Banal.*, Canned: I Howard John, on', Chicken
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-_ -|_- ay, |i 20 oz. hot. $1.06 II 4 lb. can $5.49 I I ._ V e# Cooker* Shrimn
I 1 ~ I so *l*7o. il * (lpire. W. 4., ApHI te, 1070) II 3 (Ixptr.k W.d April 2*, 1*70) lie 1 2 OX- P k -69 c ooker* Shrimp
; 1. ^ ftnftn(>nftttnm li 5 (M. Wed.._AorH W, 197.) |



. | il* L I -M -M---AAJr
--AAJr -M---AAJr \Ar
A %
lean Canter
IPUBUXI Tosty County
'. New Qwick-froitii
* Boneless
V * 1 v* \ (Plus 100 extra SON Green Stamps with coupon)
'H 1' \ Armowr ,or Plump Tasty
: k
love Tasty
Rath'* Black Hawk Baaala** Smakad
[ /j. ill 1 M HftjimiQn^^^yU^j
u[l |* I IJI 11 *T
Oscar Mayer Smokies,
Prices good Weds, noon thru Weds. Link Sausage. .i 89*
A ! no A- *1 no iota Swift's Premium Assorted Sliced
noon, April 22 April 29, 1970 SWIFT S PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT. Cold ClltS j£ 49c
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE Olive A Pim!nta,P ifklt A Pimento)
nMaagsHeanggapegingip|iiiMe|epna Tasty Florida stone
Fern Owt IMcateum Dept. £** t?-jsk"*?
* s~t.. -".I-V..I. Trout Fillets a a a .b 99*
0mw.Hd....,k.d c nn Pot Roast ib.79*
Hard Salami 99*
gq< Imperial Roast . s l* fl||
Macaroni Solod *3<- English Cot Roast ..*1 froTST
Old Fashion Flavor Swifts Premium Beef \Wu jW/ Quantities
Baked Beans 39* Short Ribs . 59*
Sandwiches b39*
WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
|p r r W. University Avenue at 34th Street 1014 N. Main Street
| -.!^ t a~ H GAINESVILLE MALL W 01101 IV
S w.b,aS9MbAa. W ..S7S M * T */jB
fe THESE PRICES EFFECTIVE IN THE FOLLOBIR6 COUNTIES ORLY!
ffirMi' Bietart, Oranfe, Osceola, Lake, Seoinele, Volesia, Maiiee mi Aladwa. '%j>iH

Thursday. April 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 23, 1970

PORT OF SPAIN (UPI) British
commonwealth troops from Jamaica and
Guyana landed in Trinidad Wednesday to
help the government put down a black
power army mutiny, and the United
States flew in a shipment of small arms.
The United States also sent six
warships with 2,000 Marines aboard to
stand by in case it becomes necessary to
evacuate the approximately 1,000 U. S.
resident nationals and an unknown
number of American tourists from the
Caribbean island.
IN LONDON, THE British Defense
Ministry said it had alerted two guided
missile frigates in the Caribbean for
possible emergency duty in Trinidad.
They cany some 500 officers and men.
A government spokesman here said
that commonwealth troops from Jamaica
and Guyana already had landed on the
Chaguaramas Peninsula to aid loyal
government forces in ousting an
estimated 200 army mutineers holding
the military base there.
The U. S. State Department said in
Washington that the request for light

No Lawyer, No Fair
Florida Court Rules

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
Florida Supreme Court ruled
Wednesday that statements
made by a state prison inmate
may not be used against him in
court unless the interrogation is
conducted in an open
atmosphere with an attorney
present.
The court ordered a new trial
for Roy Lee Young, who was
convicted of first degree murder
Jan. 29,1968, in Dade County
and sentenced to death.
YOUNG WAS serving time for
an unrelated offense when he
was questioned about the
drowning of James F. Eggler.
The interrogation took place
Jan. 15 and Feb. 3, 1966, at the
Belle Glade prison camp and
Raiford prison.
Egglers body was found tied
with wire in a sunken
automobile May 1,1962, and
police said he had been dead
about three days.
THE TESTIMONY on behalf
of both the state and appellant
indicates that appellant was not
suddenly thrust into a foreign
and hostile environment and
subjected to star chamber
tactics, said the 4-2 decision.
Nevertheless, we conclude that
he was subjected to in custody*
interrogation.**
The court based its findings
on the U. S. Supreme Court's
landmark Miranda ruling of

2 BEDROOM
FULLY FURNISHED
MOBILE HOME
SET ON LOT OF
YOUR CHOICE
$62.43 per mo.
AFTER SMALL DOWN
payment^
Mustang*^
MODI! DOMES
4820 N.W. 13th ST.
378-1346
WE WILL HELP YOU LOCATE
A LOT AT NO CHARGE

British Troops Land In Trinidad

I QUARTERLY I
I IS HERE! I

TO CRUSH BLACK POWER PLAY

weapons was received from Trinidad
government officials and that the arms
were being sold for cash.
A SPOKESMAN at the office of the
prime minister said five persons have died
since the mutiny broke out in army ranks
Tuesday when about 200 military
dissidents seized the arsenal at the
Chaguaramas base to supply a local black
power movement seeking a larger voice in
the island government.
One rebel soldier and a government
supporter were killed in fighting there
Wednesday.
Fireman Pete Praithawaite also died
Wednesday from injuries received
Tuesday night when someone threw a
Molotov cocktail at him as he fought a
fire near the city.
THE MUTINY came after the
government of Prime Minister Eric
Williams declared modified martial law to
control growing black power disorders in
the city and a threatened general strike.
Trinidadian coast guardsmen arrested
14 strike leaders and then fought off an
attempt by army dissidents to free them

1966, which held that a suspect
must be advised of his right to
an attorney and questioned in a
neutral atmosphere.
The court also ruled that the
prosecution had been allowed to
introduce too many pictures of
Egglers body. It said that after
positive identification had been
established for the jury, further
photographs were inflammatory.

I- L M
Sight A Dallcioaa, 14-oz. Bar Typa
Bottomless
Tandar, Dallcious, 8-inch Franch
Pecan
Coffe# Cake
aach
Limit! Plain or Carr aw ay Saad, 1-lb.
Sour Dough
Ryo Broad
29<
r 4 O
M BAKERY
inaavilta Moll
rdara Coll 372-3885
$i
*<9 ~11l ,n) *Rar^wM...^ussisaaaaiosissisa^MsaaaaagiMmaHiaaiMiaaMMisswiamisaa!s^wa M aa B osaa MMM M

Penn State Gets Tough

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. (UPI) Supporting
the tough no-amnesty stand of University
President Eric A. Walker, a majority of the
Pennsylvania State University trustees
Wednesday demanded expulsion of students
found responsible for campus disorders during
the past week.
The campus was reported calm Wednesday
by university officials, although about 2,000
students gathered at a rally addressed by student
protesters.
A FORCE OF 280 riot-equipped state
policemen sent here the previous day was
reduced to 175 and was slowly being phased
out, a spokesman said.
Walker, who polled the trustees, said 80 per
cent of them also favored asking a court to make

as they were being taken to an offshore
prison.
A private and a 14-year-old boy were
killed in the aborted rescue attempt
Tuesday. The army renegades fled into
the hills only apparently to regroup and
attack the Chaguaramas base 12 miles
from Port of Spain.
TRINIDAD AND the neighboring
island of Tobago were granted
independence from Britain in 1962 but
remained a member of the British
commonwealth with a governor general
representing the crown.
The city was practically deserted
Wednesday with heavily armed police
patrols halting, questioning and searching
pedestrians for arms.
All government offices, schools, stores
and businesses were closed. Police fired
over the heads of a crowd estimated at
about 1,000 and dispersed them when
they gathered to watch a fire in an old
deserted building across from the Red
House, the seat of government.
There were no casualties.
TRINIDAD, ABOUT the size of Rhode
Island, is the most southerly of the West

permanent a temporary injunction enjoining
demonstrators from taking over buildings and
destroying property.
The temporary order was issued by Centre
County court, Bellefonte, Pa., when disorders
broke out April 15, resulting in injuries to 18
policemen and the arrest of 29 persons.
AS AN INDICATION of the toughened stand
taken by authorities, five students arrested
Tuesday in a rock-throwing incident were
arraigned before Magistrate Louise Green at
Bellefonte, and held in SI,OOO bail each on
malicious mischief charges.
The five were committed-to the county jail
when they were unable to post bond.
Student demonstrators arrested last week were
released on bond ranging between SIOO and
SSOO.

ITALIAN SANDALS
WIDE SELECTION OF
NEW STYLES FLAT & HEELS
$6.00 In
Navy R^H. Brown

Indies islands. Its population of about %
million is predominantly black and East
Indian.
Black power militants demanding a
bigger voice in running the island nation
have conducted almost daily marches in
Port of Spain for nearly a month, many
of which have erupted into violence.
The demonstrations in the city first
began in early March to protest against
the trail of 10 Trinidadian students in
Montreal on charges of destroying a
computer center at Sir George Williams
University in the Canadian city.
The demonstrations gathered intensity
in subsequent weeks with black power
advocates and some of the islands trade
union leaders demanding greater
economic freedom for the islands black
people and a solution to chronic
unemployment in the colorful island.
The Chaguaramas arsenal where
Wednesdays fighting centered was one of
the former U. S. Navy bases obtained by
the late President Franklin D. Roosevelt
in the World War II exchange with Britain
for 50 U. S. destroyers.



"Super-Right" Frozen Chopped T
Frozen
j M '' m A Jane Parker
Large head Special!
FRESH LETTUCE ~ 19c j:}>l J A IK 6 !^.
Special!
JUICY LEMONS -: 49c Mi '\* WMC
reth Roasted Special!
K1 F avs 19 Biscuits sr 10c
H H With This Coupon When You Buy Ann Page Layer E Us _l_ __ M, Lb &{
11 CAKE MIXES I --J5 4 ~> l
19 4 *|-*i > oos? 1 eas 4~sl
P 9 r Coupon $1.19 [p Yellow Freestone Halvas or Sliced
Meat 2-- 29(
1 SAVE 20c 11 SAVE 25c | --
XM With This Coupon When You Buy m) 9 With this Coupon When You Buy 3 Iffl LOVO TnOSe
m __ __ _ k ____ Bj) /fli Pkgs. of Gonoral Mills Pre-Sweetened Mv> A&P SoviflQS
1 !!H CAFE t L NS H 0F w!:! E 11 LUCKY trix *. I |nv T||ft f
mj With This 49 0001300 11 COCOA PUFFS 9- KABOOM 7 I LOVE THOSE
W] Coupon ~. ~ $1.69 IBS) (JBI ill)) B| & lit
*1 ._ __ 4 AflD W< Coupon good thru April 26 at your A&P \m iLAIU
Coupon good thru April 26 at your A&P 1 STAMPS!

Thunday, April 23,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SA LE
Must Sell 15 x 14 olive-green carpet
& pad, also one large metal study
desk best offer, call 378-3083 after
6:00 PM. (A-3M24-P)
Roberts 770 x 8 track & reel to reel
tape recorder. Make your own
cartridges, $430 deal for S3OO or best
offer 378-1660. Vashlca Etectra 35; Split-Image
focosing, 35mm, built in light meter
SBS. Call 373-1947 or 392-0221.
(A-4t-124-p)

I LAST DAY IJ
! TOMOMM L BALLAD OF CABLE HOGUE.,'
I THE ADVENTURERS
I 16 xcHMChothrth*y ignite ttw world!
that wetted /3|j^ v v I
I la now on the screen t _*)f if*
| ...and moral i< ft,
| A PARAMOUNT PICTURE i
Based on the Novel THE ADVENTURERS by HAROLD ROBBINS (g |
PANAVIStON* COLOR J
: "Se^NTERTa! NMENT!!
J 4 United Press International!
ACADEMY iHI& I
AWARDS
winner i
including I I
BEST SONG
iBUTCH V i i
iCASSIDYffND the!
[SUNDANCE Klo_.. . j
| DwriNwi gaheivlWe ~|
F starts" today
J A 3 ACADEMY AWARDS WINNER |
! JSL
11
1 1
r 1
m 1
11
I A JEROME HELLMAN-JOHN SCHLESINGER PRODUCTION
DUSTOM HOFFMAN
JON VOK2HT
I "IWPyOHI COWBOY" j
=
[ AIJWS RESTAURANT" j

FOR SALE
Sofa with slipcover. $45. Call
378-6234 after 6:00 p.m.
(A-st-121-p)
HAM Transmitter, Phone and CW
Globe Scout Good Cond. $30.00
Stereo tape deck for car with
speakers $50.00 Call 373-2761.
(A-st-121-p)
EKO l2-string guitar acoustic with
electric pickup, hard shell case. Call
372-9167 Ask for Parke. PEACE.
(A-4t-123-p)

Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 23, 1970

FOR SALE
1968 Kawasaki 120. 1,600 miles,
Perfect Condition, luggage rack,
helmet. Graduating in June and must
sell 5275. Call 372-6283.
(A-3t-124-p)
Matched bedroom set 2 twin beds,
dresser, bureau, bedside table. $65
Good condition. 372-7925 after 5.
(A-3t-125-p)
Portable stereo brand new, garrard
turntable, need money must sell call
378-3593 after 7:00 pm.
(A-3t-125-p)
1969 Triumph 650, excellent
condition call Mike at 378-3587 after
7:00 pm need money must sell.
(A-3t-125-p)
Datsun Sedan 1965 looks good and
in good running order. Call Frank
373-1523. (A-lt-125-p)
DONT merely brighten your
carpets . Blue Lustre
them ... eliminate rapid resolllng.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-23-c)
.357 Magnum pistol oversized grips
trigger shoe, adjustable sights and
holster. Call 376-4962 after 6 PM will
take best offer. (A-3t-124-p)
8-Track home stereo with speakers 6
months old excellent condition. Need
Cash, SSO. or best offer. Call Jim at
392-8155 after 7:00. (A-3t-124-p)

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required. Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines.
For each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the
number of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for
consecutive insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with
remittance (check preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330,
Reitz Union, Gainesville, Florida 32601. No refunds.
Deodfirw -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* *> IO n
I lI 1| 1| £
y>cS w Q- s
Z
Q
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U1 4* tJ IO
- & S' 1
3 S< |
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Sd * £ O
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8? aa C
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FOR SALE
12 x 52 mobile home two bedrooms,
raised front kitchen. Early Amer.
$3200. Plus added extras,
dishwasher, AC, 16 x 18 awning.
Phone: 485-2531. (A-st-124-p)
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES 6 weeks old.
S3O. Call 372-2135. (A-st-124-p)
Fender Palomino 6-string acoustic
guitar. Excellent condition. Hard
shell case. $l5O. Call Anita at
392-9126. (A-st-124-p)
Irish Setter puppies, 4 weeks old,
AKC top championship stock.
Wormed, shots. Excellent pets,
hunters or show material. SIOO
372-0295. (A-13t-124-p)
Alto Saxophone Selmer Mark VI
Like New $250 Including free music.
Clarinet Gretsch Pathfinder $35. Call
378-2292 after 5 PM. (A-3t-124-p)
Grooving on a Sunday afternoon?
Take a short drive to an authenic
ANTIQUE AUCTION in Archer,
April 26, 2 P.M. C & J Auction
House. (A-3t-124-p)
Camera Petri flex 735 mm sir speeds
b-1000. 55mm fl. 8 sto. lens + 135
mm 12 8 tele. Leather case like new
cond. Only $135. Must sell, Call B.
O. Parker at 378-5836 anytime.
(A-4t-124-p)
SPRINT 1966, 250 cc H model. Very
good condition leaving state. $350.
See at 6315 SW 13th St. Apt. 17.
After 6 P.M. (A-3t-124-p)

for rent
Sublet 2-br. apt. summer quarter, ww
carpet, central AC, pool, $145/mo.
Call 392-2111, 11-12a.m. & 8-9p.m.
weekdays. (B-3t-125-p)
Need to sublet 2 bedroom, poolside,
AC Village Park Apt. Nice neighbors
good management. Call 372-9904
anytime. (B-3t-124-p)
SUBLET for summer &/or after
Landmark no. 87, 2 bdr, furn, A/C, 2
pools $ 185/mo. June rent paid
available for occupancy June 15 call
378-0727. (B-5M25-P)
Must sub-lease Immediately 12 by 50
two-bedroom furnished mobile home
on SW Archer Road. Call 373-1892.
(B-2t-125-p)
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close to;
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
3 76-8990 University Apartments
JB-24t-11-p)
several 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372-7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
utilities Included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after 5 at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Sublet starting summer quarter La
Bonne Vie, 1 bdrm., 2 or 3 persons
A/C,' pool, w/w carpet, dishwasher,
sum., $ 150/mo. Call 378-2158.
(B-st-124-p)
2 bedroom F.Q. apt. to sublease, for
the summer 115 for the entire
summer per person Call 373-2226 or
visit apt. 12. F.Q. (B-3t-124-p)
Apt. for rent: Summit House, new
building, furnished, must be married
or 21 and working. Call 376-8514
after 5:00 p.m. (B-st-124-p)
Sublet May 1 thru Aug. 1 br. furn.
Unlv. Gardens Apt. Pool, central air,
carpet, $l2O. Jane Peterson
392-0352. After 5, 378-0327.
(B-st-124-p)
1 female roomate needed Immed. at
143 Landmark Apt. Spr. & Sum.
qtrs. 46.25 mo. Call 376-0972 or
392-0506 Alice, Sandy, Ann, or
Belinda. (B-3t-124-p)
Save! Sublet: June 10th 1 br. furn.,
AC 3 blks. to campus, IV2 blks. to
med cnt. & VA hosp., Free cable TV
105 mo. Other apts. now 130. Call
378-8803. (B-llt-124-p)
fr* screen was smoking." A/. Y. Daily
Column
H mi JHr .3 I
m I f acinemahon
INDUSTRIES



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WA NTEI3
*, '
Female roommate wanted French
Quarter Apt. 97 Poolside
Please call after IPM Phone:
371-7833. (C-st-124-p)
roomate wanted summer quarter. LA
MANCHA townhouse with private
bedroom, air conditioned, and pool
ALL for S7O/mo. Call 378-9441
now. (C-3t-124-p)
SUMMIT HOUSE One Male
roommate needed immediately or for
summer quarter All conveniences
inc., pool, 143.50/mth. Call
376-1006. (C-3t-124-p)
Need 'immediately one male
roommate to share two bedroom
kitchen and bath. $37.50 per month.
Phone 378-5465 or 373-1375.
(C-3t-124-p)
1 female to share Landmark 2 bedr.
apt. no. 107 immediately poolside
and woodside, good parking, call
anytime 373-1208. (C-st-121-p)
HELP WANTED
; ; ;vXvX;X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X!X:X:XxX:XvX
FREE Private room and board for
coed in exchange for helping with my
children etc. New large home must
have own transportation. Call Mrs.
Anderson 376-8788. (E-3t-124-p)
Cocktail Waitress part-time or
full-time no experience necessary will
train must be 21 apply after 4 Dubs
Lounge 376-9175. (E-lt-125-p)
SUMMER JOBS: Jacksonville
Gainesville Miami S3OO per month
salary plus bonus Reitz Union rm.
118 Wed May 27 3:3opm.
(E-5M25-P)
A coke for a book! Bring your used
paperbacks to the Union Browsing
Library on Frl. May 1 only and get a
free coke for each one. (E-Bt-120-c)
XvXXX-X*X?XrX:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:Xx
AUTOS
mm m m m m mm m
1966 Chevelle 327 4-speed, PS, radio,
bucket seats, console, new tires,
4,400 miles. Call Dale 372-9307.
(G-3t-124-p)
62 Rambler Classic 6" A/Cond.
radio, p.s., auto., 4 dr. New paint,
good tires; $225 or best offer. P.
Day, Games Area or 376-2998 eve.
(G-2t-124-p)
Classic 60 Bugeybd SPRITE excellent
condition 6B factory rebuilt engine
radio new top; call 378-3246
after 6; $590. (G-st-122-p)
MUST SELL 64 Falcon convertible
excellent condition $450 call
anytime 376-2738. (G-st-122-p)
196 8 340 Barracuda fastback
formulas package low mileage
automatic air factor warranty $1995
evenings 378-5108. (G-st-122-p)
63 Porsche S Complete engine
overhaul, new paint, Mlchelln X tires,
interior completely redone,
AM-FM-SW radio. Call 392-8891.
(G-st-125-p)
Austin-Healy 3000 New Paint, New
Interior, New Tires, Top Condition
$1,050 Will Negotiate see at 1235
NW 39 Ave after 6:00. 1968 Pontiac Firebird 400 four speed
transmission almost new condition
$1650 or best offer 372-1393.
(G-st-125-p)
1968 TRIUMPH GTO wire wheels,
luggage rack, british racing green,
17,000 miles, take over payments.
Call 372-2135. (G-st-124-p)
: :X:X:X:X:X:X:X&X*XxX%xXxX:X:X:.
PERSONAL
: : : : : :>>.':X:X:::X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X*X:X*X
The technique of transcendental
meditation, as taught by the
Maharishl' Mahesh Yogi, will be
explained at an Introductory lecture
at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 24,
University Gallery. (J-3t-124-p)
mm*
N.W. 13th St PH. 372-9523* A A*
* A*
1 SWEDEN HEAVEN 9
AND HELL f
BABY LOVE
2 PENTHOUSE 2
THE BIBLE f
PENTHOUSE 3 #
|y LIBERTINE

-w....-.-.- W :.:o:.>:.:.x.x<.x.:x:X:X:XSx
PERSONAL
X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:XAX:X:X
Flea Market sale kids! Trade your
pile of baseball cards for someone
else s pink football jersey. Bring lots
of change whether you plan to buy
or sell. Union Tent Apr 28
(J-lt-124-c)
Campus yoyo, hulahoop, jump rope,
and ball bat contest. Take out your
old yoyo and work it back into
condition. At the Union May 1
(J-st-122-c)
Reitz Union Tent Revival Thurs
Apr. 30 from 2-6p.m. the empty tent
will be provided this one day for
anyone to come RAP ON
ANYTHING. (J-st-122-c)
Franky Benny Eammonn Roger Roy
Steve Bob Ron Scott Jerry and
Courtney You did an outstanding
job Saturday, congratulations!
Florida Track team I know you
will have a successful weekend at
Penn and/or Drake Relays! Bobbie.
(J-lt-125-p)
Uncle Jimmy, One year down and ?
to go! Im happy, happy, happy and
will love you twice as much next
year. Lets try for 50%-50%. Love,
me. (J-lt-125-p)
You meet the nicest people on a
HONDA: Will the girl I met on mine
and took to towers please meet me at
the Plaza Friday, between 1 and 4.
(J-2t-124-p)
Refunds for "Sympathy for the
Devil" will be issued from the
Constans Theatre Box Office during
its regular hours of operation (Noon
to 4:30 p.m.) Monday April 20
through Friday, April 24. NO
REFUNDS WILL BE ISSUED
AFTER 4:30 p.m. on Friday, April
24. (J-st-124-p)
Congradulation Zeta pledges for
making your grades. Much more to
come. Beware. Love, air-raids and
Zetz cheers. The Sisters. (J-3t-124-p)
Theta Chis get swamped, your house
we rolled, our masses were bold,
though few you did catch, beware
the next match, from the rest of the
batch, the T.P. Girls. (J-2t-124-p)
Do you need a ride to Chattanooga
or Detroit? One way trip Cha. sls,
or Det. $25. Flying up Thursday,
April 30, Call 392-8875 anytime.
(J-2t-124-p)
SPRING is the time when a young
mans fancy turns to LOVE. Two
young men desire liberal female
companions over 18. Contact JF at
1642 W. Univ. Ave. (above Spanish
Main) PEACE. (J-st-124-p)

THE
QUARTERLY
IS HERE!
The Quarterly is here and our best wishes and our I
the waiting is over. greatest efforts.
, . The Quarterly is here I
The Quarterly is here wit stacked on a little card table I
fiction and poetry that are j n p| aza 0 f the Americas!
alive today, written by anc j Little-Walker Plaza I
people that are alive today. f rom -jq am to4 p m I
People you might know. Tuesday through Friday of 1
this week.
The Quarterly is here with a
portfolio of photographic flMUlfl
art (that really is art). (JUiirtCtllj I
The Quarterly is here with We only did it for you. 1

Thursday, April 23, 1970, The Florida Alligator, I

::X:X:XrX:X:X:X:XrX:XrX;X!X:X:X;XxXrX
PERSONAL
GIRLS Distinctive CUSTOM
MADE Personal Dress, WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Bikinis sl4, Phone 378-0320.
(ALTERATIONS TOO).
(J-10t-124-p)
Co-eds unwanted facial hair removed
forever cost is low fast world
famous kree method. Edmund Dwyer
Electrologist. 372-8039. 102 NW 2nd
St. (J-21t-124-p)
-.\\\x.;.:.x.:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X
LOST St FOUND
Lost: Brown purse in Anderson Hall
last Thursday night. Please call
Miriam 372-7550 has personal IDs
inside. (L-3t-124-p)
y:xX:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X:X: : :XX : x : : : X
SERVICES
:X;X:XtXtX*X*X*X ; XwX'XX*X ; X ; X ; X*X
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and up
Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount 1227 W. Univ. 372-8309.
(M-102-20t-p)
Horses to rent: Hay rides, parties,
cowboys, riding stables. Open seven
days a week. 372-8460. (M-st-124-p)
German tutoring send phone no to
campus box 30-0032. (M-st-122-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
1111 S. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
Overland Expedition to India via
T urkey, Persia, Afghanistan,
Khatmnuda. Lvs London late June.
$545 fully inclusive. Encounter
Overland, 23 Manor House Dr.,
London, N.W. 6. (M-121-12t-p)
Del-ray typing service: manuscripts,
theses, term papers, letters, briefs,
dictaphone typing, light steno, etc.
Prompt, pickup-delivery, 373-1984,
9-5. (M-st-115-p)
GERMAN or SPANISH tutoring. Get
expert Help in reading, translating,
conversation. $4 a lesson. Informal.
378-2270. (M-st-121-p)
The Copy Center Xerox copies 1
to 10 copies of each original 5 cents;
over ten 4 cents. 1718 West Univ.
Now open next to Gold Coast
Restaurant. Free Collating. Try us
First for Quality & Service. Tel
376-9334. (M-17t-114-p)

Page 15

A > s
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
THURSDAY
Baked Ham and Candied
Yams 99<
FRIDAY
Fish Almondine and
UNION TENT REVIVAL
The empty Union tent will be provided on
Thurs., Apr. 30 for an open forum from 2:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m. Heres the golden opportunity to
produce the unique tent revival. Preach love or
hate, rational or irrational, silliness or sadness,
heavy or light. .or just wander through the
crowd healing!
T
O "THEYSHOOT
I A horses,
RSBJJJJSP f! Y DON'T THEY"
T*l*ph*ne37-2434 11
|MASH |H
IS THE BEST
AMERICAN WAR
COMEDY. M| DAMN"
SINCE A
SOUND ft Jr B B
CAME MF BE % EVE
New Yorker
V3SX3**
Olfe ATTENDTHE
% MATINEES
\ AND AVOID
1-. THE EVENING
M CROWDS!
20th century Fo* presents An Ingo Preminger Production
Starring
DONALD SUTHERLAND ELLIOTT GOULD TOM SKERRITT
Co Starring SALLY KELLERMAN ROBERT DUVALL JO ANN PFLUG RENE AUBERJONOIS
Produced by Directed by Screenplay by
INGO PREMINGER ROBERT ALTMAN RING LARDNER, Jr.
vNOfr 1 1 rtQurrtt
From a novel by RICHARD HOOKER Music by JOHNNY MANDEL
Parent ot Adult
Color by DE LUXE* PANAVISION
msSEmA LAST DAY
laaw im *-2r Ms 1 I
.y-t 11 "LOVING" r



jHHHHHHH fIHHH|HHHHfIBft fIfMHHHHIK gHHUUMIHUH
ewe SSs^*n '"
Shave CreamB* prices good thru wed. noon, april 29
Bins
Fryer c s6 astor allgrinds DB
FLAKES ftjJ
a $5.00 or more food order
Us Limit On* of your choice with a $5.00 or more food order excluding cigarettes
FOLGERS ALL GRINDS
CRACKIN' GOOD ROYAL HONEY THRIFTY MAIO THRIFTY MAID STEWED
Grahams 3 s l Pork & Beans. .10 S I OO Tomatoes 5- $ l
DIXIE DARIINO CAKE MIXES OR 13% ox. WHITE OR FUDGE THRIFTY MAID THRIFTY MAID FRENCH STYLE
Frosting Mix .. .4 s l Bartlett Pears Green Beans .. .6 S I OO
WHITE OR ASSORTED KWH4RX THRIFTY MAM) THRIFTY MAID CS OR WK
Facial Tissue .. 4ss $ 100l 00 Apple Juice ....3 s l Gold Corn 6 S I OO
STOKELY THRIFT? MAIO THRIFTY MAID 3 sv. ALASKA OR LARGE
Fruit Cocktail.. .5 S I OO Tomato Sauce. .10 S I OO Sweet Peas ... .6 s l #o
DEEP SOUTH SALAD
DRESSING
EMXIEI SANDWICH
VAN C AMR PORK & ARROW BEACH'S WINDOW BOX DIXIE DARLING
Beans 7 *l Napkins ..... 29 c Chocolates .. 3 . *l Danish Ring... £ 59<
MAZOtA WHITE ARROW DIXIE DARIINO BROWN A SERVE DIXIE DARLING 9
Salad 0i1..... *r 69 c Bieach £ 29 c Roils 2 r 39 c Berry Cups .2 £ 39*
Creme*Rinse 39* Meatball 5tew....79* AO* rHX~ 15
pi Lustre feme* .Bug Bomb ...., .98 c
Bj|g VVi ni!Nr*ma UK '" twoiwtoc** ioo-chox 57 AMPS
. L 1 >t egge tMfeA wwawhhi I P|o. 8 T nl J' GOOD THOU
B (49*) 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. open on Sunday 130N.W.6TH ST
Lyj RmyerAtodtoHoid V 1 JJ HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS 1401 N. MAIN ST



PRICES GOOD THRU WED. NOON, APRIL 29 SU NNVLANO PORK ROLL HOT OR MHO
lifc,: at Sausage... 69 c
-*** H ft LAND O'FROST SUCED HAM. BEEF OR
% Bfcis, FtSH FLA. SHADE "A" WHOU HSLmLZ.
W W ha *' *
lP|mr J&* CKd > raisiMk 7*
NfluO >. 4# Fish Fillets.. 69<
Shrimp.... 79 c
BANQUET BEEF STEW, CHICKEN N* DUMPLINGS, CHICKEN CHOW MEIN,
BEEF CHOP SUEY OR GIBLET GRAVY & USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND FULL CUT TARNOW
Sli. Turkey .... 2 99 c Round Steak s l l9 Sliced Bologna .. 69 c
808 WHITE REGULAR USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND TOP ROUND OR COPELAND BREAKFAST
Sliced Bacon ... 79 c Sirloin Steak *1 29 Link Sausage ... 89 c
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF BONELESS USDA CHOICE BEEF PORTERHOUSE OR USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF
Chuck Roast ... 99 c T-Bone Steak . $ 1 39 Chuck Steak... -7
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND BEEF ROUND BONE W-D BRAND PURE HANDI-PAK .. 5 Ibt. $2.89... 10 lb*. $5.69 W-D BRAND GROUND
Shoulder Roast.. 99 c Ground Beef 3 $ 1 79 Round Steak ... 99 c
STEAK .. t
ls I|P *HBr* } W? I BORDENS EAGLE BRAND NEUFCHATEI California Style Cottage
mi\jn E_z CARVE oven ready IHfl Cheese ..37 c Cheese.. Si' 69 e I
IPll A PTt jfCheese.. 89 Biscuits 2*s= 47 c
x Bffl I Cheese.. V£ 69 c Biscuits 2£Si 19 c |
r Kg mt P P "T TZ : fr|^.^E'
>x *£ i g v-Vr 1 gjefcJkTflkK J ' wi ikm -in
A I **"
Strawberries ..3 ~*r g^~~ 4 *XS !* FnrPotatoos -5 89 MB
Tomatoes 33' Margarine "4s' fraji Cobblers... ~89 1 RpilL
05T.... .8 A 69' Carrots 10' Deviled Crabs ... 99' MaEMtiMW f gjjP
Potatoes 20 *= 99 c Cabbage 2 Coffee Rich .. .4 - l ^gSgPST^LB.
Lemons.... .12 ~ 49' Orange Juice ..5 ts, l 00 Topf^ig...... - 49*
Apples^.... 11 - 99' Rsh & Chips Shnmp --- -*2 * 4P||
Lettuce 2 39' ice Craaai 59' Meat5.......4 - l 04 jRS %
corn" iipiiT'
Ar # 41 GREEN PEAS 5 Ss *l* GREEN BEANS S *1"
IL '2 >jtijL -T iKW- S-OZ. t* ASTOR IIRBY CREAM CORN OR ASTOff
EARS Jjj P** | PEAS A CARROTS 5St *1 CUT CORN 5 St*l"
Sweet N Low 49 c B-B-Q Sauce 29 Marmara Sauce ... 49 c Mmp|\
IKrarST"""T 49- Plastic Baqs 49 c Salad Dressing .... 41 e IvlEl/e EvVJ
* ;__ CTti ,^................T..TtitTY
s?sgsKh | pnivy nj§si** 11! | pB
0000*HR*ADRi*29 0000 THRU j COO * U J No. 4, T ai) vo( t |
3421 AVe' open" on Sunday 130 N.W. 6TH ST. Xf M3>
HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS ___ I!f tev \\



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 23,1970

EXHIBITION
University Gallery is currently showing the work of Julio Gonzales,
artist and sculptor who died in 1945. This is one of six sculptures in
the exhibition. Fifty drawings also are displayed. The show runs
through April 27.

Mcrnson Family Member Gets
Death Penalty In California

LOS ANGELES (UPI) A member of the
Manson Family convicted of what the state
charged was the first of eight slayings masterminded
by the hippie cult leader, has been sentenced to die
in the gas chamber.
A jury Tuesday took only two hours and 45
minutes to bring in a death penalty verdict for
Robert K. Beausoleil, 22, one of the strange
assemblage of young men and women Charles
Manson attracted to his cult.
The same jury of seven women and five men
Monday had found the defendant guilty of first
degree murder in the torture slaying of Gary
Hinman, 34, a bagpipe musician who befriended
Manson.

Tough Tost*
ROCHESTER, N. Y.
Torture chamber equipment
designed to test telephones made
by Stromberg-Carlson
Corporation, a subsidiary of
General Dynamics, sometimes
spins a single telephone dial as
many as a million times. Nearly
a month of non-stop dialing is
required to complete the test.
The endurance run is equal to
local calls or 90,900
direct distance dialings. If a
telephone subscriber were to
make 10 local calls a day every
day of the year, it would take
him 40 years to equal the figure.
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
376-0315
AND
101 N. MAIN ST.
376-5211
SOLES ATTACHED HEELS
15 mins 5 mins

IHJ WIN A BANOUETABOARD^H
l|H (In Jacksonville May 4th) flp
mm In 25 words or lest, finish these statements:
HR 1- I expect an auto dealer ... (say what RRR
Ilf you expect of him)
IH9 2. I like the Datsun automatic sedan
|ll because ... (or the Datsun automatic OH
fII woo oll because...) HHI
Ir Ifli There will be two winners. Selection will be by Bill jOBM
If'la Decke,man President Godding and Clark Motors, and
by Roy Loved ay. General Manager, based on what
Wmm these judges consider helpful insight into consumer
mm attitudes.
imM Contest limited to students at the University of
Mm Florida. Names of winners will be published in this BBflti,
pap6r gjgJjlj
jfIHH Bring your entries to the showroom at 2nd Avenue H||gS
mttm "** 2nd Strwt S.E. and drop them into the box.
H Contest doaas Apr! 30. mam
H GODDING | 2ND AVE. andIHH

Beausoleil took the death verdict with no
outward show of emotion.
Superior Court Judge William B. Keene set May
12 for arguments for a new trial and formal
sentencing.
After the verdict was read, Beausoleil asked
Keene to let him act as his own attorney at future
proceedings.
This court has condemned me to death, he
said. I plead with the court to let me have my
voice. I have told the truth exactly what
happened. Those who know of my innocence have
yet to come forward.
Keene denied the request.

SAVINGS POSSIBLE

SG Plans Record, Tape
Club For Students, Staff

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
Students soon will be able to
order records and tapes at
wholesale prices.
Kathi Spellman, Student
Government secretary of student
affairs, said students, faculty and
staff will be able to order the
top 100 pop records, as well as
classical, jazz and country
western.
THE TOP 100 will only take
a day or two, but no record or
tape should take over a week to
get.
Miss Spellman said there will
also be a large savings on tapes.
There will be a deposit
required on all orders, but the
prices and deposit still have to
be worked out. We are only
going to charge what it costs
us.
MISS SPELLMAN said it is
not known whether orders will
be taken in the SG office or
another office.
Roger Leemis, who is going to
operate the service, said it was
designed to give university universityrelated
related universityrelated people an opportunity to
buy records and tapes at cost.
I know Id like to be able to
buy records at a lot better than
regular price, Leemis said.
STUDENT BODY, President
Walter Morgan said the service
will be set up similar to a record
club, but a person will not be

obligated to buy a certain
number of records.
They can just buy one
record and never come back if
they want.
Morgan said it is hoped the
service can be expanded into
other areas.
The groundwork for the

UF Greeks Help
In City Clean-Up
Gainesville Beautification Week (April 18-25) began last week as
members of Alpha Omega Pi sorority and Theta Chi fraternity
combined forces to clean up Pine Grove Cemetery.
The majority of the members of both groups showed up at the
10-acre site on SE Fourth St. next to Evergreen Cemetery. Under the
direction of Beautification Board member R. C. Cambridge the two
groups plus other interested community members accomplished a
tremendous improvement.
I THINK everyone here has done a wonderful job. The initial
progress has'been remarkable, Curtis D. Jemigan, superintendent of
Gainesville cemeteries said, after the clean-up.
Cambridge hopes some group will adopt maintenance of Pine Grove
as a pet project since no money is provided by the city for its
upkeep.
The city provided two dump trucks and equipment for the clean-up
while members of Johnson Chapel Baptist Church provided lunch.
ELSEWHERE in the city, Theta Chis were cleaning up a vacant lot
near the Coca-Cola Bottling plant.
At the Marjorie Rawlings Elementary School, members of
Gainesvilles National Guard unit installed a chain-link fence and
planted shrubbery. Two traffic islands along recently widened East
University Avenue were also landscaped.
Wilbur Harling, chairman of the beautification board, hopes to
involve sororities, fraternities and clubs as well as create an interest in
Gainesville citizens and elementary school children during the
clean-up week.

BONUS PHOTO
Greatest thing
to happen to your
color snapshots!
'l wclmtgjjjgL Wm
IAI Rims 3V SQUARE AMD JVA MIME)
REMEMBER, WERE HEADQUARTERS FOR QUALITY PROCESSINB BY BONUS PHOTO!
a a PHOTO DEALERS:
i|K/k ALL GRESHAM
llUFljmf DRUG STORES
AND PHARMACIES

service was set last quarter, but
there was some question as to
whether it could be done,
Morgan said.
Friday, Tom Biggs, UFs
attorney, said there were no
legal complications, so Miss
Spellman has gone ahead with
it.



The
Florida
Alligator

New Music From Three Dog Night

(EDITORS NOTE: Danny
America is a radio announcer
working on WRUF-FMs
progressive rock program. He has
an exposure to nearly all new
lecord releases and will be
ie viewing in these pages those he
finds interesting.)
By DANNY AMERICA
Alligator Correspondent
In a time when originality
seems to be the one thing we are
demanding from our rock
groups, there's at least one group
- Three Dog Night thats
making a go of working almost
solely with songs written by
people outside the group.
Three Dog Night now has
ready for the market a fourth
LP, one called It Ain't Easy.
The album proves, as have the
ones before it, that the three
singers and their backup band
have something well worth
listening to.
AND THIS new recording
proves, at least to me, that these
people have beautiful tastes in
the music they select to
perform. The work of some top
writers is getting out in the
open. Perhaps it would not
otherwise.
The group got together several
yean ago with Danny Hutton,
Chuck Negron and Cory Wefis
working out all the
vocalizations. The backup group
changed in its membership from
time to time. The present people
- who Ve been working with the
three singers for some time
include Mike Allsup on guitar,
Jimmy Greenspoon on
keyboards, Joe Schermie playing
bass, and Floyd Sneed on drums.
They're good.
But vocal harmonies
definitely are the group's
highpoint. The three men work
together like a family, they
know each other's strengths and
weaknesses and each fills in
where the other leaves off. The
result is real music in the vocals,
a thing maybe missing in this
time of the apotheosis of the
electric guitar.
SIDE ONE of the album
begins with a song called
Woman. The song was written
by Fraser and Rodgers' of a
British group called Free. Its a
good song and a song that fits
remarkably well into the sound
weve come to expect from
Three Dog Night. The real treat
in the groups version of the
tune comes after the first two
choruses when the pacing drops
somewhat and a smooth
instrumental section comes in.
The vocals that rise out of that
music are powerful, fitting the
words well. The counterpoint
thp siogersjcelv
I quarterly I
I only did it for you. I

HW SR mt stt B Wk HE IB H wKEL B IBL B MB
H B fIM JK Bl
S H Wlmm Wm WB BWi Ml' WS IM Hi WK
ffcW m 9 R BBMBn'BMHii^B/m-'H'

RECORD COMMENTARY; RIGHT ENOUGH

heavily is used extremely
effectively.
A perfect example of a song
writer who is getting some
attention through Three Dog
Nights arranging is Randy
Newman. Newman has done
some beautiful writing both
words and music and gotten
practically no public attention
for it. His Cowboy is cut two
on side one. Its slow and
moving, with that religious tone
that The Beatles Let It Be
and Simon and Garfunkels
Bridge Over Troubled Waters
both have. The song, simply, is
beautiful.
CUT THREE on side one is
It Aint Easy, the title tune
written by a guy unknown to
me named R. Davies. The song
has good music in it, a fine piece
of guitar work using a steel
bodied instrument, and

MINI SKIRT FINALS TONITE
DUB S
/ w\ A V/ %As
A u. nW/
VISIT DUBS I
\l FABULOUS
V Bf GAME ROOM
Something happens EVERY WIGHT at \
nh\ Lou nap V^^''
l/IIAJ *9 VMIIJ|V 4560 NW 13th Street *Hwy. 441 North

something new for Three Dog
Night -a harmonica piece. The
vocal part is strange weird in
inflection or something but
not bad.
Out in the Country is the
next to the last cut on the side.
Its interesting, soft, very radio
rockish. The writers are, again,
unknowns.
Perhaps the nicest thing on
the side, maybe the record, is
the last cut on side one, a song
called Good Feeling. The
singers are very much into the
Rock and Roll Revival and a
falsetto harmony part as
found in the old whitesox, tight
black pants and pink shirt days
of our music is an important
touch in the song. Its really very
happy and fun.
THE ONLY song on the album
written by the group is Rock

Thuraday, April 23,1970, Tha Florida Alligator,

and Roll Widow, cut one on
side two. It's okay, not really
outstanding except for a pretty
good guitar lead near the end of
the song. The lyrics are a little
contrived but maybe rock
groups cant be condemned for
that too much. The words aren't
so bad that they get in the way,
I guess.
Mama Told Me (Not To
Come) is the second song on
side two and the second
Newman song on the album.
Again, the vocalization is
strange, something like Dr. John,
the Night Tripper if you know
what he sounds like. But in this
case, the strangeness is nice. The
repetitive chorus that comes at
the end shows what the group
does best, I think. The
instrumental work is good too,
an electric piano with a reverb
used to good result.

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

The third song on the side is
Your Song, a soft piece. Its
good, not great, not really worth
going into here.
THE USE OF repetitive
phrases | and vocal counterpoint
is u§ed 4o the best effect in the
last cut on the record, Good
Time Living. The song has
Woodstock-type lyrics, about
getting back to the land and to
living. The phrase Got to get
back and variations of it are
handled in several different ways
by the different members of the
group and the result is
refreshingly musical.
So, the group has produced
another good album. The
arrangements are interesting.
The choice of material is
excellent and constructive. The
band is in good form. The
combination seems right enough.

Page 19



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 23,1970

Page 20

i; 4 I : :
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% JL* v \ Xi | #HR^^h
s$ \ a IbsM
>iMBSB3L. Illllii
BREWER AND SHIPLEY
.. .here this weekend
Folksinging Duo At Rat
Friday, Saturday Nights

By DAN VINING
Alligator Entertainment Editor
One of the nicest things thats
happening to popular music in
our country today is the
evergrowing influence of
traditional country and western
music upon other areas of music.
And local folks will have a
'69 Top Year
For Foreign
Visitors To US
WASHINGTON (UPI) More
people than ever before visited
the United States before around
the world in 1969, according to
the Department of Commerce.
The total number of visitors,
as tourists or on business, was
1,752,842, an increase of 12.1
per cent over 1968. In addition
to overseas visitors there were an
estimated 9.4 million from
Canada and 1,015,420 from
Mexico.
The greatest number of
overseas visitors came from
Britain, 253,184. Others
included: from West Germany
Japan 124,678.
According to the Commerce
Department foreigners most
wanted to see New York, San
Francisco, Washington, Florida
and the Grand Canyon.

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
RAIDW£_^^A
1 STARKE, FLORIDA l^H||
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

chance this weekend to see the
result of much of that good
influence when a popular
folk-type duo comes to The
Rathskeller for two shows a
night Friday and Saturday
nights.
BREWER AND SHIPLEY
Mike and Tom respectively is
that duo and their sound is full
and rich and fun and has gained
much from whats been
happening in the country and
western music bag for the past
twenty years or so.
I havent heard them live yet,
but a record by the pair is more
than impressive. The music is
varied and fresh. Their voices are
quite versatile and have richness.
The record, released by Kama
Sutra, features some of the top
musicians working in America
today as backup people. The list
includes Mike Bloomfield, Mark
Naftalin, Nicky Hopkins and
others
It isnt known yet if Brewer
and Shipley will be bringing a
backup group with them to The
Rat or if they will be performing
along with their own accoustic
instruments. They should be
good in either case.
IN ADDITION to a country
influence, the pair of songwriters
and singers have done some nice
things with soft rock. A
recorded version of Dylans All
Along the Watchtower shows
this nicely.

The pair have performed in
many college clubs including the
University of Miami last
weekend where they were
received with enthusiasm. They
also have toured widely in the
Midwest.
There will be shows at 8:30
and 11 p.m. Friday and
Saturday. Admission price is
$1.50.

M TACO RANCHO M
H BUSTS BEER BARRIER.. Efl
M Low-Low Prices |j
W DRAFT CAN 6PK 24 CASEMfI
Mold Milwaukee .20 1.00 4.00 BjS
M ijL BUSCH .15 .20 1.10 4.40 Q
U TE SCHLITZ .25 1.25 5.00 0
RjS BUD .20 .25 1.30 5.20 R
B9li fiS
m WINDOW SERVICE UN

New Series Os Short
Films At Union Sunday
The second series of The Kinetic Art, a popular collection of
international short films will begin here this Sunday at the Reitz
Union Theater with Program One.
Series Two consists of three programs with eight films in each
program. The remaining two programs in this series will be shown
later in the quarter.
MANY CRITICS have called the Kinetic Art series the best
collections of short films being shown anywhere in the World today.
In addition to student filmmakers, the Kinetic series heavily relies
upon the work of major independent moviemakers from around the
World.
There will be four shows Sunday, at 2:30, 5, 7:30 and 10 pjn.
Admission is sl.
The films included in this Sundays program (with the distributors
descriptions) are:
UNKNOWN REASONS Fred Mogubgub, New York
Combining animation and live action, Mogubgub allows the
Tarot cards to tell his fate, as inks, colors and pens are taken
over by (he Unconscious. The King of pop art is exploring new
ground.
LA DIVINA John OConnor, U.S.C. Film School
An immaculate bride to the City of Angels rises from the dark
inferno of Dante and Dore.
THE WALL Jan Svankmajer, Prague
On an isolated farm in the back country, there is a living hedge
of people.
POEM FIELD NO. 1- Stan Vanderbeek, New York
A computer-made film. Dashing all mathematical formulae
aside, Vanderbeek pours honey and gold into a tumbling lyric
delight.
S.W.B. Gerard Pires, Paris
Gilles, the mod photographer who likes to quote Faulkner and
wreck police cars, searches for a girl who can replace his lost
model Sweet Wounded Bird. This brilliant take-off on some
recent big films runs far ahead in verve and impact factors
that are a large part of what cinema is all about. Subtitled.
CIRKUSZ Laslo Lugossy, Budapest
A Baroque entertainment: in vast backstage caverns, performers
practice under a pitiless regime. The impossible, which must be
achieved, is the operative mode of art. Subtitled.
BIRTHDAY Frank Roddam, London School of Film Technique An
awareness of life is the lyric resolution of this simply story.
EGYPTE, O EGYPTE Jacques Brissot, written and narrated by Jean
Cocteau
An ode to ancient Egypt, photographed in magnificent color.
The last film on which Cocteau worked, this legendary film has
never before been available. Unlike any other film, it is an
inspired combination of Cocteaus invocations. Subtitled.



19 *DJ- Viiwne dL, Milwaukee^anl
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Thursday, April 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

Page 21



The
Florida
Alligator

OVER GATOR GREATS

Dunn Thinking Os Victory

The All-Star fraternity team
will be practicing this Sunday at
4 pm. on Florida Field. The
team practiced last Sunday and
Coach Jimmy Dunn said the
spirit has been great.
Dunn, in fact, seems to think
his fraternity men can pull off
an upset in their encounter May
7 at Florida Field against the
former Gator-greats.
ASSISTING COACH DUNN
in his efforts for a big upset are
Gator quarterback John Reaves
and flanker Carlos Alvarez, who
will work with the offense. The
defensive assistants include
linebacker Mike Kelley and
monsterman Jack Bums.
But there appears to be some
weakness in the lineup, however.

[mCHALK talk iiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinmiiiiiiiiuniMniinnniiiiiiiiiiiMMiiiiiiiniiiiiiimiiffifflHimiiinmiinninnHnminimnniiin^
Too Many Hurtin 9 Gators I
gy CHUCK PARTUSCH

This spring's football preparations for next fall
are to be noted as one of the most unusual riddles
of Gatodand in many years. When new coach Doug
Dickey arrived he may have thought he was
inheriting the nucleus of the nation's number 10
ranked team.
But now after the first 12 days of spring practice
he may have trouble finding most of that team that
defeated his then Tennessee team 14-13 in the
Gator Bowl.
IN CASE YOU haven't guessed it by now, I'm
talking about the considerable number of injuries
that are presently hampering the work of the team.
An old wise saying goes that injuries are costly.
Very costly in fact because Coach Dickey has
brought a new type of offense and defense with him
and he obviously needs time to implement his
program.
After Saturdays game-type scrimmage at Florida
Field Dickey said right now he and his staff are
working with boys that will be playing second and
third team.
WHAT HE WAS getting at is that the boys who
will probably be on the first units, particularly in
the case of linemen, are out right now with injuries
or are recovering from off-season operations.
And their absences hurt because it slows down
the actual time implementation, especially in the
area of timing and coordination between linemen
and backs on offense. Defensively the time loss will
not be as crucial because adjustments there have to
be made in relationship to the opponents offense.
Now what Im saying is mostly relevent from a
total view of offensive and defensive units. I'm not
even considering the individual time it takes on the
part of an injured player to get into shape for his
position.
RIGHT NOW THE Gators have five offensive
linemen that Dickey says he is counting on for
either first or second team duty. Included in this
select group are Donnie Williams (knee operation),

GATOR SPORTS

The team is having some
difficulty coming up with a
defensive backfield that can
keep up with the likes of
Richard Trapp.
ALL THOSE fraternity men
who think that the All Campus
selectors might have overlooked
the real athletes are invited to
attend and receive a tryout this
Sunday. Coach Dunn will give

UF Bumps Rawlings
In a late afternoon game Tuesday, Coach Dave Fullers baseball
nine captured a 5-2 victory over the Rollins Tars in Winter Park.
The Gators now turn full attention back to the Southeastern
Conference fight as they prepare to face Georgias growling Bulldogs
Friday and Saturday at Florida Field. Game time is set for 3 pm. on
Friday and 10 am. on Saturday.

Dale Hutcherson (knee), Gene Conrad (bruised
shoulder), Jim Kiley (knee), and Randy Warbritton
(knee). Os these players, only Conrad has been able
to work out part time. The other four players,
because of their knee operations, will not work until
fall practice when all are expected to return 100 per
cent.
Now the reasons for injuries on the team are only
explainable as just one of those things. I mean
basically they are attributable to freak accidents to
parts of the body (like knees) that give way under
constant contact.
If anything, Coach Dickey has tried to eliminate
injuries by strongly stressing a Monday weight
training program for the entire team.
ALSO HE HAS introduced football shoes that
have shorter cleats than the normal ones the team
uses during the regular season games. By using the
shorter half-inch cleated shoes theres less chance of
a player tearing a knee out when hit because his feet
are not as firmly planted and consequently his feet
give and not his knees.
Now, besides these time consuming injuries there
is also another group of players that have nagging
type injuries, but this group is not losing the
valuable time in getting into Dickeys program as
the first group.
BUT IN SPITE of all the injuries that are
besetting Dickey and his staff, there is some
optimism on the coaches' part. One reason is many
players that are working now are gaining much
experience and two, when the returning injured
player returns Dickey and staff can expect some
spirited personal battles for starting positions.
But the factor of time will still be the important
point of consideration, at least from the standpoint
of how well the Gators can do in early season
games.
The Gators' first game, after all, is only a few
months away Sept. 12 against Duke to be exact.

everyone a fair shake.
There has also been an
attempt to find the SAE brother
who played defensive back
against the Sigma Nus and who
slipped behind the Sigma Nu
defense for a long double pass
touchdown to break a tie. This
SAE should leave his name at
the Intramural Department to be
contacted.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 22

I Intramurals
wiwimwmiiiiinmiiiiiinn hiiubbihiiihiiihi By Steve Rohan
Pi Kappa Alpha moved into a tie for second place with Sigma Chi,
just 13 points behind the Betas after stopping TEP in tennis, 3-1.
The match was played over two days due to a rain delay. On the
first day Dwight Rogers of the Pikes beat the TEPs Mickey Ross 4-0,
4-2. Pikes Jeff Graf nosed out Eddie Held, 4-1,24,4-2.
TEPS UNDEFEATED number one doubles team gave the TEPs
their only win of the match Tuesday by stopping Charlie Riechman
and Brian Goodheim, 4-1, 3-5, 7-5. Rodney Margol and Lee Borden
posted their fourth consecutive win in this match.
But Dave Brown and Bill Mandeville edged Richard Simon and Eric
Kaplan, 7-5, 9-7, to clinch the victory for the Pikes. The number one
singles match between Tom Smith and Jim Stark was cancelled after
being knotted up at 4-1,14.
WHILE THE PIKES victory put them in excellent position to take
over the lead after track, the TEPs found themselves 43 points from
the lead and in rather bad shape.
Nearly all the leading fraternities seem to be claiming track
superiority. The most interest seems to be centered around the 100-
and 220-yd. dashes. It wouldnt be surprising, however, to see the
fraternities farther down the ladder in the Orange standings coming up
with the top performances in these events. Or for that matter, the
whole event. The FIJIs for one, have always had a strong track team
and a victory by them would at least get them off the bottom of the
Orange League.

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The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 23,1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Student Spedal
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Forty Niners Lose Candlestick. Title

The fans of the San Francisco
Forty Niners, as they have done
for so many years, will be
guzzling their beer for at least
one more round in the faded and
splintery environs of Kezar
Stadium.
San Francisco Public Works
Director Myron Tatarian
recommended approval Tuesday
of a $1,140,000 bid by Rollway
Construction Co. to install 7,000
movable seats in Candlestick
Park to accommodate the
National Conference Football
Team.
However, the bid specifies
that construction would not be
completed until March 1,1971.
Forty Niner President Lou
Spadia said he has verbal
assurances from the Los Angeles
firm to try and speed
completion for a December
1970, target date.
Meantime, though, the Niners
will be back in old Kezar
Stadium. And so will their fans.
SAN FRANCISCO football
lovers must roam all over Golden
Gate Park for parking spaces,
then hike to the faded pink and
gray stadium, only to be
rewarded by a knee in the back
from the cramped quarters of
the bleacher-type seats.
But there is compensation
usually, plenty of it.
Unlike the Oakland Coliseum
across the bay, there are no rules
against bringing beer into Kezar.
The fans have made it a Sunday
tradition over the years of
lugging in the stuff by the
carton, on their shoulders, and

Baseball

NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
Chicago 8 3 .727
St. Louis 7 4 .636 1
Pittsburgh 7 4 .636 1
New York 7 6 .538 2
Philadelphia 5 8 .385 4
Montreal 1 8 .111 6
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 13 4 .765
San Francisco 7 8 .467 5
Houston 7 8 .467 5
Los Angeles 5 7 .4L7 stt
San Diego 6 9 .400 6
Atlanta 5 9 .357 6%
WEDNESDAYS RESULTS
New York 2, San Diego 1
Philadelphia 6, San Francisco 1
Chicago 7, St. Louis 5
Houston at Pittsburgh (night)
Los Angeles at Montreal (night)
THURSDAYS GAMES
Atlanta at Pittsburgh
Cincinnati at St. Louis
AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
(Night Games Not Included)
W L PCT GB
Detroit 8 3 .727
Baltimore 8 5 .615 1
Washington 5 5 .500 2%
Boston 6 6 500 2 %
New York 5 9 .357 4Yi
Cleveland 37 .300 4%
W L PCT GB
Minnesota 8 2 .800
Lahfomia 9 4 692 %
Kansas City 6 6 .500 3
2jf land 6 7 .462 3%
Mil? 80 4 8 .333 5
Milwaukee 3 9 250 6
WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS
5, Baltimore 2
3> ChiC9 * 1 < 5 innin **
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2 =S".'SSf,W
THURSDAYS GAMES
Wew York *t Washington

basking beneath the seagulls to
take repeated gulps while
watching the Forty Niners frolic
below.
* *
Y. A. TITTLE has left the San
Francisco Forty Niners once
again. This time, however, the
choice was his.
Tittle and Mike Holovak quit
their assistant coaching jobs
Tuesday. Both said they cannot
devote the time needed to serve
the National Conference football
club.
After retiring as > quarterback
of the New York Giants,Tittle
came back to San Francisco in
1965 as a tutor for Forty Niner
quarterbacks. He worked
full-time during training camp
but only part-time once the
season got underway. His

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lucrative insurance business in
Redwood City now is
demanding too much time for
him to carry on a double career.
Holovak coached the Forty
Niner offensive backfield last
season after eight years as head
man with the Boston Patriots.
Holovak said he must stay in
Boston to care for his ailing
wife.
* *
BRITAINS FIRST challenge
to the Kentucky Derby faded
Wednesday when David
Sandeman withdrew his horse
Double Splash because he has
not reached his expected form
on dirt.
I fully intend to be back in
America next year with another
three year old, said Sandeman,
who paid SIOO,OOO for the grey
colt after he had heard that no

British horse had ever run in the
American Classic.
Sandeman, 39-year-old head
of a family sherry business, said
at the time that it is high time
we British turned around and
gave them one in the eye
because the Americans are over
here buying horses to win our
classics.
Double Splash was the first
r acehorse he had ever purchased.
* *
JOHN SURTEES of Britain
will replace injured Jackie Ickx
of Belgium at the wheel of a
Ferrari in the 1,000 kilometers
of Monza Sunday.
Surtees drove the big red
racers three years ago but quit
over contract terms.
An announcement by Ferrari
in Modena, Italy said he agreed
to take the place of Ickx, who

Thursday, April 23,1970, The Florida Alligator,

was burned last Sunday when his
Ferrari caught fire after a
collision.
Ickx is not expected to
compete again for two or three
weete.
_____ SpofUs* L
Fawn deer lose their spots
when they are two to three
months old.
Cousys Scoring
CINCINNATI (UPI) Bob
Cousy, new coach and part-time
player with the Cincinnati
Royals, is the only player in
National Basketball Association
history to score more than 1,000
points in 13 different seasons.
He did it with the Boston
Celtics.

Page 23



24

1, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 23, 1970

( On Wheels "1
liiniinimiiiiwwii nniiHtmmiHaiiHtHHimiittiuj Bo Benyimm
What Is Car Racing?
It is a little known fact, but auto racing is the nations number two
spectator sport behind horseracing. Thats right, more people go and
pay to see motor racing than baseball or football.
It is a commonly held belief by many people who dont go to
races, and some who do, that the main attraction is that some driver
will lose it in some comer and crash against the wall. Other people go
to have a drunken bash, and never see the race. Surely this is part of
spectating a race, but only a small part.
TAKE DRAG RACING, the part of the sport that draws the most
spectators. The idea is to build and drive a machine to accelerate as
fast as possible down a quarter mile road. Man controlling brute
power is what makes it so interesting.
Up the stageing lane comes the king of the drag machines, a
double-A fuel dragster capable of 230 m.pJi. in 6.5 seconds. A man
sits cramped in the rear of the machine dressed in a fire-proof suit.
The engine ignites and a bellowing sound results that makes you hurry
to cover your ears. One man sits on top of all that power and brings it
to the line. A yellow light comes on and four others follow at one
second intervals, then the green light. Now is the tiny passing of time
that is drag racing. The already loud noise becomes a roar. Two huge
rear tires smoke from the sudden surge of power making them spin.
They grip the road and man and machine rip down the strip. Now add
another man and car and you have the basics of drag racing, and what
makes it interesting.
LOOK AT STOCK CAR racing, a big Southern favorite. What looks
at a glance to be an ordinary American car with numbers painted on it
is at a closer look a finely tuned and modified race car. It may look
just like the one you drive every day. You root for it and the driver to
win. For 500 miles the race goes around a super speedway of maybe
three or four miles long. Cars hurtle around the oval only inches apart
doing 200 m.p.h. It can become long and a bit boring. But during this
time a big factor of stock car racing comes to play.
A cars tires are wearing out, the gas is low, the temperature is hot,
meaning water and oil. The car turns from the speedway down pit
lane still moving fast. A screaching, sliding halt, and what takes 15
minutes at your local service station is done in close to 15 seconds. A
game of speed.
Four men throw two jacks under the car and the machine goes up.
The driver sips a Coke and revs the engine making the car rock. Four
tires are yanked off and four fresh ones thrown on. Water and oil
added, the jacks fall, the engine roars and the car leaves two black
strips out of the pit 15 seconds have passed.
THE FINAL EXCITEMENT comes on the last lap. Your driver is in
second place right on the leaders tail. Will he be first across the finish
line? The back stretch and he is still second, the last bend and here he
comes.
Yes, exciting, but there is more to racing. There are the
international endurance races. Men and machines from all over the
world gather. There are the bright red Italian Ferraris, baby blue
German Prosches, light blue French Matras, American Ford GTs,
British Lolas, and Italian Alfa Romeos.
For hours these finely developed machines will speed around,
trying to outlast the other and still go fast enough to win. It too can
become long, but there are the special moments.
A FERRARI, a Ford and a Chapparal coming screaming down the
track for the first lap. They are side by side. Noise and flash of color
make my adrenaline flow.
Or at night a Ferrari slips around a hairpin with two pencil beams
of light leading the way. The driver pushes the power on and the 12
cylinders engine screams a sweet sound. A surge and another gear is in
place.
Endurance races also have their dramatic endings. At LeMans last
year, number one Porsche breaks and a six year old Ford leads by less
than a lap on the one remaining Prosche. Almost 24 hours have
passed, its almost over, but the Porsche is closing in. The last lap and
the two cars can be seen together. The long wait, then the far off
straining screams of two cars. Ford still leads and holds on by a mere
100 yards to win after 24 hours of long grueling racing.
These are just a few of the types of racing. There are Can-Ams,
Trans-Ams, Formula As and the premier Formula One to name a few
more of the big racing series. What they all have is an exciting blur of
color and noise of competition at fast speeds with men of all types in
that blur.
It is another world from the hum-drum everyday world. One that
offers something to almost everyone. That makes it such a big
spectator sport, and makes more people try to become part of it.
FOOTBALL
Spring Practice
TENNIS
Cape Cowl Invitational

Black Hawks Down 2-0,
Must Stop Bruins In Boston

Boston and St. Louis both boast 2-0 leads in their
respective division finals of the National Hockey
League playoffs, but the Bruins are in even better
position than the Blues.
The Bruins shocked the Black Hawks by winning
both games played in Chicago and now can wind up
the series by winning the next two games on their
home ice, where theyve been beaten only three
times this season.
WHILE THE BLUES also are in commanding
position in their best-of-seven set, they must play
the next two games at Pittsburgh, where the
Penguins should perform better than they did in St.
Louis. Both series resume tonight.
Weve finally got it all going, Bruin Coach
Harry Sinden said following his teams 6-3 and 4-1
victories at Chicago. Weve got the right
combination of offense and defense and its given us

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a little momentum. The thing weve got to guard
against now is the feeling of comfort of being at
home. That wont work.
Sinden would express no thoughts on the
possibility of a four-game sweep over the Hawks,
who finished first in the East Division during the
regular season.
I KNOW IVE said it before, but the next game
is the key game, he said. I cant help it if thats a
cliche but thats the way it is.
Jack Riley, general manager of the Penguins, said
he felt expected near-capacity crowds in Pittsburgh
would help his team draw even against St. Louis.
There will be no St. Louis crowd there
tomorrow night to intimidate our players, Riley
said Wednesday. The home crowd definitely makes
a difference to the players on the ice.