Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
'AVtV.%v. .vt%v.v.%%y/.y.yw*%y.%wyA%%YA%v.vwAv.v.%v.v.v.v.v, T 9 PER CENT UNDECIDED
1 |
I Poll Indicates Uhlfelder Favored By Voters 1
x A

By GINA SCHRAMM
g And CHUCK LIGHTNER
Alligator Staff Writers
8
: Five per cent of student support may decide the
outcome of Wednesdays elections,
j: This margin is all that separates Steve Uhlfelder and
: Focus party from Alan Howes and Do It party.
j THIS FIGURE is the result of a random sample poll
: of approximately 1 per cent of the student body taken
: by the Alligator Monday.

"Pafe/.
AM. Amikum.

Vol. 62, No. 123

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BCW CAMIYBDC
, ANTI-COMBUSTION MARCHERS
... Seymour Block, Mark Gordon, Ken Watson
FIGURES DON 7 ADD UP
Rats 'Break Even
Report Questioned

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
A questionable renegotiated
contract, a S3OO table and S6OO
for a Student Government
inaugural banquet dont add up
to a break even quarter for
UFs Rathskeller.
Figures supplied by Alan
Howes the Rathskellers
manager last quarter and Do It
party candidate for Student
Body President to the
VOTE! WEDNESDAY is
SG election day.
Location of polling
precincts listed ... page 2
Clarified* 14
Editorials 6
Letters 7
Movies ' IS
Orange sod Blue 16
Spoils 18
What's Happening 3

The
Florida Alligator

accounting firm which handles
the club, indicated that the
Rathskeller broke even during
winter quarter.
HOWEVER, questions have
been raised about the figures
questions whiph a Student
Senate committee is
investigating.
Early last quarter, Your
Fathers Mustache appeared at
the Rathskeller. The Original
contract promised them $3,000
for the weekend.
Howes said the contract was
made before he became
manager.
SOMETIME after the
performance, the contract was
renegotiated so we only owed
them $2,200.
Howes said the contract was
renegotiated by Marvin Chavis,
chairman of the Rathskeller.
John Marotta, business
manager of Your Fathers
Mustache said Monday that this
was pure fabrication.
THE GROUP received
payment of SI,OOO after their
performance, Marotta said.

Telephone calls were made to students living both
off and on campus. However, no significant difference
in voting patterns was found.
The students contacted were asked whether or not
they intended to participate in the elections. If they
indicated a desire to vote they were then asked their
choice of candidate or party.
UHLFELDER was supported by 33 per cent of
those contacted; while Howes was backed by 29 per
cent. Andy Kramer of Student Freedom Party
collected nine per cent.

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

University of Florida, Gainesville

; W V JHI
ALAN HOWES
... Rat broke even?
He said Howes told him the
Rathskeller just did not have the
rest of the money at that time,
but the group would be paid.
After having made several
calls to the Rathskeller, he spoke
with Marvin Chavis, chairman of
the club.
CHAVIS and I discussed the
possibility of the groups settling
for $1,500 more within 10 days.
(SEE HAT' PAGE 2)

s
Four per cent of the votes were split between
Robert (Flash) Matte and Jimmey Bailey, both
independents.
Students who were undecided as to their choice of
candidate or party comprised 19 per cent of those :j:
polled. A small number reported they would not take
part in the elections (six per cent). :j:
Student Government elections are operated on a £
plurality rather than a majority basis, thus eliminating :
the need of a possible run-off. Under this system the :
candidate with the most votes is elected. ji

'Pollution: Problem
Os Management
Rain and last minute speaker cancellations maned the start of
Mondays Environmental Teach-In.
Ralph Nader, the scheduled speaker, could not attend because of
transportation and contract problems.
IN HIS place, four speakers, presented their views at al p.m. Plaza
of the Americas rally. Capt. W. L. Guthrie of Eastern Airlines, Dr.
Alex Green, graduate research professor in physics and astronomy,
and Dr. Robert S. Sholtes, professor of environmental engineering.
Also, Julian Juergensmayer, visiting professor of law spoke before an
audience estimated at 2SO persons.
The rally was moved to the University Auditorium because of rain.
Guthrie spoke on Management of Waste Materials. He outlined
the pollution problem as a problem of language.
IF WE straightened out our language and looked at pollution wed
find that it wasnt social or economic, he said. The problem is the
failure of the person who owns the waste materials to get rid of it
effectively.
Pollution is nothing but displaced property -a problem of
management, Guthrie said.
An Alternative Locomotion Parade began at 2:30 pm. in the plaza,
with 60 participants. The parade welcomed all forms of locomotion
other than the internal combustion engine, especially bicycles.
OTHER METHODS Qf locomotion included walking, jogging, and
shopping carts. There was a sign advertising horses, but none showed
up.
The parade ended at the Gainesville City Hall, where Governor
Claude Kirks proclamation of Environmental Teach-In Day, April 22,
was read.
At 4 pm. the Department of Physical Science sponsored a Teach-In
(SEE 'RAIN' PAGE 2)
Locomotion Paraders
March On City Hall
By CHARLOTTE O'CONNOR
Alligator Staff Writer
I hitched up my skirt, grasped my umbrella firmly, and marched on
city hall.
Hoofing it to city hall all the way from the Plaza of the Americas
was the only way I could give fair coverage to the Environmental
Action Groups Alternative Locomotion Parade, Monday.
WE ALL STARTED down University Avenue and were promptly
stopped by the Gainesville Police. We showed our parade permit and
were told to stick to one lane no sweat.
All kinds of people marched, from professors and UF students to
GHS students and little kids.
We all had one thing in common WE looked healthier than the
people in the cars.
I ASKED one girl if she was a UF student YES! she said, Do I
lode any younger?
I said, I coldnt tell with you sitting down. She was riding in a
shopping cart.
The most beautiful quote that floated on the banners was from
POGO, We have met the enemy and they are us!
I EVEN jogged for about half a block with Roy Benjamin of the
UF track team.
Most of the professors were on bikes. They are very serious about
bike riding in Florida.
When we got to city hall, the cyclist started to cilde the patio and
(SEE TARADE'PAGE 2)

V Ky

Tuesday, April 21, 1970



!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 21,1970

Page 2

Rathskeller Broke Even?

PA6e"oNI^|
He said he would call me back
and let me know. He didnt call,
so I was supposed to receive the
full amount by May 1
Marotta said if something is
not done, the group will sue for
the money.
The way it looks now, I
could lose my job. The owner of
the group told me Id better get
the money back.
HE SAID he probably would
have taken action sooner, but he
was led to believe he had made
the deal with UF, rather than a
private corporation the
Rathskeller.
Student Body President
Walter Morgan said he is waiting
for the senate committee to
complete their investigation
before he takes any action.
I will then ask the senate to
assume the financial and legal
responsibility of the debt.
HE SAID the money could be
taken from SG reserve funds.
It is an obligation SG and
the Rathskeller took upon
themselves when they opened
the Rathskeller. Legally we are
not responsible, but the original
intention was that the Faculty
Club would not be financially
responsible.

Probe: Campus Wide
The Alligator, last Friday, printed a story in which we referred to
the Florida Probe as a Sin City magazine. This was due to an
interview given to the Alligator by Probe staffer Helen Huntley.
Carol Sanger, co-editor of the Probe, notified the Alligator Monday
that the Probe is a campus wide magazine. It will be distributed
door-to-door in the apartment complex areas as well as 12 locations
on campus.
Rain Mars Teach-In
pROM PAGE ONEJ
seminar in Bless Auditorium. The topic was The Universitys Role in
Atmospheric Control.
THE SEMINAR was a repeat of the rally in the plaza earlier in the
afternoon.
At 7:30 pan., a mixed media Earth Revival was held in Walker
Auditorium. The revival was a combination of efforts by
photographers, musicians, and the UF theatre group, The Florida
Players.
The presentation included a band, The Frosted Glass, slide shows
and guerilla theatre.
Environment Parade
then the hall itself. Governor Claude Kirks proclamation was read
proclaiming April 22 as Environmental Teach-In Day.
ONE LADY bystander reminisced, Remember when we had to
ride bikes during the war to save on gas? Most of the watchers on the
parade route were shopkeepers who came out to shake their heads.
Funny, I didnt see anybbdy frowning when we got to the bike shop.
The impact of the parade really hit me (and might have killed me)
when I was offered a ride back to campus by a friendly bike rider.
Balancing mayself on the handlebars of an English racer Oh, the
pain! I met Gainesville's gasoline-fed traffic face to face.
Most drivers dont realize it but they have far more control of their
cars then the average bike rider. They just don't care how close they
come to hitting someone.
Bicycles are economical. Bicycles are healthy. Bicycles dont cause
traffic jams. Bicycles don't kill people either by hitting them or
suffocating them.
It's something to think about, wouldn't you say?
. THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
June, July and August when its published semi-weekly, and during student
holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions
of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz
Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The
Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office
at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year and $3.50 per Quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice Is given to the advertising manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
Insertion.

A S3OO table, which the
Rathskeller tried to sell to the
philosophy department last year,
has also created problems.
MORGAN said the sale of the
table was illegal because it is
state property being sold to a
state agency, by a state agency.
He said die Rathskeller
received a letter stating this is
illegal and the money should not
be listed as accounts receivable.
Howes said the Rathskeller
would get the table back.
DISCUSSION has also arisen
concerning the balance of the
debt owed by the Rathskeller to
SG.
The figures released by the
Rathskeller list a balance of
$8,300. However, Morgan said it
should be $8,900.
Last year, SGs inaugural
banquet was held in the
Rathskeller. Morgan said before
the banquet, the senate said they
would not pay for the affair.
HE SAID the Rathskeller held
the banquet anyway, but now
they are trying to deduct the
S6OO for their $9,500 loan.
Howes said former Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd had agreed that the
S6OO for the affair which had
been written off as a bad debt

could be deducted from the SG
loan.
Morgan said Shepherd did not
have the power to do this only
the senate could make this
decision.
Howes said there seems to be
a concerted effort to slur the
Rathskeller.
Other political parties are
trying to make political gains at
the expense of myself and the
Rathskeller. They sold out to
their own ambitions and jumped
on the allegations. They are just
making it more of a political
ploy.

Voting Places
Polling Precincts Location Classification Voting

Graduate Library
Norman Hall
New Engineering Complex
Weil Hall
Matherly Hall
Architecture and Fine
Arts Complex
Law Conrplex
Stadium
McCarty Hall
Rofles Hall
Florida Gym
Medical Center
Hume Hall
Graham Hall
Tolbert Area
Murphee Area
Jennings Hall
Yulee Area
Broward Hall Area
Walker Auditorium

Must have picture ID & Spring (Green) Fee Card to vote.
No exceptions. Driver's Licenses will not be accepted. __
GOOD TUESDAY ONLY
I KMh Tried thicken I
214 N.W. 13th st.
m 376-6472 114 S.W. 34th St.
jl 372-3649
I msM)i d box R 99C j
I 3 Pc. Chicken
I Mashed Potatoes Reg. 1.25 1
J

Threats,Vandalisrr)
Mar Campaigns

By TERRY PITMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
A last minute rash of
incidents indicates some mud
slinging in the Student
Government elections.
Focus party has been victim
of at least three incidents of
apparent according to
Judy Jasper, UF duplicating and
poster service department.
DO IT party candidate Alan
Howes said his wife has received
calls threatening her and their
child if he does not withdraw
from the student body
presidential race.
Original stencils for Focus
party campaign flyers were
received by some one who signed
an illegible name. Stencils with
fabricated candidates, inane
misspellings, and twisted
sentences replaced the originals
in two of the incidents, Miss
Jasper said.

Plaza Colonnade
Area Across from Main
Auditorium Doors
Area Adjacent to Entrance
of North Electrical Bldg.
* Lobby
Basement Entrance Lobby
Walkway Between AFA
Bldgs. A and C
Rear Colonnade Wall
Gate 3
Between Bldgs. A & B
Entrance Lobby
Basement
Second Floor Lobby
Walkway by Cafeteria
Lobby
South Hall Study Rm.
Fletcher K Study Rm.
Lobby
Front Porch of Yulee H
Lobby
Colonnade

Scott Gabrielson, Corry
Village mayor, said a letter was
drawn up by Focus party f or
distribution to married students
concerning things of importance
to them.
THE FOLLOWING day
members of Do It party came
into Corry Village and placed
letters of a similar platform in
our mail boxes. While they were
there they also tore down a
number of Uhlfelder posters,
Gabrielson said.
It is my opinion that the
second letter came from the
First. Anyone can tell that they
are taken from the same
source, Gabrielson said.
WERE THINKING about
taking it to Honor Court, but we
feel that these tactics wM
probably do more harm than
good in themselves, said
Gabrielson.
2,600 Focus party flyers for
distribution to married students
were stolen in a third incident.

Arts and Sciences
Education
Engineering
Engineering
Business Administration
Architecture
Law
Journal inn
Agriculture
Forestry
Physical Education
Nursing, Medicine,
Pharmacy, and Health
Related Professions
University College
University College
University College
University College
i
University College
University College
University College
University College ;



Bailey.. Free Football Tickets For Students

Presidential candidate Jimmey
Bailey has presented an alternate
ticket plan, which would allow
students, dates, faculty and staff
to attend home football games
free.
Bailey said his plan revolves
around the idea that the position
of the seat should determine the
price.
IN BASEBALL, box seats,
foul line seats, bleacher seats and
upper deck seats are all different
prices, Bailey said. The same
is possible for football. Its done
in professional football and at
some universities, like UCLA,

HEAR YE HEAR YE: Dialogue presents the presidential candidates
tonight at 11:05 on WRUF, sponsored by FBK. The discussions will
center around the UPD, the Rathskeller and the Student Union. This
is the last chance to hear the candidates before the election.
MYSTIC: Bohass, the mystic who spoke as the eclipse darkened UF
will speak Tuesday at noon in the Plaza of the Americas. Folk singer
Bo Rivers will play, and Flash will flash.
CAVING CAPERS: The UF Speleological Society meets tonight at
7 in room 342 of the Union.
TIP TOE: The Music Department presents a Band Concert tonight
in the Union Ballroom at 8:15.
SKI: The Gator Ski Club meets tomorrow at 8 pjn. in room 150 of
the Union.
SINGLES MIX AND MINGLE: The Gainesville Singles Club meets
today at 8 pjn. at the Ironwood Country Club. Bar drinks at 55 cents.
ENCOUNTER SCHEDULE: The UF Counseling Center in Little
Hall is sponsoring encounter group sessions, for more infor call
392-1578.
Monday, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. (individual students)
Wednesday, 1 to 3:15 p.m. (individual students)
Wednesday, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. (black and white students)
Thursday, 7 to 9 pjn. (individual students)

Soviets Want Ford Factory

MOSCOW (UPI) Henry Ford 11, whose family
has been building cars for Americans for more than
60 years, said Monday the Soviets had asked his
company to consider building the worlds largest
truck factory in eastern Russia.
He said he would return to the United States to
determine whether Ford can handle the project
which would produce 150,000 trucks a year at a
factory on the Kama Riverland.
I AM A FREE trader and I am willing to consider
anything that does not involve the defense interests
of the United States, the American automaker
said.
He said a truck factory of the proportions
envisioned by the Russians may be a defense item.

IT'S HERE...
by VAN M EUSEN*
Turn thumbs down on uptight shirt I
fashions! Change over to Van
Heusen 417" shirts with the HBSHIH
liberated look! We have em now I HSoNfl
in a collection of wide awake I IgNSttSSJ
stripes and solids. In your choice I
of the new longer point Brooke I 1
collar or the classic button-down
style plus the no-ironing conveni- I
ence of permanently pressed Vano- J JOUjmfpi
press. Rise up, rebels... Its time
to spring for a new 417" shirt Mill
from Van Heusen.
Downtown on tht squart

Texas, Alabama and Oklahoma.
Bailey said the seats on the
west side of the stadium
between the 40-yard lines would
cost sls. Between the 20- and
40-yard lines, seats would be
sl3 in the lower half of the
stadium and sl2 in the upper
half. From the 20-yard line to
the end zone, seats would cost
$lO in the lower half and sll in
the upper.
End zone seats would cost $7
a piece.
SEATS ON the east side of
the stadium would be for
students, their dates, staff and

PLAN WOULD MAKE PROFIT TOO

If accepted by Ford, the Kama River deal would
be one of the biggest economic pacts ever made
between the Soviet Union and a foreign firm.
At least six other companies in Europe and Japan
have been approached by the Soviets to handle the
Kama River project but most have declined because
of its size.
Ford was noncommittal on the possibility of
Ford accepting the proposal even if U. S.
government clearance was obtained. He said
extensive study and negotiation were needed and
stressed that his company would not accept a deal
in which we simply turn over the factory and have
no continuing interest in it.

faculty. These people would
pick up their seat assignments at
ticket windows approximately
one week before the game. The
tickets would be free.
Bailey said there are
approximately 27,000 seats in
the east stands. He said an
estimated 7,000 ofHh&se would
not be used by university-related
people.
He said these could be sold by
the Athletic Association at $7 a
seat.
BAILEY SAID that from the
five home games which UFs
football team will play next
year, ticket sales will come to
almost $2 million if his plan is
followed.
That will be enough to
completely underwrite what the
Athletic Association said it
would need for the year.
Bailey said each of the other
six games, the away games,
would yield at least $30,000
apiece.
BAILEY SAID the association
is now a private, non-profit
corporation.
But I am trying to get the
Florida Legislature to enact the
necessary legislation to place the
Athletic Association at all state
universities back into the
university system, he said.
Bailey said that as the system
is now, the Athletic Association
is a private corporation but has
access to money taken from
students supposedly to finance
education.
HE SAID it seems to him that
it is illegal to take money from a
citizen for one thing and use it

uwffl

s* *5 t 1
PB w
~ lli
BAILEY
... wants free tickets
for something else.
Bailey said that UFs present
system of ticket sales leads to
money-buying favors.
MEMBERS OF the Gator
Booster Club pay SSO per year
dues on each seat, in addition to
the cost of the seat, he said.
Bailey said there is no public
record of what is done with this
money.

APRIL SPECIAL
tv J/f\J "Madeleine's
I \ ( makes the new look
' the you look."
HAIR STYLISTS
1250 W. UNIVERSITY AVE
RAMADA INN ARCADE 378-6811

Tuesday, April 21, 1970, The Florida Alligator,

He said the club works like
Gov. Claude Kirks Peoples
Club.
BUT THEY are not being
investigated because Bill
Andrews, who is the chairman of
the committee investigating the
Peoples Club, is a member of
the Gator Booster Club.
My plan will work. It is
financially sound and the reserve
clause sets up what is to be done
with the excess profits, because
there will be profits, Bailey
said.
Bailey said the clause would
establish percentages which
would go into the different
areas, such as:
retirement of the debt on
Yon Hall,
football scholarships,
building and renovation of
university facilities,
Gator Loan Fund,
Student Government, for
funding various organizations.
He said that once one of these
areas is completed, such as
retirement of the debt, the
percentage for the others will
rise still equaling 100 per cent.

Page 3



Page 4

v The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 21,1970

Challenge Os 70s;Womens Convention I heme

Two hundred fifty delegates from 16 states came to UF
April 16-19 for the regional convention of the
Intercollegiate Association of Women Students (LAWS)
here on campus.
The delegates were student representatives from their
colleges and their dean of women.
THE CENTRAL theme of the conference was Dawn
of a Decade Challenge *70.
Anthropologist Margaret Mead began the conference
with a discussion via telephone entitled The Challenge of
Self-Involvement, a general forum of womens status.
Also speaking on self-involvement was Barbara Jo
Rubin, woman jockey, who spoke on Breaking Into a
Male Career.
THE CHALLENGE of Civic Involvement was taken
up by Mrs. June Wakeford from the U. S. Department of
Labor, Wage and Labor Standards Administration. She
spoke on the need for women to work in uniting together
to obtain legislative equality.
Mrs. Catherine East, executive secretary of the Citizens

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ENTHUSIASTIC ADMIRER SUNNY BARL "

After the concert of Carlos Montoya, famed
Flamenco guitarist, the artist was beseiged with
autograph seekers. This girl, whose expression defies

Antiwar Moratorium Committee
Disbands As National Group

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Vietnam Moratorium
Committee, the peace group that
brought a national focus to
antiwar sentiment, has
disbanded as a national
organization.
We felt we were becoming
peace bureaucrats, Sam Brown,
leader of the Moratorium told
UPI Sunday. The moratorium
was conceived as a strategy and
tactic and it had its day and we
feel the time has come for
something new.
THE STRATEGY of
the moratorium was organizing
local protests against the
Vietnam war rather than holding
one central mass protest.
The moratorium sponsored
the nationwide antiwar activity
of last Oct. IS. Although it has
sponsored similar activities since
the latest on April 15 it has
not been able to attain the
TOYTIME
Toys Hobbies
Juvenile Furniture
i Lft s,
A complete line of swim
goods and playground j
equipment.
1315 N.W. 16th Ava.
376-4576 Phone 376-4577
t .

success of its initial protest.
Brown emphasized, however,
that only the national office was
closing. Local chapters may
decide to carry on the
moratoriums activities. Most,

ALEXANDER EVSTAVIEV
PRESS CONSUL OF THE SOVIET EMBASSY
WILL SPEAK ON
SOVIETEDUCATION
ON APRIL 22, AT 8:00 PM IN THE JWRU BALLROOM
An Omicron Delta Kappa Student Government Production

MBBMMNNMMMMBBBjBBI
We gave the girls outlines on how
to start involvement groups on their
own campuses. We gave them
names, information and plans to
enable them to start programs such
mdiiw^^
Advisory Conned on file Status of Women (Dept, of
Labor), spoke on a forthcoming amendment which
concerns equal wages and job titles.
Caron Balk any, convention chairman, said, The
purpose of the convention was to expose a rather
conservative group to some of the alternative ways that
women have to achieve.
WERE considered very radical by the national
organization, she said. While other AWS groups are
discussing open house, curfew, dress codes and smoking,
were taking up sex education, womens liberation, day
care centers, and wastes.

any description except intenseness, received one of
the signatures.

IAWS DELEGATES

it appears, are going to stay
open, he said.
HE DENIED that the decision
to disband, made Saturday, was
the result of any disillusionment
with the neace movement

Kathy Waldman, President of the UF Womens
Commission, spoke on Is There An Alternative To
AWS?
MISS BALKANY explained the many open forums
given during the conference. Most of the girls had never
been exposed to these issues before. We set it up for them
to involve themselves.
We gave the girls outlines on how to start involvement
groups on their own campuses, she said. We gave them
names, information, and plans to enable them to start
programs such as Environmental Action Group and the
Comer Drugstore.
We also had a panel forum of Bethune Cookman
students discuss The Role Os Black Women on
Campus, she said.
Dr. Mary Calderone, National Chairman of Sex
Information and Education Council of the United States
(SIECUS), spoke on the roles of women conflicting with
motherhood. Dr. Calderone was a pioneer in the field of
sex education and planned parentage.

Impeach Douglas
Move Fought
WASHINGTON (UPI) Two Democratic House Rules Committee
members served notice Monday that they would fight a move to
establish a special impeachment committee to investigate Supreme
Court Justice William 0. Douglas.
Reps. Ray Madden, D-Ind., said the rules panel would become a
legislative laughing stock if it cleared for a house vote legislation to
set up a six-man select committee to hear charges of misbehavior
against the 71 -year-old jurist.
MADDEN is the second senior Democrat on the committee.
Rep. Richard Bolling, D-Mo., another rules committee Democrat,
said the impeachment threat, launched by 108 generaly conservative
members of both parties last Wednesday, was a patently ridiculous
attack on the institution of the Supreme Court, and the Democratic
party.
Bolling said he thought eight members of the 15-member rules
committee were against impeachment investigation, which would be
sufficient to kill the move in committee.
REP. LOUIS C. Wyman, R-N.H., who has led the conservative
impeachment attempt, drafted a letter Monday formally seeking a
hearing by Rules Chairman William C. Colmer, D-Miss.
Meantime, the impeachment move was developing into a
jurisdictional struggle between the Rules Committee, which has the
conservative-based impeachment plan, and the House Judiciary
Committee, which has another impeachment move, introduced by
liberal Rep. Andrew Jacobs J|, D-Ind.
Jacobs, who said he has an open mind on the charges of
misbehavior raised last Thursday by house GOP Leader Gerald R.
Ford, said the judiciary panel of lawyers was the proper forum for any
impeachment proceedings.
DOUGLAS, a Democrat who has been on the court since 1939,
came under fire from Ford for his former association with the Parvin
Foundation, which had Las Vegas gambling links.
His newest book Points of Rebellion, an excerpt from that
book in the April Evergreen magazine which also has pictures of nude
men and women in a separate article, and an article in a magazine
published by Ralph Ginzburg while Ginzburg had a libel case pending
in a lower federal court.



Investigation Os Apollo 13 Begins

SPACE CENTER, Houston (UPI) Their homecoming
celebrations over, Apollo 13s pilots Monday began
helpmg engineers unravel the mystery of an explosion that
turned Americas third moon landing flight into a tense
fight of survival.
The first step for James A. Lovell, Fred W. Haise and
John L. Swigert was to relive their ordeal in space,
minute-by-minute, in tape-recorded discussions.
CHIEF ASTRONAUT Donald K. Deke Slayton
closeted himself with the crew to help in this important
tnsk.'
There were times when we really didnt think wed
make it back here, Lovell said after his return to
Houston Sunday.
In Washington, Dr. Edgar M. Cortwright of the space
agencys Langley Research Center named to head an
official investigation met with top space agency leaders

iCambodian Crisis l
* jj
1 Increases Daily I
e
| SAN CLEMENTE, Calif. (UPI) President Nixons address
\ to the nation Monday night afforded him an opportunity for \
commenting for the first time on the upheavals which have ji
:j rocked Cambodia since the ouster of Prince Norodom Sihanouk. :
| The Nixon administration so far has given only vague details :
i of its policy toward the new regime of Gen. Lon Nol. j:
IT HAS GIVEN no indication of how it will cope with the :
>: problems raised by increased fighting in Cambodia between Viet :
Cong forces and the relatively ineffective Cambodian army. :
ij Sihanouk, in exile in Peking, has vowed to form a coalition :
: with the Viet Cong, Hanoi and the Communist pathet Lao in
: Laos to broaden the Vietnamese conflict throughout the :j
: Southeast Asian peninsula. j:
j: IN THE VIEW of some Southeast Asian experts his threat is
: not to be entirely discounted. y
v The Cambodian situation is further clouded by recent reports :
A of widespread massacres, encouraged by the Lon Nol regime, of j
x Vietnamese civilians living in Cambodia. $
Victims of the massacres have been explained away by the
J Cambodian regimes as Viet Cong sympathizers but, in the view :
of most knowledgeable observers, the blood bath was sparked j:
by long simmering resentments against Vietnamese, traditional x
enemies of Cambodians.
j: THE NIXON administration has received a request for 5
£ military aid from Cambodia but had given no indication of its 5
A response. :|i
: The attitude so far of the United States toward Cambodia has x
: been one of watchful waiting. i
: REPORTS OF THE massacres inside South Vietnams *i
: neighboring country have fueled antiwar sentiment in this
: country. :
: The Presidents address, billed as an updating report on South $
J Vietnam, was his first since Dec. 15,1969.
PRESIDENT NIXON was to leave the Western White House ?
immediately after his address and return to Washington, D. C. j:
In Cambodia the Viet Cong forestalled a government attempt £
to retake a village 20 miles southeast of this capital Monday by £
firing a dozen mortar rounds into Cambodian army positions.
Government military spokesman Lt. Col. Dien-Del said six
j: Cambodian battalions had been poised to try to recapture the £
village of Saang at dawn after government T2B fighter-bombers :
| had pounded the Communist positions. ~ :
;j; THE CAMBODIAN troops were about 440 yards northwest >:
$ of the village along the Bassac River when the mortar barrage
forced them to postpone their attempt to recapture it. >:
$ Dien-Del said three Viet Cong battalions were entrenched in :j:
and around the village that the Commimists captured Simday
>: afternoon, killing a Cambodian army lieutenant and another :j:
soldier.
fftVy'VMNVVMNNV.VV.VASV.V/.V.V.V..V.V.V.y.y/.v.Vvy.VvV.v.v.v/iV.v.v.v.y

Eating Out
Americans spend about S3O
billion a year for food and
beverages served away from
home.
Red Indian River
Grapefruit
$4
per 40 lb. carton
(36-40 fruit)
Profits to Citrus Club
Scholarship Fund
Call 392-1996 or come by
Rm. 1177 McC.
any afternoon
April 20 thru May 1

! Paid Political Advertisement
THE ISSUE IS:
STUDENT REPRESENTATION
WITH A FOCUS ON THE
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Steve KRAFTCHICK / 1 UC
Charles FAULDS cckjate
Lee SCHWARTZ OtINATfc
Rick SEIBERT Focus
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to select members of an official review board.
CORTWRIGHT promised his board, including a
top-ranking astronaut, would start its investigation very
soon.
At the space center, NASA picked additional pictures
for public release showing emergency measures by the
crew to keep their oxygen pure; how the blast damaged
their craft; and the view they got of the moon as they
looped behind it and turned toward home.
ENGINEERS, MANY of whom had helped work out
the emergency measures that allowed Apollo 13 to make
it home to an almost-normal splashdown Friday, hoped
the tape-recorded recollections of Lovell and his
crewmates would shed fresh light on just what caused an
oxygen tank to explode 205,000 miles from earth.
Lovell, Americas most experienced space pilot, had
hoped to walk the moon with rookie spaceman Haise. If
things had gone right, they would have splashed down in

FOR FIRE BOMB MURDER

State Court Upholds Klansmans Conviction

JACKSON, Miss. (UPI) The
Mississippi Supreme Court
refused Monday to throw out
the murder conviction of a
prominent young Laurel
businessman in connection with
an alleged Ku Klux Klan plot
resulting in the death of Negro
leader Vernon Dahmer.
The ruling came on an appeal
by Charles Clifford Wilson,
selected in 1967 as his
hometowns outstanding young
man.
WILSON WAS sentenced to
life imprisonment following his
conviction at Hattiesburg last
year in the 1966 firebomb
slaying.
Dahmer, a former president of
the Hattiesburg chapter of the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
was fatally injured the night of
Jan. 10, 1966, when nightriders
hurled firebombs into his home.
THE STATE maintained the
raid was ordered by Sam Bowers
Jr. of Laurel former imperial
wizard of the White Knights of
the Ku Klux Klan, because of
Dahmer's work to help Negroes
become registered voters.
Wilson was one of 13 white
men indicted on murder or arson
charges stemming from the
Dahmer slaying. Two other
defendants Cecil Victor
Sessums and William T. Smith
also were convicted of murder
and received life sentences, and
Lawrence Byrd received a
10-year sentence on an arson
conviction.
ALL OF THESE convictions
were upheld previously by the
State Supreme Court.
The Supreme Court, in an
opinion written by Associate
Justice Neville Patterson,
overturned arguments by
Wilsons attorneys that his
conviction was based almost

the Pacific Ocean Tuesday to end the most ambitious
lunar mission ever plannned.
INSTEAD, THE explosion last Monday set the crew on
an 86-hours, 59 minutes struggle to nurse their crippled
command ship back home.
They used its landing craft as a lifeboat source of
oxygen and electricity.
Clues about what caused the explosion were scarce.
THE SERVICE module where the blast took place was
jettisoned from the conical command ship cabin just
before re-entry, as was the moon landing craft.
This made it impossible for engineers to examine the
parts that failed.
Photographs shot by the crew just after the tank-like
service module was jettisoned, and released Sunday and
Monday by the space agency, showed the blast ripped an
entire 13-by-5.5 foot panel off the side of the craft.

entirely on the uncorroborated
testimony of an admitted
peijurer and paid informer and
should be knocked down.
Patterson wrote the case has
given the court much concern,
particularly in view of the
defendants previous good
reputation.
However, we are of the
opinion that the court should
not disturb the jury verdict since

TOMORROW!
o
TRUNK-ROOM SHOWING ff /
OF WORLD FAMOUS U /
PAPPAGALLO SHOES
at the Flagler Inn 11AM 7PM
Paid Political Announcement mmmhh
. : 3EoKpv'
Parking and Traffic Commission
Secretary of Student Affairs
Rawlings Hall Council Representative
Rawlings Outstanding Service Award
i
Ist Vice President of Women's Commission (AWS)
-*
Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities
Honor Court Arts and Sciences
Student Senate Arts and Sciences
/
Paid for by focus party
Paid Political Announcement mmmmmmmm

Tuesday, April 21,1970, The Florida Alligator, l

there was evidence to support it
and since we find no prejudicial
error in the record.
I QUARTERLY I
I IS HERE! I

Page 5



, Tha Florida AMllor, Tuaaday, April 21,1970

Page 6

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.

Where Are The Issues?

WASHINGTON lt is a fashionable cliche in this
city to say that Richard Nixon has pre-empted the
issues, and the Democratic response to the program
set forth in the State of the Union was so weak as to
make this cliche like all cliches a statement of
surface truth.
I am particularly pleased to have such strong
presidential support was Sen. Edmund Muskies
response to the Presidents statements on the
environment. It will not make a good campaign
slogan.
And National Democratic Chairman Fred Harris
plea that the Presidents welfare reform is not
enough merely focuses attention on the fact that it
was Mr. Nixon who proposed the reform.
Mr. Nixon has even succeeded in seizing the
inflation issue. He never mentions the word without
reference to his predecessor and leaves the
Democrats with the easy choice of espousing waste
and price controls or shutting up.
In short, the answer to the question of what has
happened to the majority party in the United States
the party which only five years ago swept 45
states is not just Lyndon Johnson or Vietnam or
the credibility gap or Chappaquiddick. It is also
Richard Nixon.
The Democratic party appears hopeless, and its
outlook will be hopeless until its leaders begin to
talk about the issues in more than short-range
political terms.
Pollution, Vietnam, race are issues which remain
to be seized if only there is boldness to seize them.
They are not matters on which parties should only
jockey for postion.
It is startling that no one rises to ridicule a
President who tells his government agencies
military and civilian to do something about their
own pollution of air and water in three years. One is
reminded, but not by the Democrats, of the girl
who said I*ll give you just 15 minutes to get your
hand off my knee.
For the most part, the Democrats walk around
the issue of Vietnam as though it were of about the
same magnitude, say, as calendar reform. Yet the
percentage of Americans who want immediate the
President would say precipitate withdrawal has
risen 14 points in the polls since his November
speech. It now stands at 35 per cent and rising.
It is Vietnam which is a_root cause of inflation.
Yet the President concealed its cost in the budget

Days Os Decision

An editorial in last Saturdays
Tampa Tribune told of a suicide
note left by Kenneth West
Anderson, the UF student whose
experiment with mescaline
apparently precipitated some
sort of personality disintegration
which caused him to commit
suicide. The editorial suggests
that this should be more than
enough to deter anyone who
might be considering such
experimentation.
That Andersons acute mental
disturbance and suicide can in
some measure be attributed to
his singular use of mescaline is
not debatable. But the Tribunes
editors have precious little in the
way of scientific evidence to

Alligator Staff

Neal Sanders
Assignment Editor

Dan Vining
Entertainment Editor

Robert Fraser
Editor-In-Chief
Earl Hartman

Best Policy-Dont

support their implicit
assumption that the use of
mescaline was the primary causal
factor in Andersons death. On
the other hand, Surgeon General
Terrys report on cigarette
smoking the tobacco
industrys denials
notwithstanding provided us
with evidence that this particular
weed can be a causal factor in
several types of cancer, not to
mention heart disease. The
report does not state that if you
smoke heavily, you will
inevitably get lung cancer, for it
also acknowledges that a certain
life style or genetic
predisposition may be more
important than smoking, in the

Craig Goldwyn
Sports Editor

Fred Vollrath
Wire Editor

Jeff Brain
Editorial Assistant

Karen Eng
Managing Editor
John Sugg

News Editors

Frank Monkinwicz Monkinwicz_
_ Monkinwicz_ Tom Bradon
with no complaints from the Democrats. Can
anyone imagine the response of Gerald Ford or
Melvin Laird if Lyndon Johnson had come up with
a budget concealing the cost of the war?
To bow to the President as the Democrats have
done with their mild rejoinder engineered by former
Ambassador Averell Harriman Bring home the
troops in 18 months is another way of saying
that for the next year at least 3,000 to 5,000
American deaths will be acceptable. The decision
leaves millions of Americans with no means of
political expression on what they regard as a great
moral issue.
Meantime, the problem of race confronts
Americans with another such issue. The President
and Vice President appeal to our basest instincts
while Democrats fearing a party split stand mute.
No Democrat has tried to rally the people behind
the inescapable conclusions of the Kemer
Commission and the Eisenhower Commission, that
without vast and apparently unpopular expenditures
of time, patience and money we will rapidly become
two Americas, both ugly.
It is strange to reflect upon a party so bemused
by the apparent success of its opposition that Vice
President Agnews question, Would you want to be
operated on by a doctor admitted to school under a
(racial) quota? is considered smart, short-term
politics.
The nation grew great in a religious tradition that
taught us not to yield to prejudice but to overcome
it and in a political tradition that faced problems
rather than toyed with them. At least one political
party ought to say so.

Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Student
Publications Suite, third floor, Reitz Union.
Editorial: phone 392-1686, 87, 88, or 89.
Business, Advertising: phone 392-1681, 82, 83,
or 84. Circulation: 392-1619.
Opinions expressed in the Honda Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.

By Russ Meyer

final analysis. The problem is,
we cannot yet tell a person
whether his genes or life style
make him a bad risk.
The dangers of psychedelic
drugs can be stated in similar
terms.
My point is not to make a
case for legalization of mescaline
and LSD (marijuana is {mother
matter), but to expose the
editorials inherent hypocrisy.
When a certain physician died of
lung cancer in 1959, he didnt
get an editorial, just an obituary.
He was my father, and there are
still others like him today.

editorial
Passover, A
Joyous Time
We tend to overlook the holidays of faiths with fewer
members than our dominant religion.
Passover, a joyous celebration by Americas five and
one-half million Jews, is one such holiday.
Passover signifies the flight by Moses and his followers
from an Egyptian Pharoh during the thirteenth century
before Christ. The flight lasted forty years, in which time
Moses received the Ten Commandments and the Torah as
the constitution for the new nation, Israel. Passover is the
celebration of a people unified in their liberation from
bondage.
The term Passover, Pesach in Hebrew, denotes a practice
at the time of the exodus. The Angel of Death would pass
over any house that had lambs blood on the door, while the
first bom of Egyptians perished.
Passover is an eight-day ceremony. It began last night and
will continue until next Tuesday night.
The eight-day ceremony is fraught with symbolism. Jews
left Egypt hastily and did not have time to bake their bread
with yeast. Motzah, unleavened bread, has served as a
reminder of that time. To Jews, motzah is the symbolic
food of freedom.
Horse radish, or any bitter herb, serves to remind todays
Jews of the bitterness their forefathers felt upon leaving
Egypt. The Charoset, a sweet mixture, contrasts with the
bitter herbs. It has the appearance of mortar and symbolizes
the building that the Jews were forced to perform for the
Pharoh.
American Jewry is divided roughly into three
congregations; Orthodox, Conservative and Reform. All
celebrate the same holidays but the manner differs in which
they are celebrated.
The number of seders, for example, will differ by
denomination. A seder consists of a meal with special foods
and a reenactment of the Passover story. An Orthodox Jew
will celebrate a seder on the first two nights of Passover. A
Reform Jew will celebrate a seder on the first night of the
holiday period.
The religion is big enough to contain such differences.
The basic prayer of Judaism, the Shma, begins; Hear, 0
Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one.
In light of Passovers importance we feel badly about the
advertisement that appeared in Fridays Alligator.
Erroneously, it said free beer would be served at the JTillel
Foundations Peace and Freedom Seder. Our apologies are
tendered to those Jews who might have been offended.
And we hope their Passover is a joyous one.
JNUnA i
Ji \ jm



Staff Writings

A lot of illusions about what this
system is all about were shattered with
police clubs last Saturday in St.
Petersburg. 5
About 1,000 or so antiwar
demonstrators from around the state
gathered in St. Pete for a mass, peaceful
and legal demonstration. We had our own
marshals, organized ourselves and, for the
first time a statewide organization,
signifying the deepening antiwar
sentiment, called a mobilization in
Florida.
There was special unity in this march.
Large numbers of black people and
their organizations JOMO, Malcolm X.
Liberation Group, Black Youth for Peace
and Power, Black Afro Militant
Movement plus Los Chicanos, an
organization of Mexican-Americans from
south Florida, march for the first time, in
mass in Floridas history with the antiwar
movement.
So what happened?
In an obviously planned sequence, the

* iw Fluted Colu nn n $ *'**********'**********'*******'**********l i
Dear John 1
I By John Parkerc3

Editors note: Due to the fact that our space is
limited, we can only print a few selected letters, but
John will be glad to answer each letter personally, if
you will enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope
and a check, money order or bill of lading for five
dollars.)
Dear Sick Mind:
I have been reading your editorials in the
Alligator for three years now and I must admit that
the only thing youve shown me is that you are a
very obnoxious person.
What makes you think you are so smart anyway?
AFRATMAN
An IQ of 187, a lightening-quick repartee, and
readers like you.
Dear Fluted Columnist:
Some friends of mine have told me that Flash
Matte is really you. Is this true?
CONFUSED
Absolutely not. Flash and I are one and the
same, hut we haven't decided whether we are both
him, or both me.
Dear Mr. Parker:
I have read in your columns recently that you
disapproved vigourously the proposed University
Activity Center, as of course, did the majority of
those who voted.
I am wondering if you have any suggestions as to
what could be done to the plan to make it more

MR. EDITOR:
Senator J. William Fulbright recently
stated that the United States would dc
well to recognize North Vietnam's
domination of aU of Southeast Asia. He
further indicated that such imperial
expansion of that communist state's
power was not a threat to our nation's
security.
Senator Fulbright practiced
obfuscation by saying that North
Vietnam is too weak a nation to be
capable of actual conquest of Southeast
Asia;
North Vietnamese control of Southern
Asia would, contrary to Senator
Fulbnght's statements, (more in the
nstuie of his frequent earnest hopes than
facts), present a grave danger to our
security and to such countries as Japan,
Australia, the PhflHppines and Indonesia.
North Vietnam, though not under
cooqriete Chinese control, would find
itself pushed aside by China should it be
<>7

St. Pete. Apr. 18: A Police Riot?

An Inexcusable Error

police busted Bob Canney, a UF
education instructor and outspoken
supporter of JOMO, an organization
hated by St. Pete authorities.
It is probable Canney was made a
target because of his connection with
JOMO rather than alleged obscenity (to
wit: the phrase God damn).
The crowd, in a natural reaction, rose
to protest this outrage. At this point,
large numbers of riot-equiped police,
conveniently hidden down side streets,
moved in and began a vicious attack on
demonstrators.
The police charged bottles were
thrown. The first missies thrown,
however, were by a man who, although
fully observed by the police, was never
arrested, i.e. an agent provocateur.
It was only through the action of the
Florida Antiwar Coalition (FAC) leaders
and marshals that a major confrontation
was prevented. These people directed the
demonstrators out of the park and
formed a disciplined column back to

attractive to the student at large, as it were?
STEVE C.
Yes. The OConnell Memorial Activity Center
could become a reality if you would offer to do all
the brickwork yourself.
Dear Mr. Anti-Everything:
So you think fraternities are useless and archaic,
huh? You and your big shot column go around
tearing down all the good that people have been
building for hundreds of years.
Did you know that some of my brothers are out
right now feeding table scraps to stray cats? What
do you say to that?
TRI-FU (AND PROUD OF IT)
Ate those independent cats or frat-cats?
Dear Mr. Fluted:
I am been a foreign student here last four jears. I
get all 190 hours for my English degree and now
they tell me is no good because I am never
registering.
Is something I can do because I must go back to
my country soon and I think to fed very silly?
FREDRICO ANGELES
Certainly there is. Xerox off one like I did and
forget it. Everyone around here knows its
impossible to get registered every quarter. And if
yon decide not to go home,you can always give me
MS 171 lectures.

permitted now to dominate South
Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and
Burma .Once the U. S. has departed from
Southeast Asia, Communist China, with
its superior power as compared to North
Vietnam, would not hesitate to embark
on a massive expansion of control over
the entire area.
With die ever expanding power of the
Soviet navy and its increasing penetration
of the Indian Ocean and the
Mediterranean, Southeast Asia is a vital
part of the Cold War and the victor in
that area will surely be supreme over half
the world and control the most important
geographic and strategic routes.
Senator Fulbright has committed an
error inexcusable by history. In the years
prior to World War II each act of
aggression by Japan and Germany seemed
to insignificant by itself to warrant Allied
countermeasures. Thus, when World War
n finally became global it was only
because men failed to grasp the essential
importance of small, limited, and distant
%* t

staging area of the march.
On the other hand, every action of the
police throughout the day, was calculated
to provoke marchers. The violent attack
wasnt to quell a disturbance. But it
was, in fact, designed to create a
disturbance, in order to break up the
march and rally.
The people who are reading this dont
have to merely take my word for it.
Already, over 400 people have
volunteered to come forth as witnesses
and FAC has several hundred
photographs documenting the police riot.
One may well ask why this occured.
As the antiwar movement grows and
spreads to previously inactive sectors of
society (labor, etc.), the ruling class, who
are perpetrating a genocidal war in
Vietnam, become more and more fearful.
Because, at some point in the near future,
the American people are going to say,
No more lies, Nixon. Out now!
So the ruling class acts to discredit the
antiwar movement. It red-baits. It spreads

conflicts.
In its final analysis, the senators
statement is morally indefensible. We are
the only, the last and the best hope for
peace, freedom, and independence in
Southeast Asia. To willfully abandon this
area to the enemy and with it the destiny
of millions of people to the darkness of
communist rule is as unjustifiable as
would have been accepting Hitler's
the small society

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.OPEN FORUM:^^
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/s ** hope for the < omr lnCerl

Tuesday, April 21,1970, The Florida AMgatsr, I

. By John Sugg

rumors and scare stories. And it provokes
violence in the hope violence will scare
people away from the demonstrations.
The authorities in St. Pete became
especially up tight when black, brown
and white, young and old, marched
through their city and, consequently, the
authorities acted in the best tradition
of Agnew, Mitchell and Daley, i.e. the
only good dissenter is a dead or busted
dissenter.
The sporadic violence of frustrated
individuals seeking an adventure is
nothing compared with the organized
institutionalized violence, seen on a small
scale last weekend and on a worldwide
scale with the ruling class' imperialist
wars.
Plans are still being formulated but the
antiwar movement is going to build a
defense campaign of such strength that
authorities in this state will think twice
before they swing their dub, the police,
once again. Our rights of assembly and
free speech will not be abridged.

dominance to the European continent in
the worst days ofWorld War n.
America cannot withdraw from her
global responsibilities nor ignore calls for
assistance. The challenge we face must be
met with resolute and determined efforts.
The past cannot be reclaimed; the future
is ours to win or to lose.
BRUCE DAVID ALPER.3AS
by Brickmcm

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 21,1970

ON BUTTON
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BASKET CASE?
Students protested environmental pollution in a trek Monday.
Carrying signs decrying stagnation of the air, they rode bicycles or
walked in protest. This couple dramatized the problem in their own
way.
Plant May Reopen
Gainesvilles compost plant may open again, this summer, with
support from user fees and taxes.
The plant is a pilot project in compositing, called the only
reasonable solution to solid waste disposal, by ecology activists.
IT CLOSED Dec. 31, when federal funds were cut off. No federal
funds will be available for plant operating expenses, according to Herb
Houston, manager.
The composting process uses ground garbage, mixed with sewage
effluent, and aged; then reground to produce a brown product with
the texture and smell of fertilizer.
Production cost is about $7.50 per ton, compared with about $3.00
per ton for desositing garbage in a sanitary landfill.
ALTHOUGH SOME compost was sold, most of the product could
not be marketed at the price required to keep the plant in business.
Under a funding proposal being prepared for the city council part
of the cost of the process will be paid by plant users, part by taxes.
The plant was used the City of Gainesville, Alachua County and the
UF.
*
1 : 'lIKv §E; iBLa
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(SEE STORY, PAGE 10) CLAV PH,PPS

EAG Pushes Design
For 8-Cent Stamp

By 808 WISE
Alligator Staff Writer
Americas first eight-cent stamp for surface mail
will show the survival button symbol of man in
balance with his environment if the Environmental
Action Group (EAG) has its way.
A letter from Bill Seaman, 7AS, of the EAG,
proposing the stamp, was taken under consideration
last week by the Citizens Advisory Stamp
Committee of the U. S. Post Office Department.
LETTERS AND petitions from interested citizens
are being accepted by the stamp committee.
Spearheading a national drive to have the stamp
adopted, Miss Norma Reddish, 4AS, of the EAG
will have a petition available at the EAG booth on
the Plaza of the Americas during celebration of
Clean Earth Day through Wednesday.
Were trying also to get letters from all the
states, Norma said.
THOSE INTERESTED should write to Paul
Ruddell, in care of the Citizens Advisory Stamp
Committee, Department of Philately, United States
Post Office Department, Washington, D. C. 20260.
Reason for the proposed stamp is to help raise
public concern over the environment, according to
Miss Reddish.
Designed by Hal Barcey, 3AS, the survival button

SFJC Students Monitor Atmosphere

Air pollution is being
monitered throughout Alachua
County by Santa Fe Junior
College students, with
encouraging results.
We have a very, very low
level of air pollution compared
with other regions of the
country, Bob Sterling, director
of engineering-related programs
at SFJC, said.

# Paid Political Advertisement
Part time Experiencewont do it...
Qualifications Do It! do it Party has
IjQ^H^E instance, John Maynard is not
the most qualified candidate
Mfiqualified person eligible to run.
* Assistant Chief Defense Counsel
n Maynard Secretary, Honor Court Bar
Chancellor
Vote Qualifications. Vote Do It!
Presented and Paid For by
*"" "" B Paid Political Advertisement

Air is comparatively clean
here, and is being tested to
establish a background data
against which possible future
pollution can be measured,
Sterling commented.
At 21 test stations in the
county, students training to
become air pollution testing
technicians check air samples for

' aML
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is popular with many environmental groups.
Proceeds from sales go to the nonprofit Balance
Foundation in Baltimore, Md., which provides funds
to various environmental action groups, according
to Miss Reddish.
THE BUTTON is in strong use in 45 states, is
popular in foreign countries, and has even
penetrated the iron curtain, Miss Reddish said.

suffer, suffer dioxide, flourides*,
solid particles and other
pollutants.
The program began in
September 1968, and testing has
been carried on continuously
since January 1969, Sterling
said. It is supported by HEW
funds, and data is provided to
the County Health Department.



EAG
Spearheaded
Festival

Eastern Airline Pilot Reports
Air Pollution Clouds f Natural Horizon

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writar
Gainesville has at least a six
mile thick deposit of waste in its
atmosphere.
Capt. W. L. Guthrie, Eastern
Ailines pilot, is concerned about
this waste and the
mismanagement of waste across
the nation..,
GUTHRIE IS Florida
chairman of the Waste
Management League (sponsored
by the Issack Walton National
League.) Monday he spoke at the
Clean Earth rally held in the
Plaza of the Americas.

'' ' jp . % s % % jt*/
dllllw
TOM KENNEDY
POLLUTED SKIES
... over area surrounding Gainesville
Alices Hyacinths
Subject Os Plans
By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Staff Writer
Plans for cleaning the western end of Lake Alice now, and the
eastern end later this year, are to be announced today at the Clean
Earth Festivals dump-in on the Plaza of the Americas.
Dr. John Gamble, member of the Lake Alice Restoration
Committee, will make the announcement at 3:30 p. m.
THE PLAN is being announced to enlist student help in cleaning
out the hyacinths during the third week of the Lake Alice clean-up
campaign.
Students are needed to pull hyacinths out of the water by hand
because mechanical methods of pulling would destroy not only the
hyacinths, but the natural shoreline, Gamble said.
This is the first step in cleaning up Lake Alice, and we need
student help. Without their help we are helpless, Gamble said.
THERE HAS been pessimism by some about how many students
will turn out. Im convinced that people are concerned enough to
come out and help us.
Plans for cleaning Lake Alice are being coordinated by the
committee headed by Dr. George Davis.
Cleaning the hyacinths is necessary before other wildlife and
ecological studies can be undertaken, Gamble said.
Assisting the committee in its efforts to dean the lake are the Siena
Chib, Student Government, Environmental Action Group (EAG), and
local garden dubs.

MARC GORDON
... speakers chairman

Guthrie and his son, Walter L.
Guthrie, took pictures of the
waste level over Gainesville to
bring the problem closer to the
people.
This is a grave problem for
airline pilots because you cant
see the natural horizon which
has been the cause of many of
the airline mid-air crashes,
Guthrie said.
THE PEOPLE who should
be concerned are the people who
shrug their shoulders and say
its one of those things.
Until 1967, the U. S. Weather
Bureau reports defined haze
as salt crystals and dust, but now

A Hr
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HAL BARCEY
. designed button

they include smoke in the
definition.
Smoke, in fact, is considered
now to be the main reason for
visibility problems.
THE TERM haze can mean
anything from old shoes to
chicken feathers ... The new
term just covers up the main
problem, Guthrie said.
He feels the only way to
alleviate the problem is to
inform people who cause it.

I Paid Political Advertisement
LEADERSHIP IS THE ISSUE
ROBERT WATTLES
for
TREASURER
VOTE FOR PROVEN ABILITY
Wv CHIEF ACCOUNTANT
\V) NOLLENBERG CORP.
V CANDIDATE FOR MASTERS
[ DEGREE IN FINANCE
A AK'P PROFESSIONAL
V -X business fraternity
\ CHIEF JUSTICE
V TRAFFIC COURT
jyjlnlpf* J PRESIDENT & TREASURER
> OF SOCIAL FRATERNITY
Presented and Paid For By
mum mm f hi
c an rmiiMi

' **
HHi |f
BRAD RAFFLE
... information chairman

We must approach the
businessmen with the concept of
property and part of a
business property is the waste it
distributes into the
environment, he said.
PRESENTLY, private
property is considered the
concept underlying our success
in production and distribution
of goods. Ordinarily this
includes smoke stacks, but not

Tuaaday, April 21,1970, Tha Florida AlUpator,

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|V
sT liMHHHIHHHHHHHHi-'
BILL SEAMAN
... EAG president

materials issuing from them, he
added.
Guthrie said the only way to
get to the problem is to make its
proponents responsible; to make
penalties equal to the amount of
waste distributed.
Make the problem speak in
terms of dollars something a
good businessman cant refuse to
listen to, Guthrie said.

Page 9



Page 10

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SUNNY BARLOW
BRAD RAFFLE
... litter bit adds up

Rapping Topics Include Abortion

By CHARLES TRENTELMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Sex, abortion and population
control will be topics of
discussions Tuesday and
Wednesday evening, two
sponsored by Zero Population
Growth (ZPG) and one
sponsored by the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center.
Tuesday at 8 pjn. in Walker
Auditorium, Senator C. S.
Cliff Reuter will speak on the
abortion bill, now before the
state legislature, which he
introduced.
Also speaking will be Dr.

Paid Political Advertisement
DANS THE RIGHT MAN ...
according to the Law School Newspaper The Verdict

If % I
EPS S
)
Paid For
By Focus Party

Beach Conger, director of family
planning services at Emory
University. He will speak on
Population and the
Environment.
ALSO INCLUDED in the
Tuesday meeting will be
circulation of several petitions
and pledges to be signed by
anyone present who so wishes.
They include:
t A pledge agreeing not to
have any more than two
children, except by adoption.
A he*man pledge for men
who will agree to be voluntarily
sterilized after fathering two
children, taking the burden of

Reprinted From
f. ELECTION ISSUE
br HrrlHrii:
VOLUME 111. NUMBER 111 HOLLAND LAW CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
As flip as experience on the Honor Court is concerned both candidates
for Chancellor are equally qualified. But Dan Stephens thinks realistically
and has the reputation around the law school of getting the Job done
In law school Dan is the most qualified laving competed in second
round moot court. Since the Honor Court must depend entirely on
law students and since Dan Stephens has the type of respect in the I
' law school that can generate the interest necessary amongst law
students to successfully fulfill his campaign commitments he is
the best qualified candidate. Dans the right man.

,P*d Political Advertisement

Beer cans? Dump-in 9 needs them
Population problem will be discussed
Cross-Florida Barge canal included
Architecture has a role too
i?
Movies will show what its all about
CELEBRATION

contraception off the woman.
A petition in favor of the
Rueters abortion bill.
t A petition to the county
comissioners asking for the
reopening of two birth control
clinics in Gainesville which were
closed in February as an
economy measure.
Wednesday, ZPG will have
two showings of the movie
Beyond Conception, at 7:30
and 10 pun. Several speakers will
discuss sex, birth control and
population control. Discussions
will be held following the movie.

Dr. Seymore. Block, founder
of the UF branch of ZPG,
described the movie as frank
and candid about sex.
SPEAKERS Wednesday night
will include Dr. Wayne Heine,
who will discuss the movie and
answer questions on birth
control. Dr. Mary H. McCauley,
UF assistant professor of clinical
psychology, who will discuss the
personal aspects of birth control
and marriage.
Dr. Thomas C. Emmel, who
teaches a class on population
biology, will speak on The
Population Limits of the Earth.

| Sclw
TUESDI
3:30 P.M.: Dump In,
Environmental Teach-in Committe
Division, Plaza of the Americas.
3:30 P.M.: Limits of Man
Department of Humanities, 109 Li
4:30 P.M.: Nuclear Power ant
by Department of Nuclear Engin
(formerly Engineering and Industri
7:30 P.M.: The Cross-Florida
and Social Implications, semii
Administration, Bryant Hall.
7:30 P.M.: Law and the Env
School, 297 Holland Law Center.
8:00 P.M.: Population and th
College of Medicine, Walker Auditt
I WEDNESI
10:00 A.M.: The University
Alice, seminar by Four SeasonsGi
2:30 P.M.: The Relationship o
seminar by Department of Archile
Arts Complex.
3:00 P.M.: Recycling Ceremoa
cans to Reynolds Metals, Plaza oft
7:00 P.M.: Survival Theatre (<
Wall of Constans Theatre. Filins te
Beyond Conception
Progress: Pork Barrel and Pte
Noisey Landscape
The Best We Can Do
| i Right of Way
g No Time for Ugliness
Family Planning with Donald
7:30 P.M.: Beyond Concept
by Zero Population Growth, Walk l
RED PIN oxT
NIGHT IV
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA
I GATOR I
ADS SELL! I



;jm
ssss w it jb% Hi
' ;> S&3BUB!Si& ;.
A ss&;':
lllii
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ALAN SANDLER
... festival chairman
. \
ill! IIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!
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1
iminar and display by
and UF Plants and Grounds
Dominion, seminar by
e Hall.
the Environment, seminar
ring, Weil Hall auditorium
Building). s
irge Canal Its Economic i.
by School of Business
anment, seminar by Law
environment, seminar by
am.
lY
ctivities Center and Lake s
len Club, 347 Reitz Union.
Architecture and Ecology,
are, Architecture and Fine
presentation of aluminum
Americas.
wronmental films), North
shown are:
ant Feathers
i t 1
uck
Birth Control, seminar
uditorium.
H!nal£Nll^l
Bl I 1712 W. University W
Bit TEXTBOOKS H
11 SCHOOL SUPPLIES H|
II art supplies
mII ENGINEERING
SUPPLIES
fiH II r
fB 11 Customer Parking In S
H The Rear B
BII we Welcome: B

fIWE APPOINT A SPECIAL COUNCIL
1 !N PERTH. WE ALLOCATE
J SPECIAL FUNDS FOR THIS PURPOSE SOME T
I V THE FINEST TECHNOLOGICAL MINDS IN L** / T uat*c tuf W.
f THE NATION WILL STUDY EMERY ASPECT OF WBtf THA cdit H
3 THEN, WE NAME A SPECIAL STUDY fPB ir c S iffi
| gMMIITEE TO EXAMINE THE STUDY THEYLL MAKE r?I3 ,TS fJr 100 L
1 RECOMMENDATIONS TO BE STUDIED AND yM WTE SB
4 MfLEMENTED BY A BLUE-RIBBON PANE OF y^Wlgik
CONSULT^ 'S^*''
'People Make Festival Success

By STEVE STRANG
Alligator Writer
While national sponsors of
Earth Day are having trouble
meeting their budget of
$150,000, UF sources say
Earth Day here is being
funded for less than $ 1000.
Most of the help we have
gotten is from people
contributing their time and
service, and doing their own
thing, Alan Sandler, chairman
of the Clean Earth Festival, said.
SANDLER said also the
festival has received tremendous
moral support form various
groups in Gainesville.
The City Beautification Board
has donated materials, and the
Plants and Grounds Department
on campus has been a
tremendous help, he said.
Money for the Clean Earth

Paid Political
If you havent gotten
your moneys worth ... out of the I
7 idaMTTI IP
$9.00 you pay each quarter to
the Reitz Union,
$4.97 you pay to Student Government,
$3.75 you pay to athletics,
$13.00 you pay to health services. . id jP^BHH
Isnt it time for a change?
Focus on JOHN DODSON
TREASURER
Paid For |jy Focus Party
Paid Political AdVVtiNintntHMMHMMMMMMHHMMHM

Festival is primarily from the
sale of books, buttons and
bumper stickers on the Plaza of
the Americas, he said.
ANOTHER SOURCE of
income is the sale of aluminum
cans collected in bins around
campus and at shopping centers.
Reynolds Aluminum Company
is paying ten cents per pound.
I estimated originally we
would get SSOO from the cans,
Sandler said. But now it
doesnt look like well get it.
Besides its activities with
Earth Day on campus, the Clean
Earth Festival committee is
coordinating Earth Day
observances at nine area high
schools, supplying teaching
materials and speakers.
Sandler said the festival had
received such tremendous help
because people are in this for
their health.

I tTSAMEAL! I
I ,rs M\ # > I
I Only ( Monday I
thru
Lunch and
Sorry. no take-out service or discounts at this low price
1 Daily Choice of Four j|
I Entrees |
1 Entrees Served With M
1 Choice of Potatoes, Rice or Vegetable I
I Choice of Special Salads of The Day I
I Hot Roll or Muffin I
§ Iced Tea or Coffee (Free Seconds! {
I Wmm SELF SERVICENO TIPPING I
I n/cSpu' I DOWNTOWN GAINESVILLE I
IKB PLENTY OF FREE PARKING I

Tuaaday. April 21,1*70. Tha Florida AMpMor,

Page 11



Page 12

; Th*Florki*llfc*oc.Tu*My. APfttWi I*7o

'Man In The House Rule Held Void

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Supreme
Court ruled 6 to 2 Monday that states are
barred from cutting child welfare
payments under man in the House
rules unless they prove he made actual
contributions to the childrens support.
The decision came in two California
cases but the ruling may have
repercussions in 16 other* states which
have a policy of reducing benefits for
dependent children if there is a man living
with the family unmarried to the mother,
or stepfather who has not adopted them.
THE COURT ACTION was a legal

Russia And U.S. Test
Each Other On SALT
VIENNA (UPI) The United States and Soviet Union tested
each others overall intentions at their second meeting Monday
before making any hard proposals on limiting nuclear missiles.
At the second full woiking session held in the U. S. Embassy
representatives of the two countries to the strategic arms
limitations talks (SALT) continued their careful probing,
diplomatic sources said.
THESE SOUNDINGS will go on for some time, the sources
said.
Following the 90-minute meeting, chief negotiators Gerard C.
Smith of the United States and Vladimir S. Semenov of Russia
took refreshments in a small lounge adjoining the conference
room.
The next session was set for 11 a. m. Thursday at the Soviet
Embassy.
SMITH IS reported to have instructions to test the Russians
on whether Moscow really wants to do business.
U. S. experts believe the Russians might take a somewhat
harder line because of a tougher policy said to be developing
inside the Kremlin.
Communist sources say Russia also wants to engage in
detailed probing before placing firm proposals on the
negotiating table.

Paid Political Advertisement
The only time you will see
focus party on the bottom ...
... is on the ballot tomorrow.

[ fr
FOCUS on the bottom of the ballot
Paid For by Focus Party
Paid Political Advertisement
mil ir

STATE WELFARE CUTS BARRED

victory for the Health, Education and
Welfare, (HEW) Department which had
issued a regulation that child welfare
payments could not be automatically cut
because of man in the house.
A three-judge federal court in San
Francisco held in 1968 that the HEW
ruling was unconstitutional and ruled that
under California law state and local
authorities could cut the benefits without
prior proof the man was contributing to
the childrens support.
THE SUPREME Court, in a majority
opinion by Justice William O. Douglas,

Less Racial Tension Sought

FRANKFURT, Germany (UPI) American
Army commanders are being urged to take positive
steps to reduce racial tensions in the ranks.
This was the message of a summation of race
relations in the Army published Sunday by the
Army newspaper Stars and Stripes.
A SPOKESMAN for the newspaper said the
document was drafted by the Department of the
Army in Washington. It was designed for use in
discussions organized by local commanders.
The document outlined incidents and causes of
racial strife in the Army which have emerged from
study groups appointed by commanders at various
levels.
AMONG THE sources of friction it cited is the

'quarterly we re rea,, y movin g
*

reversed the lower federal decision, citing
a previous ruling that states may not cut
off aid to families with dependent
children because of a mothers
extra-marital relationships.
Chief Justice Warren A. Burger and
Justice Hugo L. Black dissented.
IN OTHER ACTIONS, the court: Let
stand a District of Columbia federal
appeals court ruling that a 1968 revision
of the federal anti-Communist law was
unconstitutional.
The refusal of the court to review the
case means the Subversive Activities

Control board is virtually without any
business to conduct.
The 1968 amendment sought to allow
the board to list individuals as members
of the U. S. Communist party.
AGREED TO RULE next term on a
challenge to Pennsylvanias law
apportioning part of the states
multimillion dollar racetrack tax revenue
for use by church-supported schools.
Denied a request by Florida Gov. Claude
R. Kirk that the Manatee County School
busing dispute be immediately transferred
from the lower courts to the Supreme
Court.

voluntary segregation of black and white soldiers in
enlisted mens dubs and city bars, and alleged
discrimination against black soldiers by military
police and courts and in the matter of Army
promotions.
The issue is of interest in West Germany where
brawls between black and white soldiers and other
bitter disputes are becoming increasingly common
among the 230,000 American soldiers stationed
here.
The document said race trouble in the Army was
not the fault of the Army essentially.
The Army's race problem stems from the fact
that our country has a race problem, it said.
Soldiers enter the service as products of our
sodety.



ATTEND FREE
Over 90% Os The People
Who Attend Increase Their Reading
Speed On The Spot!
For The Ist Time Ever...
4
World Famous Evelyn Wood You'll see why President
Keading Dynamics offers you Kennedy invited Evelyn Wood
a free glimpse of what its like to the White House to teach
to be able to read and study his advisors and the Joint
much faster Chiefs of Staff how to read
faster.
Youll actually be taught how Youll hear what the faculty
to read and study faster during members of one of Americas
the exciting Speed- Reading foremost colleges says about
Lesson. Evelyn Wood, and watch them
read-fast!
\

I Free spud pmm Lessons! I
Today 3, 5:30, Bpm I
1015 W. Univ. Ave. I
Sucfof* 0 Woot READING DYNAMICS* I
next to University City Photo Supply I

We want you to decide for yourself the
value of becoming a Speed-Reader, Evelyn
Wood style.
For the first time we are offering a Special
Speed-Reading Lesson to provide you with
a glimpse of what it's like to be able to read
and study substantially faster... and
you'll actually participate in the techniques
that will improve your reading and study
speed on the spot!

You'll find this Special Free offer of
increased reading speed to be an exciting
and unusual experience.
Limited Seating Available at Each Lesson.
Because of limited seating capacity, we ask
that you please call the number listed
below to Reserve Your Seat. Choose the
time most convenient to your schedule and
call now for Your Personal Reservation.

Tuoaday, April 21,1970, Tfw Florida Alligator,

Page 13



v
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
... .. .. l -

FOR SALE
12 x 52 mobile home two bedrooms,
raised front kitchen. Early Amer.
(3200. Plus added extras,
dishwasher, AC, 16 x 18 awning.
Phone: 485-2531. (A-5M24-P)
Fender Palomino 6-strlng acoustic
guitar. Excellent condition. Hard
shell case. $l5O. Call Anita at
392-9126. (A-st-124-p)
SPRINT 1966, 250 cc H model. Very
good condition leaving state. $350.
See at 6315 SW 13th St. Apt. 17.
After 6 P.M. (A-3t-124-p)
Must Sell 15* x 14* olive-green carpet
& pad, also one large metal study
desk best offer, call 378-3083 after
6:00 PM. (A3t-124-p)

M. . .. .. i | ... 1 ... p ..., | |. . IS. 1 .. f|:
VOTE
IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT
ELECTION
. \ \
e
' . N ." .. '''
A PUBLIC SERVICE ADVERTISEMENT
BY THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

FOR SA LE
Irish Setter puppies, 4 weeks old,
AKC top championship stock.
Wormed, shots. Excellent pets,
hunters or show material. SIOO
372-0295. (A-13t-124-p)
Roberts 770 x 8 track & reel to reel
tape recorder. Make your own
cartridges, $430 deal for S3OO or best
offer 378-1660. (A-3t-124-p)
Y ash lea Electra 35; Split-Image
focoslng, 35mm, built In light meter
SBS. Call 373-1947 or 392-0221.
(A-4t-124-p)
SOUPS on, the rug that Is, so clean
the spot with Blue Lustre Rent
Electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-8-c)

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 21,1970
- . '.*** f > v

Page 14

FOR SALE
1968 Kawasaki 120. 1,600 miles,
Perfect Condition, luggage rack,
helmet. Graduating in June and must
sell 5275. Call 372-6283.
(A-3t-124-p)
FOR RENT
Sublet starting summer quarter La
Bonne Vie, 1 bdrm., 2 or 3 persons
A/C, pool, w/w carpet, dishwasher,
furn., $ 150/mo. Call 378-2158.
(B-st-124-p)
3 bedroom house avail. June 3 Sept.
1 br. 2 bedroom apartments
available. June or Sept. Call Jan
before 11 a.m. or after 9 p.m.,
376-9525, or 372-6333. (B-3t-124-p)

help wanted
FREE Private room and board for
coed in exchange for helping with my
children etc. New large home must
have own transportation. Call Mrs.
Anderson 376-8788. (E-3t-124-p)
PERSONAL
STAMP COLLECTORS Come to
stamp club meetings tonight abd Ist
and 3rd Tuesdays. Auctions &
Trading. Call 378-9693 for details.
(J-lt-124-p)
Congradulatlon Zetz pledges for
making your grades. Much more to
come. Beware. Love air-raids and
Zeta cheers. The Sisters. (J-3t-124-p)

;.x%<-:-x£X;X;X;X;X;X;X:X:XvX:X&*w>v
The technique of transcendental
meditation, as Jaught by the
Maharlshi Mahesh Yogi, will be
explained at an Introductory lecture
at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 24,
in the lecture hall across from the
University Gallery. (J-3t-124-p)
Refunds for Sympathy for the
Devil" will be issued from the
Constans Theatre Box Office during
its regular hours of operation (Noon
to 4:30 p.m.) Monday April 20
through Friday, April 24. NO
REFUNDS WILL BE ISSUED
AFTER 4:30 p.m. on Friday, April
24. (J-st-124-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
Fender Jazz Bass with case SIOO.
Wurlitzer stereo electric 6 string cost
$425. with case sell $125. without
case A-1 condition. 372-5157.
(A-5M19-P)
Spacious, well-kept, 10x47 GREAT
LAKES, two bedroom, air, carpet,
6x utility shed. 378-9426.
(A-st-120-p)
Trailer Bx2B plus 2 Room Cabana
SSOO. Bx3o one bedroom furnished
SIBOO. or rent 378-0226,
376-6217. '67 Rambler 32,000
miles SI,OOO. (A-st-120-p)
1968 180 Yamaha Electric,
meticulous condition, luggage rack,
parking decal lst $350 takes it,
Call 378-8210. (A-st-120-p)
HAM Transmitter, Phone and CW
Globe Scout Good Cond. $30.00
Stereo tape deck for car with
speakers $50.00 Call 373-2761.
(A-st-121-p)
Yamaha 250 Road Bike 1968 Model
excellent condition S4OO. Call
372-9307 anytime ask for Brian.
(A-3t-122-p)
Be a world famous musician I Buy my
guitar. Excellent condition. S3O (SBO
new). Free neck strap, cover, book.
Must sell. Steve 373-1085.
(A-2t-122-p)
Sofa with slipcover. $45. Call
378-6234 after 6:00 p.m.
(A-st-121-p)
12 x 52 mobile home two bedrooms,
raised front kitchen. Early Amer.
$3200. Plus added extras,
dishwasher, AC, 16 x 18 awning.
Phone: 485-2531. (A-st-124-p)
Fender Palomino 6-string acoustic
guitar. Excellent condition. Hard
shell case. $l5O. Call Anita at
392-9126. (A-st-124-p)
Irish -Setter puppies, 4 weeks old,
AKC top championship stock.
Wormed, shots. Excellent pets,
hunters or show material. SIOO
372-0295. (A-13t-124-p)
1968 Kawasaki 120. 1,600 miles.
Perfect Condition, luggage rack,
helmet. Graduating in June and must
sell 5275. Call 372-6283.
(A-3t-124-p)
Must Sell 15 x 14 olive-green carpet
& pad, also one large metal study
desk best offer, call 378-3083 after
6:00 PM. (A-3t-124-p)
Roberts 770 x 8 track & reel to reel
tape recorder. Make your own
cartridges, $430 deal for S3OO or best
offer 378-1660. (A-3t-124-p)
Yashioa Electra 35; Split-Image
focosing, 35mm, built in light meter
SBS. Call 373-1947 or 392-0221.
(A-4t-124-p)
SOUPS on, the rug that is, so clean
the spot with Blue Lustre Rent
Electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-8-c)
SPRINT 1966 250 CC H model. Very
good condition leaving state. $350.
See at 6315 SW 13th St. Apt. 17.
After 6 P.M. (A-3t-124-p)
FOR RENT
Apartments 1 & 2 brs, efficiencies,
a/c, pool, some carpeted, close to
campus. SIOO-220 per summer qtr.
3 76-8990 University Apartments
(B-24t-11-p)
Sublet 1 br. Apt. 66, Mt. Vernon
furn, A/C Carpet dishwasher laundry
bar-b-q, pool pets $145/mo. lease
expire Sept. 15, renewable 372-5389
anytime. (B-st-119-p)
everal 1 br. apts. 1 bath, kitchen,
living room, completely furnished
ww carpet, ac, $l2O mo. Colonial
Manor apts. 1216 SW 2nd Ave.
372-7111. Grad students preferred.
(B-ts-109-c)
iJxGSBSSSEa
I N.W: 13th St. -PH 372-9523' A
ACROSS FROM THE MAIL
V SWEDEN HEAVEN W
AND HELL 0
BABY LOVE 9
PENTHOUSE 2
A THE BIBLE
PENTHOUSE 3
U LIBERTINE

x-x-!-x-x-x*:*:fx-x*xx*x-:*x*x*:-x-x*i*Xv
FOR RENT
Across Street from campus Studio
Apts, for both one and two students,
ww carpet AC cable TV
u turtles Included completely
furnished ample parking swim
pool. College Terrace Apts. 1225
S.W. Ist Ave. Phone 378-2221 or
372-7111. (B-109-ts-c).
HOLIDAY GARDEN
APARTMENTS. Quiet, comfortable
apts. Within walking distance of
campus. A/C, 1-bdrm., spacious
ground and parking. Call resident
manager after § at 378-4423. 1911
S.W. 14th Terrace. (B-ts-c)
Concrete block cottages, indv. living
units, 6 mins, of campus, decor may
be changed to suit taste, furnished,
no lease S7O mo. 372-4407 evenings.
(B-2t-121-p)
Room In private home for mature
male student. Linen and maid service.
A.C. Separate entrances. Off street
parking call 376-5360. (B-120-3t-p)
Sublet starting summer quarter La
Bonne Vie, 1 bdrm., 2 or 3 persons
A/C,*pool, w/w carpet, dishwasher,
sum., $l5O/mo. Call 378-2158.
(B-st-124-p)
3 bedroom house avail. June 3 Sept.
1 br. 2 bedroom apartments
available. June or Sept. Call Jan
before 11 a.m. or after 9 p.m.,
376-9525, or 372-6333. (B-3t-124-p)
4 bedroom furnished house for
summer. 2 blocks from campus.
Wall-to-wall carpet, central air. Full
kitchen. 372-1928. (B-2t-121-p)
WANTED
X-XX-X'XvXYX-Xvi-XvX-XvX'X'X-X*
....................................
One Coed roommate for 2 bedroom
apartment close to campus $37.50
per month. Call 373-2766.
(C-st-117-p)
HEAD to share 3-bedroom house, aid
cond. PRIVATE ROOM. $45/mo.
Summer & Fall term. Call 376-2344.
NO LEASE. (C-3t-120-p)
1 or 2 female roommates for 2 bedrm
Poolside Village Park apt. occupy
tmmed. Apt can be all yours June,
when Im leaving. 378-3903 evening.
(C-3t-119-p)
Female roommate to share luxurious
1-bedroom Landmark poolside apt
for summer quarter. Suana,
dishwasher prefer over 21 after 5 call
378-1921. (C-3t-120-p)
1 female to share Landmark 2 bedr.
apt. no. 107 immediately poolside
and woodside, good parking, call
anytime 373-1208. (C-st-121-p)
3EG Needs roommate to share two
bdr. home in quiet NW Gainesville.
$45 per month plus half utilities.
378-2798 or 372-1481. (C-st-119-p)
3 female roommates wanted for
summer quarter. Pool, air cond,
wall-to-wall carp, 41.75/mo. Call
after 5: 378-0591 Summit House.
(C-3t-122-p)
:*:*x*x ; x*: ;^
help wanted
riXxiiXr^i^siiiXvXrXrXvXvXvXvXviX*:
OPPORTUNITY, sparetime,
addressing envelopes and circulars!
Make $27.00 per thousand.
Handwritten or typed, in your home.
Send just $2. for INSTRUCTIONS
plus LIST OF FIRMS using
addressers. Satisfaction Guaranteed!
B&V ENTERPRISES, Dept. 4-23, PO
Box 1056, Yucaipa, Calif. 92399.
(E-st-120-p)
fk MBM
/ 1 AWARD WINNER 1
/ A GIG YOUNG
\ JANE FONDA i
(BfS R ]
V J
MARIE SA| NLf

Tuesday, April 21,1970, The Florida Alligator,

HELP WANTED
Mature student for telephone
idvertlsing program. Approximately
> hrs. per week. Min. wage, call Mr.
3rown 372-7883. Days or evenings.
E-3t-121-p)
Bartender or barmaid needed
immediately, must be over 21, salary
according to ability, adjustable
schedule THE CHATTERBOX.
(E-3t-122-p)
FREE Private room and board for
:oed in exchange for helping with my
children etc. New large home must
have own transportation. Call Mrs.
Anderson 376-8788. (E-3t-124-p)
AUTOS

67 MGB Convertible with radio.
SIOSO call 376-0474 or 376-3747
after 5:30 PM. (G-3t-120-p)
66 VW BUG, good body. Excellent
engine. Tires good. Must sell. SBSO
must sell. Call 372-2225 or
376-0940. (G-st-119-p)
1968 Dodge Charger 383 4BBL auto
trans, power steering, wide tires,
vinyl top, and more. Excellent
condition. $2350. 392-1561 or
376-5125. (G-5M19-P)
67-Cougar x R7 4 speed, 4 br. 390ci
front disc, leather bucket seats,
posi-traction. Call 372-5698 try late,
seldom there. Best offer.
(G-st-120-p)
s
Classic 60 Bugeyed SPRITE excellent
condition 6B factory rebuilt engine
radio new top; call 378-3246
after 6; $590. (G-st-122-p)
MUST SELL 64 Falcon convertible
excellent condition $450 call
anytime 376-2738. (G-st-122-p)
196 8 340 Barracuda fastback
formulas package low mileage
automatic air factor warranty $1995
evenings 378-5108. (G-st-122-p)
1962 Chevy wagon, 327 workhorse.
Runs perfectly, clean inside. New
tires, brakes and rear end. $425. Call
Jay after 5:00 at 376-9583.
(G-120-3t-p)

HEMINGWAYS
THE SUN ALSO RISES
WITH AVA GARDNER & TYRONE POWER
IN COLOR
This film will be shown in the Union Auditorium on Tues. Apr.
21 and Wednesday, Apr. 22 at 7:00 and 9:30. Admission 50
cents.
Sponsored by J.W.R.U.
I
ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
LUNCH AND DINNER
TUESDAY
Golden Fried Chicken I
All you can eat 99<
WEDNESDAY I
Jumbo Baked Chopped I
Steak and Yellow Rice 79<

Page 15

AUTOS
VW 1969 good condition $1595 will
bargain call after 500 pm 372-7191.
(G-st-120-p)
67 MGB Convertible with radio.
SIOSO call 376-0474 or 376-3747
after 5:30 PM. (G-3t-120-p)
PE R SONA L
A coke for a book. Bring your used
paperbacks to the union browsing
library on Frl. May 1 only-and get a
free coke for each one. (d-st-121-c)
SANDALS Handcrafted at the
APOLLONIAN ALTERNATIVE a
couple of dollars less for a better
sandal, ready a week from ordering.
108 NW 7th St. 1,000 ft. from the
Circus. PAX. (J-5M19-P)
GOD FEAR YOU Have You
Dared to Consider a Life of Christian
Service? Write to: P. O. Box 65,
Maitland, Fla. 32751. (J-st-119-p)
GIRLS Distinctive CUSTOM
MADE Personal Dress, WEDDING
DRESS & Sportswear by your
English dressmaker, KATHLEEN.
Bikinis sl4. Phone 378-0320.
(J-10t-107-p)
Alterations and Dressmaking by
Experienced Seamstress
Reasonable Prices Call 378-9919.
(J-3t-122-p)
The technique of transcendental
meditation, as taught by the
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, will be
explained at an introductory lecture
at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 24,
In the lecture hall across from the
University Gallery. (J-3t-124-p)
Congradulation Zetz pledges for
making your grades. Much more to
come. Beware. Love air-raids and
Zeta cheers. The Sisters. (J-3t-124-p)
Flea market sale are you a bead
maker? Spread a blanket, set up
shop, and sell your trinkets. Union
tent Apr 28 from 6-llp.m.
(J-lt-122-c)
Campus yoyo, hulahoop, jump rope,
and ballbat contest. Take out your
old yoyo and work It back Into
condition. At the Union May 1.
(J-st-122-c)

PERSONAL
STAMP COLLECTORS Com* to
stamp club meetings tonight abd Ist
and 3rd Tuesdays. Auctions &
Trading. Call 378-9693 for details.
(J-It-124-p)
Refunds for Sympathy for the
Devil" will be Issued from the
Constans Theatre Box Office during
its regular hours of operation (Noon
to 4:30 p.m.) Monday April 20
through Friday, April 24. NO
REFUNDS WILL BE ISSUED
AFTER 4:30 p.m. on Friday, April
24. (J-5M24-P)
Reitz Union Tent Revival Thurs
Apr 30 from 2-6p.m. the empty tent
will be provided this one day for
anyone to come RAP ON
ANYTHING. (J-122-st-c)
German tutoring send phone no to
campus box 30-0032. (M-st-122-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical Systems tested and
repairs Auto Electrical Service,
lUIS. Main. (M-107-ts-c)
The Copy Center Xerox copies 1
to 10 copies of each original 5 cents;
over ten 4 cents. 1718 West Unlv.
Now open next to Gold Coast
Restaurant. Free Collating. Try us
First for Quality & Service. Tel
376-9334. (M-17t-114-p)
INCOME TAX RETURNS $4 and up
Campus Tax Service, at Rebel
Discount 1227 W. Unlv. 372-8309.
(M-102-20t-p)
Happiness Is getting your eyeglasses
at the smalles eyeglass office In town.
Drive your own waiting rdom to
UNIVERSITY OPTICIANS at 519
SW 4th Ave, across from Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-107-c)
GERMAN or SPANISH tutoring. Get
expert Help in reading, translating,
conversation. $4 a lesson-. Informal.
378-2270. (M-st-121-p)
ummimmm
I hem ciSr LAST
MCIMSIO 3 DAYS
i WINNER OF 4 fP|j
* ACADEMY AWARDS^L*Ij
PAUL
Co :'e *
I ft,, - LAST
11 3 DAYS
rwiiTwltm s. V lyl # *^
* JASON ROBARDS
STELLA STEVENS
: pa minor :
CABLS
.BOSim
*
TECHNICOLOR
..JR..**
, .. 1 LAST
3 DAYS
| mW. IWverdhr 4ve. | #
.* Makes I, *
.* A WOMAN;
: Look Like
: MARY :
ipoppins:-
l pol NEW YORK
. DAILY NEWS
'MM!
J H&eV Sk



I,The Florida AltlgMdr, Tuesday, April 21,1970

Page 16

Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFF ICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

ELIGIBILITY FOR
PARTICIPATION IN
EXTRACURRICULAR
ACTIVITIES To hold any
elected or appointed office in
any extracurricular activity, a
student must be free of
disciplinary, scholarship,
academic or admissions
probation. He also must be
classified as a full-time student
enrolled in a minimum of 12
hours. In exceptional
circumstances, a student not
eligible to hold an elected or
appointed office may obtain
information on seeking a waiver
by contacting the Office for
Student Development.
UNIVERSITY SENATE will
meet at 3:30 p.m. Thursday,
April 23, in McCarty
Auditorium. The following items
are on the agenda:
ACTION ITEMS
1. Report on Role of
Department of Administration
in Setting Prices of Athletic
Tickets at University of Florida
2. Report from Committee
on Honorary Degrees
INFORMATION ITEMS
1. Information from the
University Faculty Club
2. Annual Report of the
Campus Planning and Land Use
Committee
3. Annual Report of the
Space Utilization Committee
FUTURE ACTION ITEM
1. Revised Text of the
Constitution of the University of
Florida
NOTE: Members of the

Library Schedule
Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
College Library* Bam ll pm Bam ll pm 2pm ll pm
Research Library 8 am-11 pm 8 am llpm 2 pm llpm
PKY Lib. of Florida History 8:30 am spm 8:30 am l2 N
Special Collections 8:30 am -5 pm 8:30 am l2 N
Architecture & Fine Arts Library Bam spm
Arch. & Fine Arts Building 7pm lO pm Bam l2 Npm lO pm
Chemistry Library Bam spm 9am I2N 2pmspm
216 Leigh Hall 7pm lO pm Ipm 4pm 7pm lO pm
Education Library
341 Norman Hall Bam 10:30 om** 9am spm 2pm 10:30 pm
Engineering & Physics Library Ram spm 9am l2 Npm spm
410 Engineering Building 7pm lO pm Ipm 4pm 7pm lO pm
Health & Phys. Ed. R.. 8 am 5 pm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6pm lO pm*** Bam -12 N 7pm lO pm
Health Center Library
L 102 Med. Science Bldg. 8:30 am l2 Mam spm 2pm l2 M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall Bam ll pm Bam spm 7pm ll pm
Journalism & Communications R.R. Bam 6pm
337 Stadium 7pm lO pm*** Bam l2 N
Law Library
Holland Law Center 8 am-11 pm 8 am-11 pm 8:30 am-11 pm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School)
Yonge Bldg. F. Bam 4pm Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Office Bam spm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam l2 N 2pm spm
6pm lO pm 6pm lO pm
lpm spm
* The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday nightsfrom 11 p.m. l2 M.
** The Education Library closes at 6:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
*** The Reading Rooms close at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.

FOR YOUR NEXT CAR LOAN... & H!iHHKifikij9
Jk m jff' sT}> ssrr ~Try our low cost auto financing Interest
lDalance ancl c * vou ever save when you
before signing, papers anywhere else. I
Payroll deduction available for share and
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Q A
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours:B:ooa.m. 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday

Administrative Notices

Senate are asked to retain and
bring this copy of the Revised
Text of the Constitution of the
University of Florida to the
meeting of May 28 when it will
be an action item. The text
WILL NOT be reproduced for
the May Agenda.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
PLACEMENT TESTS in French,
German, Latin and Spanish will
be given at 7 p.m. Thursday,
April 23, in Little 101. These
tests are required for initial
registration at the University of
Florida in a language in which
the student has any prior
knowledge acquired in or out of
class. Testing time is about one
hour.
ALL STUDENTS who are
expected to take these tests
must bring a No. 2 lead pencil
and will be required to use his
social security number.
CHN 251 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, April
29, at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
CPS 123 MID-TERM TEST
wHI be given Thursday, April 30,
at 7 pjn. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113,121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matheriy 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13,14, or 16; M to
Matheriy 102, 105, 108, 111,

BLUE BULLETIN

113,115,116,117,118, or 119;
N-0 to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102,110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CSS 111 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, April 28,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10, or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 101,102,112,
or 114.
CSS 113 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, April 28,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205, or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235, or 239; l-L to
Matheriy 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; M to
Matheriy 102, 105, 108, 111,
113,115,116,117,118, or 119;
N-O to Anderson 104, 110, or
112; P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R
to Flint 101,102,110, or 112; S
to Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
PLACEMENT NOTICES
OSC£R MAYER CO. will be
interviewing sophomores and
ju n iors in business
administration, agricultural

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

economics and marketing for
vacation relief route salesmen on
May 5. Sign up now at the
Placement Center, G-22, Reitz
Union.
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
June and August graduates

Campus
Calendar

Tuesday, April 21
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 p.m.
Environmental Action Group
Dump-In, Plaza of the
Americas, 3:30 p.m.
Environmental Action Group
Speakers: Dr. George
Cornwell, Dr. David
Anthony, Dr. John Gamble,
& Mrs. Marjorie Carr, Plaza of
the Americas, 3:30 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 357 &
362 Union, 7:00 pjn.
Union Movie, "The Sun Also
Rises", Union Aud, 7:00 &
9:30 pjn.
Chess Club Meeting, 361 Union,
7:00 pjn.
Bridge Club, 150 C & D Union,
7:30 pjn.
Modem Jazz Dance Lessons, 118
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Environmental Teach-In, Dr.
Louis G. Nuemberger & State
Senator Cliff Reuter, Walker
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Engineering Dames Meeting,
University Women's Club,
8:00 pjn.
Music Dept: Band Concert,
Union Ballroom, 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, April 22
Pharmacy Dames Bake Sale, Med
Center Lobby, 7:30-10:30
a.m.
Student Government Elections
Environmental Action
Re-cycling day. Clean Earth
Festival, Plaza of the
Americas, 1:00 pjn.
Befrienders, Bring your own
dinner Meeting, Meet in front
of Infirmary, 5:30 p.m.. All
New Members Welcome.
Music Dept: Freeport, N.Y. High
School Band, University Aud.
Lawn, 6:45 pjn.
Union Movie, 'The Sun Also
Rises", Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:30 pjn.

unless indicated otherwise.
April 27: State of Florida
Department of Transportation
April 28: Burroughs Corp.;
Travelers Insurance Co.; State of
Florida Division of Youth
Services; Dow Chemical Co.
April 29: Jordan Marsh; The
Bell System; Xerox Corp.
April 30: Daniel Construction
Co., Inc.

Environmental Action Group
Survival Theatre Movies,
Constans Theatre, 7:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 362 Union, 7:00
pjn.
Yoga Lessons, 243 Union, 7:30
pjn.
Circle K Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 pjn.
Zero Population Growth Movie,
"Beyond Conception", Dr.
Wayne Heine, Speaker,
Walker Aud., 7:30 pjn.
Mensa Meeting, Winnjammer,
8:30 pjn.
Thursday, April 23
I FAS Ag. Scholarship and
Leadership Convocation,
Speaker: Dr. Palm,
"Agriculture's Role and
Responsibility in
Environmental Quality",
Hume Aud., 10:00 a.m.
Phi Chi Theta Meeting &
Pledging, 355 Union, 7:00,
Meeting; 8:00 Pledging.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
pjn.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 118
Union 7:30 p.m.
Union Book Review, Dr. John
Andes, 'The Peter Principle",
122 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Student Contractors and
Builders Assoc. Meeting, 347
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Music Dept: Woodwind Quintet,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Friday, April 24
Celebration 70, Folk Festival,
Plaza of the Americas, Noon
- 4:30 p.m.
Union Movie, 'The Russians are
Coming, The Russians are
Coming", Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE
Military Ball, $4.50 per
couple. Rathskeller membership,
$2.00. Refunds for "Sympathy
for the Devil" 12:00 noon
4:30 Monday thru Friday.



NEAR CALIFORNIA CAMPUS
Gunfire Greets Police

SANTA BARBARA, Calif.
(UPI) Thirty-one persons were
arrested during a night of
occasional gunfire and sporadic
rock-throwing Saturday and
early Sunday in the Ma Vista

Rap Brown Fails
To Appear At Trial

ELLICOTT CITY, Md. (UPI)
- Black militant H. Rap Brown
failed to appear for the opening
of his arson and riot trial
Monday but the defense stalled a
Government
Takes Geritol
To Court
NEW YORK (UPI) The
federal government filed a $1
million suit against the
manufacturer of Geritol and
Femiron and its advertising
agency Monday for claiming in
television commercials the
products would help end that
tired, rundown feeling.
J.B. WILLIAMS CO., Inc.
and the Parkson Advertising
Agency were accused of
violating a cease and desist
order issued in November 1967
by the Federal Trade
Commission FTC.
The FTC order, as cited in the
suit, prohibited any
advertisement which represents
directly or by implication that
the product is a generally
effective remedy for tiredness,
loss of strength, run down
feeling, nervousness or
irritability.
ASSISTANT U.S. Attorney
Patricia M. Hynes said in an
11-count complaint that
television commercials for
Geritol and Femiron shown
from June through October
1969 were false and misleading
to the consumer in that they
overstate the effectiveness of the
product.

Paid Political Advertisement
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
The Council of International Organizations urges all International
students to make the effort and participate in tomorrow s Student
Government elections.
We are 900 students from all over the world and our voice in Student
Government makes it an assembly of united nations.
In order to be a part of Student Government we again urge everyone
to exercise their right to vote.
The Council of International Organizations is supporting the Focus
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C. 1.0.
Paid For by Focus Party
Paid Political Advertisement

community adjacent to the
University of California campus
north of here.
An estimated 300 to 500
officers, armed with M-l

request for a contempt citation
against him by challenging the
legality of the trial.
Prosecutor William E. Yates
said he would ask Judge Janies
McGill to issue a contempt
citation against Brown and
revoke his $ 10,000 bond.
BROWN HAD been missing
since an explosion that killed
two of his associates almost six
weeks ago.
But chief defense attorney
William M. Kunstler moved first
for an indefinite adjournment of
the trial on grounds that the
court has no jurisdiction
because the defense had not
been a party to the change of
venue from Harford to Howard
County.
He also renewed his attack on
the sufficiency of the indictment
against Brown.
ASSOCIATE DEFENSE
attorney Carl Broege said Brown
was not legally required to be in
the courtroom until jury
selection began and that would
be delayed by the defense
motions.
Broege and Kunstler, who
arrived shortly before the 10:24
a. m. opening session, said they
have not heard from Brown and
do not know where he is.
THERE MAY be some reason
other than his own willful act
for his not being here, Broege
said. But Broege would not
speculate on claims by some
black militants that Brown is
dead.
I dont like to think about
that, he said.
Kunstler said only he had not
heard from Brown and did not
know where he was.

carbines, M-16 rifles, shotguns,
teargas launchers and clear
plastic shields, enforced a
dusk-to-dawn curfew and
ordered all businesses closed.
A SPOKESMAN for the
sheriffs department said the
night was Very calm compared
to the last two nights during
which UCBS honors senior
Kevin Moran was killed.
Thirty-seven persons have
been arrested since the trouble
began Thursday night after a
crowd of 1,000 persons gathered
to hear Chicago seven defendant
Jerry Rubin speak off-campus.
He did not appear, however.
MOST OF THE latest arrests
were for curfew violations with
one person charged with assault
on an officer and another with
resisting arrest.
No suspects have been
arrested in the shooting of
Moran, 22, of Saratoga, Calif.,
while he was standing on the
porch of the New Bank of
America branch, trying to
prevent it from being burned as
was its predecessor during riots
in February.
THE SHERIFFS department
has denied Moran was shot by
one of its men during the
trouble which saw pure,
unadulterated warfare between
officers and snipers in the
predawn hours Saturday.
Teams of three and four
officers patrolled the streets
Saturday night.
One sergeant said, Anybody
on the street were going to pick
up. Weve had enough. Were not
going to put up with any more.
The center of operations was
the Bank of America, which was
under heavy guard.
Newsmen were warned to
keep their hands in the air while
walking through the community
and to just stay out of our
way by deputies.
HARRY
EISENBERG
for
Senator 1 UC

| Anti-Castroites I
! Land In Cuba I
ij: MIAMI (UPI) Cuban Prime Minister Fidel Castro has jj:
charged that a band of counter-revolutionary hirelings from
U. S. shores attempted a weekend invasion of Cuba. ij:
ij: In a communique obtained by monitoring a broadcast from ;j;
Havana, Castro said Cuban militia and coast guard units engaged
ij: the invaders, killing two and capturing three in two different jij
i; clashes. Others were being hunted, the communique said **
$ Saturday evening. $
jj: IT DID not say that the invaders were Americans, but it jij
maintained they were carrying modem American weapons and ij:
ij: came from U. S. shores. ij:
ij: The State Department had no immediate comment on the ij:
ij: report. S
ij: The broadcast by Castro said four Cuban soldiers were killed §
ij: and two seriously wounded in clashes Friday and Saturday. :ji
ij: THE ANNOUNCEMENTS said the invasion group landed :%
ij: near the Yumiri River 22 kilometers 13.2 miles east of the city ;ji
iji of Baracoa in eastern Cuba Friday morning. $
jj: Tass, the Soviet news agency, reported from Havana that the |
jj: band was counter-revolutionary hirelings and said that after g
ji; the two clashes, the pursuit of the surviving interventionists J
S continues, indicating some of the invading group fled into the jj:
j: countryside. :ji
j: The size of the reported invading party was not given. :j:
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TiMaday, April 21,1*70, Tlm Florida AlHpor.

Page 17



. The
Florida
Alligator

|p \; v .; "'"' ' x M s 'if
111 J # a-.-;"-.'.'
ft isl
> !^lMmiftHlHHHHllHHftHHHftft|ft|R
TOM KENNEDY
LIFTERS SECOND

Bob Favreau lifted the UF Weightlifting Club to
second place in the first annual Florida Collegiate
Weightlifting Championship Friday. Florida Tech of
Orlando won with a 26 point score while UF was
close behind with 22 points.
The Gators had two first places, four seconds and
three thirds. Bob Favreau won the 148 pound class

; :.%%%v.v.%v.*.w.*.v.v.*.v.v.v.w.vM.%v.%v.r.r.v.v.v.?.w.v.v.v.r.w.v.?.v.%w.!.!.*.%v.%i;
l Intramurals
!
* ___
ffy SteVe RohdTl
BLUE LEAGUE: Kappa Alpha fraternity moved to within 80
points of Chi Phi in the Blue League by capturing championships in
both tennis and golf.
Former second place team, Delta Upsilon fell to third place 120
points behind the Chis, and with just two sports left have been
virtually eliminated. The DUs finished second in tennis but fell to
sixth place in golf thwarting their Presidents Cup aspirations.
The strength of Chi Phis lead going into the last two quarters is
evidenced by the fact that the KAs have won basketball, golf and
tennis while finishing second in handball. But the Chi Phis not only
took a big lead going into these sports but consistently reached the
semi-finals or finals in each sport. Chi Phi has a total of 877 points;
KA 797; and DU 757.
ORANGE LEAGUE: Beta Theta Pi has officially moved into first
place in the Orange League once again following a strong finish in
golf. The Betas mustered up a fourth place in the event and coupled
with a win in tennis, moved narrowly over Sigma Chi.
The Sigs were in second place prior to tennis but fell from that
position after being shut out in the first round of tennis.
The most outstanding performance in golf in the last seven years
enabled the Sigs to easily defeat the rest of the league in that sport
and put the Sigs back in second place only 13 points behind the Betas.
The big battle is now for third place between TEP and Pi Kappa
Alpha. The Pikes now have 670 points compared to the TEPs 660.
The two frats meet in the finals of tennis and the winner will pick
up an additional 20 points. The leading Betas have 703. A loss to the
TEPs in tennis will be more disastrous to their Presidents Cup hopes
than would be a loss to the Pikes who are expected to do well in
track.
The SAEs finished a disappointing fifth in the golf match and are
on the verge of being eliminated from the race. Their 640 points puts
them 63 points behind the leader.
'I FOOTBALL
Spring Drills on Practice Field
BASEBALL
Gators play Rollins in Winter Park
TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND I
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GATOR SPORTS

with a total lift of 645 pounds and Stuart Johnson
won the 181 pound class with a total of 675
pounds.
The UF club gave Coach Ernie Crone a special
award for sponsoring the club.
Next weekend is the State AAU weightlifting
meet in Miami.

'Mr. X Wins Duel
NEW ORLEANS (UPI)
Miller Barber watched Bob
Charles and Howie Johnson miss
40 and 17-foot birdie putts, then
calmly snaked in a 12-footer of
his own for a birdie that won
him a sudden death playoff for
the Greater New Orleans Open
title Monday on the second hole.
Barber, often called the Mr.
X of the pro golf tour for his
anonymity, thus picked up the
$25,000 first prize and sent
Charles and Johnson away with
$11,575 each for their share of
second and third place money.
Barber, who says his age is
39 and holding, last won at
the Kaiser International in 1969.
Game 0a May 2
The annual Orange-Blue
spring football game will be
held on Saturday, May 2, not
April 25 as stated in
Mondays Alligator.
Rained Out
The tennis match scheduled
for Monday between the Gators
and Georgias Bulldogs was
cancelled because of rain.
The UF netters next travel to
Cape Coral for an invitational
tournament.

Engineering Division
The Procter & Gamble Co.
NEEDS MORE ENGINEERS
M.E., CH.E., E.E. (power), Civil Building Const.
Bachelors and Masters Degrees.
June, August and December Graduates.
Sign up at the Placement Office for
Interviews on 5/4 & 5/5
UJS. Citizens Preferred, but no restrictions as to sex, race, creed or color.

CRAIG GOLDWYN
Sports Editor

Page 18

Commercialization
Os Olympics
Charged By Reds
LOS ANGELES (UPI) The president of the Los Angeles 1976
Olympic Committee took sharp exception Thursday to a published
statement by the Soviet member of the International Olympic
Committee that the Southern California city was using commercial
lures to obtain the games.
John Kilroy answered the statement by Constanin Andrianov that
one of the lures was potential television money.
KILROY SAID that as a vice president of the International
Olympic Committee Andrianov should be aware of the fact that the
IOC makes sole distribution of television money.
Mr. Andrianov said that Los Angeles had promised to turn over
considerable sums of money to the IOC from television revenues.
This, he said Violates the IOC rule that the games be
non-commercial.
v Kilroy said the Los Angeles Oympic Committee estimates that
worldwide television income from the 1976 summer Olympic Games
would be about $42 million if the games were held in Los Angeles.
Kilroy said if the 1976 summer Olympics were held in Moscow
television sales throughout the world would be limited.
RUSSIAN TELEVISION is not compatable with the rest of the
world without installation of highly technical conversion devises, he
said. They transmit black and white with no color.
Russia does not subscribe to the International Communication
Satellite Programs and have limited worldwide communication
capability.
Kilroy said the time differential involved in holding the games in
Moscow would limit television revenues.

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I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 21,1970

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

Student Special ~!
Any car or color!
Joy's Paint & Body Shop
2017 IM.E. 27th Ave.
Ph. 373-1665



i i'i shouts shouts

Off-Track Betting Legal In New York

ALBANY, NY. The
legislature voted Monday to
make New York the second state
in the nation where off-track
betting is legal.
Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller
already has promised to sign the
legislation as part of his aid to
the cities package. Only Nevada
already has legalized betting on
horse races outside of race
tracks.
The measure permits off-track
betting immediately in New
York City but other counties or
cities must submit the proposal
to local referendums.
Mayor John Lindsay, facing a
$630 million budget gap,
estimated New York City would
realize SSO million from its share
of the pari-mutuel during the
first year of operation and as
much as S2OO million next year.
Details of where the gambling
parlors would be set up and how
they would handle bets was left
up to a five-member state
commission created by the
legislation.
* *
NEW YORK Spencer
Haywood, who forfeited a year
of college eligibility to begin his
pro career, and Rick Barry, a
refugee from the rival National
Basketball Association, headed
the American Basketball
Association All-Star squad
announced Monday by
Commissioner Jack Dolph.
Joining Haywood and Barry
on the first team are center Mel
Daniels of Indiana and guards
Bob Berga of Carolina and Larry
Jones of Denver.
The second team consists of
Roger Brown and Bob
Netolicky, both of Indiana, at
forwards, Red Robbins of New
Orleans at center and Louie
Dampier of Kentucky and Don
Freeman of Miami at guards.
The All-Star squads were
picked by sprotcasters covering
the ABA.
*
LOS ANGELES pears that
the Sunday win over the Atlanta
Hawks might have cost the Los
Angeles Lakers the services of
Keith Erickson were eased
Monday with the announcement
by the Lakers that the veteran
would play Friday.
The versatile five-year
guard-forward suffered a
sprained ankle in the third
quarter of Sundays 133-114
Laker defeat of the Hawks. The
win gave the Lakers a four-game
sweep of the NBA Western
Division playoff series.
* #
CHICAGO The Chicago
Black Hawks try to even their
Stanley Cup playoff series with
the Boston Bruins at one win a
piece Monday and the Hawks
hoped their second game in
three days would show more
skills than they displayed in the
opener.
The team that wins four
games in the best-of-seven series
will advance to the finals for the
cup against the winner of the
western division semifinals
between St. Louis and
Pittsburgh. Equally important,
the players on the team that
wins the semifinals will collect
$2,250 per man and the losers
w iH get only $1,500 each.
* *
HOPKINTON, Mass. About
I*loo runners from a dozen
countries dashed off at noon

Monday as the 74th Boston
Athletic Association Marathon
got underway.
Ron Hill, of England bucked
not only a chilling rain but a
12-mile headwind over the
26-mile, = 385-yd. ordeal from
suburban Hopkinton. He
finished about a half mile ahead
of former Georgetown runner
Eamon OReilly. Hill was timed
in two hours, 10 minutes and 30
seconds.
* *
KNOXVILLE, Term.
Tennessee tracksters won five
events Saturday as 18 meet
records were broken in the
fourth annual Dogwood Relays
at the University of Tennessee
Track.
Terry Hull, of Greenville,
Tenn., running for the Knoxville
Track Club, won the womens
880-yd. run with 2:07.4,
breaking the meet record.
The Tennessee Vols set three
records. Bill Skinner broke the
javelin mark with a 253 foot,
four inch heave; Lonnie Hance
took the mens high jump with a
6-11 for a new record and the
Vols two-mile relay squad came
up with a record 7:24.1.

1 Paid Political Advertisement 1
Tigert is scared.
Real scared.
Why? Because they know a Union of Students can
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e to start answer answerr
r answerr their actions.
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owes and Do it!
have to start
ying about the
dents interests.
jive Howes, Tucker^
and Brunson your
vote. WII get
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Paid for by Do it! Party
Paid Political Advertisement

+ *
WASHINGTON Light
heavyweight champion Bob
Foster had his left fist placed in a
cast Monday, forcing indefinite
postponement of his May 4 title
fight in Baltimore with
Houstons Mark Tessman.
A spokesman said Foster
suffered painful contusions of
two knuckles of his left hand
while training in Florida and
consulted Dr. P. M. (Pat)

' /Pig

Columbo of nearby Arlington,
Va., who put on the cast and
ordered the defending champion
to keep it immobilized in a cast
for at least three weeks.
The title bout between Foster
and Tessman had been scheduled
in Baltimores Civic Auditorium.
#
RIVERSIDE, Calif. (UPI)
John Cannon of Pasadena, Calif.,
won the $30,000 Continental
Grand Prix by a full lap Sunday,

Black Belt Wins 27th
Dirk Mosig, a UF graduate student captured the heavyweight
black belt title at the 1970 Tarheel Open Karate Championships
in Asheville, N.C., Saturday.
Mosig, 7AS, took the heavyweight crown for the third
straight year but lost the grand champion title in a close match
with lightweight black belt champ Steve Stavroff of Atlanta.
Mosig has been competing in tournaments since 1967 and was
grand champion in both 67 and 6B.
WITH 27 tournament wins now under his belt, Mosig is
looking forward to the Grand Nationals at Anderson, Ind. in
June. He announced that a team of UF students from his school
will compete.
Mosig is the head instructor of the Universal Karate Dqjo and
holds both beginning karate and coed self-defense courses;
Mosig said no special talent is required to learn the oriental
sport.

Tuesday, April 21,1970, Thu Florida AMprtor, I

averaging 113.577 miles an hour
for the 100-mile race at
Riverside International
Raceway.
Cannon who had the pole
position drove a Hogan-Starr
McLaren Chevy and led from
start to finish on the 2.54-mile
winding course. Cannon,
British-born driver who is a
Citizen of Canada but lives in
Pasadena now, won $5,950.

Page 19



Page 20

>, The Florida Alligator. Tuaaday, April 21,1970

AFTER TEXAS RUN-IN

Street Faces Suspension

WACO, Tex. (UPI) A
rhubarb which developed
between Baylor Coach Dutch
Schroeder and University of
Texas star pitcher James Street
last Friday may have further
repercussions despite Streets
apology for delivering a
knockout blow to the coach.
Schroeder says he will report
his version of the incident to
Baylor Athletic Director Bill
Henderson and leave it up to
Henderson to decide whether an
official protest will be made to
the Southwest Conference.
STREET WAS THE
quarterback of the Longhorn's
national championship football
team last fall.
It all happened during the
fourth inning of the first game
of a Texas-Baylor twin bill at
Austin Friday as Street pitched
Texas to a 2-0 victory over the
NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDINGS
EAST W L PCT GB
St. Louis 7 2 .778
Chicago 6 3 .667 1
Pittsburgh 6 4 .600 IVi
New York 6 5 .545 2
Philadelphia 4 8 .333 4%
Montreal 1 8.111 6
WEST W L PCT GB
Cincinnati 12 4 .750
Houston 77 .500 4
San Francisco 77 .500 4
Los Angeles 5 7 .417 5
Atlanta S 8 .385 5Vi
San Diego 5 8 .385 5 Vi
MONDAYS RESULTS
Pittsburgh 3, Houston 1
Cincinnati 6, Atlanta 2
(Only Games Scheduled)
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Bears for his seventh victory of
the season.
Schroeder was the third base
coach at the time and said he
thought Baylors Skip Balthrop
was tagged too roughly by
Texas catcher Tom Harmon
during a run down between third
base and the plate.
THE COACH CHARGED the
plate umpire to protest, but
before he got there Street rushed
to the scene and threw a forearm

Ford Wins Trans-Am

MONTEREY, Calif. (UPI)
Pamelli Jones and teammate
George Follmer have given the
Ford entries a big lift into the
Trans-Am Sedan Championship
Racing series.
Jones charged to a first place
finish Sunday at Laguna Secas
twisting raceway while Follmer
grabbed third, both in Ford
Mustangs. Jones led for all but
three of the 90 laps and set the
fastest time around the 1.9 mile
track in 1:12.01, to earn $4,600.
MARK DONOHUE, of Media,
Pa., wound up more than 40
seconds behind Jones and
second across the finish line in
an American Motors Javelin.
By winning the season opener
for the popular pony cars,
Jones gave Ford nine points
toward the sedan series crown
which will be contested in 11
other races in Canada as well as
the United States.
Follmer, of Arcadia, Calif.,
placed ahead of the Camaro

~ Two new Chevelles at
two new lower prices.
Chevelle 4-Door Sedan i
$l4B less
than our previous lowest priced 4-door.
Chevelle Sport Coupe
$147 less
than our previous lowest priced hardtop.
Now its Americas lowest priced mid-size hardtop.

We took Americas best selling mid midsize
size midsize car. Then, added two new lower
priced models, including a Sport Coupe
thats priced less than any other mid-size
hardtop you can buy.
Still, they both have Chevelles smart
new grille for 1970. And Chevelles newly
styled Body by Fisher. And Chevelles
Full Coil suspension with custom fitted
springs at each wheel. And Chevelles

blow that sent Schroeder
sprawling.
When I came to, he said, a
young man offered me his hand
and said, lm sorry coach, I'm
sorry coach.
I WAS WOOZY and didnt
know until later it was Street.
Street said, It aU happened
so fast... it was just a reaction
on my part... I didn't really
mean to run into him.

team of Swede Savage and Milt
Minter. San Poseys Dodge was
sixth and Jerry Titus Firebird
seventh. Craig Murray, Joe
Chamberlain and John Silva Jr.,
all in Camaros, were next in
order.

GOOD TUESDAY ONLY
( Kentuckif Tried #kiikeit j
214 N.W. 13th st.
o-c bai* 11 4 S.W. 34th St. W
B 3766472 372-3649 M
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1 London Bobbies]
1 Set For Cricket ]
$ LONDON (UPI> Barbed wire girds the sports arenas and
| guard-dogs patrol the playing fields. In police headquarters, the i
:j: counter-measures are drafted right down to how long it will take :
ambulances to arrive if there are injuries. j:j
$ AND IT IS the supreme irony that the alarm and hints of
violence should surround what has long been considered the
imost gentlemanly of all sports cricket. §
In June the South African Cricket Team is scheduled to arrive jj
;$ here for a series of matches against British teams, including a
:j: test match** -a match between nations played over five days, <
:|i somewhat equilavent to a baseball world series. :j
j TO CRICKET LOVERS, a test match is the ultimate :
experience in the game and under normal conditions would
arouse high enthusiasm.
:j But the invitation to South Africa from the Marlybone
g Cricket Club was the most controversial in the history of a sport
i| centuries old. For it followed a rugby tour by a South African :
j:| team last winter that aroused opponents of South Africa's ):
apartheid policy separation of races to such fury it |
proceded in a series of pitched battles with police at every :
match. :
$ Hundreds were arrested during the 24 matches which cost the :
clubs $24,000 and the taxpayer $127,000 for extra police :
:j: protection. J :j

wide-stance chassis design, side-guard
beams in the doors, cargo-guard luggage
compartment, bias belted ply tires.
Lower priced they are, by as much as
$l4B. But lower priced looking and feel feeling
ing feeling they aren't.
Which will get us no love notes from
the competition. But maybe it will
from you.
Platting yeu first, keeps us first.

* Based on manufacturers sug suggested
gested suggested retail prices, including
federal excise tax and suggested
dealer new car preparation
charges.